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Sample records for subjects underwent mri

  1. Functional MRI of Multilingual Subjects

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    Cho, Jae Min; Ryoo, Jae Wook; Choi, Dae Seob; Shin, Tae Beom; Chung, Sung Hoon; Kim, Ji Eun [Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Han, Heon; Kim, Sam Soo; Jeon, Yong Hwan [Kangwon National University College of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    To evaluate brain activation areas during the processing of languages in multilingual volunteers by functional MRI and to examine the differences between the mother and foreign languages. Nine multilingual (Korean, French, and English speaking) Korean individuals were enrolled in this study. Functional images were acquired during a lexical decision task (LDT) and picture naming task (PNT) in each of the Korean, French and English languages. The areas activated were analyzed topographically in each language and task, and compared between languages. Activation was noted in Broca's area, supramarginal gyrus, fusiform gyrus during the LDT. During the PNT, activation was noted in Broca's area, left prefrontal area, cerebellum, right extrastriated cortex. While Broca's area activation was observed for all languages during LDT, there was more activation in Broca's area and additional activation in the right prefrontal area with foreign languages. During the PNT, there was more activation in the left prefrontal area with foreign languages. Broca's area, which is known as a major language region, was activated by all languages and tasks. The brain activation areas were largely overlapping with the mother and foreign languages. However, there were wider areas of activation and additional different activation areas with foreign languages. These results suggest more cerebral effort during foreign language processing

  2. Norms of the Mini-Mental state Examination for Japanese subjects that underwent comprehensive brain examinations: the Kashima Scan Study.

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    Yakushiji, Yusuke; Horikawa, Etsuo; Eriguchi, Makoto; Nanri, Yusuke; Nishihara, Masashi; Hirotsu, Tatsumi; Hara, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores by age and educational level was investigated in subjects that underwent comprehensive brain examinations. This cross-sectional study included 1,414 adults without neurological disorders who underwent health-screening tests of the brain, referred to as the "Brain Dock," in our center. The MMSE scores were compared between age groups (40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, 65-69, or ≥70 years) and educational levels [the low education level group (6-12 years) and the high education level group (≥13 years)]. The median age was 59 years, and 763 (54%) were women. There was no significant difference in the MMSE total score between women and men. The stepwise method of the multiple linear regression analysis confirmed that a higher age [β value, -0.129; standard error (S.E.), 0.020; p<0.001], low education level (6-12 years) (β value, -0.226; S.E., 0.075; p=0.003), and women (β values, 0.148; S.E., 0.066; p=0.024) was significantly associated with decreased MMSE score. In general, both the percentile scores and mean scores decreased with aging and were lower in the low education level group than in the high education level group. The degree of decrement in scores with age was stronger in the low education level group than in the high education level group. The provided data for age- and education-specific reference norms will be useful for both clinicians and investigators who perform comprehensive brain examinations to assess the cognitive function of subjects.

  3. Hippocampal surface deformation accuracy in T1-weighted volumetric MRI sequences in subjects with epilepsy.

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    Hogan, R Edward; Moseley, Emily D; Maccotta, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    To demonstrate the accuracy across different acquisition and analysis methods, we evaluated the variability in hippocampal volumetric and surface displacement measurements resulting from two different MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) acquisition protocols. Nine epilepsy patients underwent two independent T1-weighted magnetization prepared spoiled gradient sequences during a single 3T MRI session. Using high-dimension mapping-large deformation (HDM-LD) segmentation, we calculated volumetric estimates and generated a vector-based 3-dimensional surface model of each subject's hippocampi, and evaluated volume and surface changes, the latter using a cluster-based noise estimation model. Mean hippocampal volumes and standard deviations for the left hippocampi were 2,750 (826) mm3 and 2,782 (859) mm3 (P = .13), and for the right hippocampi were 2,558 (750) mm3 and 2,547 (692) mm3 (P = .76), respectively for the MPR1 and MPR2 sequences. Average Dice coefficient comparing overlap for segmentations was 86%. There was no significant effect of MRI sequence on volume estimates and no significant hippocampal surface change between sequences. Statistical comparison of hippocampal volumes and statistically thresholded HDM-LD surfaces in TLE patients showed no differences between the segmentations obtained in the two MRI acquisition sequences. This validates the robustness across MRI sequences of the HDM-LD technique for estimating volume and surface changes in subjects with epilepsy. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  4. HO-1 gene overexpression enhances the beneficial effects of superparamagnetic iron oxide labeled bone marrow stromal cells transplantation in swine hearts underwent ischemia/reperfusion: an MRI study.

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    Jiang, Yibo; Chen, Lijuan; Tang, Yaoliang; Ma, Genshan; Shen, Chengxing; Qi, Chunmei; Zhu, Qi; Yao, Yuyu; Liu, Naifeng

    2010-05-01

    To determine the effect of intracoronary transfer of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) labeled heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) overexpressed bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in a porcine myocardial ischemia/reperfusion model. Cell apoptosis was assayed and supernatant cytokine concentrations were measured in BMSCs that underwent hypoxia/reoxygen in vitro. Female mini-swines that underwent 1 h LAD occlusion followed by 1 h reperfusion were randomly allocated to receive intracoronary saline (control), 1 x 10(7) SPIO-labeled BMSCs transfected with pcDNA3.1-Lacz plasmid (Lacz-BMSCs), pcDNA3.1-human HO-1 (HO-1-BMSCs), pcDNA3.1-hHO-1 pretreated with a HO inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin (SnPP, n = 10 each). MRI and postmortem histological analysis were made at 1 week or 3 months thereafter. Post hypoxia/reoxygen in vitro, apoptosis was significantly reduced, supernatant VEGF significantly increased while TNF-alpha and IL-6 significantly reduced in HO-1-BMSCs group compared with Lacz-BMSCs group (all p < 0.05). Myocardial expression of VEGF was significantly higher in HO-1-BMSCs than in Lacz-BMSCs group at 1 week post transplantation (all p < 0.05). Signal voids induced by the SPIO were detected in the peri-infarction region in all BMSC groups at 1 week but not at 3 months post transplantation and the extent of the hypointense signal was the highest in HO-1-BMSCs group, and histological analysis showed that signal voids represented cardiac macrophages that engulfed the SPIO-labeled BMSCs. Pretreatment with SnPP significantly attenuated the beneficial effects of HO-1-BMSCs. Transplantation of HO-1-overexpressed BMSCs significantly enhanced the beneficial effects of BMSCs on improving cardiac function in this model.

  5. Population Receptive Field Properties from fMRI and Electrocorticography in Striate and Extrastriate Cortex of the Same Subject

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    Ben Mark Harvey

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Population receptive field (pRF modelling reconstructs the properties of visually responsive neuronal populations, typically using fMRI in humans. However, fMRI is an indirect measure of neural activity. Electrocorticography (ECoG measures electrical activity directly in humans using subdural electrodes. Here, we model pRF properties using both fMRI and ECoG data from the same subject. Prior to clinical intervention, we recorded fMRI responses to visual field mapping stimuli to determine pRF properties and visual area layout. The same subject subsequently underwent surgery to implant subdural ECoG electrodes and was shown the same visual field mapping stimuli while recording ECoG signals. ECoG data were filtered into different spectral bands, which were analysed separately. ECoG electrodes were localised to V1, MT, LO2, and IPS visual areas. Gamma-band responses allowed pRF modelling in all electrodes, and beta-band responses could also be fit in V1. pRF sizes were similar between ECoG and fMRI models. V1 alpha-band amplitude was highest when the stimulus was in the inhibitory surround of the neural population, although this did not reduce the gamma signal below baseline. IPS, MT, and LO2 alpha amplitude was highest when a blank screen was displayed, which was also found in the IPS beta-band. ECoG recording produces comparable results to fMRI for pRF modelling, providing useful validation and extension of fMRI-based reconstruction of neural pRF properties. The fMRI signal cannot be explained by one ECoG spectral density band alone. Alpha band amplitudes reflect inhibitory signals in V1 and resting-state in extra-striate cortex. The same spectral band can reflect different functional processing depending on cortical location.

  6. Delayed gastric emptying and reduced postprandial small bowel water content of equicaloric whole meal bread versus rice meals in healthy subjects: novel MRI insights

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marciani, L; Pritchard, S E; Hellier-Woods, C; Costigan, C; Hoad, C L; Gowland, P A; Spiller, R C

    2013-01-01

    ... kJ WMB or an equicaloric RP meal. Subjects underwent serial MRI scans every 45 min up to 270 min to assess gastric volumes and small bowel water content, and completed a GI symptom questionnaire...

  7. Joint fMRI analysis and subject clustering using sparse dictionary learning

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    Kim, Seung-Jun; Dontaraju, Krishna K.

    2017-08-01

    Multi-subject fMRI data analysis methods based on sparse dictionary learning are proposed. In addition to identifying the component spatial maps by exploiting the sparsity of the maps, clusters of the subjects are learned by postulating that the fMRI volumes admit a subspace clustering structure. Furthermore, in order to tune the associated hyper-parameters systematically, a cross-validation strategy is developed based on entry-wise sampling of the fMRI dataset. Efficient algorithms for solving the proposed constrained dictionary learning formulations are developed. Numerical tests performed on synthetic fMRI data show promising results and provides insights into the proposed technique.

  8. Motion or activity: their role in intra- and inter-subject variation in fMRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Torben E; Nørgaard, Minna D; Rostrup, Egill

    2005-01-01

    Linear Model (GLM). The data were analysed with and without modeling the residual movement artefacts and the impact on inter-session variance was assessed using F-contrasts. Inclusion of motion parameters in the analysis significantly reduced both the intra-subject as well as the inter-subject-variance......Functional MRI (fMRI) carries the potential for non-invasive measurements of brain activity. Typically, what are referred to as activation images are actually thresholded statistical parametric maps. These maps possess large inter-session variability. This is especially problematic when applying f......MRI to pre-surgical planning because of a higher requirement for intra-subject precision. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of residual movement artefacts on intra-subject and inter-subject variability in the observed fMRI activation. Ten subjects were examined using three different...

  9. A Forced-Attention Dichotic Listening fMRI Study on 113 Subjects

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    Kompus, Kristiina; Specht, Karsten; Ersland, Lars; Juvodden, Hilde T.; van Wageningen, Heidi; Hugdahl, Kenneth; Westerhausen, Rene

    2012-01-01

    We report fMRI and behavioral data from 113 subjects on attention and cognitive control using a variant of the classic dichotic listening paradigm with pairwise presentations of consonant-vowel syllables. The syllable stimuli were presented in a block-design while subjects were in the MR scanner. The subjects were instructed to pay attention to…

  10. Quantifying functional connectivity in multi-subject fMRI data using component models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Churchill, Nathan William; Mørup, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is increasingly used to characterize functional connectivity between brain regions. Given the vast number of between-voxel interactions in high-dimensional fMRI data, it is an ongoing challenge to detect stable and generalizable functional connectivity...... in the brain among groups of subjects. Component models can be used to define subspace representations of functional connectivity that are more interpretable. It is, however, unclear which component model provides the optimal representation of functional networks for multi-subject fMRI datasets. A flexible...... of functional connectivity, evaluated on both simulated and experimental resting-state fMRI data. It was demonstrated that highly flexible subject-specific component subspaces, as well as very constrained average models, are poor predictors of whole-brain functional connectivity, whereas the best...

  11. EEG reveals the effect of fMRI scanner noise on noise-sensitive subjects.

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    Pripfl, Juergen; Robinson, Simon; Leodolter, Ulrich; Moser, Ewald; Bauer, Herbert

    2006-05-15

    One drawback of fMRI is that subjects must endure intense noise during testing. This may be annoying to some people and acceptable to others. The aim of this study was to examine, by means of event-related potentials (ERPs), the possible influence of this noise on brain activity while performing a mental reasoning task. Subjects carrying out tasks in a silent environment were compared with two groups executing the same tasks in an "fMRI-like" noisy environment, one of which consisted of subjects who were annoyed by the noise and the other of subjects who tolerated it easily. Subjects who were annoyed performed less well (i.e., produced more errors compared to the "no noise" group) and "not annoyed" subjects showed a speed-accuracy trade-off (i.e., reacted faster but made more errors compared to "no noise" subjects). Noise led to more pronounced N1 and P2 peaks but attenuated N2. As early ERP components are influenced by attention, this observation most likely reflects different attentional requirements. The slow cortical negative shift during task processing was significantly attenuated with "annoyed" subjects compared to "not annoyed" subjects. Emotion-related subcortical structures may be responsible for the observed difference. These findings suggest that individual reactions to fMRI scanner noise should be taken into account when designing fMRI studies and interpreting results.

  12. fMRI data from Korean, Chinese and English subjects in a word rhyming judgment task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Cao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article includes the description of data information from a visual word rhyming judgment task in native Korean, native Chinese and native English speakers. You will find fMRI data information including experimental design, MRI protocol, and brain activation results from a conjunction analysis of the three groups of subjects. Other results from the same study were published in “How does language distance between L1 and L2 affect the L2 brain network? An fMRI study of Korean–Chinese–English trilinguals” (Kim et al., 2015 [1].

  13. Morphometric connectivity analysis to distinguish normal, mild cognitive impaired, and Alzheimer subjects based on brain MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erleben, Lene Lillemark; Sørensen, Lauge; Mysling, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This work investigates a novel way of looking at the regions in the brain and their relationship as possible markers to classify normal control (NC), mild cognitive impaired (MCI), and Alzheimer Disease (AD) subjects. MRI scans from a subset of 101 subjects from the ADNI study at baseline was used...

  14. Motion or activity: their role in intra- and inter-subject variation in fMRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Torben E; Nørgaard, Minna D; Rostrup, Egill

    2005-01-01

    MRI to pre-surgical planning because of a higher requirement for intra-subject precision. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of residual movement artefacts on intra-subject and inter-subject variability in the observed fMRI activation. Ten subjects were examined using three different...... word-generation tasks. Two of the subjects were examined 10 times on 10 different days using the same paradigms. We systematically investigated one approach of correcting for residual movement effects: the inclusion of regressors describing movement-related effects in the design matrix of a General...... Linear Model (GLM). The data were analysed with and without modeling the residual movement artefacts and the impact on inter-session variance was assessed using F-contrasts. Inclusion of motion parameters in the analysis significantly reduced both the intra-subject as well as the inter-subject-variance....

  15. Improving the reliability of single-subject fMRI by weighting intra-run variability.

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    de Bertoldi, F; Finos, L; Maieron, M; Weis, L; Campanella, M; Ius, T; Fadiga, L

    2015-07-01

    At present, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is one of the most useful methods of studying cognitive processes in the human brain in vivo, both for basic science and clinical goals. Although neuroscience studies often rely on group analysis, clinical applications must investigate single subjects (patients) only. Particularly for the latter, issues regarding the reliability of fMRI readings remain to be resolved. To determine the ability of intra-run variability (IRV) weighting to consistently detect active voxels, we first acquired fMRI data from a sample of healthy subjects, each of whom performed 4 runs (4 blocks each) of self-paced finger-tapping. Each subject's data was analyzed using single-run general linear model (GLM), and each block was then analyzed separately to calculate the IRV weighting. Results show that integrating IRV information into standard single-subject GLM activation maps significantly improved the reliability (p=0.007) of the single-subject fMRI data. This suggests that taking IRV into account can help identify the most constant and relevant neuronal activity at the single-subject level. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Decoding the subjective rotation direction of the spinning dancer from fMRI data

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    Song, SuTao; Liu, Yang; Zhang, JiaCai

    2015-03-01

    A challenging goal in neuroscience is to decode the mental states from brain activity. Recently, researchers have successfully deciphered the objective and static visual stimuli (such as orientation of stripes and category of objects) from brain activity recorded by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technology. However, few studies focused on the decoding of the rotation direction perception of the actual three-dimensional world with two-dimensional representations. In this study, the brain activities when subjects viewed the animation of the spinning dancer in the front were recorded using fMRI, and subjects reported the viewing-from-bottom motion direction (clockwise or counterclockwise) by press different buttons. One multivariate pattern analysis method, support vector machine was trained to predict the rotation direction. The 5-fold cross-validation result showed that the subjective rotation direction reported by the subjects can be predicted from fMRI with a possibility above the chance level, which imply that fMRI activity of the brain contains detailed rotation direction information that can reliably predict the subjective perception.

  17. Adaptive thresholding for reliable topological inference in single subject fMRI analysis.

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    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J; Storkey, Amos J; Bastin, Mark E; Pernet, Cyril R

    2012-01-01

    Single subject fMRI has proved to be a useful tool for mapping functional areas in clinical procedures such as tumor resection. Using fMRI data, clinicians assess the risk, plan and execute such procedures based on thresholded statistical maps. However, because current thresholding methods were developed mainly in the context of cognitive neuroscience group studies, most single subject fMRI maps are thresholded manually to satisfy specific criteria related to single subject analyzes. Here, we propose a new adaptive thresholding method which combines Gamma-Gaussian mixture modeling with topological thresholding to improve cluster delineation. In a series of simulations we show that by adapting to the signal and noise properties, the new method performs well in terms of total number of errors but also in terms of the trade-off between false negative and positive cluster error rates. Similarly, simulations show that adaptive thresholding performs better than fixed thresholding in terms of over and underestimation of the true activation border (i.e., higher spatial accuracy). Finally, through simulations and a motor test-retest study on 10 volunteer subjects, we show that adaptive thresholding improves reliability, mainly by accounting for the global signal variance. This in turn increases the likelihood that the true activation pattern can be determined offering an automatic yet flexible way to threshold single subject fMRI maps.

  18. MRI pattern of arthritis in systemic lupus erythematosus: a comparative study with rheumatoid arthritis and healthy subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tani, Chiara; Possemato, Niccolo; Delle Sedie, Andrea; Bombardieri, Stefano; Mosca, Marta [University of Pisa, Rheumatology Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pisa (Italy); D' aniello, Dario; Caramella, Davide [Radiology Unit, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2014-10-24

    In this study we aimed to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pattern of the distribution of bone marrow edema (BME) and joint erosion in hands and wrists of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with arthritis in comparison with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and healthy subjects (H). SLE patients with arthritis (n = 50), patients with RA (n = 22), and H (n = 48) were enrolled. Every patient underwent a non-dominant hand (2nd-5th metacarpophalangeal joints) and wrist MRI without contrast injection with a low-field extremity dedicated 0.2-Tesla instrument. BME was observed in two SLE patients in the hand (4 %) and in 15 in the wrist (13 %) versus three (30 %), and 14 (63 %) RA patients. No BME was found in H. Erosions were observed in the hand in 24 SLE patients (48 %), 15 RA patients (68 %), and 9 H (18 %); in the wrist, in 41 (82 %) SLE, all RA and 47 (97 %) H. The cumulative erosive burden in SLE was significantly higher than in H (c = 0.002) but similar to RA patients. Joint involvement of the wrist in SLE is similar to RA and is not as rare as expected, as shown by the comparison with healthy subjects. On the contrary, the involvement of the hand in SLE is significantly lower compared to RA. (orig.)

  19. Frontopolar and anterior temporal cortex activation in a moral judgment task. Preliminary functional MRI results in normal subjects

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    Moll, Jorge [LABS and Rede D' Or Hospitais, Rio de Janeiro RJ (Brazil). Grupo de Neuroimagem e Neurologia do Comportamento; Eslinger, Paul J. [Pensylvania State Univ. (United States). College of Medicine. Div. of Neurology and Behavioral Science; The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PN (United States); Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo de [Universidade do Rio de Janeiro (UNI-Rio), RJ (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Gaffree e Guinle]. E-mail: neuropsychiatry@hotmail.com

    2001-09-01

    The objective was to study the brain areas which are activated when normal subjects make moral judgments. Ten normal adults underwent BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during the auditory presentation of sentences that they were instructed to silently judge as either 'right' or 'wrong'. Half of the sentences had an explicit moral content ('We break the law when necessary'), the other half comprised factual statements devoid of moral connotation ('Stones are made of water'). After scanning, each subject rated the moral content, emotional valence, and judgment difficulty of each sentence on Likert-like scales. To exclude the effect of emotion on the activation results, individual responses were hemo dynamically modeled for event-related f MRI analysis. The general linear model was used to evaluate the brain areas activated by moral judgment. Regions activated during moral judgment included the frontopolar cortex (FPC), medial frontal gyrus, right anterior temporal cortex, lenticular nucleus, and cerebellum. Activation of FPC and medial frontal gyrus (B A 10/46 and 9) were largely independent of emotional experience and represented the largest areas of activation. These results concur with clinical observations assigning a critical role for the frontal poles and right anterior temporal cortex in the mediation of complex judgment processes according to moral constraints. The FPC may work in concert with the orbitofrontal and dorsolateral cortex in the regulation of human social conduct. (author)

  20. Modeling inter-subject variability in fMRI activation location: A Bayesian hierarchical spatial model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Johnson, Timothy D.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nee, Derek E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The aim of this work is to develop a spatial model for multi-subject fMRI data. There has been extensive work on univariate modeling of each voxel for single and multi-subject data, some work on spatial modeling of single-subject data, and some recent work on spatial modeling of multi-subject data. However, there has been no work on spatial models that explicitly account for inter-subject variability in activation locations. In this work, we use the idea of activation centers and model the inter-subject variability in activation locations directly. Our model is specified in a Bayesian hierarchical frame work which allows us to draw inferences at all levels: the population level, the individual level and the voxel level. We use Gaussian mixtures for the probability that an individual has a particular activation. This helps answer an important question which is not addressed by any of the previous methods: What proportion of subjects had a significant activity in a given region. Our approach incorporates the unknown number of mixture components into the model as a parameter whose posterior distribution is estimated by reversible jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo. We demonstrate our method with a fMRI study of resolving proactive interference and show dramatically better precision of localization with our method relative to the standard mass-univariate method. Although we are motivated by fMRI data, this model could easily be modified to handle other types of imaging data. PMID:19210732

  1. Assessment of abstract reasoning abilities in alcohol-dependent subjects: an fMRI study

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    Bagga, Deepika; Singh, Namita; Singh, Sadhana; Modi, Shilpi; Kumar, Pawan [Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences (INMAS), NMR Research Centre, Delhi (India); Bhattacharya, D. [Base Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Delhi Cantt (India); Garg, Mohan L. [Panjab University, Department of Biophysics, Chandigarh (India); Khushu, Subash [Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences (INMAS), NMR Research Centre, Delhi (India); INMAS, DRDO, NMR Research Centre, Delhi (India)

    2014-01-15

    Chronic alcohol abuse has been traditionally associated with impaired cognitive abilities. The deficits are most evident in higher order cognitive functions, such as abstract reasoning, problem solving and visuospatial processing. The present study sought to increase current understanding of the neuropsychological basis of poor abstract reasoning abilities in alcohol-dependent subjects using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). An abstract reasoning task-based fMRI study was carried out on alcohol-dependent subjects (n = 18) and healthy controls (n = 18) to examine neural activation pattern. The study was carried out using a 3-T whole-body magnetic resonance scanner. Preprocessing and post processing was performed using SPM 8 software. Behavioral data indicated that alcohol-dependent subjects took more time than controls for performing the task but there was no significant difference in their response accuracy. Analysis of the fMRI data indicated that for solving abstract reasoning-based problems, alcohol-dependent subjects showed enhanced right frontoparietal neural activation involving inferior frontal gyrus, post central gyrus, superior parietal lobule, and occipito-temporal gyrus. The extensive activation observed in alcohol dependents as compared to controls suggests that alcohol dependents recruit additional brain areas to meet the behavioral demands for equivalent task performance. The results are consistent with previous fMRI studies suggesting decreased neural efficiency of relevant brain networks or compensatory mechanisms for the execution of task for showing an equivalent performance. (orig.)

  2. Bayesian longitudinal segmentation of hippocampal substructures in brain MRI using subject-specific atlases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Van Leemput, Koen; Augustinack, Jean

    2016-01-01

    images and computational atlases, automatic segmentation of hippocampal subregions is becoming feasible in MRI scans. Here we introduce a generative model for dedicated longitudinal segmentation that relies on subject-specific atlases. The segmentations of the scans at the different time points...

  3. Serial correlations in single-subject fMRI with sub-second TR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollmann, Saskia; Puckett, Alexander M; Cunnington, Ross; Barth, Markus

    2017-10-21

    When performing statistical analysis of single-subject fMRI data, serial correlations need to be taken into account to allow for valid inference. Otherwise, the variability in the parameter estimates might be under-estimated resulting in increased false-positive rates. Serial correlations in fMRI data are commonly characterized in terms of a first-order autoregressive (AR) process and then removed via pre-whitening. The required noise model for the pre-whitening depends on a number of parameters, particularly the repetition time (TR). Here we investigate how the sub-second temporal resolution provided by simultaneous multislice (SMS) imaging changes the noise structure in fMRI time series. We fit a higher-order AR model and then estimate the optimal AR model order for a sequence with a TR of less than 600 ms providing whole brain coverage. We show that physiological noise modelling successfully reduces the required AR model order, but remaining serial correlations necessitate an advanced noise model. We conclude that commonly used noise models, such as the AR(1) model, are inadequate for modelling serial correlations in fMRI using sub-second TRs. Rather, physiological noise modelling in combination with advanced pre-whitening schemes enable valid inference in single-subject analysis using fast fMRI sequences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Multi-Subject fMRI Generalization with| Independent Component Representation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Rasmus Elsborg

    2003-01-01

    Generalizability in a multi-subject fMRI study is investigated. The analysis is based on principal and independent component representations. Subsequent supervised learning and classification is carried out by canonical variates analysis and clustering methods. The generalization error is estimated....... It is shown that independent component representation leads to improvement in the classification rate, and that canonical variates analysis is needed for making generalization cross multiple subjects....

  5. Comparison of multi-subject ICA methods for analysis of fMRI data.

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    Erhardt, Erik Barry; Rachakonda, Srinivas; Bedrick, Edward J; Allen, Elena A; Adali, Tülay; Calhoun, Vince D

    2011-12-01

    Spatial independent component analysis (ICA) applied to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data identifies functionally connected networks by estimating spatially independent patterns from their linearly mixed fMRI signals. Several multi-subject ICA approaches estimating subject-specific time courses (TCs) and spatial maps (SMs) have been developed, however, there has not yet been a full comparison of the implications of their use. Here, we provide extensive comparisons of four multi-subject ICA approaches in combination with data reduction methods for simulated and fMRI task data. For multi-subject ICA, the data first undergo reduction at the subject and group levels using principal component analysis (PCA). Comparisons of subject-specific, spatial concatenation, and group data mean subject-level reduction strategies using PCA and probabilistic PCA (PPCA) show that computationally intensive PPCA is equivalent to PCA, and that subject-specific and group data mean subject-level PCA are preferred because of well-estimated TCs and SMs. Second, aggregate independent components are estimated using either noise-free ICA or probabilistic ICA (PICA). Third, subject-specific SMs and TCs are estimated using back-reconstruction. We compare several direct group ICA (GICA) back-reconstruction approaches (GICA1-GICA3) and an indirect back-reconstruction approach, spatio-temporal regression (STR, or dual regression). Results show the earlier group ICA (GICA1) approximates STR, however STR has contradictory assumptions and may show mixed-component artifacts in estimated SMs. Our evidence-based recommendation is to use GICA3, introduced here, with subject-specific PCA and noise-free ICA, providing the most robust and accurate estimated SMs and TCs in addition to offering an intuitive interpretation. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. THETA AND ALPHA EEG FREQUENCY INTERPLAY IN SUBJECTS WITH MILD COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT: EVIDENCE FROM EEG, MRI AND SPECT BRAIN MODIFICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Vito Moretti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: reduction of regional cerebral perfusion in hippocampus as well as temporo-parietal and medial temporal cortex atrophy are associated to mild cognitive impairment (MCI due to Alzheimer disease (AD. Methods: 74 adult subjects with MCI underwent clinical and neuropsychological evaluation, electroencephalogram (EEG recording and high resolution 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Among the patients, a subset of 27 subjects underwent also perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and hippocampal atrophy evaluation. Alpha3/alpha2 power ratio as well as cortical thickness was computed for each subject. Three MCI groups were detected according to increasing tertile values of alpha3/alpha2 power ratio and difference of cortical thickness among the groups estimated. Results: higher alpha3/alpha2 power ratio group had wider cortical thinning than other groups, mapped to the Supramarginal and Precuneus bilaterally. Subjects with higher alpha3/alpha2 frequency power ratio showed a constant trend to a lower perfusion than lower alpha3/alpha2 group. Moreover, this group correlates with both a bigger hippocampal atrophy and an increase of theta frequency power.Conclusion: Higher EEG alpha3/alpha2 power ratio was associated with temporo-parietal cortical thinning, hippocampal atrophy and reduction of regional cerebral perfusion in medial temporal cortex. In this group an increase of theta frequency power was detected inMCI subjects. The combination of higher EEG alpha3/alpha2 power ratio, cortical thickness measure and regional cerebral perfusion reveals a complex interplay between EEG cerebral rhythms, structural and functional brain modifications.

  7. A versatile software package for inter-subject correlation based analyses of fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppi, Jukka-Pekka; Pajula, Juha; Tohka, Jussi

    2014-01-01

    In the inter-subject correlation (ISC) based analysis of the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data, the extent of shared processing across subjects during the experiment is determined by calculating correlation coefficients between the fMRI time series of the subjects in the corresponding brain locations. This implies that ISC can be used to analyze fMRI data without explicitly modeling the stimulus and thus ISC is a potential method to analyze fMRI data acquired under complex naturalistic stimuli. Despite of the suitability of ISC based approach to analyze complex fMRI data, no generic software tools have been made available for this purpose, limiting a widespread use of ISC based analysis techniques among neuroimaging community. In this paper, we present a graphical user interface (GUI) based software package, ISC Toolbox, implemented in Matlab for computing various ISC based analyses. Many advanced computations such as comparison of ISCs between different stimuli, time window ISC, and inter-subject phase synchronization are supported by the toolbox. The analyses are coupled with re-sampling based statistical inference. The ISC based analyses are data and computation intensive and the ISC toolbox is equipped with mechanisms to execute the parallel computations in a cluster environment automatically and with an automatic detection of the cluster environment in use. Currently, SGE-based (Oracle Grid Engine, Son of a Grid Engine, or Open Grid Scheduler) and Slurm environments are supported. In this paper, we present a detailed account on the methods behind the ISC Toolbox, the implementation of the toolbox and demonstrate the possible use of the toolbox by summarizing selected example applications. We also report the computation time experiments both using a single desktop computer and two grid environments demonstrating that parallelization effectively reduces the computing time. The ISC Toolbox is available in https://code.google.com/p/isc-toolbox/

  8. Quantifying functional connectivity in multi-subject fMRI data using component models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Kristoffer H; Churchill, Nathan W; Mørup, Morten

    2017-02-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is increasingly used to characterize functional connectivity between brain regions. Given the vast number of between-voxel interactions in high-dimensional fMRI data, it is an ongoing challenge to detect stable and generalizable functional connectivity in the brain among groups of subjects. Component models can be used to define subspace representations of functional connectivity that are more interpretable. It is, however, unclear which component model provides the optimal representation of functional networks for multi-subject fMRI datasets. A flexible cross-validation approach that assesses the ability of the models to predict voxel-wise covariance in new data, using three different measures of generalization was proposed. This framework is used to compare a range of component models with varying degrees of flexibility in their representation of functional connectivity, evaluated on both simulated and experimental resting-state fMRI data. It was demonstrated that highly flexible subject-specific component subspaces, as well as very constrained average models, are poor predictors of whole-brain functional connectivity, whereas the best-generalizing models account for subject variability within a common spatial subspace. Within this set of models, spatial Independent Component Analysis (sICA) on concatenated data provides more interpretable brain patterns, whereas a consistent-covariance model that accounts for subject-specific network scaling (PARAFAC2) provides greater stability in functional connectivity relationships between components and their spatial representations. The proposed evaluation framework is a promising quantitative approach to evaluating component models, and reveals important differences between subspace models in terms of predictability, robustness, characterization of subject variability, and interpretability of the model parameters. Hum Brain Mapp 38:882-899, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  9. POBE: A Computer Program for Optimal Design of Multi-Subject Blocked fMRI Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bärbel Maus

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies, researchers can use multi-subject blocked designs to identify active brain regions for a certain stimulus type of interest. Before performing such an experiment, careful planning is necessary to obtain efficient stimulus effect estimators within the available financial resources. The optimal number of subjects and the optimal scanning time for a multi-subject blocked design with fixed experimental costs can be determined using optimal design methods. In this paper, the user-friendly computer program POBE 1.2 (program for optimal design of blocked experiments, version 1.2 is presented. POBE provides a graphical user interface for fMRI researchers to easily and efficiently design their experiments. The computer program POBE calculates the optimal number of subjects and the optimal scanning time for user specified experimental factors and model parameters so that the statistical efficiency is maximised for a given study budget. POBE can also be used to determine the minimum budget for a given power. Furthermore, a maximin design can be determined as efficient design for a possible range of values for the unknown model parameters. In this paper, the computer program is described and illustrated with typical experimental factors for a blocked fMRI experiment.

  10. Detecting functional connectivity change points for single-subject fMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribben, Ivor; Wager, Tor D; Lindquist, Martin A

    2013-01-01

    Recently in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies there has been an increased interest in understanding the dynamic manner in which brain regions communicate with one another, as subjects perform a set of experimental tasks or as their psychological state changes. Dynamic Connectivity Regression (DCR) is a data-driven technique used for detecting temporal change points in functional connectivity between brain regions where the number and location of the change points are unknown a priori. After finding the change points, DCR estimates a graph or set of relationships between the brain regions for data that falls between pairs of change points. In previous work, the method was predominantly validated using multi-subject data. In this paper, we concentrate on single-subject data and introduce a new DCR algorithm. The new algorithm increases accuracy for individual subject data with a small number of observations and reduces the number of false positives in the estimated undirected graphs. We also introduce a new Likelihood Ratio test for comparing sparse graphs across (or within) subjects; thus allowing us to determine whether data should be combined across subjects. We perform an extensive simulation analysis on vector autoregression (VAR) data as well as to an fMRI data set from a study (n = 23) of a state anxiety induction using a socially evaluative threat challenge. The focus on single-subject data allows us to study the variation between individuals and may provide us with a deeper knowledge of the workings of the brain.

  11. Feasibility of conductivity imaging using subject eddy currents induced by switching of MRI gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oran, Omer Faruk; Ider, Yusuf Ziya

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the feasibility of low-frequency conductivity imaging based on measuring the magnetic field due to subject eddy currents induced by switching of MRI z-gradients. We developed a simulation model for calculating subject eddy currents and the magnetic fields they generate (subject eddy fields). The inverse problem of obtaining conductivity distribution from subject eddy fields was formulated as a convection-reaction partial differential equation. For measuring subject eddy fields, a modified spin-echo pulse sequence was used to determine the contribution of subject eddy fields to MR phase images. In the simulations, successful conductivity reconstructions were obtained by solving the derived convection-reaction equation, suggesting that the proposed reconstruction algorithm performs well under ideal conditions. However, the level of the calculated phase due to the subject eddy field in a representative object indicates that this phase is below the noise level and cannot be measured with an uncertainty sufficiently low for accurate conductivity reconstruction. Furthermore, some artifacts other than random noise were observed in the measured phases, which are discussed in relation to the effects of system imperfections during readout. Low-frequency conductivity imaging does not seem feasible using basic pulse sequences such as spin-echo on a clinical MRI scanner. Magn Reson Med 77:1926-1937, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  12. Multi-modal analysis of genetically-related subjects using SIFT descriptors in brain MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Kuldeep; Chauvin, Laurent; Toews, Mathew; Colliot, Olivier; Desrosiers, Christian

    2017-01-01

    International audience; So far, fingerprinting studies have focused on identifying features from single-modality MRI data, which capture individual characteristics in terms of brain structure, function, or white matter microstruc-ture. However, due to the lack of a framework for comparing across multiple modalities, studies based on multi-modal data remain elusive. This paper presents a multi-modal analysis of genetically-related subjects to compare and contrast the information provided by va...

  13. Preserving Subject Variability in Group fMRI Analysis: Performance Evaluation of GICA versus IVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eMichael

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Independent component analysis (ICA is a widely applied technique to derive functionally connected brain networks from fMRI data. Group ICA (GICA and Independent Vector Analysis (IVA are extensions of ICA that enable users to perform group fMRI analyses; however a full comparison of the performance limits of GICA and IVA has not been investigated. Recent interest in resting state fMRI data with potentially higher degree of subject variability makes the evaluation of the above techniques important. In this paper we compare component estimation accuracies of GICA and an improved version of IVA using simulated fMRI datasets. We systematically change the degree of component spatial variability and evaluate estimation accuracy over all spatial maps (SMs and time courses (TCs of the decomposition. Our results indicate the following: (1 at low levels of SM variability or when just one SM is varied, both GICA and IVA perform well, (2 at higher levels of SM variability or when more than one SMs are varied, IVA continues to perform well but GICA yields SM estimates that are composites of other SMs with errors in TCs, (3 both GICA and IVA remove spatial correlations of overlapping SMs and introduce artificial correlations in their TCs, (4 if number of SMs is over estimated, IVA continues to perform well but GICA introduces artifacts in the varying and extra SMs with artificial correlations in the TCs of extra components, and (5 in the absence or presence of SMs unique to one subject, GICA produces errors in TCs and IVA estimates are accurate. In summary, our simulation experiments (both simplistic and realistic and our holistic analyses approach indicate that IVA produces results that are closer to ground truth and thereby better preserves subject variability. The improved version of IVA is now packaged into the GIFT toolbox (http://mialab.mrn.org/software/gift.

  14. MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeter, Aileen; Rudin, Markus; Gianolio, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and MRI followed by a survey on the major classes of MRI contrast agents (CA), their modes of action, and some of the most significative applications. The two more established classes of MRI-CA are represented by paramagnetic...

  15. Detecting functional connectivity change points for single-subject fMRI data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivor eCribben

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies there has been an increased interest in understanding the dynamic manner in which brain regions communicate with one another, as subjects perform a set of experimental tasks or as their psychological state changes. Dynamic Connectivity Regression (DCR is a data-driven technique used for detecting temporal change points in functional connectivity between brain regions where the number and location of the change points are unknown a priori. After finding the change points, DCR estimates a graph or set of relationships between the brain regions for data that falls between pairs of change points. In previous work, the method was predominantly validated using multi-subject data. In this paper, we concentrate on single-subject data and introduce a new DCR algorithm. The new algorithm increases accuracy for individual subject data with a small number of observations and reduces the number of false positives in the estimated undirected graphs. We also introduce a new Likelihood Ratio test for comparing sparse graphs across (or within subjects; thus allowing us to determine whether data should be combined across subjects. We perform an extensive simulation analysis on vector autoregression (VAR data as well as to an fMRI data set from a study (n=23 of a state anxiety induction using a socially evaluative threat challenge. The focus on single-subject data allows us to study the variation between individuals and may provide us with a deeper knowledge of the workings of the brain.

  16. Single subject fMRI test-retest reliability metrics and confounding factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J; Storkey, Amos J; Bastin, Mark E; Whittle, Ian; Pernet, Cyril

    2013-04-01

    While the fMRI test-retest reliability has been mainly investigated from the point of view of group level studies, here we present analyses and results for single-subject test-retest reliability. One important aspect of group level reliability is that not only does it depend on between-session variance (test-retest), but also on between-subject variance. This has partly led to a debate regarding which reliability metric to use and how different sources of noise contribute to between-session variance. Focusing on single subject reliability allows considering between-session only. In this study, we measured test-retest reliability in four behavioural tasks (motor mapping, covert verb generation, overt word repetition, and a landmark identification task) to ensure generalisation of the results and at three levels of data processing (time-series correlation, t value variance, and overlap of thresholded maps) to understand how each step influences the other and how confounding factors influence reliability at each of these steps. The contributions of confounding factors (scanner noise, subject motion, and coregistration) were investigated using multiple regression and relative importance analyses at each step. Finally, to achieve a fuller picture of what constitutes a reliable task, we introduced a bootstrap technique of within- vs. between-subject variance. Our results show that (i) scanner noise and coregistration errors have little contribution to between-session variance (ii) subject motion (especially correlated with the stimuli) can have detrimental effects on reliability (iii) different tasks lead to different reliability results. This suggests that between-session variance in fMRI is mostly caused by the variability of underlying cognitive processes and motion correlated with the stimuli rather than technical limitations of data processing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Age-related MRI changes at 0. 1 T in cervical discs in asymptomatic subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehto, I.J. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Turku Univ. (Finland)); Tertti, M.O. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Turku Univ. (Finland)); Komu, M.E. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Turku Univ. (Finland)); Paajanen, H.E.K. (Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Tampere Univ. Hospital (Finland)); Tuominen, J. (Dept. of Biostatistics, Turku Univ. (Finland)); Kormano, M.J. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Turku Univ. (Finland))

    1994-01-01

    The age-dependent occurrence of cervical degenerative changes was studies using 0.1 T MRI in 89 asymptomatic volunteers aged 9 to 63 years. The degree of DD (disc darkening on T2[sup *]-weighted images), disc protrusions and prolapses, narrowing of disc spaces, dorsal osteophytes and spinal canal stenosis were assessed. Abnormalities were commoner in older subjects, 62% of being seen in those over 40 years old. In subjects aged less than 30 years there were virtually no abnormalities. DD was the most common abnormality, seen in 10% of discs; 57% DD was in subjects aged over 40. DD at the C5/6 level was the most common finding. No differences in abnormal findings between males and females was observed, nor any statistically significant association between DD and other abnormalities. Thus, DD begins later age in the cervical spine than in the lumbar region. Asymptomatic degenerative changes are common on MRI in the cervical spine after 30 years of age. (orig.)

  18. Head-to-toe whole-body MRI in psoriatic arthritis, axial spondyloarthritis and healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Pedersen, Susanne Juhl; Eshed, Iris

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: By whole-body MRI (WBMRI), we aimed to examine the frequency and distribution of inflammatory and structural lesions in PsA patients, SpA patients and healthy subjects (HSs), to introduce global WBMRI inflammation/damage scores, and to assess WBMRI's reproducibility and correlation...... of inflammation and structural damage were constructed, and WBMRI findings were compared with clinical measures and convMRI (SpA/HS: spine and SI joints; PsA/HS: hand). RESULTS: The readability (92-100%) and reproducibility (intrareader intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.62-1.0) were high in spine/SI joint......-15]} and SpA [8 (IQR 2-14)] than in HSs [2.5 (IQR 1-4.5)], both P structural damage scores (erosion, fat infiltration and ankylosis) were higher in SpA [7 (IQR 3-12)] than HSs [1.5 (IQR 0-4.5)], P = 0.012. Correlations between WBMRI and convMRI spine and SI joint scores were ρ = 0...

  19. Subclinical changes in MRI-determined right ventricular volumes and function in subjects with prediabetes and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patscheider, Hannah; Lorbeer, Roberto; Auweter, Sigrid; Schafnitzel, Anina; Bayerl, Christian; Curta, Adrian; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Heier, Margit; Meisinger, Christa; Peters, Annette; Bamberg, Fabian; Hetterich, Holger

    2018-02-08

    The aim of this study was to assess subclinical changes in right ventricular volumes and function in subjects with prediabetes and diabetes and controls without a history of cardiovascular disease. Data from 400 participants in the KORA FF4 study without self-reported cardiovascular disease who underwent 3-T whole-body MRI were obtained. The right ventricle was evaluated using the short axis and a four-chamber view. Diabetes was defined according to WHO criteria. Associations between glucose tolerance and right ventricular parameters were assessed using multivariable adjusted linear regression models. Data from 337 participants were available for analysis. Of these, 43 (13%) had diabetes, 87 (26%) had prediabetes, and 207 (61%) were normoglycaemic controls. There was a stepwise decrease in right ventricular volumes in men with prediabetes and diabetes in comparison with controls, including right ventricular end-diastolic volume (β = -20.4 and β = -25.6, respectively; p ≤ 0.005), right ventricular end-systolic volume (β = -12.3 and β = -12.7, respectively; p ≤ 0.037) and right ventricular stroke volume (β = -8.1 and β = -13.1, respectively, p ≤ 0.016). We did not observe any association between prediabetes or diabetes and right ventricular volumes in women or between prediabetes or diabetes and right ventricular ejection fraction in men and women. This study points towards early subclinical changes in right ventricular volumes in men with diabetes and prediabetes. • MRI was used to detect subclinical changes in right ventricular parameters. • Diabetes mellitus is associated with right ventricular dysfunction. • Impairment of right ventricular volumes seems to occur predominantly in men.

  20. Incomplete Hippocampal Inversion: a comprehensive MRI study of over 2000 subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire eCury

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The incomplete-hippocampal-inversion (IHI, also known as malrotation, is an atypical anatomical pattern of the hippocampus, which has been reported in healthy subjects in different studies. However, extensive characterization of IHI in a large sample has not yet been performed. Furthermore, it is unclear whether IHI are restricted to the medial-temporal lobe or are associated with more extensive anatomical changes. Here, we studied the characteristics of IHI in a community-based sample of 2008 subjects of the IMAGEN database and their association with extra-hippocampal anatomical variations. The presence of IHI was assessed on T1-weighted anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI using visual criteria. We assessed the association of IHI with other anatomical changes throughout the brain using automatic morphometry of cortical sulci. We found that IHI were much more frequent in the left hippocampus (left: 17%, right: 6%, χ2-test, p<10-28. Compared to subjects without IHI, subjects with IHI displayed morphological changes in several sulci located mainly in the limbic lobe. Our results demonstrate that IHI are a common left-sided phenomenon in normal subjects and that they are associated with morphological changes outside the medial temporal lobe.

  1. Incomplete Hippocampal Inversion: A Comprehensive MRI Study of Over 2000 Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cury, Claire; Toro, Roberto; Cohen, Fanny; Fischer, Clara; Mhaya, Amel; Samper-González, Jorge; Hasboun, Dominique; Mangin, Jean-François; Banaschewski, Tobias; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Buechel, Christian; Cattrell, Anna; Conrod, Patricia; Flor, Herta; Gallinat, Juergen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Lemaitre, Hervé; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paillère Martinot, Marie-Laure; Orfanos, Dimitri P; Paus, Tomas; Poustka, Luise; Smolka, Michael N; Walter, Henrik; Whelan, Robert; Frouin, Vincent; Schumann, Gunter; Glaunès, Joan A; Colliot, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The incomplete-hippocampal-inversion (IHI), also known as malrotation, is an atypical anatomical pattern of the hippocampus, which has been reported in healthy subjects in different studies. However, extensive characterization of IHI in a large sample has not yet been performed. Furthermore, it is unclear whether IHI are restricted to the medial-temporal lobe or are associated with more extensive anatomical changes. Here, we studied the characteristics of IHI in a community-based sample of 2008 subjects of the IMAGEN database and their association with extra-hippocampal anatomical variations. The presence of IHI was assessed on T1-weighted anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using visual criteria. We assessed the association of IHI with other anatomical changes throughout the brain using automatic morphometry of cortical sulci. We found that IHI were much more frequent in the left hippocampus (left: 17%, right: 6%, χ(2)-test, p < 10(-28)). Compared to subjects without IHI, subjects with IHI displayed morphological changes in several sulci located mainly in the limbic lobe. Our results demonstrate that IHI are a common left-sided phenomenon in normal subjects and that they are associated with morphological changes outside the medial temporal lobe.

  2. Optimizing preprocessing and analysis pipelines for single-subject fMRI: 2. Interactions with ICA, PCA, task contrast and inter-subject heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Nathan W; Yourganov, Grigori; Oder, Anita; Tam, Fred; Graham, Simon J; Strother, Stephen C

    2012-01-01

    A variety of preprocessing techniques are available to correct subject-dependant artifacts in fMRI, caused by head motion and physiological noise. Although it has been established that the chosen preprocessing steps (or "pipeline") may significantly affect fMRI results, it is not well understood how preprocessing choices interact with other parts of the fMRI experimental design. In this study, we examine how two experimental factors interact with preprocessing: between-subject heterogeneity, and strength of task contrast. Two levels of cognitive contrast were examined in an fMRI adaptation of the Trail-Making Test, with data from young, healthy adults. The importance of standard preprocessing with motion correction, physiological noise correction, motion parameter regression and temporal detrending were examined for the two task contrasts. We also tested subspace estimation using Principal Component Analysis (PCA), and Independent Component Analysis (ICA). Results were obtained for Penalized Discriminant Analysis, and model performance quantified with reproducibility (R) and prediction metrics (P). Simulation methods were also used to test for potential biases from individual-subject optimization. Our results demonstrate that (1) individual pipeline optimization is not significantly more biased than fixed preprocessing. In addition, (2) when applying a fixed pipeline across all subjects, the task contrast significantly affects pipeline performance; in particular, the effects of PCA and ICA models vary with contrast, and are not by themselves optimal preprocessing steps. Also, (3) selecting the optimal pipeline for each subject improves within-subject (P,R) and between-subject overlap, with the weaker cognitive contrast being more sensitive to pipeline optimization. These results demonstrate that sensitivity of fMRI results is influenced not only by preprocessing choices, but also by interactions with other experimental design factors. This paper outlines a

  3. Semiautomatic Segmentation of Ventilated Airspaces in Healthy and Asthmatic Subjects Using Hyperpolarized He MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Lui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A segmentation algorithm to isolate areas of ventilation from hyperpolarized helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging (HP 3He MRI is described. The algorithm was tested with HP 3He MRI data from four healthy and six asthmatic subjects. Ventilated lung volume (VLV measured using our semiautomated technique was compared to that obtained from manual outlining of ventilated lung regions and to standard spirometric measurements. VLVs from both approaches were highly correlated (R=0.99; P<0.0001 with a mean difference of 3.8 mL and 95% agreement indices of −30.8 mL and 38.4 mL. There was no significant difference between the VLVs obtained through the semiautomatic approach and the manual approach. A Dice coefficient which quantified the intersection of the two datasets was calculated and ranged from 0.95 to 0.97 with a mean of 0.96 ± 0.01 (mean ± SD. VLVs obtained through the semiautomatic algorithm were also highly correlated with measurements of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 (R=0.82; P=0.0035 and forced vital capacity (FVC (R=0.95; P<0.0001. The technique may open new pathways toward advancing more quantitative characterization of ventilation for routine clinical assessment for asthma severity as well as a number of other respiratory diseases.

  4. Multi-modal Brain MRI in Subjects with PD and iRBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangia, Silvia; Svatkova, Alena; Mascali, Daniele; Nissi, Mikko J.; Burton, Philip C.; Bednarik, Petr; Auerbach, Edward J.; Giove, Federico; Eberly, Lynn E.; Howell, Michael J.; Nestrasil, Igor; Tuite, Paul J.; Michaeli, Shalom

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) is a condition that often evolves into Parkinson's disease (PD). Therefore, by monitoring iRBD it is possible to track the neurodegeneration of individuals who may progress to PD. Here we aimed at piloting the characterization of brain tissue properties in mid-brain subcortical regions of 10 healthy subjects, 8 iRBD, and 9 early-diagnosed PD. We used a battery of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrasts at 3 T, including adiabatic and non-adiabatic rotating frame techniques developed by our group, along with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and resting-state fMRI. Adiabatic T1ρ and T2ρ, and non-adiabatic RAFF4 (Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field in the rotating frame of rank 4) were found to have lower coefficient of variations and higher sensitivity to detect group differences as compared to DTI parameters such as fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity. Significantly longer T1ρ were observed in the amygdala of PD subjects vs. controls, along with a trend of lower functional connectivity as measured by regional homogeneity, thereby supporting the notion that amygdalar dysfunction occurs in PD. Significant abnormalities in reward networks occurred in iRBD subjects, who manifested lower network strength of the accumbens. In agreement with previous studies, significantly longer T1ρ occurred in the substantia nigra compacta of PD vs. controls, indicative of neuronal degeneration, while regional homogeneity was lower in the substantia nigra reticulata. Finally, other trend-level findings were observed, i.e., lower RAFF4 and T2ρ in the midbrain of iRBD subjects vs. controls, possibly indicating changes in non-motor features as opposed to motor function in the iRBD group. We conclude that rotating frame relaxation methods along with functional connectivity measures are valuable to characterize iRBD and PD subjects, and with proper validation in larger cohorts may provide pathological signatures of i

  5. fMRI abnormalities in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during a working memory task in manic, euthymic and depressed bipolar subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Townsend, Jennifer; Bookheimer, Susan Y; Foland, Lara C.; Sugar, Catherine A.; Altshuler, Lori L.

    2010-01-01

    Neuropsychological studies of subjects with bipolar disorder suggest impairment of working memory not only in acute mood states, but also while subjects are euthymic. Using fMRI to probe working memory regions in bipolar subjects in different mood states, we sought to determine the functional neural basis for these impairments. Typical working memory areas in normal populations include dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA9/46) and the posterior parietal cortex (BA40). We evaluated the activatio...

  6. Subjective discomfort in children receiving 3 T MRI and experienced adults' perspective on children's tolerability of 7 T: a cross-sectional questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, I-Jun; Tench, Christopher R; Gowland, Penny; Jaspan, Tim; Dineen, Rob A; Evangelou, Nikos; Abdel-Fahim, Rasha; Whitehouse, William P; Constantinescu, Cris S

    2014-10-15

    To explore the possible discomfort perceived by children participating in 7 T MRI research, and the age range in which children are most likely to tolerate it well. A cross-sectional survey using age-appropriate questionnaires containing six measures of subjective discomfort (general discomfort, dizziness, noisiness, claustrophobia and feeling of cold or warm). For children, 3 T clinical scanner in a tertiary referral teaching hospital; for adults, 3 and 7 T scanner in a university research building. Non-sedated children and young people under 18 years of age who underwent 3 T clinical MRI for brain or musculoskeletal scans and adult volunteers attending 7 T with or without 3 T for brain scans. 83% (89/107) of involved individuals returned questionnaires. The most common discomfort among 31 children receiving 3 T MRI was noisiness (39%), followed by cold (19%), general discomfort (16%), dizziness (13%) and claustrophobia (10%). The noise was reported more frequently in children younger than 12 years than those older (p=0.021). The most common discomfort for 58 adults receiving 7 T MRI was noisiness (43%). In adults, there was a higher frequency of general discomfort during 7 than 3 T scans (p=0.031). More than 85% of adult respondents thought children aged 12-17 years would tolerate 7 T scans well, but only 35% and 15% thought children aged 10-11 and 8-9 years, respectively, would. Noisiness was the most common discomfort across all ages in 3 and 7 T scanners. Although general discomfort was more common during 7 than 3 T scans in adults, most adults thought children aged 12 years or more would tolerate 7 T MRI well. Cautious enrolment of children in 7 T MRI study is warranted, but until there is more evidence of how well those aged 12 years or more tolerate 7 T MRI, we would caution against enrolling younger children. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a

  7. MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and radio waves to create pictures of the body. It does not use radiation (x-rays). Single MRI images are called slices. The images can be stored on a computer or printed on film. One exam produces dozens or sometimes hundreds of ...

  8. Evaluation and optimization of fMRI single-subject processing pipelines with NPAIRS and second-level CVA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Anderson, Jon R; Liang, Lichen; Pulapura, Sujit K; Gatewood, Lael; Rottenberg, David A; Strother, Stephen C

    2009-02-01

    In functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analysis, although the univariate general linear model (GLM) is currently the dominant approach to brain activation detection, there is growing interest in multivariate approaches such as principal component analysis, canonical variate analysis (CVA), independent component analysis and cluster analysis, which have the potential to reveal neural networks and functional connectivity in the brain. To understand the effect of processing options on performance of multivariate model-based fMRI processing pipelines with real fMRI data, we investigated the impact of commonly used fMRI preprocessing steps and optimized the associated multivariate CVA-based, single-subject processing pipelines with the NPAIRS (nonparametric prediction, activation, influence and reproducibility resampling) performance metrics [prediction accuracy and statistical parametric image (SPI) reproducibility] on the Fiswidgets platform. We also compared the single-subject SPIs of univariate GLM with multivariate CVA-based processing pipelines from SPM, FSL.FEAT, NPAIRS.GLM and NPAIRS.CVA software packages (or modules) using a novel second-level CVA. We found that for the block-design data, (a) slice timing correction and global intensity normalization have little consistent impact on the fMRI processing pipeline, but spatial smoothing, temporal detrending or high-pass filtering, and motion correction significantly improved pipeline performance across all subjects; (b) the combined optimization of spatial smoothing, temporal detrending and CVA model parameters on average improved between-subject reproducibility; and (c) the most important pipeline choices include univariate or multivariate statistical models and spatial smoothing. This study suggests that considering options other than simply using GLM with a fixed spatial filter may be of critical importance in determining activation patterns in BOLD fMRI studies.

  9. Where agreement merges with disagreement: fMRI evidence of subject-verb integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñones, Ileana; Molinaro, Nicola; Mancini, Simona; Hernández-Cabrera, Juan Andrés; Carreiras, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Language comprehension is incremental, involving the integration of information from different words together with the need to resolve conflicting cues when unexpected information occurs. The present fMRI design seeks to segregate the neuro-anatomical substrates of these two processes by comparing well-formed and ill-formed sentences during subject-verb agreement computation. Our experiment takes advantage of a particular Spanish feature, the Unagreement phenomenon: a subject-verb agreement mismatch that results in a grammatical sentence ("Los pintores trajimos…" [The painters3.pl (we)brought1.pl…]). Comprehension of this construction implies a shift in the semantic interpretation of the subject from 3rd-person to 1st-person, enabling the phrase "The painters" to be re-interpreted as "We painters". Our results include firstly a functional dissociation between well-formed and ill-formed sentences with Person Mismatches: while Person Mismatches recruited a fronto-parietal network associated to monitoring operations, grammatical sentences (both Unagreement and Default Agreement) recruited a fronto-temporal network related to syntactic-semantic integration. Secondly, there was activation in the posterior part of the left middle frontal gyrus for both Person Mismatches and Unagreement, reflecting the evaluation of the morpho-syntactic match between agreeing constituents. Thirdly, the left angular gyrus showed increased activation only for Unagreement, highlighting its crucial role in the comprehension of semantically complex but non-anomalous constructions. These findings point to a central role of the classic fronto-temporal network, plus two additional nodes: the posterior part of the left middle frontal gyrus and the left angular gyrus; opening new windows to the study of agreement computation and language comprehension. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Single-subject independent component analysis-based intensity normalization in non-quantitative multi-modal structural MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazoglou, Sebastian; Würfel, Jens; Paul, Friedemann; Brandt, Alexander U; Scheel, Michael

    2017-04-22

    Non-quantitative MRI is prone to intersubject intensity variation rendering signal intensity level based analyses limited. Here, we propose a method that fuses non-quantitative routine T1-weighted (T1w), T2w, and T2w fluid-saturated inversion recovery sequences using independent component analysis and validate it on age and sex matched healthy controls. The proposed method leads to consistent and independent components with a significantly reduced coefficient-of-variation across subjects, suggesting potential to serve as automatic intensity normalization and thus to enhance the power of intensity based statistical analyses. To exemplify this, we show that voxelwise statistical testing on single-subject independent components reveals in particular a widespread sex difference in white matter, which was previously shown using, for example, diffusion tensor imaging but unobservable in the native MRI contrasts. In conclusion, our study shows that single-subject independent component analysis can be applied to routine sequences, thereby enhancing comparability in-between subjects. Unlike quantitative MRI, which requires specific sequences during acquisition, our method is applicable to existing MRI data. Hum Brain Mapp, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Within-subject variation in BOLD-fMRI signal changes across repeated measurements: Quantification and implications for sample size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandbelt, B.B.; Gladwin, T.E.; Raemaekers, M.; Buuren, M. van; Neggers, S.F.W.; Kahn, R.S.; Ramsey, N.F.; Vink, M.

    2008-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be used to detect experimental effects on brain activity across measurements. The success of such studies depends on the size of the experimental effect, the reliability of the measurements, and the number of subjects. Here, we report on the stability

  12. Temporal reliability of ultra-high field resting-state MRI for single-subject sensorimotor and language mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Paulo; Seixas, Daniela; Castro, São Luís

    2016-11-15

    Resting-state fMRI is a well-suited technique to map functional networks in the brain because unlike task-based approaches it requires little collaboration from subjects. This is especially relevant in clinical settings where a number of subjects cannot comply with task demands. Previous studies using conventional scanner fields have shown that resting-state fMRI is able to map functional networks in single subjects, albeit with moderate temporal reliability. Ultra-high resolution (7T) imaging provides higher signal-to-noise ratio and better spatial resolution and is thus well suited to assess the temporal reliability of mapping results, and to determine if resting-state fMRI can be applied in clinical decision making including preoperative planning. We used resting-state fMRI at ultra-high resolution to examine whether the sensorimotor and language networks are reliable over time - same session and one week after. Resting-state networks were identified for all subjects and sessions with good accuracy. Both networks were well delimited within classical regions of interest. Mapping was temporally reliable at short and medium time-scales as demonstrated by high values of overlap in the same session and one week after for both networks. Results were stable independently of data quality metrics and physiological variables. Taken together, these findings provide strong support for the suitability of ultra-high field resting-state fMRI mapping at the single-subject level. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A subject-specific framework for in vivo myeloarchitectonic analysis using high resolution quantitative MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waehnert, Miriam D; Dinse, Juliane; Schäfer, Andreas; Geyer, Stefan; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Turner, Robert; Tardif, Christine Lucas

    2016-01-15

    Structural magnetic resonance imaging can now resolve laminar features within the cerebral cortex in vivo. A variety of intracortical contrasts have been used to study the cortical myeloarchitecture with the purpose of mapping cortical areas in individual subjects. In this article, we first briefly review recent advances in MRI analysis of cortical microstructure to portray the potential and limitations of the current state-of-the-art. We then present an integrated framework for the analysis of intracortical structure, composed of novel image processing tools designed for high resolution cortical images. The main features of our framework are the segmentation of quantitative T1 maps to delineate the cortical boundaries (Bazin et al., 2014), and the use of an equivolume layering model to define an intracortical coordinate system that follows the anatomical layers of the cortex (Waehnert et al., 2014). We evaluate the framework with 150μm isotropic post mortem T2(∗)-weighted images and 0.5mm isotropic in vivo T1 maps, a quantitative index of myelin content. We study the laminar structure of the primary visual cortex (Brodmann area 17) in the post mortem and in vivo data, as well as the central sulcus region in vivo, in particular Brodmann areas 1, 3b and 4. We also investigate the impact of the layering models on the relationship between T1 and cortical curvature. Our experiments demonstrate that the equivolume intracortical surfaces and transcortical profiles best reflect the laminar structure of the cortex in areas of curvature in comparison to the state-of-the-art equidistant and Laplace implementations. This framework generates a subject specific intracortical coordinate system, the basis for subsequent architectonic analyses of the cortex. Any structural or functional contrast co-registered to the T1 maps, used to segment the cortex, can be sampled on the curved grid for analysis. This work represents an important step towards in vivo structural brain mapping

  14. A within-subject ERP and fMRI investigation of orientation-specific recognition memory for pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzmann, Grit; Jin, Mingwu; Cordes, Dietmar; Curran, Tim

    2012-09-01

    Despite a large body of recognition memory research, its temporal, measured with ERPs, and spatial, measured with fMRI, substrates have never been investigated in the same subjects. In the present study, we obtained this information in parallel sessions, in which subjects studied and recognized images of visual objects and their orientation. The results showed that ERP-familiarity processes between 240 and 440 ms temporally preceded recollection processes and were structurally associated with prefrontal brain regions. Recollection processes were most prominent from 440 to 600 ms and correlated with activation in temporal, parietal, and occipital brain regions. Post-retrieval monitoring, which occurred in the ERP between 600 and 1000 ms as a long-lasting slow-wave over frontal channel groups, showed correlations with activation in the prefrontal and parietal cortex. These ERP/fMRI relationships showed some correspondences to source localizations of the investigated ERP memory effects.

  15. Optimizing Within-Subject Experimental Designs for jICA of Multi-Channel ERP and fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangalathu-Arumana, Jain; Liebenthal, Einat; Beardsley, Scott A.

    2018-01-01

    Joint independent component analysis (jICA) can be applied within subject for fusion of multi-channel event-related potentials (ERP) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), to measure brain function at high spatiotemporal resolution (Mangalathu-Arumana et al., 2012). However, the impact of experimental design choices on jICA performance has not been systematically studied. Here, the sensitivity of jICA for recovering neural sources in individual data was evaluated as a function of imaging SNR, number of independent representations of the ERP/fMRI data, relationship between instantiations of the joint ERP/fMRI activity (linear, non-linear, uncoupled), and type of sources (varying parametrically and non-parametrically across representations of the data), using computer simulations. Neural sources were simulated with spatiotemporal and noise attributes derived from experimental data. The best performance, maximizing both cross-modal data fusion and the separation of brain sources, occurred with a moderate number of representations of the ERP/fMRI data (10–30), as in a mixed block/event related experimental design. Importantly, the type of relationship between instantiations of the ERP/fMRI activity, whether linear, non-linear or uncoupled, did not in itself impact jICA performance, and was accurately recovered in the common profiles (i.e., mixing coefficients). Thus, jICA provides an unbiased way to characterize the relationship between ERP and fMRI activity across brain regions, in individual data, rendering it potentially useful for characterizing pathological conditions in which neurovascular coupling is adversely affected. PMID:29410611

  16. Fast Random Permutation Tests Enable Objective Evaluation of Methods for Single-Subject fMRI Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Eklund

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parametric statistical methods, such as Z-, t-, and F-values, are traditionally employed in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI for identifying areas in the brain that are active with a certain degree of statistical significance. These parametric methods, however, have two major drawbacks. First, it is assumed that the observed data are Gaussian distributed and independent; assumptions that generally are not valid for fMRI data. Second, the statistical test distribution can be derived theoretically only for very simple linear detection statistics. With nonparametric statistical methods, the two limitations described above can be overcome. The major drawback of non-parametric methods is the computational burden with processing times ranging from hours to days, which so far have made them impractical for routine use in single-subject fMRI analysis. In this work, it is shown how the computational power of cost-efficient graphics processing units (GPUs can be used to speed up random permutation tests. A test with 10000 permutations takes less than a minute, making statistical analysis of advanced detection methods in fMRI practically feasible. To exemplify the permutation-based approach, brain activity maps generated by the general linear model (GLM and canonical correlation analysis (CCA are compared at the same significance level.

  17. Fast Random Permutation Tests Enable Objective Evaluation of Methods for Single-Subject fMRI Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Anders; Andersson, Mats; Knutsson, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Parametric statistical methods, such as Z-, t-, and F-values, are traditionally employed in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for identifying areas in the brain that are active with a certain degree of statistical significance. These parametric methods, however, have two major drawbacks. First, it is assumed that the observed data are Gaussian distributed and independent; assumptions that generally are not valid for fMRI data. Second, the statistical test distribution can be derived theoretically only for very simple linear detection statistics. With nonparametric statistical methods, the two limitations described above can be overcome. The major drawback of non-parametric methods is the computational burden with processing times ranging from hours to days, which so far have made them impractical for routine use in single-subject fMRI analysis. In this work, it is shown how the computational power of cost-efficient graphics processing units (GPUs) can be used to speed up random permutation tests. A test with 10000 permutations takes less than a minute, making statistical analysis of advanced detection methods in fMRI practically feasible. To exemplify the permutation-based approach, brain activity maps generated by the general linear model (GLM) and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) are compared at the same significance level. PMID:22046176

  18. An iterative two-threshold analysis for single-subject functional MRI of the human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auer, Tibor; Schweizer, Renate; Frahm, Jens [Biomedizinische NMR Forschungs GmbH am Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biophysikalische Chemie, Goettingen (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Current thresholding strategies for the analysis of functional MRI (fMRI) datasets may suffer from specific limitations (e.g. with respect to the required smoothness) or lead to reduced performance for a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Although a previously proposed two-threshold (TT) method offers a promising solution to these problems, the use of preset settings limits its performance. This work presents an optimised TT approach that estimates the required parameters in an iterative manner. The iterative TT (iTT) method is compared with the original TT method, as well as other established voxel-based and cluster-based thresholding approaches and spatial mixture modelling (SMM) for both simulated data and fMRI of a hometown walking task at different experimental settings (spatial resolution, filtering and SNR). In general, the iTT method presents with remarkable sensitivity and good specificity that outperforms all conventional approaches tested except for SMM in a few cases. This also holds true for challenging conditions such as high spatial resolution, the absence of filtering, high noise level, or a low number of task repetitions. Thus, iTT emerges as a good candidate for both scientific fMRI studies at high spatial resolution and more routine applications for clinical purposes. (orig.)

  19. An fMRI Study of the Social Competition in Healthy Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polosan, M.; Baciu, M.; Cousin, E.; Perrone, M.; Pichat, C.; Bougerol, T.

    2011-01-01

    Social interaction requires the ability to infer another person's mental state (Theory of Mind, ToM) and also executive functions. This fMRI study aimed to identify the cerebral correlates activated by ToM during a specific social interaction, the human-human competition. In this framework, we tested a conflict resolution task (Stroop) adapted to…

  20. Comparison of In Vivo and Ex Vivo MRI of the Human Hippocampal Formation in the Same Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisse, L E M; Adler, D H; Ittyerah, R; Pluta, J B; Robinson, J L; Schuck, T; Trojanowski, J Q; Grossman, M; Detre, J A; Elliott, M A; Toledo, J B; Liu, W; Pickup, S; Das, S R; Wolk, D A; Yushkevich, P A

    2017-11-01

    Multiple techniques for quantification of hippocampal subfields from in vivo MRI have been proposed. Linking in vivo MRI to the underlying histology can help validate and improve these techniques. High-resolution ex vivo MRI can provide an intermediate modality to map information between these very different imaging modalities. This article evaluates the ability to match information between in vivo and ex vivo MRI in the same subjects. We perform rigid and deformable registration on 10 pairs of in vivo (3 T, 0.4 × 0.4 × 2.6 mm3) and ex vivo (9.4 T, 0.2 × 0.2 × 0.2 mm3) scans, and describe differences in MRI appearance between these modalities qualitatively and quantitatively. The feasibility of using this dataset to validate in vivo segmentation is evaluated by applying an automatic hippocampal subfield segmentation technique (ASHS) to in vivo scans and comparing SRLM (stratum/radiatum/lacunosum/moleculare) surface to manual tracing on corresponding ex vivo scans (and in 2 cases, histology). Regional increases in thickness are detected in ex vivo scans adjacent to the ventricles and were not related to scanner, resolution differences, or susceptibility artefacts. Satisfactory in vivo/ex vivo registration and subvoxel accuracy of ASHS segmentation of hippocampal SRLM demonstrate the feasibility of using this dataset for validation, and potentially, improvement of in vivo segmentation methods. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. fMRI activation during spike and wave discharges evoked by photic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeller, Friederike; Siebner, Hartwig R; Ahlgrimm, Nils

    2009-01-01

    (EEG-fMRI) in patients with spontaneous generalised spike-wave discharges (GSW) have revealed activation of the thalamus and deactivation in frontoparietal areas, EEG-fMRI studies on evoked GSW such as PPR are lacking. In this EEG-fMRI study, 30 subjects with reported generalised PPR underwent...

  2. Connectivity pattern differences bilaterally in the cerebellum posterior lobe in healthy subjects after normal sleep and sleep deprivation: a resting-state functional MRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu XM

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Xuming Liu,1 Zhihan Yan,2 Tingyu Wang,1 Xiaokai Yang,1 Feng Feng,3 Luping Fan,1 Jian Jiang4 1Department of Radiology, The Third Clinical Institute Affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, 2Department of Radiology, The 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, 3Peking Union Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 4Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, People’s Republic of China Objective: The aim of this study was to use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI technique to explore the resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC differences of the bilaterial cerebellum posterior lobe (CPL after normal sleep (NS and after sleep deprivation (SD. Methods: A total of 16 healthy subjects (eight males, eight females underwent an fMRI scan twice at random: once following NS and the other following 24 hours’ SD, with an interval of 1 month between the two scans. The fMRI scanning included resting state and acupuncture stimulation. The special activated regions located during the acupuncture stimulation were selected as regions of interest for rsFC analysis. Results: Bilateral CPLs were positively activated by acupuncture stimulation. In the NS group, the left CPL showed rsFC with the bilateral CPL, bilateral frontal lobe (BFL, left precuneus and right inferior parietal lobule, while the right CPL showed rsFC with the bilateral temporal lobe, right cerebellum anterior lobe, right CPL, left frontal lobe, left anterior cingulate, right posterior cingulate, and bilateral inferior parietal lobule. In the SD group, the left CPL showed rsFC with the left posterior cingulate gyrus bilateral CPL, left precuneus, left precentral gyrus, BFL, and the left parietal lobe, while the right CPL showed rsFC with bilateral cerebellum anterior lobe, bilateral CPL, left frontal lobe and left temporal lobe. Compared with the NS group, the

  3. Automated longitudinal intra-subject analysis (ALISA) for diffusion MRI tractography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarnink, Saskia H; Vos, Sjoerd B; Leemans, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    the inter-subject and intra-subject automation in this situation are intended for subjects without gross pathology. In this work, we propose such an automated longitudinal intra-subject analysis (dubbed ALISA) approach, and assessed whether ALISA could preserve the same level of reliability as obtained...

  4. Altered functional connectivity of fusiform gyrus in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment: a resting state fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SuPing eCai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Visual cognition such as face recognition requires a high level of functional interaction between distributed regions of a network. It has been reported that the fusiform gyrus (FG is an important brain area involved in facial cognition; altered connectivity of FG to some other regions may lead to a deficit in visual cognition especially face recognition. However, whether functional connectivity between the FG and other brain regions changes remains unclear during the resting state in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI subjects. Here, we employed a resting state functional MRI (fMRI to examine changes in functional connectivity of left/right FG comparing aMCI patients with age-matched control subjects. Forty-eight aMCI and thirty-eight control subjects from the Alzheimer’s disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI were analyzed. We focused on the correlation between low frequency fMRI signal fluctuations in the FG and those in all other brain regions. Compared to the control group, we found some discrepant regions in the aMCI group which presented increased or decreased connectivity with the left/right FG including the left precuneus, left lingual gyrus, right thalamus, supramarginal gyrus, left supplementary motor area, left inferior temporal gyrus, and left parahippocampus. More importantly, we also obtained that both left and right FG have increased functional connections with the left middle occipital gyrus (MOG and right anterior cingulate gyrus (ACC in aMCI patients. That was not a coincidence and might imply that the MOG and ACC also play a critical role in visual cognition, especially face recognition. These findings in a large part supported our hypothesis and provided a new insight in understanding the important subtype of MCI.

  5. Simultaneous measures of kinematics and fMRI: relation between movement parameters and activation maps in healthy subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolla, M.; Casellato, C.; Ferrante, S.; Ferrigno, G.; Baselli, G.; Molteni, F.; Martegani, A.; Frattini, T.; Pedrocchi, A.

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this study was to identify on healthy subjects the correlation between motor performances and brain activation maps, by the simultaneous use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and optoelectronic motion analysis system. The specific goal was to individuate how amplitude affects the related cerebral flow maps in active, passive and electrical stimulated (FES) movements. Ankle DorsiFlexion (ADF) was chosen as analyzed task because of its importance in the gait cycle. Firstly FES compatibility with fMRI images acquisition was assessed, both for the safety of the subject and of the device, and for mutual disturbances evaluation. We identified the experimental protocol so as to optimize the measured cerebral maps and the repeatability of the results. Intra-subject analysis of movement parameters along with brain activation mapping was performed. First level analysis to compare different execution modalities have been studied and preliminary qualitative results are reported. The long term application is the exploitation of the combined system in the evaluation of neurological patients where the definition of the motor tasks could be only partially accomplished depending on the patient residual functionality.

  6. Functional MRI in healthy subjects during acupuncture: different effects of needle rotation in real and false acupoints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, J.L. [Department of Radiology, Guang An Men Hospital, China Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Peking (China); Krings, T.; Weidemann, J.; Meister, I.G.; Thron, A. [Department of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of the University of Technology, Aachen (Germany)

    2004-05-01

    The cerebral activation pattern due to acupuncture is not completely understood. Although the effect of acupuncture on cerebral haemodynamics has been studied, no previous report has focused on different puncture and stimulation methods. We used functional MRI (fMRI) in 15 healthy subjects to investigate cortical activation during stimulation of two real acupoints (Liv3 and G40) and one sham point, needled in a random and, for the subjects, blinded order employing rotating and non-rotating methods, using a blocked paradigm on a 1.5 tesla imager. Compared to the non-rotating stimulation method, during rotating stimulation of the real acupoints, we observed an increase in activation in both secondary somatosensory cortical areas, frontal areas, the right side of the thalamus and the left side of the cerebellum; no such effects of the needling technique were seen while stimulating the sham point. The observation that rotating the needle strengthened the effects of acupuncture only at real acupoints suggests that, as claimed in Chinese traditional medicine, stimulation of these acupoints has a specific effect on cortical neuronal activity, absent with sham acupoints. These specific cerebral activation patterns might explain the therapeutic effects of acupuncture in certain subjects. (orig.)

  7. MRI-based elastic-mapping method for inter-subject comparison of brain FDG-PET images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.; Huang, S.C.; Lin, K.P.; Small, G.; Phelps, M.E. [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Inter-subject anatomic differences prohibits direct image-wise statistical evaluation of brain FDG-PET images of Alzheimer`s disease (AD) patients. In this study, we propose a MRI-based elastic-mapping method which enables image-wise evaluation. The method involves intra-subject MR-PET registration, 3-D elastic mapping of two set of MR images, and elastically transforming the co-registered PET images. The MR-PET registration used simulated PET images, which were based on segmentation of MR images. In the 3-D elastic mapping stage, first a global linear scaling was applied to compensate for brain size difference, then a deformation field was obtained by minimizing the regional sum of squared difference between the two sets of MR images. Two groups (AD patient and normal control), each with three subjects, were included in the current study. After processing, images from all subjects have similar shapes. Averaging the images across all subjects (either within the individual group or for both groups) give images indistinguishable from original single subject FDG images (i.e. without much spatial resolution loss), except with lower image noise level. The method is expected to allow statistical image-wise analysis to be performed across different subjects.

  8. Patellar maltracking is prevalent among patellofemoral pain subjects with patella alta: an upright, weightbearing MRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Saikat; Besier, Thor F.; Beaupre, Gary S.; Fredericson, Michael; Delp, Scott L.; Gold, Garry E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if patellar maltracking is more prevalent among patellofemoral (PF) pain subjects with patella alta compared to subjects with normal patella height. We imaged 37 PF pain and 15 pain free subjects in an open-configuration magnetic resonance imaging scanner while they stood in a weightbearing posture. We measured patella height using the Caton-Deschamps, Blackburne-Peel, Insall-Salvati, Modified Insall-Salvati, and Patellotrochlear indices, and classified the subjects into patella alta and normal patella height groups. We measured patella tilt and bisect offset from oblique-axial plane images, and classified the subjects into maltracking and normal tracking groups. Patellar maltracking was more prevalent among PF pain subjects with patella alta compared to PF pain subjects with normal patella height (two-tailed Fisher’s exact test, p patella alta were maltrackers, whereas only 16% (4/25) of PF pain subjects with normal patella height were maltrackers. Patellofemoral pain subjects classified as maltrackers displayed a greater patella height compared to the pain free and PF pain subjects classified as normal trackers (two-tailed unpaired t-tests with Bonferroni correction, p patella alta compared to subjects with normal patella height; and 2) we show greater patella height in PF pain subjects compared to pain free subjects using four indices commonly used in clinics. PMID:23165335

  9. Donepezil Impairs Memory in Healthy Older Subjects: Behavioural, EEG and Simultaneous EEG/fMRI Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsters, Joshua H.; O'Connell, Redmond G.; Martin, Mary P.; Galli, Alessandra; Cassidy, Sarah M.; Kilcullen, Sophia M.; Delmonte, Sonja; Brennan, Sabina; Meaney, Jim F.; Fagan, Andrew J.; Bokde, Arun L. W.; Upton, Neil; Lai, Robert; Laruelle, Marc; Lawlor, Brian; Robertson, Ian H.

    2011-01-01

    Rising life expectancies coupled with an increasing awareness of age-related cognitive decline have led to the unwarranted use of psychopharmaceuticals, including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs), by significant numbers of healthy older individuals. This trend has developed despite very limited data regarding the effectiveness of such drugs on non-clinical groups and recent work indicates that AChEIs can have negative cognitive effects in healthy populations. For the first time, we use a combination of EEG and simultaneous EEG/fMRI to examine the effects of a commonly prescribed AChEI (donepezil) on cognition in healthy older participants. The short- and long-term impact of donepezil was assessed using two double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. In both cases, we utilised cognitive (paired associates learning (CPAL)) and electrophysiological measures (resting EEG power) that have demonstrated high-sensitivity to age-related cognitive decline. Experiment 1 tested the effects of 5 mg/per day dosage on cognitive and EEG markers at 6-hour, 2-week and 4-week follow-ups. In experiment 2, the same markers were further scrutinised using simultaneous EEG/fMRI after a single 5 mg dose. Experiment 1 found significant negative effects of donepezil on CPAL and resting Alpha and Beta band power. Experiment 2 replicated these results and found additional drug-related increases in the Delta band. EEG/fMRI analyses revealed that these oscillatory differences were associated with activity differences in the left hippocampus (Delta), right frontal-parietal network (Alpha), and default-mode network (Beta). We demonstrate the utility of simple cognitive and EEG measures in evaluating drug responses after acute and chronic donepezil administration. The presentation of previously established markers of age-related cognitive decline indicates that AChEIs can impair cognitive function in healthy older individuals. To our knowledge this is the first study to identify the precise

  10. Variance decomposition for single-subject task-based fMRI activity estimates across many sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Castillo, Javier; Chen, Gang; Nichols, Thomas E; Bandettini, Peter A

    2017-07-01

    Here we report an exploratory within-subject variance decomposition analysis conducted on a task-based fMRI dataset with an unusually large number of repeated measures (i.e., 500 trials in each of three different subjects) distributed across 100 functional scans and 9 to 10 different sessions. Within-subject variance was segregated into four primary components: variance across-sessions, variance across-runs within a session, variance across-blocks within a run, and residual measurement/modeling error. Our results reveal inhomogeneous and distinct spatial distributions of these variance components across significantly active voxels in grey matter. Measurement error is dominant across the whole brain. Detailed evaluation of the remaining three components shows that across-session variance is the second largest contributor to total variance in occipital cortex, while across-runs variance is the second dominant source for the rest of the brain. Network-specific analysis revealed that across-block variance contributes more to total variance in higher-order cognitive networks than in somatosensory cortex. Moreover, in some higher-order cognitive networks across-block variance can exceed across-session variance. These results help us better understand the temporal (i.e., across blocks, runs and sessions) and spatial distributions (i.e., across different networks) of within-subject natural variability in estimates of task responses in fMRI. They also suggest that different brain regions will show different natural levels of test-retest reliability even in the absence of residual artifacts and sufficiently high contrast-to-noise measurements. Further confirmation with a larger sample of subjects and other tasks is necessary to ensure generality of these results. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Mental representation of subjective pleasure of partnered experiences in women's brain conveyed through event-related fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi-Demicheli, Francesco; Ortigue, Stephanie

    2009-11-01

    Functional neuroimaging demonstrates a combined role of central and peripheral mechanisms in human sexual response. Nevertheless, inter-individual subjective differences remain unresolved. Since Freud, controversy remains regarding the similarity of each type of partnered sexual pleasure experience. The authors hypothesized that the neural networks sustaining the memory of all types of subjective partnered sexual pleasure experiences might interact with the insula, a key brain area for integrating somatic experiences. Using a 3T Phillips MRI scanner, brain activity elicited when 29 healthy female volunteers were exposed to subliminal presentation of their sexual partner's names, an approach to investigating the brain network sustaining the mental representation of their partner, was assessed. This brain activity was compared with scores from the Female Sexual Functioning Index on satisfaction and the typologies of their partnered orgasmic experiences. No orgasmic responses were recorded during fMRI. This approach allowed the investigation of the memory of the different types of stored partnered orgasmic experiences. The memory of partnered pleasure obtained by clitoral stimulation correlated with brain responses in the left insula only, while that of partnered pleasure by sexual intercourse correlated with the left insula and also with the right superior temporal gyrus, thalamus, and right inferior prefrontal gyrus. The results suggest that the memory of sexual experiences is integrated a posteriori at different levels (i.e. by different neural networks) in a woman's brain. The authors believe these findings will open a new avenue towards understanding inter- and intra-individual differences in woman's sexual mind.

  12. Applying fMRI complexity analyses to the single subject: a case study for proposed neurodiagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rădulescu, Anca R; Hannon, Emily R

    2017-04-01

    Nonlinear dynamic tools have been statistically validated at the group level to identify subtle differences in system wide regulation of brain meso-circuits, often increasing clinical sensitivity over conventional analyses alone. We explored the feasibility of extracting information at the single-subject level, illustrating two pairs of healthy individuals with psychological differences in stress reactivity. We applied statistical and nonlinear dynamic tools to capture key characteristics of the prefrontal-limbic loop. We compared single subject results with statistical results for the larger group. We concluded that complexity analyses may identify important differences at the single-subject level, supporting their potential towards neurodiagnostic applications.

  13. Differences in myocardial strain between pectus excavatum patients and healthy subjects assessed by cardiac MRI: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lollert, André; Emrich, Tilman; Eichstädt, Jakob; Kampmann, Christoph; Abu-Tair, Tariq; Turial, Salmai; Düber, Christoph; Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Staatz, Gundula

    2017-09-11

    To evaluate differences in myocardial strain between pectus excavatum (PE) patients and healthy subjects (HS) assessed by cardiac MRI using the feature-tracking algorithm. Cardiac MRI was performed in 14 PE patients and 14 HS (9:5 male to female in each group; age 11-30 years) using a 3T scanner. Post-examination analysis included manual biventricular contouring with volumetry and ejection fraction measurement by two independent radiologists. Dedicated software was used for automated strain assessment. In five of the PE patients, the right ventricular ejection fraction was slightly impaired (40-44 %). PE patients had a significantly higher left ventricular longitudinal strain (P=0.004), mid (P=0.035) and apical (P=0.001) circumferential strain as well as apical circumferential strain rate (P=0.001), mid right ventricular circumferential strain (P=0.008) and strain rate (P=0.035), and apical right ventricular circumferential strain (P=0.012) and strain rate (P=0.044) than HS. The right ventricular longitudinal strain and strain rate did not differ significantly between PE patients and HS. Myocardial strain differs significantly between PE patients and HS. Higher myocardial strain in the mid and apical ventricles of PE patients indicates a compensation mechanism to enhance ventricular output against basal sternal compression. • The right ventricle is frequently affected by the pectus excavatum deformity. • Cardiac MRI revealed differences in myocardial strain in pectus excavatum patients. • Pectus excavatum patients exhibited higher strain in the mid/apical ventricles. • A compensation mechanism to enhance ventricular output against sternal compression is possible.

  14. Enthesitis in patients with psoriatic arthritis, axial spondyloarthritis and healthy subjects assessed by ‘head-to-toe’ whole-body MRI and clinical examination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Eshed, Iris; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the ability of whole-body MRI (WBMRI) to detect axial and peripheral enthesitis in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), and in healthy subjects (HS). Furthermore, to develop MRI enthesitis indices based on WBMRI and validate...... and patient global (ρ=0.29-0.31, pimaging modality for evaluation of enthesitis in patients with PsA and axSpA, but requires further investigation before clinical use....

  15. Subject-Specific Sparse Dictionary Learning for Atlas-Based Brain MRI Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Sweeney, Elizabeth; Carass, Aaron; Reich, Daniel S; Prince, Jerry L; Pham, Dzung L

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative measurements from segmentations of human brain magnetic resonance (MR) images provide important biomarkers for normal aging and disease progression. In this paper, we propose a patch-based tissue classification method from MR images that uses a sparse dictionary learning approach and atlas priors. Training data for the method consists of an atlas MR image, prior information maps depicting where different tissues are expected to be located, and a hard segmentation. Unlike most atlas-based classification methods that require deformable registration of the atlas priors to the subject, only affine registration is required between the subject and training atlas. A subject-specific patch dictionary is created by learning relevant patches from the atlas. Then the subject patches are modeled as sparse combinations of learned atlas patches leading to tissue memberships at each voxel. The combination of prior information in an example-based framework enables us to distinguish tissues having similar intensities but different spatial locations. We demonstrate the efficacy of the approach on the application of whole-brain tissue segmentation in subjects with healthy anatomy and normal pressure hydrocephalus, as well as lesion segmentation in multiple sclerosis patients. For each application, quantitative comparisons are made against publicly available state-of-the art approaches.

  16. Subject Specific Sparse Dictionary Learning for Atlas Based Brain MRI Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Sweeney, Elizabeth; Carass, Aaron; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry L.; Pham, Dzung L.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative measurements from segmentations of human brain magnetic resonance (MR) images provide important biomarkers for normal aging and disease progression. In this paper, we propose a patch-based tissue classification method from MR images that uses a sparse dictionary learning approach and atlas priors. Training data for the method consists of an atlas MR image, prior information maps depicting where different tissues are expected to be located, and a hard segmentation. Unlike most atlas-based classification methods that require deformable registration of the atlas priors to the subject, only affine registration is required between the subject and training atlas. A subject specific patch dictionary is created by learning relevant patches from the atlas. Then the subject patches are modeled as sparse combinations of learned atlas patches leading to tissue memberships at each voxel. The combination of prior information in an example-based framework enables us to distinguish tissues having similar intensities but different spatial locations. We demonstrate the efficacy of the approach on the application of whole brain tissue segmentation in subjects with healthy anatomy and normal pressure hydrocephalus, as well as lesion segmentation in multiple sclerosis patients. For each application, quantitative comparisons are made against publicly available, state-of-the art approaches. PMID:26340685

  17. Dynamic Connectivity States Estimated from Resting fMRI Identify Differences among Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, and Healthy Control Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnaly eRashid

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder share significant overlap in clinical symptoms, brain characteristics, and risk genes, and both are associated with dysconnectivity among large-scale brain networks. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI data facilitates studying macroscopic connectivity among distant brain regions. Standard approaches to identifying such connectivity include seed-based correlation and data-driven clustering methods such as independent component analysis (ICA but typically focus on average connectivity. In this study, we utilize ICA on rsfMRI data to obtain intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs in cohorts of healthy controls (HC and age matched schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients. Subsequently, we investigated difference in functional network connectivity (FNC, defined as pairwise correlations among the timecourses of ICNs, between healthy controls and patients. We quantified differences in both static (average and dynamic (windowed connectivity during the entire scan duration. Disease-specific differences were identified in connectivity within different dynamic states. Schizophrenia patients showed more differences from healthy subjects than did bipolars, including both hyper and hypo connectivity in one common connectivity state (dynamic state 3. Also group differences between schizophrenia and bipolar patients were identified in patterns (states of connectivity involving the frontal (dynamic state 1 and frontal-parietal regions (dynamic state 3. Our results provide new information about these illnesses and strongly suggest that state-based analyses are critical to avoid averaging together important factors that can help distinguish these clinical groups.

  18. The sentence verification task: a reliable fMRI protocol for mapping receptive language in individual subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjuan, Ana; Avila, Cesar [Universitat Jaume I, Departamento de Psicologia Basica, Clinica y Psicobiologia, Castellon de la Plana (Spain); Hospital La Fe, Unidad de Epilepsia, Servicio de Neurologia, Valencia (Spain); Forn, Cristina; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Rodriguez-Pujadas, Aina; Garcia-Porcar, Maria [Universitat Jaume I, Departamento de Psicologia Basica, Clinica y Psicobiologia, Castellon de la Plana (Spain); Belloch, Vicente [Hospital La Fe, Eresa, Servicio de Radiologia, Valencia (Spain); Villanueva, Vicente [Hospital La Fe, Unidad de Epilepsia, Servicio de Neurologia, Valencia (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    To test the capacity of a sentence verification (SV) task to reliably activate receptive language areas. Presurgical evaluation of language is useful in predicting postsurgical deficits in patients who are candidates for neurosurgery. Productive language tasks have been successfully elaborated, but more conflicting results have been found in receptive language mapping. Twenty-two right-handed healthy controls made true-false semantic judgements of brief sentences presented auditorily. Group maps showed reliable functional activations in the frontal and temporoparietal language areas. At the individual level, the SV task showed activation located in receptive language areas in 100% of the participants with strong left-sided distributions (mean lateralisation index of 69.27). The SV task can be considered a useful tool in evaluating receptive language function in individual subjects. This study is a first step towards designing the fMRI task which may serve to presurgically map receptive language functions. (orig.)

  19. Subject-specific liver motion modeling in MRI: a feasibility study on spatiotemporal prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorda, Yolanda H.; Bartels, Lambertus W.; Viergever, Max A.; Pluim, Josien P. W.

    2017-04-01

    A liver motion model based on registration of dynamic MRI data, as previously proposed by the authors, was extended with temporal prediction and respiratory signal data. The potential improvements of these extensions with respect to the original model were investigated. Additional evaluations were performed to investigate the limitations of the model regarding temporal prediction and extreme breathing motion. Data were acquired of four volunteers, with breathing instructions and a respiratory belt. The model was built from these data using spatial prediction only and using temporal forward prediction of 300 ms to 1200 ms, using the extended Kalman filter. From temporal prediction of 0 ms to 1200 ms ahead, the Dice coefficient of liver overlap decreased with 0.85%, the median liver surface distance increased with 20.6% and the vessel misalignment increased with 20%. The mean vessel misalignment was 2.9 mm for the original method, 3.42 mm for spatial prediction with a respiratory signal and 4.01 mm for prediction of 1200 ms ahead with a respiratory signal. Although the extension of the model to temporal prediction yields a decreased prediction accuracy, the results are still acceptable. The use of the breathing signal as input to the model is feasible. Sudden changes in the breathing pattern can yield large errors. However, these errors only persist during a short time interval, after which they can be corrected automatically. Therefore, this model could be useful in a clinical setting.

  20. Hemispheric asymmetry for affective stimulus processing in healthy subjects--a fMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Beraha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While hemispheric specialization of language processing is well established, lateralization of emotion processing is still under debate. Several conflicting hypotheses have been proposed, including right hemisphere hypothesis, valence asymmetry hypothesis and region-specific lateralization hypothesis. However, experimental evidence for these hypotheses remains inconclusive, partly because direct comparisons between hemispheres are scarce. METHODS: The present fMRI study systematically investigated functional lateralization during affective stimulus processing in 36 healthy participants. We normalized our functional data on a symmetrical template to avoid confounding effects of anatomical asymmetries. Direct comparison of BOLD responses between hemispheres was accomplished taking two approaches: a hypothesis-driven region of interest analysis focusing on brain areas most frequently reported in earlier neuroimaging studies of emotion; and an exploratory whole volume analysis contrasting non-flipped with flipped functional data using paired t-test. RESULTS: The region of interest analysis revealed lateralization towards the left in the medial prefrontal cortex (BA 10 during positive stimulus processing; while negative stimulus processing was lateralized towards the right in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 9 & 46 and towards the left in the amygdala and uncus. The whole brain analysis yielded similar results and, in addition, revealed lateralization towards the right in the premotor cortex (BA 6 and the temporo-occipital junction (BA 19 & 37 during positive stimulus processing; while negative stimulus processing showed lateralization towards the right in the temporo-parietal junction (BA 37,39,42 and towards the left in the middle temporal gyrus (BA 21. CONCLUSION: Our data suggests region-specific functional lateralization of emotion processing. Findings show valence asymmetry for prefrontal cortical areas and left

  1. Machine Learning classification of MRI features of Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment subjects to reduce the sample size in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Javier; Zajicek, John P; Ifeachor, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    There is a need for objective tools to help clinicians to diagnose Alzheimer's Disease (AD) early and accurately and to conduct Clinical Trials (CTs) with fewer patients. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a promising AD biomarker but no single MRI feature is optimal for all disease stages. Machine Learning classification can address these challenges. In this study, we have investigated the classification of MRI features from AD, Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), and control subjects from ADNI with four techniques. The highest accuracy rates for the classification of controls against ADs and MCIs were 89.2% and 72.7%, respectively. Moreover, we used the classifiers to select AD and MCI subjects who are most likely to decline for inclusion in hypothetical CTs. Using the hippocampal volume as an outcome measure, we found that the required group sizes for the CTs were reduced from 197 to 117 AD patients and from 366 to 215 MCI subjects.

  2. PET and MRI show differences in cerebral asymmetry and functional connectivity between homo- and heterosexual subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Ivanka; Lindström, Per

    2008-07-08

    Cerebral responses to putative pheromones and objects of sexual attraction were recently found to differ between homo- and heterosexual subjects. Although this observation may merely mirror perceptional differences, it raises the intriguing question as to whether certain sexually dimorphic features in the brain may differ between individuals of the same sex but different sexual orientation. We addressed this issue by studying hemispheric asymmetry and functional connectivity, two parameters that in previous publications have shown specific sex differences. Ninety subjects [25 heterosexual men (HeM) and women (HeW), and 20 homosexual men (HoM) and women (HoW)] were investigated with magnetic resonance volumetry of cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres. Fifty of them also participated in PET measurements of cerebral blood flow, used for analyses of functional connections from the right and left amygdalae. HeM and HoW showed a rightward cerebral asymmetry, whereas volumes of the cerebral hemispheres were symmetrical in HoM and HeW. No cerebellar asymmetries were found. Homosexual subjects also showed sex-atypical amygdala connections. In HoM, as in HeW, the connections were more widespread from the left amygdala; in HoW and HeM, on the other hand, from the right amygdala. Furthermore, in HoM and HeW the connections were primarily displayed with the contralateral amygdala and the anterior cingulate, in HeM and HoW with the caudate, putamen, and the prefrontal cortex. The present study shows sex-atypical cerebral asymmetry and functional connections in homosexual subjects. The results cannot be primarily ascribed to learned effects, and they suggest a linkage to neurobiological entities.

  3. PET and MRI show differences in cerebral asymmetry and functional connectivity between homo- and heterosexual subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Savic, Ivanka; Lindström, Per

    2008-01-01

    Cerebral responses to putative pheromones and objects of sexual attraction were recently found to differ between homo- and heterosexual subjects. Although this observation may merely mirror perceptional differences, it raises the intriguing question as to whether certain sexually dimorphic features in the brain may differ between individuals of the same sex but different sexual orientation. We addressed this issue by studying hemispheric asymmetry and functional connectivity, two parameters t...

  4. Incomplete Hippocampal Inversion: A Comprehensive MRI Study of Over 2000 Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Claire eCury; Roberto eToro; Fanny eCohen; Clara eFischer; Amel eMhaya; Jorge eSamper-Gonzalez; Dominique eHasboun; Jean-Francois eMangin; Tobias eBanaschewski; Bokde, Arun L.W.; Uli eBromberg; Christian eBuechel; Anna eCattrell; Patricia eConrod; Herta eFlor

    2015-01-01

    The incomplete-hippocampal-inversion (IHI), also known as malrotation, is an atypical anatomical pattern of the hippocampus, which has been reported in healthy subjects in different studies. However, extensive characterization of IHI in a large sample has not yet been performed. Furthermore, it is unclear whether IHI are restricted to the medial-temporal lobe or are associated with more extensive anatomical changes. Here, we studied the characteristics of IHI in a community-based sample of 20...

  5. Altered Spontaneous Activity in Anisometropic Amblyopia Subjects: Revealed by Resting-State fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaoming; Ding, Kun; Liu, Yong; Yan, Xiaohe; Song, Shaojie; Jiang, Tianzi

    2012-01-01

    Amblyopia, also known as lazy eye, usually occurs during early childhood and results in poor or blurred vision. Recent neuroimaging studies have found cortical structural/functional abnormalities in amblyopia. However, until now, it was still not known whether the spontaneous activity of the brain changes in amblyopia subjects. In the present study, regional homogeneity (ReHo), a measure of the homogeneity of functional magnetic resonance imaging signals, was used for the first time to investigate changes in resting-state local spontaneous brain activity in individuals with anisometropic amblyopia. Compared with age- and gender-matched subjects with normal vision, the anisometropic amblyopia subjects showed decreased ReHo of spontaneous brain activity in the right precuneus, the left medial prefrontal cortex, the left inferior frontal gyrus, and the left cerebellum, and increased ReHo of spontaneous brain activity was found in the bilateral conjunction area of the postcentral and precentral gyri, the left paracentral lobule, the left superior temporal gyrus, the left fusiform gyrus, the conjunction area of the right insula, putamen and the right middle occipital gyrus. The observed decreases in ReHo may reflect decreased visuo-motor processing ability, and the increases in ReHo in the somatosensory cortices, the motor areas and the auditory area may indicate compensatory plasticity in amblyopia. PMID:22937041

  6. Evaluating fMRI methods for assessing hemispheric language dominance in healthy subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baciu, Monica [Laboratoire de Psychologie et NeuroCognition, UMR 5105 CNRS, Universite Pierre Mendes-France, F38040 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France)]. E-mail: mbaciu@upmf-grenoble.fr; Juphard, Alexandra [Laboratoire de Psychologie et NeuroCognition, UMR 5105 CNRS, Universite Pierre Mendes-France, F38040 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Cousin, Emilie [Laboratoire de Psychologie et NeuroCognition, UMR 5105 CNRS, Universite Pierre Mendes-France, F38040 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Bas, Jean Francois Le [Unite IRM, CHU Grenoble (France)

    2005-08-01

    We evaluated two methods for quantifying the hemispheric language dominance in healthy subjects, by using a rhyme detection (deciding whether couple of words rhyme) and a word fluency (generating words starting with a given letter) task. One of methods called 'flip method' (FM) was based on the direct statistical comparison between hemispheres' activity. The second one, the classical lateralization indices method (LIM), was based on calculating lateralization indices by taking into account the number of activated pixels within hemispheres. The main difference between methods is the statistical assessment of the inter-hemispheric difference: while FM shows if the difference between hemispheres' activity is statistically significant, LIM shows only that if there is a difference between hemispheres. The robustness of LIM and FM was assessed by calculating correlation coefficients between LIs obtained with each of these methods and manual lateralization indices MLI obtained with Edinburgh inventory. Our results showed significant correlation between LIs provided by each method and the MIL, suggesting that both methods are robust for quantifying hemispheric dominance for language in healthy subjects. In the present study we also evaluated the effect of spatial normalization, smoothing and 'clustering' (NSC) on the intra-hemispheric location of activated regions and inter-hemispheric asymmetry of the activation. Our results have shown that NSC did not affect the hemispheric specialization but increased the value of the inter-hemispheric difference.

  7. fMRI differences between subjects with low and high responses to alcohol during a stop signal task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuckit, Marc A; Tapert, Susan; Matthews, Scott C; Paulus, Martin P; Tolentino, Neil J; Smith, Tom L; Trim, Ryan S; Hall, Shana; Simmons, Alan

    2012-01-01

    A low level of response (i.e., a low LR) to alcohol is a genetically influenced phenotype that predicts later alcoholism. While the low LR reflects, at least in part, a low brain response to alcohol, the physiological underpinnings of the low LR have only recently been addressed. Forty-nine drinking but not yet alcoholic matched pairs of 18- to 25-year-old subjects (N = 98; 53% women) with low and high LRs as established in separate alcohol challenges were evaluated in 2 event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) sessions (placebo and approximately 0.7 ml/kg of alcohol) while performing a validated stop signal task. The high and low LR groups had identical blood alcohol levels during the alcohol session. Significant high versus low LR group and LR group × condition effects were observed in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal during error and inhibitory processing, despite similar LR group performance on the task. In most clusters with significant (corrected p 1,344 μl) LR group × alcohol/placebo condition interactions, the low LR group demonstrated relatively less, whereas the high LR group demonstrated more, error and inhibition-related activation after alcohol compared with placebo. This is one of the first fMRI studies to demonstrate significant differences between healthy groups with different risks of a future life-threatening disorder. The results may suggest a brain mechanism that contributes to how a low LR might enhance the risk of future heavy drinking and alcohol dependence. Copyright © 2011 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  8. Subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Vega Encabo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I claim that subjectivity is a way of being that is constituted through a set of practices in which the self is subject to the dangers of fictionalizing and plotting her life and self-image. I examine some ways of becoming subject through narratives and through theatrical performance before others. Through these practices, a real and active subjectivity is revealed, capable of self-knowledge and self-transformation. 

  9. Spinal fMRI during proprioceptive and tactile tasks in healthy subjects: activity detected using cross-correlation, general linear model and independent component analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valsasina, P.; Agosta, F.; Filippi, M. [Scientific Institute Ospedale San Raffaele, Neuroimaging Research Unit, Milan (Italy); Caputo, D. [Scientific Institute Fondazione Don Gnocchi, Department of Neurology, Milan (Italy); Stroman, P.W. [Queen' s University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Centre for Neuroscience Studies, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Functional MRI (fMRI) of the spinal cord is able to provide maps of neuronal activity. Spinal fMRI data have been analyzed in previous studies by calculating the cross-correlation (CC) between the stimulus and the time course of every voxel and, more recently, by using the general linear model (GLM). The aim of this study was to compare three different approaches (CC analysis, GLM and independent component analysis (ICA)) for analyzing fMRI scans of the cervical spinal cord. We analyzed spinal fMRI data from healthy subjects during a proprioceptive and a tactile stimulation by using two model-based approaches, i.e., CC analysis between the stimulus shape and the time course of every voxel, and the GLM. Moreover, we applied independent component analysis, a model-free approach which decomposes the data in a set of source signals. All methods were able to detect cervical cord areas of activity corresponding to the expected regions of neuronal activations. Model-based approaches (CC and GLM) revealed similar patterns of activity. ICA could identify a component correlated to fMRI stimulation, although with a lower statistical threshold than model-based approaches, and many components, consistent across subjects, which are likely to be secondary to noise present in the data. Model-based approaches seem to be more robust for estimating task-related activity, whereas ICA seems to be useful for eliminating noise components from the data. Combined use of ICA and GLM might improve the reliability of spinal fMRI results. (orig.)

  10. Training efficiency and transfer success in an extended real-time functional MRI neurofeedback training of the somato-motor cortex of healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor eAuer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the level of self-regulation of the somato-motor cortices (SMC attained by an extended functional MRI (fMRI neurofeedback training. Sixteen healthy subjects performed 12 real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI neurofeedback training sessions within 4 weeks, involving motor imagery of the dominant right as well as the non-dominant left hand. Target regions of interests in the SMC were individually localized prior to the training by overt finger movements. The feedback signal was defined as the difference between fMRI activation in the contra- and ipsilateral SMC and visually presented to the subjects. Training efficiency was determined by an off-line GLM analysis determining the fMRI percent signal changes in the somato-motor cortex (SMC target areas accomplished during the neurofeedback training. Transfer success was assessed by comparing the pre- and post-training transfer task, i.e. the neurofeedback paradigm without the presentation of the feedback signal. Group results show a distinct increase in feedback performance in the transfer task for the trained group compared to a matched untrained control group, as well as an increase in the time course of the training, indicating an efficient training and a successful transfer. Individual analysis revealed that the training efficiency was not only highly correlated to the transfer success but also predictive. Trainings with at least 12 efficient training runs were associated with a successful transfer outcome. A group analysis of the hemispheric contributions to the feedback performance showed that it is mainly driven by increased fMRI activation in the contralateral SMC, although some individuals relied on ipsilateral deactivation. Training and transfer results showed no difference between left and right hand imagery, with a slight indication of more ipsilateral deactivation in the early right hand trainings.

  11. 4D Wavelet-Based Regularization for Parallel MRI Reconstruction: Impact on Subject and Group-Levels Statistical Sensitivity in fMRI

    CERN Document Server

    Chaari, Lotfi; Badillo, Solveig; Pesquet, Jean-Christophe; Ciuciu, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Parallel MRI is a fast imaging technique that enables the acquisition of highly resolved images in space. It relies on $k$-space undersampling and multiple receiver coils with complementary sensitivity profiles in order to reconstruct a full Field-Of-View (FOV) image. The performance of parallel imaging mainly depends on the reconstruction algorithm, which can proceed either in the original $k$-space (GRAPPA, SMASH) or in the image domain (SENSE-like methods). To improve the performance of the widely used SENSE algorithm, 2D- or slice-specific regularization in the wavelet domain has been efficiently investigated. In this paper, we extend this approach using 3D-wavelet representations in order to handle all slices together and address reconstruction artifacts which propagate across adjacent slices. The extension also accounts for temporal correlations that exist between successive scans in functional MRI (fMRI). The proposed 4D reconstruction scheme is fully \\emph{unsupervised} in the sense that all regulariz...

  12. Assessment of muscle function using hybrid PET/MRI: comparison of {sup 18}F-FDG PET and T2-weighted MRI for quantifying muscle activation in human subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddock, Bryan; Holm, Soeren; Poulsen, Jakup M.; Enevoldsen, Lotte H.; Larsson, Henrik B.W.; Kjaer, Andreas; Suetta, Charlotte [Rigshospitalet Glostrup, Copenhagen University Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Glostrup (Denmark)

    2017-04-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between relative glucose uptake and MRI T{sub 2} changes in skeletal muscles following resistance exercise using simultaneous PET/MRI scans. Ten young healthy recreationally active men (age 21 - 28 years) were injected with {sup 18}F-FDG while activating the quadriceps of one leg with repeated knee extension exercises followed by hand-grip exercises for one arm. Immediately following the exercises, the subjects were scanned simultaneously with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI and muscle groups were evaluated for increases in {sup 18}F-FDG uptake and MRI T{sub 2} values. A significant linear correlation between {sup 18}F-FDG uptake and changes in muscle T{sub 2} (R {sup 2} = 0.71) was found. for both small and large muscles and in voxel to voxel comparisons. Despite large intersubject differences in muscle recruitment, the linear correlation between {sup 18}F-FDG uptake and changes in muscle T{sub 2} did not vary among subjects. This is the first assessment of skeletal muscle activation using hybrid PET/MRI and the first study to demonstrate a high correlation between {sup 18}F-FDG uptake and changes in muscle T{sub 2} with physical exercise. Accordingly, it seems that changes in muscle T{sub 2} may be used as a surrogate marker for glucose uptake and lead to an improved insight into the metabolic changes that occur with muscle activation. Such knowledge may lead to improved treatment strategies in patients with neuromuscular pathologies such as stroke, spinal cord injuries and muscular dystrophies. (orig.)

  13. Optimizing preprocessing and analysis pipelines for single-subject fMRI. I. Standard temporal motion and physiological noise correction methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Nathan W; Oder, Anita; Abdi, Hervé; Tam, Fred; Lee, Wayne; Thomas, Christopher; Ween, Jon E; Graham, Simon J; Strother, Stephen C

    2012-03-01

    Subject-specific artifacts caused by head motion and physiological noise are major confounds in BOLD fMRI analyses. However, there is little consensus on the optimal choice of data preprocessing steps to minimize these effects. To evaluate the effects of various preprocessing strategies, we present a framework which comprises a combination of (1) nonparametric testing including reproducibility and prediction metrics of the data-driven NPAIRS framework (Strother et al. [2002]: NeuroImage 15:747-771), and (2) intersubject comparison of SPM effects, using DISTATIS (a three-way version of metric multidimensional scaling (Abdi et al. [2009]: NeuroImage 45:89-95). It is shown that the quality of brain activation maps may be significantly limited by sub-optimal choices of data preprocessing steps (or "pipeline") in a clinical task-design, an fMRI adaptation of the widely used Trail-Making Test. The relative importance of motion correction, physiological noise correction, motion parameter regression, and temporal detrending were examined for fMRI data acquired in young, healthy adults. Analysis performance and the quality of activation maps were evaluated based on Penalized Discriminant Analysis (PDA). The relative importance of different preprocessing steps was assessed by (1) a nonparametric Friedman rank test for fixed sets of preprocessing steps, applied to all subjects; and (2) evaluating pipelines chosen specifically for each subject. Results demonstrate that preprocessing choices have significant, but subject-dependant effects, and that individually-optimized pipelines may significantly improve the reproducibility of fMRI results over fixed pipelines. This was demonstrated by the detection of a significant interaction with motion parameter regression and physiological noise correction, even though the range of subject head motion was small across the group (≪ 1 voxel). Optimizing pipelines on an individual-subject basis also revealed brain activation patterns

  14. Habitual emotion regulation strategies and depressive symptoms in healthy subjects predict fMRI brain activation patterns related to major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abler, Birgit; Hofer, Christian; Walter, Henrik; Erk, Susanne; Hoffmann, Holger; Traue, Harald C; Kessler, Henrik

    2010-08-30

    The response-focused emotion regulation style 'Expressive suppression' has been associated with symptoms of lower psychological well-being and increased function magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activation of the sublenticular extended amygdala (SLEA) in patients with major depression. Extending prior studies on active emotion regulation, we were interested in effects of habitual emotion regulation on neurobiology. Thirty subjects with either relatively high or low suppression scores as assessed with the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire without symptoms of clinical depression participated in the study. They were instructed to expect and then perceive emotionally unpleasant, pleasant or neutral stimuli selected from the International Affective Picture System that were announced by a congruent cue during fMRI. In the subjects with high suppression scores, decreased activation of the orbital medial prefrontal cortex (oMFC) when expecting negative pictures and increased activation of the SLEA upon presentation of neutral stimuli were found. Subclinical depression ratings independently of suppression scores in the healthy subjects were positively correlated with brain activation in the SLEA when expecting negative pictures. SLEA hyperactivity may represent an emotional responsivity that involves less successful habitual emotion regulation and a tendency to depressed mood in healthy subjects, as shown in patients with major depression. Decreased anticipatory oMFC activation may parallel a lack of antecedent emotion regulation in subjects with high suppression scores, representing another neurobiological predictor of lower mental well-being. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Texture analysis of bone marrow in knee MRI for classification of subjects with bone marrow lesion - data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, Tong Kuan; Van Reeth, Eric; Sheah, Kenneth; Poh, Chueh Loo

    2013-07-01

    Visualization of bone marrow lesion (BML) can improve the diagnosis of many bone disorders that are associated with it. A quantitative approach in detecting BML could increase the accuracy and efficiency of diagnosing those bone disorders. In this paper, we investigated the feasibility of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based texture to (a) identify slices and (b) classify subjects with and without BML. A total of 58 subjects were studied; 29 of them were affected by BML. The ages of subjects ranged from 45 to 74years with a mean age of 59. Texture parameters were calculated for the weight-bearing region of distal femur. The parameters were then analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test and individual feature selection methods to identify potentially discriminantive parameters. Forward feature selection was applied to select features subset for classification. Classification results from eight classifiers were studied. Results show that 98 of the 147 parameters studied are statistically significantly different between the normal and affected marrows: parameters based on co-occurrence matrix are ranked highest in their separability. The classification of subjects achieved an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.914, and the classification of slices achieved an AUC of 0.780. The results show that MRI-texture-based classification can effectively classify subjects/slices with and without BML. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Synaesthetic perception of colour and visual space in a blind subject: An fMRI case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niccolai, V.; Leeuwen, T.M. van; Blakemore, C.; Störig, P.

    2012-01-01

    In spatial sequence synaesthesia (SSS) ordinal stimuli are perceived as arranged in peripersonal space. Using fMRI, we examined the neural bases of SSS and colour synaesthesia for spoken words in a late-blind synaesthete, JF. He reported days of the week and months of the year as both coloured and

  17. Physiorack: an integrated MRI safe/conditional, gas delivery, respiratory gating, and subject monitoring solution for structural and functional assessments of pulmonary function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halaweish, Ahmed F; Charles, H Cecil

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the use of a modular MRI conditional respiratory monitoring and gating solution, designed to facilitate proper monitoring of subjects' vital signals and their respiratory efforts, during free-breathing and breathheld 19F, oxygen-enhanced, and Fourier-decomposition MRI-based acquisitions. All Imaging was performed on a Siemens TIM Trio 3 Tesla MRI scanner, following Institutional Review Board approval. Gas delivery is accomplished through the use of an MR compatible pneumotachometer, in conjunction with two three-way pneumatically controlled Hans Rudolph Valves. The pneumatic valves are connected to Douglas bags used as the gas source. A mouthpiece (+nose clip) or an oro-nasal Hans Rudolph disposable mask is connected following the pneumatic valve to minimize dead-space and provide an airtight seal. Continuous monitoring/sampling of inspiratory and expiratory oxygen and carbon dioxide levels at the mouthpiece/mask is achieved through the use of an Oxigraf gas analyzer. Forty-four imaging sessions were successfully monitored, during Fourier-decomposition (n=3), fluorine-enhanced (n=29), oxygen-enhanced, and ultra short echo (n=12) acquisitions. The collected waveforms, facilitated proper monitoring and coaching of the subjects. We demonstrate an inexpensive, off-the-shelf solution for monitoring these signals, facilitating assessments of lung function. Monitoring of respiratory efforts and exhaled gas concentrations assists in understanding the heterogeneity of lung function visualized by gas imaging. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Functional MRI in human subjects with gradient-echo and spin-echo EPI at 9.4 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budde, Juliane; Shajan, G; Zaitsev, Maxim; Scheffler, Klaus; Pohmann, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    The increased signal-to-noise ratio and blood oxygen level dependent signal at ultra-high field can only help to boost the resolution in functional MRI studies if the spatial specificity of the activation signal is improved. At a field strength of 9.4 T, both gradient-echo and spin-echo based echo-planar imaging were implemented and applied to investigate the specificity of human functional MRI. A finger tapping paradigm was used to acquire functional MRI data with scan parameters similar to standard neuroscientific applications. Spatial resolution, echo, and readout times were varied to determine their influence on the distribution of the blood oxygen level dependent signal. High-resolution co-localized images were used to classify the signal according to its origin in veins or tissue. High-quality activation maps were obtained with both sequences. Signal contributions from tissue were found to be smaller or slightly larger than from veins. Gradient-echo echo-planar imaging yielded lower ratios of micro-/macro-vascular signals of around 0.6 than spin-echo based functional MRI, where this ratio varied between 0.75 and 1.02, with higher values for larger echo and shorter readout time. This study demonstrates the feasibility of human functional MRI at 9.4 T with high spatial specificity. Although venous contributions could not be entirely suppressed, venous effects in spin-echo echo-planar imaging are significantly reduced compared with gradient-echo echo-planar imaging. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Cine MRI: a new approach to the diagnosis of scapholunate dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langner, I.; Eisenschenk, A. [University Medicine Greifswald, Division of Hand Surgery and Functional Microsurgery, Department of Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Greifswald (Germany); Fischer, S.; Langner, S. [University Medicine Greifswald, Institute for Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology, Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of cine MRI for the detection of scapholunate dissociation (SLD) and to compare the sensitivity and specificity of cine MRI with those of cineradiography and arthroscopy. To evaluate feasibility, healthy subjects underwent cine MRI of the wrist. To evaluate sensitivity and specificity, patients with clinically suspected scapholunate ligament (SLL) injury after trauma to the wrist were prospectively included and underwent radiographic examination, cineradiography, and cine MRI. In 25 out of 38 patients, subsequent arthroscopy was performed. Results of cineradiography and cine MRI correlated with those of arthroscopy. Cine MRI was of diagnostic quality in all healthy subjects and patients with good interrater agreement. There was excellent correlation between cineradiography and cine MRI. Scapholunate distance differed significantly between healthy subjects and patients with scapholunate dissociation (p < 0.001), but not between imaging modalities in the patient group. Cine MRI had 85 % sensitivity and 90 % specificity for the detection of SLD. Cine MRI of the wrist is a fast and reliable technique for the detection of SLD with diagnostic accuracy comparable to cineradiography. It can be easily implemented as a routine clinical MRI examination, facilitating diagnostic workup of patients with suspected SLD while avoiding radiation exposure. (orig.)

  20. Cine MRI: a new approach to the diagnosis of scapholunate dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner, I; Fischer, S; Eisenschenk, A; Langner, S

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of cine MRI for the detection of scapholunate dissociation (SLD) and to compare the sensitivity and specificity of cine MRI with those of cineradiography and arthroscopy. To evaluate feasibility, healthy subjects underwent cine MRI of the wrist. To evaluate sensitivity and specificity, patients with clinically suspected scapholunate ligament (SLL) injury after trauma to the wrist were prospectively included and underwent radiographic examination, cineradiography, and cine MRI. In 25 out of 38 patients, subsequent arthroscopy was performed. Results of cineradiography and cine MRI correlated with those of arthroscopy. Cine MRI was of diagnostic quality in all healthy subjects and patients with good interrater agreement. There was excellent correlation between cineradiography and cine MRI. Scapholunate distance differed significantly between healthy subjects and patients with scapholunate dissociation (p Cine MRI had 85% sensitivity and 90% specificity for the detection of SLD. Cine MRI of the wrist is a fast and reliable technique for the detection of SLD with diagnostic accuracy comparable to cineradiography. It can be easily implemented as a routine clinical MRI examination, facilitating diagnostic workup of patients with suspected SLD while avoiding radiation exposure.

  1. Training Efficiency and Transfer Success in an Extended Real-Time Functional MRI Neurofeedback Training of the Somatomotor Cortex of Healthy Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Tibor; Schweizer, Renate; Frahm, Jens

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the level of self-regulation of the somatomotor cortices (SMCs) attained by an extended functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) neurofeedback training. Sixteen healthy subjects performed 12 real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging neurofeedback training sessions within 4 weeks, involving motor imagery of the dominant right as well as the non-dominant left hand. Target regions of interests in the SMC were individually localized prior to the training by overt finger movements. The feedback signal (FS) was defined as the difference between fMRI activation in the contra- and ipsilateral SMC and visually presented to the subjects. Training efficiency was determined by an off-line general linear model analysis determining the fMRI percent signal changes in the SMC target areas accomplished during the neurofeedback training. Transfer success was assessed by comparing the pre- and post-training transfer task, i.e., the neurofeedback paradigm without the presentation of the FS. Group results show a distinct increase in feedback performance (FP) in the transfer task for the trained group compared to a matched untrained control group, as well as an increase in the time course of the training, indicating an efficient training and a successful transfer. Individual analysis revealed that the training efficiency was not only highly correlated to the transfer success but also predictive. Trainings with at least 12 efficient training runs were associated with a successful transfer outcome. A group analysis of the hemispheric contributions to the FP showed that it is mainly driven by increased fMRI activation in the contralateral SMC, although some individuals relied on ipsilateral deactivation. Training and transfer results showed no difference between left- and right-hand imagery, with a slight indication of more ipsilateral deactivation in the early right-hand trainings. PMID:26500521

  2. fMRI of pain studies using laser-induced heat on skin with and without the loved one near the subject - a pilot study on 'love hurts'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofina, T.; Kamil, W. A.; Ahmad, A. H.

    2014-11-01

    The aims of this study are to image and investigate the areas of brain response to laser-induced heat pain, to analyse for any difference in the brain response when a subject is alone and when her loved one is present next to the MRI gantry. Pain stimuli was delivered using Th-YAG laser to four female subjects. Blood-Oxygenation-Level-Dependent (BOLD) fMRI experiment was performed using blocked design paradigm with five blocks of painful (P) stimuli and five blocks of non-painful (NP) stimuli arranged in pseudorandom order with an 18 seconds rest (R) between each stimulation phase. Brain images were obtained from 3T Philips Achieva MRI scanner using 32-channel SENSE head coil. A T1-weighted image (TR/TE/slice/FOV = 9ms/4ms/4mm slices/240×240mm) was obtained for verification of brain anatomical structures. An echo-planar-imaging sequence were used for the functional scans (TR/TE/slice/flip/FOV=2000ms/35ms/4mm slices/90°/220×220mm). fMRI data sets were analysed using SPM 8.0 involving preprocessing steps followed by t-contrast analysis for individuals and FFX analysis. In both with and without-loved-one conditions, neuronal responses were seen in the somatosensory gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, thalamus and insula regions, consistent with pain-related areas. FFX analysis showed that the presence of loved one produced more activation in the frontal and supramarginal gyrus during painful and non-painful stimulations compared to absence of a loved one. Brain response to pain is modulated by the presence of a loved one, causing more activation in the cognitive/emotional area i.e. 'love hurts'.

  3. Tensor-based morphometry as a neuroimaging biomarker for Alzheimer's disease: an MRI study of 676 AD, MCI, and normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xue; Leow, Alex D; Parikshak, Neelroop; Lee, Suh; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Toga, Arthur W; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Thompson, Paul M

    2008-11-15

    In one of the largest brain MRI studies to date, we used tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to create 3D maps of structural atrophy in 676 subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and healthy elderly controls, scanned as part of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Using inverse-consistent 3D non-linear elastic image registration, we warped 676 individual brain MRI volumes to a population mean geometric template. Jacobian determinant maps were created, revealing the 3D profile of local volumetric expansion and compression. We compared the anatomical distribution of atrophy in 165 AD patients (age: 75.6+/-7.6 years), 330 MCI subjects (74.8+/-7.5), and 181 controls (75.9+/-5.1). Brain atrophy in selected regions-of-interest was correlated with clinical measurements--the sum-of-boxes clinical dementia rating (CDR-SB), mini-mental state examination (MMSE), and the logical memory test scores - at voxel level followed by correction for multiple comparisons. Baseline temporal lobe atrophy correlated with current cognitive performance, future cognitive decline, and conversion from MCI to AD over the following year; it predicted future decline even in healthy subjects. Over half of the AD and MCI subjects carried the ApoE4 (apolipoprotein E4) gene, which increases risk for AD; they showed greater hippocampal and temporal lobe deficits than non-carriers. ApoE2 gene carriers--1/6 of the normal group--showed reduced ventricular expansion, suggesting a protective effect. As an automated image analysis technique, TBM reveals 3D correlations between neuroimaging markers, genes, and future clinical changes, and is highly efficient for large-scale MRI studies.

  4. Estimation of Pulmonary Motion in Healthy Subjects and Patients with Intrathoracic Tumors Using 3D-Dynamic MRI: Initial Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plathow, Christian; Schoebinger, Max; Meinzer, Heinz Peter [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Herth, Felix; Tuengerthal, Siegfried [Clinic of Thoracic Disease, Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans Ulrich [University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    To estimate a new technique for quantifying regional lung motion using 3D-MRI in healthy volunteers and to apply the technique in patients with intra- or extrapulmonary tumors. Intraparenchymal lung motion during a whole breathing cycle was quantified in 30 healthy volunteers using 3D-dynamic MRI (FLASH [fast low angle shot] 3D, TRICKS [time-resolved interpolated contrast kinetics]). Qualitative and quantitative vector color maps and cumulative histograms were performed using an introduced semiautomatic algorithm. An analysis of lung motion was performed and correlated with an established 2D-MRI technique for verification. As a proof of concept, the technique was applied in five patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 5 patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). The correlation between intraparenchymal lung motion of the basal lung parts and the 2D-MRI technique was significant (r = 0.89, p < 0.05). Also, the vector color maps quantitatively illustrated regional lung motion in all healthy volunteers. No differences were observed between both hemithoraces, which was verified by cumulative histograms. The patients with NSCLC showed a local lack of lung motion in the area of the tumor. In the patients with MPM, there was global diminished motion of the tumor bearing hemithorax, which improved significantly after chemotherapy (CHT) (assessed by the 2D- and 3D-techniques) (p < 0.01). Using global spirometry, an improvement could also be shown (vital capacity 2.9 {+-} 0.5 versus 3.4 L {+-} 0.6, FEV1 0.9 {+-} 0.2 versus 1.4 {+-} 0.2 L) after CHT, but this improvement was not significant. A 3D-dynamic MRI is able to quantify intraparenchymal lung motion. Local and global parenchymal pathologies can be precisely located and might be a new tool used to quantify even slight changes in lung motion (e.g. in therapy monitoring, follow-up studies or even benign lung diseases)

  5. Effect of eight weeks of endurance exercise training on right and left ventricular volume and mass in untrained obese subjects: a longitudinal MRI study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogelsang, T W; Hanel, B; Kristoffersen, U S

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to examine how 8 weeks of intense endurance training influenced right and left ventricular volumes and mass in obese untrained subjects. Ten overweight subjects (19-47 years; body mass index of 34+/-5 kg/m(2)) underwent intensive endurance training (rowing......) three times 30 min/week for 8 weeks at a relative intensity of 72+/-8% of their maximal heart rate response (mean+/-SD). Before and after 8 weeks of endurance training, the left and the right end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), ejection fraction (EF), stroke volume (SV...

  6. A low-rank multivariate general linear model for multi-subject fMRI data and a non-convex optimization algorithm for brain response comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingting; Pham, Minh; Sun, Jianhui; Yan, Guofen; Li, Huazhang; Sun, Yinge; Gonzalez, Marlen Z; Coan, James A

    2017-12-26

    The focus of this paper is on evaluating brain responses to different stimuli and identifying brain regions with different responses using multi-subject, stimulus-evoked functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. To jointly model many brain voxels' responses to designed stimuli, we present a new low-rank multivariate general linear model (LRMGLM) for stimulus-evoked fMRI data. The new model not only is flexible to characterize variation in hemodynamic response functions (HRFs) across different regions and stimulus types, but also enables information "borrowing" across voxels and uses much fewer parameters than typical nonparametric models for HRFs. To estimate the proposed LRMGLM, we introduce a new penalized optimization function, which leads to temporally and spatially smooth HRF estimates. We develop an efficient optimization algorithm to minimize the optimization function and identify the voxels with different responses to stimuli. We show that the proposed method can outperform several existing voxel-wise methods by achieving both high sensitivity and specificity. We apply the proposed method to the fMRI data collected in an emotion study, and identify anterior dACC to have different responses to a designed threat and control stimuli. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. The Observation and Execution of Actions Share Motor and Somatosensory Voxels in all Tested Subjects : Single-Subject Analyses of Unsmoothed fMRI Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazzola, Valeria; Keysers, Christian

    Many neuroimaging studies of the mirror neuron system (MNS) examine if certain voxels in the brain are shared between action observation and execution (shared voxels, sVx). Unfortunately, finding sVx in standard group analyses is not a guarantee that sVx exist in individual subjects. Using

  8. Quantification of regional fractional ventilation in human subjects by measurement of hyperpolarized 3He washout with 2D and 3D MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Felix C; Deppe, Martin H; Marshall, Helen; Parra-Robles, Juan; Wild, Jim M

    2014-01-15

    Multiple-breath washout hyperpolarized (3)He MRI was used to calculate regional parametric images of fractional ventilation (r) as the ratio of fresh gas entering a volume unit to the total end inspiratory volume of the unit. Using a single dose of inhaled hyperpolarized gas and a total acquisition time of under 1 min, gas washout was measured by dynamic acquisitions during successive breaths with a fixed delay. A two-dimensional (2D) imaging protocol was investigated in four healthy subjects in the supine position, and in a second protocol the capability of extending the washout imaging to a three-dimensional (3D) acquisition covering the whole lungs was tested. During both protocols, subjects were breathing comfortably, only restricted by synchronization of breathing to the sequence timings. The 3D protocol was also successfully tested on one patient with cystic fibrosis. Mean r values from each volunteer were compared with global gas volume turnover, as calculated from flow measurement at the mouth divided by total lung volume (from MRI images), and a significant correlation (r = 0.74, P lung. Intersubject reproducibility of r imaging with the 2D and 3D protocol was tested, and a significant correlation between repeated experiments was found in a pixel-by-pixel comparison. The proposed methods can be used to measure r on a regional basis.

  9. Development of the Complex General Linear Model in the Fourier Domain: Application to fMRI Multiple Input-Output Evoked Responses for Single Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel E. Rio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A linear time-invariant model based on statistical time series analysis in the Fourier domain for single subjects is further developed and applied to functional MRI (fMRI blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD multivariate data. This methodology was originally developed to analyze multiple stimulus input evoked response BOLD data. However, to analyze clinical data generated using a repeated measures experimental design, the model has been extended to handle multivariate time series data and demonstrated on control and alcoholic subjects taken from data previously analyzed in the temporal domain. Analysis of BOLD data is typically carried out in the time domain where the data has a high temporal correlation. These analyses generally employ parametric models of the hemodynamic response function (HRF where prewhitening of the data is attempted using autoregressive (AR models for the noise. However, this data can be analyzed in the Fourier domain. Here, assumptions made on the noise structure are less restrictive, and hypothesis tests can be constructed based on voxel-specific nonparametric estimates of the hemodynamic transfer function (HRF in the Fourier domain. This is especially important for experimental designs involving multiple states (either stimulus or drug induced that may alter the form of the response function.

  10. Obesity increases the prevalence and severity of focal knee abnormalities diagnosed using 3T MRI in middle-aged subjects - data from the osteoarthritis initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laberge, Marc A.; Baum, Thomas; Virayavanich, Warapat; Nardo, Lorenzo; Link, Thomas M. [University of California San Francisco, Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nevitt, M.C.; Lynch, J.; McCulloch, C.E. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2012-06-15

    To study the effect of BMI on the prevalence, severity, and 36-month progression of early degenerative changes in the knee by using 3T MRI in middle-aged subjects without radiographic osteoarthritis (OA). We examined baseline and 36-month follow-up MR studies from 137 middle-aged individuals (45-55 years old) with risk factors for knee OA but no radiographic OA from the Osteoarthritis Initiative. Subjects were grouped into three categories: normal BMI (BMI < 25 kg/m{sup 2}, n = 38), overweight (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m{sup 2}, n = 37), and obese (BMI {>=} 30 kg/m{sup 2}, n = 62). Using 3T MRI, cartilage, meniscus, and bone marrow abnormalities were graded using the OA Whole-organ MR Imaging Score (WORMS). The statistical analysis was corrected as necessary for differences in age, sex, and OA risk factors other than BMI. The overall prevalence of lesions was 64% for meniscus and 79% for cartilage (including low grade lesions). At baseline, the prevalence and severity of knee lesions was positively associated with BMI, with a nearly fourfold increase in meniscal tears and more than twofold increase in high-grade cartilage defects in obese individuals relative to normal-weight subjects. Over the 36-month follow-up period, the number of new or worsening cartilage lesions of any grade was significantly higher in obese subjects (p = 0.039), while there was no significant difference in meniscal lesion progression. Obesity was associated with both higher prevalence and severity of early degenerative changes in the knee in middle-aged individuals without radiographic OA and with significantly increased cartilage lesion progression (of any grade) over 36 months. (orig.)

  11. Heart MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  12. Weight loss is effective for symptomatic relief in obese subjects with knee osteoarthritis independently of joint damage severity assessed by high-field MRI and radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudbergsen, H; Boesen, M; Lohmander, L S; Christensen, R; Henriksen, M; Bartels, E M; Christensen, P; Rindel, L; Aaboe, J; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B; Riecke, B F; Bliddal, H

    2012-06-01

    With an increasing prevalence of older and obese citizens, the problems of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) will escalate. Weight loss is recommended for obese KOA patients and in a majority of cases this leads to symptomatic relief. We hypothesized that pre-treatment structural status of the knee joint, assessed by radiographs, 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and knee-joint alignment, may influence the symptomatic changes following a significant weight reduction. Patients were recruited from a Department of Rheumatology. Eligibility criteria were age above 50 years, body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m(2), primary KOA diagnosed according to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria and having verified structural damage. Patients underwent a 16 weeks dietary programme with formula products and counselling. MRI and radiographs of the most symptomatic knee were obtained at baseline and assessed for structural damage using the Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis of the Knee Score, minimum joint space width and Kellgren-Lawrence score. Imaging variables, muscle strength and degree of alignment, were examined as predictors of changes in Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and Outcome Measures in Rheumatoid Arthritis Clinical Trials (OMERACT) - Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) Responder Criterion. Structural damage at baseline assessed by imaging, muscle strength or knee-joint alignment showed no statistically significant association to changes in KOOS pain and function in daily living (r ≤ 0.13; P>0.05) or the OMERACT-OARSI Responder Criterion (OR 0.48-1.68; P-values ≥ 0.13). Presence of joint damage did not preclude symptomatic relief following a clinically relevant weight loss in older obese patients with KOA. Neither muscle strength nor knee-joint alignment was associated with the degree of symptomatic relief. Copyright © 2012 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Observation and Execution of Actions Share Motor and Somatosensory Voxels in all Tested Subjects: Single-Subject Analyses of Unsmoothed fMRI Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keysers, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Many neuroimaging studies of the mirror neuron system (MNS) examine if certain voxels in the brain are shared between action observation and execution (shared voxels, sVx). Unfortunately, finding sVx in standard group analyses is not a guarantee that sVx exist in individual subjects. Using unsmoothed, single-subject analyses we show sVx can be reliably found in all 16 investigated participants. Beside the ventral premotor (BA6/44) and inferior parietal cortex (area PF) where mirror neurons (MNs) have been found in monkeys, sVx were reliably observed in dorsal premotor, supplementary motor, middle cingulate, somatosensory (BA3, BA2, and OP1), superior parietal, middle temporal cortex and cerebellum. For the premotor, somatosensory and parietal areas, sVx were more numerous in the left hemisphere. The hand representation of the primary motor cortex showed a reduced BOLD during hand action observation, possibly preventing undesired overt imitation. This study provides a more detailed description of the location and reliability of sVx and proposes a model that extends the original idea of the MNS to include forward and inverse internal models and motor and sensory simulation, distinguishing the MNS from a more general concept of sVx. PMID:19020203

  14. Knee cartilage assessment with MRI (dGEMRIC) and subjective knee function in ACL injured copers: a cohort study with a 20 year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, P; Owman, H; Müller, G; Englund, M; Tiderius, C J; Dahlberg, L E

    2014-01-01

    To assess knee cartilage quality and subjective knee function, 20 years after injury in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injured copers. We examined 32 knees using delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC), 20 years after a complete ACL tear. Only subjects who had coped with the ACL injury without ACL reconstruction (ACLR), and who presented without radiographic signs of osteoarthritis (OA) at an earlier 16-year follow-up, were included in this study. The quality of the central weight-bearing parts of the medial and lateral femoral cartilage was estimated with dGEMRIC (T1Gd). These results were compared with corresponding results in 24 healthy individuals, and with the subjects' self-reported subjective knee function using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) questionnaire. The values of T1Gd in the medial and lateral femoral cartilage of the study group (mean (95% CI)), were 404 (385-423) and 427 (399-455) ms, not statistically different from those of the healthy reference group (P = 0.065 and 0.31). The subjective knee function 20 years after the injury, according to the five domains of the KOOS score, was good, with a mean score of 90 ± 11. Values of T1Gd for the medial femoral cartilage were correlated with the KOOS subgroup QOL (P = 0.021, Pearson correlation). Subjects who have managed to cope with their ACL injury for 20 years with sustained good subjective knee function also seem to have knee cartilage of good quality, with T1Gd values not very different from a healthy reference group. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Discographic, MRI and psychosocial determinants of low back pain disability and remission: a prospective study in subjects with benign persistent back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carragee, Eugene J; Alamin, Todd F; Miller, Jonothan L; Carragee, John M

    2005-01-01

    A range of morphologic and psychosocial variables has been suggested as risk factors for serious low back pain (LBP) illness. Although the relative contributions of structural and psychosocial variables are intensely debated, the validity of differing hypotheses has proven difficult to test because the incidence of serious disabling LBP illness is low in healthy subjects. These factors dictate the requirement for large sample sizes, extensive structural imaging and extended longitudinal study. Previous studies included either small cohorts with intensive imaging testing or large population studies that do not establish a detailed morphologic baseline. To establish, using a strict patient sample design, the relative contribution of structural and psychosocial determinants of serious LBP illness among subjects with no previous LBP disability or clinical LBP illness. A prospective, longitudinal study of subjects with high risk factors for serious LBP as determined by structural and psychosocial characteristics. One hundred subjects with known mild persistent low back pain and a 2:1 ratio of chronic (non-lumbar) pain syndrome were recruited from a study population with a predisposition to disc degenerative disease, to undergo baseline examination, testing and 5-year follow-up. Observations were made at 6-month intervals over 4 to 6 years (mean, 5.3) for the after primary outcomes measures: episodes of serious back pain (visual analogue scale [VAS] > or =6), episodes of occupational disability less than 1 week, episodes of occupational disability for 1 week, remission episodes of all back pain symptoms at least 6 months and medical visits primarily for LBP evaluation and treatment. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), lumbar provocative discography (in psychometrically normal subjects), physical examinations, medical and work histories and psychometric testing were performed at baseline. Imaging and psychometric testing were graded by blinded examiners. A scripted

  16. Synaesthetic perception of colour and visual space in a blind subject: an fMRI case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niccolai, Valentina; van Leeuwen, Tessa M; Blakemore, Colin; Stoerig, Petra

    2012-06-01

    In spatial sequence synaesthesia (SSS) ordinal stimuli are perceived as arranged in peripersonal space. Using fMRI, we examined the neural bases of SSS and colour synaesthesia for spoken words in a late-blind synaesthete, JF. He reported days of the week and months of the year as both coloured and spatially ordered in peripersonal space; parts of the days and festivities of the year were spatially ordered but uncoloured. Words that denote time-units and triggered no concurrents were used in a control condition. Both conditions inducing SSS activated the occipito-parietal, infero-frontal and insular cortex. The colour area hOC4v was engaged when the synaesthetic experience included colour. These results confirm the continued recruitment of visual colour cortex in this late-blind synaesthetes. Synaesthesia also involved activation in inferior frontal cortex, which may be related to spatial memory and detection, and in the insula, which might contribute to audiovisual integration related to the processing of inducers and concurrents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Weak language lateralization affects both verbal and spatial skills: an fMRI study in 297 subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellet, E; Zago, L; Jobard, G; Crivello, F; Petit, L; Joliot, M; Mazoyer, B; Tzourio-Mazoyer, N

    2014-12-01

    The present study reappraised the relationship between hemispheric specialization strength and cognitive skills in a sample of 297 individuals including 153 left-handers. It additionally assessed the interaction with manual laterality factors, such as handedness, asymmetry of hand motor skills, and familial sinistrality. A Hemispheric Functional Lateralization Index (HFLI) for language was derived from fMRI. Through mixture Gaussian modeling, three types of language hemispheric lateralization were defined: typical (left hemisphere dominance with clear positive HFLI), ambilateral (no dominant hemisphere with HFLI values close to 0), and strongly-atypical (right-hemisphere dominance with clear negative HFLI values). Three cognitive scores were derived from 12 tests covering various aspects of verbal and spatial cognition. Compared to both typical and strongly-atypical participants, those ambilateral for language production had lower performances in verbal and non-verbal domains, indicating that hemispheric specialization and cognitive skills are related in adults. Furthermore, this relationship was independent from handedness and asymmetry for motor skills, as no interaction was observed between these factors. On the other hand, the relationship between familial sinistrality and cognitive skills tended to differ according to language lateralization type. In contrast to previous reports in children, in the present adult population, we found no linear correlation between HFLI and cognitive skills, regardless of lateralization type. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of far-infrared radiation on heart rate variability and central manifestations in healthy subjects: a resting-fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yii-Jeng; Kung, Yen-Ying; Kuo, Wen-Jui; Niddam, David M; Cheng, Chou-Ming; Chou, Chih-Che; Yeh, Tzu-Chen; Hsieh, Jen-Chuen; Chiu, Jen-Hwey

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the autonomic responses and central manifestations by peripheral FIR stimulation. Ten subjects (mean ± SD age 26.2 ± 3.52 years) received FIR stimulation at left median nerve territory for 40 min. Electrocardiograph was continuously recorded and heart rate variability (HRV) were analyzed. By using a 3 T-MRI scanner, three sessions of resting-state functional magnetic resonance images (fMRI) were acquired, namely, before (baseline-FIR), immediately after (IA-FIR) and 15 min after FIR was turned off (Post-FIR). The fractional amplitude of low-frequency (0.01-0.08 Hz) fluctuation (fALFF) of each session to evaluate the intensity of resting-brain activity in each session was analyzed. Our results showed that FIR stimulation induced significant HRV responses such as an increasing trend of nLF and LF/HF ratio, while FIR increased fALFF in right superior front gyrus, middle frontal gyrus and decreased the resting brain activity at fusiform gyrus, extrastriae cortex, inferior temporal gyrus and middle temporal gyrus, especially 15 min after FIR was turned off. We conclude that the central manifestation and the autonomic responses are prominent during and after FIR stimulation, which provide important mechanistic explanation on human disorder treated by such energy medicine.

  19. Shoulder MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Shoulder Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the shoulder ... limitations of MRI of the shoulder? What is MRI of the shoulder? MRI of the shoulder provides ...

  20. Knee MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Knee Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee ... of a knee MRI? What is a Knee MRI? MRI of the knee provides detailed images of ...

  1. Empathy for social exclusion involves the sensory-discriminative component of pain: a within-subject fMRI study

    OpenAIRE

    Novembre, Giovanni; Zanon, Marco; Silani, Giorgia

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has shown that experiencing events that represent a significant threat to social bonds activates a network of brain areas associated with the sensory-discriminative aspects of pain. In the present study, we investigated whether the same brain areas are involved when witnessing social exclusion threats experienced by others. Using a within-subject design, we show that an ecologically valid experience of social exclusion recruits areas coding the somatosensory components of phys...

  2. Automated mapping of hippocampal atrophy in 1-year repeat MRI data from 490 subjects with Alzheimer's disease, mild cognitive impairment, and elderly controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, Jonathan H; Tu, Zhuowen; Apostolova, Liana G; Green, Amity E; Avedissian, Christina; Madsen, Sarah K; Parikshak, Neelroop; Toga, Arthur W; Jack, Clifford R; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W; Thompson, Paul M

    2009-03-01

    As one of the earliest structures to degenerate in Alzheimer's disease (AD), the hippocampus is the target of many studies of factors that influence rates of brain degeneration in the elderly. In one of the largest brain mapping studies to date, we mapped the 3D profile of hippocampal degeneration over time in 490 subjects scanned twice with brain MRI over a 1-year interval (980 scans). We examined baseline and 1-year follow-up scans of 97 AD subjects (49 males/48 females), 148 healthy control subjects (75 males/73 females), and 245 subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI; 160 males/85 females). We used our previously validated automated segmentation method, based on AdaBoost, to create 3D hippocampal surface models in all 980 scans. Hippocampal volume loss rates increased with worsening diagnosis (normal=0.66%/year; MCI=3.12%/year; AD=5.59%/year), and correlated with both baseline and interval changes in Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores and global and sum-of-boxes Clinical Dementia Rating scale (CDR) scores. Surface-based statistical maps visualized a selective profile of ongoing atrophy in all three diagnostic groups. Healthy controls carrying the ApoE4 gene atrophied faster than non-carriers, while more educated controls atrophied more slowly; converters from MCI to AD showed faster atrophy than non-converters. Hippocampal loss rates can be rapidly mapped, and they track cognitive decline closely enough to be used as surrogate markers of Alzheimer's disease in drug trials. They also reveal genetically greater atrophy in cognitively intact subjects.

  3. High success rates of sedation-free brain MRI scanning in young children using simple subject preparation protocols with and without a commercial mock scanner-the Diabetes Research in Children Network (DirecNet) experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnea-Goraly, Naama; Marzelli, Matt J.; Mazaika, Paul K. [Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA (United States); Weinzimer, Stuart A. [Yale University, Pediatric Endocrinology, New Haven, CT (United States); Ruedy, Katrina J.; Beck, Roy W.; Kollman, Craig; Cheng, Peiyao [Jaeb Center for Health Research, Tampa, FL (United States); Mauras, Nelly; Fox, Larry [Nemours Children' s Clinic, Pediatric Endocrinology, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Aye, Tandy [Stanford University, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford, CA (United States); White, Neil H. [Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Pediatrics, St. Louis, MO (United States); Tsalikian, Eva [University of Iowa, Pediatric Endocrinology, Iowa City, IA (United States); Reiss, Allan L. [Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford University, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Diabetes Research in Children Network (DirecNet), Stanford, CA (United States); Collaboration: on behalf of the Diabetes Research in Children Network (DirecNet)

    2014-02-15

    The ability to lie still in an MRI scanner is essential for obtaining usable image data. To reduce motion, young children are often sedated, adding significant cost and risk. We assessed the feasibility of using a simple and affordable behavioral desensitization program to yield high-quality brain MRI scans in sedation-free children. 222 children (4-9.9 years), 147 with type 1 diabetes and 75 age-matched non-diabetic controls, participated in a multi-site study focused on effects of type 1 diabetes on the developing brain. T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) MRI scans were performed. All children underwent behavioral training and practice MRI sessions using either a commercial MRI simulator or an inexpensive mock scanner consisting of a toy tunnel, vibrating mat, and video player to simulate the sounds and feel of the MRI scanner. 205 children (92.3%), mean age 7 ± 1.7 years had high-quality T1-W scans and 174 (78.4%) had high-quality diffusion-weighted scans after the first scan session. With a second scan session, success rates were 100% and 92.5% for T1-and diffusion-weighted scans, respectively. Success rates did not differ between children with type 1 diabetes and children without diabetes, or between centers using a commercial MRI scan simulator and those using the inexpensive mock scanner. Behavioral training can lead to a high success rate for obtaining high-quality T1-and diffusion-weighted brain images from a young population without sedation. (orig.)

  4. Empathy for social exclusion involves the sensory-discriminative component of pain: a within-subject fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novembre, Giovanni; Zanon, Marco; Silani, Giorgia

    2015-02-01

    Recent research has shown that experiencing events that represent a significant threat to social bonds activates a network of brain areas associated with the sensory-discriminative aspects of pain. In the present study, we investigated whether the same brain areas are involved when witnessing social exclusion threats experienced by others. Using a within-subject design, we show that an ecologically valid experience of social exclusion recruits areas coding the somatosensory components of physical pain (posterior insular cortex and secondary somatosensory cortex). Furthermore, we show that this pattern of activation not only holds for directly experienced social pain, but also during empathy for social pain. Finally, we report that subgenual cingulate cortex is the only brain area conjointly active during empathy for physical and social pain. This supports recent theories that affective processing and homeostatic regulation are at the core of empathic responses. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Volitional regulation of brain responses to food stimuli in overweight and obese subjects: A real-time fMRI feedback study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spetter, Maartje S; Malekshahi, Rahim; Birbaumer, Niels; Lührs, Michael; van der Veer, Albert H; Scheffler, Klaus; Spuckti, Sophia; Preissl, Hubert; Veit, Ralf; Hallschmid, Manfred

    2017-05-01

    Obese subjects who achieve weight loss show increased functional connectivity between dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), key areas of executive control and reward processing. We investigated the potential of real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) neurofeedback training to achieve healthier food choices by enhancing self-control of the interplay between these brain areas. We trained eight male individuals with overweight or obesity (age: 31.8 ± 4.4 years, BMI: 29.4 ± 1.4 kg/m 2 ) to up-regulate functional connectivity between the dlPFC and the vmPFC by means of a four-day rt-fMRI neurofeedback protocol including, on each day, three training runs comprised of six up-regulation and six passive viewing trials. During the up-regulation runs of the four training days, participants successfully learned to increase functional connectivity between dlPFC and vmPFC. In addition, a trend towards less high-calorie food choices emerged from before to after training, which however was associated with a trend towards increased covertly assessed snack intake. Findings of this proof-of-concept study indicate that overweight and obese participants can increase functional connectivity between brain areas that orchestrate the top-down control of appetite for high-calorie foods. Neurofeedback training might therefore be a useful tool in achieving and maintaining weight loss. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Neural basis of the association between depressive symptoms and memory deficits in nondemented subjects: resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chunming; Goveas, Joseph; Wu, Zhilin; Li, Wenjun; Chen, Guangyu; Franczak, Malgorzata; Antuono, Piero G; Jones, Jennifer L; Zhang, Zhijun; Li, Shi-Jiang

    2012-06-01

    Depressive symptoms often coexist with memory deficits in older adults and also are associated with incident cognitive decline in the elderly. However, little is known about the neural correlates of the association between depressive symptoms and memory deficits in nondemented elderly. Fifteen amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and 20 cognitively normal (CN) subjects completed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) scans. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to test the main effects of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test delayed recall (RAVLT-DR) scores, and their interaction on the intrinsic amygdala functional connectivity (AFC) network activity. Severer depressive symptoms and memory deficits were found in the aMCI group than in the CN group. Partial correlation analysis identified that the RAVLT-DR scores were significantly correlated with the AFC network in the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), dorsomedial and anterior prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), middle occipital gyrus, right inferior parietal cortex, and left middle temporal gyrus (MTG). The GDS scores were positively correlated with the AFC network in the bilateral PCC and MTG, and left DLPFC. The interactive effects of the GDS and RAVLT-DR scores on the AFC network were seen in the bilateral PCC, MTG, and left DLPFC. These findings not only supported that there were interactive neural links between depressive symptoms and memory functions in nondemented elderly at the system level, but also demonstrated that R-fMRI has advantages in investigating the interactive nature of different neural networks involved in complex functions, such as emotion and cognition. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Subject-specific bone attenuation correction for brain PET/MR: can ZTE-MRI substitute CT scan accurately?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifé, Maya; Fernandez, Brice; Jaubert, Olivier; Soussan, Michael; Brulon, Vincent; Buvat, Irène; Comtat, Claude

    2017-10-01

    In brain PET/MR applications, accurate attenuation maps are required for accurate PET image quantification. An implemented attenuation correction (AC) method for brain imaging is the single-atlas approach that estimates an AC map from an averaged CT template. As an alternative, we propose to use a zero echo time (ZTE) pulse sequence to segment bone, air and soft tissue. A linear relationship between histogram normalized ZTE intensity and measured CT density in Hounsfield units (HU ) in bone has been established thanks to a CT-MR database of 16 patients. Continuous AC maps were computed based on the segmented ZTE by setting a fixed linear attenuation coefficient (LAC) to air and soft tissue and by using the linear relationship to generate continuous μ values for the bone. Additionally, for the purpose of comparison, four other AC maps were generated: a ZTE derived AC map with a fixed LAC for the bone, an AC map based on the single-atlas approach as provided by the PET/MR manufacturer, a soft-tissue only AC map and, finally, the CT derived attenuation map used as the gold standard (CTAC). All these AC maps were used with different levels of smoothing for PET image reconstruction with and without time-of-flight (TOF). The subject-specific AC map generated by combining ZTE-based segmentation and linear scaling of the normalized ZTE signal into HU was found to be a good substitute for the measured CTAC map in brain PET/MR when used with a Gaussian smoothing kernel of 4~mm corresponding to the PET scanner intrinsic resolution. As expected TOF reduces AC error regardless of the AC method. The continuous ZTE-AC performed better than the other alternative MR derived AC methods, reducing the quantification error between the MRAC corrected PET image and the reference CTAC corrected PET image.

  8. Ultra-fast speech comprehension in blind subjects engages primary visual cortex, fusiform gyrus, and pulvinar – a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Individuals suffering from vision loss of a peripheral origin may learn to understand spoken language at a rate of up to about 22 syllables (syl) per second - exceeding by far the maximum performance level of normal-sighted listeners (ca. 8 syl/s). To further elucidate the brain mechanisms underlying this extraordinary skill, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed in blind subjects of varying ultra-fast speech comprehension capabilities and sighted individuals while listening to sentence utterances of a moderately fast (8 syl/s) or ultra-fast (16 syl/s) syllabic rate. Results Besides left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), bilateral posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) and left supplementary motor area (SMA), blind people highly proficient in ultra-fast speech perception showed significant hemodynamic activation of right-hemispheric primary visual cortex (V1), contralateral fusiform gyrus (FG), and bilateral pulvinar (Pv). Conclusions Presumably, FG supports the left-hemispheric perisylvian “language network”, i.e., IFG and superior temporal lobe, during the (segmental) sequencing of verbal utterances whereas the collaboration of bilateral pulvinar, right auditory cortex, and ipsilateral V1 implements a signal-driven timing mechanism related to syllabic (suprasegmental) modulation of the speech signal. These data structures, conveyed via left SMA to the perisylvian “language zones”, might facilitate – under time-critical conditions – the consolidation of linguistic information at the level of verbal working memory. PMID:23879896

  9. The valuation system: a coordinate-based meta-analysis of BOLD fMRI experiments examining neural correlates of subjective value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartra, Oscar; McGuire, Joseph T; Kable, Joseph W

    2013-08-01

    Numerous experiments have recently sought to identify neural signals associated with the subjective value (SV) of choice alternatives. Theoretically, SV assessment is an intermediate computational step during decision making, in which alternatives are placed on a common scale to facilitate value-maximizing choice. Here we present a quantitative, coordinate-based meta-analysis of 206 published fMRI studies investigating neural correlates of SV. Our results identify two general patterns of SV-correlated brain responses. In one set of regions, both positive and negative effects of SV on BOLD are reported at above-chance rates across the literature. Areas exhibiting this pattern include anterior insula, dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, dorsal and posterior striatum, and thalamus. The mixture of positive and negative effects potentially reflects an underlying U-shaped function, indicative of signal related to arousal or salience. In a second set of areas, including ventromedial prefrontal cortex and anterior ventral striatum, positive effects predominate. Positive effects in the latter regions are seen both when a decision is confronted and when an outcome is delivered, as well as for both monetary and primary rewards. These regions appear to constitute a "valuation system," carrying a domain-general SV signal and potentially contributing to value-based decision making. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Lyrical and musical auditive mental imagery in functional MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducreux, D; Marsot-Dupuch, K; Lasjaunias, P; Oppenheim, C; Frédy, D

    2003-01-01

    to explore with functional MRI cerebral areas involved in musical and lyrical sounds signal processing with the mental imagery method. and nine volunteers (mean age: 27 years old) underwent functional MRI with BOLD contrast at 1.5 T. Box-car paradigms of partial recollections of musical or lyrical memories tasks were performed. Statistical correlations mappings were calculated and superimposed on previously realigned anatomical reference imaging to observe activated cerebral areas. all except one subjects had activation areas in primary and secondary auditive cortices in the temporal Heschl gyrus and the Planum Temporale, unilaterally (n=2) or bilaterally (n=6) during both mental tasks. Contralateral activation improvement was observed in 4 cases when the lyrical tasks were performed. Temporal and insular regions involved in language processing were observed in eight of nine subjects. auditive mental imagery can show in functional MRI cerebral areas involved in auditive functions and some of the areas involved in language processing.

  11. Brain Reorganization in Patients with Brachial Plexus Injury: A Longitudinal Functional MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeharu Yoshikawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to assess plastic changes of the sensorimotor cortex (SMC in patients with traumatic brachial plexus injury (BPI using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Twenty patients with traumatic BPI underwent fMRI using blood oxygen level-dependent technique with echo-planar imaging before the operation. Sixteen patients underwent their second fMRI at approximately one year after injury. The subjects performed two tasks: a flexion-extension task of the affected elbow and a task of the unaffected elbow. After activation, maps were generated, the number of significantly activated voxels in SMC contralateral to the elbow movement in the affected elbow task study (Naf and that in the unaffected task study (Nunaf were counted. An asymmetry index (AI was calculated, where AI=(Naf−Nunaf/(Naf+Nunaf. Ten healthy volunteers were also included in this fMRI study. The AI of the first fMRI of the patients with BPI was significantly lower than that of the healthy subjects (P=0.035. The AI of the second fMRI significantly decreased compared with that of the first fMRI (P=0.045. Brain reorganization associates with peripheral nervous changes after BPI and after operation for functional reconstruction.

  12. The influence of androstadienone during psychosocial stress is modulated by gender, trait anxiety and subjective stress: An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, K C; Springer, I; Kogler, L; Turetsky, B; Freiherr, J; Derntl, B

    2016-06-01

    Androstadienone (ANDR), a bodily secreted steroid compound, is a socially relevant chemosignal that modulates subjective and (neuro)physiological responses, predominantly in females. The impact of ANDR on stress responses in males and females has not been explored. Therefore, this fMRI study aimed to examine psychosocial stress reactions induced by mental arithmetic and social evaluation on behavioral and hormonal levels (46 participants: 15 naturally cycling females in their early follicular phase (EF), 15 females on hormonal contraceptives (HC) and 16 males); and on a neural level (40 participants: 13 EF-females, 13 HC-females and 14 males) in an ANDR and placebo treatment repeated-measures design. While no gender differences emerged in subjective ratings and performance during stress, neural activation patterns differed significantly. Besides, ANDR attenuated the post-stress increase of negative mood in all participants. Region of interest analyses showed that irrespective of treatment, males showed stronger activation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) than females. At the whole brain level, gender differences emerged indicating stronger fronto-parietal activation in males compared to HC-females on both treatments. Males showed stronger visual and fusiform activation than EF-females under ANDR. Both female groups did not show stronger activation than males. Further, error ratio in the ANDR-stress condition was positively associated with their post-stress cortisol level and increase in subjective stress in males; and male DLPFC activity in the ANDR-stress condition was negatively associated with trait anxiety. Surprisingly, compared to HC-females, EF-female only showed stronger activation of arousal-related areas under placebo treatment. Taken together, these findings suggest that the male stress reaction under social evaluative threat was stronger than female stress reactions as a function of ANDR. More specifically, this effect on behavioral and

  13. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - chest; Magnetic resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI ... healthy enough to filter the contrast. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  14. Evaluation of dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted perfusion MRI in the differentiation of tumor recurrence from radiation necrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Vibeke Andrée; Simonsen, Helle J; Law, Ian

    2013-01-01

    to measure cerebral blood volume (CBV), blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and cerebral blood flow (CBF). Subjects also underwent FDG-PET and lesions were classified as either metabolically active or inactive. Follow-up clinical MRI and lesion histology in case of additional tissue resection was used...

  15. A case that underwent bilateral video-assisted thoracoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case that underwent bilateral video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical (VATS) biopsy combined with pneumonectomy is presented. The patient developed hypoxia during the contralateral VATS biopsy. His hypoxia was treated with positive expiratory pressure (PEEP) to the dependent lung and apneic oxygen insufflation to ...

  16. NUTRITION SUPPORT COMPLICATIONS IN PATIENT WHO UNDERWENT CARDIAC SURGERY

    OpenAIRE

    Krdžalić, Alisa; Kovčić, Jasmina; Krdžalić, Goran; Jahić, Elmir

    2016-01-01

    Background: The nutrition support complications after cardiac surgery should be detected and treated on time. Aim: To show the incidence and type of nutritional support complication in patients after cardiac surgery. Methods: The prospective study included 415 patients who underwent cardiac surgery between 2010 and 2013 in Clinic for Cardiovascular Disease of University Clinical Center Tuzla. Complications of the delivery system for nutrition support (NS) and nutrition itself were analy...

  17. Combined MRI and MRS improves pre-therapeutic diagnoses of pediatric brain tumors over MRI alone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiroishi, Mark S.; Nelson, Marvin D. [Children' s Hospital Los Angeles/Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Panigrahy, Ashok [Children' s Hospital Los Angeles/Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Moore, Kevin R. [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Gilles, Floyd H. [Children' s Hospital Los Angeles/Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Pathology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio [All Children' s Hospital, Department of Pathology, St. Petersburg, FL (United States); Blueml, Stefan [Children' s Hospital Los Angeles/Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Rudi Schulte Research Institute, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The specific goal of this study was to determine whether the inclusion of MRS had a measureable and positive impact on the accuracy of pre-surgical MR examinations of untreated pediatric brain tumors over that of MRI alone in clinical practice. Final imaging reports of 120 pediatric patients with newly detected brain tumors who underwent combined MRI/MRS examinations were retrospectively reviewed. Final pathology was available in all cases. Group A comprised 60 subjects studied between June 2001 and January 2005, when MRS was considered exploratory and radiologists utilized only conventional MRI to arrive at a diagnosis. For group B, comprising 60 subjects studied between January 2005 and March 2008, the radiologists utilized information from both MRI and MRS. Furthermore, radiologists revisited group A (blind review, time lapse >4 years) to determine whether the additional information from MRS would have altered their interpretation. Sixty-three percent of patients in group A were diagnosed correctly, whereas in 10 % the report was partially correct with the final tumor type mentioned (but not mentioned as most likely tumor), while in 27 % of cases the reports were wrong. For group B, the diagnoses were correct in 87 %, partially correct in 5 %, and incorrect in 8 % of the cases, which is a significant improvement (p < 0.005). Re-review of combined MRI and MRS of group A resulted 87 % correct, 7 % partially correct, and 7 % incorrect diagnoses, which is a significant improvement over the original diagnoses (p < 0.05). Adding MRS to conventional MRI significantly improved diagnostic accuracy in preoperative pediatric patients with untreated brain tumors. (orig.)

  18. A Pregnant Woman Who Underwent Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy due to Cushing’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halit Diri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cushing’s syndrome (CS may lead to severe maternal and fetal morbidities and even mortalities in pregnancy. However, pregnancy complicates the diagnosis and treatment of CS. This study describes a 26-year-old pregnant woman admitted with hypertension-induced headache. Hormonal analyses performed due to her cushingoid phenotype revealed a diagnosis of adrenocorticotropic hormone- (ACTH- independent CS. MRI showed a 3.5 cm adenoma in her right adrenal gland. After preoperative metyrapone therapy, she underwent a successful unilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy at 14-week gestation. Although she had a temporary postoperative adrenal insufficiency, hormonal analyses showed that she has been in remission since delivery. Findings in this patient, as well as those in previous patients, indicate that pregnancy is not an absolute contraindication for laparoscopic adrenalectomy. Rather, such surgery should be considered a safe and efficient treatment method for pregnant women with cortisol-secreting adrenal adenomas.

  19. Proton MR Spectroscopy in Patients with Structural MRI-Negative Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Michael Y; Ergene, Erhan; Zagardo, Michael; Tracy, Patrick T; Wang, Huaping; Liu, WenChing; Machens, Nancy A

    2015-01-01

    With conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 20-30% of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) have negative pathological MRI findings. Further investigations of the role of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in the pre-surgical evaluation of patients with MRI-negative TLE are important to avoid intracranial EEG recording and to better understand the mechanism of the epileptogenic process. This study aimed to compare the measurements of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr), and choline (Cho) in the hippocampi of MRI-negative TLE patients and normal subjects. Twenty patients with MRI-negative TLE and 10 age-matched healthy control subjects underwent MRI and MRS. The concentrations of NAA, Cr, and Cho and the ratios of NAA/Cr and NAA/(Cr+Cho) were measured. Seven of these 20 patients also underwent surgical treatment for TLE. Their pathological results and surgical outcomes were evaluated. In the hippocampi ipsilateral to the seizure side, the NAA/Cr and NAA/(Cr+Cho) ratios were significantly decreased compared with the ratios of the hippocampi contralateral to the seizure side and the normal control hippocampi. There was no significant difference between the hippocampi contralateral to the seizure side and the normal control hippocampi. The pathological results from the patients who underwent temporal lobe resection indicated mild to moderate gliosis and minimal loss of neurons. Five patients were seizure-free during the follow-up period of 9- 47 months (mean 27.7 months). In MRI-negative TLE, significant reductions in the NAA/Cr and NAA/(Cr+Cho) ratios ipsilateral to the seizure side may help lateralize and localize the epileptogenic zone. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  20. Single-subject fMRI mapping at 7 T of the representation of fingertips in S1: a comparison of event-related and phase-encoding designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besle, Julien; Sánchez-Panchuelo, Rosa-Maria; Bowtell, Richard; Francis, Susan; Schluppeck, Denis

    2013-05-01

    A desirable goal of functional MRI (fMRI), both clinically and for basic research, is to produce detailed maps of cortical function in individual subjects. Single-subject mapping of the somatotopic hand representation in the human primary somatosensory cortex (S1) has been performed using both phase-encoding and block/event-related designs. Here, we review the theoretical strengths and limits of each method and empirically compare high-resolution (1.5 mm isotropic) somatotopic maps obtained using fMRI at ultrahigh magnetic field (7 T) with phase-encoding and event-related designs in six subjects in response to vibrotactile stimulation of the five fingertips. Results show that the phase-encoding design is more efficient than the event-related design for mapping fingertip-specific responses and in particular allows us to describe a new additional somatotopic representation of fingertips on the precentral gyrus. However, with sufficient data, both designs yield very similar fingertip-specific maps in S1, which confirms that the assumption of local representational continuity underlying phase-encoding designs is largely valid at the level of the fingertips in S1. In addition, it is shown that the event-related design allows the mapping of overlapping cortical representations that are difficult to estimate using the phase-encoding design. The event-related data show a complex pattern of overlapping cortical representations for different fingertips within S1 and demonstrate that regions of S1 responding to several adjacent fingertips can incorrectly be identified as responding preferentially to one fingertip in the phase-encoding data.

  1. Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis in a Patient who Underwent Hip Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevzat Dabak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS is a rare, benign, but a locally aggressive tumor. It is characterized by the proliferation of synovial membrane, but it can also be seen in tendon sheaths and bursae. Clinical presentation of solitary lesions include compression and locking of the joint suggesting loose bodies in the joint and a subsequent findings of an effusion, whereas diffuse lesions manifest with pain and chronic swelling. In this article, we presented a curious case of PVNS in a female patient who have been followed up due to an acetabular cystic lesion. She underwent total hip arthroplasty for severe osteoarthritis of the hip joint and associated pain. The diagnosis of PVNS was established intraoperatively. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52: 235-7

  2. Hepatic iron in African Americans who underwent liver biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, James C; Bertoli, Luigi F; Alford, Thomas J; Barton, J Clayborn; Edwards, Corwin Q

    2015-01-01

    Primary iron overload in African Americans has been reported predominantly from autopsy studies. We characterized hepatic iron phenotypes in 83 African Americans who underwent liver biopsy during the interval 1990 to 1995. We tabulated pathology report form data, iron grades in hepatocytes (0-4) and Kupffer cells (0-3) and abnormal liver histology. Increased iron was defined as hepatocyte or Kupffer iron grades ≥ 2, respectively. Heavy iron was defined as hepatocyte iron grade 3 or 4. Primary iron overload was defined as the presence of grade 3 or 4 hepatocellular iron in the absence of evidence of chronic alcohol effect, viral hepatitis, steatosis, unexplained inflammation, chronic erythrocyte transfusion or chronic ingestion of iron supplements. There were 37 men and 46 women (mean age: 53 ± 15 [SD] years). We observed heavy ethanol consumption, 12.0%; viral hepatitis, 26.5%; steatosis without heavy ethanol consumption, 43.4%; inflammation, 45.6%; fibrosis, 26.2% and bridging fibrosis/cirrhosis, 29.4%. Logistic regression on bridging fibrosis/cirrhosis revealed positive associations with heavy ethanol consumption (P = 0.0410) and viral hepatitis (P = 0.0044). The 22 patients (26.5%) with increased iron had greater mean age, proportion of men and heavy ethanol consumption. Five patients had heavy iron staining, among whom were 3 women (mean age: 54 years) with primary iron overload. Two of the 3 women had cirrhosis and diabetes mellitus. Among 83 adult African Americans who underwent liver biopsy, 3.6% had hepatic iron phenotypes consistent with primary iron overload.

  3. ALGORITHM FOR MANAGEMENT OF HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS UNDERWENT UROLOGY INTERVENTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Davydova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the efficacy of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and pre-operative preparation in hypertensive patients needed in surgical treatment of urology dis- eases.Material and methods. Males (n=883, aged 40 to 80 years were included into the study. The main group consisted of patients that underwent laparotomic nephrectomy (LTN group; n=96 and patients who underwent laparoscopic nephrectomy (LSN group; n=53. Dynamics of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM data was analyzed in these groups in the immediate postoperative period. The efficacy of a package of non-invasive methods for cardiovascular system assessment was studied. ABPM was performed after nephrectomy (2-nd and 10-th days after surgery in patients with complaints of vertigo episodes or intense general weakness to correct treatment.Results. In LTN group hypotension episodes or blood pressure (BP elevations were observed in 20 (20.8% and 22 (22.9% patients, respectively, on the 2-nd day after the operation. These complications required antihypertensive treatment correction. Patients with hypotension episodes were significantly older than patients with BP elevation and had significantly lower levels of 24-hour systolic BP, night diastolic BP and minimal night systolic BP. Re-adjustment of antihypertensive treatment on the 10-th postoperative day was required to 2 (10% patients with hypotension episodes and to 1 (4.5% patient with BP elevation. Correction of antihypertensive therapy was required to all patients in LSN group on the day 2, and to 32 (60.4% patients on the 10-th day after the operation. Reduction in the incidence of complications (from 1.2% in 2009 to 0.3% in 2011, p<0.001 was observed during the application of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and preoperative preparation in hypertensive patients.Conclusion. The elaborated management algorithm for patients with concomitant hypertension is recommended to reduce the cardiovascular

  4. Analysis of 42 patients who underwent tracheal resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gönül Sağıroğlu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We aimed to analyze the etiology, diagnostic and surgical methods, complications and mortality of the patients who underwent tracheal resection for tracheal stenosis.Materials and methods: Between January 2006 and January 2010, 42 patients who underwent tracheal resection and reconstruction was retrospectively analyzed in terms of age, sex, co-morbid disease, etiology of tracheal stenosis, symptoms, the location of stenosis, surgical approach, incision techniques, length of resected segment, types of different suture materials, length of anesthesia and surgery, the ratio of prolonged intubation, morbidities and mortality ratios were analyzed.Results: There were 26 men and 16 female with the mean age was 48 (9-79 years. The etiology was tracheal stenos in 30 patients, tracheal tumor in 10 patients, trauma and congenital tracheal stenos in one each. Symptoms were dispnea, cough, stridor and hemoptysis. Surgical technique was performed through cervical incision (n=36 and cervical incision plus partial sternotomy (n=4 in patients with high tracheal stenosis where the stenosis is lower then complete sternotomy was performed. The mean tracheal segmental resection was 4.1 cm (2-5.2 cm. The morbidities were respiratory insufficiency, secretion retention and atelectasis, pneumonia, sepsis and tracheal re-stenosis. The postoperative mortality was seen in 4 (%9.5 patients.Conclusion: The most important issue leading to complication during tracheal surgery is the ventilation and aspiration towards bronchus. The intense collaboration between surgeon, anesthesiologist and intensive care physician is a necessity in order to reduce complication rates and mortality.

  5. Head-to-toe whole-body MRI in psoriatic arthritis, axial spondyloarthritis and healthy subjects: first steps towards global inflammation and damage scores of peripheral and axial joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Pedersen, Susanne Juhl; Eshed, Iris; Sørensen, Inge Juul; Møller, Jakob M; Madsen, Ole Rintek; Thomsen, Henrik S; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2015-06-01

    By whole-body MRI (WBMRI), we aimed to examine the frequency and distribution of inflammatory and structural lesions in PsA patients, SpA patients and healthy subjects (HSs), to introduce global WBMRI inflammation/damage scores, and to assess WBMRI's reproducibility and correlation with conventional MRI (convMRI). WBMRI (3.0-T) of patients with peripheral PsA (n = 18) or axial SpA (n = 18) and of HS (n = 12) was examined for proportion of evaluable features (readability) and the presence and pattern of lesions in axial and peripheral joints. Furthermore, global WBMRI scores of inflammation and structural damage were constructed, and WBMRI findings were compared with clinical measures and convMRI (SpA/HS: spine and SI joints; PsA/HS: hand). The readability (92-100%) and reproducibility (intrareader intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.62-1.0) were high in spine/SI joint, but lower in the distal peripheral joints. Wrists, shoulders, knees, ankles and MTP joints were most commonly involved, with frequency of synovitis > bone marrow oedema (BMO) > erosion. WBMRI global BMO scores of peripheral and axial joints were higher in PsA {median 7 [interquartile range (IQR) 3-15]} and SpA [8 (IQR 2-14)] than in HSs [2.5 (IQR 1-4.5)], both P joint scores were ρ = 0.20-0.78. WBMRI allows simultaneous assessment of peripheral and axial joints in PsA and SpA, and the distribution of inflammatory and structural lesions and global scores can be determined. The study strongly encourages further development and longitudinal testing of WBMRI techniques and assessment methods in PsA and SpA. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. MRI Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from ...

  7. High-Field MRI and Mercury Release from Dental Amalgam Fillings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SMJ Mortazavi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is among the most toxic nonradioactive elements which may cause toxicity even at low doses. Some studies showed release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings in individuals who used mobile phone. This study was conducted to assess the effect of high-field MRI on mercury release from dental amalgam filling. We studied two groups of students with identical tooth decays requiring a similar pattern of restorative dentistry. They were exposed to a magnetic flux density of 1.5 T produced by a MRI machine. 16 otherwise healthy students with identical dental decay participated in this study. They underwent similar restorative dentistry procedures and randomly divided into two groups of MRI-exposed and control arms. Urinary concentrations of mercury in the control subjects were measured before (hour 0 and 48 and 72 hrs after amalgam restoration, using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Urinary concentrations of mercury in exposed individuals were determined before (hour 0, and 24, 48, 72 and 96 hrs after amalgam restoration. Unlike control subjects, they underwent conventional brain MRI (15 min, 99 slices, 24 hrs after amalgam restoration. The mean±SD urinary mercury levels in MRI-exposed individuals increased linearly from a baseline value of 20.70±17.96 to 24.83±22.91 μg/L 72 hrs after MRI. In the control group, the concentration decreased linearly from 20.70±19.77 to 16.14±20.05 μg/L. The difference between urinary mercury in the exposed and control group, 72 hrs after MRI (96 h after restoration,was significant (p=0.046. These findings provide further support for the noxious effect of MRI (exposure to strong magnetic fieldand release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings.

  8. Physical and social characteristics and support needs of adult female childhood cancer survivors who underwent hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Akiko; Maru, Mitsue; Kashimada, Kenichi; Sakakibara, Hideya

    2017-08-01

    Female childhood cancer survivors who develop gonadal dysfunction require female hormone replacement therapy (HRT) from puberty until menopause. However, the support provided in such cases has not been studied. We investigated the physical and social characteristics and support needs of adult female childhood cancer survivors who underwent HRT. Forty-nine adult female childhood cancer survivors completed self-administered questionnaires. We compared the clinical characteristics, health status, and social conditions between a group that underwent HRT and a group that did not, and we surveyed support needs of the group that underwent HRT. The median age of the subjects was 25.0 years (range 20-41). Twenty subjects (40.8%) underwent HRT. A significantly high number of those who underwent HRT also underwent radiation therapy (p social characteristics between the groups. Those who experienced anxiety regarding fertility required information about HRT, a platform to share their concerns, and psychological support and cooperation among healthcare providers. Although the subjects of this survey exhibited good social adjustment regardless of whether or not they underwent HRT, they were anxious about fertility. It is important to understand the concerns and anxieties unique to female childhood cancer survivors and to enhance psychological support in addition to providing educational support so that HRT can be administered.

  9. Frequency of Helicobacter pylori in patients underwent endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Tay

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate thefrequency of Helicobacter pylori in patients underwent endoscopyeastern Anatolia.Materials and methods: The patients whose endoscopicantral biopsies were taken for any reason in our endoscopyunit in February-June 2010 period were includedand retrospectively investigated. The frequency of Helicobacterpylori was determined as separating the patientsaccording to general, sex and the age groups. Antral biopsieswere stained with hematoxylin-eosin and modified giemsamethod and examined under light microscope andreported as (+ mild, (++ moderate, (+++ severe positiveaccording to their intensities.Results: Biopsy specimens of 1298 patients were includedinto the study. The mean age was 47.5 ± 17.5 years(range 14-88 and 607 of these patients (47% were male.Histopathological evaluation revealed that, 918 of the patientswere (71% positive and 379 (29% were negativefor Helicobacter pylori. Approximately 60% of our patientshad mild, 29% had moderate and 11% had severe positivityfor Helicobacter pylori. No significant difference wasfound in the frequency of Helicobacter pylori betweenwomen and men. The frequencies of Helicobacter pyloriwere 73.2%, 71.5%, 68.6% and 70.4%, respectively, inthe age groups of 14-30 years, 31-45 years, 46-60 yearsand 61-88 years.Conclusion: The frequency of Helicobacter pylori was71% in Eastern Anatolia Region. No statistically significantdifference was found between genders and agegroups in term of the frequency of Helicobacter pylori.

  10. Robust extrapolation scheme for fast estimation of 3D Ising field partition functions: application to within subject fMRI data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risser, L.; Vincent, T.; Ciuciu, Ph. [NeuroSpin CEA, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Risser, L.; Vincent, T. [Laboratoire de Neuroimagerie Assistee par Ordinateur (LNAO) CEA - DSV/I2BM/NEUROSPIN (France); Risser, L. [Institut de mecanique des fluides de Toulouse (IMFT), CNRS: UMR5502 - Universite Paul Sabatier - Toulouse III - Institut National Polytechnique de Toulouse - INPT (France); Idier, J. [Institut de Recherche en Communications et en Cybernetique de Nantes (IRCCyN) CNRS - UMR6597 - Universite de Nantes - ecole Centrale de Nantes - Ecole des Mines de Nantes - Ecole Polytechnique de l' Universite de Nantes (France)

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, we present a first numerical scheme to estimate Partition Functions (PF) of 3D Ising fields. Our strategy is applied to the context of the joint detection-estimation of brain activity from functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) data, where the goal is to automatically recover activated regions and estimate region-dependent, hemodynamic filters. For any region, a specific binary Markov random field may embody spatial correlation over the hidden states of the voxels by modeling whether they are activated or not. To make this spatial regularization fully adaptive, our approach is first based upon it, classical path-sampling method to approximate a small subset of reference PFs corresponding to pre-specified regions. Then, file proposed extrapolation method allows its to approximate the PFs associated with the Ising fields defined over the remaining brain regions. In comparison with preexisting approaches, our method is robust; to topological inhomogeneities in the definition of the reference regions. As a result, it strongly alleviates the computational burden and makes spatially adaptive regularization of whole brain fMRI datasets feasible. (authors)

  11. Clinical and MRI models predicting amyloid deposition in progressive aphasia and apraxia of speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitwell, Jennifer L; Weigand, Stephen D; Duffy, Joseph R; Strand, Edythe A; Machulda, Mary M; Senjem, Matthew L; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Lowe, Val J; Jack, Clifford R; Josephs, Keith A

    2016-01-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition can be observed in primary progressive aphasia (PPA) and progressive apraxia of speech (PAOS). While it is typically associated with logopenic PPA, there are exceptions that make predicting Aβ status challenging based on clinical diagnosis alone. We aimed to determine whether MRI regional volumes or clinical data could help predict Aβ deposition. One hundred and thirty-nine PPA (n = 97; 15 agrammatic, 53 logopenic, 13 semantic and 16 unclassified) and PAOS (n = 42) subjects were prospectively recruited into a cross-sectional study and underwent speech/language assessments, 3.0 T MRI and C11-Pittsburgh Compound B PET. The presence of Aβ was determined using a 1.5 SUVR cut-point. Atlas-based parcellation was used to calculate gray matter volumes of 42 regions-of-interest across the brain. Penalized binary logistic regression was utilized to determine what combination of MRI regions, and what combination of speech and language tests, best predicts Aβ (+) status. The optimal MRI model and optimal clinical model both performed comparably in their ability to accurately classify subjects according to Aβ status. MRI accurately classified 81% of subjects using 14 regions. Small left superior temporal and inferior parietal volumes and large left Broca's area volumes were particularly predictive of Aβ (+) status. Clinical scores accurately classified 83% of subjects using 12 tests. Phonological errors and repetition deficits, and absence of agrammatism and motor speech deficits were particularly predictive of Aβ (+) status. In comparison, clinical diagnosis was able to accurately classify 89% of subjects. However, the MRI model performed well in predicting Aβ deposition in unclassified PPA. Clinical diagnosis provides optimum prediction of Aβ status at the group level, although regional MRI measurements and speech and language testing also performed well and could have advantages in predicting Aβ status in unclassified PPA subjects.

  12. Clinical and MRI models predicting amyloid deposition in progressive aphasia and apraxia of speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Whitwell

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Beta-amyloid (Aβ deposition can be observed in primary progressive aphasia (PPA and progressive apraxia of speech (PAOS. While it is typically associated with logopenic PPA, there are exceptions that make predicting Aβ status challenging based on clinical diagnosis alone. We aimed to determine whether MRI regional volumes or clinical data could help predict Aβ deposition. One hundred and thirty-nine PPA (n = 97; 15 agrammatic, 53 logopenic, 13 semantic and 16 unclassified and PAOS (n = 42 subjects were prospectively recruited into a cross-sectional study and underwent speech/language assessments, 3.0 T MRI and C11-Pittsburgh Compound B PET. The presence of Aβ was determined using a 1.5 SUVR cut-point. Atlas-based parcellation was used to calculate gray matter volumes of 42 regions-of-interest across the brain. Penalized binary logistic regression was utilized to determine what combination of MRI regions, and what combination of speech and language tests, best predicts Aβ (+ status. The optimal MRI model and optimal clinical model both performed comparably in their ability to accurately classify subjects according to Aβ status. MRI accurately classified 81% of subjects using 14 regions. Small left superior temporal and inferior parietal volumes and large left Broca's area volumes were particularly predictive of Aβ (+ status. Clinical scores accurately classified 83% of subjects using 12 tests. Phonological errors and repetition deficits, and absence of agrammatism and motor speech deficits were particularly predictive of Aβ (+ status. In comparison, clinical diagnosis was able to accurately classify 89% of subjects. However, the MRI model performed well in predicting Aβ deposition in unclassified PPA. Clinical diagnosis provides optimum prediction of Aβ status at the group level, although regional MRI measurements and speech and language testing also performed well and could have advantages in predicting Aβ status in unclassified

  13. Investigating the relationship between subjective drug craving and temporal dynamics of the default mode network, executive control network, and salience network in methamphetamine dependents using rsfMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanian-Zadeh, Somayyeh; Hossein-Zadeh, Gholam-Ali; Shahbabaie, Alireza; Ekhtiari, Hamed

    2016-03-01

    Resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) studies using fMRI provides a great deal of knowledge on the spatiotemporal organization of the brain. The relationships between and within a number of resting state functional networks, namely the default mode network (DMN), salience network (SN) and executive control network (ECN) have been intensely studied in basic and clinical cognitive neuroscience [1]. However, the presumption of spatial and temporal stationarity has mostly restricted the assessment of rsFC [1]. In this study, sliding window correlation analysis and k-means clustering were exploited to examine the temporal dynamics of rsFC of these three networks in 24 abstinent methamphetamine dependents. Afterwards, using canonical correlation analysis (CCA) the possible relationship between the level of self-reported craving and the temporal dynamics was examined. Results indicate that the rsFC transits between 6 discrete "FC states" in the meth dependents. CCA results show that higher levels of craving are associated with higher probability of transiting from state 4 to 6 (positive FC of DMN-ECN getting weak and negative FC of DMN-SN appearing) and staying in state 4 (positive FC of DMN-ECN), lower probability of staying in state 2 (negative FC of DMN-ECN), transiting from state 4 to 2 (change of positive FC of DMN-ECN to negative FC), and transiting from state 3 to 5 (appearance of negative FC of DMN-SN and positive FC of DMN-ECN with the presence of negative FC of SN-ECN). Quantitative measures of temporal dynamics in large-scale brain networks could bring new added values to increase potentials for applications of rsfMRI in addiction medicine.

  14. MRI in Japanese encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Radiology; Misra, U.K. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Neurology; Kalita, J. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Neurology; Salwani, V. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Radiology; Gupta, R.K. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Radiology; Gujral, R. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Radiology

    1997-03-01

    We document the MRI features in seven patients with Japanese encephalitis. MRI was carried out on a 1.5 T system within 10-60 days of onset. In all the patients MRI revealed bilateral thalamic lesions, haemorrhagic in five. Signal changes were present in the cerebrum in four patients, the midbrain and cerebellum in three each, the pons in two and the basal ganglia in one. The lesions were haemorrhagic in three of the four patients with lesions in the cortex, two of the three with lesions in the midbrain and cerebellum, but the pontine lesions were haemorrhagic in both patients. Spinal cord involvement was seen in one of the three patients who underwent MRI. In two patients MRI was repeated 3 years after the onset, showing marked reduction in abnormal signal; and all the lesions gave low signal on both T1- and T2-weighted images. Bilateral thalamic involvement, especially haemorrhagic, may be considered characteristic of Japanese encephalitis, especially in endemic areas. (orig.)

  15. Differences in perfusion parameters between upper and lower lumbar vertebral segments with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savvopoulou, Vasiliki; Vlahos, Lampros; Moulopoulos, Lia Angela [University of Athens, Areteion Hospital, Department of Radiology, Medical School, Athens (Greece); Maris, Thomas G. [University of Crete, Deparment of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, Heraklion (Greece)

    2008-09-15

    To investigate the influence of age, sex and spinal level on perfusion parameters of normal lumbar bone marrow with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE MRI). Sixty-seven subjects referred for evaluation of low back pain or sciatica underwent DCE MRI of the lumbar spine. After subtraction of dynamic images, a region of interest (ROI) was placed on each lumbar vertebral body of all subjects, and time intensity curves were generated. Consequently, perfusion parameters were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed to search for perfusion differences among lumbar vertebrae and in relation to age and sex. Upper (L1, L2) and lower (L3, L4, L5) vertebrae showed significant differences in perfusion parameters (p<0.05). Vertebrae of subjects younger than 50 years showed significantly higher perfusion compared to vertebrae of older ones (p<0.05). Vertebrae of females demonstrated significantly increased perfusion compared to those of males of corresponding age (p<0.05). All perfusion parameters, except for washout (WOUT), showed a mild linear correlation with age. Time to maximum slope (TMSP) and time to peak (TTPK) showed the same correlation with sex (0.22subjects and of females compared to males. (orig.)

  16. Concordance between inflammation at physical examination and on MRI in patients with early arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabben, A; Stomp, W; Huizinga, T W J; van der Heijde, D; Bloem, J L; Reijnierse, M; van der Helm-van Mil, A H M

    2015-03-01

    MRI is increasingly used to measure inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) research, but the correlation to clinical assessment is unexplored. This study determined the association and concordance between inflammation of small joints measured with MRI and physical examination. 179 patients with early arthritis underwent a 68 tender joint count and 66 swollen joint count and 1.5T MRI of MCP (2-5), wrist and MTP (1-5) joints at the most painful side. Two readers scored synovitis and bone marrow oedema (BME) according to the OMERACT RA MRI scoring method and assessed tenosynovitis. The MRI data were first analysed continuously and then dichotomised to analyse the concordance with inflammation at joint examination. 1790 joints of 179 patients were studied. Synovitis and tenosynovitis on MRI were independently associated with clinical swelling, in contrast to BME. In 86% of the swollen MCP joints and in 92% of the swollen wrist joints any inflammation on MRI was present. In 27% of the non-swollen MCP joints and in 66% of the non-swollen wrist joints any MRI inflammation was present. Vice versa, of all MCP, wrist and MTP joints with inflammation on MRI 64%, 61% and 77%, respectively, were not swollen. BME, also in case of severe lesions, occurred frequently in clinically non-swollen joints. Similar results were observed for joint tenderness. Inflammation on MRI is not only present in clinically swollen but also in non-swollen joints. In particular BME occurred in clinically non-inflamed joints. The relevance of subclinical inflammation for the disease course is a subject for further studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. A coordinate-based ALE functional MRI meta-analysis of brain activation during verbal fluency tasks in healthy control subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The processing of verbal fluency tasks relies on the coordinated activity of a number of brain areas, particularly in the frontal and temporal lobes of the left hemisphere. Recent studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study the neural networks subserving verbal fluency functions have yielded divergent results especially with respect to a parcellation of the inferior frontal gyrus for phonemic and semantic verbal fluency. We conducted a coordinate-based activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis on brain activation during the processing of phonemic and semantic verbal fluency tasks involving 28 individual studies with 490 healthy volunteers. Results For phonemic as well as for semantic verbal fluency, the most prominent clusters of brain activation were found in the left inferior/middle frontal gyrus (LIFG/MIFG) and the anterior cingulate gyrus. BA 44 was only involved in the processing of phonemic verbal fluency tasks, BA 45 and 47 in the processing of phonemic and semantic fluency tasks. Conclusions Our comparison of brain activation during the execution of either phonemic or semantic verbal fluency tasks revealed evidence for spatially different activation in BA 44, but not other regions of the LIFG/LMFG (BA 9, 45, 47) during phonemic and semantic verbal fluency processing. PMID:24456150

  18. Evolution of elderly patients who underwent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Moré Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a steady increase in the number of elderly patients with severe cardiovascular diseases who require a surgical procedure to recover some quality of life that allows them a socially meaningful existence, despite the risks.Objectives: To analyze the behavior of elderly patients who underwent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.Method: A descriptive, retrospective, cross-sectional study was conducted with patients over 65 years of age who underwent surgery at the Cardiocentro Ernesto Che Guevara, in Santa Clara, from January 2013 to March 2014.Results: In the study, 73.1% of patients were men; and there was a predominance of subjects between 65 and 70 years of age, accounting for 67.3%. Coronary artery bypass graft was the most prevalent type of surgery and had the longest cardiopulmonary bypass times. Hypertension was present in 98.1% of patients. The most frequent postoperative complications were renal dysfunction and severe low cardiac output, with 44.2% and 34.6% respectively.Conclusions: There was a predominance of men, the age group of 65 to 70 years, hypertension, and patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft with prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass. Renal dysfunction was the most frequent complication.

  19. Laryngeal mask airway (LMA) artefact resulting in MRI misdiagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieble, Thomas [University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Department of Anesthesiology, New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ (United States); Maimonides Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Patel, Anuradha; Davidson, Melissa [University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Department of Anesthesiology, New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ (United States)

    2008-03-15

    We report a 7-year-old child who underwent brain MRI for a known seizure disorder. The technique used for general anesthesia included inhalation induction followed by placement of a laryngeal mask airway (LMA) for airway maintenance. Because the reviewing radiologist was unfamiliar with the use of an LMA during anesthesia, and because the attending anesthesiologist did not communicate his technique to the radiologist, an MRI misdiagnosis was reported because of artefact created by the in situ LMA. As a result of this misdiagnosis the child was subjected to unnecessary subsequent testing to rule out a reported anatomic abnormality induced by the LMA. Our case illustrates the need for coordination of patient care among hospital services. (orig.)

  20. CSF dynamics in the patients with syringomyelia associated with Chiari's malformation; Quantitative analysis on cine MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Satoshi; Matsuzawa, Hitoshi; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Hida, Kazutoshi; Imamura, Hiroyuki; Abe, Hiroshi (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine); Saito, Hisatoshi

    1994-01-01

    In a series of 12 patients with syringomyelia associated with Chiari's malformation, the authors quantitatively analyzed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics in the subarachnoid space of the cranio-spinal junction, using cine MRI combined with pre-saturation method. In most of subjects, cine MRI revealed (1) decreased or increased maximum velocity of CSF in the caudal direction and (2) disturbed CSF motion in the caudal direction (delayed % cardiac cycle) in the craniospinal junction, strongly suggesting disturbed CSF dynamics in the craniospinal junction because of the tonsilar herniation. Of 12 subjects, 8 patients underwent formen magnum decompression and 4 underwent syringo-subarachnoid shunt (SS shunt). In the patients who showed marked callapse of syrinx after foramen magnum decompression, follow-up cine MRI revealed the normalization of % cardiac cycle, representing postoperative improvement of CSF dynamics in the craniospinal function. On the other hand, % cardiac cycle did not improve significantly in the patients who did not show marked collapse of the syrinx or suffered from meningitis after surgery. Significant changes were not observed in the patients who underwent SS shunt. In summary, these results suggested that cine MRI combined with pre-saturation method could detect the pathophysiological changes and evaluate the efficacy of the surgery, especially foramen magnum decompression, in the patients with syringomyelia associated with Chiari's malformation. (author).

  1. Noninvasive detection of coronary artery wall thickening with age in healthy subjects using high resolution MRI with beat-to-beat respiratory motion correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Andrew D; Keegan, Jennifer; Mohiaddin, Raad H; Firmin, David N

    2011-10-01

    To demonstrate coronary artery wall thickening with age in a small healthy cohort using a highly efficient, reliable, and reproducible high-resolution MR technique. A 3D cross-sectional MR vessel wall images (0.7 × 0.7 × 3 mm resolution) with retrospective beat-to-beat respiratory motion correction (B2B-RMC) were obtained in the proximal right coronary artery of 21 healthy subjects (age, 22-62 years) with no known cardiovascular disease. Lumen and outer wall (lumen + vessel wall) areas were measured in one central slice from each subject and average wall thickness and wall area/outer wall area ratio (W/OW) calculated. Imaging was successful in 18 (86%) subjects with average respiratory efficiency 99.3 ± 1.7%. Coronary vessel wall thickness and W/OW significantly correlate with subject age, increasing by 0.088 mm and 0.031 per decade respectively (R = 0.53, P = 0.024 and R = 0.48, P = 0.046). No relationship was found between lumen area and vessel wall thickness (P = NS), but outer wall area increased significantly with vessel wall thickness at 19 mm(2) per mm (P = 0.046). This is consistent with outward vessel wall remodeling. Despite the small size of our healthy cohort, using high-resolution MR imaging and B2B-RMC, we have demonstrated increasing coronary vessel wall thickness and W/OW with age. The results obtained are consistent with outward vessel wall remodeling. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. The effect of phonation into a straw on the vocal tract adjustments and formant frequencies. A preliminary MRI study on a single subject completed with acoustic results

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Laukkanen, A. M.; Horáček, Jaromír; Krupa, P.; Švec, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2012), s. 50-57 ISSN 1746-8094 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/08/1155 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : vocal exercises * semi-occlusions * vocal tract setting Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 1.074, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1746809411000097

  3. Inverse Effects of Oxytocin on Attributing Mental Activity to Others in Depressed and Healthy Subjects: A Double-Blind Placebo Controlled fMRI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Pincus

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oxytocin is a stress-attenuating and pro-social neuropeptide. To date, no study has looked at the effects of oxytocin in modulating brain activity in depressed individuals nor attempted to correlate this activity with attribution of mental activity in others. Method: We enrolled 10 unmedicated depressed adults and 10 matched healthy controls in a crossover, double blind placebo controlled fmri 40 i.u. intra-nasal oxytocin study (20 i.u. per nostril. Each subject performed Reading the Mind in the Eyes task (RMET before and after inhalation of oxytocin or placebo control for a total of 80 scans. Results: Before oxytocin administration, RMET engaged medial and lateral prefrontal cortex, amygdala, insula and associative areas. Depressed subjects showed increased anterior ventral activation for the RMET minus gender identification contrast whereas matched controls showed increased dorsal and frontal activity. Compared to placebo, oxytocin in depressed subjects showed increased activity in the superior middle frontal gyrus and insula, while controls exhibited more activity in ventral regions. Oxytocin also led to inverse effects in reaction times on attribution task between groups, with controls getting faster and depressed individuals slower to respond. Conclusion: Depression is associated with increased paralimbic activity during emotional mental attribution of others, appearing to be distinctly modulated by oxytocin when compared to healthy controls. Further studies are needed to explore long-term exposure to pro-social neuropeptides on mood in depressed populations and assess their clinical relevance.

  4. MRI of the Chest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest ... limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  5. MRI of the Prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Prostate Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate ... limitations of MRI of the Prostate? What is MRI of the Prostate? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  6. MRI of the Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Breast Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast ... limitations of MRI of the Breast? What is MRI of the Breast? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety MRI Safety During Pregnancy Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest ...

  8. MRI zoo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    The basic idea was to use MRI to produce a sequence of 3D gray scale image slices of various animals, subsequentlyimaged with a clinical CT system. For this purpose, these animals were used: toad, lungfish, python snake and a horseshoe crab. Each animal was sacrificed according to standard....... MRI was done using a Philips Achieva 1.5 T system and CT was performed using a Siemens Somatom system. Axial and sagittal slices were acquired using standard T1w and T2w MRI sequences, and visualization was made using the Mistar software (Apollo Imaging Technology, Melbourne, Australia). Images were...

  9. Evaluation of MRI-US Fusion Technology in Sports-Related Musculoskeletal Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-On, Manuel; Til-Pérez, Lluís; Balius, Ramón

    2015-06-01

    A combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with real-time high-resolution ultrasound (US) known as fusion imaging may improve visualization of musculoskeletal (MSK) sports medicine injuries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the applicability of MRI-US fusion technology in MSK sports medicine. This study was conducted by the medical services of the FC Barcelona. The participants included volunteers and referred athletes with symptomatic and asymptomatic MSK injuries. All cases underwent MRI which was loaded into the US system for manual registration on the live US image and fusion imaging examination. After every test, an evaluation form was completed in terms of advantages, disadvantages, and anatomic fusion landmarks. From November 2014 to March 2015, we evaluated 20 subjects who underwent fusion imaging, 5 non-injured volunteers and 15 injured athletes, 11 symptomatic and 4 asymptomatic, age range 16-50 years, mean 22. We describe some of the anatomic landmarks used to guide fusion in different regions. This technology allowed us to examine muscle and tendon injuries simultaneously in US and MRI, and the correlation of both techniques, especially low-grade muscular injuries. This has also helped compensate for the limited field of view with US. It improves spatial orientation of cartilage, labrum and meniscal injuries. However, a high-quality MRI image is essential in achieving an adequate fusion image, and 3D sequences need to be added in MRI protocols to improve navigation. The combination of real-time MRI and US image fusion and navigation is relatively easy to perform and is helping to improve understanding of MSK injuries. However, it requires specific skills in MSK imaging and still needs further research in sports-related injuries. Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation.

  10. Muscle MRI of the Upper Extremity in the Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kouji; Hamano, Tadanori; Kawamura, Yasutaka; Kimura, Hirohiko; Matsunaga, Akiko; Ikawa, Masamichi; Yamamura, Osamu; Mutoh, Tatsuro; Higuchi, Itsuro; Kuriyama, Masaru; Nakamoto, Yasunari

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relation between muscle MRI findings and weakness of the upper extremity muscles in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Nineteen DM1 patients from 15 families were enrolled in this study. Muscle weakness was evaluated using the modified Medical Research Council scale. Subjects also underwent a genetic study and muscle MRI of the upper extremities. In patients with DM1, the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP), flexor pollicis longus, flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), extensor pollicis, abductor pollicis longus (APL), lateral head of triceps brachii and infraspinatus (INF) muscles were frequently and severely affected. Muscle strength was significantly correlated with the severity of muscle MRI findings in the FDP, short head of biceps brachii (SBB), and medial head of triceps brachii muscles. Disease duration was correlated significantly with MRI findings in the FDP, FDS, long head of biceps brachii, INF, APL, and SBB muscles. Unexpectedly, the degree of trinucleotide expansion of myotonin protein kinase was not correlated with muscle MRI findings. Muscle MRI of the upper extremity is useful to detect affected muscles in DM1 patients. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Pediatric MRI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Study of Normal Brain Development is a longitudinal study using anatomical MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) to map pediatric...

  12. Cardiac MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants & ... interfere with the MRI machine or cause skin burns. Tattoos may cause a problem because older tattoo ...

  13. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants & ... interfere with the MRI machine or cause skin burns. Tattoos may cause a problem because older tattoo ...

  14. Head MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... metal zippers, and similar metallic items Removable dental work ... test. The strong magnetic fields created during an MRI can make heart pacemakers and other implants not work as well. It can also cause a piece ...

  15. Low Field Squid MRI Devices, Components and Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  16. Task Dependence, Tissue Specificity, and Spatial Distribution of Widespread Activations in Large Single-Subject Functional MRI Datasets at 7T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Castillo, Javier; Hoy, Colin W; Handwerker, Daniel A; Roopchansingh, Vinai; Inati, Souheil J; Saad, Ziad S; Cox, Robert W; Bandettini, Peter A

    2015-12-01

    It was recently shown that when large amounts of task-based blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) data are combined to increase contrast- and temporal signal-to-noise ratios, the majority of the brain shows significant hemodynamic responses time-locked with the experimental paradigm. Here, we investigate the biological significance of such widespread activations. First, the relationship between activation extent and task demands was investigated by varying cognitive load across participants. Second, the tissue specificity of responses was probed using the better BOLD signal localization capabilities of a 7T scanner. Finally, the spatial distribution of 3 primary response types--namely positively sustained (pSUS), negatively sustained (nSUS), and transient--was evaluated using a newly defined voxel-wise waveshape index that permits separation of responses based on their temporal signature. About 86% of gray matter (GM) became significantly active when all data entered the analysis for the most complex task. Activation extent scaled with task load and largely followed the GM contour. The most common response type was nSUS BOLD, irrespective of the task. Our results suggest that widespread activations associated with extremely large single-subject functional magnetic resonance imaging datasets can provide valuable information about the functional organization of the brain that goes undetected in smaller sample sizes. Published by Oxford University Press 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  17. Sarcopenia: a new predictor of postoperative complications for elderly gastric cancer patients who underwent radical gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chong-Jun; Zhang, Feng-Min; Zhang, Fei-Yu; Yu, Zhen; Chen, Xiao-Lei; Shen, Xian; Zhuang, Cheng-Le; Chen, Xiao-Xi

    2017-05-01

    A geriatric assessment is needed to identify high-risk elderly patients with gastric cancer. However, the current geriatric assessment has been considered to be either time-consuming or subjective. The present study aimed to investigate the predictive effect of sarcopenia on the postoperative complications for elderly patients who underwent radical gastrectomy. We conducted a prospective study of patients who underwent radical gastrectomy from August 2014 to December 2015. Computed tomography-assessed lumbar skeletal muscle, handgrip strength, and gait speed were measured to define sarcopenia. Sarcopenia was present in 69 of 240 patients (28.8%) and was associated with lower body mass index, lower serum albumin, lower hemoglobin, and higher nutritional risk screening 2002 scores. Postoperative complications significantly increased in the sarcopenic patients (49.3% versus 24.6%, P sarcopenia (odds ratio: 2.959, 95% CI: 1.629-5.373, P Sarcopenia, presented as a new geriatric assessment factor, was a strong and independent risk factor for postoperative complications of elderly patients with gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Entorhinal cortex volume measured with 3T MRI is positively correlated with the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised logical/verbal memory score for healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Masami; Abe, Osamu; Miyati, Tosiaki; Yoshikawa, Takeharu; Hayashi, Naoto; Takao, Hidemasa; Inano, Sachiko; Kabasawa, Hiroyuki; Mori, Harushi; Kunimatsu, Akira; Aoki, Shigeki; Ino, Kenji; Iida, Kyouhito; Yano, Keiichi; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies revealed a correlation between local brain volume and cognitive function. The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between local gray matter volume and the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) logical/verbal memory (WMS-R-verbal) score in healthy adults using a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance scanner and voxel-based morphometry (VBM). T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were obtained in 1,169 healthy adults. The T1-weighted images in native space were bias-corrected, spatially normalized, and segmented into gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid images with Statistical Parametric Mapping 5. To investigate regionally the specific effects of the WMS-R-verbal score on the gray matter images, simple regression analysis was performed by VBM treating age, total intracranial volume, and gender as confounding covariates. A P value of less than 0.05 corrected with false discovery rate in voxel difference was considered to be statistically significant. Our study showed a significant positive correlation between the WMS-R-verbal score and the bilateral entorhinal cortex volume. In the right entorhinal, T value is 4.75, and the size of the clusters is 155 voxels. In the left entorhinal, T value is 4.08, and the size of the clusters is 23 voxels. A significant negative correlation was not found. To our knowledge, this is the first VBM study showing that entorhinal cortex volume is positively correlated with the WMS-R-verbal score for healthy subjects. Therefore, in our structural neuroimaging study, we add evidence to the hypothesis that the entorhinal cortex is involved in verbal memory processing.

  19. Role of the insula and vestibular system in patients with chronic subjective dizziness: An fMRI study using sound-evoked vestibular stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iole eIndovina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic subjective dizziness (CSD is a common vestibular disorder characterized by persistent non-vertiginous dizziness, unsteadiness, and heightened sensitivity to motion stimuli that may last for months to years after events that cause acute vestibular symptoms or disrupt balance. CSD is not associated with abnormalities of basic vestibular or oculomotor reflexes. Rather, it is thought to arise from persistent use of high-threat postural control strategies and greater reliance on visual cues for spatial orientation (i.e., visual dependence, long after triggering events resolve. Anxiety-related personality traits confer vulnerability to CSD. Anomalous interactions between the central vestibular system and neural structures related to anxiety may sustain it. Vestibular- and anxiety-related processes overlap in the brain, particularly in the insula and hippocampus. Alterations in activity and connectivity in these brain regions in response to vestibular stimuli may be the neural basis of CSD.We examined this hypothesis by comparing brain activity from 18 patients with CSD and 18 healthy controls measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging during loud short tone bursts, which are auditory stimuli that evoke robust vestibular responses. Relative to controls, patients with CSD showed reduced activations to sound-evoked vestibular stimulation in the parieto-insular vestibular cortex (PIVC including the posterior insula, and in the anterior insula, inferior frontal gyrus, hippocampus, and anterior cingulate cortex. Patients with CSD also showed altered connectivity between the anterior insula and PIVC, anterior insula and middle occipital cortex, hippocampus and PIVC, and anterior cingulate cortex and PIVC.We conclude that reduced activation in PIVC, hippocampus, anterior insula, inferior frontal gyrus, and anterior cingulate cortex, as well as connectivity changes among these regions, may be linked to long-term vestibular symptoms in patients

  20. Entorhinal cortex volume measured with 3T MRI is positively correlated with the Wechsler memory scale-revised logical/verbal memory score for healthy subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Masami [University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Radiological Technology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kanazawa University, Tsunomatyou, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa (Japan); Abe, Osamu; Takao, Hidemasa; Inano, Sachiko; Mori, Harushi; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni [University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Miyati, Tosiaki [Kanazawa University, Tsunomatyou, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa (Japan); Yoshikawa, Takeharu; Hayashi, Naoto [University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Computational Diagnostic Radiology and Preventive Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kabasawa, Hiroyuki [GE Healthcare, Japan Applied Science Laboratory, Hino (Japan); Aoki, Shigeki [Juntendo University, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Ino, Kenji; Iida, Kyouhito; Yano, Keiichi [University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Radiological Technology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    Previous studies revealed a correlation between local brain volume and cognitive function. The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between local gray matter volume and the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) logical/verbal memory (WMS-R-verbal) score in healthy adults using a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance scanner and voxel-based morphometry (VBM). T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were obtained in 1,169 healthy adults. The T1-weighted images in native space were bias-corrected, spatially normalized, and segmented into gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid images with Statistical Parametric Mapping 5. To investigate regionally the specific effects of the WMS-R-verbal score on the gray matter images, simple regression analysis was performed by VBM treating age, total intracranial volume, and gender as confounding covariates. A P value of less than 0.05 corrected with false discovery rate in voxel difference was considered to be statistically significant. Our study showed a significant positive correlation between the WMS-R-verbal score and the bilateral entorhinal cortex volume. In the right entorhinal, T value is 4.75, and the size of the clusters is 155 voxels. In the left entorhinal, T value is 4.08, and the size of the clusters is 23 voxels. A significant negative correlation was not found. To our knowledge, this is the first VBM study showing that entorhinal cortex volume is positively correlated with the WMS-R-verbal score for healthy subjects. Therefore, in our structural neuroimaging study, we add evidence to the hypothesis that the entorhinal cortex is involved in verbal memory processing. (orig.)

  1. Triphasic MRI of pelvic organ descent: sources of measurement error

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morren, Geert L. [Bowel and Digestion Centre, The Oxford Clinic, 38 Oxford Terrace, Christchurch (New Zealand)]. E-mail: geert_morren@hotmail.com; Balasingam, Adrian G. [Christchurch Radiology Group, P.O. Box 21107, 4th Floor, Leicester House, 291 Madras Street, Christchurch (New Zealand); Wells, J. Elisabeth [Department of Public Health and General Medicine, Christchurch School of Medicine, St. Elmo Courts, Christchurch (New Zealand); Hunter, Anne M. [Christchurch Radiology Group, P.O. Box 21107, 4th Floor, Leicester House, 291 Madras Street, Christchurch (New Zealand); Coates, Richard H. [Christchurch Radiology Group, P.O. Box 21107, 4th Floor, Leicester House, 291 Madras Street, Christchurch (New Zealand); Perry, Richard E. [Bowel and Digestion Centre, The Oxford Clinic, 38 Oxford Terrace, Christchurch (New Zealand)

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To identify sources of error when measuring pelvic organ displacement during straining using triphasic dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods: Ten healthy nulliparous woman underwent triphasic dynamic 1.5 T pelvic MRI twice with 1 week between studies. The bladder was filled with 200 ml of a saline solution, the vagina and rectum were opacified with ultrasound gel. T2 weighted images in the sagittal plane were analysed twice by each of the two observers in a blinded fashion. Horizontal and vertical displacement of the bladder neck, bladder base, introitus vaginae, posterior fornix, cul-de sac, pouch of Douglas, anterior rectal wall, anorectal junction and change of the vaginal axis were measured eight times in each volunteer (two images, each read twice by two observers). Variance components were calculated for subject, observer, week, interactions of these three factors, and pure error. An overall standard error of measurement was calculated for a single observation by one observer on a film from one woman at one visit. Results: For the majority of anatomical reference points, the range of displacements measured was wide and the overall measurement error was large. Intra-observer error and week-to-week variation within a subject were important sources of measurement error. Conclusion: Important sources of measurement error when using triphasic dynamic MRI to measure pelvic organ displacement during straining were identified. Recommendations to minimize those errors are made.

  2. Blood oxygen-level dependent functional assessment of cerebrovascular reactivity: Feasibility for intraoperative 3 Tesla MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierstra, Jorn; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; van Niftrik, Christiaan Hendrik Bas; Piccirelli, Marco; Pangalu, Athina; Kocian, Roman; Neidert, Marian Christoph; Valavanis, Antonios; Regli, Luca; Bozinov, Oliver

    2017-02-01

    To assess the feasibility of functional blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) MRI to evaluate intraoperative cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) at 3 Tesla field strength. Ten consecutive neurosurgical subjects scheduled for a clinical intraoperative MRI examination were enrolled in this study. In addition to the clinical protocol a BOLD sequence was implemented with three cycles of 44 s apnea to calculate CVR values on a voxel-by-voxel basis throughout the brain. The CVR range was then color-coded and superimposed on an anatomical volume to create high spatial resolution CVR maps. Ten subjects (mean age 34.8 ± 13.4; 2 females) uneventfully underwent the intraoperative BOLD protocol, with no complications occurring. Whole-brain CVR for all subjects was (mean ± SD) 0.69 ± 0.42, whereas CVR was markedly higher for tumor subjects as compared to vascular subjects, 0.81 ± 0.44 versus 0.33 ± 0.10, respectively. Furthermore, color-coded functional maps could be robustly interpreted for a whole-brain assessment of CVR. We demonstrate that intraoperative BOLD MRI is feasible in creating functional maps to assess cerebrovascular reactivity throughout the brain in subjects undergoing a neurosurgical procedure. Magn Reson Med 77:806-813, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. The complementary roles of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT for imaging of carotid atherosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calcagno, Claudia; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Mani, Venkatesh; Millon, Antoine [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1234, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Izquierdo-Garcia, David [Harvard University - MIT - Massachusetts General Hospital, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, MA (United States); Rosenbaum, David [Hopital Pitie Salpetriere, Paris (France); Tawakol, Ahmed [Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Woodward, Mark [University of Sydney, George Institute, Sydney (Australia); Bucerius, Jan [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht (Netherlands); Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Moshier, Erin; Godbold, James [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Biostatistics Shared Research Facility, New York, NY (United States); Kallend, David [F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Basel (Switzerland); Farkouh, Michael E. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Cardiovascular Institute, New York, NY (United States); Peter Munk Cardiac Centre and Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, Toronto (Canada); Fuster, Valentin [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Cardiovascular Institute, New York, NY (United States); The Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC), Madrid (Spain); Rudd, James H.F. [University of Cambridge, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Fayad, Zahi A. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1234, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Cardiovascular Institute, New York, NY (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Inflammation and neovascularization in vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques are key features for severe clinical events. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI and FDG PET are two noninvasive imaging techniques capable of quantifying plaque neovascularization and inflammatory infiltrate, respectively. However, their mutual role in defining plaque vulnerability and their possible overlap has not been thoroughly investigated. We studied the relationship between DCE-MRI and {sup 18}F-FDG PET data from the carotid arteries of 40 subjects with coronary heart disease (CHD) or CHD risk equivalent, as a substudy of the dal-PLAQUE trial (NCT00655473). The dal-PLAQUE trial was a multicenter study that evaluated dalcetrapib, a cholesteryl ester transfer protein modulator. Subjects underwent anatomical MRI, DCE-MRI and {sup 18}F-FDG PET. Only baseline imaging and biomarker data (before randomization) from dal-PLAQUE were used as part of this substudy. Our primary goal was to evaluate the relationship between DCE-MRI and {sup 18}F-FDG PET data. As secondary endpoints, we evaluated the relationship between (a) PET data and whole-vessel anatomical MRI data, and (b) DCE-MRI and matching anatomical MRI data. All correlations were estimated using a mixed linear model. We found a significant inverse relationship between several perfusion indices by DCE-MRI and {sup 18}F-FDG uptake by PET. Regarding our secondary endpoints, there was a significant relationship between plaque burden measured by anatomical MRI with several perfusion indices by DCE-MRI and {sup 18}F-FDG uptake by PET. No relationship was found between plaque composition by anatomical MRI and DCE-MRI or {sup 18}F-FDG PET metrics. In this study we observed a significant, weak inverse relationship between inflammation measured as {sup 18}F-FDG uptake by PET and plaque perfusion by DCE-MRI. Our findings suggest that there may be a complex relationship between plaque inflammation and microvascularization during the different

  4. The usefulness of brain MRI and CT in the clinical practice of epilepsia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horita, Hideki [Jikei Univ., Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Daisan Hospital; Maekawa, Kihei

    1995-09-01

    This study was conducted to clarify the usefulness of brain MRI and CT in the clinical practice of epilepsy. The subjects were 100 epileptic child patients (average age, 13.2{+-}8.2 years) who underwent brain MRI, including 93 patients who also underwent brain CT. Twenty-two abnormal findings were obtained by MRI and 25 by CT. Thirty-nine patients who had complications such as mental retardation, cerebral palsy, or the overlapping disorders showed abnormal findings in a significantly high incidence. No significant correlations existed between the presence or absence of abnormal findings and the disease course after seizures. Patients with symptomatic localization-related epilepsies or cryptogenic and symptomatic generalized epilepsies showed abnormal findings in a significantly high incidence and unfavorable disease course after seizures. In 10 of 28 patients who showed abnormal findings, the abnormal finding site on images were correlated to the focus site on electroencephalograms. In conclusion, brain MRI and CT are essential in the clinical practice of epilepsy, however, we should notice the limitation of these methods. (Y.S.).

  5. Evolution of Intrameniscal Signal-Intensity Alterations Detected on MRI Over 24 Months in Patients With Traumatic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimaraes, Julio Brandao; Facchetti, Luca; Schwaiger, Benedikt J; Gersing, Alexandra S; Majumdar, Sharmila; Ma, Benjamin C; Li, Xiaojuan; Link, Thomas M

    2017-02-01

    The objective of our study was to assess the prevalence and evolution of intrameniscal signal-intensity alteration in subjects with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear over 24 months and compare clinical outcome and changes of cartilage between subjects with and those without this meniscal abnormality. Fifty-seven subjects with an ACL tear were screened for intrameniscal signal-intensity alteration. Morphologic and compositional MRI was performed before ACL reconstruction and 12 and 24 months after ACL reconstruction. Twelve subjects with an intrameniscal signal-intensity alteration and 12 subjects without any meniscal abnormality on MRI were identified. Clinical outcome was measured using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and T1ρ and T2 maps of the cartilage were obtained. In 10 of 12 subjects (83%) the meniscal signal-intensity abnormality identified on baseline MRI was located at the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. None of these subjects presented with a meniscal tear over 24 months of follow-up. At 12 months after the ACL tear, the intrameniscal signal-intensity alteration detected on baseline MRI had completely resolved in seven of 12 subjects (58%), showed a signal-intensity decrease in four (33%), and remained stable in one subject (8%). Of the 10 subjects who underwent MRI at 24 months, the meniscal signal-intensity alteration had completely resolved in eight (80%), and the signal intensity had decreased in the other two subjects. Changes in the KOOS and cartilage T1ρ and T2 values from baseline and 24 months did not differ significantly between subjects with and those without intrameniscal signal-intensity alteration (p > 0.05). High intrameniscal signal-intensity alterations are a common finding in subjects with an ACL tear and have a benign course over 24 months after surgical repair of the ACL tear.

  6. The Biological Activity of Propolis-Containing Toothpaste on Oral Health Environment in Patients Who Underwent Implant-Supported Prosthodontic Rehabilitation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morawiec, Tadeusz; Dziedzic, Arkadiusz; Niedzielska, Iwona; Mertas, Anna; Tanasiewicz, Marta; Skaba, Dariusz; Kasperski, Jacek; Machorowska-Pieniążek, Agnieszka; Kucharzewski, Marek; Szaniawska, Karolina; Więckiewicz, Włodzimierz; Więckiewicz, Mieszko

    2013-01-01

    .... Sixteen subjects who underwent an oral rehabilitation with dental implants were selected and randomly assigned into two groups, which received a newly formulated propolis-containing toothpaste (3% (CA...

  7. Portable MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  8. T1-weighted sodium MRI of the articulator cartilage in osteoarthritis: a cross sectional and longitudinal study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rexford D Newbould

    Full Text Available Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has shown great utility in diagnosing soft tissue burden in osteoarthritis (OA, though MRI measures of cartilage integrity have proven more elusive. Sodium MRI can reflect the proteoglycan content of cartilage; however, it requires specialized hardware, acquisition sequences, and long imaging times. This study was designed to assess the potential of a clinically feasible sodium MRI acquisition to detect differences in the knee cartilage of subjects with OA versus healthy controls (HC, and to determine whether longitudinal changes in sodium content are observed at 3 and 6 months. 28 subjects with primary knee OA and 19 HC subjects age and gender matched were enrolled in this ethically-approved study. At baseline, 3 and 6 months subjects underwent structural MRI and a 0.4ms echo time 3D T1-weighted sodium scan as well as the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS and knee pain by visual analogue score (VAS. A standing radiograph of the knee was taken for Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L scoring. A blinded reader outlined the cartilage on the structural images which was used to determine median T1-weighted sodium concentrations in each region of interest on the co-registered sodium scans. VAS, K-L, and KOOS all significantly separated the OA and HC groups. OA subjects had higher T1-weighted sodium concentrations, most strongly observed in the lateral tibial, lateral femoral and medial patella ROIs. There were no significant changes in cartilage volume or sodium concentration over 6 months. This study has shown that a clinically-feasible sodium MRI at a moderate 3T field strength and imaging time with fluid attenuation by T1 weighting significantly separated HCs from OA subjects.

  9. MRI Safety during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z MRI Safety During Pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Illness ... during the exam? Contrast material MRI during pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) If you are pregnant and your doctor ...

  10. Breast MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRI - breast; Magnetic resonance imaging - breast; Breast cancer - MRI; Breast cancer screening - MRI ... radiologist) see some areas more clearly. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  11. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  12. dependent subjects: An fMRI study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CIRPLE. RULIRG. CLORE. REGIVAL coogie. SAREW coaging. ROUNG. ENFINE sinxer dengity. SHRITE. FABOR sixpy. DREPS. SMOLE facen suine edigion. SNOVE fanric SUMSIT episone. SPART figer TACKIC. ESPEROR. HOWOR treapy frane. STROTE. H U M O Y troply galtery. TRAILEP. HUPTER truca. GRAIB twiss.

  13. Frontopolar and anterior temporal cortex activation in a moral judgment task: preliminary functional MRI results in normal subjects Ativação do córtex frontopolar e temporal anterior em uma tarefa de julgamento moral: resultados preliminares de ressonância magnética funcional em indivíduos normais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Moll

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study the brain areas which are activated when normal subjects make moral judgments. METHOD: Ten normal adults underwent BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during the auditory presentation of sentences that they were instructed to silently judge as either "right" or "wrong". Half of the sentences had an explicit moral content ("We break the law when necessary", the other half comprised factual statements devoid of moral connotation ("Stones are made of water". After scanning, each subject rated the moral content, emotional valence, and judgment difficulty of each sentence on Likert-like scales. To exclude the effect of emotion on the activation results, individual responses were hemodynamically modeled for event-related fMRI analysis. The general linear model was used to evaluate the brain areas activated by moral judgment. RESULTS: Regions activated during moral judgment included the frontopolar cortex (FPC, medial frontal gyrus, right anterior temporal cortex, lenticular nucleus, and cerebellum. Activation of FPC and medial frontal gyrus (BA 10/46 and 9 were largely independent of emotional experience and represented the largest areas of activation. CONCLUSIONS: These results concur with clinical observations assigning a critical role for the frontal poles and right anterior temporal cortex in the mediation of complex judgment processes according to moral constraints. The FPC may work in concert with the orbitofrontal and dorsolateral cortex in the regulation of human social conduct.OBJETIVO: Estudar, com ressonância magnética funcional (RMf, as áreas cerebrais normalmente ativadas por julgamentos morais em tarefa de verificação de sentenças. MÉTODO: Dez adultos normais foram estudados com RMf-BOLD durante a apresentação auditiva de sentenças cujo conteúdo foram instruídos a julgar como "certo" ou "errado". Metade das sentenças possuía um conteúdo moral explícito ("Transgredimos a lei se necess

  14. Study of the seroma volume changes in the patients who underwent Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Son, Sang Jun; Mun, Jun Ki; Seo, Seok Jin; Lee, Je Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    By analyzing seroma volume changes in the patients who underwent Partial breast radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery, we try to contribute to the improvement of radiotherapy effect. Enrolled 20 patients who underwent partial breast radiation therapy by ViewRay MRIdian System were subject. After seeking for the size of the removed sample in the patients during surgery and obtained seroma volume changes on a weekly basis. On the Basis of acquired volume, it was compared with age, term from start of the first treatment after surgery, BMI (body mass index) and the extracted sample size during surgery. And using the ViewRay MRIdian RTP System, the figure was analyzed by PTV(=seroma volume + margin) to obtain a specific volume of the Partial breast radiation therapy. The changes of seroma volume from MR simulation to the first treatment (a week) is 0~5% in 8, 5~10% in 3, 10 to 15% in 2, and 20% or more in 5 people. Two patients(A, B patient) among subjects showed the biggest change. The A patient's 100% of the prescribed dose volume is 213.08 cc, PTV is 181.93 cc, seroma volume is 15.3 cc in initial plan. However, while seroma volume decreased 65.36% to 5.3 cc, 100% of the prescribed dose volume was reduced to 3.4% to 102.43 cc and PTV also did 43.6% to 102.54 cc. In the case of the B patient, seroma volume decreased 42.57% from 20.2 cc to 11.6 cc. Because of that, 100% of the prescribed dose volume decreased 8.1% and PTV also did to 40%. As the period between the first therapy and surgery is shorter, the patient is elder and the size of sample is smaller than 100 cc, the change grow bigger. It is desirable to establish an adaptive plan according to each patient's changes of seroma volume through continuous observation. Because partial breast patients is more sensitive than WBRT patients about dose conformity in accordance with the volume change.

  15. Evaluation of dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted perfusion MRI in the differentiation of tumor recurrence from radiation necrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Vibeke A. [Glostrup University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Glostrup (Denmark); Glostrup University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Copenhagen Oe (Denmark); Simonsen, Helle J.; Larsson, Henrik B.W. [Glostrup University Hospital, Functional Imaging Unit, Glostrup (Denmark); Glostrup University Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology, Glostrup (Denmark); Law, Ian [Nuclear Medicine and PET, Department of Clinical Physiology, Copenhagen Oe (Denmark); Hansen, Adam E. [Glostrup University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Glostrup (Denmark); Glostrup University Hospital, Functional Imaging Unit, Glostrup (Denmark)

    2013-03-15

    To investigate if perfusion measured with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) can be used to differentiate radiation necrosis from tumor recurrence in patients with high-grade glioma. The study was approved by the institutional review board and informed consent was obtained from all subjects. 19 patients were recruited following surgery and radiation therapy for glioma. Patients had contrast enhancing lesions, which during the standard MRI examination could not be exclusively determined as recurrence or radiation necrosis. DCE-MRI was used to measure cerebral blood volume (CBV), blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and cerebral blood flow (CBF). Subjects also underwent FDG-PET and lesions were classified as either metabolically active or inactive. Follow-up clinical MRI and lesion histology in case of additional tissue resection was used to determine whether lesions were regressing or progressing. Fourteen enhancing lesions could be classified as progressing (11) or regressing (three). An empirical threshold of 2.0 ml/100 g for CBV allowed detection of regressing lesions with a sensitivity of 100 % and specificity of 100 %. FDG-PET and DCE-MRI agreed in classification of tumor status in 13 out of the 16 cases where an FDG-PET classification was obtained. In two of the remaining three patients, MRI follow-up and histology was available and both indicated that the DCE-MRI answer was correct. CBV measurements using DCE-MRI may predict the status of contrast enhancing lesions and give results very similar to FDG-PET with regards to differentiation between tumor recurrence and radiation necrosis. (orig.)

  16. MRI to predict prostate growth and development in children, adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jing; Liu, Huijia; Wang, He; Wen, Didi; Huang, Xufang; Ren, Fang; Huan, Yi

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of MRI in predicting prostate growth and development. A total of 1,500 healthy male volunteers who underwent MRI of the pelvis were included in this prospective study. Subjects were divided into five groups according to age (group A, 2-5 years; group B, 6-10 years; group C, 11-15 years; group D, 16-20 years; group E, 21-25 years). Total prostate volume (TPV) as well as prostate central zone (CZ) and peripheral zone (PZ) were measured and evaluated on MRI. Data of the different groups were compared using variance analysis, Scheffé's method, Kruskal-Wallis H-test, and Pearson's correlation. Statistical significance was inferred at P development scores were 0.08, 0.69, 1.56, 2.38, and 2.74, respectively. Both TPVs and zonal anatomy scores varied significantly among the five groups (P = 0.000). TPV and zonal anatomy score increased with increasing age. MRI provides a reliable quantitative reference for prostate growth and development. • When and how the prostate develops after birth remains unclear. • Prostate volume increases rapidly after the age of 10 years. • MRI provides a reliable objective and quantitative reference for prostate growth and development.

  17. Evaluation of biliary ductal anatomy in potential living liver donors: comparison between MRCP and Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosh, D; Goel, A; Birchall, I W; Kumar, A; Lee, K H; Patel, V H; Low, G

    2017-10-01

    To compare magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI in the evaluation of the biliary anatomy in potential living liver donors (LLDs). A retrospective study was conducted in a tertiary care liver transplant center after obtaining ethics and institutional approvals. A total of 42 potential LLD MRI examinations were performed between November 2013 and March 2016. All patients underwent a standard MRI protocol which included MRCP and Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI sequences in a single session. Three abdominal MR radiologists independently reviewed the studies and completed a customized data collection sheet for each MR sequence. The readers subjectively scored the bile duct visualization on each MR sequence on a Likert scale and classified the biliary anatomic configuration. Statistical analysis was performed using intraclass correlation coefficient and the McNemar Chi-square (χ 2) test. The 42 potential LLDs included 22 males and 20 females with an age range of 18-60 years. There was 'good' or 'excellent' inter-reader agreement on either MRI examination for the visualization of the first- and second-order ducts and the majority of third-order ducts. 'Good' inter-reader agreement on Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI and 'fair' inter-reader agreement on MRCP was noted for the left third-order medial duct. There was significantly better visualization of the cystic duct, left hepatic duct, and right second-order ducts on Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI compared with MRCP. A 12.6% improvement in classifying the biliary branch pattern was also observed on Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI compared with MRCP (P = 0.03). Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI provides additional diagnostic confidence over MRCP in the evaluation of the biliary ductal anatomy in potential LLDs.

  18. Reproducibility, and age, body-weight and gender dependency of candidate skeletal muscle MRI outcome measures in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Jasper M; Sinclair, Christopher D J; Fischmann, Arne; Reilly, Mary M; Hanna, Michael G; Yousry, Tarek A; Thornton, John S

    2014-07-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can potentially meet the pressing need for objective, sensitive, reproducible outcome measures in neuromuscular disease trials. We tested, in healthy volunteers, the consistency, reliability and sensitivity to normal inter-subject variation of MRI methods targeted to lower limb muscle pathology to inform the design of practical but comprehensive MRI outcome measure protocols for use in imminent patient studies. Forty-seven healthy volunteers, age 21-81 years, were subject at 3T to three-point Dixon fat-fraction measurement, T₁-relaxometry, T₂-relaxometry and magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR) imaging at mid-thigh and mid-calf level bilaterally. Fifteen subjects underwent repeat imaging at 2 weeks. Mean between-muscle fat fraction and T₂ differences were small, but significant (p measures in neuromuscular disease treatment trials. • Quantitative lower limb muscle MRI provides potential outcome measures in neuromuscular diseases • Bilateral thigh/calf coverage using sequences sensitive to acute and chronic pathology • Measurements have excellent scan-rescan and interobserver reliability • Measurements show small but significant inter-subject age and weight dependency • Readily implementable sequences suitable for further assessment in patient studies.

  19. Safety of routine early MRI in preterm infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaisier, Annemarie; Feijen-Roon, Monique; Heemskerk, Anneriet M.; Dudink, Jeroen [Erasmus Medical Centre - Sophia, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus Medical Centre - Sophia, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Raets, Marlou M.A.; Govaert, Paul [Erasmus Medical Centre - Sophia, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Starre, Cynthia van der [Erasmus Medical Centre - Sophia, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus Medical Centre - Sophia, Intensive Care, Department of Pediatrics and Pediatric Surgery, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lequin, Maarten H. [Erasmus Medical Centre - Sophia, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-10-15

    Cerebral MRI performed on preterm infants at term-equivalent 30 weeks' gestational age (GA) is increasingly performed as part of standard clinical care. We evaluated safety of these early MRI procedures. We retrospectively collected data on patient safety of preterm infants who underwent early MRI scans. Data were collected at fixed times before and after the MRI scan. MRI procedures were carried out according to a comprehensive guideline. A total of 52 infants underwent an MRI scan at 30 weeks' GA. Although no serious adverse events occurred and vital parameters remained stable during the procedure, minor adverse events were encountered in 26 infants (50%). The MRI was terminated in three infants (5.8%) because of respiratory instability. Increased respiratory support within 24 h after the MRI was necessary for 12 infants (23.1%) and was significantly associated with GA, birth weight and the mode of respiratory support. Hypothermia (core temperature < 36 C) occurred in nine infants (17.3%). Temperature dropped significantly after the MRI scan. Minor adverse events after MRI procedures at 30 weeks GA were common and should not be underestimated. A dedicated and comprehensive guideline for MRI procedures in preterm infants is essential. (orig.)

  20. Comparative analysis of pain in patients who underwent total knee replacement regarding the tourniquet pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos George de Souza Leão

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES: To evaluate through the visual analog scale (VAS the pain in patients undergoing total knee replacement (TKR with different pressures of the pneumatic tourniquet. METHODS: An observational, randomized, descriptive study on an analytical basis, with 60 patients who underwent TKR, divided into two groups, which were matched: a group where TKR was performed with tourniquet pressures of 350 mmHg (standard and the other with systolic blood pressure plus 100 mmHg (P + 100. These patients had their pain assessed by VAS at 48 h, and at the 5th and 15th days after procedure. Secondarily, the following were also measured: range of motion (ROM, complications, and blood drainage volume in each group; the data were subjected to statistical analysis. RESULTS: After data analysis, there was no statistical difference regarding the incidence of complications (p = 0.612, ROM (p = 0.202, bleeding after 24 and 48 h (p = 0.432 and p = 0.254 or in relation to VAS. No correlation was observed between time of ischemia compared to VAS and bleeding. CONCLUSIONS: The use of the pneumatic tourniquet pressure at 350 mmHg or systolic blood pressure plus 100 mmHg did not influence the pain, blood loss, ROM, and complications. Therefore the pressures at these levels are safe and do not change the surgery outcomes; the time of ischemia must be closely observed to avoid major complications.

  1. Language dominance assessment in a bilingual population: validity of fMRI in the second language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, Maria; Koepp, Matthias J; Vollmar, Christian; Stretton, Jason; Sidhu, Meneka; Michallef, Caroline; Symms, Mark R; Thompson, Pamela J; Duncan, John S

    2014-10-01

    Assessment of language dominance using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a standard tool to estimate the risk of language function decline after epilepsy surgery. Although there has been considerable research in the characterization of language networks in bilingual individuals; little is known about the clinical usefulness of language mapping in a secondary language in patients with epilepsy, and how language lateralization assessed by fMRI may differ by the use of native or a secondary language paradigms. In this study we investigate language representation in a population of nonnative English speakers to assess differences in fMRI language lateralization between the first (native) and second language (English). Sixteen nonnative English-speaking patients with focal drug-resistant epilepsy underwent language fMRI in their first (native) language (L1) and in English (L2). Differences between language maps using L1 and L2 paradigms were examined at the single subject level by comparing within-subject lateralization indexes obtained for each language. Differences at the group level were examined for each of the tasks and languages. Group maps for the second language (English) showed overlapping areas of activation with the native language, but with larger clusters, and more bilaterally distributed than for the first language. However, at the individual level, lateralization indexes were concordant between the two languages, except for one patient with bilateral hippocampal sclerosis who was left dominant in English and showed bilateral dominance for verb generation and right dominance for verbal fluency in his native tongue. Language lateralization can generally be reliably derived from fMRI tasks in a second language provided that the subject can follow the task. Subjects with greater likelihood of atypical language representation should be evaluated more carefully, using more than one language paradigm. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International

  2. MRI of the arthritic small joints: comparison of extremity MRI (0.2 T) vs high-field MRI (1.5 T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savnik, A. [Dept. of Rheumatology, Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark); Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital at Herlev, Copenhagen (Denmark); Dept. of Radiology, Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark); Malmskov, H.; Graff, L.B.; Danneskiold-Samsoee, B.; Bliddal, H. [Dept. of Rheumatology, Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark); Thomsen, H.S.; Bretlau, T. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital at Herlev, Copenhagen (Denmark); Nielsen, H. [Dept. of Rheumatology, University Hospital at Herlev, Copenhagen (Denmark); Boesen, J. [Dept. of Radiology, Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2001-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic capabilities of extremity MRI (E-MRI) with high-field MRI in arthritic small joints, and to evaluate the patients' acceptance and perceptions of the two MR systems. One hundred three patients (group 1=28 patients with RA <3 years, group 2=25 patients with reactive and psoriatic arthritis and mixed connective tissue disease, group 3= 25 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) more than 3 years and group 4=25 patients with arthralgia) underwent dedicated E-MRI and high-field MRI of the wrist and finger joints. Coronal short tau inversion recovery and transversal 3D T1-weighted images before and after gadodiamide (Gd) were performed in both cases to outline the volume of the synovial membrane (Vsm) and to evaluate joints with enhancement, effusion, bone edema, and erosions. Investigators blinded to the clinical findings evaluated the images. Patients' compliance and acceptance of E-MRI and high-field MRI were evaluated. The median Vsm obtained on E-MRI did not differ significantly from that obtained on high-field MRI. Vsm=1 ml (E-MRI) and 1.1 ml (high-field MRI) before Gd and Vsm=0.1 ml (E-MRI) and 0 ml (high-field MRI) after Gd (Wilcoxon test, p>0.05). The difference in agreement was 8% for joint enhancement, 2% for joint effusion, 3% for bone edema, and 4% for bone erosions. Of the patients, 64% preferred E-MRI due to more comfortable positioning and less claustrophobia and noise. Extremity MRI of the small arthritic joints is comparable to high-field MRI and more readily accepted than high-field MRI by this patient group. (orig.)

  3. MRI derived brain atrophy in PSP and MSA-P. Determining sample size to detect treatment effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paviour, Dominic C; Price, Shona L; Lees, Andrew J; Fox, Nick C

    2007-04-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system (MSA) atrophy are associated with progressive brain atrophy. Serial MRI can be applied in order to measure this change in brain volume and to calculate atrophy rates. We evaluated MRI derived whole brain and regional atrophy rates as potential markers of progression in PSP and the Parkinsonian variant of multiple system atrophy (MSA-P). 17 patients with PSP, 9 with MSA-P and 18 healthy controls underwent two MRI brain scans. MRI scans were registered, and brain and regional atrophy rates (midbrain, pons, cerebellum, third and lateral ventricles) measured. Sample sizes required to detect the effect of a proposed disease-modifying treatment were estimated. The effect of scan interval on the variance of the atrophy rates and sample size was assessed. Based on the calculated yearly rates of atrophy, for a drug effect equivalent to a 30% reduction in atrophy, fewer PSP subjects are required in each treatment arm when using midbrain rather than whole brain atrophy rates (183 cf. 499). Fewer MSA-P subjects are required, using pontine/cerebellar, rather than whole brain atrophy rates (164/129 cf. 794). A reduction in the variance of measured atrophy rates was observed with a longer scan interval. Regional rather than whole brain atrophy rates calculated from volumetric serial MRI brain scans in PSP and MSA-P provide a more practical and powerful means of monitoring disease progression in clinical trials.

  4. Anatomo-clinical overlapping maps (AnaCOM): a new method to create anatomo-functional maps from neuropsychological tests and structural MRI scan of subjects with brain lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinkingnehun, Serge R. J.; du Boisgueheneuc, Foucaud; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Zhang, Sandy X.; Levy, Richard; Dubois, Bruno

    2004-04-01

    We have developed a new technique to analyze correlations between brain anatomy and its neurological functions. The technique is based on the anatomic MRI of patients with brain lesions who are administered neuropsychological tests. Brain lesions of the MRI scans are first manually segmented. The MRI volumes are then normalized to a reference map, using the segmented area as a mask. After normalization, the brain lesions of the MRI are segmented again in order to redefine the border of the lesions in the context of the normalized brain. Once the MRI is segmented, the patient's score on the neuropsychological test is assigned to each voxel in the lesioned area, while the rest of the voxels of the image are set to 0. Subsequently, the individual patient's MRI images are superimposed, and each voxel is reassigned the average score of the patients who have a lesion at that voxel. A threshold is applied to remove regions having less than three overlaps. This process leads to an anatomo-functional map that links brain areas to functional loss. Other maps can be created to aid in analyzing the functional maps, such as one that indicates the 95% confidence interval of the averaged scores for each area. This anatomo-clinical overlapping map (AnaCOM) method was used to obtain functional maps from patients with lesions in the superior frontal gyrus. By finding particular subregions more responsible for a particular deficit, this method can generate new hypotheses to be tested by conventional group methods.

  5. Comparison of MRI- and CT-based semiautomated liver segmentation: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotra, Akshat; Chartrand, Gabriel; Vu, Kim-Nhien; Vandenbroucke-Menu, Franck; Massicotte-Tisluck, Karine; de Guise, Jacques A; Tang, An

    2017-02-01

    To compare the repeatability, agreement, and efficiency of MRI- and CT-based semiautomated liver segmentation for the assessment of total and subsegmental liver volume. This retrospective study was conducted in 31 subjects who underwent contemporaneous liver MRI and CT. Total and subsegmental liver volumes were segmented from contrast-enhanced 3D gradient-recalled echo MRI sequences and CT images. Semiautomated segmentation was based on variational interpolation and Laplacian mesh optimization. All segmentations were repeated after 2 weeks. Manual segmentation of CT images using an active contour tool was used as the reference standard. Repeatability and agreement of the methods were evaluated with intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) and Bland-Altman analysis. Total interaction time was recorded. Intra-reader ICC were ≥0.987 for MRI and ≥0.995 for CT. Intra-reader repeatability was 30 ± 217 ml (bias ± 1.96 SD) (95% limits of agreement: -187 to 247 ml) for MRI and -10 ± 143 ml (-153 to 133 ml) for CT. Inter-method ICC between semiautomated and manual volumetry were ≥0.995 for MRI and ≥0.986 for CT. Inter-method segmental ICC varied between 0.584 and 0.865 for MRI and between 0.596 and 0.890 for CT. Inter-method agreement was -14 ± 136 ml (-150 to 122 ml) for MRI and 50 ± 226 ml (-176 to 276 ml) for CT. Inter-method segmental agreement ranged from 10 ± 47 ml (-37 to 57 ml) to 2 ± 214 ml (-212 to 216 ml) for MRI and 9 ± 45 ml (-36 to 54 ml) to -46 ± 183 ml (-229 to 137 ml) for CT. Interaction time (mean ± SD) was significantly shorter for MRI-based semiautomated segmentation (7.2 ± 0.1 min, p segmentation (6.5 ± 0.2 min, p segmentation (14.5 ± 0.4 min). MRI-based semiautomated segmentation provides similar repeatability and agreement to CT-based segmentation for total liver volume.

  6. Inter- and intra-observer agreement of BI-RADS-based subjective visual estimation of amount of fibroglandular breast tissue with magnetic resonance imaging: comparison to automated quantitative assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wengert, G.J.; Helbich, T.H.; Woitek, R.; Kapetas, P.; Clauser, P.; Baltzer, P.A. [Medical University of Vienna/ Vienna General Hospital, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Vogl, W.D. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Computational Imaging Research Lab, Wien (Austria); Weber, M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of General and Pediatric Radiology, Wien (Austria); Meyer-Baese, A. [State University of Florida, Department of Scientific Computing in Medicine, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Pinker, Katja [Medical University of Vienna/ Vienna General Hospital, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Vienna (Austria); State University of Florida, Department of Scientific Computing in Medicine, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Services, New York City, NY (United States)

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate the inter-/intra-observer agreement of BI-RADS-based subjective visual estimation of the amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to investigate whether FGT assessment benefits from an automated, observer-independent, quantitative MRI measurement by comparing both approaches. Eighty women with no imaging abnormalities (BI-RADS 1 and 2) were included in this institutional review board (IRB)-approved prospective study. All women underwent un-enhanced breast MRI. Four radiologists independently assessed FGT with MRI by subjective visual estimation according to BI-RADS. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurement of FGT with MRI was performed using a previously described measurement system. Inter-/intra-observer agreements of qualitative and quantitative FGT measurements were assessed using Cohen's kappa (k). Inexperienced readers achieved moderate inter-/intra-observer agreement and experienced readers a substantial inter- and perfect intra-observer agreement for subjective visual estimation of FGT. Practice and experience reduced observer-dependency. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurement of FGT was successfully performed and revealed only fair to moderate agreement (k = 0.209-0.497) with subjective visual estimations of FGT. Subjective visual estimation of FGT with MRI shows moderate intra-/inter-observer agreement, which can be improved by practice and experience. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurements of FGT are necessary to allow a standardized risk evaluation. (orig.)

  7. Large scale fusion of gray matter and resting-state functional MRI reveals common and shared biological markers across the psychosis spectrum in the B-SNIP cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng eWang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To investigate whether aberrant interactions between brain structure and function present similarly or differently across probands with psychotic illnesses (schizophrenia (SZ, schizoaffective disorder (SAD, and bipolar I disorder with psychosis (BP and whether these deficits are shared with their first-degree non-psychotic relatives. A total of 1199 subjects were assessed, including 220 SZ, 147 SAD, 180 psychotic BP, 150 first-degree relatives of SZ, 126 SAD relatives, 134 BP relatives and 242 healthy controls. All subjects underwent structural MRI (sMRI and resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI scanning. Joint independent analysis (jICA was used to fuse sMRI gray matter (GM and rs-fMRI amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF data to identify the relationship between the two modalities. Joint ICA revealed two significantly fused components. The association between functional brain alteration in a prefrontal-striatal-thalamic-cerebellar network and structural abnormalities in the default mode network (DMN was found to be common across psychotic diagnoses and correlated with cognitive function, social function and Schizo-Bipolar Scale (SBS scores. The fused alteration in the temporal lobe was unique to SZ and SAD. The above effects were not seen in any relative group (including those with cluster-A personality. Using a multivariate fused approach involving two widely used imaging markers we demonstrate both shared and distinct biological traits across the psychosis spectrum. Further, our results suggest that the above traits are psychosis biomarkers rather than endophenotypes.

  8. Brain activity modification produced by a single radioelectric asymmetric brain stimulation pulse: a new tool for neuropsychiatric treatments. Preliminary fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castagna A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Salvatore Rinaldi1,2, Vania Fontani1, Alessandro Castagna1 1Department of Neuro-Psycho-Physio Pathology, Rinaldi Fontani Institute, Florence, Italy; 2Medical School of Occupational Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy Purpose: Radioelectric asymmetric brain stimulation technology with its treatment protocols has shown efficacy in various psychiatric disorders. The aim of this work was to highlight the mechanisms by which these positive effects are achieved. The current study was conducted to determine whether a single 500-millisecond radioelectric asymmetric conveyor (REAC brain stimulation pulse (BSP, applied to the ear, can effect a modification of brain activity that is detectable using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Methods: Ten healthy volunteers, six females and four males, underwent fMRI during a simple finger-tapping motor task before and after receiving a single 500-millisecond REAC-BSP. Results: The fMRI results indicate that the average variation in task-induced encephalic activation patterns is lower in subjects following the single REAC pulse. Conclusion: The current report demonstrates that a single REAC-BSP is sufficient to modulate brain activity in awake subjects, able to be measured using fMRI. These initial results open new perspectives into the understanding of the effects of weak and brief radio pulses upon brain activity, and provide the basis for further indepth studies using REAC-BSP and fMRI. Keywords: fMRI, brain stimulation, brain modulation, REAC, neuropsychiatric treatments

  9. Distinctive MRI features of the epileptogenic zone in children with tuberous sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahodova, A., E-mail: a.jagoda@email.cz [Department of Pediatric Neurology, Charles University, Second Medical School, Motol University Hospital, V Uvalu 84, Prague 5 150 06 (Czech Republic); Krsek, P., E-mail: pavel.krsek@post.cz [Department of Pediatric Neurology, Charles University, Second Medical School, Motol University Hospital, V Uvalu 84, Prague 5 150 06 (Czech Republic); Kyncl, M., E-mail: martinkyn@seznam.cz [Department of Radiology, Charles University, Second Medical School, Motol University Hospital, V Uvalu 84, Prague 5 150 06 (Czech Republic); Jezdik, P., E-mail: jezdip1@feld.cvut.cz [Department of Measurement, Faculty of Electric, Czech Technical University Prague, Technicka 2, CZ 166 27 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Kudr, M., E-mail: mat.kudr@gmail.com [Department of Pediatric Neurology, Charles University, Second Medical School, Motol University Hospital, V Uvalu 84, Prague 5 150 06 (Czech Republic); Komarek, V., E-mail: vladimir.komarek@fnmotol.cz [Department of Pediatric Neurology, Charles University, Second Medical School, Motol University Hospital, V Uvalu 84, Prague 5 150 06 (Czech Republic); Jayakar, P., E-mail: Prasanna.Jayakar@mch.com [Department of Neurology and Comprehensive Epilepsy Program, Brain Institute, Miami Children' s Hospital, 3200 S.W. 60th Court, Miami, FL (United States); Miller, I., E-mail: ian.miller@mchdocs.com [Department of Neurology and Comprehensive Epilepsy Program, Brain Institute, Miami Children' s Hospital, 3200 S.W. 60th Court, Miami, FL (United States); Resnick, T., E-mail: trevor.resnick@mch.com [Department of Neurology and Comprehensive Epilepsy Program, Brain Institute, Miami Children' s Hospital, 3200 S.W. 60th Court, Miami, FL (United States); Department of Neurology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); and others

    2014-04-15

    Objective: Localization of the epileptogenic zone (EZ) is challenging in children with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). We sought to ascertain whether brain MRI could identify the EZ in TSC patients independent of the clinical and diagnostic data. Methods: Presurgical MRI's of 34 children with TSC who underwent epilepsy surgery at Miami Children's Hospital were retrospectively reevaluated by experts blinded to all other data. Changes typical of TSC (tubers, calcifications, cystic changes) and abnormalities of the perituberal cortex typical of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) (increased cortical thickness, abnormal gyration, transmantle change, gray/white matter junction blurring) were identified and their localization was compared with the resection site. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of individual MRI features to localize the EZ were determined and statistically compared between postoperatively seizure-free and non-seizure-free patients as well as clusters of features typical of FCD and TSC. Results: MRI alone correctly localized the resection cavity in all 19 postoperatively seizure-free patients and 12 of 15 non-seizure-free subjects. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI features typical of FCD to localize EZ (90%, 96% and 96%, respectively) were superior to those typical of TCS (79%, 75% and 75%, p < 0.0001). Increased cortical thickness and abnormal gyral formation outside tubers occurred only in the resection site. Resection sites were better predicted by MRI in seizure-free than in non-seizure-free patients. Conclusion: Thorough MRI evaluation identifies the EZ in a significant proportion of TSC patients. Epileptogenic regions were mostly characterized by “FCD-like” changes outside cortical tubers. The findings may have important practical consequences for surgical planning in TSC.

  10. Dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MRI in early ischaemia of the proximal femoral epiphysis - a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X.; Qi, J.; Xia, L.; Yu, C.; Peng, W.; Hu, X. [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Hu, D. [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China)], E-mail: lilyboston2002@163.com; Feng, D.; Hu, J. [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Qiu, L. [Department of Statistics, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Li, H. [Department of Histology, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China)

    2008-10-15

    Aim: To compare the sensitivities of dynamic Gadoteridol (Gd)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and conventional Gd-enhanced spin-echo (SE) T1-weighted imaging (WI) in the detection of decreased perfusion of early epiphyseal ischaemia, and to determine the contribution of metaphyseal vascularity to physeal perfusion in epiphyseal vascular occlusion by dynamic Gd-enhanced MRI. Materials and methods: Twenty-eight 2-week-old piglets were divided evenly into four groups: control groups A and B, and ischaemic groups A and B (seven animals in each). In the ischaemic groups, MRI was performed bilaterally on hips in persistent hyperabduction for 30 min. In the control and ischaemic group A the piglets underwent dynamic Gd-enhanced MRI, and in control and ischaemic group B the piglets were subjected to Gd-enhanced SE T1WI. Results: In ischaemic group A, the enhancement ratio (ER) and enhancement speed (ES) of the various tissues (except the metaphysis) were significantly lower than those in control group A on dynamic Gd-enhanced MRI (p < 0.05). However, in ischaemic group B, no significant decrease in the ER of each tissue was found, compared with the ER in control group B as viewed using Gd-enhanced SE T1WI (p > 0.05). On dynamic Gd-enhanced MRI, the ER and ES of the physis were less than those of metaphysis in the ischaemic group A (p < 0.05); however, the ER and ES of the physis were similar to those of metaphysis in control group A (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Dynamic Gd-enhanced MRI is more sensitive than conventional Gd-enhanced SE T1WI in the detection of early epiphyseal ischaemia. Physeal perfusion might be from the metaphysis in epiphyseal vascular occlusion.

  11. Uterine Cervical Malignancy: Diagnostic Accuracy of MRI with Histopathologic Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A Shweel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cervical cancer is the third most common malignancy in women worldwide. Accurate staging of the disease is crucial in planning the optimal treatment strategy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in the assessment of extension and staging of cervical malignancy in correlation with histopathologic examination. Materials and Methods: Thirty females with untreated pathologically proven uterine cervical carcinoma were included in this prospective study. The patients were 40 - 65 years of age and their average age was 45 years. All patients were subjected to routine clinical staging workup and underwent MRI for preoperative staging. Preoperative MRI findings were reviewed and compared with the final pathological staging that is the Gold Standard of reference. Results: Histopathologic examination established that of the 30 tumors, 22 (73.3% were squamous cell carcinoma. According to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO staging criteria, 2/30 patients (6.6% were stage IB, 12/30 (40.3% were IIA, 8/30 were IIB (26.6%, and 8/30 (26.6% were IVA. MRI had a sensitivity of 100% and specificity 85.7% in the detection of parametrial infiltration, and a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 90% in the detection of vaginal infiltration. It was sensitive (100% and specific (100% in detecting tumor extension to the stroma, urinary bladder, and rectum. Pathological examination demonstrated stage IB cervical carcinoma in 2/30 patients (6.6%, stage IIA disease in 10/30 patients (33.3%, stage IIB in 6/30 patients (20%, and stage IV disease in 8/30 patients (26.6%. MRI features demonstrated stage IB in 2/30 patients (6.6%, stage IIA disease in 12/30 patients (40%, stage IIB in 8/30 patients (26.6%, and stage IV disease in 8/30 patients (26.6%. MRI staging of cervical carcinoma was in concordance with histopathologic staging in stages IB and IVA and over-staging in IIA and IIB stages

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest ... limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  13. MRI findings of juvenile psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Edward Y.; Kleinman, Paul K. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, MA (United States); Sundel, Robert P.; Kim, Susan [Harvard Medical School, Rheumatology Program, Division of Immunology and the Department of Pediatrics, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, MA (United States); Zurakowski, David [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-11-15

    The aim of this study was to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JpsA) in children in order to facilitate early diagnosis and proper management. Two pediatric radiologists retrospectively reviewed in consensus a total of 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric patients (nine boys, 22 girls; age range 1-17 years; mean age 9.4 years) who had a definite diagnosis of JpsA and underwent MRI. Each MRI was evaluated for synovium abnormality (thickening and enhancement), joint effusion (small, moderate, and large), bone marrow abnormality (edema, enhancement, and location of abnormality), soft tissue abnormality (edema, enhancement, atrophy, and fatty infiltration), tendon abnormality (thickening, edema, tendon sheath fluid, and enhancement), and articular abnormality (joint space narrowing and erosion). The distribution of abnormal MRI findings among the six categories for the 37 MRI examinations was evaluated. The number of abnormal MRI findings for each MRI examination was assessed. Age at MRI examination and all six categories of abnormal MRI findings according to gender were evaluated. There were a total 96 abnormal MRI findings noted on 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric patients. The 37 abnormal MRI examinations included MRI of the hand (n=8), knee (n = 8), ankle (n = 5), pelvis (n = 5), temporomandibular joint (n = 4), wrist (n = 3), foot (n = 2), elbow (n = 1), and shoulder (n = 1). Twenty-eight diffuse synovial thickening and/or enhancement were the most common MRI abnormality (29.2%). Joint effusion comprised 22 abnormal MRI findings (22.9%). There were 16 abnormal MRI bone marrow edema and/or enhancement findings (16.7%), and in seven (7.3%) the edema involved non-articular sites. Soft tissue abnormality manifested as edema and/or enhancement constituted 14 abnormal MRI findings (14.5%). There were ten MRI abnormalities (10.4%) involving tendons. Articular abnormality seen as joint space

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is ... not to have an MRI exam during the first trimester unless medically necessary. MRI may not always ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... the limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the chest is ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the chest is performed ...

  19. The Effect of Two Different Hand Exercises on Grip Strength, Forearm Circumference, and Vascular Maturation in Patients Who Underwent Arteriovenous Fistula Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Sangwon; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Junho; Jang, Seong Ho

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the effect of two different hand exercises on hand strength and vascular maturation in patients who underwent arteriovenous fistula surgery. Methods We recruited 18 patients who had chronic kidney disease and had undergone arteriovenous fistula surgery for hemodialysis. After the surgery, 10 subjects performed hand-squeezing exercise with GD Grip, and other 8 subjects used Soft Ball. The subjects continued the exercises for 4 weeks. The hand grip strength, pinch strength ...

  20. Hyperpolarized Helium-3 MRI of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction during challenge and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Stanley J; Niles, David J; Dardzinski, Bernard; Harman, Amy; Jarjour, Nizar N; Ruddy, Marcella; Nagle, Scott K; Francois, Christopher J; Sorkness, Ronald L; Burton, Ryan M; Munoz del Rio, Alejandro; Fain, Sean B

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the utility of hyperpolarized He-3 MRI for detecting regional lung ventilated volume (VV) changes in response to exercise challenge and leukotriene inhibitor montelukast, human subjects with exercise induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) were recruited. This condition is described by airway constriction following exercise leading to reduced forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) coinciding with ventilation defects on hyperpolarized He-3 MRI. Thirteen EIB subjects underwent spirometry and He-3 MRI at baseline, postexercise, and postrecovery at multiple visits. On one visit montelukast was given and on two visits placebo was given. Regional VV was calculated in the apical/basilar dimension, in the anterior/posterior dimension, and for the entire lung volume. The whole lung VV was used as an end-point and compared with spirometry. Postchallenge FEV1 dropped with placebo but not with treatment, while postchallenge VV dropped more with placebo than treatment. Sources of variability for VV included region (anterior/posterior), scan, and treatment. VV correlated with FEV1/ forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75% of FVC and showed gravitational dependence after exercise challenge. A paradigm testing the response of ventilation to montelukast revealed both a whole-lung and regional response to exercise challenge and therapy in EIB subjects. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how does it ... and MRI Breast-feeding and MRI What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  4. MRI of the Musculoskeletal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Musculoskeletal Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... the limitations of a Musculoskeletal MRI? What is MRI of the Musculoskeletal System? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine ... limitations of MRI of the Spine? What is MRI of the Spine? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  6. Improving language mapping in clinical fMRI through assessment of grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Połczyńska, Monika; Japardi, Kevin; Curtiss, Susan; Moody, Teena; Benjamin, Christopher; Cho, Andrew; Vigil, Celia; Kuhn, Taylor; Jones, Michael; Bookheimer, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Brain surgery in the language dominant hemisphere remains challenging due to unintended post-surgical language deficits, despite using pre-surgical functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) and intraoperative cortical stimulation. Moreover, patients are often recommended not to undergo surgery if the accompanying risk to language appears to be too high. While standard fMRI language mapping protocols may have relatively good predictive value at the group level, they remain sub-optimal on an individual level. The standard tests used typically assess lexico-semantic aspects of language, and they do not accurately reflect the complexity of language either in comprehension or production at the sentence level. Among patients who had left hemisphere language dominance we assessed which tests are best at activating language areas in the brain. We compared grammar tests (items testing word order in actives and passives, wh -subject and object questions, relativized subject and object clauses and past tense marking) with standard tests (object naming, auditory and visual responsive naming), using pre-operative fMRI. Twenty-five surgical candidates (13 females) participated in this study. Sixteen patients presented with a brain tumor, and nine with epilepsy. All participants underwent two pre-operative fMRI protocols: one including CYCLE-N grammar tests (items testing word order in actives and passives, wh-subject and object questions, relativized subject and object clauses and past tense marking); and a second one with standard fMRI tests (object naming, auditory and visual responsive naming). fMRI activations during performance in both protocols were compared at the group level, as well as in individual candidates. The grammar tests generated more volume of activation in the left hemisphere (left/right angular gyrus, right anterior/posterior superior temporal gyrus) and identified additional language regions not shown by the standard tests (e.g., left anterior

  7. Cortical Cerebral Microinfarcts on 3 Tesla MRI in Patients with Vascular Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Doeschka A; van Veluw, Susanne J; Koek, Huiberdina L; Exalto, Lieza G; Biessels, Geert Jan

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral microinfarcts (CMIs) are small ischemic lesions that are a common neuropathological finding in patients with stroke or dementia. CMIs in the cortex can now be detected in vivo on 3 Tesla MRI. To determine the occurrence of CMIs and associated clinical features in patients with possible vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). 182 memory-clinic patients (mean age 71.4±10.6, 55% male) with vascular injury on brain MRI (i.e., possible VCI) underwent a standardized work-up including 3 Tesla MRI and cognitive assessment. A control group consisted of 70 cognitively normal subjects (mean age 70.6±4.7, 60% male). Cortical CMIs and other neuroimaging markers of vascular brain injury were rated according to established criteria. Occurrence of CMIs was higher (20%) in patients compared to controls (10%). Among patients, the presence of CMIs was associated with male sex, history of stroke, infarcts, and white matter hyperintensities. CMI presence was also associated with a diagnosis of vascular dementia and reduced performance in multiple cognitive domains. CMIs on 3 Tesla MRI are common in patients with possible VCI and co-occur with imaging markers of small and large vessel disease, likely reflecting a heterogeneous etiology. CMIs are associated with worse cognitive performance, independent of other markers of vascular brain injury.

  8. Effects of cannabis on cognition in patients with MS: a psychometric and MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavisian, Bennis; MacIntosh, Bradley J; Szilagyi, Greg; Staines, Richard W; O'Connor, Paul; Feinstein, Anthony

    2014-05-27

    To determine functional and structural neuroimaging correlates of cognitive dysfunction associated with cannabis use in multiple sclerosis (MS). In a cross-sectional study, 20 subjects with MS who smoked cannabis and 19 noncannabis users with MS, matched on demographic and neurologic variables, underwent fMRI while completing a test of working memory, the N-Back. Resting-state fMRI and structural MRI data (lesion and normal-appearing brain tissue volumes, diffusion tensor imaging metrics) were also collected. Neuropsychological data pertaining to verbal (Selective Reminding Test Revised) and visual (10/36 Spatial Recall Test) memory, information processing speed (Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test [2- and 3-second versions] and Symbol Digit Modalities Test), and attention (Word List Generation) were obtained. The cannabis group performed more poorly on the more demanding of the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test tasks (i.e., 2-second version) (p Cannabis users had more diffuse cerebral activation across all N-Back trials and made more errors on the 2-Back task (p working memory. No group differences in resting-state networks or structural MRI variables were found. Patients with MS who smoke cannabis are more cognitively impaired than nonusers. Cannabis further compromises cerebral compensatory mechanisms, already faulty in MS. These imaging data boost the construct validity of the neuropsychological findings and act as a cautionary note to cannabis users and prescribers. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  9. Bilateral transfer phenomenon: A functional magnetic resonance imaging pilot study of healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uggetti, Carla; Ausenda, Carlo D; Squarza, Silvia; Cadioli, Marcello; Grimoldi, Ludovico; Cerri, Cesare; Cariati, Maurizio

    2016-08-01

    The bilateral transfer of a motor skill is a physiological phenomenon: the development of a motor skill with one hand can trigger the development of the same ability of the other hand. The purpose of this study was to verify whether bilateral transfer is associated with a specific brain activation pattern using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The motor task was implemented as the execution of the Nine Hole Peg Test. Fifteen healthy subjects (10 right-handers and five left-handers) underwent two identical fMRI runs performing the motor task with the non-dominant hand. Between the first and the second run, each subject was intensively trained for five minutes to perform the same motor task with the dominant hand. Comparing the two functional scans across the pool of subjects, a change of the motor activation pattern was observed. In particular, we observed, in the second run, a change in the activation pattern both in the cerebellum and in the cerebral cortex. We found activations in cortical areas involved in somatosensory integration, areas involved in procedural memory. Our study shows, in a small group of healthy subjects, the modification of the fMRI activation pathway of a motor task performed by the non-dominant hand after intensive exercise performing the same task with the dominant hand. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. MRI differentiation of pneumonia-like mucinous adenocarcinoma and infectious pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaeta, Michele, E-mail: gaesam@hotmail.it [Department of Radiological Sciences, Policlinico ' G. Martino' , Via Consolare Valeria 1, 98100 Messina (Italy); Ascenti, Giorgio, E-mail: gascenti@unime.it [Department of Radiological Sciences, Policlinico ' G. Martino' , Via Consolare Valeria 1, 98100 Messina (Italy); Mazziotti, Silvio, E-mail: smazziotti@unime.it [Department of Radiological Sciences, Policlinico ' G. Martino' , Via Consolare Valeria 1, 98100 Messina (Italy); Contiguglia, Rosario, E-mail: rosariocontiguglia@libero.it [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Local Health Unit, Messina (Italy); Barone, Mario, E-mail: mario.barone@unime.it [Clinical and Experimental Department of Medicine and Pharmacology, Policlinico ' G. Martino' , Messina (Italy); Mileto, Achille, E-mail: achille.mileto@gmail.com [Department of Radiological Sciences, Policlinico ' G. Martino' , Via Consolare Valeria 1, 98100 Messina (Italy)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To evaluate the role of MRI water-sensitive sequences in the differential diagnosis between pneumonia-like mucinous adenocarcinoma and infectious pneumonia. Subjects and methods: Twenty-three patients with pneumonia-like mucinous adenocarcinoma and 30 patients with infectious pneumonia underwent computed tomography (CT) and MRI. Two blinded and independent readers evaluated CT and MR images using a 3-level confidence scale in two separate sessions. Results were tested for statistical significance using the Fisher's exact test and the Cohen's k test. Results: On CT, the two readers respectively made correct diagnoses of mucinous adenocarcinoma in 17 out of 23 cases (73.9%), and in 15 out of 23 cases (65.2%). A correct diagnosis of infectious pneumonia was made in 22 out of 30 cases (73.3%), and in 24 out of 30 cases (80.0%). On MRI, both readers made correct diagnoses of mucinous adenocarcinoma in 23 out of 23 (100%) cases, and of infectious pneumonia in 30 out of 30 (100%) cases. Fisher's exact test showed a significant difference in the diagnosis of mucinous adenocarcinoma between MRI and CT for both readers, P = 0.01 for reader 1 and P = 0.002 for reader 2, respectively. A good agreement (k = 0.73) was found between the two readers on CT evaluation, whereas an almost perfect agreement (k = 1.00) was found for MRI. Conclusions: MRI with 'water-sensitive' sequences should be added in the diagnostic protocol of every patient with pulmonary consolidation suspected to be mucinous adenocarcinoma.

  11. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest uses a powerful ... Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  12. Simultaneous evaluation of brain tumour metabolism, structure and blood volume using [18F]-fluoroethyltyrosine (FET) PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Otto M.; Larsen, Vibeke A; Muhic, Aida

    2016-01-01

    of simultaneous structural MRI, BV MRI and FET PET of gliomas using an integrated PET/MRI scanner and to assess the spatial and quantitative agreement in tumour imaging between BV MRI and FET PET. METHODS: A total of 32 glioma patients underwent a 20-min static simultaneous PET/MRI acquisition on a Siemens m......MR system 20 min after injection of 200 MBq FET. The MRI protocol included standard structural MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) imaging for BV measurements. Maximal relative tumour FET uptake (TBRmax) and BV (rBVmax), and Dice coefficients were calculated to assess the quantitative and spatial...

  13. Regional fMRI hypoactivation and altered functional connectivity during emotion processing in nonmedicated depressed patients with bipolar II disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizueta, Nathalie; Rudie, Jeffrey D; Townsend, Jennifer D; Torrisi, Salvatore; Moody, Teena D; Bookheimer, Susan Y; Altshuler, Lori L

    2012-08-01

    Although the amygdala and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex have been implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar I disorder, the neural mechanisms underlying bipolar II disorder remain unknown. The authors examined neural activity in response to negative emotional faces during an emotion perception task that reliably activates emotion regulatory regions. Twenty-one nonmedicated depressed bipolar II patients and 21 healthy comparison subjects underwent functional MRI (fMRI) while performing an emotional face-matching task. Within- and between-group whole-brain fMRI activation and seed-based connectivity analyses were conducted. In depressed bipolar II patients, random-effects between-group fMRI analyses revealed a significant reduction in activation in several regions, including the left and right ventrolateral prefrontal cortices (Brodmann's area [BA] 47) and the right amygdala, a priori regions of interest. Additionally, bipolar patients exhibited significantly reduced negative functional connectivity between the right amygdala and the right orbitofrontal cortex (BA 10) as well as the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 46) relative to healthy comparison subjects. These findings suggest that bipolar II depression is characterized by reduced regional orbitofrontal and limbic activation and altered connectivity in a fronto-temporal circuit implicated in working memory and emotional learning. While the amygdala hypoactivation observed in bipolar II depression is opposite to the direction seen in bipolar I mania and may therefore be state dependent, the observed orbitofrontal cortex hypoactivation is consistent with findings in bipolar I depression, mania, and euthymia, suggesting a physiologic trait marker of the disorder.

  14. Feasibility and acceptance of simultaneous amyloid PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuetz, Lisa; Tiepolt, Solveig; Werner, Peter; Jochimsen, Thies; Rullmann, Michael; Sattler, Bernhard; Patt, Marianne; Barthel, Henryk [Leipzig University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Lobsien, Donald; Fritzsch, Dominik; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus [Leipzig University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Leipzig (Germany); Schroeter, Matthias L.; Villringer, Arno [Leipzig University Hospital and Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Day Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, Leipzig (Germany); Leipzig University Hospital, IFB Adiposity Diseases, Leipzig (Germany); Berrouschot, Joerg [Clinical Centre Altenburger Land, Altenburg (Germany); Saur, Dorothee; Classen, Joseph [Leipzig University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Leipzig (Germany); Hesse, Swen; Sabri, Osama [Leipzig University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Leipzig University Hospital, IFB Adiposity Diseases, Leipzig (Germany); Gertz, Hermann-Josef [Leipzig University Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Established Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarker concepts classify into amyloid pathology and neuronal injury biomarkers, while recent alternative concepts classify into diagnostic and progression AD biomarkers. However, combined amyloid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) offers the chance to obtain both biomarker category read-outs within one imaging session, with increased patient as well as referrer convenience. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate this matter for the first time. 100 subjects (age 70 ± 10 yrs, 46 female), n = 51 with clinically defined mild cognitive impairment (MCI), n = 44 with possible/probable AD dementia, and n = 5 with frontotemporal lobe degeneration, underwent simultaneous [{sup 18}F]florbetaben or [{sup 11}C]PIB PET/MRI (3 Tesla Siemens mMR). Brain amyloid load, mesial temporal lobe atrophy (MTLA) by means of the Scheltens scale, and other morphological brain pathologies were scored by respective experts. The patients/caregivers as well as the referrers were asked to assess on a five-point scale the convenience related to the one-stop-shop PET and MRI approach. In three subjects, MRI revealed temporal lobe abnormalities other than MTLA. According to the National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association classification, the combined amyloid-beta PET/MRI evaluation resulted in 31 %, 45 %, and 24 % of the MCI subjects being categorized as ''MCI-unlikely due to AD'', ''MCI due to AD-intermediate likelihood'', and ''MCI due to AD-high likelihood'', respectively. 50 % of the probable AD dementia patients were categorized as ''High level of evidence of AD pathophysiological process'', and 56 % of the possible AD dementia patients as ''Possible AD dementia - with evidence of AD pathophysiological process''. With regard to the International Working Group 2 classification, 36 subjects had both

  15. Diagnostic performance of CUBE MRI sequences of the knee compared with conventional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, T; Zhang, W; Priddy, N K; Li, X

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and efficiency of three-dimensional (3D) fast spin-echo (FSE) with variable flip angle ("CUBE") magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in knee imaging as compared with conventional MRI. Twenty-nine patients (single knee) with joint injuries of varying degrees were enrolled in this study between January, 2011 and December, 2011. All patients underwent conventional MRI and a fat-suppressed CUBE MRI sequence. All patients subsequently underwent knee arthroscopic surgery performed by an experienced orthopaedic surgeon within 2 weeks after the MRI examinations. With standard reference provided by arthroscopic results, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of both the CUBE and conventional MRI techniques were calculated for detecting cartilage lesions, meniscus tears, and anterior cruciate ligament injuries, respectively. A chi-square test was used for statistical analysis with a level of significance of p superior sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy to a conventional imaging protocol in the comprehensive evaluation of knee joint injuries. Copyright © 2012 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. PKCα is genetically linked to memory capacity in healthy subjects and to risk for posttraumatic stress disorder in genocide survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Ackermann, Sandra; Aerni, Amanda; Boesiger, Peter; Demougin, Philippe; Elbert, Thomas; Ertl, Verena; Gschwind, Leo; Hadziselimovic, Nils; Hanser, Edveena; Heck, Angela; Hieber, Petra; Huynh, Kim-Dung; Klarhöfer, Markus; Luechinger, Roger; Rasch, Björn; Scheffler, Klaus; Spalek, Klara; Stippich, Christoph; Vogler, Christian; Vukojevic, Vanja; Stetak, Attila; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas

    2012-05-29

    Strong memory of a traumatic event is thought to contribute to the development and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Therefore, a genetic predisposition to build strong memories could lead to increased risk for PTSD after a traumatic event. Here we show that genetic variability of the gene encoding PKCα (PRKCA) was associated with memory capacity--including aversive memory--in nontraumatized subjects of European descent. This finding was replicated in an independent sample of nontraumatized subjects, who additionally underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). fMRI analysis revealed PRKCA genotype-dependent brain activation differences during successful encoding of aversive information. Further, the identified genetic variant was also related to traumatic memory and to the risk for PTSD in heavily traumatized survivors of the Rwandan genocide. Our results indicate a role for PKCα in memory and suggest a genetic link between memory and the risk for PTSD.

  17. Brain MRI and SPECT in the diagnosis of early neurological involvement in Wilson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piga, Mario; Satta, Loredana; Serra, Alessandra; Loi, Gianluigi [Policlinico Universitario, University of Cagliari, Nuclear Medicine, Department of Medical Science, Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Murru, Alessandra; Demelia, Luigi [Policlinico Universitario, University of Cagliari, Gastroenterology, Department of Medical Science, Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Sias, Alessandro [Policlinico Universitario, University of Cagliari, Radiology, Department of Medical Science, Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Marrosu, Francesco [Policlinico Universitario, University of Cagliari, Neurology, Department of Medical Science, Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy)

    2008-04-15

    To evaluate the impact of brain MRI and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in early detection of central nervous system abnormalities in patients affected by Wilson's disease (WD) with or without neurological involvement. Out of 25 consecutive WD patients, 13 showed hepatic involvement, ten hepatic and neurological manifestations, and twp hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric symptoms, including mainly movement disorders, major depression, and psychosis. Twenty-four healthy, age-gender matched subjects served as controls. All patients underwent brain MRI and {sup 99m}Tc-ethyl-cysteinate dimer (ECD) SPECT before starting specific therapy. Voxel-by-voxel analyses were performed using statistical parametric mapping to compare differences in {sup 99m}Tc-ECD brain uptake between the two groups. Brain MRI showed T2-weighted hyperintensities in seven patients (28%), six of whom were affected by hepatic and neurological forms. Brain perfusion SPECT showed pathological data in 19 patients (76%), revealing diffuse or focal hypoperfusion in superior frontal (Brodmann area (BA) 6), prefrontal (BA 9), parietal (BA 40), and occipital (BA 18, BA 39) cortices in temporal gyri (BA 37, BA 21) and in caudatus and putamen. Moreover, hepatic involvement was detected in nine subjects; eight presented both hepatic and neurological signs, while two exhibited WD-correlated hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric alterations. All but one patient with abnormal MRI matched with abnormal ECD SPECT. Pathologic MRI findings were obtained in six out of ten patients with hepatic and neurological involvement while abnormal ECD SPECT was revealed in eight patients. Both patients with hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric involvement displayed abnormal ECD SPECT and one displayed an altered MRI. These findings suggest that ECD SPECT might be useful in detecting early brain damage in WD, not only in the perspective of assessing and treating motor impairment but also in evaluating

  18. Multiparametric MRI in the assessment of response of rectal cancer to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy: A comparison of morphological, volumetric and functional MRI parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoetker, Andreas M. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Universitaetsmedizin Mainz, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Mainz (Germany); Tarlinton, Lisa; Gollub, Marc J. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Mazaheri, Yousef [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Woo, Kaitlin M.; Goenen, Mithat [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Saltz, Leonard B. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, Gastrointestinal Oncology Service, New York, NY (United States); Goodman, Karyn A. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, New York, NY (United States); Garcia-Aguilar, Julio [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-12-15

    To compare morphological and functional MRI metrics and determine which ones perform best in assessing response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in rectal cancer. This retrospective study included 24 uniformly-treated patients with biopsy-proven rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent MRI, including diffusion-weighted (DW) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) sequences, before and after completion of CRT. On all MRI exams, two experienced readers independently measured longest and perpendicular tumour diameters, tumour volume, tumour regression grade (TRG) and tumour signal intensity ratio on T2-weighted imaging, as well as tumour volume and apparent diffusion coefficient on DW-MRI and tumour volume and transfer constant K{sup trans} on DCE-MRI. These metrics were correlated with histopathological percent tumour regression in the resected specimen (%TR). Inter-reader agreement was assessed using the concordance correlation coefficient (CCC). For both readers, post-treatment DW-MRI and DCE-MRI volumetric tumour assessments were significantly associated with %TR; DCE-MRI volumetry showed better inter-reader agreement (CCC=0.700) than DW-MRI volumetry (CCC=0.292). For one reader, mrTRG, post-treatment T2 tumour volumetry and assessments of volume change made with T2, DW-MRI and DCE-MRI were also significantly associated with %TR. Tumour volumetry on post-treatment DCE-MRI and DW-MRI correlated well with %TR, with DCE-MRI volumetry demonstrating better inter-reader agreement. (orig.)

  19. Synthetic MRI for visualization of quantitative MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Erika

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an imaging technique that is used in hospitals worldwide. The images are acquired through the use of an MRI scanner and the clinical information is provided through the image contrast, which is based on the magnetic properties in biological tissue. By altering the scanner settings, images with different contrast properties can be obtained. Conventional MRI is a qualitative imaging technique and no absolute measurements are performed. At Center for Medical I...

  20. The spinning dancer illusion and spontaneous brain fluctuations: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Byron; Guillen, Magno; Marquez, Juan Camilo

    2014-01-01

    The brain activation associated with the Spinning Dancer Illusion, a cognitive visual illusion, is not entirely known. Inferences from other study modalities point to the involvement of the dorso-parieto-occipital areas in the spontaneous switchings of perception in other bistable non-kinetic illusions. fMRI is a mature technique used to investigate the brain responses associated with mental changes. Resting-state fMRI is a novel technique that may help ascertain the effects of spontaneous brain changes in the top-down regulation of visual perception. The purpose of this report is to describe the brain activation associated with the subjective illusory changes of perception of a kinetic bistable stimulus. We hypothesize that there is a relationship between the perception phases with the very slow cortical spontaneous fluctuations, recently described. A single normal subject who was trained to produce voluntarily perception phase switches underwent a series of fMRI studies whose blocks were either defined post-hoc or accordingly with a predefined timeline to assess spontaneous and voluntarily evoked visual perception switches, respectively. Correlation of findings with resting-state fMRI and independent component analysis of the task series was sought. Phases of the rotation direction were found associated with right parietal activity. Independent component analysis of the task series and their comparison with basal resting-state components suggest that this activity is related to one of the very slow spontaneous brain fluctuations. The spontaneous fluctuations of the cortical activity may explain the subjective changes in perception of direction of the Spinning Dancer Illusion. This observation is a proof-of-principle, suggesting that the spontaneous brain oscillations may influence top-down sensory regulation.

  1. A prostate MRI atlas of biochemical failures following cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Mirabela; Kurhanewicz, John; Tewari, Ashutosh; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-03-01

    Radical prostatectomy (RP) and radiation therapy (RT) are the most common treatment options for prostate cancer (PCa). Despite advancements in radiation delivery and surgical procedures, RP and RT can result in failure rates as high as 40% and >25%, respectively. Treatment failure is characterized by biochemical recurrence (BcR), which is defined in terms of prostate specific antigen (PSA) concentrations and its variation following treatment. PSA is expected to decrease following treatment, thereby its presence in even small concentrations (e.g 0.2 ng/ml for surgery or 2 ng/ml over the nadir PSA for radiation therapy) is indicative of treatment failure. Early identification of treatment failure may enable the use of more aggressive or neo-adjuvant therapies. Moreover, predicting failure prior to treatment may spare the patient from a procedure that is unlikely to be successful. Our goal is to identify differences on pre-treatment MRI between patients who have BcR and those who remain disease-free at 5 years post-treatment. Specifically, we focus on (1) identifying statistically significant differences in MRI intensities, (2) establishing morphological differences in prostatic anatomic structures, and (3) comparing these differences with the natural variability of prostatic structures. In order to attain these objectives, we use an anatomically constrained registration framework to construct BcR and non-BcR statistical atlases based on the pre-treatment magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the prostate. The patients included in the atlas either underwent RP or RT and were followed up for at least 5 years. The BcR atlas was constructed from a combined population of 12 pre-RT 1.5 Tesla (T) MRI and 33 pre-RP 3T MRI from patients with BcR within 5 years of treatment. Similarly, the non-BcR atlas was built based on a combined cohort of 20 pre-RT 1.5T MRI and 41 pre-RP 3T MRI from patients who remain disease-free 5 years post treatment. We chose the atlas framework as it

  2. Muscle MRI findings in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerevini, Simonetta; Scarlato, Marina; Maggi, Lorenzo; Cava, Mariangela; Caliendo, Giandomenico; Pasanisi, Barbara; Falini, Andrea; Previtali, Stefano Carlo; Morandi, Lucia

    2016-03-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is characterized by extremely variable degrees of facial, scapular and lower limb muscle involvement. Clinical and genetic determination can be difficult, as molecular analysis is not always definitive, and other similar muscle disorders may have overlapping clinical manifestations. Whole-body muscle MRI examination for fat infiltration, atrophy and oedema was performed to identify specific patterns of muscle involvement in FSHD patients (30 subjects), and compared to a group of control patients (23) affected by other myopathies (NFSHD). In FSHD patients, we detected a specific pattern of muscle fatty replacement and atrophy, particularly in upper girdle muscles. The most frequently affected muscles, including paucisymptomatic and severely affected FSHD patients, were trapezius, teres major and serratus anterior. Moreover, asymmetric muscle involvement was significantly higher in FSHD as compared to NFSHD patients. In conclusion, muscle MRI is very sensitive for identifying a specific pattern of involvement in FSHD patients and in detecting selective muscle involvement of non-clinically testable muscles. Muscle MRI constitutes a reliable tool for differentiating FSHD from other muscular dystrophies to direct diagnostic molecular analysis, as well as to investigate FSHD natural history and follow-up of the disease. Muscle MRI identifies a specific pattern of muscle involvement in FSHD patients. Muscle MRI may predict FSHD in asymptomatic and severely affected patients. Muscle MRI of upper girdle better predicts FSHD. Muscle MRI may differentiate FSHD from other forms of muscular dystrophy. Muscle MRI may show the involvement of non-clinical testable muscles.

  3. Value of repeat brain MRI in children with focal epilepsy and negative findings on initial MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Tae Yeon; Kim, Ji Hye; Lee, Jee Hun; Yoo, So Young; Hwang, Sook Min; Lee, Mun Hyang [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the value of repeat brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in identifying potential epileptogenic lesions in children with initial MRI-negative focal epilepsy. Our Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective study and waived the requirement for informed consent. During a 15-year period, 257 children (148 boys and 109 girls) with initial MRI-negative focal epilepsy were included. After re-evaluating both initial and repeat MRIs, positive results at repeat MRI were classified into potential epileptogenic lesions (malformation of cortical development and hippocampal sclerosis) and other abnormalities. Contributing factors for improved lesion conspicuity of the initially overlooked potential epileptogenic lesions were analyzed and classified into lesion factors and imaging factors. Repeat MRI was positive in 21% (55/257) and negative in 79% cases (202/257). Of the positive results, potential epileptogenic lesions comprised 49% (27/55) and other abnormalities comprised 11% of the cases (28/257). Potential epileptogenic lesions included focal cortical dysplasia (n = 11), hippocampal sclerosis (n = 10), polymicrogyria (n = 2), heterotopic gray matter (n = 2), microlissencephaly (n = 1), and cortical tumor (n = 1). Of these, seven patients underwent surgical resection. Contributing factors for new diagnoses were classified as imaging factors alone (n = 6), lesion factors alone (n = 2), both (n = 18), and neither (n = 1). Repeat MRI revealed positive results in 21% of the children with initial MRI-negative focal epilepsy, with 50% of the positive results considered as potential epileptogenic lesions. Enhanced MRI techniques or considering the chronological changes of lesions on MRI may improve the diagnostic yield for identification of potential epileptogenic lesions on repeat MRI.

  4. The diagnostic performance of radiography for detection of osteoarthritis-associated features compared with MRI in hip joints with chronic pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Li [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Hayashi, Daichi; Guermazi, Ali [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Hunter, David J. [University of Sydney, Department of Medicine, Sydney (Australia); Li, Ling [New England Baptist Hospital, Division of Research, Boston, MA (United States); Winterstein, Anton; Bohndorf, Klaus [Klinikum Augsburg, Department of Radiology, Augsburg (Germany); Roemer, Frank W. [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Klinikum Augsburg, Department of Radiology, Augsburg (Germany); University of Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of radiography for the detection of MRI-detected osteoarthritis-associated features in various articular subregions of the hip joint. Forty-four patients with chronic hip pain (mean age, 63.3 {+-} 9.5 years), who were part of the Hip Osteoarthritis MRI Scoring (HOAMS) cohort, underwent both weight-bearing anteroposterior pelvic radiography and 1.5 T MRI. The HOAMS study was a prospective observational study involving 52 subjects, conducted to develop a semiquantitative MRI scoring system for hip osteoarthritis features. In the present study, eight subjects were excluded because of a lack of radiographic assessment. On radiography, the presence of superior and medial joint space narrowing, superior and inferior acetabular/femoral osteophytes, acetabular subchondral cysts, and bone attrition of femoral head was noted. On MRI, cartilage, osteophytes, subchondral cysts, and bone attrition were evaluated in the corresponding locations. Diagnostic performance of radiography was compared with that of MRI, and the area under curve (AUC) was calculated for each pathological feature. Compared with MRI, radiography provided high specificity (0.76-0.90) but variable sensitivity (0.44-0.78) for diffuse cartilage damage (using JSN as an indirect marker), femoral osteophytes, acetabular subchondral cysts and bone attrition of the femoral head, and a low specificity (0.42 and 0.58) for acetabular osteophytes. The AUC of radiography for detecting overall diffuse cartilage damage, marginal osteophytes, subchondral cysts and bone attrition was 0.76, 0.78, 0.67, and 0.82, respectively. Diagnostic performance of radiography is good for bone attrition, fair for marginal osteophytes and cartilage damage, but poor for subchondral cysts. (orig.)

  5. Reproducibility, and age, body-weight and gender dependency of candidate skeletal muscle MRI outcome measures in healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, Jasper M.; Reilly, Mary M.; Hanna, Michael G. [UCL Institute of Neurology, Medical Research Council Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, Department of Molecular Neuroscience, London (United Kingdom); Sinclair, Christopher D.J.; Yousry, Tarek A.; Thornton, John S. [UCL Institute of Neurology, Medical Research Council Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, Department of Molecular Neuroscience, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Neurology, Neuroradiological Academic Unit, Department of Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, London (United Kingdom); Fischmann, Arne [University of Basel Hospital, Department of Radiology, Division of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Basel (Switzerland)

    2014-07-15

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can potentially meet the pressing need for objective, sensitive, reproducible outcome measures in neuromuscular disease trials. We tested, in healthy volunteers, the consistency, reliability and sensitivity to normal inter-subject variation of MRI methods targeted to lower limb muscle pathology to inform the design of practical but comprehensive MRI outcome measure protocols for use in imminent patient studies. Forty-seven healthy volunteers, age 21-81 years, were subject at 3T to three-point Dixon fat-fraction measurement, T{sub 1}-relaxometry, T{sub 2}-relaxometry and magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR) imaging at mid-thigh and mid-calf level bilaterally. Fifteen subjects underwent repeat imaging at 2 weeks. Mean between-muscle fat fraction and T{sub 2} differences were small, but significant (p < 0.001). Fat fraction and T{sub 2} correlated positively, and MTR negatively with subject age in both the thigh and calf, with similar significant correlations with weight at thigh level only (p < 0.001 to p < 0.05). Scan-rescan and inter-observer intra-class correlation coefficients ranged between 0.62-0.84 and 0.79-0.99 respectively. Quantitative lower-limb muscle MRI using readily implementable methods was sensitive enough to demonstrate inter-muscle differences (small in health), and correlations with subject age and weight. In combination with high reliability, this strongly supports the suitability of these methods to provide longitudinal outcome measures in neuromuscular disease treatment trials. (orig.)

  6. High resolution MRI for preoperative work-up of neonates with an anorectal malformation: a direct comparison with distal pressure colostography/fistulography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomeer, Maarten G; Devos, Annick; Lequin, Maarten; De Graaf, Nanko; Meeussen, Conny J H M; Meradji, Morteza; De Blaauw, Ivo; Sloots, Cornelius E J

    2015-12-01

    To compare MRI and colostography/fistulography in neonates with anorectal malformations (ARM), using surgery as reference standard. Thirty-three neonates (22 boys) with ARM were included. All patients underwent both preoperative high-resolution MRI (without sedation or contrast instillation) and colostography/fistulography. The Krickenbeck classification was used to classify anorectal malformations, and the level of the rectal ending in relation to the levator muscle was evaluated. Subjects included nine patients with a bulbar recto-urethral fistula, six with a prostatic recto-urethral fistula, five with a vestibular fistula, five with a cloacal malformation, four without fistula, one with a H-type fistula, one with anal stenosis, one with a rectoperineal fistula and one with a bladderneck fistula. MRI and colostography/fistulography predicted anatomy in 88 % (29/33) and 61 % (20/33) of cases, respectively (p = 0.012). The distal end of the rectal pouch was correctly predicted in 88 % (29/33) and 67 % (22/33) of cases, respectively (p = 0.065). The length of the common channel in cloacal malformation was predicted with MRI in all (100 %, 5/5) and in 80 % of cases (4/5) with colostography/fistulography. Two bowel perforations occurred during colostography/fistulography. MRI provides the most accurate evaluation of ARM and should be considered a serious alternative to colostography/fistulography during preoperative work-up. • High-resolution MRI is feasible without the use of sedation or anaesthesia. • MRI is more accurate than colostography/fistulography in visualising the type of ARM. • MRI is as reliable as colostography/fistulography in predicting the level of the rectal pouch. • Colostography/fistulography can be complicated by bowel perforation.

  7. Testicular microlithiasis and leydig cell proliferation in wistar rats underwent fowler-stephens procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gougoudi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present study investigates the outcome of Fowler-Stephens operation in prepubertal Wistar rats focused on microlithiasis and Leydig cell hyperplasia development. Methods: Thirty-eight (38 animals underwent laparoscopic Fowler-Stephens operation on the right testis (8 of them formed the control group and 6 of them additional contra-lateral orchectomy. The testes were examined histological 9,30,70 and 90 days later, while ultrasound study was perfomed a day earlier. Results: Initially, atrophic signs were visible as early as 9 days after the operation. Signs of intratubular calcification were obvious 30 days after the operation, in severe atrophic testes. Another important point was that in the animals that underwent orchectomy, testicular microlithiasis co-existed with lesions of Leydig cell hyperplasia. Conclusions: Microlithiasis and Leydig cell hyperplasia seem to have causative relation in operated undescended testis and present serious postoperative complications, with a review in the literature.

  8. Evidence for cortical visual substitution of chronic bilateral vestibular failure (an fMRI study)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dieterich, Marianne; Bauermann, Thomas; Best, Christoph; Stoeter, Peter; Schlindwein, Peter

    2007-01-01

    .... Functional MRI (fMRI) in healthy subjects has shown that stimulation of the visual system induces an activation of the visual cortex and ocular motor areas bilaterally as well as simultaneous deactivations of multisensory...

  9. Effect of using pump on postoperative pleural effusion in the patients that underwent CABG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Özülkü

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The present study investigated effect of using pump on postoperative pleural effusion in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. Methods: A total of 256 patients who underwent isolated coronary artery bypass grafting surgery in the Cardiovascular Surgery clinic were enrolled in the study. Jostra-Cobe (Model 043213 105, VLC 865, Sweden heart-lung machine was used in on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting was performed using Octopus and Starfish. Proximal anastomoses to the aorta in both on-pump and off-pump techniques were performed by side clamps. The patients were discharged from the hospital between postoperative day 6 and day 11. Results: The incidence of postoperative right pleural effusion and bilateral pleural effusion was found to be higher as a count in Group 1 (on-pump as compared to Group 2 (off-pump. But the difference was not statistically significant [P>0.05 for right pleural effusion (P=0.893, P>0.05 for bilateral pleural effusion (P=0.780]. Left pleural effusion was encountered to be lower in Group 2 (off-pump. The difference was found to be statistically significant (P<0.05, P=0.006. Conclusion: Under the light of these results, it can be said that left pleural effusion is less prevalent in the patients that underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting when compared to the patients that underwent on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting.

  10. Dysphagia among Adult Patients who Underwent Surgery for Esophageal Atresia at Birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Huynh-Trudeau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical experiences of adults who underwent surgery for esophageal atresia at birth is limited. There is some evidence that suggests considerable long-term morbidity, partly because of dysphagia, which has been reported in up to 85% of adult patients who undergo surgery for esophageal atresia. The authors hypothesized that dysphagia in this population is caused by dysmotility and/or anatomical anomalies.

  11. LARYNGEAL CANCER: SOCIODEMOGRAPHIC, LIFE STYLE AND CLINICAL RISK FACTORS AMONG PATIENTS UNDERWENT TOTAL LARYNGECTOMY

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. EL-MOSELHY, Y. M. SALEH, M. M. EL-SAWY

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Laryngeal cancer (LC) is an important health problem. It is one of the most common respiratory cancers. The prevalence of this cancer is increasing all over the world. Objectives: The aim of the present study is to determine the clinical features of the laryngeal cancer patients underwent total laryngectomty (TL); to define the characteristic features of surgery in these patients; and to define the life style, health behavioral, sociodemographic and clinical risk factors of the ...

  12. PROPHYLAXIS OF SURGICAL SITE INFECTION WITH VANCOMYCIN IN 513 PATIENTS THAT UNDERWENT TO LUMBAR FUSION

    OpenAIRE

    Scheverin, Nicolas; Steverlynck, Alejandro; Castelli, Roberto; Sobrero, Diego; Kopp, Nicolas Videla; Dinelli, Dino; Sarotto, Anibal; Falavigna, Asdrubal

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To assess the prophylactic effects of local vancomycin on an infection of the surgical site in patients undergoing lumbar instrumented fusion.Methods:Retrospective study from January 2011 to June 2014 in patients with symptomatic and refractory lumbar spine stenosis and listhesis who underwent instrumented pedicle screw spinal fusion. Two groups of patient were analyzed, one using vancomycin on the surgical site, vancomycin group (VG) and the control group (CG) without topical vanco...

  13. Canalis basilaris medianus: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquemin, C. [Dept. of Radiology, King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Bosley, T.M.; Al Saleh, M. [Div. of Neuro-ophthalmology, King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Mullaney, P. [Division of Pediatrics, King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2000-02-01

    We report the MRI appearances of an developmental anatomical variant of the basiocciput, with neuroimaging findings (CT and MRI). Such variants are commonly asymptomatic, but may be associated with episodes of meningitis. (orig.)

  14. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce ...

  15. Abdominal MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - abdomen; NMR - abdomen; Magnetic resonance imaging - abdomen; MRI of the abdomen ... radiologist see certain areas more clearly. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... may not fit into the opening of certain types of MRI machines. The presence of an implant ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want to ask your physician for ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... a very small chance of irritation of your skin at the site of the IV tube insertion. ... detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures ... as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scan. Because they can interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items ... and braces usually are not affected by the magnetic field, but they may distort images of the facial ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... eyes or other reactions. If you experience allergic symptoms, notify the technologist. A radiologist or other physician ... detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in ... does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that ... risking the side effects of conventional (catheter) angiography . Risks The MRI examination poses almost no risk to ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven ... the technologist or nurse will monitor your vital signs to minimize this risk. Although the strong magnetic ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians ... computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... heart, valves, great vessels, etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If sedation is used, there ... patient story here Images × ... Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety MRI Safety During Pregnancy Images related to Magnetic ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... women should not have this exam in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the ... not to have an MRI exam during the first trimester unless medically necessary. MRI may not always ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven valuable in ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ... might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods. The contrast material used in MRI exams is ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... devices require a short period of time after placement (usually six weeks) before being safe for MRI ... devices that contain metal may malfunction or cause problems during an MRI exam. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played ... the limitations of MRI of the Chest? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... MRI. For more information, consult your radiologist. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to ... tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger diameter bore which can be ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be performed during the MRI exam ...

  18. Risk Factors for Metachronous Gastric Neoplasms in Patients Who Underwent Endoscopic Resection of a Gastric Neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyuk; Kim, Nayoung; Shin, Cheol Min; Lee, Hye Seung; Kim, Bo Kyoung; Kang, Gyeong Hoon; Kim, Jung Mogg; Kim, Joo Sung; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-03-01

    To identify the risk factors for metachronous gastric neoplasms in patients who underwent an endoscopic resection of a gastric neoplasm. We prospectively collected clinicopathologic data and measured the methylation levels of HAND1, THBD, APC, and MOS in the gastric mucosa by methylation-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction in patients who underwent endoscopic resection of gastric neoplasms. A total of 257 patients with gastric neoplasms (113 low-grade dysplasias, 25 highgrade dysplasias, and 119 early gastric cancers) were enrolled. Metachronous gastric neoplasm developed in 7.4% of patients during a mean follow-up of 52 months. The 5-year cumulative incidence of metachronous gastric neoplasm was 4.8%. Multivariate analysis showed that moderate/severe corpus intestinal metaplasia and family history of gastric cancer were independent risk factors for metachronous gastric neoplasm development; the hazard ratios were 4.12 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23 to 13.87; p=0.022) and 3.52 (95% CI, 1.09 to 11.40; p=0.036), respectively. The methylation level of MOS was significantly elevated in patients with metachronous gastric neoplasms compared age- and sex-matched patients without metachronous gastric neoplasms (p=0.020). In patients who underwent endoscopic resection of gastric neoplasms, moderate/severe corpus intestinal metaplasia and a family history of gastric cancer were independent risk factors for metachronous gastric neoplasm, and MOS was significantly hypermethylated in patients with metachronous gastric neoplasms.

  19. Acute myocardial infarctation in patients with critical ischemia underwent lower limb revascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esdras Marques Lins

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atherosclerosis is the main cause of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD of the lower limbs. Patients with PAOD often also have obstructive atherosclerosis in other arterial sites, mainly the coronary arteries. This means that patients who undergo infrainguinal bypass to treat critical ischemia have a higher risk of AMI. There are, however, few reports in the literature that have assessed this risk properly. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of acute myocardial infarction in patients who underwent infrainguinal bypass to treat critical ischemia of the lower limbs caused by PAOD. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 64 patients who underwent 82 infrainguinal bypass operations, from February 2011 to July 2012 were studied. All patients had electrocardiograms and troponin I blood assays during the postoperative period (within 72 hours. RESULTS: There were abnormal ECG findings and elevated blood troponin I levels suggestive of AMI in five (6% of the 82 operations performed. All five had conventional surgery. The incidence of AMI as a proportion of the 52 conventional surgery cases was 9.6%. Two patients died. CONCLUSION: There was a 6% AMI incidence among patients who underwent infrainguinal bypass due to PAOD. Considering only cases operated using conventional surgery, the incidence of AMI was 9.6%.

  20. Estimation of spinopelvic muscles' volumes in young asymptomatic subjects: a quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Celia; Moal, Bertrand; Chtara, Oussama Arous; Pillet, Helene; Raya, Jose G; Iannessi, Antoine; Skalli, Wafa; Lafage, Virginie; Bronsard, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    Muscles have been proved to be a major component in postural regulation during pathological evolution or aging. Particularly, spinopelvic muscles are recruited for compensatory mechanisms such as pelvic retroversion, or knee flexion. Change in muscles' volume could, therefore, be a marker of greater postural degradation. Yet, it is difficult to interpret spinopelvic muscular degradation as there are few reported values for young asymptomatic adults to compare to. The objective was to provide such reference values on spinopelvic muscles. A model predicting the muscular volume from reduced set of MRI segmented images was investigated. A total of 23 asymptomatic subjects younger than 24 years old underwent an MRI acquisition from T12 to the knee. Spinopelvic muscles were segmented to obtain an accurate 3D reconstruction, allowing precise computation of muscle's volume. A model computing the volume of muscular groups from less than six MRI segmented slices was investigated. Baseline values have been reported in tables. For all muscles, invariance was found for the shape factor [ratio of volume over (area times length): SD muscles' values for a reference population have been reported. A new model predicting the muscles' volumes from a reduced set of MRI slices is proposed. While this model still needs to be validated on other populations, the current study appears promising for clinical use to determine, quantitatively, the muscular degradation.

  1. Radiotherapy beyond cancer: Target localization in real-time MRI and treatment planning for cardiac radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ipsen, S. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia and Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Blanck, O.; Rades, D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Oborn, B. [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre (ICCC), Wollongong, New South Wales 2500, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Bode, F. [Medical Department II, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Liney, G. [Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, New South Wales 2170 (Australia); Hunold, P. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Schweikard, A. [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Keall, P. J., E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia that affects millions of patients world-wide. AFib is usually treated with minimally invasive, time consuming catheter ablation techniques. While recently noninvasive radiosurgery to the pulmonary vein antrum (PVA) in the left atrium has been proposed for AFib treatment, precise target location during treatment is challenging due to complex respiratory and cardiac motion. A MRI linear accelerator (MRI-Linac) could solve the problems of motion tracking and compensation using real-time image guidance. In this study, the authors quantified target motion ranges on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analyzed the dosimetric benefits of margin reduction assuming real-time motion compensation was applied. Methods: For the imaging study, six human subjects underwent real-time cardiac MRI under free breathing. The target motion was analyzed retrospectively using a template matching algorithm. The planning study was conducted on a CT of an AFib patient with a centrally located esophagus undergoing catheter ablation, representing an ideal case for cardiac radiosurgery. The target definition was similar to the ablation lesions at the PVA created during catheter treatment. Safety margins of 0 mm (perfect tracking) to 8 mm (untracked respiratory motion) were added to the target, defining the planning target volume (PTV). For each margin, a 30 Gy single fraction IMRT plan was generated. Additionally, the influence of 1 and 3 T magnetic fields on the treatment beam delivery was simulated using Monte Carlo calculations to determine the dosimetric impact of MRI guidance for two different Linac positions. Results: Real-time cardiac MRI showed mean respiratory target motion of 10.2 mm (superior–inferior), 2.4 mm (anterior–posterior), and 2 mm (left–right). The planning study showed that increasing safety margins to encompass untracked respiratory motion leads to overlapping structures even in the

  2. A functional MRI study of the influence of sleep deprivation on digital memory in human brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAN Shuang-yi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Working for long hours often leads to mental fatigue. There is evidence that mental fatigue is serious damage to cognitive function and behavior of the operator. Revealing the mechanism of continuous operation and sleep deprivation (SD on cognitive function, will help to combat the fatigue caused by continuous operation and to improve capacity of operators. This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study focused on the influence of sleep deprivation on digital memory in human brain. Methods Totally 6 healthy subjects underwent a digital memory encoding, maintenance and retrieval session during fMRI scanning before and after 48 h sleep deprivation. Results The digital memory test had the same error rate before and after sleep deprivation (P > 0.05, for all, but the reponse time of seven-number memory was longer after sleep deprivation (P = 0.005. During encoding trials decreased fMRI regions of significant activation between sleep control and sleep deprivation were in left parahippocampal gyrus Brodmann 30, left superior temporal gyrus Brodmann 42, left insular lobe Brodmann 41 and left frontal lobe Brodmann 6. During maintenance trials decreased fMRI regions of significant activation were at left superior temporal gyrus Brodmann 38, left middle temporal gyrus Brodmann 21, left parahippocampus and amygdaloid nucleus Brodmann 30, left middle frontal gyrus Brodmann 47, left lenticular nucleus and thalamus, right lenticular nucleus, left retrosplenial granular cortex Brodmann 30, right retrosplenial granular cortex Brodmann 30, bilateral cingulate gyrus Brodmann 24 and bilateral middle frontal gyrus, medial frontal gyrus Brodmann 6. During retrieval trials decreased fMRI regions of significantly positive activation were at bilateral hippocampus, right amygdaloid nucleus and inferior parietal lobule Brodmann 40, left precuneus Brodmann 19 and thalamus. Conclusion Different brain regions are activated at different stages of the

  3. fMRI Neuroinformatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Christensen, Mark Schram; Madsen, Kristoffer M.

    2006-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) generates vast amounts of data. The handling, processing, and analysis of fMRI data would be inconceivable without computer-based methods. fMRI neuroinformatics is concerned with research, development, and operation of these methods. Reconstruction...

  4. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or CT. A special form of MRI called magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is helpful to assess the vessels of ... child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety MRI Safety During Pregnancy Images ...

  5. MRI of Cerebellar Infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Cocker, Laurens J L; Lövblad, Karl-Olof; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MRI is the imaging modality of choice for diagnosing brain infarction. Because of few or atypical clinical symptoms and a relatively low sensitivity of CT scans, many cerebellar infarctions may be detected only with MRI. With adequate recognition of cerebellar infarction on MRI and

  6. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI exam is assumed to outweigh the potential risks. Pregnant women should not receive injections of gadolinium contrast material except when absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia ( ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... heart, valves, great vessels, etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  8. MRI in acute poliomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornreich, L. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Dagan, O. [The Intensive Care Unit, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Beilinson Medical Campus, Petah Tiqva (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Grunebaum, M. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    1996-05-01

    MRI can be used in the diagnosis of anterior horn infection and for assessing the extent of disease. There are no specific MRI signs to differentiate between the various possible pathogens. This is demonstrated in the present case of poliomyelitis, in which MRI of the spine played an important role in establishing the diagnosis. (orig.). With 1 fig.

  9. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tumors. MRI can help physicians evaluate both the structure of an organ and how it is working. MRI enables the discovery of abnormalities that might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods. The contrast material used in MRI exams is less likely to ...

  10. [Application of MRI in the diagnosis of glomus tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yijun, Shi; Jianming, Hua; Qi, Ma; Hu, Xueqing

    2015-07-01

    To discuss the necessity of MRI as a routine examination for diagnosis of glomus tumor. From Nov. 2013 to July 2014, 7 cases of glomus tumor were treated in our department. All patients had typical clinical symptoms of glomus tumor and received preoperative X-ray and/or MRI examination. The diagnosis was confirmed by postoperative histopathologic examination. All the patients were retrospectively analyzed by reviewing the preoperative examination results and PubMed search results. 2 cases underwent only X-ray examination before operation with no positive results. 3 cases underwent both X-ray and MRI. No positive finding happened in X-ray, while MRI showed glomus tumor characteristic on T1- and T2-weighted images which demonstreated a more intense signal after injection of gadolinium. The last 2 cases underwent only MRI examination, which revealed positive images of glomus tumor. MRI plays an important role in diagnosis of glomus tumor and should be adopted as a routine examination.

  11. Multiparametric MRI in men with clinical suspicion of prostate cancer undergoing repeat biopsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Lars; Nørgaard, Nis; Løgager, Vibeke

    2017-01-01

    Background Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) can improve detection of clinically significant prostate cancer (csPCa). Purpose To compare mpMRI score subgroups to systematic transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsies (TRUSbx) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based findings...... for detection of csPCa in men undergoing repeat biopsies. Material and Methods MpMRI was performed prior to re-biopsy in 289 prospectively enrolled patients. All underwent repeat TRUSbx followed by targeted biopsies (MRITB) of any mpMRI-identified lesion. MpMRI suspicion grade, PSA level, and density (PSAd...

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) used for the investigation of recti extraocular muscle paths in normal and highly myopic subjects; Magnetresonanztomographische Messungen des Verlaufs der geraden aeusseren Augenmuskeln bei Normalpersonen und bei Patienten mit hochgradiger Kurzsichtigkeit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, B. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Augenklinik fuer Schielbehandlung und Neuroophthalmlogie]|[Marburg Univ. (Germany). Medizinisches Zentrum fuer Augenheilkunde; Krzizok, T. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Augenklinik fuer Schielbehandlung und Neuroophthalmlogie; Traupe, H. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie

    1998-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the paths of the rectus extraocular muscles (EOMs) in patients with high axial myopia, using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results: In comparison to the controls, patients with high axial myopia were found to have significant misplacement of the recti EOMs. Thus in group 1 (group 2 within brackets) the lateral rectus muscle (LR) was misplaced 2.9 (1.4) mm into the lower temporal quadrant p<0.001 (p=0.07). The course of the superior rectus muscle (SR) was shifted 1.5 (1.5) mm medially p=0.02 (p=0.03) and the path of the inferior rectus muscle (IR) 1.3 (1.3) mm medially p=0.06 (p=0.06). The medial rectus muscle (MR) showed a 1.3 (1.2) mm downward mislocation p=0.01 (p=0.07). Conclusions: In patients with high axial myopia (group 1 and group 2) misplacement of all rectus EOMs could be demonstrated by high resolution MRI with controlled gaze. All patients showed an approximately equal amount of MR, SR and IR mislocation. However, misplacement of the LR was significantly greater in patients with high myopia and restrictive eye motility (group 1) than in those without restrictive ocular motility (group 2), p=0.03. We therefore assume that LR downward mislocation is a major determinant for restrictive eye motility in high myopia. (orig./AJ) [Deutsch] Ziel: Die magnetresonanztomographische (MRT) Untersuchung von Veraenderungen im intraorbitalen Verlauf der geraden aeusseren Augenmuskeln bei Patienten mit hochgradiger Kurzsichtigkeit (Myopie). Ergebnisse: Im Vergleich zur Kontrollgruppe zeigten die Patienten mit hochgradiger Kurzsichtigkeit deutliche Verlagerungen der geraden Augenmuskeln. In Gruppe 1 (Gruppe 2 in Klammern) war der Musculus rectus lateralis (MRL) um durchschnittlich 2,9 (1,4) mm nach medio-kaudal disloziert p<0,001 (p=0,07), der Musculus rectus superior (MRS) fand sich 1,5 (1,5) mm nach medial verlagert p=0,02 (p=0,03). Der Musculus rectus inferior (MRI) war 1,3 (1,3) mm nach medial p=0,06 (p=0,06), der Musculus

  13. MRI in knee osteoarthritis. Application in diet intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudbergsen, Henrik

    2013-03-01

    This thesis examines two main hypotheses: 1. Obese knee osteoarthritis (KOA) patients can achieve symptomatic improvements following diet intervention regardless of their level of structural damage and overall joint malfunctioning: 2. Rapid weight-loss in obese patients with KOA will lead to improvements in KOA related pathology that can be assessed and evaluated by MRI. Data for the studies were obtained from obese KOA patients who were recruited for a 16 week diet intervention trial, the CAROT-trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identification no.: NCT00655941). Inclusion criteria were age ≥ 50 years, BMI ≥ 30 kg/square metro plus symptomatic and verified KOA. Patients underwent a 16 weeks dietary programme with formula products and counselling. Baseline and week 16 assessments included clinical examinations, MRI and CR of the most symptomatic knee, muscle strength tests, gait analyses, blood samples and collection of patient-reported outcomes with a variety of generic and specific health status questionnaires. MRI scans were graded by the BLOKS and CR was analysed by measuring the mJSW and grading the knee as described by KL. 388 possible subjects were pre-screened, 192 were enrolled. Following the 16 weeks diet intervention 175 patients remained in the study. 187 (97%) MRI scans were completed at baseline, 172 (98 %) MRI scans obtained at week 16 and this left the study with 169 (97%) patients with complete MRI datasets at week 16. No statistical significant differences were detected between baseline characteristics of all the initially included patients (n = 192) and the 169 patients included in the per protocol analyses performed in study III (p structural damage, measures of joint malfunctioning and general pre-study patient characteristics. The final study examined whether or not weight-loss had an immediate impact on MRI assessed BMLs. The results showed that changes seen in the total TF sum of BML scores and maximal BML scores did not differ between patients

  14. Imaging-Concordant Benign MRI-Guided Vacuum-Assisted Breast Biopsy May Not Warrant MRI Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Monica L; Speer, Megan; Dogan, Basak E; Rauch, Gaiane M; Candelaria, Rosalind P; Adrada, Beatriz E; Hess, Kenneth R; Yang, Wei T

    2017-04-01

    The follow-up of breast lesions with imaging-concordant benign histopathology results on MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy (VAB) is not currently standardized. We determined the false omission rate of breast MRI-guided VAB with benign histopathology (negative results) to assess whether breast MRI follow-up is needed. The medical records of patients who underwent 9-gauge breast MRI-guided VAB during 2007-2012 were reviewed retrospectively. Lesions with imaging-concordant benign histopathology results from MRI-guided VAB and surgery or 2 years or more of imaging follow-up were included. The false omission rate (1 - negative predictive value; [number of false-negative results / number of negative results]) of MRI-guided VAB was calculated. One hundred sixty-nine lesions were included, and 135 had only imaging follow-up (mammography follow-up: range, 17-107 months [median, 52 months]; MRI follow-up: range, 5-95 months [median, 35 months]). Of the 135 lesions with only imaging follow-up, 48 had mammography only (range, 26-86 months; median, 52 months), and 87 had mammography (range, 17-107 months; median, 52 months) and MRI (range, 5-95 months; median, 35 months). Thirty-four lesions had surgical correlation, and there were no cases of imaging-surgical discordance. Four malignancies were later diagnosed in the same breast in which MRI-guided VAB had been performed. One (0.6%) malignancy was invasive ductal carcinoma at 1 cm from the MRI-guided VAB site; it was mammographically detected 24 months after MRI-guided VAB. The other three malignancies developed 4 cm or more from the site of MRI-guided VAB: one ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) detected on mammography 12 months after MRI-guided VAB, one DCIS detected on MRI 24 months after MRI-guided VAB, and one Paget disease lesion detected at physical examination 32 months after MRI-guided VAB. Breast MRI-guided VAB has a low false omission rate. MRI follow-up of lesions with concordant benign MRI-guided VAB histopathology

  15. Establishing motion control in children with autism and intellectual disability: Applications for anatomical and functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Alison D; Virues-Ortega, Javier; Julio, Flavia; Martin, Toby L

    2017-01-01

    Excessive motion makes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) extremely challenging among children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The medical risks of sedation establish the need for behavioral interventions to promote motion control among children with ASD undergoing MRI scans. We present a series of experiments aimed at establishing both tolerance of the MRI environment and a level of motion control that would be compatible with a successful MRI. During Study 1, we evaluated the effects of prompting and contingent reinforcement on compliance with a sequence of successive approximations to an MRI using a mock MRI. During Study 2, we used prompting and progressive differential reinforcement of other behaviors (DRO) to promote motion control in a mock MRI for increasing periods of time. Finally, during Study 3, some of the participants underwent a real MRI scan while a detailed in-session motion analysis informed the quality of the images captured. © 2016 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  16. 3D {sup 23}Na MRI of human skeletal muscle at 7 Tesla: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Gregory; Wang, Ligong; Regatte, Ravinder R. [Center for Biomedical Imaging/Hospital for Joint Diseases, Department of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Schweitzer, Mark E. [Ottawa General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2010-08-15

    To evaluate healthy skeletal muscle pre- and post-exercise via 7 T {sup 23}Na MRI and muscle proton T{sub 2} mapping, and to evaluate diabetic muscle pre- and post-exercise via 7 T {sup 23}Na MRI. The calves of seven healthy subjects underwent imaging pre- and post-exercise via 7 T {sup 23}Na MRI (3D fast low angle shot, TR/TE = 80 ms/0.160 ms, 4 mm x 4 mm x 4 mm) and 1 week later by {sup 1}H MRI (multiple spin-echo sequence, TR/TE = 3,000 ms/15-90 ms). Four type 2 diabetics also participated in the {sup 23}Na MRI protocol. Pre- and post-exercise sodium signal intensity (SI) and proton T{sub 2} relaxation values were measured/calculated for soleus (S), gastrocnemius (G), and a control, tibialis anterior (TA). Two-tailed t tests were performed. In S/G in healthy subjects post-exercise, sodium SI increased 8-13% (p < 0.03), then decreased (t{sub 1/2} = 22 min), and {sup 1}H T{sub 2} values increased 12-17% (p < 0.03), then decreased (t{sub 1/2} = 12-15 min). In TA, no significant changes in sodium SI or {sup 1}H T{sub 2} values were seen (-2.4 to 1%, p > 0.17). In S/G in diabetics, sodium SI increased 10-11% (p < 0.04), then decreased (t{sub 1/2} = 27-37 min) without significant change in the TA SI (-3.6%, p = 0.066). It is feasible to evaluate skeletal muscle via 3D {sup 23}Na MRI at 7 T. Post-exercise muscle {sup 1}H T{sub 2} values return to baseline more rapidly than sodium SI. Diabetics may demonstrate delayed muscle sodium SI recovery compared with healthy subjects. (orig.)

  17. Multi-parametric MRI findings of transitional zone prostate cancers: correlation with 3-dimensional transperineal mapping biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Sajal S; Patel, Nayana U; Garg, Kavita; La Rosa, Francisco G; Arangua, Paul; Jones, Clifford; Crawford, E David

    2015-01-01

    A preliminary project to correlate MR findings with mapping prostate biopsy to help differentiate malignant transitional zone lesions form benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) nodules. Institutional IRB approved retrospective study with 14 patients suspected of having prostate cancer who underwent both prostate 3T MRI using endorectal coil and 3D transperineal mapping prostate biopsy. MR exams were independently reviewed by two abdominal radiologists blinded to pathology with disagreement resolved by consensus. An MRI lesion was defined as having hypointense T2 signal subjectively without corresponding T1 high signal intensity and low signal on ADC maps in the central gland. Mapping biopsy consisted of systematic transperineal US guided biopsy with 55-108 cores per patient. Twenty-nine lesions were detected on MRI. Of these, 13 correlated with Gleason 6 or higher biopsy samples. 16 were biopsy negative. Among the various MRI characteristics assessed, lack of T2 hypointense rim demonstrated the highest specificity (93%) and positive predictive value (89%). Highest sensitivity (85%) and negative predictive value (78%) were seen with ill-defined nodules. When suspicious MR characteristics were combined, the specificity and PPV rose to 100% while sensitivity decreased to 45% and NPV decreased to 73%. Preliminary study indicates MR findings which can help differentiate a BPH nodule from transitional zone prostate cancers which could help direct biopsy in the large and growing number of people suspected of having prostate cancer. Further work will be needed for validation.

  18. A study of structural and functional connectivity in early Alzheimer's disease using rest fMRI and diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandar, R; John, J P; Saini, J; Kumar, K J; Joshi, H; Sadanand, S; Aiyappan, S; Sivakumar, P T; Loganathan, S; Varghese, M; Bharath, S

    2015-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative condition where in early diagnosis and interventions are key policy priorities in dementia services and research. We studied the functional and structural connectivity in mild AD to determine the nature of connectivity changes that coexist with neurocognitive deficits in the early stages of AD. Fifteen mild AD subjects and 15 cognitively healthy controls (CHc) matched for age and gender, underwent detailed neurocognitive assessment and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Rest fMRI was analyzed using dual regression approach and DTI by voxel wise statistics. Patients with mild AD had significantly lower functional connectivity (FC) within the default mode network and increased FC within the executive network. The mild AD group scored significantly lower in all domains of cognition compared with CHc. But fractional anisotropy did not significantly (p Resting state functional connectivity alterations are noted during initial stages of cognitive decline in AD, even when there are no significant white matter microstructural changes. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Differential fMRI BOLD responses in amygdala in intermittent explosive disorder as a function of past Alcohol Use Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccaro, Emil F; Keedy, Sarah K; Gorka, Stephanie M; King, Andrea C; Fanning, Jennifer R; Lee, Royce J; Phan, K Luan

    2016-11-30

    Individuals with intermittent explosive disorder (IED) were previously found to exhibit amygdala (AMYG) hyperactivation to anger faces during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, acute alcohol consumption, and/or life history of alcoholism, may blunt amygdala responses to negative emotional stimuli. Thus, we examined the influence of a past history of DSM-5 Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) on the fMRI BOLD AMYG response to anger faces in IED. Forty-two IED participants, 18 with a past history of AUD (IED+AUD) and 24 without Past AUD (IED), and 32 healthy control (HC) participants, underwent fMRI scanning while viewing blocks of angry, fearful, and happy faces. Compared to HC and IED+AUD participants, IED subjects exhibited greater AMYG responses to angry, but not to fear or happy, faces in the left AMYG. There were no group differences in responses to anger, fear, or happy, faces in the OFC. These findings suggest the possibility of a longstanding effect of AUD on AMYG response in IED to anger-related stimuli and highlight the possibility that history of AUD should be considered as an important factor in the interpretation of fMRI studies involving the AMYG response to negative emotional stimuli. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Incidence of Concomitant Precancerous Lesions in Cases Who Underwent Hysterectomy for Prolapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Aydin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was is to assess the incidence of unexpected gynecological cancers and pre-cancerous lesions following hysterectomy for pelvic organ prolapse to better understand the risks of uterine sparing surgery. Material and Method: This was a retrospective analysis of histopathology findings after hysterectomy for uterine prolapse surgery who underwent preoperative diagnostic work including cervical cytology, transvaginal ultrasonography and endometrial histopathological examination for a high risk group (Postmenopausal women with an endometrial thickness of %u22655 mm and premenopausal women with abnormal bleeding. Patients with a history of endometrial, cervical and/or adnexal precancerous or cancerous pathological conditions and with incomplete medical records were excluded.Results: Results were taken from 106 women who underwent hysterectomy. The abdominal route was used in 22 cases (21.7 %, the vaginal route in 82 patients (77.4 % and laparoscopic-assisted vaginal route in two (1.9 % women. Oophorectomy was performed in 35 (33 % cases. None of the patients had malignant histopathology specimens from hysterectomy. Total premalignant pathology incidence was 7.5 % (8/106. Six (5.7% patients had simple endometrial hyperplasia and 2 patients (1.9 % had cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Discussion: The incidence of unexpected endometrial, cervical or ovarian malignancy among women who underwent hysterectomy after preoperative diagnostic workup including transvaginal ultrasonograhy, endometrial pathological examination to high risk cases was negligible. The inclusion of low risk endometrial and cervical precancerous lesions increased the incidences. Our results could provide precious data to extrapolate to similar populations with uterine prolapse who desire surgical correction sparing uterus.

  1. Human Amygdala Represents the Complete Spectrum of Subjective Valence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jingwen; Zelano, Christina; Gottfried, Jay A.

    2015-01-01

    Although the amygdala is a major locus for hedonic processing, how it encodes valence information is poorly understood. Given the hedonic potency of odor stimuli and the amygdala's anatomical proximity to the peripheral olfactory system, we combined high-resolution fMRI with pattern-based multivariate techniques to examine how valence information is encoded in the amygdala. Ten human subjects underwent fMRI scanning while smelling 9 odorants that systematically varied in perceived valence. Representational similarity analyses showed that amygdala codes the entire dimension of valence, ranging from pleasantness to unpleasantness. This unidimensional representation significantly correlated with self-reported valence ratings but not with intensity ratings. Furthermore, within-trial valence representations evolved over time, prioritizing earlier differentiation of unpleasant stimuli. Together, these findings underscore the idea that both spatial and temporal features uniquely encode pleasant and unpleasant odor valence in the amygdala. The availability of a unidimensional valence code in the amygdala, distributed in both space and time, would create greater flexibility in determining the pleasantness or unpleasantness of stimuli, providing a mechanism by which expectation, context, attention, and learning could influence affective boundaries for guiding behavior. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our findings elucidate the mechanisms of affective processing in the amygdala by demonstrating that this brain region represents the entire valence dimension from pleasant to unpleasant. An important implication of this unidimensional valence code is that pleasant and unpleasant valence cannot coexist in the amygdale because overlap of fMRI ensemble patterns for these two valence extremes obscures their unique content. This functional architecture, whereby subjective valence maps onto a pattern continuum between pleasant and unpleasant poles, offers a robust mechanism by which context

  2. High resolution MRI for preoperative work-up of neonates with an anorectal malformation: a direct comparison with distal pressure colostography/fistulography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomeer, Maarten G. [Erasmus MC, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Devos, Annick; Lequin, Maarten; Graaf, Nanko de; Meradji, Morteza [Erasmus MC, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Meeussen, Conny J.H.M.; Blaauw, Ivo de; Sloots, Cornelius E.J. [Erasmus MC, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-12-15

    To compare MRI and colostography/fistulography in neonates with anorectal malformations (ARM), using surgery as reference standard. Thirty-three neonates (22 boys) with ARM were included. All patients underwent both preoperative high-resolution MRI (without sedation or contrast instillation) and colostography/fistulography. The Krickenbeck classification was used to classify anorectal malformations, and the level of the rectal ending in relation to the levator muscle was evaluated. Subjects included nine patients with a bulbar recto-urethral fistula, six with a prostatic recto-urethral fistula, five with a vestibular fistula, five with a cloacal malformation, four without fistula, one with a H-type fistula, one with anal stenosis, one with a rectoperineal fistula and one with a bladderneck fistula. MRI and colostography/fistulography predicted anatomy in 88 % (29/33) and 61 % (20/33) of cases, respectively (p = 0.012). The distal end of the rectal pouch was correctly predicted in 88 % (29/33) and 67 % (22/33) of cases, respectively (p = 0.065). The length of the common channel in cloacal malformation was predicted with MRI in all (100 %, 5/5) and in 80 % of cases (4/5) with colostography/fistulography. Two bowel perforations occurred during colostography/fistulography. MRI provides the most accurate evaluation of ARM and should be considered a serious alternative to colostography/fistulography during preoperative work-up. (orig.)

  3. MRI signal changes of the bone marrow in HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy: correlation with clinical parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Ana I.; Tomas, Xavier; Pomes, Jaume; Amo, Montserrat del [Hospital Clinic, Department of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain); Milinkovic, Ana; Perez, Inaki; Mallolas, Josep [IDIBAPS-Hospital Clinic, Department of Infectious Diseases, Barcelona (Spain); Rios, Jose [Hospital Clinic, Department of Biostatistics, Barcelona (Spain); Vidal-Sicart, Sergi [Hospital Clinic, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    To assess the prevalence, imaging appearance, and clinical significance, of bone marrow MR signal changes in a group of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy syndrome. Twenty-eight HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy syndrome treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy, and 12 HIV-negative controls underwent MRI of the legs. Whole-body MRI, SPECT/CT, and a complete radiographic skeletal survey were obtained in subjects with signal changes in bone marrow. MRI and clinical evaluations were reviewed 6 months after baseline to determine changes after switching from thymidine analogs (TA) to tenofovir-DF (TDF). MRI results correlated with clinical parameters. We observed foci of a serous-like pattern (low signal and no enhancement on T1-weighted, high signal on T2-weighted images) in 4 out of 28 patients (14.3%) and an intermediate signal on T1-weighted images in 4 out of 28 patients (14.3%). Serous-like lesions were located in the lower limbs and scattered in the talus, calcaneus, femurs, and humeral bones; they showed slight uptake on SPECT bone scans and were normal on CT and radiographs. Patients with serous-like lesions had significantly lower peripheral and total fat at baseline than other groups (P < 0.05). No changes at 6 months were observed on MRI, and the serous-like lesion group showed good peripheral fat recovery after changing drug treatment. A serous-like MRI pattern is observed in the peripheral skeletons of HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy, which correlates with peripheral lipoatrophy, and should not be misdiagnosed as malignant or infectious diseases. Although the MR lesions did not improve after switching the treatment, there was evidence of lipoatrophy recovery. (orig.)

  4. MRI acoustic noise can harm experimental and companion animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Amanda M; El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M; Kraitchman, Dara L; Edelstein, William A

    2012-09-01

    To assess possible damage to the hearing of experimental and companion animal subjects of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Using animal hearing threshold data and sound level measurements from typical MRI pulse sequences, we estimated "equivalent loudness" experienced by several experimental and companion animals commonly subjects of MRI scans. We compared the equivalent loudness and exam duration to safe noise standards set by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Monkeys, dogs, cats, pigs, and rabbits are frequently exposed to equivalent loudness levels during MRI scans beyond what is considered safe for human exposure. The sensitive frequency ranges for rats and mice are shifted substantially upward and their equivalent loudness levels fall within the NIOSH safe zone. MRI exposes many animals to levels of noise and duration that would exceed NIOSH human exposure limits. Researchers and veterinarians should use hearing protection for animals during MRI scans. Experimental research animals used in MRI studies are frequently kept and reimaged, and hearing loss could result in changed behavior. Damage to companion animals' hearing could make them less sensitive to commands and generally worsen interactions with family members. Much quieter MRI scanners would help decrease stress and potential harm to scanned animals, normalize physiology during MRI, and enable MRI of awake animals. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Seeing the sound after visual loss: functional MRI in acquired auditory-visual synesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Zixin; Hsieh, Po-Jang; Milea, Dan

    2017-02-01

    Acquired auditory-visual synesthesia (AVS) is a rare neurological sign, in which specific auditory stimulation triggers visual experience. In this study, we used event-related fMRI to explore the brain regions correlated with acquired monocular sound-induced phosphenes, which occurred 2 months after unilateral visual loss due to an ischemic optic neuropathy. During the fMRI session, 1-s pure tones at various pitches were presented to the patient, who was asked to report occurrence of sound-induced phosphenes by pressing one of the two buttons (yes/no). The brain activation during phosphene-experienced trials was contrasted with non-phosphene trials and compared to results obtained in one healthy control subject who underwent the same fMRI protocol. Our results suggest, for the first time, that acquired AVS occurring after visual impairment is associated with bilateral activation of primary and secondary visual cortex, possibly due to cross-wiring between auditory and visual sensory modalities.

  6. [Cine-MRI contribution to assess swallowing mechanism and oro-pharyngeal dysphagia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauvet, F; Charpiot, A; Schultz, P; Riehm, S; Vetter, D; Veillon, F; Hémar, P; Debry, C

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the performance of Cine-MRI to assess swallowing in patients previously treated for head and neck cancer. 10 healthy control subjects and a cohort of 10 patients with 8 partial glossectomies, 1 total laryngectomy and 1 glossolaryngectomy underwent imaging from October 2005 to February 2007. The MRI examinations were performed on a 1.5 Tesla system (Siemens Avanto), with True-Fisp sequences (TR = 170 ms, TE = 1 ms, slice thickness = 10 mm) at a rate of 8 pictures per second, during dry swallowing. Results are relevant for real-time spatial resolution from lips to larynx and dynamic motions analyses of tongue, velum, posterior pharyngeal wall and larynx during dry swallowing. Oro-pharyngo-laryngeal occlusion deficiency induces aspiration in case of partial glossectomy. Total laryngectomy modifies tongue, velum and pharynx landmarks. Cine-MRI i) provides functional insight from the oral cavity to the larynx, ii) gives accurate informations about impairments due to the pathology and its treatment, iii) completes others investigations like fiberoptic endoscopy or transit time, iiii) allows a precise analysis of the muscular movements involved in the deficient swallowing mechanism, in order to optimize rehabilitative strategies and results.

  7. [Rupture or stress injury of the flexor tendon pulleys? Early diagnosis with MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabl, M; Lener, M; Pechlaner, S; Lutz, M; Rudisch, A

    1996-11-01

    Eighteen extreme rock climbers underwent primary clinical and MRI examination because of recent closed injuries to the flexor tendon pulleys. Follow-ups were after approximately 36 months on the average. The recent injuries, which are difficult to diagnose clinically, could be ascertained by means of MRI: This type of injury seems to occur more frequently than is currently diagnosed. Eight patients with overuse syndrome and eight patients with a short pulley rupture were treated conservatively. In two patients with long pulley rupture, the pulleys were reconstructed by means of a tendon graft using Kleinert's technique. Clinically manifest bowstringing or flexion contracture after treatment could not be ascertained on any one of the patients. All except for one showed an almost normal range of motion. By means of control MRI it was, however, possible to ascertain minor bowstringing and scars in most patients. Clinically, this partial instability manifested by lasting swelling. What was most disturbing, however, was reduced strength and the subjective feeling of insecurity during climbing.

  8. HLA-G regulatory haplotypes and implantation outcome in couples who underwent assisted reproduction treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Cynthia Hernandes; Gelmini, Georgia Fernanda; Wowk, Pryscilla Fanini; Mattar, Sibelle Botogosque; Vargas, Rafael Gustavo; Roxo, Valéria Maria Munhoz Sperandio; Schuffner, Alessandro; Bicalho, Maria da Graça

    2012-09-01

    The role of HLA-G in several clinical conditions related to reproduction has been investigated. Important polymorphisms have been found within the 5'URR and 3'UTR regions of the HLA-G promoter. The aim of the present study was to investigate 16 SNPs in the 5'URR and 14-bp insertion/deletion (ins/del) polymorphism located in the 3'UTR region of the HLA-G gene and its possible association with the implantation outcome in couples who underwent assisted reproduction treatments (ART). The case group was composed of 25 ART couples. Ninety-four couples with two or more term pregnancies composed the control group. Polymorphism haplotype frequencies of the HLA-G were determined for both groups. The Haplotype 5, Haplotype 8 and Haplotype 11 were absolute absence in ART couples. The HLA-G*01:01:02a, HLA-G*01:01:02b alleles and the 14-bp ins polymorphism, Haplotype 2, showed an increased frequency in case women and similar distribution between case and control men. However, this susceptibility haplotype is significantly presented in case women and in couple with failure implantation after treatment, which led us to suggest a maternal effect, associated with this haplotype, once their presence in women is related to a higher number of couples who underwent ART. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Clinical profiles of 710 premenopausal women with adenomyosis who underwent hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuelian; Liu, Xishi; Guo, Sun-Wei

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of various symptoms and their associated characteristics in women with adenomyosis who underwent hysterectomy, and to determine which symptoms are likely to go with which others in these patients. In 2007, 1697 consecutive patients underwent hysterectomy in our hospital. Among them, 734 (43.3%) were histologically confirmed to have adenomyosis, and 710 of them were premenopausal. The medical charts of all 734 patients were retrieved, and their demographic, clinical information and postoperative findings were recorded. We used the Verbal Descriptor Scale to measure the preoperative severity of dysmenorrhea. The Apriori Algorithm was used for mining the association of different symptoms. Among the 710 premenopausal patients, only 4.5% of them had no symptoms. Dysmenorrhea was the most common complaint, occurring in 81.7% of patients. Dysmenorrhea co-occurred most frequently with menorrhagia. The presence of adhesion, presence of endometriosis, complaint of menorrhagia, longer duration of disease, gravidity, palpable pain during pelvic examination, and diffuse adenomyosis were positively associated with the severity of dysmenorrhea. Age, severity of dysmenorrhea, and complaint of metrorrhagia were positively associated with the risk of menorrhagia. Dysmenorrhea is the most common complaint in women with adenomyosis, which often goes with that of menorrhagia. Adenomyosis often co-occurs with endometriosis and leiomyomas. Various factors are associated with the risk of having different symptoms. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2013 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  10. Voiding patterns of adult patients who underwent hypospadias repair in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Jawdat; Kocherov, Stanislav; Chertin, Leonid; Farkas, Amicur; Chertin, Boris

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the voiding patterns of adult patients who underwent hypospadias repair in childhood. Following IRB approval 103 (22.7%) of 449 adult patients who underwent hypospadias repair between 1978 and 1993 responded to the following questionnaires: International Prostate Symptom Score (I-PSS) and Short Form 12 questionnaire (SF-12). Uroflowmetry (UF) was performed for all patients. The patients were divided into three groups according to the primary meatus localization. Group I had 63 patients (61.5%) treated for glanular hypospadias, group II had 19 patients (18.4%) treated for distal hypospadias, and group III comprised the remaining 21 patients (20.4%) treated for proximal hypospadias. The mean ± SD I-PSS score for all patients who responded to the questionnaire was 2.3 ± 2.4, and UF was 21.1 ± 4.3 mL/s. The patients from groups I and III had fewer urinary symptoms compared with those of the group II: 1.3 ± 1.5, 5.5 ± 2.4, and 1.6 ± 1.4, respectively (p hypospadias repair in childhood had normal or mild voiding disturbance, with no effects on their physical or mental status. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Circulating S100B and Adiponectin in Children Who Underwent Open Heart Surgery and Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Varrica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. S100B protein, previously proposed as a consolidated marker of brain damage in congenital heart disease (CHD newborns who underwent cardiac surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB, has been progressively abandoned due to S100B CNS extra-source such as adipose tissue. The present study investigated CHD newborns, if adipose tissue contributes significantly to S100B serum levels. Methods. We conducted a prospective study in 26 CHD infants, without preexisting neurological disorders, who underwent cardiac surgery and CPB in whom blood samples for S100B and adiponectin (ADN measurement were drawn at five perioperative time-points. Results. S100B showed a significant increase from hospital admission up to 24 h after procedure reaching its maximum peak (P0.05 have been found all along perioperative monitoring. ADN/S100B ratio pattern was identical to S100B alone with the higher peak at the end of CPB and remained higher up to 24 h from surgery. Conclusions. The present study provides evidence that, in CHD infants, S100B protein is not affected by an extra-source adipose tissue release as suggested by no changes in circulating ADN concentrations.

  12. Undergrading and understaging in patients with clinically insignificant prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irai S. Oliveira

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of our study is to evaluate the undergrading and understaging rates in patients with clinically localized insignificant prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between July 2005 and July 2008, 406 patients underwent radical prostatectomy for clinical localized prostate cancer in our hospital. Based on preoperative data, 93 of these patients fulfilled our criteria of non-significance: Gleason score < 7, stage T1c, PSA < 10 ng/mL and percentage of affected fragments less than 25%. The pathologic stage and Gleason score were compared to preoperative data to evaluate the rate of understaging and undergrading. The biochemical recurrence free survival of these operated insignificant cancers were also evaluated. RESULTS: On surgical specimen analysis 74.7% of patients had Gleason score of 6 or less and 25.3% had Gleason 7 or greater. Furthermore 8.3% of cases showed extracapsular extension. After 36 months of follow-up 3.4% had biochemical recurrence, defined by a PSA above 0.4 ng/mL. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the limited number of cases, we have found considerable rates of undergrading and understaging in patients with prostate cancer whose current definitions classified them as candidates for active surveillance. According to our results the current definition seems inadequate as up to a third of patients had higher grade or cancer outside the prostate.

  13. A qualitative report on the subjective experience of intravenous psilocybin administered in an FMRI environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, S; Nutt, D J; Carhart-Harris, R L

    2014-01-01

    This report documents the phenomenology of the subjective experiences of 15 healthy psychedelic experienced volunteers who were involved in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study that was designed to image the brain effects of intravenous psilocybin. The participants underwent a semi-structured interview exploring the effects of psilocybin in the MRI scanner. These interviews were analysed by Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. The resultant data is ordered in a detailed matrix, and presented in this paper. Nine broad categories of phenomenology were identified in the phenomenological analysis of the experience; perceptual changes including visual, auditory and somatosensory distortions, cognitive changes, changes in mood, effects of memory, spiritual or mystical type experiences, aspects relating to the scanner and research environment, comparisons with other experiences, the intensity and onset of effects, and individual interpretation of the experience. This article documents the phenomenology of psilocybin when given in a novel manner (intravenous injection) and setting (an MRI scanner). The findings of the analysis are consistent with previous published work regarding the subjective effects of psilocybin. There is much scope for further research investigating the phenomena identified in this paper.

  14. The impact of preparation and support procedures for children with sickle cell disease undergoing MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cejda, Katherine R. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Child Life Program, Memphis, TN (United States); Smeltzer, Matthew P. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Biostatistics, Memphis, TN (United States); Hansbury, Eileen N. [Baylor International Hematology Center of Excellence and the Texas Children' s Center for Global Health, Houston, TX (United States); McCarville, Mary Elizabeth; Helton, Kathleen J. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); Hankins, Jane S. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Hematology, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) often undergo MRI studies to assess brain injury or to quantify hepatic iron. MRI requires the child to lie motionless for 30-60 min, thus sedation/anesthesia might be used to facilitate successful completion of exams, but this poses additional risks for SCD patients. To improve children's ability to cope with MRI examinations and avoid sedation, our institution established preparation and support procedures (PSP). To investigate the impact of PSP in reducing the need for sedation during MRI exams among children with SCD. Data on successful completion of MRI testing were compared among 5- to 12-year-olds who underwent brain MRI or liver R2*MRI with or without receiving PSP. Seventy-one children with SCD (median age 9.85 years, range 5.57-12.99 years) underwent a brain MRI (n = 60) or liver R2*MRI (n = 11). Children who received PSP were more likely to complete an interpretable MRI exam than those who did not 30 of 33; 91% vs. 27 of 38; 71%, unadjusted OR = 4.1 (P = 0.04) and OR = 8.5 (P < 0.01) when adjusting for age. PSP can help young children with SCD complete clinically interpretable, nonsedated MRI exams, avoiding the risks of sedation/anesthesia. (orig.)

  15. Diagnostic accuracy and patient acceptance of MRI in children with suspected appendicitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thieme, Mai E.; Leeuwenburgh, Marjolein M. N.; Valdehueza, Zaldy D.; Bouman, Donald E.; de Bruin, Ivar G. J. M.; Schreurs, W. Hermien; Houdijk, Alexander P. J.; Stoker, Jaap; Wiarda, Bart M.

    2014-01-01

    To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound in children with suspected appendicitis. In a single-centre diagnostic accuracy study, children with suspected appendicitis were prospectively identified at the emergency department. All underwent abdominal ultrasound and MRI within 2 h,

  16. The Copenhagen Standardised MRI protocol to assess the pubic symphysis and adductor regions of athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branci, Sonia; Thorborg, Kristian; Bech, Birthe Højlund

    2015-01-01

    radiologists developed an 11-element MRI evaluation protocol defined according to precise criteria and illustrated in a pictorial atlas. Eighty-six male athletes (soccer players and non-soccer players) underwent standardised 3 Tesla MRI of the pelvis. Two external musculoskeletal radiologists were trained...

  17. [UroMRI, a diagnostic alternative].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemecek, Tanja Andrea; Militello, José Ignacio

    2008-10-01

    This paper aims to evaluate the clinical and diagnostic usefulness of uro MRI, to show the study technique and to establish correlations of some of its results with conventional intravenous urography (IVU). Frequency and prevalence by age and gender of pathologies were evaluated. We studied a total of 58 patients, 31 females and 27 males, with an age range between 22-92 years. All patients underwent uro MRI between April 2003 and January 2005. We perform a double-blind study with those patients undergoing conventional IVU before uro MRI. The total number of patients evaluated was 58, 35 of which present more than 1 concurrent pathology 17.2% (n=10) of the studies were normal, five males and five females, with an age range between 22 and 83 years, and a mean age of 46.1 years. IVU was diagnostic for 100% and 83.3% of A and B observers respectively; uro MRI was diagnostic for 50% and 0% respectively. Ureteral lithiasis showed a result of 50% and 100% for IVU; uro MRI had a 75% for both observers. In cases of double pyelocalyceal system both methods have a 100% accordance between both observers. In bladder cancer, uro MRI was diagnostic in 100% and IVU in 0% for both observers. The most frequent concurrent pathology was cystic renal disease, and the second was urolithiasis with urinary tract dilation. Uro MRI was superior to see bladder and pyeloureteral pathologies, but in cases of renal lithiasis and urinary tract calcifications IVU is the test of choice yet.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of breast cancer: does the time interval between biopsy and MRI influence MRI-pathology discordance in lesion sizing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennella, Simone; Paparo, Francesco; Revelli, Matteo; Baccini, Paola; Secondini, Lucia; Barbagallo, Stella; Friedman, Daniele; Garlaschi, Alessandro

    2017-07-01

    Background Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is more accurate than ultrasound and mammography in estimating local extension of both invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and it is part of a breast cancer patient's preoperative management. Purpose To verify if time interval between breast biopsy and preoperative MRI, lesion margins, and biopsy technique can influence tumor sizing on MRI. Material and Methods By a database search, we retrospectively identified all women with a newly diagnosed, biopsy-proven, primary breast cancer who underwent MRI before surgery. The time interval between biopsy and MRI, the type of biopsy procedure, and various pathological features of tumors were collected. We defined the concordance between MRI and pathology measurements as a difference of biopsy and MRI showed only a weak correlation with the absolute MRI-pathology difference (r = 0.236). Stratifying the whole cohort of patients using a cutoff value of 30 days, we found that the MRI-pathology discordance was significantly higher in patients with a biopsy-MRI time interval >30 days ( P biopsy procedure and the time interval between biopsy and preoperative MRI are not independently associated to MRI-pathology discordance.

  19. Quantitative MRI of kidneys in renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Timothy L; Edwards, Marie E; Garg, Ishan; Irazabal, Maria V; Korfiatis, Panagiotis; Harris, Peter C; King, Bernard F; Torres, Vicente E; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K; Erickson, Bradley J

    2017-06-28

    To evaluate the reproducibility and utility of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences for the assessment of kidneys in young adults with normal renal function (eGFR ranged from 90 to 130 mL/min/1.73 m 2 ) and patients with early renal disease (autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease). This prospective case-control study was performed on ten normal young adults (18-30 years old) and ten age- and sex-matched patients with early renal parenchymal disease (autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease). All subjects underwent a comprehensive kidney MRI protocol, including qualitative imaging: T1w, T2w, FIESTA, and quantitative imaging: 2D cine phase contrast of the renal arteries, and parenchymal diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), magnetization transfer imaging (MTI), blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) imaging, and magnetic resonance elastography (MRE). The normal controls were imaged on two separate occasions ≥24 h apart (range 24-210 h) to assess reproducibility of the measurements. Quantitative MR imaging sequences were found to be reproducible. The mean ± SD absolute percent difference between quantitative parameters measured ≥24 h apart were: MTI-derived ratio = 4.5 ± 3.6%, DWI-derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) = 6.5 ± 3.4%, BOLD-derived R2* = 7.4 ± 5.9%, and MRE-derived tissue stiffness = 7.6 ± 3.3%. Compared with controls, the ADPKD patient's non-cystic renal parenchyma (NCRP) had statistically significant differences with regard to quantitative parenchymal measures: lower MTI percent ratios (16.3 ± 4.4 vs. 23.8 ± 1.2, p quantitative measurements was obtained in all cases. Significantly different quantitative MR parenchymal measurement parameters between ADPKD patients and normal controls were obtained by MT, DWI, BOLD, and MRE indicating the potential for detecting and following renal disease at an earlier stage than the conventional qualitative imaging techniques.

  20. Outcome of Patients Underwent Emergency Department Thoracotomy and Its Predictive Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Paydar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency department thoracotomy (EDT may serve as the last survival chance for patients who arrive at hospital in extremis. It is considered as an effective tool for improvement of traumatic patients’ outcome. The present study was done with the goal of assessing the outcome of patients who underwent EDT and its predictive factors. Methods: In the present study, medical charts of 50 retrospective and 8 prospective cases underwent emergency department thoracotomy (EDT were reviewed during November 2011 to June 2013. Comparisons between survived and died patients were performed by Mann-Whitney U test and the predictive factors of EDT outcome were measured using multivariate logistic regression analysis. P < 0.05 considered statistically significant. Results: Fifty eight cases of EDT were enrolled (86.2% male. The mean age of patients was 43.27±19.85 years with the range of 18-85. The mean time duration of CPR was recorded as 37.12±12.49 minutes. Eleven cases (19% were alive to be transported to OR (defined as ED survived. The mean time of survival in ED survived patients was 223.5±450.8 hours. More than 24 hours survival rate (late survived was 6.9% (4 cases. Only one case (1.7% survived to discharge from hospital (mortality rate=98.3%. There were only a significant relation between ED survival and SBP, GCS, CPR duration, and chest trauma (p=0.04. The results demonstrated that initial SBP lower than 80 mmHg (OR=1.03, 95% CI: 1.001-1.05, p=0.04 and presence of chest trauma (OR=2.6, 95% CI: 1.75-3.16, p=0.02 were independent predictive factors of EDT mortality. Conclusion: The findings of the present study showed that the survival rate of trauma patients underwent EDT was 1.7%. In addition, it was defined that falling systolic blood pressure below 80 mmHg and blunt trauma of chest are independent factors that along with poor outcome.

  1. Saline-filled breast implant contamination with Curvularia species among women who underwent cosmetic breast augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainer, Marion A; Keshavarz, Homa; Jensen, Bette J; Arduino, Matthew J; Brandt, Mary E; Padhye, Arvind A; Jarvis, William R; Archibald, Lennox K

    2005-07-01

    During December 2000-July 2001, black sediment was noted in saline-filled silicone breast implants of women who had undergone revision surgery at facility A. Curvularia fungus was isolated from implant saline. To identify risk factors for contamination with Curvularia species, we performed case-control, retrospective cohort, and laboratory studies and conducted procedural reviews. A case patient was defined as any woman who underwent revision surgery at facility A between January 2000 and June 2001 and had black sediment in her implants. Five patients met the case definition. Contamination was associated with having had surgery performed in operating room (OR) 2 (4/88 vs. 1/140; P=.07) and a longer duration of surgery (PSurgery center infection control measures must include moisture control and balanced ventilation systems.

  2. Applying feature selection methods on fMRI data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Schooten, S.; Harel, R.; Ercan, S.; De Groot, E.

    2014-01-01

    In neuroscience, the ability to correlate and classify certain activity patterns of the brain to different physical and mental states of the subject is of high importance. Analysis of fMRI data is one of the venues in which this objective is being pursued. However data produced using fMRI technology

  3. Clinicopathological Features of Cervical Esophageal Cancer: Retrospective Analysis of 63 Consecutive Patients Who Underwent Surgical Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Hiroshi; Tsutsumi, Satoshi; Yukaya, Takafumi; Tajiri, Hirotada; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Sho; Nakaji, Yu; Kudou, Kensuke; Akiyama, Shingo; Kasagi, Yuta; Nakashima, Yuichiro; Sugiyama, Masahiko; Sonoda, Hideto; Ohgaki, Kippei; Oki, Eiji; Yasumatsu, Ryuji; Nakashima, Torahiko; Morita, Masaru; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this retrospective study were to elucidate the clinicopathological features and recent surgical results of cervical esophageal cancer. Cervical esophageal cancer has been reported to have a dismal prognosis. Accurate knowledge of the clinical characteristics of cervical esophageal cancer is warranted to establish appropriate therapeutic strategies. The clinicopathological features and treatment results of 63 consecutive patients with cervical esophageal cancer (Ce group) who underwent surgical resection from 1980 to 2013 were analyzed and compared with 977 patients with thoracic or abdominal esophageal cancer (T/A group) who underwent surgical resection during that time. Among the patients who received curative resection, the 5-year overall and disease-specific survival rates of the Ce patients were significantly better than those of the T/A patients (overall: 77.3% vs 46.5%, respectively, P = 0.0067; disease-specific: 81.9% vs 55.8%, respectively, P = 0.0135). Although total pharyngo-laryngo-esophagectomy procedures were less frequently performed in the recent period, the rate of curative surgical procedures was markedly higher in the recent period (2000-1013) than that in the early period (1980-1999) (44.4% vs 88.9%, P = 0.0001). The 5-year overall survival rate in the recent period (71.5%) was significantly better than that in the early period (40.7%, P = 0.0342). Curative resection for cervical esophageal cancer contributes to favorable outcomes compared with other esophageal cancers. Recent surgical results for cervical esophageal cancer have improved, and include an increased rate of curative resection and decreased rate of extensive surgery.

  4. Correlation between location of transposed ovary and function in cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Aera; Lee, Yoo-Young; Park, Won; Huh, Seung Jae; Choi, Chel Hun; Kim, Tae-Joong; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Bae, Duk-Soo

    2015-05-01

    The study investigated the association between the location of transposed ovaries and posttreatment ovarian function in patients with early cervical cancer (IB1-IIA) who underwent radical hysterectomy and ovarian transposition with or without adjuvant therapies. Retrospective medical records were reviewed to enroll the patients with early cervical cancer who underwent ovarian transposition during radical hysterectomy at Samsung Medical Center between July 1995 and July 2012. Serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) level was used as a surrogate marker for ovarian function. Twenty-one patients were enrolled. The median age and body mass index (BMI) were 31 years (range, 24-39 years) and 21.3 kg/m² (range, 17.7-31.2 kg/m²), respectively. The median serum FSH level after treatment was 7.9 mIU/mL (range, 2.4-143.4 mIU/mL). The median distance from the iliac crest to transposed ovaries on erect plain abdominal x-ray was 0.5 cm (range, -2.7 to 5.2 cm). In multivariate analysis, posttreatment serum FSH levels were significantly associated with the location of transposed ovaries (β = -8.1, P = 0.032), concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) as an adjuvant therapy (β = 71.08, P = 0.006), and BMI before treatment (underweight: β = -59.93, P = 0.05; overweight: β = -40.62, P = 0.041). Location of transposed ovaries, adjuvant CCRT, and BMI before treatment may be associated with ovarian function after treatment. We suggest that ovaries should be transposed as highly as possible during radical hysterectomy to preserve ovarian function in young patients with early cervical cancer who might be a candidate for adjuvant CCRT and who have low BMI before treatment.

  5. Assessment of lung disease in children with cystic fibrosis using hyperpolarized 3-Helium MRI: comparison with Shwachman score, Chrispin-Norman score and spirometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beek, Edwin J.R. van [University of Sheffield, Unit of Academic Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City (United States); University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa City, IA (United States); Hill, Catherine; Woodhouse, Neil; Fichele, Stanislao; Fleming, Sally; Wild, Jim M. [University of Sheffield, Unit of Academic Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Howe, Bridget; Bott, Sandra; Taylor, Christopher J. [University of Sheffield, Academic Unit of Child Health, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2007-04-15

    This study assesses the feasibility of hyperpolarized 3-Helium MRI in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and correlates the findings with standard clinical parameters based on chest radiograph (CXR) and pulmonary function tests (PFT). An uncontrolled, observational study in eighteen children with cystic fibrosis aged 5 - 17 years (median 12.1 years), with different severity of disease was carried out. All subjects underwent routine clinical assessment including PFT and standard auxology; CXR was obtained and Shwachman and Chrispin-Norman scores calculated. Hyperpolarized 3-He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was carried out using a spin-exchange polarizer and a whole body 1.5 T scanner. Ventilation distribution images were obtained during a 21-second breath-hold and scored according to previously defined criteria. Spearman's non-parametric correlations test was performed to assess for statistical significance at the p<0.05 level. The children tolerated the procedure well. No desaturation events were observed during 3-He MRI. A significant, albeit moderate, correlation was found between MRI score and FEV1% predicted (r=-0.41; p=0.047) and FVC% predicted (r=-0.42; p=0.04), while there were trends of correlations between Shwachman score and MRI score (r=-0.38; p=0.06) and Shwachman score and FEV1% predicted (r=0.39; p=0.055). The feasibility of hyperpolarized 3-He MRI in children with CF was demonstrated. MRI appears to be able to demonstrate functional lung changes, although correlations with routine clinical tests are only moderate to poor. This non-ionising radiation technique could be useful for monitoring lung disease and assessing therapy in this patient population. (orig.)

  6. MRI in psychiatry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulert, Christoph [UKE, Hamburg (Germany). Psychiatry Neuroimaging Branch; Shenton, Martha E. (ed.) [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry and Radiology

    2014-07-01

    This is the first comprehensive textbook on the use of MRI in psychiatry covering imaging techniques, brain systems and a review of findings in different psychiatric disorders. The book is divided into three sections, the first of which covers in detail all the major MRI-based methodological approaches available today, including fMRI, EEG-fMRI, DTI, and MR spectroscopy. In addition, the role of MRI in imaging genetics and combined brain stimulation and imaging is carefully explained. The second section provides an overview of the different brain systems that are relevant for psychiatric disorders, including the systems for perception, emotion, cognition, and reward. The final part of the book presents the MRI findings that are obtained in all the major psychiatric disorders using the previously discussed techniques. Numerous carefully chosen images support the informative text, making this an ideal reference work for all practitioners and trainees with an interest in this flourishing field.

  7. Childhood moyamoya disease: hemodynamic MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzika, A.A. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Robertson, R.L. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Barnes, P.D. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Vajapeyam, S. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Burrows, P.E. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Treves, S.T. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Scott, R.M. l [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    1997-09-01

    Background. Childhood moyamoya disease is a rare progressive cerebrovascular disease. Objective. To evaluate cerebral hemodynamics using dynamic Gd-DTPA-enhanced imaging in children with moyamoya disease. Materials and methods. Eight children (2-11 years of age) with the clinical and angiographic findings typical of moyamoya disease, before and/or after surgical intervention (pial synangiosis), underwent conventional MR imaging (MRI) and hemodynamic MR imaging (HMRI). HMRI used a spoiled gradient-echo with low flip angle (10 deg) and long TE (TR/TE = 24/15 ms) to minimize T 1 effects and emphasize T 2{sup *} weighting. Raw and calculated hemodynamic images were reviewed. Three-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiography (MRA) and perfusion brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were also performed. Results. Abnormal hemodynamic maps resulting from vascular stenosis or occlusion and basal collaterals were observed in six patient studies. HMRI depicted perfusion dynamics of affected cerebrovascular territories, detected cortical perfusion deficits, and complemented conventional MRI and MRA. HMRI findings were consistent with those of catheter angiography and perfusion SPECT. Conclusion. Our preliminary experience suggests that HMRI may be of value in the preoperative and postoperative evaluation of surgical interventions in moyamoya disease. (orig.). With 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  9. Clitoral size and location in relation to sexual function using pelvic MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Susan H; Vaccaro, Christine M; Crisp, Catrina C; Estanol, M Victoria; Fellner, Angela N; Kleeman, Steven D; Pauls, Rachel N

    2014-04-01

    The female sexual response is dynamic; anatomic mechanisms may ease or enhance the intensity of orgasm. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clitoral size and location with regard to female sexual function. This cross-sectional TriHealth Institutional Board Review approved study compared 10 sexually active women with anorgasmia to 20 orgasmic women matched by age and body mass index (BMI). Data included demographics, sexual history, serum hormone levels, Prolapse/Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire-12 (PISQ-12), Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), Body Exposure during Sexual Activity Questionnaire (BESAQ), and Short Form Health Survey-12. All subjects underwent pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without contrast; measurements of the clitoris were calculated. Our primary outcomes were clitoral size and location as measured by noncontrast MRI imaging in sagittal, coronal, and axial planes. Thirty premenopausal women completed the study. The mean age was 32 years (standard deviation [SD] 7), mean BMI 25 (SD 4). The majority was white (90%) and married (61%). Total PISQ-12 (P orgasmic subjects, indicating better sexual function. On MRI, the area of the clitoral glans in coronal view was significantly smaller for the anorgasmic group (P = 0.005). A larger distance from the clitoral glans (51 vs. 45 mm, P = 0.049) and body (29 vs. 21 mm, P = 0.008) to the vaginal lumen was found in the anorgasmic subjects. For the entire sample, larger distance between the clitoris and the vagina correlated with poorer scores on the PISQ-12 (r = -0.44, P = 0.02), FSFI (r = -0.43, P = 0.02), and BESAQ (r = -0.37, P = 0.04). Women with anorgasmia possessed a smaller clitoral glans and clitoral components farther from the vaginal lumen than women with normal orgasmic function. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  10. Value of dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MRI in the acute phase of transient global amnesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Förster

    Full Text Available Transient global amnesia (TGA is a transitory, short-lasting neurological disorder characterized by a sudden onset of antero- and retrograde amnesia. Perfusion abnormalities in TGA have been evaluated mainly by use of positron emission tomography (PET or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT. In the present study we explore the value of dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion-weighted MRI (PWI in TGA in the acute phase.From a MRI report database we identified TGA patients who underwent MRI including PWI in the acute phase and compared these to control subjects. Quantitative perfusion maps (cerebral blood flow (CBF and volume (CBV were generated and analyzed by use of Signal Processing In NMR-Software (SPIN. CBF and CBV values in subcortical brain regions were assessed by use of VOI created in FIRST, a model-based segmentation tool in the Oxford Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain (FMRIB Software Library (FSL.Five TGA patients were included (2 men, 3 women. On PWI, no relevant perfusion alterations were found by visual inspection in TGA patients. Group comparisons for possible differences between TGA patients and control subjects showed significant lower rCBF values bilaterally in the hippocampus, in the left thalamus and globus pallidus as well as bilaterally in the putamen and the left caudate nucleus. Correspondingly, significant lower rCBV values were observed bilaterally in the hippocampus and the putamen as well as in the left caudate nucleus. Group comparisons for possible side differences in rCBF and rCBV values in TGA patients revealed a significant lower rCBV value in the left caudate nucleus.Mere visual inspection of PWI is not sufficient for the assessment of perfusion changes in TGA in the acute phase. Group comparisons with healthy control subjects might be useful to detect subtle perfusion changes on PWI in TGA patients. However, this should be confirmed in larger data sets and serial PWI

  11. Value of dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MRI in the acute phase of transient global amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Alex; Al-Zghloul, Mansour; Kerl, Hans U; Böhme, Johannes; Mürle, Bettina; Groden, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a transitory, short-lasting neurological disorder characterized by a sudden onset of antero- and retrograde amnesia. Perfusion abnormalities in TGA have been evaluated mainly by use of positron emission tomography (PET) or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In the present study we explore the value of dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion-weighted MRI (PWI) in TGA in the acute phase. From a MRI report database we identified TGA patients who underwent MRI including PWI in the acute phase and compared these to control subjects. Quantitative perfusion maps (cerebral blood flow (CBF) and volume (CBV)) were generated and analyzed by use of Signal Processing In NMR-Software (SPIN). CBF and CBV values in subcortical brain regions were assessed by use of VOI created in FIRST, a model-based segmentation tool in the Oxford Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain (FMRIB) Software Library (FSL). Five TGA patients were included (2 men, 3 women). On PWI, no relevant perfusion alterations were found by visual inspection in TGA patients. Group comparisons for possible differences between TGA patients and control subjects showed significant lower rCBF values bilaterally in the hippocampus, in the left thalamus and globus pallidus as well as bilaterally in the putamen and the left caudate nucleus. Correspondingly, significant lower rCBV values were observed bilaterally in the hippocampus and the putamen as well as in the left caudate nucleus. Group comparisons for possible side differences in rCBF and rCBV values in TGA patients revealed a significant lower rCBV value in the left caudate nucleus. Mere visual inspection of PWI is not sufficient for the assessment of perfusion changes in TGA in the acute phase. Group comparisons with healthy control subjects might be useful to detect subtle perfusion changes on PWI in TGA patients. However, this should be confirmed in larger data sets and serial PWI

  12. MRI in primary intraspinal extradural hydatid disease: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berk, C. [Department of Neurosurgery, Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Avicenna Medical Centre, Ankara (Turkey); Ciftci, E. [Camlik Sitesi, Ankara (Turkey); Erdogan, A. [Department of Radiology, Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Avicenna Medical Centre, Ankara (Turkey)

    1998-06-01

    A rare case of pathologically proven primary intraspinal extradural hydatid disease of the thoracic region with spinal cord compression is reported. The diagnosis was established preoperatively on the basis of the MRI findings. The patient underwent surgery and recovered completely. (orig.) With 2 figs., 12 refs.

  13. Non-traumatic peroneal nerve palsy: MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.Y. [Departments of Radiology St Vincent' s Hospital, Catholic University of Korea, Paldal-gu, Suwon city, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Ihn, Y.K. [Departments of Radiology St Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Paldal-gu, Suwon city, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: Ihn@catholic.ac.kr; Kim, J.S. [Department of Rehabilitation medicine, St Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Paldal-gu, Suwon city, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Chun, K.A. [Department of Radiology, Uijeongbu St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Geumo-dong, Uijeongbu city, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Sung, M.S. [Department of Radiology, Holy Family Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Sosa-dong, Wonmi-gu, Bucheon city, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Cho, K.H. [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam Univ. Medical Center, Nam-gu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-15

    Aim: To present magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of non-traumatic peroneal nerve palsy and to evaluate the usefulness of MRI in patients with non-traumatic peroneal nerve palsy. Materials and methods: In a retrospective study, 11 consecutive patients presenting with peroneal nerve palsy were included. MR images of the lower leg and electrophysiological examinations were also reviewed. The cause of peroneal nerve palsy was determined on the basis of MRI findings and was evaluated using electrophysiological data. Nine patients with causative lesions detected on MRI, underwent surgery. Results: Clinical examination and electromyography (EMG) disclosed 11 peroneal lesions. MRI and EMG revealed three types of signal intensity change, i.e. deep peroneal nerve palsy type, common peroneal nerve palsy type, and superficial peroneal nerve palsy type. The MRI and EMG findings were in agreement in seven (65%) of the 11 study patients. In nine patients the causative lesions were identified using MRI, including ganglion cyst (n = 6), osteochondroma (n = 1), synovial cyst (n = 1), and aneurysm (n = 1). Conclusion: Ganglion cyst is the most common cause of non-traumatic peroneal nerve palsy. MRI offers a noninvasive method for obtaining useful information to assess, localize, and monitor peripheral peroneal nerve palsy.

  14. Evaluation of uterine peristalsis using cine MRI on the coronal plane in comparison with the sagittal plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitano, Fuki; Kido, Aki; Kataoka, Masako; Fujimoto, Koji; Kiguchi, Kayo; Fushimi, Yasutaka; Togashi, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    Uterine peristalsis is supposed to be closely related to the early stages of reproduction. Sperms are preferentially transported from the uterine cervix to the side of the tube with the dominant follicle. However, with respect to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), uterine peristalsis has only been evaluated at the sagittal plane of cine MRI. To evaluate and compare uterine peristalsis both on sagittal and coronal planes using cine MRI. Internal ethics committee approval was obtained, and subjects provided informed written consent. Thirty-one women underwent MRI scans in the periovulatory phase of the menstrual cycle. Cine MR images obtained by fast advanced spin echo sequence at 3-T field strength magnet (Toshiba Medical Systems) were visually evaluated by two independent radiologists. The frequency and the direction of peristalsis, and the presence of outer myometrium conduction of signal intensities (OMC), were evaluated. The laterality of the dominant follicle was determined on axial images and compared with the peristaltic direction in fundus. The subjects in which peristaltic directions were more clearly recognized were significantly frequent in coronal planes than in sagittal planes (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the peristaltic frequency between the sagittal and the coronal plane. However, the OMC was more recognized in the coronal plane than in the sagittal plane (P < 0.05). Peristaltic waves conducted toward the possible ovulation side were observed in only three of the 10 subjects. OMC of uterine peristalsis was better demonstrated in the coronal plane compared to the sagittal plane. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  15. Fundus fluorescein angiographic findings in patients who underwent ventricular assist device implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Taylan; Nalcaci, Serhad; Ozturk, Pelin; Engin, Cagatay; Yagdi, Tahir; Akkin, Cezmi; Ozbaran, Mustafa

    2013-09-01

    Disruption of microcirculation in various tissues as a result of deformed blood rheology due to ventricular assist device (VAD) implantation causes novel arteriovenous malformations. Capillary disturbances and related vascular leakage in the retina and choroidea may also be seen in patients supported by VADs. We aimed to evaluate retinal vasculature deteriorations after VAD implantation. The charts of 17 patients who underwent VAD implantation surgery for the treatment of end-stage heart failure were retrospectively reviewed. Eight cases (47.1%) underwent pulsatile pump implantation (Berlin Heart EXCOR, Berlin Heart Mediprodukt GmbH, Berlin, Germany); however, nine cases (52.9%) had continuous-flow pump using centrifugal design (HeartWare, HeartWare Inc., Miramar, FL, USA). Study participants were selected among the patients who had survived with a VAD for at least 6 months, and results of detailed ophthalmologic examinations including optic coherence tomography (OCT) and fundus fluorescein angiography (FA) were documented. All of the 17 patients were male, with a mean age of 48.5 ± 14.8 years (15-67 years). Detailed ophthalmologic examinations including the evaluation of retinal vascular deteriorations via FA were performed at a mean of 11.8 ± 3.7 months of follow-up (6-18 months). Mean best-corrected visual acuity and intraocular pressure were found as logMAR 0.02 ± 0.08 and 14.6 ± 1.9 mm Hg, respectively in the study population. Dilated fundoscopy revealed severe focal arteriolar narrowing in two patients (11.8%), and arteriovenous crossing changes in four patients (23.5%); however, no pathological alteration was present in macular OCT scans. In patients with continuous-flow blood pumps, mean arm-retina circulation time (ARCT) and arteriovenous transit time (AVTT) were found to be 16.8 ± 3.0 and 12.4 ± 6.2 s, respectively; whereas those with pulsatile-flow blood pumps were found to be 17.4 ± 3.6 and 14.0 ± 2.1 s in patients (P=0.526 and P=0

  16. Women's acceptance of MRI in breast cancer surveillance because of a familial or genetic predisposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essink-Bot, M. L.; Rijnsburger, A. J.; van Dooren, S.; de Koning, H. J.; Seynaeve, C.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breasts is a promising screening modality for early detection in women at increased breast cancer risk. We investigated the subjective experiences with MRI and the preferences for MRI, mammography or clinical breast examination in 178 high-risk women adhering

  17. Transcranial doppler sonography in two patients who underwent decompressive craniectomy for traumatic brain swelling: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bor-Seng-Shu Edson

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of decompressive craniectomy in the treatment of severe posttraumatic cerebral swelling remains quite a controversial issue. To the best of our knowledge, there is no study demonstrating the effect of decompressive craniectomy on cerebral blood flow (CBF velocity by means of transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD. We present two patients who developed traumatic brain swelling and uncontrollable intracranial hypertension with coma and signs of transtentorial herniation. One patient underwent bifrontal, while the second, unilateral, frontotemporoparietal decompressive craniectomy with dural expansion. In both patients, TCD examinations were performed immediately before and after surgery to study the cerebral hemodynamic changes related to the operations. Pre and postoperative TCD examinations demonstrated a significant increase in blood flow velocity in the intracranial arteries in both subjects. In conclusion, our cases suggest that decompressive craniectomy with dural expansion may result in elevation of CBF velocity in patients with massive brain swelling. The increase in CBF velocity appears to occur not only in the decompressed hemisphere, but also on the opposite side.

  18. The Effects of Functional Knee Brace on Postural Control in Patients Who Underwent Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salehi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The current study aimed to evaluate the postural control in patients underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction pre and post wearing functional knee brace. Methods Eighteen athletes undergone unilateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction included in the study. They had unilateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction at least six months before session test. Postural control was assessed pre and post wearing custom-fit functional knee brace using a posturographic platform prokin 254. The balance tests included: 1 standing on prokin platform with eyes open/closed on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction limb, 2 standing on prokin platform with eyes open/closed on both limbs. The standard deviation (SD of body sway along the anteroposterior (AP and mediolateral (ML axis, mean velocity of center of pressure (COP along AP/ ML axis and the area ellipse (measured in 2 mm were calculated. Results Results of the paired T-test revealed a significant effect on selected postural control variables for the brace conditions especially in low challengeable conditions (double leg, eyes open test situations (P < 0.05. But in high challengeable conditions this effect was not significant. Conclusions Functional knee brace improved postural control in the simple balancing task in the subjects with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. But this improvement in more difficult balancing task was limited.

  19. Effects of niacin on glucose levels, coronary stenosis progression, and clinical events in subjects with normal baseline glucose levels (Atherosclerosis Treatment Study (FATS), HDL-Atherosclerosis Treatment Study (HATS), Armed Forces Regression Study (AFREGS), and Carotid Plaque Composition by MRI during lipid-lowering (CPC) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Binh An P; Muñoz, Luis; Shadzi, Pey; Isquith, Daniel; Triller, Michael; Brown, B Greg; Zhao, Xue-Qiao

    2013-02-01

    Although the effect of niacin on the glucose levels in subjects with diabetes mellitus has been investigated, niacin's effects on the glucose levels and atherosclerosis in subjects with normal glucose levels have not been well established. We examined the effect of niacin on the glucose levels, coronary stenosis progression using quantitative coronary angiography, and clinical events in 407 subjects who had a baseline glucose level <100 mg/dl and were enrolled in the Familial Atherosclerosis Treatment Study (FATS), HDL-Atherosclerosis Treatment Study (HATS), Armed Forces Regression Study (AFREGS), or Carotid Plaque Composition by MRI during lipid-lowering (CPC) study testing active niacin therapy. Although the fasting glucose levels increased significantly within 3 years in both subjects treated with niacin (from 85.6 ± 9.5 to 95.5 ± 19.7 mg/dl, p <0.001) and without niacin (from 85.2 ± 9.6 to 90 ± 17.9 mg/dl, p = 0.009), those treated with niacin had a significantly larger increase in glucose levels than those not taking niacin (9.88 vs 4.05 mg/dl, p = 0.002). Overall, 29% of subjects developed impaired fasting glucose within 3 years. Incident impaired fasting glucose was significantly more likely to be observed in subjects treated with niacin than in those who were not. However, the frequency of new-onset diabetes mellitus did not differ significantly between the 2 groups (5.6% vs 4.8%, p = 0.5). Niacin-treated subjects compared to untreated subjects had significantly less change in mean coronary stenosis (0.1 ± 0.3% vs 2 ± 12%, p <0.0001) and less major cardiovascular events (8% vs 21%, p = 0.001). In conclusion, the use of niacin for 3 years in subjects with normal baseline glucose levels was associated with an increase in blood glucose levels and the risk of developing impaired fasting glucose, but not diabetes mellitus, and was associated with a significantly reduced incidence of coronary stenosis progression and major cardiovascular events. Copyright

  20. Intraocular lens power estimation by accurate ray tracing for eyes underwent previous refractive surgeries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Que; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Chunyu; Zhang, Lu; Meng, Qingyu; Zhu, Qiudong

    2015-08-01

    For normal eyes without history of any ocular surgery, traditional equations for calculating intraocular lens (IOL) power, such as SRK-T, Holladay, Higis, SRK-II, et al., all were relativley accurate. However, for eyes underwent refractive surgeries, such as LASIK, or eyes diagnosed as keratoconus, these equations may cause significant postoperative refractive error, which may cause poor satisfaction after cataract surgery. Although some methods have been carried out to solve this problem, such as Hagis-L equation[1], or using preoperative data (data before LASIK) to estimate K value[2], no precise equations were available for these eyes. Here, we introduced a novel intraocular lens power estimation method by accurate ray tracing with optical design software ZEMAX. Instead of using traditional regression formula, we adopted the exact measured corneal elevation distribution, central corneal thickness, anterior chamber depth, axial length, and estimated effective lens plane as the input parameters. The calculation of intraocular lens power for a patient with keratoconus and another LASIK postoperative patient met very well with their visual capacity after cataract surgery.

  1. Incidence of venous thromboembolism among patients who underwent major surgery in a public hospital in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anindya P. Susanto

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a fatal yet potentially preventable complication of surgery. Routine thromboprophylaxis is still unequivocal prescription is problematic due to perception of low VTE incidence among Asian population. This study aims to investigate the incidence of VTE and thromboprophylaxis prescription among patients undergoing major surgery in a Singapore hospital.Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Data were obtained from medical record of 1,103 patients who had underwent major orthopaedic or abdominal surgery in 2011-2012 at Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Singapore. Incidence of VTE events either in the same admission or re-admission in less than one month time were noted as study parameters.Results: Incidence of VTE was 2.1% (95% CI: 1.67 - 2.53 of which 1.3% and 0.8% were DVT and PE cases respectively. Age, gender, history of VTE, ischemic heart disease, and mechanical prophylaxis were associated with VTE incidence based on bivariate analysis. The prescription of pharmacological thromboprophylaxis was associated with prior anticoagulant medication, type of surgery, and incidence of new bleeding. Conclusion: Subsequent to major surgeries, VTE is as common in Asian patients as published data in other populations. Pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis should be considered as recommended in non-Asian guidelines.Keywords: thromboprophylaxis, venous thromboembolism

  2. Influence of perioperative administration of amino acids on thermoregulation response in patients underwent colorectal surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeba Snježana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hypothermia in the surgical patients can be the consequence of long duration of surgical intervention, general anesthesia and low temperature in operating room. Postoperative hypothermia contributes to a number of postoperative complications such as arrhythmia, myocardial ischemia, hypertension, bleeding, wound infection, coagulopathy, prolonged effect of muscle relaxants. External heating procedures are used to prevent this condition, but some investigations reported that infusion of aminoacids during surgery can induce thermogenesis and prevent postoperative hypothermia. Case report. We reported two males who underwent major colorectal surgery for rectal carcinoma. One patient received Aminosol 15% solution, 125 ml/h, while the other did not. The esophageal temperatures in both cases were measured every 30 minutes during the operation and 60 minutes after in Intensive Care Unit. We were monitoring blood pressure, heart rate, ECG, and shivering. Patient who received aminoacids showed ameliorated postoperative hypothermia without hypertension, arrhythmia, or shivering, while the other showed all symptoms mentioned above. Conclusion. According to literature data, as well as our findings, we can conclude that intraoperative intravenous treatment with amino acid solution ameliorates postoperative hypothermia along with its complications. .

  3. The X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and its modified Pegasus booster rocket recently underwent c

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The first of three X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and its modified Pegasus booster rocket recently underwent combined systems testing while mounted to NASA's NB-52B carrier aircraft at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The combined systems test was one of the last major milestones in the Hyper-X research program before the first X-43A flight. The X-43A flights will be the first actual flight tests of an aircraft powered by a revolutionary supersonic-combustion ramjet ('scramjet') engine capable of operating at hypersonic speeds (above Mach 5, or five times the speed of sound). The 12-foot, unpiloted research vehicle was developed and built by MicroCraft Inc., Tullahoma, Tenn., under NASA contract. The booster was built by Orbital Sciences Corp., Dulles, Va.,After being air-launched from NASA's venerable NB-52 mothership, the booster will accelerate the X-43A to test speed and altitude. The X-43A will then separate from the rocket and fly a pre-programmed trajectory, conducting aerodynamic and propulsion experiments until it descends into the Pacific Ocean. Three research flights are planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10.

  4. [Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a pediatric patient who underwent a hematopoietic stem cell transplant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Julia; Catalán, Paula; Mardones, Patricia; Santolaya, M Elena

    2013-04-01

    We report the case of a 10 year old girl with a relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who underwent a haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), with grade II skin and digestive graft versus host disease, treated with corticosteroids and cyclosporine. On day + 54, she presented fever, with no other remarkable clinical findings. Imaging study showed the presence of lung and liver nodules, liver biopsy was performed. The study included histology, staining and culture for bacteria and fungi, and the preservation of a piece of tissue at -20°C for future prospective studies. Ziehl Nielsen stain was positive, and study for Mycobacterium infection was performed. Microbiological smears of tracheal and gastric aspirate, and bronchial fluid obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were positive. The final report confirmed Mycobacterium tuberculosis in gastric content, sputum, BAL and liver tissue, susceptible to rifampin, isoniazid, streptomycin and ethambutol, with determination of mutations for genes rpoβ and kat G (-). Tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis was confirmed. The girl received daily therapy for two months and then she continued on three times per week therapy for 9 months. Controlled by the transplant, infectious diseases and respiratory teams, the patient remained in good general condition, with radiologic resolution of pulmonary and liver involvement and negative smears. We conclude that Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection should be part of differential diagnosis of febrile illness in patients undergoing HSCT, and biopsy should be a standard practice of early diagnosis in these patients.

  5. Utility of MRI for cervical spine clearance in blunt trauma patients after a negative CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Ajay; Durand, David; Wu, Xiao; Geng, Bertie; Abbed, Khalid; Nunez, Diego B; Sanelli, Pina

    2018-02-15

    To determine the utility of cervical spine MRI in blunt trauma evaluation for instability after a negative non-contrast cervical spine CT. A review of medical records identified all adult patients with blunt trauma who underwent CT cervical spine followed by MRI within 48 h over a 33-month period. Utility of subsequent MRI was assessed in terms of findings and impact on outcome. A total of 1,271 patients with blunt cervical spine trauma underwent both cervical spine CT and MRI within 48 h; 1,080 patients were included in the study analysis. Sixty-six percent of patients with a CT cervical spine study had a negative study. Of these, the subsequent cervical spine MRI had positive findings in 20.9%; 92.6% had stable ligamentous or osseous injuries, 6.0% had unstable injuries and 1.3% had potentially unstable injuries. For unstable injury, the NPV for CT was 98.5%. In all 712 patients undergoing both CT and MRI, only 1.5% had unstable injuries, and only 0.42% had significant change in management. MRI for blunt trauma evaluation remains not infrequent at our institution. MRI may have utility only in certain patients with persistent abnormal neurological examination. • MRI has limited utility after negative cervical CT in blunt trauma. • MRI is frequently positive for non-specific soft-tissue injury. • Unstable injury missed on CT is infrequent.

  6. Impact of sensory design interventions on image quality, patient anxiety and overall patient experience at MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Emma; Cradock, Andrea; Bisset, James; McEntee, Ciara; O'Connell, Martin J

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of sensory stimulation on patient MRI experience and to assess whether sensory stimulation has a significant effect on MR image quality. A case-control study was conducted over 4 months, involving patients undergoing MRI brain, cervical spine, breast and prostate. The study involved 106 patients, 64 cases and 42 controls. Cases underwent sensory stimulation during the scan in the form of a scented cotton pad placed in the scanner near their head and/or calming bird noises were played over headphones. Post-scan, participants completed a questionnaire regarding their experience of MRI. Scanning radiographers completed a questionnaire regarding patient tolerance of the scan. All studies were evaluated by two radiologists for the presence of movement artefact. 39% of cases and 38% of controls reported anxiety in the days preceding MRI. 6.2% of cases required coaching during image acquisition, while 9.7% of controls required coaching. 4.7% of cases and 4.8% controls required sequence repetition owing to movement artefact. Mean patient experience score (as graded by the patient) for controls was 1.74 ± 0.63 standard deviation (SD) and for cases, it was 1.67 ± 0.60 SD. (Lower assigned scores equated to a better experience). Mean patient experience score based on comments on a 5-point scale as graded by two observers was 2.81 ± 0.70 SD for controls, 2.42 + 0.94 SD for sound intervention and 2.46 ± 1.01 SD for scent intervention. Mean motion artefact score graded by the two radiologists was 1.13 ± 0.53 SD for controls and 1.08 ± 0.36 SD for cases. (A lower score equated to less movement artefact). We demonstrated a trend towards a relaxing experience in those patients undergoing MRI for the first time who underwent sensory intervention. Participant positive ratings of the smell pleasantness were associated with a reduced likelihood of experiencing anxiety (p = 0.13). Results were not statistically

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want ... medically necessary. MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  12. Glucose and caffeine effects on sustained attention: an exploratory fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Grabulosa, Josep M; Adan, Ana; Falcón, Carles; Bargalló, Núria

    2010-11-01

    Caffeine and glucose can have beneficial effects on cognitive performance. However, neural basis of these effects remain unknown. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of caffeine and glucose on sustained attention, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Forty young right-handed, healthy, low caffeine-consuming subjects participated in the study. In a double-blind, randomised design, subjects received one of the following beverages: vehicle (water, 150 ml); vehicle plus 75 g of glucose; vehicle plus 75 mg of caffeine; vehicle plus 75 g of glucose and 75 mg of caffeine. Participants underwent two scanning fMRI sessions (before and 30 min after of the administration of the beverage). A continuous performance test was used to assess sustained attention. Participants who received combined caffeine and glucose had similar performance to the others but had a decrease in activation in the bilateral parietal and left prefrontal cortex. Since these areas have been related to the sustained attention and working memory processes, results would suggest that combined caffeine and glucose could increase the efficiency of the attentional system. However, more studies using larger samples and different levels of caffeine and glucose are necessary to better understand the combined effects of both substances. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Usefulness of MRI-assisted metabolic volumetric parameters provided by simultaneous {sup 18}F-fluorocholine PET/MRI for primary prostate cancer characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong-il [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Department of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Gi Jeong [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Radiological Science Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, 101 Daehak-ro, Chongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paeng, Jin Chul [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jeong Yeon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Radiological Science Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 101 Daehak-ro, Chongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Cheol [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Urology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Keon Wook; Chung, June-Key [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Radiological Science Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Euishin Edmund [Seoul National University, Department of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine, CA (United States); Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Department of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the usefulness of MRI-assisted positron emission tomography (PET) parameters provided by simultaneous {sup 18}F-fluorocholine (FCH) PET/MRI for characterization of primary prostate cancer. Thirty patients with localized prostate cancer (mean age 69.4 ± 6.7 years) confirmed by biopsy were prospectively enrolled for simultaneous PET/MRI imaging. The patients underwent {sup 18}F-FCH PET/MRI 1 week before undergoing total prostatectomy. Multiple parameters of diffusion-weighted MRI [minimum and mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC{sub min} and ADC{sub mean})], metabolic PET [maximum and mean standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean})], and metabolic volumetric PET [metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and uptake volume product (UVP)] were compared with laboratory, pathologic, and immunohistochemical (IHC) features of the prostate cancer specimen. PET parameters were divided into two categories as follows: volume of interest (VOI) of prostate by SUV cutoff 2.5 (SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}, MTV{sub SUV}, and UVP{sub SUV}) and MRI-assisted VOI of prostate cancer (SUV{sub maxMRI}, SUV{sub meanMRI}, MTV{sub MRI}, and UVP{sub MRI}). The rates of prostate cancer-positive cases identified by MRI alone, {sup 18}F-FCH PET alone, and {sup 18}F-FCH PET/MRI were 83.3, 80.0, and 93.3 %, respectively. Among the multiple PET/MRI parameters, MTV{sub MRI} showed fair correlation with serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA; r = 0.442, p = 0.014) and highest correlation with tumor volume (r = 0.953, p < 0.001). UVP{sub MRI} showed highest correlation with serum PSA (r = 0.531, p = 0.003), good correlation with tumor volume (r = 0.908, p < 0.001), and it was significantly associated with Gleason score (p = 0.041). High MTV{sub MRI} and UVP{sub MRI} values were significant for perineural invasion, lymphatic invasion, extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, and positive B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) expression (all p < 0

  14. MRI to predict prostate growth and development in children, adolescents and young adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Jing; Liu, Huijia; Wen, Didi; Huang, Xufang; Ren, Fang; Huan, Yi [Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, Xijing Hospital, Xi' an City (China); Wang, He [Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Urology, Tangdu Hospital, Xi' an City (China)

    2014-08-06

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of MRI in predicting prostate growth and development. A total of 1,500 healthy male volunteers who underwent MRI of the pelvis were included in this prospective study. Subjects were divided into five groups according to age (group A, 2-5 years; group B, 6-10 years; group C, 11-15 years; group D, 16-20 years; group E, 21-25 years). Total prostate volume (TPV) as well as prostate central zone (CZ) and peripheral zone (PZ) were measured and evaluated on MRI. Data of the different groups were compared using variance analysis, Scheffe's method, Kruskal-Wallis H-test, and Pearson's correlation. Statistical significance was inferred at P < 0.05. In groups A and B, the prostates were barely visible. In group C, although TPV was measured, it was hard to distinguish CZ and PZ. In group D, 136 CZ and PZ were clearly visible. In group E, 377 CZ and PZ were clearly visible on T2-weighted imaging (T2WI). The median TPVs of groups A, B, C, D, and E were 0.00 cm{sup 3}, 0.05 cm{sup 3}, 2.83 cm{sup 3}, 8.32 cm{sup 3,} and 11.56 cm{sup 3}, respectively, and the median prostate development scores were 0.08, 0.69, 1.56, 2.38, and 2.74, respectively. Both TPVs and zonal anatomy scores varied significantly among the five groups (P = 0.000). TPV and zonal anatomy score increased with increasing age. MRI provides a reliable quantitative reference for prostate growth and development. (orig.)

  15. Characterizing indeterminate (Likert-score 3/5) peripheral zone prostate lesions with PSA density, PI-RADS scoring and qualitative descriptors on multiparametric MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizmohun Appayya, Mrishta; Sidhu, Harbir S; Dikaios, Nikolaos; Johnston, Edward W; Simmons, Lucy Am; Freeman, Alex; Kirkham, Alexander Ps; Ahmed, Hashim U; Punwani, Shonit

    2018-02-01

    To determine whether indeterminate (Likert-score 3/5) peripheral zone (PZ) multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) studies are classifiable by prostate-specific antigen (PSA), PSA density (PSAD), Prostate Imaging Reporting And Data System version 2 (PI-RADS_v2) rescoring and morphological MRI features. Men with maximum Likert-score 3/5 within their PZ were retrospectively selected from 330 patients who prospectively underwent prostate mpMRI (3 T) without an endorectal coil, followed by 20-zone transperineal template prostate mapping biopsies +/- focal lesion-targeted biopsy. PSAD was calculated using pre-biopsy PSA and MRI-derived volume. Two readers A and B independently assessed included men with both Likert-assessment and PI-RADS_v2. Both readers then classified mpMRI morphological features in consensus. Men were divided into two groups: significant cancer (≥ Gleason 3 + 4) or insignificant cancer (≤ Gleason 3 + 3)/no cancer. Comparisons between groups were made separately for PSA & PSAD using Mann-Whitney test and morphological descriptors with Fisher's exact test. PI-RADS_v2 and Likert-assessment were descriptively compared and percentage inter-reader agreement calculated. 76 males were eligible for PSA & PSAD analyses, 71 for PI-RADS scoring, and 67 for morphological assessment (excluding significant image artefacts). Unlike PSA (p = 0.915), PSAD was statistically different (p = 0.004) between the significant [median: 0.19 ng ml - 2 (interquartile range: 0.13-0.29)] and non-significant/no cancer [median: 0.13 ng ml - 2 (interquartile range: 0.10-0.17)] groups. Presence of mpMRI morphological features was not significantly different between groups. Subjective Likert-assessment discriminated patients with significant cancer better than PI-RADS_v2. Inter-reader percentage agreement was 83% for subjective Likert-assessment and 56% for PI-RADS_v2. PSAD may categorize presence of significant cancer in patients with Likert-scored 3/5 PZ mpMRI findings. Advances in

  16. Evaluation of medial meniscus tears and meniscal stability: weight-bearing MRI vs arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barile, Antonio; Conti, Laura; Lanni, Giuseppe; Calvisi, Vittorio; Masciocchi, Carlo

    2013-04-01

    To assess the role of dedicated low-field standard and weight-bearing MRI in the evaluation of stable or unstable tears of medial meniscus in comparison with arthroscopy. Our series included 1750 knee MRI scans performed with a high-field MRI scanner from July 2010 to August 2011. We retrospectively reviewed and analyzed 20 MRI exams of normal knee and 57 MRI exams of knee with clinical evidence of tears of the medial meniscus. In the same session, after conventional 1.5T and "dedicated" 0.25T supine MRI exam, the patients underwent weight-bearing examination with the same dedicated MRI unit. In all cases sagittal and coronal PD-W were used. All patients underwent arthroscopy 18-25 days after the weight-bearing MRI. In the first group, no statistically significant anatomical modifications of shape, intensity and position of the medial meniscus between standard 1.5T, dedicated supine and upright MRI were observed. In group A, the images acquired in the supine position (dedicated and 1.5T MRI) documented in 21 cases a traumatic tear (group 2A) and in 36 cases a degenerative tear (group 2B). In group 2A, weight-bearing MRI showed presence of unstable tear a degenerative unstable meniscal tear only in 19 out of 36 cases. In group 2B, weight-bearing MRI showed only in 9 out 21 cases. Arthroscopy confirmed weight-bearing MRI diagnosis in all cases. This new approach to meniscus pathology gives an important contribution to a better management of a diagnostic-therapeutic approach in which standard MRI has not played a key role, so far. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven ... in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and ... tissues, except for lung abnormalities where Chest CT is a preferred imaging ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... pediatric facilities have child life personnel who can work with younger children to help avoid the need for sedation or anesthesia. They prepare the children for MRI by showing them a dummy scanner, play the noises that the child might hear during the MRI ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... lesions seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called ... perform than other imaging modalities. MRI of the chest takes more time than an x-ray or CT exam. Because of the length of ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... zippers and similar metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike ... (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses ...

  3. Cervical MRI scan

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    ... cancer in the spine Arthritis in the spine MRI works better than CT scan in diagnosing these problems ... test. The strong magnetic fields created during an MRI can cause heart pacemakers and other implants to not work as well. It can also cause a piece ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... Whether a child requires sedation depends on the child's age, intellectual development and the type of exam. Moderate and conscious ... for MRI by showing them a dummy scanner, play the noises that the child might hear during the MRI exam, answer any ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... if a finding is stable or changed over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a ... resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have ... may take more time to perform than other imaging modalities. MRI of ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. People with the ...

  8. THE EXPERIENCE OF TREGALOZA BASED LUBRICANT USAGE FOR PATIENTS WHO UNDERWENT EXCIMER LASER SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Eskina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to evaluate the tregalose based eye drops effectiveness in patients who underwent PRK or TransPRK surgery. patients and methods: 50 patients with moderate myopia were examined before, 7 days and 1 month after PRK or TransPRK surgery made by SCHWIND Amaris excimer laser by the same surgeon. In addition to conventional diagnostics, Schirmer test and tear break up time were performed as well as ODSI questionare and Oxford index of ocular surface disorders were investigated. Patients were divided in two groups, Study group — “Thealos” group and “Control” group. In both groups patients have started using non preservative eye drops based on tregalosa and hyaluronic acid 4-th day after surgery respectively. results: The tear film breakup time was significantly better in “Thealos” group (7,22±3,61 sec 7 days postop and 9,36±3,68 sec 1 month postop in comparison to «Control” group 5,21±0,25 (р<0,01 sec and 7,21±2,85 sec respectively (р<0,05 as well as ocular surface index score in “Thealos” group post surgery was less (0,26±0,38 и 0,85±0,31 marks 7 days postop (р<0,05 and 0,09±0,19 and 0,21±0,4 (р<0,05 1 month postop respectively. There were no other statistically significant differences found in analysed data. Conclusion: Using of “Thealoz” non-preservative eye drops leads to faster recovery after surface excimer laser ablations in terms of dry eye manifestation, those as tearfilm stability and ocular surface index score, measured using “Oxford” scale. Moistening properties of tregaloze solution could be compared with those of hyaluronic acid solution.

  9. Retention of laparoscopic skills in naive medical students who underwent short training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant'Ana, Guilherme M; Cavalini, Worens; Negrello, Bruce; Bonin, Eduardo A; Dimbarre, Daniellson; Claus, Christiano; Loureiro, Marcelo P; Salvalaggio, Paolo R

    2017-02-01

    Simulators are useful tools in the development of laparoscopic skills. However, little is known about the effectiveness of short laparoscopic training sessions and how retention of skills occurs in surgical trainees who are naïve to laparoscopy. This study analyses the retention of laparoscopic surgical skills in medical students without prior surgical training. A group of first- and second-year medical students (n = 68), without prior experience in surgery or laparoscopy, answered a demographic questionnaire and had their laparoscopic skills assessed by the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) training protocol. Subsequently, they underwent a 150-minute training course after which they were re-tested. One year after the training, the medical students' performance in the simulator was re-evaluated in order to analyse retention. Of the initial 68 students, a total of 36 participated throughout the entire study, giving a final participation rate of 52 %. Thirty-six medical students with no gender predominance and an average age of 20 years were evaluated. One year after the short training programme, retention was 69.3 % in the peg transfer (p training evaluation. There was no significant difference in suturing. The average sample score in the baseline test was 8.3, in the post-training test it was 89.7, and in the retention test it was 84.2, which corresponded to a skill retention equivalence of 93 %. There was a significant retention of the laparoscopic surgical skills developed. Even 1 year after a short training session, medical students without previous surgical experience showed that they have retained a great part of the skills acquired through training.

  10. Brain modifications after acute alcohol consumption analyzed by resting state fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnolli, Federica; Cerini, Roberto; Cardobi, Nicolò; Barillari, Marco; Manganotti, Paolo; Storti, Silvia; Mucelli, Roberto Pozzi

    2013-10-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a recent breakthrough in neuroimaging research able to describe "in vivo" the spontaneous baseline neuronal activity characterized by blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal fluctuations at slow frequency (0.01-0.1Hz) that, in the absence of any task, forms spatially distributed functional connectivity networks, called resting state networks (RSNs). The aim of this study was to investigate, in the young and healthy population, the changing of the RSNs after acute ingestion of an alcohol dose able to determine a blood concentration (0.5g/L) that barely exceeds the legal limits for driving in the majority of European Countries. Fifteen healthy volunteers underwent two fMRI sessions using a 1.5T MR scanner before and after alcohol oral consumption. The main sequence acquired was EPI 2D BOLD, one per each session. To prevent the excessive alcohol consumption the subjects underwent the estimation of blood rate by breath test and after the stabilization of blood alcohol level (BAL) at 0.5g/L the subjects underwent the second fMRI session. Functional data elaboration was carried out using the probabilistic independent component analysis (PICA). Spatial maps so obtained were further organized, with MELODIC multisession temporal concatenation FSL option, in a cluster representing the group of pre-alcohol sessions and the group of post-alcohol sessions, followed by the dual regression approach in order to evaluate the increase or decrease in terms of connectivity in the RSNs between the two sessions at group level. The results we obtained reveal that acute consumption of alcohol reduces in a significant way the BOLD signal fluctuations in the resting brain selectively in the sub-callosal cortex (SCC), in left temporal fusiform cortex (TFC) and left inferior temporal gyrus (ITG), which are cognitive regions known to be part of the reward brain network and the ventral visual system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc

  11. MRI findings in aphasic status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Manuel; Munuera, Josep; Sueiras, Maria; Rovira, Rosa; Alvarez-Sabín, José; Rovira, Alex

    2008-08-01

    Ictal-MRI studies including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), and MR-angiography (MRA) in patients with aphasic status epilepticus (ASE) are lacking. In this report, we aim to describe the consequences of the ASE on DWIs and its impact on cerebral circulation. We retrospectively studied eight patients with ASE confirmed by ictal-EEG, who underwent ictal-MRI shortly after well-documented onset (mean time delay 3 h). ASE consisted in fluctuating aphasia, mostly associated with other subtle contralateral neurological signs such as hemiparesia, hemianopia, or slight clonic jerks. In MRI, six patients showed cortical temporoparietal hyperintensity in DWI and four of them had also ipsilateral pulvinar lesions. Five patients showed close spatial hyperperfusion areas matching the DWI lesions and an enhanced blow flow in the middle cerebral artery. Parenchymal lesions and hemodynamic abnormalities were not associated with seizure duration or severity in any case. The resolution of DWI lesions at follow-up MRI depended on the length of the MRIs interval. In patients with ASE, lesions on DWI in the temporo-parietal cortex and pulvinar nucleus combined with local hyperperfusion can be observed, even when they appear distant from the epileptic focus or the language areas.

  12. MRI of menisci repaired with bioabsorbable arrows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustonen, Antti O.T.; Kiuru, Martti; Koskinen, Seppo K. [Helsinki University Hospital - Radiology, Helsinki (Finland); Tielinen, Laura; Lindahl, Jan; Hirvensalo, Eero [Helsinki University Hospital - Traumatology, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-15

    To analyze with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) the signal appearance of menisci repaired with bioabsorbable arrows. Forty-four patients with 47 meniscal tears treated with bioabsorbable arrows underwent follow-up conventional MRI examination. The time interval between the surgery and MRI varied from 5 to 67 months (mean 26 months). Twenty-six patients also had concurrent repair of torn anterior cruciate ligament. The following grades were used to classify meniscal signal intensity: (a) G0; low signal intensity on all sequences and regular configuration in every plane, (b) G1; increased signal intensity within the meniscus, not extending to the meniscal surface, (c) G2; increased signal intensity linear in shape, which may or may not communicate with the capsular margin of the meniscus, without extending to the meniscal surface, and (d) G3; increased signal intensity extending to the meniscal surface. Thirteen menisci (27.5%) had normal signal intensity, 13 menisci (27.5%) Grade 1 signal intensity, 9 menisci (19%) Grade 2 signal intensity and 12 menisci (26%) Grade 3 signal intensity. The time difference between operation and MRI was statistically significant between the G0 (36 months) and G3 groups (14 months; P=0.0288). There was no statistical significance in different grades between medial and lateral meniscus or between patients with operated or intact ACL. On physical examination sixteen patients reported slight symptoms, seen evenly in each group. (orig.)

  13. A genome-wide supported psychiatric risk variant in NCAN influences brain function and cognitive performance in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raum, Heidelore; Dietsche, Bruno; Nagels, Arne; Witt, Stephanie H; Rietschel, Marcella; Kircher, Tilo; Krug, Axel

    2015-01-01

    The A allele of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1064395 in the NCAN gene has recently been identified as a susceptibility factor for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. NCAN encodes neurocan, a brain-specific chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan that is thought to influence neuronal adhesion and migration. Several lines of research suggest an impact of NCAN on neurocognitive functioning. In the present study, we investigated the effects of rs1064395 genotype on neural processing and cognitive performance in healthy subjects. Brain activity was measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during an overt semantic verbal fluency task in 110 healthy subjects who were genotyped for the NCAN SNP rs1064395. Participants additionally underwent comprehensive neuropsychological testing. Whole brain analyses revealed that NCAN risk status, defined as AA or AG genotype, was associated with a lack of task-related deactivation in a large left lateral temporal cluster extending from the middle temporal gyrus to the temporal pole. Regarding neuropsychological measures, risk allele carriers demonstrated poorer immediate and delayed verbal memory performance when compared to subjects with GG genotype. Better verbal memory performance was significantly associated with greater deactivation of the left temporal cluster during the fMRI task in subjects with GG genotype. The current data demonstrate that common genetic variation in NCAN influences both neural processing and cognitive performance in healthy subjects. Our study provides new evidence for a specific genetic influence on human brain function. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Postinterventional MRI findings following MRI-guided laser ablation of osteoid osteoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, S., E-mail: simon.fuchs@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Humboldt University, Berlin (Germany); Gebauer, B.; Stelter, L.; Schäfer, M.L.; Renz, D.M. [Department of Radiology, Charité, Humboldt University, Berlin (Germany); Melcher, I.; Schaser, K. [Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Charité, Humboldt University, Berlin (Germany); Hamm, B.; Streitparth, F. [Department of Radiology, Charité, Humboldt University, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Objective: To evaluate postinterventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics following MRI-guided laser ablation of osteoid osteoma (OO). Materials and methods: 35 patients treated with MRI-guided laser ablation underwent follow-up MRI immediately after the procedure, after 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, and up to 48 months. The imaging protocol included multiplanar fat-saturated T2w TSE, unenhanced and contrast-enhanced T1w SE, and subtraction images. MR images were reviewed regarding the appearance and size of treated areas, and presence of periablation bone and soft tissue changes. Imaging was correlated with clinical status. Results: Mean follow-up time was 13.6 months. 28/35 patients (80%) showed a postinterventional “target-sign” appearance consisting of a fibrovascular rim zone and a necrotic core area. After an initial increase in total lesion diameter after 3 months, a subsequent progressive inward remodeling process of the zonal compartments was observed for up to 24 months. Periablation bone and soft tissue changes showed a constant decrease over time. MR findings correlated well with the clinical status. Clinical success was achieved in 32/35 (91%). Conclusions: Evaluation of long-term follow-up MRI after laser ablation of OO identified typical postinterventional changes and thus may contribute to the interpretation of therapeutic success and residual or recurrent OO in suspected cases.

  15. CT, MRI, and PET findings of gastric schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Minako; Amano, Yasuo; Machida, Tadashi; Kato, Shunji; Naito, Zenya; Kumita, Shinichiro

    2012-08-01

    Gastric schwannoma is a rare tumor that accounts for only 0.2 % of all gastric tumors. We report a case of gastric schwannoma that underwent computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), and its histological confirmation was acquired. Gastric schwannoma showed high intensity on T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI and high maximum standardized uptake on [(18)F]-FDG-PET. Lymphadenopathy close to the tumor was also found. Although diffusion-weighted MRI, [(18)F]-FDG-PET, and the presence of lymphadenopathy could suggest malignant tumors, the detail interpretation of the other CT and MRI findings may give a clue for the diagnosis of gastric schwannoma.

  16. Optimization of Transcutaneous Vagus Nerve Stimulation Using Functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakunina, Natalia; Kim, Sam Soo; Nam, Eui-Cheol

    2017-04-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an established therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy, depression, and a number of other disorders. Transcutaneous stimulation of the auricular branch of the vagus nerve (tVNS) has been considered as a non-invasive alternative. Several functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies on the effects of tVNS used different stimulation parameters and locations in the ear, which makes it difficult to determine the optimal tVNS methodology. The present study used fMRI to determine the most effective location for tVNS. Four stimulation locations in the ear were compared: the inner tragus, inferoposterior wall of the ear canal, cymba conchae, and earlobe (sham). Thirty-seven healthy subjects underwent two 6-min tVNS stimulation runs per electrode location (monophasic rectangular 500 μs pulses, 25 Hz). General linear model was performed using SPM; region-of-interest analyses were performed for the brainstem areas. Stimulation at the ear canal resulted in the weakest activation of the nucleus of solitary tract (NTS), the recipient of most afferent vagal projections, and of the locus coeruleus (LC), a brainstem nucleus that receives direct input from the NTS. Stimulation of the inner tragus and cymba conchae activated these two nuclei as compared to sham. However, ROI analysis showed that only stimulation of the cymba conchae produced a significantly stronger activation in both the NTS and LC than did the sham stimulation. These findings suggest that tVNS at the cymba conchae properly activates the vagal pathway and results in its strongest activation, and thus may be the optimal location for tVNS therapies applied to the auricle. © 2016 International Neuromodulation Society.

  17. Effect of Direct Marketing for Uterine Artery Embolization on Rates of Leiomyomas, Incidental Findings, and Management After Pelvic MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurwara, Sheena; Allen, Brian C; Kouri, Brian; Clingan, M Jennings; Picard, Melissa; Leyendecker, John R

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a self-referred population screened by an interventional radiology (IR) clinic and a non-IR, physician-referred population differed with regard to suitability for uterine artery embolization (UAE) for symptomatic leiomyomas on the basis of preprocedure MRI. This was an institutional review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant retrospective study of 301 women evaluated in an IR clinic for possible UAE from January 2009 to September 2012. Subjects were retrospectively divided into two groups: self-referred via direct marketing (group A, n = 203; mean age, 41.8 years; range, 22-58 years) and physician referred (group B, n = 98; mean age, 42.9 years; range, 30-65 years). There was no significant difference between groups in presenting symptoms (multiple symptoms, bleeding, bulk-related symptoms, pain). After initial screening, 73.4% of group A (149 of 203) and 79.6% of group B (78 of 98) underwent MRI (P = .242). On the basis of MRI findings, 91.3% of group A (136 of 149) and 94.9% of group B (74 of 78) had uterine leiomyomas (P = .328). Adenomyosis without leiomyoma was present in 4.0% of group A (6 of 149) and 3.8% of group B (3 of 78) (P = .947). Incidental findings requiring further clinical or imaging evaluation were found in 20.8% of group A (31 of 149) and 24.4% of group B (19 of 78) (P = .539). After MRI, 41.6% of group A (62 of 149) and 48.7% of group B (38 of 78) proceeded to UAE (P = .306). After initial screening, similar proportions of self-referred and physician-referred patients were candidates for UAE. The rates of confirmed leiomyomas and incidental findings on MRI were similar between groups. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. All rights reserved.

  18. Four Dimensional Transcatheter Intraarterial Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (4D TRIP-MRI) for Monitoring Chemoembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaba, Ron C.; Wang, Dingxin; Lewandowski, Robert J.; Ryu, Robert K.; Sato, Kent T.; Kulik, Laura M.; Mulcahy, Mary F.; Salem, Riad; Larson, Andrew C.; Omary, Reed A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Angiographic endpoints for transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are subjective, and optimal endpoints remain unknown. Transcatheter intraarterial perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (TRIP-MRI), when performed in a combined MR-interventional radiology (MR-IR) suite, offers an objective method to quantify intra-procedural tumor perfusion changes, but was previously limited to two spatial dimensions. We prospectively tested the hypothesis that a new volumetric acquisition over time, 4D TRIP-MRI, can measure HCC perfusion changes during TACE. Materials and Methods Seven men (mean age 53 years, range 42-65 years) with eight tumors (mean size 2.5×2.4 cm2, diameter range 1.5-5.2 cm) underwent TACE in an MR-IR suite between 2/2007-12/2007, with intra-procedural tumor perfusion reductions monitored using 4D TRIP-MRI. Microcatheter TACE was performed using 1:1 chemotherapy:emulsifying contrast mixture followed by gelatin microspheres. Pre- and post-TACE time-intensity curves were generated for each tumor. Semi-quantitative measures of tumor perfusion, including area under curve (AUC), peak signal intensity (SI), time to peak SI, and maximum upslope (MUS), were calculated, and mean differences pre- and post-TACE were compared using paired t-tests. Results 4D TRIP-MRI monitored TACE was successful in all cases. Calculated pre- and post-TACE AUC (439 versus 221, P=0.004, 50% reduction), peak SI (32 versus 19, P=0.012, 41% reduction), and MUS (11 versus 3, P=0.028, 73% reduction) showed statistically significant reductions after TACE. Time to peak SI did not significantly change (23 versus 36 seconds, P=0.235, 57% increase). Conclusions 4D TRIP-MRI can successfully measure semi-quantitative changes in HCC perfusion during MR-IR monitored TACE. Future studies may correlate changes in these objective functional parameters with tumor response. PMID:18818097

  19. Hemodynamic study of TCPC using in vivo and in vitro 4D Flow MRI and numerical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán-Alzate, Alejandro; García-Rodríguez, Sylvana; Anagnostopoulos, Petros V; Srinivasan, Shardha; Wieben, Oliver; François, Christopher J

    2015-05-01

    Altered total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) hemodynamics can cause long-term complications. Patient-specific anatomy hinders generalized solutions. 4D Flow MRI allows in vivo assessment, but not predictions under varying conditions and surgical approaches. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) improves understanding and explores varying physiological conditions. This study investigated a combination of 4D Flow MRI and CFD to assess TCPC hemodynamics, accompanied with in vitro measurements as CFD validation. 4D Flow MRI was performed in extracardiac and atriopulmonary TCPC subjects. Data was processed for visualization and quantification of velocity and flow. Three-dimensional (3D) geometries were generated from angiography scans and used for CFD and a physical model construction through additive manufacturing. These models were connected to a perfusion system, circulating water through the vena cavae and exiting through the pulmonary arteries at two flow rates. Models underwent 4D Flow MRI and image processing. CFD simulated the in vitro system, applying two different inlet conditions from in vitro 4D Flow MRI measurements; no-slip was implemented at rigid walls. Velocity and flow were obtained and analyzed. The three approaches showed similar velocities, increasing proportionally with high inflow. Atriopulmonary TCPC presented higher vorticity compared to extracardiac at both inflow rates. Increased inflow balanced flow distribution in both TCPC cases. Atriopulmonary IVC flow participated in atrium recirculation, contributing to RPA outflow; at baseline, IVC flow preferentially traveled through the LPA. The combination of patient-specific in vitro and CFD allows hemodynamic parameter control, impossible in vivo. Physical models serve as CFD verification and fine-tuning tools. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME IN PATIENTS WHO UNDERWENT LUMBAR MICRODISCECTOMY FOR INTERVERTEBRAL DISC PROLAPSE (IVDP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudheer Urampath

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Intervertebral Disc Prolapse (IVDP is a very common cause for low backache in younger population. When conservative treatment fails or when patient develops complications like neurological deficit, then the treatment is surgical discectomy. Open laminectomy and microdiscectomy are the modes of surgical interventions for such patients. There is a lot of morbidity for open laminectomy when compared to microdiscectomy to assess the functional outcome of patients underwent lumbar microdiscectomy. METHODS A prospective study was done among 30 patients with Intervertebral Disc Prolapse (IVDP who did not respond to conservative treatment were undergone the surgical procedure microdiscectomy. The patients were re-evaluated for pre and postoperative neurological deficit and postoperative pain relief at 1 week, 6 weeks, 6 months, 12 months and 24 months after surgery. RESULTS Out of 30 patients in 15 (50% patients, microdiscectomy was done in hip flexion and in the remaining half (15 patients it was done without hip flexion. There were 18 men and 12 women with a mean age of 39.4. All patients 30 (100% is presented with preoperative neurological impairment had a positive Lasegue sign, 20 (66.67% had motor deficits and 18 (60% had sensory deficits. In this study group, the vertebral levels mainly affected were L4-L5 in 18 (60% patients and L5-S1 in 12 (40% patients. After microdiscectomy, motor deficit was reduced from 66.67% to 20% out of 30 patients by the end of one year. Similarly, a reduction in sensory deficit was also seen from 60% to 20%. Pain relief was also found to be excellent in 86.6% patients at the end of 24 months. CONCLUSION Early postoperative mobilisation and earlier pain relief are the most important advantages of this novel technique. Lesser blood loss, low surgical time, least destabilisation of spine are other merits of this procedure and can be recommended as the gold standard surgical method for patients with IVDP who

  1. Expanding subjectivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda; Soldz, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A major theme in recent psychoanalytic thinking concerns the use of therapist subjectivity, especially “countertransference,” in understanding patients. This thinking converges with and expands developments in qualitative research regarding the use of researcher subjectivity as a tool to understa...

  2. Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Ultrasound- and MRI-guided prostate ... MRI-guided Prostate Biopsy? What is Ultrasound- and MRI-guided Prostate Biopsy? Ultrasound- and MRI-guided prostate ...

  3. MRI of the Body (Chest, Abdomen, Pelvis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Body Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the body ... limitations of MRI of the Body? What is MRI of the Body? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  4. Plastic modulation of PTSD resting-state networks and subjective wellbeing by EEG neurofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluetsch, R C; Ros, T; Théberge, J; Frewen, P A; Calhoun, V D; Schmahl, C; Jetly, R; Lanius, R A

    2014-08-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) neurofeedback training has been shown to produce plastic modulations in salience network and default mode network functional connectivity in healthy individuals. In this study, we investigated whether a single session of neurofeedback training aimed at the voluntary reduction of alpha rhythm (8-12 Hz) amplitude would be related to differences in EEG network oscillations, functional MRI (fMRI) connectivity, and subjective measures of state anxiety and arousal in a group of individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Twenty-one individuals with PTSD related to childhood abuse underwent 30 min of EEG neurofeedback training preceded and followed by a resting-state fMRI scan. Alpha desynchronizing neurofeedback was associated with decreased alpha amplitude during training, followed by a significant increase ('rebound') in resting-state alpha synchronization. This rebound was linked to increased calmness, greater salience network connectivity with the right insula, and enhanced default mode network connectivity with bilateral posterior cingulate, right middle frontal gyrus, and left medial prefrontal cortex. Our study represents a first step in elucidating the potential neurobehavioural mechanisms mediating the effects of neurofeedback treatment on regulatory systems in PTSD. Moreover, it documents for the first time a spontaneous EEG 'rebound' after neurofeedback, pointing to homeostatic/compensatory mechanisms operating in the brain. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Restriction spectrum imaging improves MRI-based prostate cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCammack, Kevin C; Schenker-Ahmed, Natalie M; White, Nathan S; Best, Shaun R; Marks, Robert M; Heimbigner, Jared; Kane, Christopher J; Parsons, J Kellogg; Kuperman, Joshua M; Bartsch, Hauke; Desikan, Rahul S; Rakow-Penner, Rebecca A; Liss, Michael A; Margolis, Daniel J A; Raman, Steven S; Shabaik, Ahmed; Dale, Anders M; Karow, David S

    2016-05-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of restriction spectrum imaging (RSI), with that of conventional multi-parametric (MP) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for prostate cancer (PCa) detection in a blinded reader-based format. Three readers independently evaluated 100 patients (67 with proven PCa) who underwent MP-MRI and RSI within 6 months of systematic biopsy (N = 67; 23 with targeting performed) or prostatectomy (N = 33). Imaging was performed at 3 Tesla using a phased-array coil. Readers used a five-point scale estimating the likelihood of PCa present in each prostate sextant. Evaluation was performed in two separate sessions, first using conventional MP-MRI alone then immediately with MP-MRI and RSI in the same session. Four weeks later, another scoring session used RSI and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) without conventional diffusion-weighted or dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging. Reader interpretations were then compared to prostatectomy data or biopsy results. Receiver operating characteristic curves were performed, with area under the curve (AUC) used to compare across groups. MP-MRI with RSI achieved higher AUCs compared to MP-MRI alone for identifying high-grade (Gleason score greater than or equal to 4 + 3=7) PCa (0.78 vs. 0.70 at the sextant level; P sextant level). With hemigland analysis, high-grade disease results were similar when comparing RSI + T2WI with MP-MRI, although with greater AUCs compared to the sextant analysis (0.80 vs. 0.79). Including RSI with MP-MRI improves PCa detection compared to MP-MRI alone, and RSI with T2WI achieves similar PCa detection as MP-MRI.

  6. Effects of active music therapy on the normal brain: fMRI based evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raglio, Alfredo; Galandra, Caterina; Sibilla, Luisella; Esposito, Fabrizio; Gaeta, Francesca; Di Salle, Francesco; Moro, Luca; Carne, Irene; Bastianello, Stefano; Baldi, Maurizia; Imbriani, Marcello

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the neurophysiological bases of Active Music Therapy (AMT) and its effects on the normal brain. Twelve right-handed, healthy, non-musician volunteers were recruited. The subjects underwent 2 AMT sessions based on the free sonorous-music improvisation using rhythmic and melodic instruments. After these sessions, each subject underwent 2 fMRI scan acquisitions while listening to a Syntonic (SP) and an A-Syntonic (AP) Production from the AMT sessions. A 3 T Discovery MR750 scanner with a 16-channel phased array head coil was used, and the image analysis was performed with Brain Voyager QX 2.8. The listening to SP vs AP excerpts mainly activated: (1) the right middle temporal gyrus and right superior temporal sulcus, (2) the right middle frontal gyrus and in particular the right precentral gyrus, (3) the bilateral precuneus, (4) the left superior temporal sulcus and (5) the left middle temporal gyrus. These results are consistent with the psychological bases of the AMT approach and with the activation of brain areas involved in memory and autobiographical processes, and also in personal or interpersonal significant experiences. Further studies are required to confirm these findings and to explain possible effects of AMT in clinical settings.

  7. MRI/linac integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagendijk, Jan J W; Raaymakers, Bas W; Raaijmakers, Alexander J E; Overweg, Johan; Brown, Kevin J; Kerkhof, Ellen M; van der Put, Richard W; Hårdemark, Björn; van Vulpen, Marco; van der Heide, Uulke A

    2008-01-01

    In radiotherapy the healthy tissue involvement still poses serious dose limitations. This results in sub-optimal tumour dose and complications. Daily image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) is the key development in radiation oncology to solve this problem. MRI yields superb soft-tissue visualization and provides several imaging modalities for identification of movements, function and physiology. Integrating MRI functionality with an accelerator can make these capacities available for high precision, real time IGRT. The system being built at the University Medical Center Utrecht is a 1.5T MRI scanner, with diagnostic imaging functionality and quality, integrated with a 6MV radiotherapy accelerator. The realization of a prototype of this hybrid system is a joint effort between the Radiotherapy Department of the University of Utrecht, the Netherlands, Elekta, Crawley, U.K., and Philips Research, Hamburg, Germany. Basically, the design is a 1.5 T Philips Achieva MRI scanner with a Magnex closed bore magnet surrounded by a single energy (6 MV) Elekta accelerator. Monte Carlo simulations are used to investigate the radiation beam properties of the hybrid system, dosimetry equipment and for the construction of patient specific dose deposition kernels in the presence of a magnetic field. The latter are used to evaluate the IMRT capability of the integrated MRI linac. A prototype hybrid MRI/linac for on-line MRI guidance of radiotherapy (MRIgRT) is under construction. The aim of the system is to deliver the radiation dose with mm precision based on diagnostic quality MR images.

  8. Measurement of the distribution of ventilation-perfusion ratios in the human lung with proton MRI: comparison with the multiple inert-gas elimination technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Rui Carlos; Henderson, A Cortney; Simonson, Tatum; Arai, Tatsuya J; Wagner, Harrieth; Theilmann, Rebecca J; Wagner, Peter D; Prisk, G Kim; Hopkins, Susan R

    2017-07-01

    We have developed a novel functional proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique to measure regional ventilation-perfusion (V̇A/Q̇) ratio in the lung. We conducted a comparison study of this technique in healthy subjects (n = 7, age = 42 ± 16 yr, Forced expiratory volume in 1 s = 94% predicted), by comparing data measured using MRI to that obtained from the multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET). Regional ventilation measured in a sagittal lung slice using Specific Ventilation Imaging was combined with proton density measured using a fast gradient-echo sequence to calculate regional alveolar ventilation, registered with perfusion images acquired using arterial spin labeling, and divided on a voxel-by-voxel basis to obtain regional V̇A/Q̇ ratio. LogSDV̇ and LogSDQ̇, measures of heterogeneity derived from the standard deviation (log scale) of the ventilation and perfusion vs. V̇A/Q̇ ratio histograms respectively, were calculated. On a separate day, subjects underwent study with MIGET and LogSDV̇ and LogSDQ̇ were calculated from MIGET data using the 50-compartment model. MIGET LogSDV̇ and LogSDQ̇ were normal in all subjects. LogSDQ̇ was highly correlated between MRI and MIGET (R = 0.89, P = 0.007); the intercept was not significantly different from zero (-0.062, P = 0.65) and the slope did not significantly differ from identity (1.29, P = 0.34). MIGET and MRI measures of LogSDV̇ were well correlated (R = 0.83, P = 0.02); the intercept differed from zero (0.20, P = 0.04) and the slope deviated from the line of identity (0.52, P = 0.01). We conclude that in normal subjects, there is a reasonable agreement between MIGET measures of heterogeneity and those from proton MRI measured in a single slice of lung.NEW & NOTEWORTHY We report a comparison of a new proton MRI technique to measure regional V̇A/Q̇ ratio against the multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET). The study reports good relationships between

  9. Assessment of cartilage repair after chondrocyte transplantation with a fibrin-hyaluronan matrix--correlation of morphological MRI, biochemical T2 mapping and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshed, Iris; Trattnig, Siegfried; Sharon, Michal; Arbel, Ron; Nierenberg, Gabriel; Konen, Eli; Yayon, Avner

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate change over time of clinical scores, morphological MRI of cartilage appearance and quantitative T2 values after implantation with BioCart™II, a second generation matrix-assisted implantation system. Thirty-one patients were recruited 6-49 months post surgery for cartilage defect in the femoral condyle. Subjects underwent MRI (morphological and T2-mapping sequences) and completed the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) questionnaire. MRI scans were scored using the MR Observation of Cartilage Repair Tissue (MOCART) system and cartilage T2-mapping values were registered. Analysis included correlation of IKDC scores, MOCART and T2 evaluation with each other, with implant age and with previous surgical intervention history. IKDC score significantly correlated with MOCART score (r = -0.39, p = 0.031), inversely correlated with previous interventions (r = -0.39, p = 0.034) and was significantly higher in patients with longer follow-up time (p = 0.0028). MOCART score was slight, but not significantly higher in patients with longer term implants (p = 0.199). T2 values were significantly lower in patients with longer duration implants (p trend was repeated in patients with previous interventions, although to a lesser extent. Significant improvement with time from BioCart™II implantation can be expected by IKDC scoring and MRI T2-mapping values. Patients with previous knee operations can also benefit from this procedure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Long-term neuropsychological sequelae in HIV-seronegative cryptococcal meningoencephalitis patients with and without ventriculoperitoneal shunts: a cine MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meng-Hsiang; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Wang, Hung-Chen; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Li, Shau-Hsuan; Hsu, Nai-Wen; Lin, Wei-Ming; Kung, Chia-Te; Lin, Wei-Che

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocephalus in cryptococcal meningoencephalitis is most commonly managed with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. This study applied cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate initial disease severity on long-term cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow dynamics and associated neuropsychological sequelae in cryptococcal meningoencephalitis patients with and without ventriculoperitoneal shunts. Eighteen human immunodeficiency virus-seronegative cryptococcal meningoencephalitis patients (10 with shunts versus 8 without shunts) were compared with 32 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. All subjects underwent complete neurologic examination and neuropsychological testing. Cine MRI was conducted to evaluate CSF flow parameters. Initial CSF laboratory analysis and imaging findings were correlated with present CSF flow parameters and neuropsychological scores. Patients without shunts had higher average flow than controls, suggesting chronic hydrocephalus. Initial Evans ratios and CSF glucose levels were associated with CSF peak velocity and flow. Worsening CSF flow parameters correlated with decreased neuropsychological performance. CSF flow parameter differences between the cryptococcal meningoencephalitis patients both with and without ventriculoperitoneal shunts could be detected by cine MRI and correlated with acute stage disease severity and chronic stage neuropsychological results. Cine MRI is useful for assessing the chronic hydrocephalus that may lead to neuropsychological deficits in cryptococcal meningoencephalitis patients.

  11. MRI of pathology-proven peripheral nerve amyloidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, Gavin A.; Broski, Stephen M.; Howe, Benjamin M.; Spinner, Robert J.; Amrami, Kimberly K.; Dispenzieri, Angela; Ringler, Michael D. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2017-01-15

    To highlight the MRI characteristics of pathologically proven amyloidosis involving the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and determine the utility of MRI in directing targeted biopsy for aiding diagnosis. A retrospective study was performed for patients with pathologically proven PNS amyloidosis who also underwent MRI of the biopsied or excised nerve. MRI signal characteristics, nerve morphology, associated muscular denervation changes, and the presence of multifocal involvement were detailed. Pathology reports were reviewed to determine subtypes of amyloid. Charts were reviewed to gather patient demographics, neurological symptoms and radiologist interpretation. Four men and three women with a mean age of 62 ± 11 years (range 46-76) were identified. All patients had abnormal findings on EMG with mixed sensorimotor neuropathy. All lesions demonstrated diffuse multifocal neural involvement with T1 hypointensity, T2 hyperintensity, and variable enhancement on MRI. One lesion exhibited superimposed T2 hypointensity. Six of seven patients demonstrated associated muscular denervation changes. Peripheral nerve amyloidosis is rare, and the diagnosis is difficult because of insidious symptom onset, mixed sensorimotor neurologic deficits, and the potential for a wide variety of nerves affected. On MRI, peripheral nerve involvement is most commonly characterized by T1 hypointensity, T2 hyperintensity, variable enhancement, maintenance of the fascicular architecture with fusiform enlargement, multifocal involvement and muscular denervation changes. While this appearance mimics other inflammatory neuropathies, MRI can readily detect neural changes and direct-targeted biopsy, thus facilitating early diagnosis and appropriate management. (orig.)

  12. [MRI in congenital Brown's syndrome: report of 16 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousin, M; Girard, N; Denis, D

    2013-03-01

    Superior oblique retraction syndrome or Brown's syndrome is one of the so-called restrictive syndromes causing anatomic strabismus. It is characterized by active and passive limitation of upward gaze in adduction in the field of action of the superior oblique muscle (SO). The etiology of this congenital syndrome remains unknown. The purpose of this prospective study is to analyze brain and orbital magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with congenital Brown's syndrome. Sixteen children (19 months - 9 years) underwent complete ophthalmologic evaluation followed by brain/orbital MRI with attention to the superior oblique muscle. Average age at time of MRI was 4.2 years old. Among patients included were eight girls and eight boys. MRI was performed on a 1.5T (Symphony TIM, Siemens, Erlangen) to visualize the orbit and specifically the SO. Of 16 eyes, 13 demonstrated radiologic abnormalities of the SO muscle; six demonstrated tendon-trochlea complex hypertrophy, four demonstrated complete SO hypertrophy (tendon-trochlea-muscle belly), one demonstrated trochlear hypertrophy, and two demonstrated abnormalities solely of the tendons, of which one was longer and one was thinner with fibrosis. MRI shows a high frequency of SO radiologic abnormalities in congenital Brown's syndrome. MRI permits the analysis of not only the tendon, but also the trochlea and muscle belly, whereas surgery only allows visualization of the tendon. MRI proved to be an interesting tool for investigation of these patients and for a better understanding of the pathogenesis. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. The MRI appearances of early vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunbar, J.A.T.; Sandoe, J.A.T. [Department of Microbiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Rao, A.S. [Department of Orthopaedics, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Crimmins, D.W. [Department of Neurosurgery, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Baig, W. [Department of Cardiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Rankine, J.J., E-mail: james.rankine@leedsth.nhs.u [Department of Radiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    Aim: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances in patients with a clinical history suggestive of vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis who underwent MRI very early in their clinical course. Materials and methods: A retrospective review of the database of spinal infections from a spinal microbiological liaison team was performed over a 2 year period to identify cases with clinical features suggestive of spinal infection and an MRI that did not show features typical of vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis. All patients had positive microbiology and a follow up MRI showing typical features of spinal infection. Results: In four cases the features typical of spinal infection were not evident at the initial MRI. In three cases there was very subtle endplate oedema associated with disc degeneration, which was interpreted as Modic type I degenerative endplate change. Intravenous antibiotic therapy was continued prior to repeat MRI examinations. The mean time to the repeat examination was 17 days with a range of 8-22 days. The second examinations clearly demonstrated vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis. Conclusion: Although MRI is the imaging method of choice for vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis in the early stages, it may show subtle, non-specific endplate subchondral changes; a repeat examination may be required to show the typical features.

  14. Influence of imaging and histological factors on prostate cancer detection and localisation on multiparametric MRI: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratan, Flavie; Niaf, Emilie; Melodelima, Christelle; Chesnais, Anne Laure; Souchon, Rémi; Mège-Lechevallier, Florence; Colombel, Marc; Rouvière, Olivier

    2013-07-01

    To assess factors influencing prostate cancer detection on multiparametric (T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and dynamic contrast-enhanced) MRI. One hundred and seventy-five patients who underwent radical prostatectomy were included. Pre-operative MRI performed at 1.5 T (n = 71) or 3 T (n = 104), with (n = 58) or without (n = 117) an endorectal coil were independently interpreted by two radiologists. A five-point subjective suspicion score (SSS) was assigned to all focal abnormalities (FAs). MR findings were then compared with whole-mount sections. Readers identified 192-214/362 cancers, with 130-155 false positives. Detection rates for tumours of 2 cc were 33-45/155 (21-29 %), 15-19/35 (43-54 %) and 8-9/12 (67-75 %) for Gleason ≤6, 17/27 (63 %), 42-45/51 (82-88 %) and 34/35 (97 %) for Gleason 7 and 4/5 (80 %), 13/14 (93 %) and 28/28 (100 %) for Gleason ≥8 cancers respectively. At multivariate analysis, detection rates were influenced by tumour Gleason score, histological volume, histological architecture and location (P < 0.0001), but neither by field strength nor coils used for imaging. The SSS was a significant predictor of both malignancy of FAs (P < 0.005) and aggressiveness of tumours (P < 0.00001). Detection rates were significantly influenced by tumour characteristics, but neither by field strength nor coils used for imaging. The SSS significantly stratified the risk of malignancy of FAs and aggressiveness of detected tumours. • Prostate cancer volume, Gleason score, architecture and location are MRI predictors of detection. • Field strength and coils used do not influence the tumour detection rate. • Multiparametric MRI is accurate for detecting aggressive tumours. • A subjective suspicion score can stratify the risk of malignancy and tumour aggressiveness.

  15. MRI in sarcoglycanopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tasca, Giorgio; Monforte, Mauro; Díaz-Manera, Jordi

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To characterise the pattern and spectrum of involvement on muscle MRI in a large cohort of patients with sarcoglycanopathies, which are limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD2C-2F) caused by mutations in one of the four genes coding for muscle sarcoglycans. METHODS: Lower limb MRI scans......, while lower leg muscles were relatively spared even in advanced disease. A proximodistal gradient of involvement of vasti muscles was a consistent finding in these patients, including the most severe ones. CONCLUSIONS: Muscle involvement on MRI is consistent in patients with LGMD2C-F and can be helpful...

  16. The evaluation of FDG-PET imaging for epileptogenic focus localization in patients with MRI positive and MRI negative temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gok, Beril [Drexel University, Department of Radiology, Mercy Catholic Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Johns Hopkins University, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); Jallo, George [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Neurosurgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Hayeri, Reza [Drexel University, Department of Radiology, Mercy Catholic Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Wahl, Richard [Johns Hopkins University, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); Aygun, Nafi [Johns Hopkins University, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2013-05-15

    We studied the contribution of interictal FDG-PET ([18 F] fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography) in epileptic focus identification in temporal lobe epilepsy patients with positive, equivocal and negative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ninety-eight patients who underwent surgical treatment for drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy after neuropsychological evaluation, scalp video EEG monitoring, FDG-PET, MRI and/or long-term intracranial EEG and with >12 months clinical follow-up were included in this study. FDG-PET findings were compared to MRI, histopathology, scalp video EEG and long-term intracranial EEG monitoring. FDG-PET lateralized the seizure focus in 95 % of MRI positive, 69 % of MRI equivocal and 84 % of MRI negative patients. There was no statistically significant difference between the surgical outcomes among the groups with Engel class I and II outcomes achieved in 86 %, 86 %, 84 % of MRI positive, equivocal and negative temporal lobe epilepsy patients, respectively. The patients with positive unilateral FDG-PET demonstrated excellent postsurgical outcomes, with 96 % Engel class I and II. Histopathology revealed focal lesions in 75 % of MRI equivocal, 84 % of MRI positive, and 23 % of MRI negative temporal lobe epilepsy cases. FDG-PET is an accurate noninvasive method in lateralizing the epileptogenic focus in temporal lobe epilepsy, especially in patients with normal or equivocal MRIs, or non-lateralized EEG monitoring. Very subtle findings in MRI are often associated with histopathological lesions and should be described in MRI reports. The patients with negative or equivocal MRI temporal lobe epilepsy are good surgical candidates with comparable postsurgical outcomes to patients with MRI positive temporal lobe epilepsy. (orig.)

  17. The Bt-DUX: development of a subjective measure of health-related quality of life in patients who underwent surgery for lower extremity malignant bone tumor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkering, W.P.; Vlieland, T.P.; Koopman, H.M.; Schaap, G.R.; Schreuder, H.W.B.; Beishuizen, A.; Tissing, W.J.; Hoogerbrugge, P.M.; Anninga, J.K.; Taminiau, A.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To examine the practical applicability, internal consistency, and validity of the Bt-DUX, a disease-specific Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) instrument. The Bt-Dux was developed to examine patients' individual values of their life after a malignant bone tumor of the lower

  18. The Bt-DUX : Development of a Subjective Measure of Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients Who Underwent Surgery for Lower Extremity Malignant Bone Tumor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkering, W. Peter; Vlieland, Theodora P. M. Vliet; Koopman, Hendrik M.; Schaap, Gerard R.; Schreuder, H. W. Bart; Beishuizen, Auke; Tissing, Wim J. E.; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M.; Anninga, Jacob K.; Taminiau, Antonie H. M.

    Background To examine the practical applicability, internal consistency, and validity of the Bt-DUX, a disease-specific Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) instrument. The Bt-Dux was developed to examine patients' individual values of their life after a malignant bone tumor of the lower extremity

  19. Adult Treatment Panel III 2001 but not International Diabetes Federation 2005 criteria of the metabolic syndrome predict clinical cardiovascular events in subjects who underwent coronary angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saely, Christoph H; Koch, Lorena; Schmid, Fabian; Marte, Thomas; Aczel, Stefan; Langer, Peter; Hoefle, Guenter; Drexel, Heinz

    2006-04-01

    The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has recently established a worldwide consensus definition of the metabolic syndrome. No prospective data are available on the cardiovascular risk associated with this new metabolic syndrome definition. In a prospective study of 750 coronary patients, we recorded vascular events over 4 years. From our patients, 37.3% (n = 280) had the metabolic syndrome according to the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATPIII) definition and 45.5% (n = 341) according to the IDF definition. The metabolic syndrome as defined by the ATPIII criteria significantly predicted vascular events (adjusted hazard ratio 1.745 [95% CI 1.255-2.427]; P = 0.001), but the metabolic syndrome as defined by IDF criteria did not (1.189 [0.859-1.646]; P = 0.297). Accordingly, event-free survival was significantly lower among patients who fulfilled the ATPIII but not the IDF criteria than among those who met the IDF but not the ATPIII criteria (P = 0.012). The metabolic syndrome as defined by ATPIII criteria remained significantly predictive of vascular events after adjustment for type 2 diabetes but not after additional adjustment for the metabolic syndrome components high triglycerides and low HDL cholesterol. These lipid traits in turn proved significantly predictive of vascular events even after adjustment for the metabolic syndrome. The ATPIII definition of the metabolic syndrome confers a significantly higher risk of vascular events than the IDF definition. However, among angiographied coronary patients, even the ATPIII definition of the metabolic syndrome does not provide prognostic information beyond its dyslipidemic features.

  20. Integrated 18F-FDG PET/MRI compared to MRI alone for identification of local recurrences of soft tissue sarcomas: a comparison trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erfanian, Youssef; Grueneisen, Johannes; Wetter, Axel; Forsting, Michael; Umutlu, Lale [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Kirchner, Julian [University Hospital Dusseldorf, University of Dusseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Dusseldorf (Germany); Podleska, Lars Erik [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Sarcoma Surgery Division, Department of General-, Visceral- and Transplantation Surgery, Essen (Germany); Bauer, Sebastian [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Division of Solid Tumor Translational Oncology, Department of Medical Oncology, West German Cancer Center, Essen (Germany); Poeppel, Thorsten; Herrmann, Ken [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Clinic for Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    To assess and compare the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MRI and MRI alone for the detection of local recurrences of soft tissue sarcomas (STS) after initial surgical resection of the primary tumors. A total of 41 patients with clinically suspected tumor relapse of STS underwent an {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/MRI examination for assessment of local recurrence. Two experienced physicians interpreted the MRI data and subsequently the PET/MRI datasets in two separate reading sessions and were instructed to identify potential local tumor recurrences. Additionally, the diagnostic confidence in each reading for the identification of malignant lesions was determined. A McNemar test was applied to test for differences of both ratings and a Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to identify differences of the confidence levels. Histopathological verification and follow-up imaging were applied for standard of reference. Tumor relapse was present in 27/41 patients. Calculated sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and diagnostic accuracy for the detection of local tumor recurrence was 82%, 86%, 92%, 71% and 83% for MRI, and 96%, 79%, 90%, 92% and 90% for PET/MRI (p > 0.05). Furthermore, PET/MRI showed significantly higher confidence levels (p < 0.05) for the determination of malignant lesions. Our results endorse {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI to be an excellent imaging method in the evaluation of recurrent STS after surgical excision, yielding superior tumor detection when compared to MRI alone. (orig.)

  1. Motion correction in MRI of the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godenschweger, F; Kägebein, U; Stucht, D; Yarach, U; Sciarra, A; Yakupov, R; Lüsebrink, F; Schulze, P; Speck, O

    2016-01-01

    Subject motion in MRI is a relevant problem in the daily clinical routine as well as in scientific studies. Since the beginning of clinical use of MRI, many research groups have developed methods to suppress or correct motion artefacts. This review focuses on rigid body motion correction of head and brain MRI and its application in diagnosis and research. It explains the sources and types of motion and related artefacts, classifies and describes existing techniques for motion detection, compensation and correction and lists established and experimental approaches. Retrospective motion correction modifies the MR image data during the reconstruction, while prospective motion correction performs an adaptive update of the data acquisition. Differences, benefits and drawbacks of different motion correction methods are discussed. PMID:26864183

  2. Brain MRI in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, F.J.A.; Goraj, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this review article, conventional brain MRI and advanced MRI techniques in Parkinson`s disease (PD) are discussed, with emphasis on clinical relevance. Conventional brain MRI sequences generally demonstrate limited abnormalities specific for PD and in clinical practice brain MRI is mainly used to

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  4. Second-generation autologous chondrocyte transplantation: MRI findings and clinical correlations at a minimum 5-year follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kon, E. [Biomechanics Laboratory, III Clinic, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via Di Barbiano 1/10, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Di Martino, A., E-mail: a.dimartino@biomec.ior.it [Biomechanics Laboratory, III Clinic, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via Di Barbiano 1/10, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Filardo, G. [Biomechanics Laboratory, III Clinic, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via Di Barbiano 1/10, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Tetta, C.; Busacca, M. [Radiology, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Bologna (Italy); Iacono, F. [Biomechanics Laboratory, III Clinic, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via Di Barbiano 1/10, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Delcogliano, M. [Orthopaedic Departement San Carlo di Nancy Hospital, Rome (Italy); Albisinni, U. [Radiology, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Bologna (Italy); Marcacci, M. [Biomechanics Laboratory, III Clinic, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via Di Barbiano 1/10, 40136 Bologna (Italy)

    2011-09-15

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical outcome of hyaluronan-based arthroscopic autologous chondrocyte transplantation at a minimum of 5 years of follow-up and to correlate it with the MRI evaluation parameters. Methods: Fifty consecutive patients were included in the study and evaluated clinically using the Cartilage Standard Evaluation Form as proposed by ICRS and the Tegner score. Forty lesions underwent MRI evaluation at a minimum 5-year follow-up. For the description and evaluation of the graft, we employed the MOCART-scoring system. Results: A statistically significant improvement in all clinical scores was observed at 2 and over 5 years. The total MOCART score and the signal intensity (3D-GE-FS) of the repair tissue were statistically correlated to the IKDC subjective evaluation. Larger size of the treated cartilage lesions had a negative influence on the degree of defect repair and filling, the integration to the border zone and the subchondral lamina integrity, whereas more intensive sport activity had a positive influence on the signal intensity of the repair tissue, the repair tissue surface, and the clinical outcome. Conclusion: Our findings confirm the durability of the clinical results obtained with Hyalograft C and the usefulness of MRI as a non-invasive method for the evaluation of the repaired tissue and the outcome after second-generation autologous transplantation over time.

  5. Quantitative tracking of edema, hemorrhage, and microvascular obstruction in subacute myocardial infarction in a porcine model by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghugre, Nilesh R; Ramanan, Venkat; Pop, Mihaela; Yang, Yuesong; Barry, Jennifer; Qiang, Beiping; Connelly, Kim A; Dick, Alexander J; Wright, Graham A

    2011-10-01

    Pathophysiological responses after acute myocardial infarction include edema, hemorrhage, and microvascular obstruction along with cellular damage. The in vivo evolution of these processes simultaneously throughout infarct healing has not been well characterized. The purpose of our study was to quantitatively monitor the time course of these mechanisms by MRI in a porcine model of myocardial infarction. Ten pigs underwent MRI before coronary occlusion with subgroups studied at day 2 and weeks 1, 2, 4, and 6 post-infarction. Tissue characterization was performed using quantitative T2 and T2* maps to identify edema and hemorrhage, respectively. Contrast-enhanced MRI was used for infarct/ microvascular obstruction delineation. Inflammation was reflected by T2 fluctuations, however at day 2, edema and hemorrhage had counter-acting effects on T2. Hemorrhage (all forms) and mineralization (calcium) could be identified by T2* in the presence of edema. Simultaneous resolution of microvascular obstruction and T2* abnormality suggested that the two phenomenon were closely associated during the healing process. Our study demonstrates that quantitative T2 and T2* mapping techniques allow regional, longitudinal, and cross-subject comparisons and give insights into histological and tissue remodeling processes. Such in vivo characterization will be important in grading severity and evaluating treatment strategies for myocardial infarction, potentially improving clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Factors associated with bone mineral density in women who underwent bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luzia Jaeger Hintze

    2014-03-01

    To analyze factors associated with bone mineral density (BMD of candidates and patients admitted to Bariatric Surgery (BS. This study included 61 women who had done or were waiting for BS. Anthropometric variables, body composition and BMD from the femur, femoral neck, lumbar spine and the whole body were measured. The factors associated with changes in BMD, such as smoking, alcohol ingestion, sedentary lifestyle, BS, nutritional supplementation and age were evaluated. The statistical significance was set at 5%. Age and BS were associated with changes in BMD. Among the individuals who had  BS done, the rates of osteopenia/osteoporosis were greater in the femur (OR 3.34; CI [1.52 - 1.83] and femoral neck (OR 3.69; CI [1.34 – 2.08]. Subjects older than 50 years also had greater rates of BMD in the lumbar spine (OR 4.12; CI [2.09 – 22.33], the whole body (OR 4.77; CI [1.34 – 28.14], femur (OR 16.94; CI [2.16 - 124.32] and femoral neck (OR 14.95; CI [1.86 - 110.66]. Patients who have had BS and are over 50 years of age showed higher rates of osteopenia/osteoporosis, which demonstrate the necessity of further studies exploring the effects of BS and its impact on bone metabolism.

  7. Diagnostic accuracy and patient acceptance of MRI in children with suspected appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thieme, Mai E.; Valdehueza, Zaldy D.; Wiarda, Bart M. [Medical Centre Alkmaar, Department of Radiology, Alkmaar (Netherlands); Leeuwenburgh, Marjolein M.N. [Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bouman, Donald E. [Medical Spectrum Twente, Department of Radiology, Enschede (Netherlands); Bruin, Ivar G.J.M. de; Schreurs, W.H.; Houdijk, Alexander P.J. [Medical Centre Alkmaar, Department of Surgery, Alkmaar (Netherlands); Stoker, Jaap [Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-03-15

    To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound in children with suspected appendicitis. In a single-centre diagnostic accuracy study, children with suspected appendicitis were prospectively identified at the emergency department. All underwent abdominal ultrasound and MRI within 2 h, with the reader blinded to other imaging findings. An expert panel established the final diagnosis after 3 months. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of three imaging strategies: ultrasound only, conditional MRI after negative or inconclusive ultrasound, and MRI only. Significance between sensitivity and specificity was calculated using McNemar's test statistic. Between April and December 2009 we included 104 consecutive children (47 male, mean age 12). According to the expert panel, 58 patients had appendicitis. The sensitivity of MRI only and conditional MRI was 100 % (95 % confidence interval 92-100), that of ultrasound was significantly lower (76 %; 63-85, P < 0.001). Specificity was comparable among the three investigated strategies; ultrasound only 89 % (77-95), conditional MRI 80 % (67-89), MRI only 89 % (77-95) (P values 0.13, 0.13 and 1.00). In children with suspected appendicitis, strategies with MRI (MRI only, conditional MRI) had a higher sensitivity for appendicitis compared with a strategy with ultrasound only, while specificity was comparable. (orig.)

  8. Assessment of CF lung disease using motion corrected PROPELLER MRI: a comparison with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciet, Pierluigi [General Hospital Ca' Foncello, Radiology Department, Treviso (Italy); Sophia Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Pulmonology Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Serra, Goffredo; Catalano, Carlo [University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' , Radiology, Rome (Italy); Bertolo, Silvia; Morana, Giovanni [General Hospital Ca' Foncello, Radiology Department, Treviso (Italy); Spronk, Sandra [Erasmus MC, Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Epidemiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Ros, Mirco [Ca' Foncello Hospital, Pediatrics, Treviso (Italy); Fraioli, Francesco [University College London (UCL), Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Quattrucci, Serena [University of Rome Sapienza, Pediatrics, Rome (Italy); Assael, M.B. [Azienda Ospedaliera di Verona, Verona CF Center, Verona (Italy); Pomerri, Fabio [University of Padova, Department of Medicine-DIMED, Padova (Italy); Tiddens, Harm A.W.M. [Sophia Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Pulmonology Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-03-15

    To date, PROPELLER MRI, a breathing-motion-insensitive technique, has not been assessed for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. We compared this technique to CT for assessing CF lung disease in children and adults. Thirty-eight stable CF patients (median 21 years, range 6-51 years, 22 female) underwent MRI and CT on the same day. Study protocol included respiratory-triggered PROPELLER MRI and volumetric CT end-inspiratory and -expiratory acquisitions. Two observers scored the images using the CF-MRI and CF-CT systems. Scores were compared with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI versus CT were calculated. MRI sensitivity for detecting severe CF bronchiectasis was 0.33 (CI 0.09-0.57), while specificity was 100 % (CI 0.88-1). ICCs for bronchiectasis and trapped air were as follows: MRI-bronchiectasis (0.79); CT-bronchiectasis (0.85); MRI-trapped air (0.51); CT-trapped air (0.87). Bland-Altman plots showed an MRI tendency to overestimate the severity of bronchiectasis in mild CF disease and underestimate bronchiectasis in severe disease. Motion correction in PROPELLER MRI does not improve assessment of CF lung disease compared to CT. However, the good inter- and intra-observer agreement and the high specificity suggest that MRI might play a role in the short-term follow-up of CF lung disease (i.e. pulmonary exacerbations). (orig.)

  9. MRI with fibre tracking in Cogan congenital oculomotor apraxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlini, Laura [University Hospital of Geneva, Pediatric Radiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Vargas, Maria I. [University Hospital of Geneva, Neuroradiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Haller, Raoul de [University Hospital of Geneva, Pediatric Ophthalmology, Geneva (Switzerland); Rilliet, Benedict [University Hospital of Geneva, Pediatric Neurosurgery, Geneva (Switzerland); Fluss, Joel [University Hospital of Geneva, Pediatric Neurology, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2010-10-15

    Congenital ocular motor apraxia (COMA) occasionally shares with Joubert syndrome (JS) and related disorders (JSRDs) a peculiar malformation, the 'molar tooth sign' (MTS). In JSRDs, the absence of superior cerebellar peduncles (SCP) decussation is reported. To investigate whether COMA demonstrates similar abnormal axonal pathways. Eight healthy age-matched controls, three children with clinical COMA and one child with clinical JSRD underwent examination with a 1.5-T MRI scanner. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), colour-coded fractional anisotropy maps and three-dimensional diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography of the cerebellorubral network were analyzed. On DTI cartography, the 'red dot' originally supposed to represent the SCP decussation in the midbrain was present in controls as well in those with COMA but absent in the single case with JS. In none of the subjects including controls was 3-D FT able to depict the SCP decussation. When seeded, the red dot resulted in the ventral tegmental decussation (VTD). It was normal in controls and in patients with COMA but was absent in our single patient with JSRD. MTS was identified in alla patients with COMA and in the patient with JSRD. MTS can be present in both COMA and JSRD but the underlying anatomy depicted by fibre tracking is distinct. The main difference is the integrity of the VTD in COMA. (orig.)

  10. Upper Limb Evaluation in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Fat-Water Quantification by MRI, Muscle Force and Function Define Endpoints for Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricotti, Valeria; Evans, Matthew R B; Sinclair, Christopher D J; Butler, Jordan W; Ridout, Deborah A; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Emira, Ahmed; Morrow, Jasper M; Reilly, Mary M; Hanna, Michael G; Janiczek, Robert L; Matthews, Paul M; Yousry, Tarek A; Muntoni, Francesco; Thornton, John S

    2016-01-01

    A number of promising experimental therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are emerging. Clinical trials currently rely on invasive biopsies or motivation-dependent functional tests to assess outcome. Quantitative muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could offer a valuable alternative and permit inclusion of non-ambulant DMD subjects. The aims of our study were to explore the responsiveness of upper-limb MRI muscle-fat measurement as a non-invasive objective endpoint for clinical trials in non-ambulant DMD, and to investigate the relationship of these MRI measures to those of muscle force and function. 15 non-ambulant DMD boys (mean age 13.3 y) and 10 age-gender matched healthy controls (mean age 14.6 y) were recruited. 3-Tesla MRI fat-water quantification was used to measure forearm muscle fat transformation in non-ambulant DMD boys compared with healthy controls. DMD boys were assessed at 4 time-points over 12 months, using 3-point Dixon MRI to measure muscle fat-fraction (f.f.). Images from ten forearm muscles were segmented and mean f.f. and cross-sectional area recorded. DMD subjects also underwent comprehensive upper limb function and force evaluation. Overall mean baseline forearm f.f. was higher in DMD than in healthy controls (pmuscle f.f. as a biomarker to monitor disease progression in the upper limb in non-ambulant DMD, with sensitivity adequate to detect group-level change over time intervals practical for use in clinical trials. Clinical validity is supported by the association of the progressive fat transformation of muscle with loss of muscle force and function.

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... any recent surgeries. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given gadolinium ... an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... also provides movie-like sequential imaging of the cardiovascular system that is important to assess the health ... invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven valuable in diagnosing a ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants ... projectiles within the MRI scanner room and may cause you and/or others nearby harm. These items ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... you should let the radiologist know about them. Parents or family members who accompany patients into the ... intercom. Many MRI centers allow a friend or parent to stay in the room as long as ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... patient to have an allergy to a gadolinium-based contrast agent used for MRI than the iodine- ... For more information on adverse reactions to gadolinium-based contrast agents, please consult the ACR Manual on ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... be removed. MRI exams generally include multiple runs (sequences), some of which may last several minutes. The ... You may be able to relax between imaging sequences, but will be asked to maintain your position ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to assess the anatomy and function of the heart and its blood flow. Tell your doctor about ... chest cavity, including the mediastinum , chest wall, pleura, heart and vessels, from almost any angle. MRI also ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to perform a blood ... procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... may sense a temporary metallic taste in their mouth after the contrast injection. If you do not ... the iodine-based contrast materials used for conventional x-rays and CT scanning. MRI of the chest is ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want ... in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, heart valve abnormalities, bone ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings ... from the contrast material, including nausea, headache and pain at the site of injection. Similarly, patients are ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... very rare occasions, a few patients experience side effects from the contrast material, including nausea, headache and ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... period is necessary. You may resume your usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. On ... that time the imaging based on the electrical activity of the heart, such as electrocardiography (EKG). MRI ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to detect and identify any metal objects. In general, metal objects used in orthopedic surgery pose no ... units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older open MRI units may not ...

  6. Constrained MRI Impedance Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Plewes, Donald

    2002-01-01

    An approach for imaging electric tissue properties in vivo is proposed. The technique relies upon the integration of MRI data with electrical potential measurements made over the surface of the patient...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... you have any devices or metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam ... soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x- ...

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    Full Text Available ... devices or metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam vary between facilities. ... fitting and has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam vary with ...

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    Full Text Available ... blood flow to the heart) and myocardial infarct (scar in the heart muscle due to prior obstruction ... contrast material except when absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI examinations may require you to receive an injection of contrast material into the bloodstream. The radiologist , ... the potential risks. Pregnant women should not receive injections of gadolinium contrast material except when absolutely necessary ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam is assumed to outweigh the potential risks. Pregnant women should not receive injections of gadolinium ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... for more information. top of page How should I prepare? You may be asked to wear a ... total exam time. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Most MRI ...

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    Full Text Available ... surgery pose no risk during MRI. However, a recently placed artificial joint may require the use of ... maintain your position without movement as much as possible. You will usually be alone in the exam ...

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    Full Text Available ... activated. Some centers provide earplugs, while others use headphones to reduce the intensity of the sounds made ... Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI) of the chest uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

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    Full Text Available ... by showing them a dummy scanner, play the noises that the child might hear during the MRI ... being imaged, send and receive radio waves, producing signals that are detected by the coils. The electric ...

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    Full Text Available ... any recent surgeries. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given gadolinium contrast ... an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD or uploaded to ... MRI exam, a physician, nurse or technologist will insert an intravenous (IV) catheter, also known as an ...

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    Full Text Available ... might hear during the MRI exam, answer any questions and explain the procedure to relieve their anxiety. ... in case the radiologist or technologist has any questions. Some implanted devices require a short period of ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... the eyes are particularly important because they may move during the scan, possibly causing blindness. Dyes used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is rare. ...

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... radiation. MR images of the heart and vascular structures are often clearer and more detailed than with ...

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

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    Full Text Available ... wall, pleura, heart and vessels, from almost any angle. MRI also provides movie-like sequential imaging of ... The images can then be studied from different angles by the interpreting radiologist. Frequently, the differentiation of ...

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    Full Text Available ... provides movie-like sequential imaging of the cardiovascular system that is important to assess the health and ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

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    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... by showing them a dummy scanner, play the noises that the child might hear during the MRI exam, answer any questions and explain the procedure to relieve their anxiety. Some pediatric facilities also provide goggles or headsets ...

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    Full Text Available ... scanned and should not enter the MRI scanning area: cochlear (ear) implant some types of clips used ... but they may distort images of the facial area or brain, so you should let the radiologist ...

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding after receiving intravenous contrast. For further information please ...

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    Full Text Available ... asked to wear a gown. If you have claustrophobia or anxiety, you may want to ask your ... information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... vary between facilities. Unless you are told otherwise, take your regular medications as usual. Leave jewelry at ... you may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations ...

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    Full Text Available ... Infants and young children usually require sedation or anesthesia to complete an MRI exam without moving. Whether ... A physician or nurse specializing in sedation or anesthesia for children should be available during the exam ...

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    Full Text Available ... vessels, from almost any angle. MRI also provides movie-like sequential imaging of the cardiovascular system that ... headsets so that the child can watch a movie while the scan is being performed. Thus, the ...

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    Full Text Available ... MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want to ask your ... imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic region. Discuss the fees associated with your prescribed ...

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    Full Text Available ... in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is rare. ... who will share the results with you. Follow-up examinations may be necessary. Your doctor will explain ...

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    Full Text Available ... copied to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed ... physicians with expertise in several radiologic areas. Outside links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... will hear and feel loud tapping or thumping sounds when the coils that generate the radiofrequency pulses ... use headphones to reduce the intensity of the sounds made by the MRI machine. You may be ...

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    Full Text Available ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other coils, located in the machine and in some cases, placed around the part ...

  2. Sinus MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tissues surrounding the eye (orbital cellulitis) Nasal polyps Sinusitis -- acute Sinusitis -- chronic Talk to your provider if you have ... therefore is not typically used for suspected acute sinusitis. Alternative Names MRI of the sinuses; Magnetic resonance ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie ... your skin at the site of the IV tube insertion. Some patients may sense a temporary metallic ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ... signals that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older ... believed to be caused by the injection of high doses of gadolinium-based contrast material in patients ...

  7. Combined PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D. L.; Pichler, B. J.; Gückel, B.

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarises key themes and discussions from the 4th international workshop dedicated to the advancement of the technical, scientific and clinical applications of combined positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems that was held in Tübingen, Germany, from...... February 23 to 27, 2015. Specifically, we summarise the three days of invited presentations from active researchers in this and associated fields augmented by round table discussions and dialogue boards with specific topics. These include the use of PET/MRI in cardiovascular disease, paediatrics, oncology......, neurology and multi-parametric imaging, the latter of which was suggested as a key promoting factor for the wider adoption of integrated PET/MRI. Discussions throughout the workshop and a poll taken on the final day demonstrated that attendees felt more strongly that PET/MRI has further advanced in both...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam vary between facilities. Unless you are told otherwise, ... doctor for a mild sedative prior to the exam. What is MRI of the Chest? What are ...

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    Full Text Available ... that the child might hear during the MRI exam, answer any questions and explain the procedure to relieve their anxiety. Some pediatric facilities also provide goggles or headsets ...

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    Full Text Available ... by showing them a dummy scanner, play the noises that the child might hear during the MRI ... a noninvasive imaging technique that does not involve exposure to ionizing radiation. MR images of the heart ...

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    Full Text Available ... images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam ... Foreign bodies near and especially lodged in the eyes are particularly important because they may move during ...

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    Full Text Available ... copied to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: ...

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    Full Text Available ... high quality images for many types of exams. Older open MRI units may not provide this same ... You may resume your usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. On very rare occasions, ...

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    Full Text Available ... ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses implanted nerve stimulators metal pins, screws, plates, stents or surgical ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

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    Full Text Available ... patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist preparing patient for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... prior to your scheduled examination. Infants and young children usually require sedation or anesthesia to complete an MRI exam without moving. Whether a child requires sedation depends on the child's age, intellectual ...

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    Full Text Available ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that does ... data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding after receiving intravenous contrast. For further information please ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ... time an MRI takes to complete, many young children and infants require sedation to hold still for ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is ... special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) ...

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    Full Text Available ... MRI exams is less likely to produce an allergic reaction than the iodine-based contrast materials used for ... There is a very slight risk of an allergic reaction if contrast material is injected. Such reactions are ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... being safe for MRI examinations. Examples include but are not limited to: artificial heart valves implanted drug infusion ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses implanted nerve stimulators metal pins, screws, plates, ...

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    Full Text Available ... your regular medications as usual. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be ... Jewelry and other accessories should be left at home, if possible, or removed prior to the MRI ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to ... x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... Older open MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams cannot be ... the metallic objects. Patient movement can have the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ... to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. ...

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    Full Text Available ... may have. top of page What does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a ... traction devices and many types of life support equipment may distort the MR images and as a ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ... vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that does not involve exposure to ionizing radiation. ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... systemic fibrosis is currently a recognized, but rare, complication of MRI believed to be caused by the ... injection minimizes the risk of this very rare complication. There is a very slight risk of an ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... devices they may have. top of page What does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit ... room from the scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations ...

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    Full Text Available ... implanted drug infusion ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses implanted nerve stimulators metal pins, screws, plates, ... risk during MRI. However, a recently placed artificial joint may require the use of another imaging procedure. ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam vary between facilities. Unless you ... has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam vary with the specific ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... of the chest uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

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    Full Text Available ... Thus, the child remains motionless allowing for good quality images. Jewelry and other accessories should be left ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older open ...

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... are not limited to: artificial heart valves implanted drug infusion ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses ...

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    Full Text Available ... before an MRI exam vary with the specific exam and with the imaging facility. Unless you are told otherwise, you may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... have an allergy to a gadolinium-based contrast agent used for MRI than the iodine-containing contrast ... information on adverse reactions to gadolinium-based contrast agents, please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media . ...

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    Full Text Available ... unborn baby will be in a strong magnetic field, pregnant women should not have this exam in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam is assumed to ...

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... from the contrast material, including nausea, headache and pain at the site of injection. Similarly, patients are ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may require you to receive an injection of ... for a mild sedative prior to your scheduled examination. Infants and young children usually require sedation or ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be performed during the MRI exam ... in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, heart valve abnormalities, bone ...