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Sample records for subjects measured daytime

  1. Objective measurement of daytime napping, cognitive dysfunction and subjective sleepiness in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel J Bolitho

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Sleep-wake disturbances and concomitant cognitive dysfunction in Parkinson's disease (PD contribute significantly to morbidity in patients and their carers. Subjectively reported daytime sleep disturbance is observed in over half of all patients with PD and has been linked to executive cognitive dysfunction. The current study used daytime actigraphy, a novel objective measure of napping and related this to neuropsychological performance in a sample of PD patients and healthy, age and gender-matched controls. Furthermore this study aimed to identify patients with PD who may benefit from pharmacologic and behavioural intervention to improve these symptoms. METHODS: Eighty-five PD patients and 21 healthy, age-matched controls completed 14 days of wrist actigraphy within two weeks of neuropsychological testing. Objective napping measures were derived from actigraphy using a standardised protocol and subjective daytime sleepiness was recorded by the previously validated Epworth Sleepiness Scale. RESULTS: Patients with PD had a 225% increase in the mean nap time per day (minutes as recorded by actigraphy compared to age matched controls (39.2 ± 35.2 vs. 11.5 ± 11.0 minutes respectively, p < 0.001. Significantly, differences in napping duration between patients, as recorded by actigraphy were not distinguished by their ratings on the subjective measurement of excessive daytime sleepiness. Finally, those patients with excessive daytime napping showed greater cognitive deficits in the domains of attention, semantic verbal fluency and processing speed. CONCLUSION: This study confirms increased levels of napping in PD, a finding that is concordant with subjective reports. However, subjective self-report measures of excessive daytime sleepiness do not robustly identify excessive napping in PD. Fronto-subcortical cognitive dysfunction was observed in those patients who napped excessively. Furthermore, this study suggests that daytime

  2. Objective Measurement of Daytime Napping, Cognitive Dysfunction and Subjective Sleepiness in Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolitho, Samuel J.; Naismith, Sharon L.; Salahuddin, Pierre; Terpening, Zoe; Grunstein, Ron R.; Lewis, Simon J. G.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Sleep-wake disturbances and concomitant cognitive dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease (PD) contribute significantly to morbidity in patients and their carers. Subjectively reported daytime sleep disturbance is observed in over half of all patients with PD and has been linked to executive cognitive dysfunction. The current study used daytime actigraphy, a novel objective measure of napping and related this to neuropsychological performance in a sample of PD patients and healthy, age and gender-matched controls. Furthermore this study aimed to identify patients with PD who may benefit from pharmacologic and behavioural intervention to improve these symptoms. Methods Eighty-five PD patients and 21 healthy, age-matched controls completed 14 days of wrist actigraphy within two weeks of neuropsychological testing. Objective napping measures were derived from actigraphy using a standardised protocol and subjective daytime sleepiness was recorded by the previously validated Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Results Patients with PD had a 225% increase in the mean nap time per day (minutes) as recorded by actigraphy compared to age matched controls (39.2 ± 35.2 vs. 11.5 ± 11.0 minutes respectively, p napping duration between patients, as recorded by actigraphy were not distinguished by their ratings on the subjective measurement of excessive daytime sleepiness. Finally, those patients with excessive daytime napping showed greater cognitive deficits in the domains of attention, semantic verbal fluency and processing speed. Conclusion This study confirms increased levels of napping in PD, a finding that is concordant with subjective reports. However, subjective self-report measures of excessive daytime sleepiness do not robustly identify excessive napping in PD. Fronto-subcortical cognitive dysfunction was observed in those patients who napped excessively. Furthermore, this study suggests that daytime actigraphy, a non-invasive and inexpensive objective measure of

  3. Objective measurement of daytime napping, cognitive dysfunction and subjective sleepiness in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolitho, Samuel J; Naismith, Sharon L; Salahuddin, Pierre; Terpening, Zoe; Grunstein, Ron R; Lewis, Simon J G

    2013-01-01

    Sleep-wake disturbances and concomitant cognitive dysfunction in Parkinson's disease (PD) contribute significantly to morbidity in patients and their carers. Subjectively reported daytime sleep disturbance is observed in over half of all patients with PD and has been linked to executive cognitive dysfunction. The current study used daytime actigraphy, a novel objective measure of napping and related this to neuropsychological performance in a sample of PD patients and healthy, age and gender-matched controls. Furthermore this study aimed to identify patients with PD who may benefit from pharmacologic and behavioural intervention to improve these symptoms. Eighty-five PD patients and 21 healthy, age-matched controls completed 14 days of wrist actigraphy within two weeks of neuropsychological testing. Objective napping measures were derived from actigraphy using a standardised protocol and subjective daytime sleepiness was recorded by the previously validated Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Patients with PD had a 225% increase in the mean nap time per day (minutes) as recorded by actigraphy compared to age matched controls (39.2 ± 35.2 vs. 11.5 ± 11.0 minutes respectively, p napping duration between patients, as recorded by actigraphy were not distinguished by their ratings on the subjective measurement of excessive daytime sleepiness. Finally, those patients with excessive daytime napping showed greater cognitive deficits in the domains of attention, semantic verbal fluency and processing speed. This study confirms increased levels of napping in PD, a finding that is concordant with subjective reports. However, subjective self-report measures of excessive daytime sleepiness do not robustly identify excessive napping in PD. Fronto-subcortical cognitive dysfunction was observed in those patients who napped excessively. Furthermore, this study suggests that daytime actigraphy, a non-invasive and inexpensive objective measure of daytime sleep, can identify patients with PD

  4. Objective measurement of daytime napping, cognitive dysfunction and subjective sleepiness in Parkinson's disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bolitho, Samuel J; Naismith, Sharon L; Salahuddin, Pierre; Terpening, Zoe; Grunstein, Ron R; Lewis, Simon J G

    2013-01-01

    .... The current study used daytime actigraphy, a novel objective measure of napping and related this to neuropsychological performance in a sample of PD patients and healthy, age and gender-matched controls...

  5. Objective Measurement of Daytime Napping, Cognitive Dysfunction and Subjective Sleepiness in Parkinsons Disease: e81233

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Samuel J Bolitho; Sharon L Naismith; Pierre Salahuddin; Zoe Terpening; Ron R Grunstein; Simon J G Lewis

    2013-01-01

    .... The current study used daytime actigraphy, a novel objective measure of napping and related this to neuropsychological performance in a sample of PD patients and healthy, age and gender-matched controls...

  6. Effect of Daytime Exercise on Sleep Eeg and Subjective Sleep

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    Sasazawa, Y.; Kawada, T.; Kiryu, Y.

    1997-08-01

    This study was designed to assess the effects of daytime physical exercise on the quality of objective and subjective sleep by examining all-night sleep EEGs. The subjects were five male students, aged 19 to 20 years, who were in the habit of performing regular daytime exercise. The sleep polygraphic parameters in this study were sleep stage time as a percentage of total sleep time (%S1, %S2, %S(3+4), %SREM, %MT), time in bed (TIB), sleep time (ST), total sleep time (TST), sleep onset latency (SOL), waking from sleep, sleep efficiency, number of awakenings, number of stage shifts, number of spindles, and percentages of α and δ waves, all of which were determined by an automatic computer analysis system. The OSA questionnaire was used to investigate subjective sleep. The five scales of the OSA used were sleepiness, sleep maintenance, worry, integrated sleep feeling, and sleep initiation. Each sleep parameter was compared in the exercise and the non-exercise groups. Two-way analysis of variance was applied using subject factor and exercise factor. The main effect of the subject was significant in all parameters and the main effect of exercise in %S(3+4), SOL and sleep efficiency, among the objective sleep parameters. The main effects of the subject, except sleepiness, were significant, as was the main effect of exercise on sleep initiation, among the subjective sleep parameters. These findings suggest that daytime exercise shortened sleep latency and prolonged slow-wave sleep, and that the subjects fell asleep more easily on exercise days. There were also significant individual differences in both the objective and subjective sleep parameters.

  7. Reduced Slow-Wave Rebound during Daytime Recovery Sleep in Middle-Aged Subjects

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    Lafortune, Marjolaine; Gagnon, Jean-François; Latreille, Véronique; Vandewalle, Gilles; Martin, Nicolas; Filipini, Daniel; Doyon, Julien; Carrier, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Cortical synchronization during NREM sleep, characterized by electroencephalographic slow waves (SW 75 µV), is strongly related to the number of hours of wakefulness prior to sleep and to the quality of the waking experience. Whether a similar increase in wakefulness length leads to a comparable enhancement in NREM sleep cortical synchronization in young and older subjects is still a matter of debate in the literature. Here we evaluated the impact of 25-hours of wakefulness on SW during a daytime recovery sleep episode in 29 young (27y ±5), and 34 middle-aged (51y ±5) subjects. We also assessed whether age-related changes in NREM sleep cortical synchronization predicts the ability to maintain sleep during daytime recovery sleep. Compared to baseline sleep, sleep efficiency was lower during daytime recovery sleep in both age-groups but the effect was more prominent in the middle-aged than in the young subjects. In both age groups, SW density, amplitude, and slope increased whereas SW positive and negative phase duration decreased during daytime recovery sleep compared to baseline sleep, particularly in anterior brain areas. Importantly, compared to young subjects, middle-aged participants showed lower SW density rebound and SW positive phase duration enhancement after sleep deprivation during daytime recovery sleep. Furthermore, middle-aged subjects showed lower SW amplitude and slope enhancements after sleep deprivation than young subjects in frontal and prefrontal derivations only. None of the SW characteristics at baseline were associated with daytime recovery sleep efficiency. Our results support the notion that anterior brain areas elicit and may necessitate more intense recovery and that aging reduces enhancement of cortical synchronization after sleep loss, particularly in these areas. Age-related changes in the quality of wake experience may underlie age-related reduction in markers of cortical synchronization enhancement after sustained wakefulness. PMID

  8. Reduced slow-wave rebound during daytime recovery sleep in middle-aged subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolaine Lafortune

    Full Text Available Cortical synchronization during NREM sleep, characterized by electroencephalographic slow waves (SW 75 µV, is strongly related to the number of hours of wakefulness prior to sleep and to the quality of the waking experience. Whether a similar increase in wakefulness length leads to a comparable enhancement in NREM sleep cortical synchronization in young and older subjects is still a matter of debate in the literature. Here we evaluated the impact of 25-hours of wakefulness on SW during a daytime recovery sleep episode in 29 young (27 y ± 5, and 34 middle-aged (51 y ± 5 subjects. We also assessed whether age-related changes in NREM sleep cortical synchronization predicts the ability to maintain sleep during daytime recovery sleep. Compared to baseline sleep, sleep efficiency was lower during daytime recovery sleep in both age-groups but the effect was more prominent in the middle-aged than in the young subjects. In both age groups, SW density, amplitude, and slope increased whereas SW positive and negative phase duration decreased during daytime recovery sleep compared to baseline sleep, particularly in anterior brain areas. Importantly, compared to young subjects, middle-aged participants showed lower SW density rebound and SW positive phase duration enhancement after sleep deprivation during daytime recovery sleep. Furthermore, middle-aged subjects showed lower SW amplitude and slope enhancements after sleep deprivation than young subjects in frontal and prefrontal derivations only. None of the SW characteristics at baseline were associated with daytime recovery sleep efficiency. Our results support the notion that anterior brain areas elicit and may necessitate more intense recovery and that aging reduces enhancement of cortical synchronization after sleep loss, particularly in these areas. Age-related changes in the quality of wake experience may underlie age-related reduction in markers of cortical synchronization enhancement after

  9. The effects of glycine on subjective daytime performance in partially sleep-restricted healthy volunteers

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    Makoto eBannai

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 30% of the general population suffers from insomnia. Given that insomnia causes many problems, amelioration of the symptoms is crucial. Recently, we found that a nonessential amino acid, glycine subjectively and objectively improves sleep quality in humans who have difficulty sleeping. We evaluated the effects of glycine on daytime sleepiness, fatigue and performances in sleep-restricted healthy subjects. Sleep was restricted to 25% less than the usual sleep time for three consecutive nights. Before bedtime, 3 g of glycine or placebo were ingested, sleepiness and fatigue were evaluated using the visual analogue scale (VAS and a questionnaire, and performance were estimated by personal computer (PC performance test program on the following day. In subjects given glycine, the VAS data showed a significant reduction in fatigue and a tendency toward reduced sleepiness. These observations were also found via the questionnaire, indicating that glycine improves daytime sleepiness and fatigue induced by acute sleep restriction. PC performance test revealed significant improvement in psychomotor vigilance test. We also measured plasma melatonin and the expression of circadian-modulated genes expression in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN to evaluate the effects of glycine on circadian rhythms. Glycine did not show significant effects on plasma melatonin concentrations during either the dark or light period. Moreover, the expression levels of clock genes such as Bmal1 and Per2 remained unchanged. However, we observed a glycine-induced increase in the neuropeptides arginine vasopressin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in the light period. Although no alterations in the circadian clock itself were observed, our results indicate that glycine modulated SCN function. Thus, glycine modulates certain neuropeptides in the SCN and this phenomenon may indirectly contribute to improving the occasional sleepiness and fatigue induced by sleep

  10. Subjective sleep quality and daytime sleepiness in late midlife and their association with age-related changes in cognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waller, Katja Linda; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Avlund, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    ) or cognitively impaired (N = 92). METHODS: The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Epworth Sleepiness Scale measured subjective sleep quality and daytime sleepiness, respectively. Depressive symptoms were determined using Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI-II). A neuropsychological battery was administered....... Our results suggest that sleep quality may be an early marker of cognitive decline in midlife.......UNLABELLED: In an increasingly aged population, sleep disturbances and neurodegenerative disorders have become a major public health concern. Poor sleep quality and cognitive changes are complex health problems in aging populations that are likely to be associated with increased frailty, morbidity...

  11. Short Daytime Naps Briefly Attenuate Objectively Measured Sleepiness Under Chronic Sleep Restriction.

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    Saletin, Jared M; Hilditch, Cassie J; Dement, William C; Carskadon, Mary A

    2017-09-01

    Napping is a useful countermeasure to the negative effects of acute sleep loss on alertness. The efficacy of naps to recover from chronic sleep loss is less well understood. Following 2 baseline nights (10 hours' time-in-bed), participants were restricted to 7 nights of 5-hour sleep opportunity. Ten adults participated in the No-Nap condition, and a further 9 were assigned to a Nap condition with a daily 45-minute nap opportunity at 1300 h. Sleepiness was assessed using the multiple sleep latency test and a visual analogue scale at 2-hour intervals. Both objective and subjective indexes of sleepiness were normalized within subject as a difference from those at baseline prior to sleep restriction. Mixed-effects models examined how the daytime nap opportunity altered sleepiness across the day and across the protocol. Short daytime naps attenuated sleepiness due to chronic sleep restriction for up to 6-8 hours after the nap. Benefits of the nap did not extend late into evening. Subjective sleepiness demonstrated a similar short-lived benefit that emerged later in the day when objective sleepiness already returned to pre-nap levels. Neither measure showed a benefit of the nap the following morning after the subsequent restriction night. These data indicate a short daytime nap may attenuate sleepiness in chronic sleep restriction, yet subjective and objective benefits emerge at different time scales. Because neither measure showed a benefit the next day, the current study underscores the need for careful consideration before naps are used as routine countermeasures to chronic sleep loss.

  12. Frequent nocturnal awakening in children: prevalence, risk factors, and associations with subjective sleep perception and daytime sleepiness.

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    Li, Liwen; Ren, Jiwei; Shi, Lei; Jin, Xinming; Yan, Chonghuai; Jiang, Fan; Shen, Xiaoming; Li, Shenghui

    2014-07-30

    Nocturnal awakening is the most frequent insomnia complaint in the general population. In contrast to a growing knowledge based on adults, little is known about its prevalence, correlated factors, and associations with subjective sleep perception and daytime sleepiness in children. This study was designed to assess the prevalence and the correlate factors of frequent nocturnal awakening (FNA) among Chinese school-aged children. Furthermore, the associations of FNA with subjective sleep perception and daytime sleepiness were examined. A random sample of 20,505 children aged 5.00 to 11.92 years old (boys: 49.5% vs. girls: 50.5%) participated in a cross-sectional survey, which was conducted in eight cities of China. Parent-administered questionnaires were used to collect information on children's sleep behaviors, sleep perception, and potential influential factors of FNA from six domains. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were performed. The prevalence of FNA was 9.8% (10.0% for boys vs. 8.9% for girls) in our sampled children. The prominent FNA-related factors inclued biological health problems, such as overweight/obesity (OR = 1.70), chronic pain during night (OR = 2.47), and chronic respiratory condition (OR = 1.23), poor psychosocial condition, such as poor mental and emotional functioning (OR = 1.34), poor sleep hygiene, such as frequently doing exciting activities before bedtime (OR = 1.24) and bedtime resistance (OR = 1.42), and parents' history of insomnia (OR = 1.31). FNA was associated with subjective poor sleep quality (OR = 1.24), subjective insufficient sleep (OR = 1.21), and daytime sleepiness (OR = 1.35). FNA was associated with poor sleep and daytime sleepiness. Compared to sleep environment and family susceptibility, chronic health problems, poor psychosocial condition, and poor sleep hygiene had greater impact on FNA, indicating childhood FNA could be partly prevented by health promotion, by psychological intervention, and by

  13. Daytime sodium airglow emission measurements over Trivandrum using a scanning monochromator: first results

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    M. M. Hossain

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents measurement of daytime Sodium (Na airglow emissions at 589.6 nm wavelength using a ground based 1-m scanning monochromator from Trivandrum (8.5° N, 77° E, 0.5° N dip latitude, a near-equatorial station in India. The Na emission intensity exhibits significant temporal variability within a day and from one day to another. The Na intensity has been compared with the daytime OH airglow intensity at 731.6 nm simultaneously measured using the unique Multiwavelength Dayglow Photometer (MWDPM. The temporal variabilities of the Na and OH intensities corroborate each other in most of the occasions without any appreciable time delay, although a small time delay up to ~10 min has been observed at times. It appears that the variability of daytime Na emissions is influenced too by the photo-chemical excitations. The observed similarities in the Na and OH intensities are believed to be due to the similar roles played by [O] and O3 (in their photo-chemical excitations and the dynamics occurring at about the same altitude region (~90 km. It has also been found that the gravity waves play significant role in producing the short-scale oscillations in these emissions.

  14. High Spectral Resolution Lidar Based on a Potassium Faraday Dispersive Filter for Daytime Temperature Measurement

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    Abo Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new high-spectral-resolution lidar technique is proposed for measuring the profiles of atmospheric temperature in daytime. Based on the theory of high resolution Rayleigh scattering, the feasibility and advantages of using potassium (K Faraday dispersive optical filters as blocking filters for measuring atmospheric temperature are demonstrated with a numerical simulation. It was found that temperature profiles could be measured within 1K error for the height of 9 km with a 500 m range resolution in 60 min by using laser pulses with 1mJ/pulse and 1 kHz, and a 50 cm diameter telescope. Furthermore, we are developing compact pulsed laser system for temperature lidar transmitter.

  15. A lidar for water vapour measurements in daytime at Lampedusa, Italy

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    F. Marenco

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available ENEA is planning to develop a lidar system for measurement of the vertical profi le of water vapour mixing ratio in daytime at a remote site, the Station for Climate Observations located in Lampedusa, Italy. The Raman lidar technique has been retained because of its experimental simplicity with respect to DIAL, and the UV spectral range has been chosen because Raman cross-sections and detector effi ciencies are larger. For a wavelength larger than ~ 300 nm the signal is limited in daytime by sky background, but extinction is acceptable, and the aims of the system can be reached with a strong laser source. The 355 nm wavelength of a frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser has been retained as this laser source permits to reach a large pulse energy while keeping the system simple to operate. Geometrical form factor calculations need to be performed to evaluate the near-range overlap between the laser beam and the fi eld-of-view of the receiver. Among several options, a dual-receiver system has been retained to account for the several orders of magnitude expected in the backscattered signal intensity: a smaller receiver, with a primary mirror of 200 mm diameter for the 0.2-1 km range, and a larger 500 mm receiver for the 1-3 km range.

  16. Excessive Daytime Sleepiness

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    Yavuz Selvi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Excessive daytime sleepiness is one of the most common sleep-related patient symptoms, with preva-lence in the community estimated to be as high as 18%. Patients with excessive daytime sleepiness may exhibit life threatening road and work accidents, social maladjustment, decreased academic and occupational performance and have poorer health than comparable adults. Thus, excessive daytime sleepiness is a serious condition that requires investigation, diagnosis and treatment primarily. As with most medical condition, evaluation of excessive daytime sleepiness begins a precise history and various objective and subjective tools have been also developed to assess excessive daytime sleepiness. The most common causes of excessive daytime sleepiness are insufficient sleep hygiene, chronic sleep deprivation, medical and psychiatric conditions and sleep disorders, such as obstructive sleep apnea, medications, and narcolepsy. Treatment option should address underlying contributors and promote sleep quantity by ensuring good sleep hygiene. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(2: 114-132

  17. Measurement-based modeling of daytime and nighttime oxidation of atmospheric mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, Eran; Gabay, Maor; Peleg, Mordechai; Fredj, Erick

    2017-04-01

    Accurate characterization of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) chemical oxidation pathways and their kinetics is critically important for assessing the transfer of atmospheric mercury to bioaquatic systems. Recent comprehensive field measurements have suggested that the nitrate radical (NO3) plays a role in efficient nighttime oxidation of GEM, and that the role of the hydroxyl radical (OH) as a GEM oxidant has been underestimated. We used the CAABA/MECCA chemical box model and additional kinetic calculations to analyze these measurement results, in order to investigate the nighttime and daytime oxidation of GEM. We assumed a second-order reaction for the NO3 induced nighttime oxidation of GEM. Our analysis demonstrated that nighttime oxidation of GEM has to be included in the model to account for the measured variations in nighttime reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) concentration. A lower limit and best-fit rate constant for GEM nighttime oxidation are provided. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a rate for nighttime oxidation of GEM has been determined based on field measurements. Our analysis further indicates that OH has a much more important role in GEM oxidation than commonly considered. A lower-limit rate constant for the OH-RGM reaction is provided.

  18. [Reproducibility of subjective refraction measurement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grein, H-J; Schmidt, O; Ritsche, A

    2014-11-01

    Reproducibility of subjective refraction measurement is limited by various factors. The main factors affecting reproducibility include the characteristics of the measurement method and of the subject and the examiner. This article presents the results of a study on this topic, focusing on the reproducibility of subjective refraction measurement in healthy eyes. The results of previous studies are not all presented in the same way by the respective authors and cannot be fully standardized without consulting the original scientific data. To the extent that they are comparable, the results of our study largely correspond largely with those of previous investigations: During repeated subjective refraction measurement, 95% of the deviation from the mean value was approximately ±0.2 D to ±0.65 D for the spherical equivalent and cylindrical power. The reproducibility of subjective refraction measurement in healthy eyes is limited, even under ideal conditions. Correct assessment of refraction results is only feasible after identifying individual variability. Several measurements are required. Refraction cannot be measured without a tolerance range. The English full-text version of this article is available at SpringerLink (under supplemental).

  19. Daytime formation of HONO measured close to the surface: Indication for a light driven process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörgel, M.; Held, A. B.

    2012-12-01

    The photolysis of HONO is an important primary OH radical source. The OH radical is the most important oxidizing agent, the so called "detergent" of the atmosphere. HONO formation pathways are still unclear (e.g. Sörgel et al., 2011). Nevertheless, the main pathways are believed to be heterogeneous. Thus, the surface is proposed to be a major source. Furthermore, soil emissions of HONO due to microbiological activity in soil (Su et al., 2011) have been proposed and have to be distinguished from the proposed photochemical sources. Therefore, we measured gradients of HONO, NO, NO2 and O3 close to the surface (0.1 to 1.6 m above ground) at the forest floor and on a clearing. We used an automated, programmable moving inlet to measure at 3 or 5 heights between 0.1 m and 1.6 m above the ground. HONO, O3, NO and NO2 were measured simultaneously. HONO was measured with a long path absorption photometer (LOPAP), O3 by UV absorption and NO and NO2 by chemiluminescence with photolytic conversion of NO2. The time resolution of an individual LOPAP measurement was 3 min, and a full profile was measured within 30 min. Additionally, profiles of temperature and relative humidity as well as leaf wetness and j(NO2) were measured. Measurements were conducted at the forest floor and on a clearing at the Waldstein field site of the University of Bayreuth in the Fichtelgebirge Mountains in south-east Germany. Preliminary results are presented. For example, during the day the highest values were often measured close to the ground at the clearing, indicating emission of HONO at the surface. This also indicates that the daytime formation of HONO is heterogeneous or the emissions are due to microbiological activity (Su et al., 2011). During the night, the lowest values were often measured at the surface indicating deposition. Thus, HONO emissions as well as HONO deposition have been observed. The profile data will be analyzed with respect to light intensity, NO2 availability, atmospheric

  20. Relationship between clinical, 24-hour, average day-time and night-time blood pressure and measures of arterial stiffness in essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, J; Strauch, B; Petrák, O; Pikus, T; Holaj, R; Zelinka, T; Wichterle, D; Widimský, J

    2008-01-01

    Arterial wall stiffness is considered an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Aim of this study was to evaluate relationship between clinical, 24-hour, average day-time and night-time blood pressure (BP) and measures of arterial stiffness assessed by pulse wave velocity (PWV) (using SphygmoCor applanation tonometer) in essential hypertension (severe-resistant (RH, n=29) and moderate hypertension (EH, n=35)) and in normotensive control subjects (n-29) (NCS) matched by age. After multiple regression analysis, PWV remains significantly correlated mainly with night-time pulse pressure and to a lesser extent with age. PWV was significantly higher in RH compared to moderate EH and NCS.

  1. Daytime sleepiness in Parkinson's disease: a reappraisal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Cochen De Cock

    Full Text Available Excessive daytime sleepiness is a frequent complaint in Parkinson's disease (PD; however the frequency and risk factors for objective sleepiness remain mostly unknown. We investigated both the frequency and determinants of self-reported and objective daytime sleepiness in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD using a wide range of potential predictors.One hundred and thirty four consecutive patients with PD, without selection bias for sleep complaint, underwent a semi-structured clinical interview and a one night polysomnography followed by a multiple sleep latency test (MSLT. Demographic characteristics, medical history, PD course and severity, daytime sleepiness, depressive and insomnia symptoms, treatment intake, pain, restless legs syndrome, REM sleep behaviour disorder, and nighttime sleep measures were collected. Self-reported daytime sleepiness was defined by an Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS score above 10. A mean sleep latency on MSLT below 8 minutes defined objective daytime sleepiness.Of 134 patients with PD, 46.3% had subjective and only 13.4% had objective sleepiness with a weak negative correlation between ESS and MSLT latency. A high body mass index (BMI was associated with both ESS and MSLT, a pain complaint with ESS, and a higher apnea/hypopnea index with MSLT. However, no associations were found between both objective and subjective sleepiness, and measures of motor disability, disease onset, medication (type and dose, depression, insomnia, restless legs syndrome, REM sleep behaviour disorder and nighttime sleep evaluation.We found a high frequency of self-reported EDS in PD, a finding which is however not confirmed by the gold standard neurophysiological evaluation. Current treatment options for EDS in PD are very limited; it thus remains to be determined whether decreasing pain and BMI in association with the treatment of sleep apnea syndrome would decrease significantly daytime sleepiness in PD.

  2. Daytime sleepiness in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, B; Roehrs, T; Zorick, F; Roth, T

    1988-02-01

    The daytime sleepiness of a large sample (n = 129) of healthy, young (age 18-29) adults with no sleep-wake complaints was measured and compared with that of a sample (n = 47) of older (age 30-80) healthy, normal sleeping, subjects. Each spent 8 h in the laboratory on 1 night and received the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) the following day. Sleep latency was measured at 1000, 1200, 1400, and 1600 h. Mean sleep latency ranged from 2 to 20 min within each group, but the shape of the distribution of latency between groups was different. The mean latency of young subjects (particularly college students) was shorter than that of the older subjects, with the differences occurring between the sleepiest 80% of each distribution. Among the college students, those with higher nocturnal sleep efficiencies (the previous night) were sleepier the following day than those with lower sleep efficiencies. The relation between nocturnal sleep efficiency and daytime sleepiness suggests that the increased sleepiness of average young adults is due to mild sleep restriction.

  3. Mood and objective and subjective measures of sleep during late pregnancy and the postpartum period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coo, Soledad; Milgrom, Jeannette; Trinder, John

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the association between measures of objective sleep (OS) and subjective sleep (SS) to postpartum mood in healthy women from the third trimester of pregnancy to 10 to 12 weeks postpartum. Twenty-nine pregnant women completed self-report measures of mood and SS, and wore actigraphs for 7 continuous days during the third trimester (Time 1), within 15 days (Time 2), and 10 to 12 weeks postpartum (Time 3). The subjective perception of marked daytime dysfunction was associated with low mood during Time 1 and Time 3. Poor nighttime SS was related to low mood only at Time 2, whereas poor nighttime OS influenced stress during the same assessment time. These data indicate a stronger association between postpartum mood and the subjective perception of sleep than with OS quality and duration in healthy, non-depressed women, and highlight the awareness of poor daytime functioning as a significant contributor to new mothers' emotional wellbeing.

  4. Variation in non-invasive measurements of vascular function in healthy volunteers during daytime.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avest, E. ter; Holewijn, S.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.; Graaf, J. de

    2005-01-01

    Although it is often recommended to standardize the time of day when performing non-invasive measurements of vascular function, the exact influence of the time of day on the outcome of IMT (intima-media thickness), PWV (pulse wave velocity), AIX (augmentation index) and FMD (flow-mediated

  5. A daytime measurement of the lunar contribution to the night sky brightness in LSST's ugrizy bands-initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Michael; Stubbs, Christopher; Claver, Chuck

    2016-06-01

    We report measurements from which we determine the spatial structure of the lunar contribution to night sky brightness, taken at the LSST site on Cerro Pachon in Chile. We use an array of six photodiodes with filters that approximate the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope's u, g, r, i, z, and y bands. We use the sun as a proxy for the moon, and measure sky brightness as a function of zenith angle of the point on sky, zenith angle of the sun, and angular distance between the sun and the point on sky. We make a correction for the difference between the illumination spectrum of the sun and the moon. Since scattered sunlight totally dominates the daytime sky brightness, this technique allows us to cleanly determine the contribution to the (cloudless) night sky from backscattered moonlight, without contamination from other sources of night sky brightness. We estimate our uncertainty in the relative lunar night sky brightness vs. zenith and lunar angle to be between 0.3-0.7 mags depending on the passband. This information is useful in planning the optimal execution of the LSST survey, and perhaps for other astronomical observations as well. Although our primary objective is to map out the angular structure and spectrum of the scattered light from the atmosphere and particulates, we also make an estimate of the expected number of scattered lunar photons per pixel per second in LSST, and find values that are in overall agreement with previous estimates.

  6. Analysis of nocturnal actigraphic sleep measures in patients with COPD and their association with daytime physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Gabriele; Spruit, Martijn A; Alison, Jennifer; Benzo, Roberto P; Calverley, Peter M A; Clarenbach, Christian F; Costello, Richard W; Donaire-Gonzalez, David; Dürr, Selina; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; van Gestel, Arnoldus J R; Gramm, Marco; Hernandes, Nidia A; Hill, Kylie; Hopkinson, Nicholas S; Jarreta, Diana; Kohler, Malcolm; Kirsten, Anne M; Leuppi, Jörg D; Magnussen, Helgo; Maltais, François; Man, William D-C; McKeough, Zoe J; Mesquita, Rafael; Miedinger, David; Pitta, Fabio; Singh, Sally J; Smeenk, Frank W J M; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Vagaggini, Barbara; Waschki, Benjamin; Watz, Henrik; Wouters, Emiel F M; Zogg, Stefanie; den Brinker, Albertus C

    2017-08-01

    Sleep disturbances are common in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with a considerable negative impact on their quality of life. However, factors associated with measures of sleep in daily life have not been investigated before nor has the association between sleep and the ability to engage in physical activity on a day-to-day basis been studied. To provide insight into the relationship between actigraphic sleep measures and disease severity, exertional dyspnoea, gender and parts of the week; and to investigate the association between sleep measures and next day physical activity. Data were analysed from 932 patients with COPD (66% male, 66.4±8.3 years, FEV1% predicted=50.8±20.5). Participants had sleep and physical activity continuously monitored using a multisensor activity monitor for a median of 6 days. Linear mixed effects models were applied to investigate the factors associated with sleep impairment and the association between nocturnal sleep and patients' subsequent daytime physical activity. Actigraphic estimates of sleep impairment were greater in patients with worse airflow limitation and worse exertional dyspnoea. Patients with better sleep measures (ie, non-fragmented sleep, sleeping bouts ≥225 min, sleep efficiency ≥91% and time spent awake after sleep onset sleep in patients with COPD and the amount of activity they undertake during the waking day. Identifying groups with specific sleep characteristics may be useful information when designing physical activity-enhancing interventions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Subjective measures of well--being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Veenhoven (Ruut)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis chapter deals with three question: 1) What are ‘subjective’ measure? 2) What is ‘wellbeing’? and 3) Are subjective measures of wellbeing of use for policymaking, in particular in developing nations? The first question is answered by making a distinction between two kinds of

  8. Excessive daytime sleepiness and metabolic syndrome in men with obstructive sleep apnea: a large cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yiqun; Xu, Huajun; Xia, Yunyan; Qian, Yingjun; Li, Xinyi; Zou, Jianyin; Wang, Yuyu; Meng, Lili; Tang, Xulan; Zhu, Huaming; Zhou, Huiqun; Su, Kaiming; Yu, Dongzhen; Yi, Hongliang; Guan, Jian; Yin, Shankai

    2017-10-03

    Excessive daytime sleepiness is a common symptom in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Previous studies have showed that excessive daytime sleepiness is associated with some individual components of metabolic syndrome. We performed a large cross-sectional study to explore the relationship between excessive daytime sleepiness and metabolic syndrome in male OSA patients. A total of 2241 suspected male OSA patients were consecutively recruited from 2007 to 2013. Subjective daytime sleepiness was assessed using the Epworth sleepiness scale. Anthropometric, metabolic, and polysomnographic parameters were measured. Metabolic score was used to evaluate the severity of metabolic syndrome. Among the male OSA patients, most metabolic parameters varied by excessive daytime sleepiness. In the severe group, male OSA patients with excessive daytime sleepiness were more obese, with higher blood pressure, more severe insulin resistance and dyslipidemia than non-sleepy patients. Patients with metabolic syndrome also had a higher prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness and scored higher on the Epworth sleepiness scale. Excessive daytime sleepiness was independently associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome (odds ratio =1.242, 95% confidence interval: 1.019-1.512). No substantial interaction was observed between excessive daytime sleepiness and OSA/ obesity. Excessive daytime sleepiness was related to metabolic disorders and independently associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome in men with OSA. Excessive daytime sleepiness should be taken into consideration for OSA patients, as it may be a simple and useful clinical indicator for evaluating the risk of metabolic syndrome.

  9. Insomnia and daytime napping in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Martin, Jennifer L

    2006-07-15

    Insomnia, daytime sleepiness, and napping are all highly prevalent among the elderly, reflecting changes in sleep architecture, sleep efficiency, sleep quality, and circadian sleep-wake cycles. Insomnia is sometimes associated with subjective daytime sleepiness, as well as other clinical and socioeconomic consequences. The daytime sleepiness will at times lead to napping. Although napping is viewed as a common age-related occurrence, little is known about its benefits or consequences. Factors reported to be contributors to daytime napping include sleep-maintenance difficulty and sleep fragmentation with consequent daytime sleepiness, nighttime use of long-acting sedating agents, daytime use of sedating medications, and dementia. However, a correlation between sleep disturbance and daytime napping has not been consistently observed. Whether napping is beneficial, neutral, or detrimental is an important issue, in light of conflicting findings regarding the impact of daytime napping on nighttime sleep and recent reports of an association between napping and adverse clinical outcomes, including increased mortality risk. Further research is needed to determine whether there is a cause-and-effect relationship between napping and insomnia, and between napping and adverse clinical outcomes, and to explore the clinical implications of improving insomnia and reducing daytime napping. Clinical evaluations of hypnotic agents should assess efficacy for both improving insomnia symptoms (particularly sleep-maintenance difficulty, in the case of elderly patients) and reducing daytime sleepiness that would lead to inadvertent napping.

  10. Initial daytime and nighttime SOFDI observations of thermospheric winds from Fabry-Perot Doppler shift measurements of the 630-nm OI line-shape profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Gerrard

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present both night and day thermospheric wind observations made with the Second-generation, Optimized, Fabry-Perot Doppler Imager (SOFDI, a novel triple-etalon Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI designed to make 24-h measurements of thermospheric winds from OI 630-nm emission. These results were obtained from the northeastern United States and from under the magnetic equator at Huancayo, Peru and demonstrate the current instrument capability for measurements of Doppler shifts for either night or day. We found the uncertainties in the measurements agree with expected values based upon forward modeling calculations; nighttime wind components having an uncertainty of ~20-m s−1 at 30-min resolution and daytime wind components having an uncertainty of ~70-m s−1 at 20-min resolution. The nighttime uncertainties are typically larger than those seen with traditional single-etalon FPIs, which occur at the cost of being able to achieve daytime measurements. The thermospheric wind measurements from Huancayo replicate recently reported CHAMP zonal winds and are in disagreement with current empirical wind climatologies. In addition, we discuss the incorporation of how multiple point heads in the SOFDI instrument will allow for unique studies of gravity wave activity in future measurements.

  11. Whistle characteristics and daytime dive behavior in pantropical spotted dolphins (Stenella attenuata) in Hawai'i measured using digital acoustic recording tags (DTAGs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tammy L; Mooney, T Aran; Sayigh, Laela S; Tyack, Peter L; Baird, Robin W; Oswald, Julie N

    2016-07-01

    This study characterizes daytime acoustic and dive behavior of pantropical spotted dolphins (Stenella attenuata) in Hawai'i using 14.58 h of data collected from five deployments of digital acoustic recording tags (DTAG3) in 2013. For each tagged animal, the number of whistles, foraging buzzes, dive profiles, and dive statistics were calculated. Start, end, minimum, and maximum frequencies, number of inflection points and duration were measured from 746 whistles. Whistles ranged in frequency from 9.7 ± 2.8 to 19.8 ± 4.2 kHz, had a mean duration of 0.7 ± 0.5 s and a mean of 1.2 ± 1.2 inflection points. Thirteen foraging buzzes were recorded across all tags. Mean dive depth and duration were 16 ± 9 m and 1.9 ± 1.0 min, respectively. Tagged animals spent the majority of time in the upper 10 m (76.9% ± 16.1%) of the water column. Both whistle frequency characteristics and dive statistics measured here were similar to previously reported values for spotted dolphins in Hawai'i. Shallow, short dive profiles combined with few foraging buzzes provide evidence that little spotted dolphin feeding behavior occurs during daytime hours. This work represents one of the first successful DTAG3 studies of small pelagic delphinids, providing rare insights into baseline bioacoustics and dive behavior.

  12. Objective daytime sleepiness in patients with somnambulism or sleep terrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Régis; Jaussent, Isabelle; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2014-11-25

    To objectively measure daytime sleepiness and to assess for clinical and polysomnographic determinants of mean sleep latency in adult patients with somnambulism (sleepwalking [SW]) or sleep terrors (ST) compared with controls. Thirty drug-free adult patients with primary SW or ST, and age-, sex-, and body mass index-matched healthy controls underwent a standardized clinical interview, completed questionnaires including the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and underwent one night of video polysomnography followed by the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT). Excessive daytime sleepiness defined as Epworth Sleepiness Scale score >10 was reported in 66.7% of patients and 6.7% of controls. The temporal pattern of sleep latencies in individual MSLT trials differed between patients and controls, with progressive increased sleep latency in patients across the trials in contrast to a "U curve" for controls. We did not find between-group differences regarding the mean sleep latency on the 5 MSLT trials, but did observe reduced sleep latencies in patients for the first 2 trials. Despite increased slow-wave sleep disruptions found in patients (i.e, more micro-arousals and hypersynchronous high-voltage delta waves arousals), we did not find polysomnographic characteristic differences when comparing sleepy patients for either subjective or objective daytime sleepiness on the MSLT compared with alert patients. Excessive daytime sleepiness is a common complaint in subjects with SW or ST and shorter sleep latencies in the early morning hours. Despite an increased slow-wave sleep fragmentation found in these patients, we did not identify any association with the level of daytime sleepiness. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  13. Daytime Sleepiness Increases With Age in Early Adolescence: A Sleep Restriction Dose-Response Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ian G; Burright, Christopher S; Kraus, Amanda M; Grimm, Kevin J; Feinberg, Irwin

    2017-05-01

    Daytime sleepiness increases across adolescence. This increase is commonly attributed to insufficient sleep durations resulting from increasingly limited time in bed. We tested the effects of 3 sleep schedules on daytime sleepiness and whether these effects changed with age in early adolescence. In 77 children ranging in age from 9.9 to 14 years, objective (multiple sleep latency test [MSLT]) and subjective (Karolinska sleepiness scale [KSS]) sleepiness was measured following 4 consecutive nights of either 7, 8.5, or 10 hours in bed. All participants completed all 3 sleep schedules. The order in which they completed the schedules was not randomized but was accounted for in all statistical analyses. Time in bed restriction decreased sleep duration and increased objective and subjective daytime sleepiness. Although the sleep durations did not change with age, the likelihood of falling asleep during the MSLT increased with age. Nevertheless, sleep restriction produced a greater increase in MSLT-measured sleepiness in younger participants. Subjective sleepiness measured with the KSS increased with shorter sleep duration, but this effect did not change with age. Increasing objective daytime sleepiness in early adolescence cannot simply be attributed to reduced sleep due to restricted sleep schedules. We propose that some of the increased daytime sleepiness of adolescents is a consequence of adolescent brain reorganization driven by synaptic pruning which decreases the intensity of waking brain activity.

  14. The Validity of Subjective Performance Measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kenneth J.; Winter, Søren C.; O'Toole, Laurence J.

    2015-01-01

    Public management studies are increasingly using survey data on managers’ perceptions of performance to measure organizational performance. The perceptual measures are tempting to apply because archival performance data or surveys of target group outcomes and satisfaction are often lacking, costly...... to provide, and are highly policy specific rendering generalization difficult. But are perceptual performance measures valid, and do they generate unbiased findings? We examine these questions in a comparative study of middle managers in schools in Texas and Denmark. The findings are remarkably similar...... the resources it has. Even worse, the use of perceptual performance measures seems to provide biased estimates when examining how management affects performance....

  15. Associations of objectively and subjectively measured physical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PBSSs) calculated from physical activity (PA) questionnaires and accelerometry measures of PA with trabecular and cortical bone properties in prepubertal children. Methods. We compared PBSSs calculated from the bone-specific component of PA ...

  16. Subjective Optic Disc Assessment and Single Measurement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Verbal consent was obtained from the Treasury Department of the Rivers State Ministry of Finance and also from all individuals who participated in the study. Demographic data including age and sex were recorded in the WHO/PBL eye examination form. Ocular examination consisted of uncorrected VA measured with ...

  17. Adolescent daytime sleepiness as a risk factor for adult crime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine, Adrian; Venables, Peter H

    2017-06-01

    While recent cross-sectional research has documented a relationship between sleep problems and antisocial behavior, the longitudinal nature of this relationship is unknown. This study tests both the hypothesis that adolescent daytime sleepiness is associated with later adult criminal offending, and also tests a biopsychosocial mediation model in which social adversity predisposes to sleepiness, which in turn predisposes to attentional impairment, and to adult crime. Schoolboys aged 15 years rated themselves on self-report sleepiness. Age 15 antisocial behavior was assessed by teacher ratings and self-reports, while convictions for crime were assessed at age 29. Attentional capacity at age 15 was assessed by autonomic orienting, with arousal assessed by the electroencephalogram (EEG). Sleepy adolescents were more likely to be antisocial during adolescence, and were 4.5 times more likely to commit crime by age 29. The sleepiness-adult crime relationship withstood control for adolescent antisocial behavior. Self-report sleepiness predicted to adult crime over and above objective measures of daytime sleepiness (EEG theta activity) and age 15 antisocial behavior. Poor daytime attention partly mediated the sleep-crime relationship. Mediation analyses also showed that social adversity predisposed to daytime sleepiness which was associated with reduced attention which in turn predisposed to adult crime. Findings are the first to document a longitudinal association between sleepiness in adolescence and crime in adulthood. The longitudinal nature of this relationship, controlling for age 15 antisocial behavior, is consistent with the hypothesis that adolescent sleepiness predisposes to later antisociality. Findings are also consistent with the notion that the well-established link between social adversity and adult crime is partly explained by sleepiness. Results suggest that a very brief and simple assessment of subjective daytime sleepiness may have prognostic clinical

  18. The association between daytime napping and cognitive functioning in chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotts, Zoe M; Ellis, Jason G; Deary, Vincent; Barclay, Nicola; Newton, Julia L

    2015-01-01

    The precise relationship between sleep and physical and mental functioning in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) has not been examined directly, nor has the impact of daytime napping. This study aimed to examine self-reported sleep in patients with CFS and explore whether sleep quality and daytime napping, specific patient characteristics (gender, illness length) and levels of anxiety and depression, predicted daytime fatigue severity, levels of daytime sleepiness and cognitive functioning, all key dimensions of the illness experience. 118 adults meeting the 1994 CDC case criteria for CFS completed a standardised sleep diary over 14 days. Momentary functional assessments of fatigue, sleepiness, cognition and mood were completed by patients as part of usual care. Levels of daytime functioning and disability were quantified using symptom assessment tools, measuring fatigue (Chalder Fatigue Scale), sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale), cognitive functioning (Trail Making Test, Cognitive Failures Questionnaire), and mood (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). Hierarchical Regressions demonstrated that a shorter time since diagnosis, higher depression and longer wake time after sleep onset predicted 23.4% of the variance in fatigue severity (p naps predicted 25.6% of the variance in objective cognitive dysfunction (p napping predicted 32.2% of the variance in subjective cognitive dysfunction (p naps, those who mainly napped in the afternoon, and those with higher levels of anxiety, were more likely to be in the moderately sleepy group. Napping, particularly in the afternoon is associated with poorer cognitive functioning and more daytime sleepiness in CFS. These findings have clinical implications for symptom management strategies.

  19. Associations among daytime sleepiness, depression and suicidal ideation in Korean adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Boksun; Choe, Kwisoon; Park, Youngrye; Kang, Youngmi

    2017-06-09

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of daytime sleepiness on depression and suicidal ideation in adolescent high-school students. A survey of 538 high school students aged 16-17 years attending two academic schools was conducted. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), the Beck Depression Inventory and the Scale for Suicide Ideation were used to assess subjects' daytime sleepiness, depression and suicidal ideation. The mean score for daytime sleepiness was 8.52, which indicates a sleep deficit. Significant positive correlations were found between daytime sleepiness and depression, between daytime sleepiness and suicidal ideation and between depression and suicidal ideation. Gender and depression were significant predictors of suicidal ideation, accounting for 48% of the variance in this measure. Depression acts as a mediator of the relationship between daytime sleepiness and suicidal ideation. High school students in Korea generally have insufficient sleep time and feel sleepy during the day; insufficient sleep during adolescence may be associated with depression and suicidal ideation.

  20. A novel approach to office blood pressure measurement: 30-minute office blood pressure vs daytime ambulatory blood pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wel, M.C. van der; Buunk, I.E.; Weel, C. van; Thien, Th.; Bakx, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Current office blood pressure measurement (OBPM) is often not executed according to guidelines and cannot prevent the white-coat effect. Serial, automated, oscillometric OBPM has the potential to overcome both these problems. We therefore developed a 30-minute OBPM method that we compared

  1. Self-absorption theory applied to rocket measurements of the nitric oxide (1, 0) gamma band in the daytime thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eparvier, F. G.; Barth, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the UV fluorescent emissions of the NO (1, 0) and (0, 1) gamma bands in the lower-thermospheric dayglow, made with a sounding rocket launched on March 7, 1989 from Poker Flat, Alaska, were analyzed. The resonant (1, 0) gamma band was found to be attenuated below an altitude of about 120 km. A self-absorption model based on Holstein transmission functions was developed for the resonant (1, 0) gamma band under varying conditions of slant column density and temperature and was applied for the conditions of the rocket flight. The results of the model agreed with the measured attenuation of the band, indicating the necessity of including self-absorption theory in the analysis of satellite and rocket limb data of NO.

  2. Reproducibility of single-subject functional connectivity measurements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anderson, J S; Ferguson, M A; Lopez-Larson, M; Yurgelun-Todd, D

    2011-01-01

    .... We collected data to characterize how much imaging time is necessary to obtain reproducible quantitative functional connectivity measurements needed for a reliable single-subject diagnostic test...

  3. Development of a daytime cloud and haze detection algorithm for Himawari-8 satellite measurements over central and eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Huazhe; Chen, Liangfu; Letu, Husi; Zhao, Meng; Li, Shenshen; Bao, Shanhu

    2017-03-01

    Cloud detection by passive satellite sensors is very challenging in hazy weather over China because the reflective characteristics of haze and clouds are very similar. Consequently, hazy areas tend to be mistaken as cloudy or clear areas by current cloud mask algorithms. The Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI) aboard Himawari-8 is a multispectral Earth observation sensor with high temporal and spatial resolutions. A cloud and haze detection algorithm for AHI measurements is urgently needed for monitoring atmospheric pollution and its transport over China. This study presents the new Himawari-8 Cloud and Haze Mask (HCHM) algorithm that classifies image pixels from central and eastern China into one of three categories: clear, cloudy, or hazy. Based on the observations that haze occurs near the ground and accumulates in low-elevation plains and basins while clouds form at high altitudes, the proposed HCHM algorithm incorporates altitude information to adjust the thresholds used in the selected threshold tests to separate haze and cloud pixels. We find that combining auxiliary digital elevation model data with traditional indicators, such as the R0.86/R0.64, R0.86/R1.6, and BT11-BT3.9, improves the accuracy of cloud and haze discrimination. The HCHM algorithm is applied to Himawari-8 observations from August 2015, November 2015, January 2016, and May 2016 and validated against the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation vertical feature mask results. The validation shows that the average leakage rate, false alarm rate, and haze missing rate of the HCHM algorithm are 3.95%, 5.88%, and 4.17%, respectively.

  4. Comparing subjective and objective measures of headgear compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Annemieke; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Hoogstraten, Johan; Prahl-Andersen, Birte; Kuitert, Rein

    2007-12-01

    Many studies have used subjective measures to examine patient compliance during orthodontic treatment. Objective measurement of compliance has been confined to only a few studies that used electronic timing devices built into removable appliances. Our aim in this study was to compare subjective and objective methods of measuring compliance with headgear wear. It was hypothesized that orthodontists, patients, and patients' parents overestimate compliance and report more wearing hours than the headgear timers indicate. Also, relationships between sex, age, treatment time, and headgear compliance were explored. A headgear timer device and 3 questionnaires were developed to assess compliance. The subjects were unaware that their headgear use was being measured. Significant differences between the estimates of orthodontists, patients, parents, and headgear timer scores were found. Also, there were differences regarding age and treatment time. Subjective measures might result in overestimation of compliance. This suggests that the use of an objective instrument to measure headgear compliance should be continued in future studies.

  5. Obstructive Sleep Apnea With Objective Daytime Sleepiness Is Associated With Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Rong; Li, Yun; Zhang, Jihui; Zhou, Junying; Sun, Yuanfeng; Tan, Lu; Li, Taomei; Wing, Yun-Kwok; Tang, Xiangdong

    2016-11-01

    Subjective daytime sleepiness is considered a significant risk factor of hypertension in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In this study, our goal was to examine the joint effect on hypertension of OSA and objective daytime sleepiness measured by the multiple sleep latency test (MSLT). A total of 1338 Chinese patients with OSA and 484 primary snorers were included in the study. All subjects underwent 1 night polysomnography followed by MSLT. The MSLT values were classified into 3 categories: >8 minutes, 5 to 8 minutes, and Hypertension was defined based either on direct blood pressure measures or on diagnosis by a physician. After controlling for confounders, OSA combined with MSLT of 5 to 8 minutes increased the odds of hypertension by 95% (odds ratio, 1.95; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-3.46), whereas OSA combined with MSLT hypertension by 111% (odds ratio, 2.11; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-3.31) compared with primary snorers with MSLT >8 minutes. In stratified analyses, the association of hypertension with MSLT in OSA patients was seen among both sexes, younger ages, both obese and nonobese patients, and patients with and without subjective excessive daytime sleepiness. We conclude that objective daytime sleepiness is associated with hypertension in patients with OSA. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. The association between daytime napping and cognitive functioning in chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe M Gotts

    Full Text Available The precise relationship between sleep and physical and mental functioning in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS has not been examined directly, nor has the impact of daytime napping. This study aimed to examine self-reported sleep in patients with CFS and explore whether sleep quality and daytime napping, specific patient characteristics (gender, illness length and levels of anxiety and depression, predicted daytime fatigue severity, levels of daytime sleepiness and cognitive functioning, all key dimensions of the illness experience.118 adults meeting the 1994 CDC case criteria for CFS completed a standardised sleep diary over 14 days. Momentary functional assessments of fatigue, sleepiness, cognition and mood were completed by patients as part of usual care. Levels of daytime functioning and disability were quantified using symptom assessment tools, measuring fatigue (Chalder Fatigue Scale, sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale, cognitive functioning (Trail Making Test, Cognitive Failures Questionnaire, and mood (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale.Hierarchical Regressions demonstrated that a shorter time since diagnosis, higher depression and longer wake time after sleep onset predicted 23.4% of the variance in fatigue severity (p <.001. Being male, higher depression and more afternoon naps predicted 25.6% of the variance in objective cognitive dysfunction (p <.001. Higher anxiety and depression and morning napping predicted 32.2% of the variance in subjective cognitive dysfunction (p <.001. When patients were classified into groups of mild and moderate sleepiness, those with longer daytime naps, those who mainly napped in the afternoon, and those with higher levels of anxiety, were more likely to be in the moderately sleepy group.Napping, particularly in the afternoon is associated with poorer cognitive functioning and more daytime sleepiness in CFS. These findings have clinical implications for symptom management strategies.

  7. Cultural influences on the measurement of subjective mental workload

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Addie; Widyanti, Ari

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive ergonomics is well entrenched in North American and most European work environments, where systems and products are designed with the capabilities and limitations of the user in mind. A prominent technique for analysing task demands is subjective mental workload measurement. Subjective

  8. Measuring human wellbeing in Pakistan: objective versus subjective indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Haq, Rashida

    2009-01-01

    The concern for measuring wellbeing objectively and subjectively is found in modern political philosophy. This study explores objective indicators versus subjective perceptions of human wellbeing in ranking of survey data for districts of Pakistan. Data used for the analysis is ‘The Pakistan Social and Living Standards Measurement Survey’ for the year 2006-07. The human wellbeing is examined in four domains: education, health, living conditions and economic situation. Principal component anal...

  9. Sleep, eating disorder symptoms, and daytime functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tromp, Marilou Dp; Donners, Anouk Amt; Garssen, Johan; Verster, Joris C

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between eating disorders, body mass index (BMI), sleep disorders, and daytime functioning. DESIGN: Survey. SETTING: The Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: N=574 Dutch young adults (18-35 years old). MEASUREMENTS: Participants completed a survey on eating and sleep

  10. Subjective Narcosis Assessment Scale: measuring the subjective experience of nitrogen narcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijk, Charles H; Meintjes, W A J

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of subjective experiences and objective measures of neuropsychological performance during hyperbaric exposure has received less attention in the literature, in part due to the shortage of available and appropriately standardized measures. This study aimed to describe the psychometric properties of a modified version of the Subjective High Assessment Scale when used in the hyperbaric context, by exploring internal reliability, factor structure, associations with psychological variables and simple cognitive delayed recall, and the effect of task focus on the recall of subjective experience. Seventy qualified divers completed dry hyperbaric chamber dives to 607.95 kPa, and completed ratings of their subjective experiences. Some also completed a delayed recall task and psychological measures prior to their dives. The scale displayed good internal consistency, with four meaningful factors emerging. It showed some significant but small associations with trait anxiety and transient mood states, and a small to moderate correlation with recall performance. There was no significant effect of task focus on self-report of subjective experiences. The modified scale, renamed the Subjective Narcosis Assessment Scale here, has useful psychometric properties, and promising potential for future use.

  11. [Objective and subjective measures of sleep of shift-working nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Mitsuhiro; Lee, Bumsuk; Tozato, Fusae; Gennai, Kazuko; Shiihara, Yasufumi

    2014-01-01

    To objectively evaluate sleep quality of shift-working nurses, we used an Actiwatch 2, a watch-like actigraphy device designed to measure sleep and wakefulness based on the amount of movement. Subjective sleep quality was also assessed using the St. Mary's Hospital Sleep Questionnaire. Nineteen shift-working nurses wore the Actiwatch 2 for 5 days. The monitoring began with 2 days of the morning shift, which were followed by a 16-hour night shift and a rest day. Sleep recordings were obtained four times: night sleep after the second morning shift ("sleep 1"), napping on the night shift ("nap 1"), daytime napping after the night shift ("nap 2") and night sleep after the night shift ("sleep 2"). Actiwatch 2 sleep measures include sleep onset latency, snooze time, sleep efficiency, and percent sleep. In addition, the perceived quality of sleep was obtained using five questions of the St. Mary's Hospital Sleep Questionnaire. Objective and subjective sleep quality were compared between different sleep/nap times: sleep 1 vs. sleep 2, and nap 1 vs. nap 2. Percent sleep of sleep 2 was higher than that of sleep 1. In almost all responses to the St. Mary's Hospital Sleep Questionnaire, the perceived quality of sleep on sleep 2 was better than those of sleep 1, and that of nap 2 was better than nap 1. A significant negative correlation was found between the perceived sleep quality of nap 2 and the characteristics of participants (age, number of children, and length of career). There were positive correlations between the perceived sleep quality of sleep and percent sleep, and between the perceived sleep quality of nap and sleep efficiency. Moreover, the perceived sleep quality of nap 2 tended to decrease in participants whose bedtime deviated from the mean value on morning shift days and the rest day. We found that perceived sleep quality is related to percent sleep, and that the perceived sleep quality of nap is related to sleep efficiency. The results suggest that improving

  12. Excessive Daytime Sleepiness in Stroke Survivors: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qinglan; Whittemore, Robin; Redeker, Nancy

    2016-07-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is a prevalent symptom among stroke survivors. This symptom is an independent risk factor for stroke and may reduce stroke survivors' quality of life, cognitive functioning, and daytime functional performance. The lack of a universally accepted definition of EDS makes it difficult to measure EDS and synthesize research. The purpose of this integrative review is to describe poststroke EDS, ascertain conceptual and operational definitions of EDS, identify factors that contribute to EDS in stroke survivors, and explore outcomes associated with EDS in stroke survivors. We searched the following databases: PubMed and MEDLINE (OvidSP 1946-April; Week 2, 2015), Embase (OvidSP 1974-March; Week 1, 2015), and PsycINFO (OvidSP 1967-April; Week 2, 2015). Our search yielded 340 articles, 27 of which met inclusion criteria. The literature reveals EDS to be a multidimensional construct that is operationalized with both subjective and objective measures. Choosing measures that can quantify both the objective and subjective components is useful for gaining a comprehensive understanding of EDS. The antecedents of EDS are stroke, sleep-disordered breathing, reversed Robin Hood syndrome, and depression. The outcomes associated with EDS in stroke patients are serious and negative. Via synthesis of this research, we propose a possible framework for poststroke EDS, which may be of use in clinical practice and in research to identify valid quantifying methods for EDS as well as to prevent harmful outcomes in stroke survivors. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Comparing subjective and objective measures of headgear compliance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, A.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Hoogstraten, J.; Prahl-Andersen, B.; Kuitert, R.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Many studies have used subjective measures to examine patient compliance during orthodontic treatment. Objective measurement of compliance has been confined to only a few studies that used electronic timing devices built into removable appliances. Our aim in this study was to compare

  14. Simuluating quantum many-body systems subject to measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelmark, Søren

    We demonstrate how to simulate both discrete and continuous stochastic evolutions of a quantum many-body system subject to measurements using matrix product states. A particular, but generally applicable, measurement model is analyzed and a simple representation in terms of matrix product operators...

  15. Simulating quantum many-body systems subject to measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelmark, Søren

    We demonstrate how to simulate both discrete and continuous stochastic evolutions of a quantum many-body system subject to measurements using matrix product states. A particular, but generally applicable, measurement model is analyzed and a simple representation in terms of matrix product operators...

  16. Optimizing measurement of subjective amplitude of accommodation with defocus curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Navneet; Wolffsohn, James S W; Naroo, Shehzad A

    2008-08-01

    To determine whether letter sequences and/or lens-presentation order should be randomized when measuring defocus curves and to assess the most appropriate criterion for calculating the subjective amplitude of accommodation (AoA) from defocus curves. Eye Clinic, School of Life & Health Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham, United Kingdom. Defocus curves (from +3.00 diopters [D] to -3.00 D in 0.50 D steps) for 6 possible combinations of randomized or nonrandomized letter sequences and/or lens-presentation order were measured in a random order in 20 presbyopic subjects. Subjective AoA was calculated from the defocus curves by curve fitting using various published criteria, and each was correlated to subjective push-up AoA. Objective AoA was measured for comparison of blur tolerance and pupil size. Randomization of lens-presentation order and/or letter sequences, or lack of, did not affect the measured defocus curves (P >.05, analysis of variance). The range of defocus that maintains highest achievable visual acuity (allowing for variability of repeated measurement) was better correlated to (r = 0.84) and agreed best with (+/-0.50 D) subjective push-up AoA than any other relative or absolute acuity criterion used in previous studies. Nonrandomized letters and lens presentation on their own did not affect subjective AoA measured by defocus curves, although their combination should be avoided. Quantification of subjective AoA from defocus curves should be standardized to the range of defocus that maintains the best achievable visual acuity.

  17. Subjective Sleep Measures in Children: Self-Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Andrea M; Bashore, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) recently published a consensus statement on the recommended number of hours of sleep in infants and children. The AASM expert panel identified seven health categories in children influenced by sleep duration, a component of sleep quality. For optimal health and general function, children require a certain number of hours of sleep each night. Limited data exist to subjectively assess sleep in this population. Practitioners must evaluate overall sleep quality not simply sleep duration. The purpose of this article is to provide a mini-review of the self-report sleep measures used in children. The authors individually completed a review of the literature for this article via an independent review followed by collaborative discussion. The subjective measures included in this mini-review have been used in children, but not all measures have reported psychometrics. Several tools included in this mini-review measure subjective sleep in children but with limited reliabilities or only preliminary psychometrics. Accurate measurement of self-reported sleep in children is critical to identify sleep problems in this population and further detect associated health problems. Ongoing studies are warranted to establish reliable and valid measures of self-reported sleep in children to accurately detect health problems associated with poor sleep quality. This mini-review of the literature is an important first step to identify the most reliable subjective sleep measures in children.

  18. A measure of subjective happiness: Preliminary reliability and construct validation

    OpenAIRE

    Lyubomirsky, S; Lepper, HS

    1999-01-01

    Using a 'subjectivist' approach to the assessment of happiness, a new 4-item measure of global subjective happiness was developed and validated in 14 studies with a total of 2 732 participants. Data was collected in the United States from students on two college campuses and one high school campus, from community adults in two California cities, and from older adults. Students and community adults in Moscow, Russia also participated in this research. Results indicated that the Subjective Happ...

  19. On the relationship between subjective and objective measures of fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völker, Ina; Kirchner, Christine; Bock, Otmar Leo

    2016-09-01

    Objective and subjective methods have been used in the past to assess workplace fatigue, but little is known about correlations between them. We examine correlations between subjective and objective measures, including measures collected in a workplace scenario. 15 young and 17 older participants were assessed before and after work with four types of fatigue measure: objective physical (posturography), objective mental (psychomotor vigilance task), subjective physical and mental (self-assessment), objective and subjective realistic (oculomotor behaviour, observer-rated facial expression, typing performance). Pre- and post-test scores were analysed with an ANOVA, significant differences were submitted to a factor analysis. It yielded three factors: one representing posturography, the second self-rated mental and physical fatigue and the third observer-rated facial expression. Results advocate the existence of three independent fatigue components: Objective physical fatigue, introspective and extrospective fatigue. Practitioner Summary: This study analyses correlations between different subjective and objective fatigue markers to better understand the complex nature of workplace fatigue. Measurements were conducted directly at the workplace. Results reveal that fatigue comprises three independent fatigue components: Objective physical fatigue, introspective and extrospective fatigue.

  20. Comparing perceptual judgment and subjective measures of spatial awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Matthew L; Bass, Ellen J

    2009-07-01

    Spatial awareness is important in domains where safety hinges on human operators keeping track of the relative locations of objects in the environment. While a variety of subjective and judgment-based measures have been used to evaluate spatial awareness, none have probed all three of its levels: (1) identification of environmental objects, (2) their current locations relative to the operator, and (3) their relative positions over time. This work compares new judgment-based measures of spatial awareness that probe all three levels of spatial awareness to conventional subjective measures. In the evaluation of 14 configurations of Synthetic Vision Systems head down displays (seven terrain textures and two Geometric Fields of View (GFOVs)), 18 pilots made four types of judgments (relative angle, distance, height, and abeam time) regarding the location of terrain points displayed in 112 5-s, non-interactive simulations. They also provided subjective demand, awareness, clutter, SA-SWORD, and preferred GFOV measures. Correlation analyses revealed that displays that received higher awareness and SA-SWORD subjective ratings were associated with smaller errors in abeam time judgments and, for SA-SWORD, smaller errors in relative distance judgments. Thus SA-SWORD provides insight into level 2 spatial awareness and both SA-SWORD and awareness provide insight into level 3 spatial awareness. ANOVA and chi(2) analyses revealed comparable results between display configurations that produced the minimum error in judgments and those recommended by the awareness, SA-SWORD, and preferred GFOV measures.

  1. Reproducibility of single-subject functional connectivity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J S; Ferguson, M A; Lopez-Larson, M; Yurgelun-Todd, D

    2011-03-01

    Measurements of resting-state functional connectivity have increasingly been used for characterization of neuropathologic and neurodevelopmental populations. We collected data to characterize how much imaging time is necessary to obtain reproducible quantitative functional connectivity measurements needed for a reliable single-subject diagnostic test. We obtained 100 five-minute BOLD scans on a single subject, divided into 10 sessions of 10 scans each, with the subject at rest or while watching video clips of cartoons. These data were compared with resting-state BOLD scans from 36 healthy control subjects by evaluating the correlation between each pair of 64 small spheric regions of interest obtained from a published functional brain parcellation. Single-subject and group data converged to reliable estimates of individual and population connectivity values proportional to 1 / sqrt(n). Dramatic improvements in reliability were seen by using ≤25 minutes of imaging time, with smaller improvements for additional time. Functional connectivity "fingerprints" for the individual and population began diverging at approximately 15 minutes of imaging time, with increasing reliability even at 4 hours of imaging time. Twenty-five minutes of BOLD imaging time was required before any individual connections could reliably discriminate an individual from a group of healthy control subjects. A classifier discriminating scans during which our subject was resting or watching cartoons was 95% accurate at 10 minutes and 100% accurate at 15 minutes of imaging time. An individual subject and control population converged to reliable different functional connectivity profiles that were task-modulated and could be discriminated with sufficient imaging time.

  2. Objective and subjective measures of vergence step responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jainta, S; Hoormann, J; Jaschinski, W

    2007-12-01

    Dichoptic nonius lines are used for subjectively (psychophysically) measuring vergence states, but they have been questioned as valid indicators of vergence eye position. In a mirror-stereoscope, we presented convergent and divergent step-stimuli and estimated the vergence response with nonius lines flashed at fixed delays after the disparity step stimulus. For each delay, an adaptive psychophysical procedure was run to determine the physical nonius offset required for subjective alignment; these vergence states were compared with objective eye movement recordings. Between both measures of initial vergence, we calculated the maximal cross-correlation coefficient: the median in our sample was about 0.9 for convergence and divergence, suggesting a good agreement. Relative to the objective measures, the subjective method revealed a smaller vergence velocity and a larger vergence response in the final phase of the response, but both measures were well correlated. The dynamic nonius test is therefore considered to be useful to relatively evaluate a subject's ability in disparity vergence.

  3. Vehicle handling: relationships between subjective and objective measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, R.M.A.F.; Hogema, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    TNO Human Factors and TNO Automotive are investigating relationships between subjective and objective measures in the area of vehicle handling. This paper presents a driving simulator study and a field experiment in which these relationships were investigated. First, in the driving simulator

  4. Comparing objective and subjective error measures for color constancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, M.P.; Gijsenij, A.; Gevers, T.

    2008-01-01

    We compare an objective and a subjective performance measure for color constancy algorithms. Eight hyper-spectral images were rendered under a neutral reference illuminant and four chromatic illuminants (Red, Green, Yellow, Blue). The scenes rendered under the chromatic illuminants were color

  5. Subjective Quality Measurement of Speech Its Evaluation, Estimation and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kondo, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    It is becoming crucial to accurately estimate and monitor speech quality in various ambient environments to guarantee high quality speech communication. This practical hands-on book shows speech intelligibility measurement methods so that the readers can start measuring or estimating speech intelligibility of their own system. The book also introduces subjective and objective speech quality measures, and describes in detail speech intelligibility measurement methods. It introduces a diagnostic rhyme test which uses rhyming word-pairs, and includes: An investigation into the effect of word familiarity on speech intelligibility. Speech intelligibility measurement of localized speech in virtual 3-D acoustic space using the rhyme test. Estimation of speech intelligibility using objective measures, including the ITU standard PESQ measures, and automatic speech recognizers.

  6. The impact of sleep restriction on daytime movement in typically developing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Abbey; Gendron, Melissa; Vriend, Jennifer; Davidson, Fiona; Corkum, Penny

    2016-03-01

    The current study investigated the link between poor sleep and ADHD symptomatology. The effects of extending versus restricting sleep on subjective (questionnaires) and objective (actigraphy) measures of daytime movement were examined in 25 typically developing children aged 8-12 years. Subjective measures demonstrated an increase in ADHD symptomology following sleep restriction, with follow-up analyses indicating that findings were due to poorer attention, not changes in hyperactivity. The results of actigraphy data indicated that there were no differences found for mean or median daytime activity, but the standard deviation of activity was found to be significantly higher following sleep restriction. Contrary to the popular belief that sleep restriction results in increased overall activity, this study instead found an increase in variability of activity. This suggests that a sleep-restricted child's activity level may appear as alternating periods of high and low activity levels throughout the day.

  7. How Objective Are Subjective Measures of Organizational Innovativeness, Really?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja Klimas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper aims to match subjective and objective measures of organizational innovativeness and test correlative relationship between the two. Methodology: The research adopts a quantitative approach, and applies correlation analysis to identify interdependencies. The study has been done in the aviation industry, as organizational innovativeness has so far been described especially in high-tech industries – however it has not been investigated within aviation industry yet. Findings: The results show that the discussions over reliability of research based on subjective measurements techniques are not unfounded. The evidence suggests that subjective measures are not correlated with objective measures, and the outcomes of third-party investigations differ considerably. Therefore decisions about measurements techniques should be deliberate, thought out, theoretically grounded and justifi ed. In general, methodological recommendations provided by this paper could be boiled down to the ascertainment that accurate and reliable assessment of organizational innovativeness should use a set of objective measures addressing all stages of the innovation process. Originality: It should be noted that this study was restricted to only one industry and prone to some common bias. The aviation industry sample was relatively small and purposefully selected, disallowing conclusive statements made outside of this empirical setting. However despite the limitations this paper provides some significant contribution to evaluation and research on innovativeness. It compares two approaches to measurement and empirically proves which approach is more suitable in case of such a highly innovation-intensive sector like aviation. Moreover, it introduces a new in Polish research tool for subjective assessment of organizational innovativeness namely the questionnaire developed by Wang and Ahmed (2004.

  8. Family Medicine in Croatia: Quality Measured by Patients’ Subjective Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Stanić, Arsen; Stevanović, Ranko; Pristaš, Ivan; Tiljak, Hrvoje; Benković, Vanesa; Krčmar, Nevenka; Jovanović, Aleksandar; Jurlina, Nataša; Nott, Teodora

    2007-01-01

    A survey of the subjective assessment of quality in the fi eld of family medicine was conducted on a random sample of 50 family medicine teams distributed proportionally across all Croatian counties, and both rural and urban areas. It measured the satisfaction of insurants/patients, i.e. healthcare service users, on the basis of the completed EUROPEP questionnaire. The survey included 7.271 respondents (the response rate to 15.000 distributed questionnaires was 48.47%). O...

  9. Evaluation of aerodynamic stability and a trial study of construction-accuracy control by daytime measurement of Meiko West Bridge; Meiko Nishi Ohashi no taifusei kento to chukan keisoku kekka wo mochiita kasetsu seido kanri no shiko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, C.; Shimodoi, H.; Isoe, A.; Sakai, Y.; Ochiai, M.; Watabe, T.; Ebihara, R. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    1998-12-20

    The new Meiko West Bridge was constructed very closely to the phase I line bridge which have been already in a service from 1985, and the distance of this world unique parallel cable-stayed bridges is 50m. The length, span and pylon height of these bridges are identical. By conducting wind tunnel experiments considering the aerodynamic interference of the close parallel bridges, the aerodynamic stability of the bridge had been confirmed during construction as well as complete state. After the construction was completed, the important wind characteristics of the parallel cable-stayed bridges were obtained from the site observation. Regarding cable vibrations, a common problem with cable-stayed bridges, a suitable vibration suppression method was applied based on the site observation. In general, the construction-accuracy control is performed by doing measurement at night However, to study the possibility of the accuracy-control by daytime measurement the measurement was conducted not only at night but also in the daytime. (author)

  10. Executive function in fibromyalgia: Comparing subjective and objective measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelonch, Olga; Garolera, Maite; Valls, Joan; Rosselló, Lluís; Pifarré, Josep

    2016-04-01

    There is evidence to suggest the existence of an executive dysfunction in people diagnosed with fibromyalgia, although there are certain inconsistencies between studies. Here, we aim to compare executive performance between patients with fibromyalgia and a control group by using subjective and objective cognitive tests, analyzing the influence of patient mood on the results obtained, and studying associations between the two measures. 82 patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia and 42 healthy controls, matched by age and years of education, were assessed using the Behavioral Rating Inventory of Executive Function - Adult Version (BRIEF-A) as a subjective measure of executive functioning. A selection of objective cognitive tests were also used to measure a series of executive functions and to identify symptoms of depression and anxiety. Patients with fibromyalgia perceived greater difficulties than the control group on all of the BRIEF-A scales. However, after adjustments were made for depression and anxiety the only differences that remained were those associated with the working memory scale and the Metacognition and Global Executive Composite index. In the case of the objective cognitive tests, a significantly worse overall performance was evidenced for the fibromyalgia patients. However, this also disappeared when adjustments were made for depression and anxiety. After this adjustment, fibromyalgia patients only performed significantly worse for the interference effect in the Stroop Test. Although there were no significant associations between most of the objective cognitive tests and the BRIEF-A scales, depression and anxiety exhibited strong associations with almost all of the BRIEF-A scales and with several of the objective cognitive tests. Patients with fibromyalgia showed executive dysfunction in subjective and objective measures, although most of this impairment was associated with mood disturbances. Exceptions to this general rule were observed in the

  11. Effects of music during daytime rest in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Isabella P; Langhorn, Leanne; Dreyer, Pia

    2017-11-20

    Sleep is essential to the recovery of patients in the intensive care unit. Patients in the intensive care unit frequently experience poor sleep, characterized by sleep deprivation, sleep fragmentation and abnormal sleep architecture. Factors affecting sleep are multifactorial. To investigate the effects of music on self-reported quality of sleep during daytime rest among patients in the intensive care unit. A randomized controlled trial. The study was conducted between February and April 2016 in two Danish multidisciplinary intensive care units. The study sample consisted of 37 patients (19 in the control group and 18 in the intervention group) who complied with the criteria of inclusion for the study. Patients were randomly assigned to either an intervention group or a control group. The intervention group listened to music for 30 min during daytime rest while the control group rested without music. The Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire was used to measure the subjective quality of sleep. Significant differences in the mean scores of the subjective quality of sleep were found between the intervention group and the control group (p music during daytime rest improves subjective sleep in patients in the intensive care unit. Furthermore, there are indications that listening to music reduces the subjective experience of noise in some patients. The result of this study implies that music can be an effective practice for nurses to improve sleep among patients in the intensive care unit. © 2017 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  12. On the psychophysics of workload - Why bother with subjective measures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopher, D.; Braune, R.

    1984-01-01

    Psychophysical functions describe the relationship between variations in the amplitude of a defined physical quantity and the psychological perception of these changes. Examples are brightness, loudness, and pain. The regularities of these relationships have been formulated into psychophysical laws. The measurement methodology of psychophysical scaling has been refined by the Harvard group led by Stevens (1957 and 1966), who proposed a power function as a general form for such laws. It is argued here that a similar scaling approach can be adapted to the measurement of workload and task demands based upon subjective estimates. The rationale is that these estimates, like other psychophysical judgments, reflect the individual's perception of the amount of processing resources that the subject invests to meet the demand imposed by a task. This approach was successfully applied to the assessment of 21 experimental conditions given to a group of 60 subjects. The paper discusses the main results of this effort and their implications to theory and application in human performance.

  13. Sleep, eating disorder symptoms, and daytime functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tromp MD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Marilou DP Tromp,1 Anouk AMT Donners,1 Johan Garssen,1,2 Joris C Verster1,31Division of Pharmacology, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands; 2Nutricia Research, Utrecht, the Netherlands; 3Center for Human Psychopharmacology, Swinburne University, Melbourne, VIC, AustraliaObjective: To investigate the relationship between eating disorders, body mass index (BMI, sleep disorders, and daytime functioning.Design: Survey.Setting: The Netherlands.Participants: N=574 Dutch young adults (18–35 years old.Measurements: Participants completed a survey on eating and sleep habits including the Eating Disorder Screen for Primary care (ESP and SLEEP-50 questionnaire subscales for sleep apnea, insomnia, circadian rhythm disorder (CRD, and daytime functioning. SLEEP-50 outcomes of participants who screened negative (≤2 and positive (>2 on the ESP were compared. In addition, SLEEP-50 scores of groups of participants with different ESP scores (0–4 and different BMI groups (ie, underweight, healthy weight, overweight, and obese were compared using nonparametric statistics.Results: Almost 12% (n=67 of participants screened positive for having an eating disorder. Relative to participants without eating disorders, participants who screened positive for eating disorders reported significantly higher scores on sleep apnea (3.7 versus 2.9, P=0.012, insomnia (7.7 versus 5.5, P<0.0001, CRD (2.9 versus 2.3, P=0.011, and impairment of daytime functioning (8.8 versus 5.8, P=0.0001. ESP scores were associated with insomnia (r=0.117, P=0.005, sleep apnea (r=0.118, P=0.004, sleep quality (r=−0.104, P=0.012, and daytime functioning (r=0.225, P<0.0001, but not with CRD (r=0.066, P=0.112. BMI correlated significantly with ESP scores (r=0.172, P<0.0001 and scores on sleep apnea (r=0.171, P<0.0001. When controlling for BMI, the partial correlation between ESP and sleep apnea remained significant (r=0.10, P=0.015.Conclusion

  14. Subjective relevance of objective measures for spatial impression (A)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Lily M.; Gade, Anders Christian

    2000-01-01

    Several objective measures have been proposed to describe the feeling of spatial impression in concert halls, including Lateral Energy Fraction (LF) and Interaural Cross-Correlation Coefficient (IACC). However, previous studies have shown that LF and IACC values did not highly correlate with each...... generated by the room acoustics simulation program ODEON, using four different musical motifs, and were presented to test subjects via headphones. Results from the experiments are presented. [Work supported by ASA Hunt Postdoctoral Research Fellowship.]...... other at individual seat positions in real halls [J. S. Bradley, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 96, 3525–3535 (1994)]. To investigate the listener envelopment aspect of spatial impression further, subjective paired-comparison tests have been run using signals which have various values for LF, early IACC (from 5...

  15. The effect of narrowband 500 nm light on daytime sleep in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Elizabeth M; Gorman, Michael R; Mednick, Sara C

    2011-05-03

    Naps frequently take place during the daytime under some ambient light. People are commonly advised to wear eyeshades, or use black-out curtains while sleeping, as light is thought to inhibit sleep. Little is known, however, about how light during daytime sleep may affect the quality or architecture of that sleep. The present within-subjects design administered green narrowband light via light masks to 17 young adults (23.2 ± 4.7 years) during four 90-minute afternoon naps. Subjects were exposed to each of four light conditions that approximate the intensity of 1) physiological darkness (~0 lx), 2) moonlight (~1 lx), 3) typical indoor lighting (~80 lx) and 4) indirect outdoor light (~6400 lx). All subjects were able to sleep in all lighting conditions, with no differences in sleep quality or architecture. Power analysis revealed sufficient power to detect meaningful differences. Sleep inertia measured upon waking showed a general effect of the nap, independent of condition. Although light has various alerting effects at night, 500 nm LED light presented via light mask does not appear to inhibit daytime sleep. The finding that this light had no effect on the ability of individuals to fall asleep or stay asleep during an afternoon nap may inform decisions regarding the use of the nap as a facilitator of schedule adjustment, and challenges the assumption of light as a barrier to napping. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Vega Encabo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I claim that subjectivity is a way of being that is constituted through a set of practices in which the self is subject to the dangers of fictionalizing and plotting her life and self-image. I examine some ways of becoming subject through narratives and through theatrical performance before others. Through these practices, a real and active subjectivity is revealed, capable of self-knowledge and self-transformation. 

  17. Shift Work: Improving Daytime Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Good daytime sleep is possible, though, if shift work is a necessary part of your work life. To promote better sleep during the day: ... Take naps. Napping late in the day before work might help you make up your sleep debt. ...

  18. Daytime naps, motor memory consolidation and regionally specific sleep spindles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Nishida

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Increasing evidence demonstrates that motor-skill memories improve across a night of sleep, and that non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep commonly plays a role in orchestrating these consolidation enhancements. Here we show the benefit of a daytime nap on motor memory consolidation and its relationship not simply with global sleep-stage measures, but unique characteristics of sleep spindles at regionally specific locations; mapping to the corresponding memory representation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two groups of subjects trained on a motor-skill task using their left hand - a paradigm known to result in overnight plastic changes in the contralateral, right motor cortex. Both groups trained in the morning and were tested 8 hr later, with one group obtaining a 60-90 minute intervening midday nap, while the other group remained awake. At testing, subjects that did not nap showed no significant performance improvement, yet those that did nap expressed a highly significant consolidation enhancement. Within the nap group, the amount of offline improvement showed a significant correlation with the global measure of stage-2 NREM sleep. However, topographical sleep spindle analysis revealed more precise correlations. Specifically, when spindle activity at the central electrode of the non-learning hemisphere (left was subtracted from that in the learning hemisphere (right, representing the homeostatic difference following learning, strong positive relationships with offline memory improvement emerged-correlations that were not evident for either hemisphere alone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate that motor memories are dynamically facilitated across daytime naps, enhancements that are uniquely associated with electrophysiological events expressed at local, anatomically discrete locations of the brain.

  19. Neurobehavioral Performance Impairment in Insomnia: Relationships with Self-Reported Sleep and Daytime Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekleton, Julia A.; Flynn-Evans, Erin E.; Miller, Belinda; Epstein, Lawrence J.; Kirsch, Douglas; Brogna, Lauren A.; Burke, Liza M.; Bremer, Erin; Murray, Jade M.; Gehrman, Philip; Lockley, Steven W.; Rajaratnam, Shantha M. W.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Despite the high prevalence of insomnia, daytime consequences of the disorder are poorly characterized. This study aimed to identify neurobehavioral impairments associated with insomnia, and to investigate relationships between these impairments and subjective ratings of sleep and daytime dysfunction. Design: Cross-sectional, multicenter study. Setting: Three sleep laboratories in the USA and Australia. Patients: Seventy-six individuals who met the Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC) for Primary Insomnia, Psychophysiological Insomnia, Paradoxical Insomnia, and/or Idiopathic Childhood Insomnia (44F, 35.8 ± 12.0 years [mean ± SD]) and 20 healthy controls (14F, 34.8 ± 12.1 years). Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Participants completed a 7-day sleep-wake diary, questionnaires assessing daytime dysfunction, and a neurobehavioral test battery every 60-180 minutes during an afternoon/evening sleep laboratory visit. Included were tasks assessing sustained and switching attention, working memory, subjective sleepiness, and effort. Switching attention and working memory were significantly worse in insomnia patients than controls, while no differences were found for simple or complex sustained attention tasks. Poorer sustained attention in the control, but not the insomnia group, was significantly associated with increased subjective sleepiness. In insomnia patients, poorer sustained attention performance was associated with reduced health-related quality of life and increased insomnia severity. Conclusions: We found that insomnia patients exhibit deficits in higher level neurobehavioral functioning, but not in basic attention. The findings indicate that neurobehavioral deficits in insomnia are due to neurobiological alterations, rather than sleepiness resulting from chronic sleep deficiency. Citation: Shekleton JA; Flynn-Evans EE; Miller B; Epstein LJ; Kirsch D; Brogna LA; Burke LM; Cremer E; Murray JM; Gehrman P; Lockley SW; Rajaratnam SMW

  20. Daytime sleepiness and sleep quality among Malaysian medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zailinawati, A H; Teng, C L; Chung, Y C; Teow, T L; Lee, P N; Jagmohni, K S

    2009-06-01

    Poor sleep quality and daytime somnolence is reported to be associated with cardiovascular events, road traffic accident, poor academic performance and psychological distress. Some studies documented that it is prevalent in most populations but its frequency among medical students has not been documented in Malaysia. This is a self-administered questionnaire survey of medical students from International Medical University, Malaysia. Daytime sleepiness of medical students was assessed using Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Student scoring ESS > 11 was regarded as having excessive daytime sleepiness. Psychological distress was measured using 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). A total of 799 medical students participated in this survey (response rate 69.5%). Daytime sleepiness occurred in 35.5%, psychological distress was present in 41.8% and 16.1% reported bad sleep quality. Daytime sleepiness was significantly more common among the clinical students, those with self-reported bad sleep quality and psychological distress; but unrelated to the number of hours sleep at night. We have documented high prevalence of daytime sleepiness, poor sleep quality and psychological distress. Higher frequency among clinical students and the significant relationship with psychological distress suggest possible link to the stressful clinical training.

  1. Measuring Subjective Happiness by Newly Developed Scale in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Abachizadeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Happiness as one of the main positive health indicators has drawn more attention in recent years among policy makers and health system managers. There are few studies performed to measure happiness in population-based settings in Iran. In response to this need, our study tends to assess Iranians subjective happiness in Tehran, Capital city of Iran.Materials and Methods: Present study was conducted in Tehran, Capital of Iran, with more than 7 Million populations in January 2013, using a two-step approach. In first step c conceptual framework of Iranians’ happiness was developed. In the second phase of study, a survey recruiting 700 participants was conducted. Stratified cluster sampling method was employed. Participants were recruited from all the 22 municipal divisions of Tehran as strata, proportional to the population size and its gender and age distribution. Happiness was measure by a 40-item questionnaire with scores ranged among 40 to 200.Results: Conceptual framework of Iranians’ happiness based on reviewed documents and consensus building process was the product of first step. At second step, from a pool of 700 persons, 696 (97% agreed to participate and filled out the questionnaire completely.  The mean of happiness score was 143.9 (95% confidence interval, 142.5 to 145.4. The results show that the happiness score of jobless people (135.1, 95%CI: 128.1-142.0 and widowed singles (126.6, 95%CI: 113.0-140.2 were significantly lower than other corresponding groups. There was no significant association between gender, age group, educational level as determinants and happiness.Conclusion: Happiness level of Tehranians is somewhat higher than the moderate level. This finding is consistent with findings of other conducted studies in country. However, it is not consistent with some of international reports of happiness, For instance, Happy Planet Index. Due to inadequate information, it is necessary to conduct more research to

  2. Predictors of Increased Daytime Sleepiness in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Enz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD suffer from increased daytime sleepiness. The aim of this study was to identify potential predictors of subjective daytime sleepiness with special regard to sleep-related breathing disorder and nocturnal activity. Methods. COPD patients were recruited at the University Hospital Basel, Switzerland. COPD risk groups A–D were determined according to spirometry and COPD Assessment Test (CAT. Breathing disorder evaluation was performed with the ApneaLink device. Nocturnal energy expenditure was measured with the SenseWear Mini Armband. Subjective daytime sleepiness was recorded using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS. Results. Twenty-two patients (36% were in COPD risk group A, 28 patients (45% in risk group B, and 12 patients (19% in risk groups C + D (n=62. Eleven patients (18% had a pathological ESS ≥ 10/24. ESS correlated positively with CAT (r=0.386, p<0.01 and inversely with age (r=-0.347, p<0.01. In multiple linear regression age (β=-0.254, p<0.05, AHI (β=0.287, p<0.05 and CAT score (β=0.380, p<0.01 were independent predictors of ESS, while nocturnal energy expenditure showed no significant association (p=0.619. Conclusion. These findings provide evidence that daytime sleepiness in COPD patients may partly be attributable to nocturnal respiratory disturbances and it seems to mostly affect younger patients with more severe COPD symptoms.

  3. Biases and power for groups comparison on subjective health measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Hamel

    Full Text Available Subjective health measurements are increasingly used in clinical research, particularly for patient groups comparisons. Two main types of analytical strategies can be used for such data: so-called classical test theory (CTT, relying on observed scores and models coming from Item Response Theory (IRT relying on a response model relating the items responses to a latent parameter, often called latent trait. Whether IRT or CTT would be the most appropriate method to compare two independent groups of patients on a patient reported outcomes measurement remains unknown and was investigated using simulations. For CTT-based analyses, groups comparison was performed using t-test on the scores. For IRT-based analyses, several methods were compared, according to whether the Rasch model was considered with random effects or with fixed effects, and the group effect was included as a covariate or not. Individual latent traits values were estimated using either a deterministic method or by stochastic approaches. Latent traits were then compared with a t-test. Finally, a two-steps method was performed to compare the latent trait distributions, and a Wald test was performed to test the group effect in the Rasch model including group covariates. The only unbiased IRT-based method was the group covariate Wald's test, performed on the random effects Rasch model. This model displayed the highest observed power, which was similar to the power using the score t-test. These results need to be extended to the case frequently encountered in practice where data are missing and possibly informative.

  4. Which diagnostic findings in disorders with excessive daytime sleepiness are really helpful? A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretzschmar, Ute; Werth, Esther; Sturzenegger, Christian; Khatami, Ramin; Bassetti, Claudio L; Baumann, Christian R

    2016-06-01

    Due to extensive clinical and electrophysiological overlaps, the correct diagnosis of disorders with excessive daytime sleepiness is often challenging. The aim of this study was to provide diagnostic measures that help discriminating such disorders, and to identify parameters, which don't. In this single-center study, we retrospectively identified consecutive treatment-naïve patients who suffered from excessive daytime sleepiness, and analyzed clinical and electrophysiological measures in those patients in whom a doubtless final diagnosis could be made. Of 588 patients, 287 reported subjective excessive daytime sleepiness. Obstructive sleep apnea is the only disorder that could be identified by polysomnography alone. The diagnosis of insufficient sleep syndrome relies on actigraphy as patients underestimate their sleep need and the disorder shares several clinical and electrophysiological properties with both narcolepsy type 1 and idiopathic hypersomnia. Sleep stage sequencing on MSLT appears helpful to discriminate between insufficient sleep syndrome and narcolepsy. Sleep inertia is a strong indicator for idiopathic hypersomnia. There are no distinctive electrophysiological findings for the diagnosis of restless legs syndrome. Altogether, EDS disorders are common in neurological sleep laboratories, but usually cannot be diagnosed based on PSG and MSLT findings alone. The diagnostic value of actigraphy recordings can hardly be overestimated. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  5. Daytime sleep and performance following a zolpidem and melatonin cocktail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesensten, Nancy Jo; Balkin, Thomas J; Reichardt, Rebecca M; Kautz, Mary A; Saviolakis, George A; Belenky, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    Pharmacologic enhancement of daytime sleep may help sustain optimal cognitive performance. At effective doses, zolpidem induces sleep but also impairs performance. Combining melatonin with low-dose zolpidem may promote daytime sleep without exacerbating performance impairments seen with high-dose zolpidem alone. Following an 8-hour undisturbed nighttime sleep period, 80 subjects (50 men, 30 women) were administered oral zolpidem 0, 5, 10, or 20 mg at 10:00 am (n = 20 per group) and then oral melatonin 0 or 5 mg at 10:30 am (thus, n = 10 per drug combination) in a double-blind randomized fashion. Subjects napped from 10:00 am to 11:30 am, at which time they were awakened and cognitive tests administered (Restricted Reminding, Paired-Associates, and Psychomotor Vigilance). A second nap ensued from 12:45 pm to 4:00 pm, followed immediately by further testing. Melatonin 5 mg plus zolpidem 0 mg enhanced daytime sleep (P .05). Zolpidem 20 mg plus melatonin 0 mg also enhanced daytime sleep (albeit nonsignificantly), but memory and vigilance were impaired (P sleep-promoting effects were not evident until the second nap. No advantages to administering melatonin plus zolpidem "cocktails" were evident. Unlike zolpidem, melatonin 5 mg alone improved daytime sleep without impairing memory and vigilance. Functional coupling of sleep-inducing and memory-impairing effects may be specific to benzodiazepine-receptor agonists such as zolpidem, suggesting potential advantages to using melatonin in the operational environment. That melatonin's sleep-promoting effects were delayed for several hours presents a practical consideration that may limit melatonin's usefulness when daytime sleep periods cannot be reliably anticipated or planned in advance.

  6. Nocturnal loss and daytime source of nitrous acid through reactive uptake and displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenboer, Trevor C.; Young, Cora J.; Talukdar, Ranajit K.; Markovic, Milos Z.; Brown, Steven S.; Roberts, James M.; Murphy, Jennifer G.

    2015-01-01

    The nature of daytime sources and night-time sinks of nitrous acid is a key uncertainty in understanding atmospheric oxidation and radical cycling. The accumulation of nitrous acid in the air has been observed to slow down during the night, implying the presence of a night-time sink. In addition, there may be a photochemical source of nitrous acid during the daytime. We used flow tube experiments, measurements of acid displacement efficiencies, and field monitoring of nitrous acid and nitrite concentrations to study the exchange of nitrous acid with soils. Here we show that nitrous acid can react with carbonates or soil at night and subsequently be displaced from soils during the day by air-to-soil transfer of hydrogen chloride and nitric acid, which are generated in the atmosphere photochemically. These processes provide a critical link between the sink of nitrous acid at night and its emission the following day. We conclude that the acid displacement process could contribute a substantial fraction of daytime nitrous acid emissions in numerous environments, including agricultural, urban and vegetated regions, and in any location subject to deposition of soil-derived mineral dust.

  7. EFFECTS OF NIGHTTIME NAP AND DAYTIME SLEEP ON HEART RATE AND DROWSINESS IN LONG-DISTANCE HIGHWAY BUS DRIVERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi IKEDA

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a nighttime nap and daytime sleep on the heart rates of professional long-distance bus drivers and also a subjective rating of drowsiness through the use of a questionnaire survey on 58 drivers and a heart rate study on 9 drivers during both work and sleep. Of 2 bus drivers, one continued to drive for approximately 2-3 hours while another was alternately able to take a nap during nighttime in the bus cabin for a maximum of around 2 hours during their rest time. In a questionnaire survey, around 80% of 58 drivers reported that they could sleep well for at least one-half of the duration of the nap time reported. The nighttime nap showed a beneficial effect on their sleep debt which results from both night driving as well as from insufficient daytime sleep in local lodgings after duty. Concerning both the nighttime nap and daytime sleep, according to the heart rate measurements of 9 drivers during their duty time, it was found that the average heart rate had higher levels during daytime sleep than during a nighttime nap, presumably due to circadian rhythm. It was disclosed that the duration of a nap in the cabin was very short but the recovery from drowsiness could be effective.

  8. Maintenance Models for Systems subject to Measurable Deterioration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P. Nicolai (Robin)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractComplex engineering systems such as bridges, roads, flood defence structures, and power pylons play an important role in our society. Unfortunately such systems are subject to deterioration, meaning that in course of time their condition falls from higher to lower, and possibly even to

  9. Subjective sleepiness and sleep quality in adolescents are related to objective and subjective measures of school performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschloo, Annemarie; Krabbendam, Lydia; Dekker, Sanne; Lee, Nikki; De Groot, Renate; Jolles, Jelle

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the relation between sleep and school performance in a large sample of 561 adolescents aged 11–18 years. Three subjective measures of sleep were used: sleepiness, sleep quality, and sleep duration. They were compared to three measures of school performance: objective school

  10. Subjective sleepiness and sleep quality in adolescents are related to objective and subjective measures of school performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschloo, Annemarie; Krabbendam, Lydia; Dekker, Sanne; Lee, Nikki; De Groot, Renate; Jolles, Jelle

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the relation between sleep and school performance in a large sam- ple of 561 adolescents aged 11–18 years. Three subjective measures of sleep were used: sleepiness, sleep quality, and sleep duration. They were compared to three measures of school performance: objective school

  11. Subjective sleepiness and sleep quality in adolescents are related to objective and subjective measures of school performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschloo, A.; Krabbendam, L.; Dekker, S.; Lee, N.; Groot, R. de; Jolles, J.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relation between sleep and school performance in a large sample of 561 adolescents aged 11-18 years. Three subjective measures of sleep were used: sleepiness, sleep quality, and sleep duration. They were compared to three measures of school performance: objective school

  12. Daytime sleepiness and associated factors in Japanese school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaina, Alexandru; Sekine, Michikazu; Hamanishi, Shimako; Chen, Xiaoli; Wang, Hongbing; Yamagami, Takashi; Kagamimori, Sadanobu

    2007-11-01

    To examine daytime sleepiness and sleepiness interrelationship with sleep-wake patterns, eating habits, physical activity, and TV/video game time. A cross-sectional survey with 9,261 school children (mean age of 12.8 years) from 93 junior high schools in Toyama prefecture, Japan. The main outcome measures were daytime sleepiness during schooldays and sleepiness interrelationship with sleep-wake patterns, eating habits, physical activity, and visual media use. A total of 2,328 children (25.2%) reported sleepiness almost always and 4,401 (47.6%) sleepiness often. Regarding sex difference, a higher proportion of girls reported sleepiness in comparison to boys (79% vs 66%, P media use time. Sleep insufficiency represents a main cause for daytime sleepiness in Japanese junior high school children. Proper sleep habits, high physical activity level, and limited TV viewing time should be promoted among school children.

  13. Subjective Sleep Measures in Children: Self-Report

    OpenAIRE

    Erwin, Andrea M.; Bashore, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) recently published a consensus statement on the recommended number of hours of sleep in infants and children. The AASM expert panel identified seven health categories in children influenced by sleep duration, a component of sleep quality. For optimal health and general function, children require a certain number of hours of sleep each night. Limited data exist to subjectively assess sleep in this population. Practitioners must evaluate overall sle...

  14. Measurement of tendon reflexes by surface electromyography in normal subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, J.; van Crevel, H.

    1989-01-01

    A simple method for measuring the tendon reflexes was developed. A manually operated, electronic reflex hammer was applied that enabled measurement of the strength of tendon taps. Reflex responses were recorded by surface electromyography. Stimulus-response relations and latencies of tendon reflexes

  15. Individual daytime noise exposure in different microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Ute; Breitner, Susanne; Hampel, Regina; Wolf, Kathrin; Cyrys, Josef; Geruschkat, Uta; Gu, Jianwei; Radon, Katja; Peters, Annette; Schneider, Alexandra

    2015-07-01

    Numerous studies showed that chronic noise exposure modeled through noise mapping is associated with adverse health effects. However, knowledge about real individual noise exposure, emitted by several sources, is limited. To explain the variation in individual daytime noise exposure regarding different microenvironments, activities and individual characteristics. In a repeated measures study in Augsburg, Germany (March 2007-December 2008), 109 individuals participated in 305 individual noise measurements with a mean duration of 5.5h. Whereabouts and activities were recorded in a diary. One-minute averages of A-weighted equivalent continuous sound pressure levels (Leq) were determined. We used mixed additive models to elucidate the variation of Leq by diary-based information, baseline characteristics and time-invariant variables like long-term noise exposure. Overall noise levels were highly variable (median: 64 dB(A); range: 37-105 dB(A)). Highest noise levels were measured in traffic during bicycling (69 dB(A); 49-97 dB(A)) and lowest while resting at home (54 dB(A); 37-94 dB(A)). Nearly all diary-based information as well as physical activity, sex and age-group had significant influences on individual noise. In an additional analysis restricted to times spent at the residences, long-term noise exposure did not improve the model fit. Individual exposures to day-time noise were moderate to high and showed high variations in different microenvironments except when being in traffic. Individual noise levels were greatly determined by personal activities but also seemed to depend on environmental noise levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Do night naps impact driving performance and daytime recovery sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centofanti, Stephanie A; Dorrian, Jillian; Hilditch, Cassie J; Banks, Siobhan

    2017-02-01

    Short, nighttime naps are used as a fatigue countermeasure in night shift work, and may offer protective benefits on the morning commute. However, there is a concern that nighttime napping may impact upon the quality of daytime sleep. The aim of the current project was to investigate the influence of short nighttime naps (sleep. Thirty-one healthy subjects (aged 21-35 y; 18 females) participated in a 3-day laboratory study. After a 9-h baseline sleep opportunity (22:00h-07:00h), subjects were kept awake the following night with random assignment to: a 10-min nap ending at 04:00h plus a 10-min nap at 07:00h; a 30-min nap ending at 04:00h; or a no-nap control. A 40-min driving simulator task was administered at 07:00h and 18:30h post-recovery sleep. All conditions had a 6-h daytime recovery sleep opportunity (10:00h-16:00h) the next day. All sleep periods were recorded polysomnographically. Compared to control, the napping conditions did not significantly impact upon simulated driving lane variability, percentage of time in a safe zone, or time to first crash on morning or evening drives (p>0.05). Short nighttime naps did not significantly affect daytime recovery total sleep time (p>0.05). Slow wave sleep (SWS) obtained during the 30-min nighttime nap resulted in a significant reduction in SWS during subsequent daytime recovery sleep (psleep following a night shift. Further investigation is needed to examine the optimal timing, length or combination of naps for reducing performance decrements on the morning commute, whilst still preserving daytime sleep quality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Subject bias in three self-report measures of change.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprangers, M.; Hoogstraten, J.

    1991-01-01

    Examined whether 3 measures of self-reported change (post minus pre difference scores, post minus then difference scores, and direct improvement scores) are susceptible to training related S bias. 19 university students were assigned to a study planning (experimental) group, 19 to a text studying

  18. Pilot workload evaluated with subjective and physiological measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, J.A.; Gaillard, A.W.K.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to validate different measures for mental workload. Ten aspirant fighter jet pilots flew several scenarios in a flight simulator. The scenarios were divided into segments with different levels of task load. During the flight, heart rate, respiration and blood pressure

  19. Subjective sleepiness and sleep quality in adolescents are related to objective and subjective measures of school performance

    OpenAIRE

    Annemarie eBoschloo; Lydia eKrabbendam; Sanne eDekker; Lee, Nikki C.; Renate ede Groot; Jelle eJolles

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relation between sleep and school performance in a large sample of 561 adolescents aged 11-18 years. Three subjective measures of sleep were used: sleepiness, sleep quality and sleep duration. They were compared to three measures of school performance: objective school grades, self-reported school performance, and parent-reported school performance. Sleepiness – ‘I feel sleepy during the first hours at school’ – appeared to predict both school grades and self-repor...

  20. Measuring Graph Literacy without a Test: A Brief Subjective Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Retamero, Rocio; Cokely, Edward T; Ghazal, Saima; Joeris, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Visual aids tend to help diverse and vulnerable individuals understand risk communications, as long as these individuals have a basic understanding of graphs (i.e., graph literacy). Tests of objective graph literacy (OGL) can effectively identify individuals with limited skills, highlighting vulnerabilities and facilitating custom-tailored risk communication. However, the administration of these tests can be time-consuming and may evoke negative emotional reactions (e.g., anxiety). To evaluate a brief and easy-to-use assessment of subjective graph literacy (SGL) (i.e., self-reported ability to process and use graphically presented information) and to estimate the robustness and validity of the SGL scale and compare it with the leading OGL scale in diverse samples from different cultures. Demographically diverse residents (n = 470) of the United States, young adults (n = 172) and patients (n = 175) from Spain, and surgeons (n = 175) from 48 countries. A focus group and 4 studies for instrument development and initial validation (study 1), reliability and convergent and discriminant validity evaluation (study 2), and predictive validity estimation (studies 3 and 4). Psychometric properties of the scale. In about 1 minute, the SGL scale provides a reliable, robust, and valid assessment of skills and risk communication preferences and evokes fewer negative emotional reactions than the OGL scale. The SGL scale can be suitable for use in clinical research and may be useful as a communication aid in clinical practice. Theoretical mechanisms involved in SGL, emerging applications, limitations, and open questions are discussed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Sleepiness or excessive daytime somnolence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edd, Ethel Mitty; Flores, Sandi

    2009-01-01

    Excessive daytime somnolence (EDS) is associated with age-related changes, environment, circadian rhythm or sleep pattern disorder, insomnia, medications, lifestyle factors, depression, pain, and illness. The notion of "sleep architecture" connotes a structure that describes the sleep cycle (i.e., stages) and wakefulness during a single sleep period-that is, rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM sleep. Circadian rhythms perform a variety of functions including regulation of the quality and distribution of the stages of sleep. Insomnia includes delayed sleep onset as well as premature wakening; sleep is nonrestorative. Comorbidities associated with insomnia are Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, delirium, depression, congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, gastroesophageal reflux disease, pain, degenerative diseases of the neurological system, and sleep apnea. Continuous inadequate sleep affects cognitive function, physical performance, overall well-being, and quality of life. There is a greater risk of falls from insomnia than is the use of hypnotics to manage it. Sleep disruption among older adults is underrecognized and undertreated. Assessment using valid tools can be performed rapidly. There are a variety of treatment options, including sleep hygiene and pharmacological and alternative modalities.

  2. Association between habitual daytime napping and metabolic syndrome: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Diaozhu; Sun, Kan; Li, Feng; Qi, Yiqin; Ren, Meng; Huang, Chulin; Tang, Juying; Xue, Shengneng; Li, Yan; Yan, Li

    2014-12-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the association between habitual daytime napping and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. We conducted a population-based study of 8,547 subjects aged 40 years or older. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to a harmonized definition from a joint statement and the recommended thresholds for the Chinese population. Information about sleep duration was self-reported. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the no daytime napping group, the 0 to 1 hour daytime napping group and the more than 1 hour daytime napping group were 35.0%, 36.0% and 44.5% among the females (Pnapping hours were positively associated with parameters of metabolic syndrome in the female subjects, including waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, triglycerides and fasting plasma glucose (Pnapping females, napping for more than 1 hour was independently associated with an increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome (odds ratio 1.39, 95% confidence interval, 1.13-1.72). Compared to the female subjects in the no daytime napping group, those habitually napped for more than 1 hour exhibited 46% and 26% increases in the prevalence of central obesity and hypertriglyceridemia (all Pnapping hours and metabolic syndrome among the male subjects. Daytime napping is associated with an increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome in middle-aged non-obese Chinese women. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Consequences of Split Shift Work in Indian Traffic Police Personnel: Daytime Sleepiness, Stressors and Psychological Distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Soni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed to measure the daily routine preference, daytime sleepiness, and psychological distress experiences, because of split shift system job in a sample in traffic police personnel of Raipur city, India. To measure such parameters we used the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS, Operational Police Stress Questionnaire (OPSQ, General Health Questionnaire and the Distress. To evaluate differences between age, body mass index, period of service length and drug / alcohol use for all the subjects (traffic police personnel the t-test and chi-square test were used. Total Hundred male traffic police personnel participated and out of which most of them were found to belong in the evening active category. This study also indicates increased prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness and (EDS high level of psychological distress as measured by the GHQ-12 among few police workers. Moreover, a number of participants reported significant distress levels, when measured with distress thermometer. In nutshell, the study sample suggests adaptive coping strategies of traffic police personnel working in split shift system profession can be attributed to their evening (E-type circadian preferences.

  4. Effects of daytime food intake on memory consolidation during sleep or sleep deprivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Herzog

    Full Text Available Sleep enhances memory consolidation. Bearing in mind that food intake produces many metabolic signals that can influence memory processing in humans (e.g., insulin, the present study addressed the question as to whether the enhancing effect of sleep on memory consolidation is affected by the amount of energy consumed during the preceding daytime. Compared to sleep, nocturnal wakefulness has been shown to impair memory consolidation in humans. Thus, a second question was to examine whether the impaired memory consolidation associated with sleep deprivation (SD could be compensated by increased daytime energy consumption. To these aims, 14 healthy normal-weight men learned a finger tapping sequence (procedural memory and a list of semantically associated word pairs (declarative memory. After the learning period, standardized meals were administered, equaling either ∼50% or ∼150% of the estimated daily energy expenditure. In the morning, after sleep or wakefulness, memory consolidation was tested. Plasma glucose was measured both before learning and retrieval. Polysomnographic sleep recordings were performed by electroencephalography (EEG. Independent of energy intake, subjects recalled significantly more word pairs after sleep than they did after SD. When subjects stayed awake and received an energy oversupply, the number of correctly recalled finger sequences was equal to those seen after sleep. Plasma glucose did not differ among conditions, and sleep time in the sleep conditions was not influenced by the energy intake interventions. These data indicate that the daytime energy intake level affects neither sleep's capacity to boost the consolidation of declarative and procedural memories, nor sleep's quality. However, high energy intake was followed by an improved procedural but not declarative memory consolidation under conditions of SD. This suggests that the formation of procedural memory is not only triggered by sleep but is also

  5. Effects of daytime food intake on memory consolidation during sleep or sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Nina; Friedrich, Alexia; Fujita, Naoko; Gais, Steffen; Jauch-Chara, Kamila; Oltmanns, Kerstin M; Benedict, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Sleep enhances memory consolidation. Bearing in mind that food intake produces many metabolic signals that can influence memory processing in humans (e.g., insulin), the present study addressed the question as to whether the enhancing effect of sleep on memory consolidation is affected by the amount of energy consumed during the preceding daytime. Compared to sleep, nocturnal wakefulness has been shown to impair memory consolidation in humans. Thus, a second question was to examine whether the impaired memory consolidation associated with sleep deprivation (SD) could be compensated by increased daytime energy consumption. To these aims, 14 healthy normal-weight men learned a finger tapping sequence (procedural memory) and a list of semantically associated word pairs (declarative memory). After the learning period, standardized meals were administered, equaling either ∼50% or ∼150% of the estimated daily energy expenditure. In the morning, after sleep or wakefulness, memory consolidation was tested. Plasma glucose was measured both before learning and retrieval. Polysomnographic sleep recordings were performed by electroencephalography (EEG). Independent of energy intake, subjects recalled significantly more word pairs after sleep than they did after SD. When subjects stayed awake and received an energy oversupply, the number of correctly recalled finger sequences was equal to those seen after sleep. Plasma glucose did not differ among conditions, and sleep time in the sleep conditions was not influenced by the energy intake interventions. These data indicate that the daytime energy intake level affects neither sleep's capacity to boost the consolidation of declarative and procedural memories, nor sleep's quality. However, high energy intake was followed by an improved procedural but not declarative memory consolidation under conditions of SD. This suggests that the formation of procedural memory is not only triggered by sleep but is also sensitive to the

  6. Changes over time of psychoacoustic outcome measurements are not a substitute for subjective outcome measurements in acute tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabau, Sarah; Cox, Tony; Punte, Andrea Kleine; Waelkens, Brecht; Gilles, Annick; Wouters, Kristien; de Varebeke, Sebastien Janssens; Van de Heyning, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess correlations between the changes over time of various tinnitus measurements. A longitudinal prospective study comparing two test moments was performed: before treatment and after 90 days. Tinnitus assessment consisted of psychoacoustic outcome measurements (minimal masking level and loudness matching at 1 kHz) and subjective outcome measurements (Tinnitus Impairment Questionnaire, Tinnitus Questionnaire and Numeric Rating Scale of loudness and annoyance). Additionally, the effect size was measured. 35 subjects were included in this study. The subjects had a permanent, non-pulsatile tinnitus acquired psychoacoustic outcome measurements and ∆subjective outcome measurements. The effect size showed that subjective outcome measurements were the most responsive to measure change in tinnitus complaints. We can conclude that psychoacoustic outcome measurements of tinnitus cannot substitute subjective outcome measurements in patients with acute tinnitus. The authors recommend subjective outcome measurements as primary outcome measurements in a clinical setting. In research, however, it is meaningful to quantify tinnitus in both ways.

  7. Subjective Sleepiness and Sleep Quality in Adolescents are Related to Objective and Subjective Measures of School Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Boschloo, Annemarie; Krabbendam, Lydia; Dekker, Sanne; Lee, Nikki; De Groot, Renate; Jolles, Jelle

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relation between sleep and school performance in a large sample of 561 adolescents aged 11–18 years. Three subjective measures of sleep were used: sleepiness, sleep quality, and sleep duration. They were compared to three measures of school performance: objective school grades, self-reported school performance, and parent-reported school performance. Sleepiness – “I feel sleepy during the first hours at school” – appeared to predict both school grades and self-repo...

  8. Stability of oxyhemoglobin affinity in patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome without daytime hypoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clause, Didier; Detry, Bruno; Rodenstein, Daniel; Liistro, Giuseppe

    2008-12-01

    A decrease in hemoglobin affinity for oxygen is considered an adaptive mechanism against tissue hypoxia. Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is characterized by recurrent episodes of apnea and hypopnea resulting in arterial oxygen desaturations during sleep. Maillard et al. (10) observed a right shift of the oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve (ODC) and an increase in 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) concentration ([2,3-DPG]) in 15 patients with severe OSAHS, but some had slight daytime arterial hypoxemia while breathing room air. The aim of our study was to measure the ODC and 2,3-DPG concentrations in a group of subjects normoxemic during daytime referred to our sleep laboratory for suspicion of snoring or OSAHS. The patients were recruited during a period of 6 mo. All arterial and venous blood samples were taken early in the morning within 1 h of awakening following a full-night polysomnography. ODC and 2,3-DPG were analyzed in 88 patients: 56 OSAHS (oxygen desaturation index: 27.5 +/- 24.5) and 32 non-OSAHS. We found a significant correlation between the P50 and 2,3-DPG levels in the 88 patients: r = 0.502, P oxyhemoglobin affinity than nonapneic subjects.

  9. Daytime Sleep Aids and Nighttime Cognitive Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eddy, Douglas; Barton, Emily; Cardenas, Rebecca; French, Jonathan; Gibbons, John; Hickey, Patrick; Miller, James; Ramsey, Carol; Storm, William

    2005-01-01

    .... This study compared two doses of the hypnotic zolpidem, two doses of melatonin and placebo for their effects on daytime sleep, on nighttime cognitive performance and on mood in an operationally...

  10. Sleep Quality Assessment and Daytime Sleepiness of Liver Transplantation Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, D M; Teixeira, H R S; Lopes, A R F; Martins-Pedersoli, T A; Ziviani, L C; Mente, Ê D; Castro-E-Silva, O; Galvão, C M; Mendes, K S

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the sleep quality and daytime sleepiness of patients eligible for liver transplants. A cross-sectional prospective study was conducted on liver transplant candidates from a transplant center in the interior of São Paulo State. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Epworth Sleepiness Scale questionnaires were applied to obtain demographic and clinical characteristics and to assess sleep quality and daytime sleepiness. The mean (±SD) score on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale of the 45 liver transplantation candidates was 7.00 ± 2.83 points, with 28.89% having scores >10 points, indicating excessive daytime sleepiness. The mean score on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was 6.64 ± 4.95 points, with 60% of the subjects showing impaired sleep quality, with scores >5 points. The average sleep duration was 07:16 h. Regarding sleep quality self-classification, 31.11% reported poor or very poor quality. It is noteworthy that 73.33% of patients had to go to the bathroom, 53.33% woke up in the middle of the night, and 40.00% reported pain related to sleeping difficulties. Comparison of subjects with good and poor sleep quality revealed a significant difference in time to sleep (P = .0002), sleep hours (P = .0003), and sleep quality self-classification (P = .000072). Liver transplant candidates have a compromised quality of sleep and excessive daytime sleepiness. In clinical practice, we recommend the evaluation and implementation of interventions aimed at improving the sleep and wakefulness cycle, contributing to a better quality of life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Monitoring the athlete training response: subjective self-reported measures trump commonly used objective measures: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Anna E; Main, Luana C; Gastin, Paul B

    2016-03-01

    Monitoring athlete well-being is essential to guide training and to detect any progression towards negative health outcomes and associated poor performance. Objective (performance, physiological, biochemical) and subjective measures are all options for athlete monitoring. We systematically reviewed objective and subjective measures of athlete well-being. Objective measures, including those taken at rest (eg, blood markers, heart rate) and during exercise (eg, oxygen consumption, heart rate response), were compared against subjective measures (eg, mood, perceived stress). All measures were also evaluated for their response to acute and chronic training load. The databases Academic search complete, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, SPORTDiscus and PubMed were searched in May 2014. Fifty-six original studies reported concurrent subjective and objective measures of athlete well-being. The quality and strength of findings of each study were evaluated to determine overall levels of evidence. Subjective and objective measures of athlete well-being generally did not correlate. Subjective measures reflected acute and chronic training loads with superior sensitivity and consistency than objective measures. Subjective well-being was typically impaired with an acute increase in training load, and also with chronic training, while an acute decrease in training load improved subjective well-being. This review provides further support for practitioners to use subjective measures to monitor changes in athlete well-being in response to training. Subjective measures may stand alone, or be incorporated into a mixed methods approach to athlete monitoring, as is current practice in many sport settings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Daytime Exposure to Short- and Medium-Wavelength Light Did Not Improve Alertness and Neurobehavioral Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Ahuva Y; Sletten, Tracey L; Flynn-Evans, Erin E; Lockley, Steven W; Rajaratnam, Shantha M W

    2016-10-01

    While previous studies have demonstrated short-wavelength sensitivity to the acute alerting effects of light during the biological night, fewer studies have assessed the alerting effect of light during the daytime. This study assessed the wavelength-dependent sensitivity of the acute alerting effects of daytime light exposure following chronic sleep restriction in 60 young adults (29 men, 31 women; 22.5 ± 3.1 mean ± SD years). Participants were restricted to 5 h time in bed the night before laboratory admission and 3 h time in bed in the laboratory, aligned by wake time. Participants were randomized for exposure to 3 h total of either narrowband blue (λmax 458-480 nm, n = 23) or green light (λmax 551-555 nm, n = 25) of equal photon densities (2.8-8.4 × 10(13) photons/cm(2)/sec), beginning 3.25 h after waking, and compared with a darkness control (0 lux, n = 12). Subjective sleepiness (Karolinska Sleepiness Scale), sustained attention (auditory Psychomotor Vigilance Task), mood (Profile of Mood States Bi-Polar form), working memory (2-back task), selective attention (Stroop task), and polysomnographic and ocular sleepiness measures (Optalert) were assessed prior to, during, and after light exposure. We found no significant effect of light wavelength on these measures, with the exception of a single mood subscale. Further research is needed to optimize the characteristics of lighting systems to induce alerting effects during the daytime, taking into account potential interactions between homeostatic sleep pressure, circadian phase, and light responsiveness. © 2016 The Author(s).

  13. Of MOS and men : Bridging the gap between objective and subjective quality measurements in mobile TV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Koning, T.C.M.; Veldhoven, P.; Knoche, H.; Kooij, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we explore the relation between subjective and objective measures of video quality. We computed objective MOS values from video clips using the video quality measuring tool VQM and compared it to the clips’ subjective Acceptability scores. Using the ITU defined mapping (M2G) from MOS

  14. Associations between physical activity, sedentary time, sleep duration and daytime sleepiness in US adults

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McClain, James J; Lewin, Daniel S; Laposky, Aaron D; Kahle, Lisa; Berrigan, David

    2014-01-01

    To examine the associations between objectively measured physical activity (PA) or sedentary behavior and self-reported sleep duration or daytime sleepiness in a nationally representative sample of healthy US adults (N=2128...

  15. E-MODULE DEVELOPMENT FOR THE SUBJECT OF MEASURING INSTRUMENTS AND MEASUREMENT IN ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuryake Fajaryati

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to develop an e-module as a medium of learning for the practice course of Measuring Instruments and Measurement in the Department of Electronics Engineering Education of Yogyakarta State University and to determine the feasibility of the e-module. This study employed a method of research and development. The development process was conducted through four phases by using the model of Lee and Owens which consisted of analysis phase, design phase, developing and implementation phase, as well as evaluation phase.The evaluation was conducted in several stages. Firstly, an alpha test for product validation was conducted by the experts on material and media. After that, a beta test was conducted by testing the product in small group users. The subjects of this study were the students of Electronics Engineering. The instruments used to collect the data were a validation sheet and questionnaires. The results of qualitative data were then modified into quantitative data with a range of 1 to 5, then they were converted with a rating scale to determine the feasibility of the medium. The results showed that based on the alpha test, the medium was in a very high quality. Meanwhile, in the beta test of the instructional aspect, in terms of material and evaluation and the multimedia aspect the e-module was respectively considered feasible and quite feasible. The four indicators namely text, image, animation and video were all generally considered feasible. In terms of usage aspect, the e-module was considered feasible where its two indicators, namely instructions and navigation, were generally regarded as very feasible by all respondents.

  16. Circadian preference, sleep and daytime behaviour in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannotti, Flavia; Cortesi, Flavia; Sebastiani, Teresa; Ottaviano, Salvatore

    2002-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between circadian preferences, regularity of sleep patterns, sleep problems, daytime sleepiness and daytime behaviour. As a part of an epidemiological survey on sleep in a representative sample of Italian high-school students, a total of 6631 adolescents, aged 14.1-18.6 years, completed the School Sleep Habits Survey, a comprehensive questionnaire including items regarding sleep, sleepiness, substance use, anxiety and depressed mood, use of sleeping pills, school attendance and a morningness/eveningness scale. The sample consisted of 742 evening-types (315 males and 427 females; mean age 17.1 years) and 1005 morning-types (451 males and 554 females; mean age 16.8 years). No significant sex differences were found for morningness/eveningness score. Eveningness was associated with later bedtime and wake-up time, especially on weekends, shorter time in bed during the week, longer weekend time in bed, irregular sleep-wake schedule, subjective poor sleep. Moreover, evening types used to nap more frequently during school days, complained of daytime sleepiness, referred more attention problems, poor school achievement, more injuries and were more emotionally upset than the other chronotype. They referred also greater caffeine-containing beverages and substances to promote sleep consumption. Our results suggest that circadian preference might be related not only to sleep pattern, but also to other adolescent behaviours.

  17. Effects of caffeine on daytime recovery sleep: A double challenge to the sleep-wake cycle in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Julie; Paquet, Jean; Fernandez-Bolanos, Marta; Girouard, Laurence; Roy, Joanie; Selmaoui, Brahim; Filipini, Daniel

    2009-10-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used stimulant to counteract the effects of sleepiness, but it also produces important detrimental effects on subsequent sleep, especially when sleep is initiated at a time when the biological clock sends a strong waking signal such as during daytime. This study compares the effects of caffeine on daytime recovery sleep in young (20-30 y.) and middle-aged subjects (45-60 y.). Subjects participated in both caffeine (200mg) and placebo conditions (double-blind cross-over design), spaced one month apart. For each condition, subjects initially came to the laboratory for a nocturnal sleep episode. Daytime recovery sleep started in the morning after 25h of wakefulness. Subjects were administered either one caffeine (100mg) or placebo capsule three hours before daytime recovery sleep and the remaining dose one hour before daytime recovery sleep. Middle-aged subjects showed greater decrements of sleep duration and sleep efficiency than young subjects during daytime recovery under placebo compared to nocturnal sleep. Caffeine decreased sleep efficiency, sleep duration, slow-wave sleep (SWS) and REM sleep during daytime recovery sleep similarly in both age groups. Caffeine also reduced N-REM sleep EEG synchronization during daytime recovery sleep (reduced delta, theta, and alpha power, and greater beta power). The combined influence of age and caffeine made the sleep of middle-aged subjects particularly vulnerable to the circadian waking signal. We propose that lower brain synchronization due to age and caffeine produces greater difficulty in overriding the circadian waking signal during daytime sleep and leads to fragmented sleep. These results have implications for the high proportion of the population using caffeine to cope with night work and jet lag, particularly the middle-aged.

  18. Is daytime napping associated with inflammation in adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowski, Karen P; Hall, Martica H; Marsland, Anna L; Matthews, Karen A

    2016-12-01

    Daytime napping has been associated with poor health outcomes in adults. It is not known whether daytime napping is similarly linked to adverse health in adolescents, although many report napping. The present study evaluated associations between daytime napping and 2 markers of increased inflammation, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 (IL-6), in healthy high school students. Two hundred thirty-four Black and White high school students completed a week of actigraph and diary measures of sleep and napping and provided a fasting blood sample. Napping measures were the proportion of days napped and the average minutes napped across 1 week during the school year. Linear regressions adjusted for age, sex, race, average nocturnal sleep duration, time between sleep protocol and blood draw, and body mass index percentile demonstrated that proportion of days napped measured by actigraphy, B(SE) = .41(.19), p napped between 2 p.m. and 6 p.m., B(SE) = .40(.20), p nap duration and either study outcome. Diary-reported napping was unrelated to either study outcome. Actigraphy-assessed napping and IL-6 are associated but the direction of the relationship remains to be determined. Overall, napping is an important factor to consider to better understand the relationship between short sleep and cardiovascular health in adolescents. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Subjective sleepiness and sleep quality in adolescents are related to objective and subjective measures of school performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemarie eBoschloo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the relation between sleep and school performance in a large sample of 561 adolescents aged 11-18 years. Three subjective measures of sleep were used: sleepiness, sleep quality and sleep duration. They were compared to three measures of school performance: objective school grades, self-reported school performance, and parent-reported school performance. Sleepiness – ‘I feel sleepy during the first hours at school’ – appeared to predict both school grades and self-reported school performance. Sleep quality on the other hand – as a measure of (uninterrupted sleep and/or problems falling asleep or waking up – predicted parent-reported school performance. Self- and parent-reported school performance correlated only moderately with school grades. So it turns out that the measures used to measure either sleep or school performance impacts whether or not a relation is found. Further research on sleep and school performance should take this into account. The findings do underscore the notion that sleep in adolescence can be important for learning. They are compatible with the hypothesis that a reduced sleep quality can give rise to sleepiness in the first hours at school which results in lower school performance. This notion could have applied value in counseling adolescents and their parents in changing adolescents’ sleep behavior.

  20. Subjective Sleepiness and Sleep Quality in Adolescents are Related to Objective and Subjective Measures of School Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschloo, Annemarie; Krabbendam, Lydia; Dekker, Sanne; Lee, Nikki; de Groot, Renate; Jolles, Jelle

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relation between sleep and school performance in a large sample of 561 adolescents aged 11-18 years. Three subjective measures of sleep were used: sleepiness, sleep quality, and sleep duration. They were compared to three measures of school performance: objective school grades, self-reported school performance, and parent-reported school performance. Sleepiness - "I feel sleepy during the first hours at school" - appeared to predict both school grades and self-reported school performance. Sleep quality on the other hand - as a measure of (un)interrupted sleep and/or problems falling asleep or waking up - predicted parent-reported school performance. Self- and parent-reported school performance correlated only moderately with school grades. So it turns out that the measures used to measure either sleep or school performance impacts whether or not a relation is found. Further research on sleep and school performance should take this into account. The findings do underscore the notion that sleep in adolescence can be important for learning. They are compatible with the hypothesis that a reduced sleep quality can give rise to sleepiness in the first hours at school which results in lower school performance. This notion could have applied value in counseling adolescents and their parents in changing adolescents' sleep behavior.

  1. Sleep Characteristics and Daytime Cortisol Levels in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Ethan; Schumm, L Philip; McClintock, Martha; Waite, Linda; Lauderdale, Diane S

    2017-05-01

    Older adults frequently report sleep problems and are at increased risk of cardiometabolic disruption. Experimental sleep restriction of younger adults has suggested that cortisol may be on the pathway between sleep restriction and cardiometabolic disease. We investigated whether the natural variation in sleep among older adults is associated with daytime cortisol level. Salivary cortisol samples and actigraphy sleep data were collected from a random subsample of participants in the National Social Life, Health and Aging Project, a nationally representative probability sample of adults aged 62-90 (N = 672). Salivary cortisol was measured with 3 timed samples at the beginning, middle, and end of a 2-hr in-home interview. Sleep characteristics were derived from wrist actigraphy (fragmentation, wake after sleep onset [WASO], and duration) and from survey responses about usual sleep duration and sleep problems. For each individual, a single summary daytime cortisol level was estimated by fitting a marginal longitudinal model for the 3 time-stamped cortisol samples. The resulting estimates were then regressed on each sleep measure, adjusting for sociodemographics, health behaviors, and comorbidities. From actigraphy, both higher fragmentation score (β = 0.02; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.00 to 0.03) and longer WASO (β = 0.27; 95% CI = 0.04 to 0.51) were significantly associated with higher daytime cortisol; sleep duration was not. Self-reported sleep duration and sleep problems were also not associated with cortisol. Actigraph measures of sleep disturbance are associated with higher daytime cortisol among older adults. However, cross-sectional data cannot distinguish causal direction or whether cortisol and sleep disruption have a common cause.

  2. The effort-reward imbalance work-stress model and daytime salivary cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) among Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Atsuhiko; Mase, Junji; Howteerakul, Nopporn; Rajatanun, Thitipat; Suwannapong, Nawarat; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Ono, Yuichiro

    2014-09-17

    We examined the influence of work-related effort-reward imbalance and overcommitment to work (OC), as derived from Siegrist's Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) model, on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis. We hypothesized that, among healthy workers, both cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) secretion would be increased by effort-reward imbalance and OC and, as a result, cortisol-to-DHEA ratio (C/D ratio) would not differ by effort-reward imbalance or OC. The subjects were 115 healthy female nursery school teachers. Salivary cortisol, DHEA, and C/D ratio were used as indexes of HPA activity. Mixed-model analyses of variance revealed that neither the interaction between the ERI model indicators (i.e., effort, reward, effort-to-reward ratio, and OC) and the series of measurement times (9:00, 12:00, and 15:00) nor the main effect of the ERI model indicators was significant for daytime salivary cortisol, DHEA, or C/D ratio. Multiple linear regression analyses indicated that none of the ERI model indicators was significantly associated with area under the curve of daytime salivary cortisol, DHEA, or C/D ratio. We found that effort, reward, effort-reward imbalance, and OC had little influence on daytime variation patterns, levels, or amounts of salivary HPA-axis-related hormones. Thus, our hypotheses were not supported.

  3. Measuring organizational performance in the hospital industry: an exploratory comparison of objective and subjective methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, M J; McIlwain, T F; Fottler, M D

    2001-11-01

    One of the major challenges facing health services management researchers is the measurement of various aspects of organizational performance. This challenge is exacerbated by a reluctance of many healthcare organizations to share data with researchers because of a fear of competitor access to these data. Even where objective, reliable and valid measures of organizational performance are available, typically they are available only in aggregate form, rather than for individual organizations. In response to these constraints, researchers have used subjective measures of performance often based on the perception of key executives. This research compares the subjective perceptions of hospital executives to the objective financial performance data of 60 hospitals. While the correlations between the subjective and objective measures vary, return of assets (ROA) and operating margin are the most valid subjective financial measures of hospital performance. Implications for future research are discussed.

  4. Daytime Ayahuasca administration modulates REM and slow-wave sleep in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbanoj, Manel J; Riba, Jordi; Clos, S; Giménez, S; Grasa, E; Romero, S

    2008-02-01

    Ayahuasca is a traditional South American psychoactive beverage and the central sacrament of Brazilian-based religious groups, with followers in Europe and the United States. The tea contains the psychedelic indole N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) and beta-carboline alkaloids with monoamine oxidase-inhibiting properties that render DMT orally active. DMT interacts with serotonergic neurotransmission acting as a partial agonist at 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor sites. Given the role played by serotonin in the regulation of the sleep/wake cycle, we investigated the effects of daytime ayahuasca consumption in sleep parameters. Subjective sleep quality, polysomnography (PSG), and spectral analysis were assessed in a group of 22 healthy male volunteers after the administration of a placebo, an ayahuasca dose equivalent to 1 mg DMT kg(-1) body weight, and 20 mg d-amphetamine, a proaminergic drug, as a positive control. Results show that ayahuasca did not induce any subjectively perceived deterioration of sleep quality or PSG-measured disruptions of sleep initiation or maintenance, in contrast with d-amphetamine, which delayed sleep initiation, disrupted sleep maintenance, induced a predominance of 'light' vs 'deep' sleep and significantly impaired subjective sleep quality. PSG analysis also showed that similarly to d-amphetamine, ayahuasca inhibits rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, decreasing its duration, both in absolute values and as a percentage of total sleep time, and shows a trend increase in its onset latency. Spectral analysis showed that d-amphetamine and ayahuasca increased power in the high frequency range, mainly during stage 2. Remarkably, whereas slow-wave sleep (SWS) power in the first night cycle, an indicator of sleep pressure, was decreased by d-amphetamine, ayahuasca enhanced power in this frequency band. Results show that daytime serotonergic psychedelic drug administration leads to measurable changes in PSG and sleep power spectrum and suggest an

  5. Prevalence, Patterns, and Predictors of Sleep Problems and Daytime Sleepiness in Young Adolescents With ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langberg, Joshua M; Molitor, Stephen J; Oddo, Lauren E; Eadeh, Hana-May; Dvorsky, Melissa R; Becker, Stephen P

    2017-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of multiple types of sleep problems in young adolescents with ADHD. Adolescents comprehensively diagnosed with ADHD (N = 262) and their caregivers completed well-validated measures of sleep problems and daytime sleepiness. Participants also completed measures related to medication use, comorbidities, and other factors that could predict sleep problems. Daytime sleepiness was by far the most common sleep problem, with 37% of adolescents meeting the clinical threshold according to parent report and 42% according to adolescent report. In contrast, prevalence rates for specific nighttime sleep problems ranged from 1.5% to 7.6%. Time spent in bed, bedtime resistance, ADHD inattentive symptoms, and Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT) symptoms were significant in the final model predicting daytime sleepiness. Adolescents with ADHD commonly experience problems with daytime sleepiness that may significantly affect their functioning, but this may not be directly attributable to specific sleep problems.

  6. Schrodinger's Cat: Empirical Research into the Radical Subjective solution of the Measurement problem.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bierman, D.; Whitmarsh, S.

    2007-01-01

    Schrodinger's Cat: Empirical research into the radical subjective solution of the measurement problem Dick J. Bierman & Stephen Whitmarsh The most controversial of all solutions of the measurement problem holds that a measurement is not completed until a conscious observation is made. In other

  7. THE SYSTEM OF STATISTICAL OBJECTIVE AND SUBJECTIVE INDICATORS OF MEASURING QUALITY OF LIFE

    OpenAIRE

    I. Romaniuk

    2015-01-01

    This article examines approaches to defining and measuring quality of life. Each approach to measuring the quality of life contains information that is not contained in the other measures. It describes the economic, subjective and social indicators. The strengths and weaknesses of those indicators are also analyzed.

  8. Individual and average responses of sleep quality and daytime sleepiness after four weeks of strength training in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Julia Lyra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims: To analyze the average and individual responses of sleep quality and daytime sleepiness in adolescents after four weeks of strength training. Methods: 19 adolescents with sleep problems recruited in the Federal Institute of Pernambuco, were subject to anthropometric evaluations as well as those for body composition assessment, a 1 repetition maximum test, the sleep parameters (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index-PSQI and Epworth Sleepiness Scale-ESS and were submitted to four weeks of strength-training, performed alternately by segment, two sessions per week, according to recommendations for this population. Results: A decrease in the average PSQI score was observed (10.3±3.3 vs 8.8±4.0; p=0.006, but not in ESS (p>0.05, after intervention. The individual analyses demonstrated that ~63% of adolescents experienced reductions ≥ 3 points in the PSQI and ~58% of them experienced reductions ≥ 3 points in the measure of daytime sleepiness. The prevalence of poor sleep quality and daytime sleepiness reduced from 84.2% to 68.4% and from 52.6% to 31.6%, respectively. The comparisons of high and low responders to exercise training show that adolescents who reduced ≥3 points in the score of a least one sleep parameter presented lower weight, fat mass, and fat percentage (p<0.05. Conclusion: A short-term strength-training program is able to improve global sleep quality, but not daytime sleepiness in adolescents. Furthermore, the changes after training are highly heterogeneous. Further studies are required to better understand the effects of strength training on sleep parameters of adolescents.

  9. Daytime sleepiness associated with poor sustained attention in middle and late adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Chang-Ho; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Seung Ku; Suh, Sooyeon; Lee, Seung Hoon; Park, Seong-Ho; Thomas, Robert J; Au, Rhoda; Shin, Chol

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to determine the association between psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) performance and sleep-related factors including sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, poor sleep quality, insomnia, and habitual snoring in a population-based sample. This was a cross-sectional analysis from the ongoing prospective cohort study, the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study. We measured PVT performance and documented demographics, sleep-related factors, life style, and medical conditions in community dwelling adults (N = 2499; mean age 57.1 ± 7.3; male 1259). Associations between PVT parameters and sleep-related factors were tested, adjusting for age, gender, smoking, alcohol use, education, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, depression, and the interval between mid-sleep time and PVT test. High Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS, ≥8) was associated with slower mean reciprocal response speed (mean RRT) (3.69 ± 0.02 vs. 3.77 ± 0.01, p sleep and PVT test were also associated with poor performance. Sleep duration, habitual snoring, insomnia, or poor sleep quality (the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score > 5) was not related to PVT parameters. At the population level, our results revealed important modifiers of PVT performance, which included subjective reports of daytime sleepiness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of daytime naps on procedural and declarative memory in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeck-Hirschner, Mareen; Baier, Paul Christian; Sever, Serap; Buschbacher, Andrea; Aldenhoff, Josef B; Göder, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Sleep has been identified as a state that optimizes the consolidation of newly acquired information in memory. Straight memory deficits and sleep disturbances are well-known in patients with schizophrenia. This study tested the hypothesis that patients with schizophrenia have a deficit in procedural and declarative memory consolidation after a short midday nap when compared to healthy controls and patients with remitted to moderate major depression. Following a normal night's sleep, 22 healthy subjects, 20 patients with major depression and 21 patients with schizophrenia were studied in a napping and wake condition in a random-order cross-over design, early in the afternoon. To test declarative memory, the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test respectively the Taylor Complex Figure Test and, for procedural learning, a mirror tracing task were performed. The present study is the first to demonstrate significant differences between individuals with schizophrenia, depression and healthy matched controls with regard to measures of sleep and memory performance after a short period of daytime sleep (napping). In particular we found that a daytime nap of only about 40min led to improvement of declarative memory performance in all investigated groups, whereas no beneficial effect was seen on procedural performance in the group of medicated patients with schizophrenia in contrast to healthy controls and patients with remitted to moderate major depression.

  11. Differences between Subjective Balanced Occlusion and Measurements Reported With T-Scan III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zana Lila-Krasniqi

    2017-08-01

    CONCLUSION: In our study, it was concluded that there were statistically significant differences of balanced occlusion in all three groups. Also it was concluded that subjective data are not exact with measurements reported with electronic device T-scan III.

  12. The psychophysics of workload - A second look at the relationship between subjective measures and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopher, D.; Chillag, N.; Arzi, N.

    1985-01-01

    Load estimates based upon subjective and performance indices were compared for subjects performing size matching and letter typing tasks under 6 levels of priorities, in single and dual task conditions. Each half of the group used a different task as reference in their subjective judgement. The results are interpreted to indicate that subjective measures are especially sensitive to voluntary allocation of attention and to the load on working memory. Association with performance is expected whenever these two factors are main determinants of performance efficiency, otherwise the two are likely to dissociate.

  13. HEART RATE VARIABILITY DURING DAYTIME NAPS IN HEALTHY ADULTS: AUTONOMIC PROFILE AND SHORT-TERM RELIABILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Cellini, Nicola; Whitehurst, Lauren N.; McDevitt, Elizabeth A.; Sara C Mednick

    2015-01-01

    In healthy individuals, a reduction in cardiovascular output and a shift to parasympathetic/vagal dominant activity is observed across nocturnal sleep. This cardiac autonomic profile, often measured by heart rate variability (HRV), has been associated with significant benefits for the cardiovascular system. However, little is known about the autonomic profile during daytime sleep. Here we investigated the autonomic profile and the short-term reliability of HRV during daytime naps in 66 health...

  14. Effect of CPAP Therapy in Improving Daytime Sleepiness in Indian Patients with Moderate and Severe OSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battan, Gulshan; Kumar, Sanjeev; Panwar, Ajay; Atam, Virendra; Kumar, Pradeep; Gangwar, Anil; Roy, Ujjawal

    2016-11-01

    Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA) is a highly prevalent disease and a major public health issue in India. Excessive daytime sleepiness is an almost ubiquitous symptom of OSA. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score is a validated objective score to measure the degree of daytime sleepiness. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) therapy has been established as the gold standard treatment modality for OSA patients. A few Indian studies have reported the effectiveness of CPAP therapy in improving ESS scores after 1st month of CPAP use. To observe both, short-term (one month) and long-term (three month) effects of CPAP therapy on ESS scores in moderate to severe OSA patients. The patients complaining of excessive day-time sleepiness, snoring and choking episodes during sleep, consecutively presenting to medicine OPD over a period of 2 years, were subjected to Polysomnography (PSG). Seventy-three patients with apnoea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥15 were categorised as having moderate to severe forms of OSA (moderate OSA with AHI=15-30 and severe OSA with AHI >30), and were scheduled for an initial trial of CPAP therapy. Forty-seven patients reported good tolerance to CPAP therapy after a trial period of 2 weeks and comprised the final study group. ESS scores in these patients were recorded at the baseline, and after 1st and 3rd month of CPAP therapy, and statistically analysed for significance. Mean ESS score at the baseline among moderate and severe OSA patients were 13.67±2.29 and 16.56 ±1.87, respectively. ESS score in both these subgroups improved significantly to 11.63±3.79, p=0.022, CI (0.3293-4.0106)} and 14.13 ±3.74, p OSA patients improved significantly to 9.84 ±2.97, p = 0.022, CI (0.3293-4.0106) and 12.29 ±3.97, p OSA. Benefits in daytime sleepiness were observed after short-term as well as long-term use of CPAP therapy.

  15. Lights on for daytime driving: mandatory from 1 January 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    In accordance with the Swiss Federal Decree of 15 June 2012, it will be mandatory from 1 January 2014 to keep your vehicle lights permanently switched on when driving on Swiss territory.   New vehicles are now equipped with daytime running lights which switch on automatically. For older vehicles, side lights can be used as daytime running lights, and it is always possible to fit specific daytime running lights to a vehicle at a later date. This measure is already in force in most European countries and is particularly aimed at improving the visibility of vehicles and helping pedestrians and cyclists to judge the distance and speed of an approaching vehicle more easily. From 1 January 2014, this obligation applies to all “automobiles (passenger cars, heavy goods vehicles, delivery vehicles and coaches)”(1) as well as to “motorcycles” driven on Swiss roads. “Electric bicycles and vehicles in circulation before 1970”(2) are exempt.&nb...

  16. Lights on for daytime driving: mandatory from 1 January 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    In accordance with the Swiss Federal Decree of 15 June 2012, it will be mandatory from 1 January 2014 to keep your vehicle lights permanently switched on when driving on Swiss territory.   New vehicles are now equipped with daytime running lights which switch on automatically. For older vehicles, side lights can be used as daytime running lights, and it is always possible to fit specific daytime running lights to a vehicle at a later date. This measure is already in force in most European countries and is particularly aimed at improving the visibility of vehicles and helping pedestrians and cyclists to judge the distance and speed of an approaching vehicle more easily. From 1 January 2014, this obligation applies to all “automobiles (passenger cars, heavy goods vehicles, delivery vehicles and coaches)”(1) as well as to “motorcycles” driven on Swiss roads. “Electric bicycles and vehicles in circulation before 1970”(2) are exempt.&nb...

  17. Hysteresis response of daytime net ecosystem exchange during drought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Pingintha

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Continuous measurements of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE using the eddy-covariance method were made over an agricultural ecosystem in the southeastern US. During optimum environmental conditions, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR was the primary driver controlling daytime NEE, accounting for as much as 67 to 89% of the variation in NEE. However, soil water content became the dominant factor limiting the NEE-PAR response during the peak growth stage. NEE was significantly depressed when high PAR values coincided with very low soil water content. The presence of a counter-clockwise hysteresis of daytime NEE with PAR was observed during periods of water stress. This is a result of the stomatal closure control of photosynthesis at high vapor pressure deficit and enhanced respiration at high temperature. This result is significant since this hysteresis effect limits the range of applicability of the Michaelis-Menten equation and other related expressions in the determination of daytime NEE as a function of PAR. The systematic presence of hysteresis in the response of NEE to PAR suggests that the gap-filling technique based on a non-linear regression approach should take into account the presence of water-limited field conditions. Including this step is therefore likely to improve current evaluation of ecosystem response to increased precipitation variability arising from climatic changes.

  18. Differences in quantitative methods for measuring subjective cognitive decline - results from a prospective memory clinic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Asmus; Salem, Lise Cronberg; Andersen, Birgitte Bo

    2016-01-01

    decline. Depression scores were significantly correlated to both scales measuring subjective decline. Linear regression models showed that age did not have a significant contribution to the variance in subjective memory beyond that of depressive symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Measures for subjective cognitive......BACKGROUND: Cognitive complaints occur frequently in elderly people and may be a risk factor for dementia and cognitive decline. Results from studies on subjective cognitive decline are difficult to compare due to variability in assessment methods, and little is known about how different methods...... influence reports of cognitive decline. METHODS: The Subjective Memory Complaints Scale (SMC) and The Memory Complaint Questionnaire (MAC-Q) were applied in 121 mixed memory clinic patients with mild cognitive symptoms (mean MMSE = 26.8, SD 2.7). The scales were applied independently and raters were blinded...

  19. Daytime Sleepiness: Associations with Alcohol Use and Sleep Duration in Americans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhajit Chakravorty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current analysis was to investigate the relationship of daytime sleepiness with alcohol consumption and sleep duration using a population sample of adult Americans. Data was analyzed from adult respondents of the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES 2007-2008 (N=2919 using self-reported variables for sleepiness, sleep duration, and alcohol consumption (quantity and frequency of alcohol use. A heavy drinking episode was defined as the consumption of ≥5 standard alcoholic beverages in a day. Logistic regression models adjusted for sociodemographic variables and insomnia covariates were used to evaluate the relationship between daytime sleepiness and an interaction of alcohol consumption variables with sleep duration. The results showed that daytime sleepiness was reported by 15.07% of the subjects. In univariate analyses adjusted for covariates, an increased probability of daytime sleepiness was predicted by decreased log drinks per day [OR = 0.74 (95% CI, 0.58–0.95], a decreased log drinking frequency [0.90 (95% CI, 0.83–0.98], and lower sleep duration [OR = 0.75 (95% CI, 0.67–0.84]. An interaction between decreased sleep duration and an increased log heavy drinking frequency predicted increased daytime sleepiness (P=0.004. Thus, the effect of sleep duration should be considered when evaluating the relationship between daytime sleepiness and heavy drinking.

  20. Bud break responds more strongly to daytime than night-time temperature under asymmetric experimental warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Sergio; Isabel, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    Global warming is diurnally asymmetric, leading to a less cold, rather than warmer, climate. We investigated the effects of asymmetric experimental warming on plant phenology by testing the hypothesis that daytime warming is more effective in advancing bud break than night-time warming. Bud break was monitored daily in Picea mariana seedlings belonging to 20 provenances from Eastern Canada and subjected to daytime and night-time warming in growth chambers at temperatures varying between 8 and 16 °C. The higher advancements of bud break and shorter times required to complete the phenological phases occurred with daytime warming. Seedlings responded to night-time warming, but still with less advancement of bud break than under daytime warming. No advancement was observed when night-time warming was associated with a daytime cooling. The effect of the treatments was uniform across provenances. Our observations realized under controlled conditions allowed to experimentally demonstrate that bud break can advance under night-time warming, but to a lesser extent than under daytime warming. Prediction models using daily timescales could neglect the diverging influence of asymmetric warming and should be recalibrated for higher temporal resolutions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Biochemical and cardiovascular measures in subjects with noise-induced hearing loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, S.; Haran, I.; Attias, J.; Shapira, I.; Shahar, A. (Institute for Noise Hazards Research, Ramat Gan (Israel))

    1989-11-01

    Reports on a potential relationship between noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) and cardiovascular as well as biochemical measures are controversial. This study compares the means of certain cardiovascular and biochemical measures in subjects with NIHL with those in subjects exposed to similar occupational noise, but demonstrating normal hearing. This might indicate certain predisposing factors for NIHL. Eight hundred noise-exposed subjects were divided into two age-matched hearing groups (NIHL and normal hearing). The results showed that the mean values of all the variables examined in both hearing groups were within the normal range. No significant differences were found between the two groups in terms of the distribution of subjects for the indices measured.

  2. Correlation of subjective slipperiness judgements with quantitative COF (Coefficient Of Friction) measurements for structural steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purswell, Jerry L.; Schlegel, Robert E.

    1988-06-01

    When there is no simple or accurate procedure for measuring the coefficient of friction (COF) at a job site, workers and/or supervisors involved must make subjective judgments about the slipperiness of the walking and climbing surfaces and in turn decide whether the surface presents a safe or an unsafe condition for work. This project was designed to determine whether these subjective judgment calls did in fact agree with the COF measurements obtained using a mechanical device. It was noted that the coatings chosen for study were subject to a polishing factor by the boot soles during the trials, causing the COF values to become lower as the trials continued. Poor correlation was obtained between subjective ratings of slipperiness and the COF values measured before the trials began. A relatively high correlation was obtained between subjective ratings and the COF values measured after the trials had been completed. A difference was noted in the subjective ratings for the effects of water on a coating for column climbing, but not for walking a beam, suggesting the effects of water on a coating are related to the type of task being performed in steel erection. An increase in the measured COF was noted for all of the coatings when they were wet as compared to the dry condition. The importance of clean shoe soles was clearly demonstrated.

  3. Poor actigraphic and self-reported sleep patterns predict delinquency and daytime impairment among at-risk adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Kristen C; Cuellar, Crystal R; Miller-Loncar, Cynthia L; LaGasse, Linda L; Lester, Barry M

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate associations between actigraphic sleep patterns, subjective sleep quality, and daytime functioning (ie, sleepiness, symptoms of depression, and delinquency and other conduct problems) in at-risk adolescents. Prospective, observational cohort study. Providence, RI, predominantly home and school and 2 visits to the Brown Center for the Study of Children at Risk. A diverse group of low-income 13-year-olds (n = 49) with and without prenatal drug exposure. None. Actigraphy, sleep diaries, and sleep and health questionnaires. Above and beyond the effects of prenatal drug exposure and postnatal adversity, actigraphic daytime sleep was a significant predictor of daytime sleepiness and delinquency. Subjective sleep quality was a significant predictor of daytime sleepiness, delinquency, and depressive symptoms. Later bed times predicted increased delinquency. There was a unique effect of actigraphic daytime sleep duration, subjective nighttime sleep quality, and bedtime on daytime functioning (ie, sleepiness, symptoms of depression, and delinquency and other conduct problems) of at-risk adolescents. In these vulnerable youth, these problematic sleep patterns may contribute to feeling and behaving poorly. Intervention studies with at-risk teens should be conducted to further explore the role of these sleep parameters on daytime functioning. Copyright © 2015 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Subjective well-being in schizophrenia as measured with the Subjective Well-Being under Neuroleptic Treatment scale : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vothknecht, Sylke; Schoevers, Robert A.; de Haan, Lieuwe

    Objective: The Subjective Well-being under Neuroleptic Treatment scale (SWN) is the most widely used self-rating scale in recent research of subjective well-being in schizophrenia. We reviewed all available publications on relevant research of subjective well-being using the SWN, in order to

  5. Subjective well-being in schizophrenia as measured with the Subjective Well-Being under Neuroleptic Treatment scale: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vothknecht, Sylke; Schoevers, Robert A.; de Haan, Lieuwe

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The Subjective Well-being under Neuroleptic Treatment scale (SWN) is the most widely used self-rating scale in recent research of subjective well-being in schizophrenia. We reviewed all available publications on relevant research of subjective well-being using the SWN, in order to

  6. Some Daytime Activities in Solar Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burin, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    This century's transits of Venus (2004, 2012) captured significant public attention, reminding us that the wonders of astronomy need not be confined to the night. And while nighttime telescope viewing gatherings (a.k.a. "star parties") are perennially popular, astronomy classes are typically held in the daytime. The logistics of…

  7. Sleep Schedules and Daytime Functioning in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Amy R.; Carskadon, Mary A.

    1998-01-01

    Studied relationship between adolescents' sleep/wake habits and daytime functioning. Found that self-reported total sleep times decreased from age 13 to 19 years. Struggling or failing students obtained less sleep, went to bed later, and had greater weekend delays of sleep than those with better grades. Students with inadequate sleep reported…

  8. Daytime running lights : its safety evidence revisited.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornstra, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Retrospective in-depth accident studies from several countries confirm that human perception errors are the main causal factor in road accidents. The share of accident types which are relevant for the effect of daytime running lights (DRL), such as overtaking and crossing accidents, in the total of

  9. Excessive daytime sleepiness, nocturnal sleep duration and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    2011-12-04

    Dec 4, 2011 ... The average adult human sleeps for about 8 of every 24 hours.1. Most of our sleep occurs at night, since we function predominantly during the day and it is necessary to be awake and alert. Under certain conditions, humans are unable to maintain the state of wakefulness needed for daytime functioning.

  10. Daytime Napping, Nighttime Sleeping, and Parkinson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jianjun; Huang, Xuemei; Park, Yikyung; Hollenbeck, Albert; Blair, Aaron; Schatzkin, Arthur; Chen, Honglei

    2011-01-01

    Preliminary evidence suggests that daytime sleepiness may predate clinical diagnosis of Parkinson disease. The authors examined daytime napping and nighttime sleeping durations, reported in 1996–1997 by 220,934 US NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study participants, in relation to Parkinson disease diagnoses at 3 clinical stages: established (cases diagnosed before 1995, n = 267), recent (1995–1999, n = 396), and prediagnostic (2000 and after, n = 770). Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were derived from multivariate logistic regression models. Longer daytime napping was associated with higher odds of Parkinson disease at all 3 clinical stages: the odds ratios comparing long nappers (>1 hour/day) with nonnappers were 3.9 (95% confidence interval: 2.8, 5.6) for established cases, 2.2 (95% confidence interval: 1.7, 3.0) for recent cases, and 1.5 (95% confidence interval: 1.2, 1.9) for prediagnostic cases. Further control for health status or nighttime sleeping duration attenuated the association for established cases but made little difference for recent or prediagnostic cases. In the nighttime sleeping analysis, a clear U-shaped association with Parkinson disease was observed for established cases; however, this association was attenuated markedly for recent cases and disappeared for prediagnostic cases. This study supports the notion that daytime sleepiness, but not nighttime sleeping duration, is one of the early nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson disease. PMID:21402730

  11. Daytime Celestial Navigation for the Novice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Philip M.; Night, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    What kinds of astronomical lab activities can high school and college astronomy students carry out easily in daytime? The most impressive is the determination of latitude and longitude from observations of the Sun. The "shooting of a noon sight" and its "reduction to a position" grew to become a daily practice at the start of the 19th century…

  12. Excessive daytime sleepiness, nocturnal sleep duration and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and objectives. Short nocturnal sleep duration resulting in sleep debt may be a cause of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Severity of depression (psychopathology) has been found to be directly related to EDS. There is an association between sleep duration and mental health, so there may therefore be an ...

  13. Psychological job strain, social support at work and daytime secretion of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in healthy female employees: cross-sectional analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Atsuhiko Ota; Hiroshi Yatsuya; Junji Mase; Yuichiro Ono

    2015-01-01

    Evidence is limited concerning the influences of high psychological job strain and low social support at work on daytime secretion of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), which demonstrates anti-cortisol effects. We carried out a cross-sectional study to examine the associations of job strain and social support with daytime secretion amounts of DHEA and cortisol and daytime variation of the cortisol-to-DHEA ratio (C/D ratio) in healthy female workers. Study subjects comprised 115 healthy female nur...

  14. Satisfaction with travel and subjective well-being: development and test of a measurement tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, D.F.; Gärling, T.; Eriksson, L.; Friman, M.; Olsson, L.E.; Fujii, S.

    2011-01-01

    Subjective well-being (SWB) that includes individuals’ cognitive and affective evaluations of life in general is proposed to be a more appropriate measure capturing the benefits individuals derive from travel improvements. We develop and testa measure of travel-related SWB, the nine item self-report

  15. Associations of objectively and subjectively measured sleep quality with subsequent cognitive decline in older community-dwelling men: the MrOS sleep study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Terri; Yaffe, Kristine; Laffan, Alison; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Redline, Susan; Ensrud, Kristine E; Song, Yeonsu; Stone, Katie L

    2014-04-01

    To examine associations of objectively and subjectively measured sleep with subsequent cognitive decline. A population-based longitudinal study. Six centers in the United States. Participants were 2,822 cognitively intact community-dwelling older men (mean age 76.0 ± 5.3 y) followed over 3.4 ± 0.5 y. None. OBJECTIVELY MEASURED SLEEP PREDICTORS FROM WRIST ACTIGRAPHY: total sleep time (TST), sleep efficiency (SE), wake after sleep onset (WASO), number of long wake episodes (LWEP). Self-reported sleep predictors: sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI]), daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale [ESS]), TST. Clinically significant cognitive decline: five-point decline on the Modified Mini-Mental State examination (3MS), change score for the Trails B test time in the worse decile. Associations of sleep predictors and cognitive decline were examined with logistic regression and linear mixed models. After multivariable adjustment, higher levels of WASO and LWEP and lower SE were associated with an 1.4 to 1.5-fold increase in odds of clinically significant decline (odds ratio 95% confidence interval) Trails B test: SE sleep efficiency, greater nighttime wakefulness, greater number of long wake episodes, and poor self-reported sleep quality were associated with subsequent cognitive decline.

  16. Validity and reliability of subjective wellbeing indicators in sociological research: The measurement of life satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mentus Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this paper is the level of accuracy i.e. validity and reliability of subjective well-being indicators in sociological research, in case of life satisfaction. First, the relationship between subjective and objective indicators of well-being is presented. Second, the concept of life satisfaction is defined, and the findings of research related to the validity (convergent, discriminant, and predictive and reliability (test-retest, and internal consistency of life satisfaction measures are presented. Third, these findings were reassessed using data originating from large international surveys, which have not been used for this purpose yet. The results in this paper generally contribute to, in quite a large extent existing agreement within the scientific literature about the satisfactory level of validity and reliability of life satisfaction measures i.e. subjective indicators of well-being.

  17. Mood Influences the Concordance of Subjective and Objective Measures of Sleep Duration in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Baillet

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective/Background: Sleep plays a central role in maintaining health and cognition. In most epidemiologic studies, sleep is evaluated by self-report questionnaires but several reports suggest that these evaluations might be less accurate than objective measures such as polysomnography or actigraphy. Determinants of the discrepancy between objective and subjective measures remain to be investigated. The aim of this pilot-study was to examine the role of mood states in determining the discrepancy observed between objective and subjective measures of sleep duration in older adults.Patients/Methods: Objective sleep quantity and quality were recorded by actigraphy in a sample of 45 elderly subjects over at least three consecutive nights. Subjective sleep duration and supplementary data, such as mood status and memory, were evaluated using Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA.Results: A significant discrepancy was observed between EMA and actigraphic measures of sleep duration (p<0.001. The magnitude of this difference was explained by the patient’s mood status (p=0.020. No association was found between the magnitude of this discrepancy and age, sex, sleep quality or memory performance.Conclusion: The discrepancy classically observed between objective and subjective measures of sleep duration can be explained by mood status at the time of awakening. These results have potential implications for epidemiologic and clinical studies examining sleep as a risk factor for morbidity or mortality.

  18. Mood Influences the Concordance of Subjective and Objective Measures of Sleep Duration in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillet, Marion; Cosin, Charlotte; Schweitzer, Pierre; Pérès, Karine; Catheline, Gwenaëlle; Swendsen, Joel; Mayo, Willy

    2016-01-01

    Sleep plays a central role in maintaining health and cognition. In most epidemiologic studies, sleep is evaluated by self-report questionnaires but several reports suggest that these evaluations might be less accurate than objective measures such as polysomnography or actigraphy. Determinants of the discrepancy between objective and subjective measures remain to be investigated. The aim of this pilot-study was to examine the role of mood states in determining the discrepancy observed between objective and subjective measures of sleep duration in older adults. Objective sleep quantity and quality were recorded by actigraphy in a sample of 45 elderly subjects over at least three consecutive nights. Subjective sleep duration and supplementary data, such as mood status and memory, were evaluated using ecological momentary assessment (EMA). A significant discrepancy was observed between EMA and actigraphic measures of sleep duration (p sleep quality or memory performance. The discrepancy classically observed between objective and subjective measures of sleep duration can be explained by mood status at the time of awakening. These results have potential implications for epidemiologic and clinical studies examining sleep as a risk factor for morbidity or mortality.

  19. Subjective measures of hearing aid benefit in the NIDCD/VA Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskell, George B; Noffsinger, Douglas; Larson, Vernon D; Williams, David W; Dobie, Robert A; Rogers, Janette L

    2002-08-01

    Subjective measures of performance were assessed on three different hearing aid circuits as part of a large clinical trial. These measurements included the Profile of Hearing Aid Performance and a subjective ranking of individual preference. A multi-center, double-masked clinical trial of hearing aids was conducted at eight VA Medical Centers. Three hearing aid circuits, a linear peak-clipper, a linear compression limiter and a wide dynamic range compressor, were investigated. The experimental design was a three-period, three-treatment crossover design. Subjects (N = 360) were stratified by site and randomized to one of six sequences for the hearing aid circuits. All fittings were binaural and involved a 3-mo trial with each of the three circuits. All subjective measures were administered for unaided and aided conditions at the end of each trial period. While all of the circuits resulted in improved scores on the aided versus the unaided PHAP, there were few conditions in which one circuit outperformed the others. An exception was the aversiveness of sound subscale where the peak clipper frequently scored worse than either the compression limiter or the wide dynamic range compressor. In the subjective ranking scale the compression limiter received more first place rankings than the other two circuits, especially for one subgroup of patients with moderate flat hearing loss. All circuits were perceived as beneficial by these subjects in most situations. The peak clipper scored worse on aversiveness of sound than did the other two circuits for most subjects, while the compression limiter seemed to have a slight advantage in subjective rankings. Most subjects perceived considerable aided benefit in situations involving background noise and reverberation, situations where hearing aid benefit is often questioned.

  20. Retinal nerve fiber layer measurements by scanning laser polarimetry with enhanced corneal compensation in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Harsha L; Venkatesh, Chirravuri R; Vidyasagar, Kelli; Yadav, Ravi K; Addepalli, Uday K; Jude, Aarthi; Senthil, Sirisha; Garudadri, Chandra S

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the (i) effects of biological (age and axial length) and instrument-related [typical scan score (TSS) and corneal birefringence] parameters on the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) measurements and (ii) repeatability of RNFL measurements with the enhanced corneal compensation (ECC) protocol of scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) in healthy subjects. In a cross-sectional study, 140 eyes of 73 healthy subjects underwent RNFL imaging with the ECC protocol of SLP. Linear mixed modeling methods were used to evaluate the effects of age, axial length, TSS, and corneal birefringence on RNFL measurements. One randomly selected eye of 48 subjects from the cohort underwent 3 serial scans during the same session to determine the repeatability. Age significantly influenced all RNFL measurements. RNFL measurements decreased by 1 µm for every decade increase in age. TSS affected the overall average RNFL measurement (β=-0.62, P=0.003), whereas residual anterior segment retardance affected the superior quadrant measurement (β=1.14, P=0.01). Axial length and corneal birefringence measurements did not influence RNFL measurements. Repeatability, as assessed by the coefficient of variation, ranged between 1.7% for the overall average RNFL measurement and 11.4% for th nerve fiber indicator. Age significantly affected all RNFL measurements with the ECC protocol of SLP, whereas TSS and residual anterior segment retardance affected the overall average and the superior average RNFL measurements, respectively. Axial length and corneal birefringence measurements did not influence any RNFL measurements. RNFL measurements had good intrasession repeatability. These results are important while evaluating the change in structural measurements over time in glaucoma patients.

  1. Sleep disordered breathing and daytime sleepiness are associated with poor academic performance in teenagers. A study using the Pediatric Daytime Sleepiness Scale (PDSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Chada, Daniel; Perez-Lloret, Santiago; Videla, Alejandro J; Cardinali, Daniel; Bergna, Miguel A; Fernández-Acquier, Mariano; Larrateguy, Luis; Zabert, Gustavo E; Drake, Christopher

    2007-12-01

    Inadequate sleep and sleep disordered breathing (SDB) can impair learning skills. Questionnaires used to evaluate sleepiness in adults are usually inadequate for adolescents. We conducted a study to evaluate the performance of a Spanish version of the Pediatric Daytime Sleepiness Scale (PDSS) and to assess the impact of sleepiness and SDB on academic performance. A cross-sectional survey of students from 7 schools in 4 cities of Argentina. A questionnaire with a Spanish version of the PDSS was used. Questions on the occurrence of snoring and witnessed apneas were answered by the parents. Mathematics and language grades were used as indicators of academic performance. The sample included 2,884 students (50% males; age: 13.3 +/- 1.5 years) Response rate was 85%; 678 cases were excluded due to missing data. Half the students slept <9 h per night on weekdays. The mean PDSS value was 15.74 +/- 5.93. Parental reporting of snoring occurred in 511 subjects (23%); snoring was occasional in 14% and frequent in 9%. Apneas were witnessed in 237 cases (11%), being frequent in 4% and occasional in 7%. Frequent snorers had higher mean PDSS scores than occasional or nonsnorers (18 +/- 5, 15.7 +/- 6 and 15.5 +/- 6, respectively; P < 0.001). Reported snoring or apneas and the PDSS were significant univariate predictors of failure and remained significant in multivariate logistic regression analysis after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, specific school attended, and sleep habits. Insufficient hours of sleep were prevalent in this population. The Spanish version of the PDSS was a reliable tool in middle-school-aged children. Reports of snoring or witnessed apneas and daytime sleepiness as measured by PDSS were independent predictors of poor academic performance.

  2. Can standardized sleep questionnaires be used to identify excessive daytime sleeping in older post-acute rehabilitation patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibitsky, Megan; Edelen, Maria Orlando; Martin, Jennifer L; Harker, Judith; Alessi, Cathy; Saliba, Debra

    2012-02-01

    Excessive daytime sleeping is associated with poorer functional outcomes in rehabilitation populations and may be improved with targeted interventions. The purpose of this study was to test simple methods of screening for excessive daytime sleeping among older adults admitted for postacute rehabilitation. Secondary analysis of data from 2 clinical samples. Two postacute rehabilitation (PAR) units in southern California. Two hundred twenty-six patients older than 65 years with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score higher than 11 undergoing rehabilitation. The primary outcome was excessive daytime sleeping, defined as greater than 15% (1.8 hours) of daytime hours (8 am to 8 pm) sleeping as measured by actigraphy. Participants spent, on average, 16.2% (SD 12.5%) of daytime hours sleeping as measured by actigraphy. Thirty-nine percent of participants had excessive daytime sleeping. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was significantly associated with actigraphically measured daytime sleeping (P = .0038), but the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) was not (P = .49). Neither the ESS nor the PSQI achieved sufficient sensitivity and specificity to be used as a screening tool for excessive daytime sleeping. Two additional models using items from these questionnaires were not significantly associated with the outcome. In an older PAR population, self-report items from existing sleep questionnaires do not identify excessive daytime sleeping. Therefore we recommend objective measures for the evaluation of excessive daytime sleeping as well as further research to identify new self-report items that may be more applicable in PAR populations. Copyright © 2012 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Products for Children with Enuresis and Daytime Urinary Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home » Products for Children with Enuresis and Daytime Urinary Incontinence The products listed here are designed for children with bedwetting (enuresis) or daytime bladder control problems (incontinence or ...

  4. Relationships Among Daytime Napping and Fatigue, Sleep Quality, and Quality of Life in Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jia-Ling; Lin, Chia-Chin

    2016-01-01

    The relationships among napping and sleep quality, fatigue, and quality of life (QOL) in cancer patients are not clearly understood. The aim of the study was to determine whether daytime napping is associated with nighttime sleep, fatigue, and QOL in cancer patients. In total, 187 cancer patients were recruited. Daytime napping, nighttime self-reported sleep, fatigue, and QOL were assessed using a questionnaire. Objective sleep parameters were collected using a wrist actigraph. According to waking-after-sleep-onset measurements, patients who napped during the day experienced poorer nighttime sleep than did patients who did not (t = -2.44, P = .02). Daytime napping duration was significantly negatively correlated with QOL. Patients who napped after 4 PM had poorer sleep quality (t = -1.93, P = .05) and a poorer Short-Form Health Survey mental component score (t = 2.06, P = .04) than did patients who did not. Fatigue, daytime napping duration, and sleep quality were significant predictors of the mental component score and physical component score, accounting for 45.7% and 39.3% of the variance, respectively. Daytime napping duration was negatively associated with QOL. Napping should be avoided after 4 PM. Daytime napping affects the QOL of cancer patients. Future research can determine the role of napping in the sleep hygiene of cancer patients.

  5. Objective and subjective measures of neighborhood environment (NE): relationships with transportation physical activity among older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyunt, Ma Shwe Zin; Shuvo, Faysal Kabir; Eng, Jia Yen; Yap, Keng Bee; Scherer, Samuel; Hee, Li Min; Chan, Siew Pang; Ng, Tze Pin

    2015-09-15

    This study examined the associations of subjective and objective measures of the neighbourhood environment with the transportation physical activity of community-dwelling older persons in Singapore. A modified version of the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale (NEWS) and Geographical Information System (GIS) measures of the built environment characteristics were related to the frequency of walking for transportation purpose in a study sample of older persons living in high-density apartment blocks within a public housing estate in Singapore. Relevant measured variables to assess the complex relationships among built environment measures and transportation physical activity were examined using structural equation modelling and multiple regression analyses. The subjective measures of residential density, street connectivity, land use mix diversity and aesthetic environment and the objective GIS measure of Accessibility Index have positively significant independent associations with transportation physical activity, after adjusting for demographics, socio-economic and health status. Subjective and objective measures are non-overlapping measures complementing each other in providing information on built environment characteristics. For elderly living in a high-density urban neighborhood, well connected street, diversity of land use mix, close proximity to amenities and facilities, and aesthetic environment were associated with higher frequency of walking for transportation purposes.

  6. Effects of tryptophan-rich breakfast and light exposure during the daytime on melatonin secretion at night.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushige, Haruna; Fukuda, Yumi; Tanaka, Mizuho; Inami, Kaoru; Wada, Kai; Tsumura, Yuki; Kondo, Masayuki; Harada, Tetsuo; Wakamura, Tomoko; Morita, Takeshi

    2014-11-19

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate effects of tryptophan intake and light exposure on melatonin secretion and sleep by modifying tryptophan ingestion at breakfast and light exposure during the daytime, and measuring sleep quality (by using actigraphy and the OSA sleep inventory) and melatonin secretion at night. Thirty three male University students (mean ± SD age: 22 ± 3.1 years) completed the experiments lasting 5 days and 4 nights. The subjects were randomly divided into four groups: Poor*Dim (n = 10), meaning a tryptophan-poor breakfast (55 mg/meal) in the morning and dim light environment (breakfast (476 mg/meal) and dim light environment; Poor*Bright (n = 9), tryptophan-poor breakfast and bright light environment (>5,000 lx); and Rich*Bright (n = 7), tryptophan-rich breakfast and bright light. Saliva melatonin concentrations on the fourth day were significantly lower than on the first day in the Poor*Dim group, whereas they were higher on the fourth day in the Rich*Bright group. Creatinine-adjusted melatonin in urine showed the same direction as saliva melatonin concentrations. These results indicate that the combination of a tryptophan-rich breakfast and bright light exposure during the daytime could promote melatonin secretion at night; further, the observations that the Rich*Bright group had higher melatonin concentrations than the Rich*Dim group, despite no significant differences being observed between the Poor*Dim and Rich*Dim groups nor the Poor*Bright and Rich*Bright groups, suggest that bright light exposure in the daytime is an important contributor to raised melatonin levels in the evening. This study is the first to report the quantitative effects of changed tryptophan intake at breakfast combined with daytime light exposure on melatonin secretion and sleep quality. Evening saliva melatonin secretion changed significantly and indicated that a tryptophan-rich breakfast and bright light exposure during the daytime

  7. Sleep disordered breathing and daytime quality of life in children with allergic rhinitis during treatment with intranasal budesonide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Lyndon E; Diaz, Gonzalo; Posey, Catherine R; Flores-Neder, Jaime

    2004-02-01

    Nasal obstruction is recognized as an important cause of sleep disordered breathing. Congestion of the nasal mucosa and obstruction are common symptoms of allergic rhinitis. Daytime sleepiness is a common finding in symptomatic allergic rhinitis. Effective therapy of the nasal congestion of allergic rhinitis should alter sleep patterns in patients with symptomatic allergic rhinitis. To measure objective changes in polysomnograms (sleep studies) of children with allergic rhinitis before and after therapy with intranasal budesonide and to measure changes in the quality of life of these patients during treatment. Open clinical trial with objective measurements (polysomnography) and subjective data (Rhinitis Quality of Life Questionnaire [RQLQ]). Evaluations were performed before, during, and at completion of therapeutic intervention. The 14 studied children tolerated the procedures and treatment without problems. The mean number of sleep arousals per hour (all apneas and hypopneas) decreased from a baseline of 8.4 to 1.2 (P = .005) after treatment. The change was mainly in hypopneic episodes (7.5-0.9, P = .003). Objective responses on the RQLQ showed improvements consistent with improved sleep and lessened rhinitis symptoms. Decreasing the nasal congestion associated with allergic rhinitis can improve sleep measured by objective sleep studies and lead to improvement in daytime quality of life.

  8. Reproducibility of the measurements of knee joint proprioception in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee and healthy subject

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurkmans, E.; van der Esch, M.; Ostelo, R.W.J.G.; Knol, D.L.; Dekker, J; Steultjens, M

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To estimate the inter- and intrarater reliability and agreement of instrumented knee joint proprioception measurement in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and healthy subjects; to assess the effect of variations in the measurement procedure on agreement parameters. Methods.

  9. Tropospheric haze and colors of the clear daytime sky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Raymond L

    2015-02-01

    To casual observers, haze's visible effects on clear daytime skies may seem mundane: significant scattering by tropospheric aerosols visibly (1) reduces the luminance contrast of distant objects and (2) desaturates sky blueness. However, few published measurements of hazy-sky spectra and chromaticities exist to compare with these naked-eye observations. Hyperspectral imaging along sky meridians of clear and hazy skies at one inland and two coastal sites shows that they have characteristic colorimetric signatures of scattering and absorption by haze aerosols. In addition, a simple spectral transfer function and a second-order scattering model of skylight reveal the net spectral and colorimetric effects of haze.

  10. Poor sleep moderates the relationship between daytime napping and inflammation in Black and White men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowski, Karen P; Boylan, Jennifer M; Cundiff, Jenny M; Matthews, Karen A

    2017-10-01

    To test whether napping was associated with 2 inflammatory markers with known relationships to cardiovascular disease: high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Because IL-6 is known to impact central inflammatory processes that relate to sleep regulation, including subjective fatigue, we tested whether this relationship was moderated by sleep duration, sleep efficiency, and self-reported sleep quality. Cross-sectional. A community sample of Black and White men (N=253) completed a week of actigraphy and diary measures of sleep and napping and provided a fasting blood sample. Napping was measured as the proportion of days with at least 30 minutes napped and the average minutes napped per day. Linear regressions adjusted for race, socioeconomic status, employment, body mass index, smoking, medications that affect sleep or inflammation, working the nightshift, and day-sleeping status, followed by interaction terms between napping and sleep duration, efficiency, and quality, respectively. There were no significant main effects of actigraphy- or diary-measured napping on IL-6 or hsCRP. Moderation analyses indicated elevated IL-6 values among men who napped more days (by actigraphy) and demonstrated short sleep duration (P=.03). Moderation analyses also indicated elevated IL-6 among men who demonstrated greater average minutes napped (by actigraphy) and short sleep duration (Pnapping or hsCRP were not significant. Actigraphy-assessed daytime napping is related to higher IL-6 in men who demonstrate worse sleep characteristics. Daytime napping may pose additional risk for inflammation beyond the known risk conferred by short sleep. Copyright © 2017 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Measuring Welfare beyond GDP : 'Objective' and 'Subjective' Indicators in Sweden, 1968-2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Kullenberg

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses a series of negotiations on how to measure welfare and quality of life in Sweden beyond economic indicators. It departs from a 2015 Government Official Report that advanced a strong recommendation to measure only 'objective indicators' of quality of life, rather than relying on what is referred to as 'subjective indicators' such as life satisfaction and happiness. The assertion of strictly 'objective' indicators falls back on a sociological perspective developed in the 1970s, which conceived of welfare as being measurable as 'levels of living', a framework that came to be called 'the Scandinavian model of welfare research'. However, in the mid-2000s, objective indicators were challenged scientifically by the emerging field of happiness studies, which also found political advocates in Sweden who argued that subjective indicators should become an integral part of measuring welfare. This tension between 'subjective' and 'objective' measurements resulted in a controversy between several actors about what should count as a valuable measurement of welfare. As a consequence, we argue that the creation of such value meters is closely intertwined with how welfare is defined, and by what measures welfare should be carried through.

  12. Seasonality of temperate forest photosynthesis and daytime respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehr, R; Munger, J W; McManus, J B; Nelson, D D; Zahniser, M S; Davidson, E A; Wofsy, S C; Saleska, S R

    2016-06-30

    Terrestrial ecosystems currently offset one-quarter of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions because of a slight imbalance between global terrestrial photosynthesis and respiration. Understanding what controls these two biological fluxes is therefore crucial to predicting climate change. Yet there is no way of directly measuring the photosynthesis or daytime respiration of a whole ecosystem of interacting organisms; instead, these fluxes are generally inferred from measurements of net ecosystem-atmosphere CO2 exchange (NEE), in a way that is based on assumed ecosystem-scale responses to the environment. The consequent view of temperate deciduous forests (an important CO2 sink) is that, first, ecosystem respiration is greater during the day than at night; and second, ecosystem photosynthetic light-use efficiency peaks after leaf expansion in spring and then declines, presumably because of leaf ageing or water stress. This view has underlain the development of terrestrial biosphere models used in climate prediction and of remote sensing indices of global biosphere productivity. Here, we use new isotopic instrumentation to determine ecosystem photosynthesis and daytime respiration in a temperate deciduous forest over a three-year period. We find that ecosystem respiration is lower during the day than at night-the first robust evidence of the inhibition of leaf respiration by light at the ecosystem scale. Because they do not capture this effect, standard approaches overestimate ecosystem photosynthesis and daytime respiration in the first half of the growing season at our site, and inaccurately portray ecosystem photosynthetic light-use efficiency. These findings revise our understanding of forest-atmosphere carbon exchange, and provide a basis for investigating how leaf-level physiological dynamics manifest at the canopy scale in other ecosystems.

  13. Objectively and subjectively measured physical activity: associations with cognition and academic achievement in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, Martin; De Groot, Renate; Van Acker, Frederik; Savelberg, Hans; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Van Dijk, M. L., De Groot, R. H. M., Van Acker, F., Savelberg, H. C. M., & Kirschner, P. A. (2013, 26 February). Objectively and subjectively measured physical activity: associations with cognition and academic achievement in adolescents. Presentation at the CELSTEC plenary, Heerlen, The

  14. Comparison of the subjective sense of high or low metabolism and objectively measured resting metabolic rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallhuss, Andreas; Isik, Markus; Nystrom, Fredrik H

    2010-09-01

    To measure caloric intake, physical activity level and resting metabolic rate in participants having the subjective opinion of either having a high or low metabolic rate. Recruitment by local advertising of healthy subjects feeling that they have high or low metabolism, i.e. either a tendency to easily stay lean ('high') or to very easily gain weight ('low') also when taking food intake in comparison with physical activity into account. Walking distance was estimated by pedometry, assessment of caloric intake was determined by food registration. Measurement of resting metabolic rate was performed in the fasting state. We recruited 44 participants with a sense of 'high' metabolism and 12 subjects in the contrasting group. Subjects with 'high' metabolism were leaner ('high': 20.4 +/- 2.1 kg/m(2), 'low': 27.8 +/- 7.5 kg/m(2), p difference in the measured resting metabolic rate between the two groups ('high': 7230 +/- 1233 kJ/24 h, 'low': 7430 +/- 1422 kJ/24 h, p = 0.6), nor was there any difference in physical activity measured by pedometry. Resting metabolic rate was negatively correlated with age and positively correlated with BMI in multivariate analyses of the total cohort. The sense of having a low or high metabolic rate is not related to actual resting metabolic rate.

  15. "Chips with Everything": A Laboratory Exercise for Comparing Subjective and Objective Measurements of Potato Chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Cathy

    2005-01-01

    The following laboratory exercise was designed to aid student understanding of the differences between subjective and objective measurements. Students assess the color and texture of different varieties of potato chip (crisps) by means of an intensity rating scale and a rank test and objectively with a colorimeter and texture analyzer. For data…

  16. Measuring Quality of Life in Stroke Subjects Receiving an Implanted Neural Prosthesis for Drop Foot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kottink, Anke I.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Catharina Gerarda Maria; Kottink, A.I.R.

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to determine if the treatment of a drop foot by means of an implantable two-channel peroneal nerve stimulator improves health-related quality of life (HRQoL). All subjects were measured at baseline and after a follow-up period of 12 and 26 weeks. Twenty-nine stroke survivors with chronic

  17. Objectively versus subjectively measured physical activity: associations with cognition and academic achievement in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, Martin; De Groot, Renate; Savelberg, Hans; Van Acker, Frederik; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Van Dijk, M. L., De Groot, R. H. M., Savelberg, H. C. M., Van Acker, F. H. M., & Kirschner, P. A. (2013, 25 May). Objectively versus subjectively measured physical activity: associations with cognition and academic achievement in adolescents. Poster presentation at the ISBNPA conference 2013, Ghent,

  18. A Short Introduction to Subjective Well-being: Measurement, Correlates and Policy Uses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorn, A.A.J. van

    2008-01-01

    Since the emergence of the field over five decades ago, the subjective well-being (SWB; e.g. self-reported happiness or life satisfaction) literature has progressed rapidly. This overview discusses the state of the art in the measurement of SWB, the understanding of the factors determining SWB,

  19. Age-related Changes In Sleep Spindles Characteristics During Daytime Recovery Following a 25-Hour Sleep Deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaïna eRosinvil

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The mechanisms underlying sleep spindles (~11-15Hz; >0.5s help to protect sleep. With age, it becomes increasingly difficult to maintain sleep at a challenging time (e.g. daytime, even after sleep loss. This study compared spindle characteristics during daytime recovery and nocturnal sleep in young and middle-aged adults. In addition, we explored whether spindles characteristics in baseline nocturnal sleep were associated with the ability to maintain sleep during daytime recovery periods in both age groups.Methods: Twenty-nine young (15 women and 14 men; 27.3 ± 5.0 and 31 middle-aged (19 women and 13 men; 51.6 y ± 5.1 healthy subjects participated in a baseline nocturnal sleep and a daytime recovery sleep after 25 hours of sleep deprivation. Spindles were detected on artefact-free NREM sleep epochs. Spindle density (nb/min, amplitude (μV, frequency (Hz and duration (s were analyzed on parasagittal (linked-ears derivations. Results: In young subjects, spindle frequency increased during daytime recovery sleep as compared to baseline nocturnal sleep in all derivations, whereas middle-aged subjects showed spindle frequency enhancement only in the prefrontal derivation. No other significant interaction between age group and sleep condition was observed. Spindle density for all derivations and centro-occipital spindle amplitude decreased whereas prefrontal spindle amplitude increased from baseline to daytime recovery sleep in both age groups. Finally, no significant correlation was found between spindle characteristics during baseline nocturnal sleep and the marked reduction in sleep efficiency during daytime recovery sleep in both young and middle-aged subjects.Conclusion: These results suggest that the interaction between homeostatic and circadian pressure module spindle frequency differently in aging. Spindle characteristics do not seem to be linked with the ability to maintain daytime recovery sleep.

  20. Comparison of verbal and pictorial measures of hunger during fasting in normal weight and obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, M R; Friedman, M I; Mattes, R; Kopyt, D; Gayda, C

    2000-11-01

    Friedman, Ulrich, and Mattes described a new pictorial instrument for assessing hunger wherein respondents outline areas on a drawing of a human figure to depict the location of their hunger sensations. The present study compared normal weight and obese individuals on the pictorial measure and on more traditional verbal hunger measures during a 22-hour fast. The pictorial measure, along with 13 verbal items assessing hunger and hunger-related symptoms, was administered to 29 normal weight college students and 46 overweight clinic patients four times during a 22-hour fast. Factor analyses of verbal hunger items produced Hunger, Somatic Symptoms, and Stomach Symptoms factors. The pictorial measure was divided into peripheral (arms, legs, head) and central (trunk) body areas. The increases in hunger during the fast were greater when measured using the pictorial as opposed to the verbal instrument. Correlations between and within the three verbal hunger measures and two pictorial measures were generally few in number and modest in size. The overall pattern of correlations suggested that the verbally based hunger measures more adequately reflected the experience of hunger in normal weight than in obese individuals. A significant interaction between weight status and assessment period was found for the pictorial measure, indicating that normal weight subjects experienced more bodily hunger than overweight subjects initially but experienced less hunger than obese subjects after a prolonged period of food deprivation. Although more testing is needed, these results suggest that the pictorial hunger assessment provides information about the experience of hunger that could complement information provided by traditional verbally based hunger measures.

  1. Examining complexity across domains: relating subjective and objective measures of affective environmental scenes, paintings and music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Manuela M; Leder, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Subjective complexity has been found to be related to hedonic measures of preference, pleasantness and beauty, but there is no consensus about the nature of this relationship in the visual and musical domains. Moreover, the affective content of stimuli has been largely neglected so far in the study of complexity but is crucial in many everyday contexts and in aesthetic experiences. We thus propose a cross-domain approach that acknowledges the multidimensional nature of complexity and that uses a wide range of objective complexity measures combined with subjective ratings. In four experiments, we employed pictures of affective environmental scenes, representational paintings, and Romantic solo and chamber music excerpts. Stimuli were pre-selected to vary in emotional content (pleasantness and arousal) and complexity (low versus high number of elements). For each set of stimuli, in a between-subjects design, ratings of familiarity, complexity, pleasantness and arousal were obtained for a presentation time of 25 s from 152 participants. In line with Berlyne's collative-motivation model, statistical analyses controlling for familiarity revealed a positive relationship between subjective complexity and arousal, and the highest correlations were observed for musical stimuli. Evidence for a mediating role of arousal in the complexity-pleasantness relationship was demonstrated in all experiments, but was only significant for females with regard to music. The direction and strength of the linear relationship between complexity and pleasantness depended on the stimulus type and gender. For environmental scenes, the root mean square contrast measures and measures of compressed file size correlated best with subjective complexity, whereas only edge detection based on phase congruency yielded equivalent results for representational paintings. Measures of compressed file size and event density also showed positive correlations with complexity and arousal in music, which is

  2. Local effects in the respiratory tract: relevance of subjectively measured irritation for setting occupational exposure limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, Josje H E; de Heer, Cees; Woutersen, Ruud A

    2006-04-01

    Chemosensory effects of stimulation by a chemical can either be irritating (trigeminal stimulation) or odorous (olfactory stimulation) or both. For odorous irritants, a clear-cut distinction between odour and irritation is difficult to make. The differences in the lowest concentration found to be irritating to the respiratory tract in humans when compared to experimental animals has brought much debate in the process of setting occupational exposure limits (OELs) for such chemicals. In this paper it will be discussed as to how far subjectively measured sensory irritation threshold levels can be used to establish OELs. Data on respiratory irritation of four odorous irritants were retrieved from public literature and discussed, viz. acetone, formaldehyde, furfural and sulphur dioxide. Objective measures of irritation yielded results that differed from subjective evaluations. Important factors modulating the reported levels of irritation and health symptoms include the perception of odour intensity, exposure history and the individual's bias to report irritation on the basis of his/her prejudice or knowledge of the compound. Subjective measures alone are less appropriate for establishing sensory irritation thresholds of odorous irritants and are, therefore, less suitable to establish OELs without supporting evidence. Objectively measured irritation in humans, the Alarie assay (an experimental animal test assessing the concentration that results in a 50% reduction of the breathing frequency) and repeated exposure studies in animals may be of help to study objective irritation. If subjective measurements are used to study sensory irritation, the study design should at least include: measurement of both incidence and severity determined at several concentrations, an appropriate (0 ppm) control condition, preferably a non-irritant odorant control exposure, validated questionnaires and correct concentration measurements.

  3. Multichannel SQUID system for measurement of spinal cord evoked magnetic field for supine subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Y; Kawai, J; Miyamoto, M; Uehara, G; Ogata, H [Applied Electronics Laboratory, Kanazawa Institute of Technology, 3 Amaike, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-1331 (Japan); Kawabata, S [Section of Orthopaedic and Spinal Surgery, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8519 (Japan)

    2008-02-01

    A SQUID biomagnetometer system for cervical spinal cord evoked field (SCEF) was developed to investigate a non-invasive diagnosis of function of the spinal cord. The measurement system was characterized by a uniquely shaped cryostat designed for supine subjects. The cryostat has a vertical cylindrical main body whose dimensions are 500 mm in diameter and 940 mm in height and a horizontal protrusion from the side surface with 390 mm of length. The sensor array of 35 LTS-SQUID vector gradiometers directed vertically upward is installed in the end of the protruded part. Subjects lie on a bed in supine position with the head running off the edge of the bed and the back of the neck supported on the upper surface of the protruded part of the cryostat standing beside the bed. This structure readily enables the sensor array to approach close to the neck of the supine subject. The subjects can keep their posture stable during the measurement. We demonstrated the cervical SCEF was successfully detected from a healthy subject who was given electric stimulation to the median nerve at the wrist. The intensity of the evoked magnetic field was 40-70 fT in amplitude. The neural signal propagating along the spinal cord was magnetically observed from the investigation of the transition of the magnetic field distribution.

  4. Electromyogram biofeedback training for daytime clenching and its effect on sleep bruxism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M; Iizuka, T; Watanabe, A; Iwase, N; Otsuka, H; Terada, N; Fujisawa, M

    2015-02-01

    Bruxism contributes to the development of temporomandibular disorders as well as causes dental problems. Although it is an important issue in clinical dentistry, no treatment approaches have been proven effective. This study aimed to use electromyogram (EMG) biofeedback (BF) training to improve awake bruxism (AB) and examine its effect on sleep bruxism (SB). Twelve male participants (mean age, 26·8 ± 2·5 years) with subjective symptoms of AB or a diagnosis of SB were randomly divided into BF (n = 7) and control (CO, n = 5) groups to undergo 5-h daytime and night-time EMG measurements for three consecutive weeks. EMG electrodes were placed over the temporalis muscle on the habitual masticatory side. Those in the BF group underwent BF training to remind them of the occurrence of undesirable clenching activity when excessive EMG activity of certain burst duration was generated in week 2. Then, EMGs were recorded at week 3 as the post-BF test. Those in the CO group underwent EMG measurement without any EMG BF training throughout the study period. Although the number of tonic EMG events did not show statistically significant differences among weeks 1-3 in the CO group, events in weeks 2 and 3 decreased significantly compared with those in week 1, both daytime and night-time, in the BF group (P < 0·05, Scheffé's test). This study results suggest that EMG BF to improve AB tonic EMG events can also provide an effective approach to regulate SB tonic EMG events. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Comparison of Occlusion Effect in Normal Hearing Subjects via Real Ear Measurement and Audiometric Bing Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meymaneh Jafari

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: One of the most common complaints, particularly among patients with normal or near normal low-frequency hearing, is that their voice sounds "hollow". This is associated with "Occlusion effect". The aim of this study was to comparison of occlusion effect in normal hearing subjects via Real Ear Measurement and Audiometric Bing test. Materials and Method: Twenty volunteers with normal hearing (10 male, 10 female, with ages ranging from 18 – 24 years were enrolled in this study. First, audiometric Bing test was performed in frequencies of 250, 500, 750 and 1000 Hz. Then in real ear measurement, subjects were instructed to vocalize /â/ and /i/ for 5 seconds. Probe microphone was recorded the sound pressure in the ear canals. The degrees of occlusion effect unit were obtained for further analysis.Results: The means of occlusion effect were present in all subjects. There was no correlation between the results of audiometric Bing test and real-ear measurement. No significant difference was obtained between genders and monaural or binaural occlusion in real-ear measurement. But in audiometric Bing test, the difference between monaural or binaural occlusion was significant(p<0.05.Conclusion: The peak of occlusion effect varies significantly among hearing aid users, so the hearing aid must be tuned. Probe- microphone measures will assist in determination how much gain is enough, and where frequency- specific adjustments are needed.

  6. Anxiety and cerebral blood flow during behavioral challenge. Dissociation of central from peripheral and subjective measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zohar, J.; Insel, T.R.; Berman, K.F.; Foa, E.B.; Hill, J.L.; Weinberger, D.R.

    1989-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between anxiety and regional cerebral blood flow, we administered behavioral challenges to 10 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder while measuring regional cerebral blood flow with the xenon 133 inhalation technique. Each patient was studied under three conditions: relaxation, imaginal flooding, and in vivo (actual) exposure to the phobic stimulus. Subjective anxiety, obsessive-compulsive ratings, and autonomic measures (heart rate, blood pressure) increased significantly, but respiratory rate and PCO/sub 2/ did not change across the three conditions. Regional cerebral blood flow increased slightly (in the temporal region) during imaginal flooding, but decreased markedly in several cortical regions during in vivo exposure, when anxiety was highest by subjective and peripheral autonomic measures. These results demonstrate that intense anxiety can be associated with decreased rather than increased cortical perfusion and that ostensibly related states of anxiety (eg, anticipatory and obsessional anxiety) may be associated with opposite effects on regional cerebral blood flow.

  7. Evaluation of ride quality measurement procedures by subjective experiments using simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauder, L. T., Jr.; Clevenson, S. A.

    1975-01-01

    Since ride quality is, by definition, a matter of passenger response, there is need for a qualification procedure (QP) for establishing the degree to which any particular ride quality measurement procedure (RQMP) does correlate with passenger responses. Once established, such a QP will provide very useful guidance for optimal adjustment of the various parameters which any given RQMP contains. A QP is proposed based on use of a ride motion simulator and on test subject responses to recordings of actual vehicle motions. Test subject responses are used to determine simulator gain settings for the individual recordings such as to make all of the simulated rides equally uncomfortable to the test subjects. Simulator platform accelerations vs. time are recorded with each ride at its equal discomfort gain setting. The equal discomfort platform acceleration recordings are then digitzed.

  8. Serum troponin I measurement of subjects exposed to the Taser X-26.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloane, Christian M; Chan, Theodore C; Levine, Saul D; Dunford, James V; Neuman, Tom; Vilke, Gary M

    2008-07-01

    The Taser is a high-voltage, low-amperage conducted energy device used by many law enforcement agencies as a less lethal force weapon. The objective of this study was to evaluate for a rise in serum troponin I level after deployment of the Taser on law enforcement training volunteers. A prospective, observational cohort study was performed evaluating serum troponin I levels in human subjects 6 h after an exposure to the Taser X-26. Outcome measures included abnormal elevation in serum troponin I level (> 0.2 ng/mL). There were 66 subjects evaluated. The mean shock duration was 4.36 s (range 1.2-5 s). None of the subjects had a positive troponin I level 6 h after exposure. It was concluded that human volunteers exposed to a single shock from the Taser did not develop an abnormal serum troponin I level 6 h after shock, suggesting that there was no myocardial necrosis or infarction.

  9. Assessment of pilot workload - Converging measures from performance based, subjective and psychophysiological techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Arthur F.; Sirevaag, Erik J.; Braune, Rolf

    1986-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between the P300 component of the event-related brain potential (ERP) and the processing demands of a complex real-world task. Seven male volunteers enrolled in an Instrument Flight Rule (IFR) aviation course flew a series of missions in a single engine fixed-based simulator. In dual task conditions subjects were also required to discriminate between two tones differing in frequency. ERPs time-locked to the tones, subjective effort ratings and overt performance measures were collected during two 45 min flights differing in difficulty (manipulated by varying both atmospheric conditions and instrument reliability). The more difficult flight was associated with poorer performance, increased subjective effort ratings, and smaller secondary task P300s. Within each flight, P300 amplitude was negatively correlated with deviations from command headings indicating that P300 amplitude was a sensitive workload metric both between and within the flight missions.

  10. The subjective handicap of epilepsy. A new approach to measuring treatment outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, M F; Duncan, J S; Sander, J W

    1998-02-01

    It is now widely acknowledged that the impact of epilepsy on the individual extends beyond the occurrence of seizures, and that there is a need for outcome measures sensitive to these consequences. Until now these instruments have largely been developed within a 'quality of life' framework. The technical and conceptual difficulties that arise with measuring quality of life have led us to develop a more focused measurement model, the 'Subjective Handicap of Epilepsy' (SHE) scale, based on the World Health Organization's concept of handicap. The scale contains 32 items in six subscales: 'Work and activities' (eight items), 'Social and personal' (four items), 'Self-perception' (five items), 'Physical' (four items), 'Life-satisfaction' (four items) and a 'Change' scale (seven items); and it takes on average handicapping effects of increasing seizure frequency, employment status, the impact of epilepsy on career choice and the subject's own opinion as to the major determinant of their quality of life. The scales were also sensitive, retrospectively, to the benefits of successful epilepsy surgery in a cohort of 105 patients. Scales focusing specifically on handicap were more sensitive to group differences in seizure frequency in the clinic population, and to outcome after epilepsy surgery, than the 'Life-satisfaction' scale and the Epilepsy Surgery Inventory 55 (ESI-55) scales. This supports the contention that measuring 'subjective handicap' may be a more sensitive, and more useful, approach to assessing the impact of interventions on the long-term consequences of epilepsy than current methods.

  11. Trismus following different treatment modalities for head and neck cancer: a systematic review of subjective measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Sook Y; Mcleod, Robert W J; Elhassan, Hassan A

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this review was to compare systematically the subjective measure of trismus between different interventions to treat head and neck cancer, particularly those of the oropharynx. Using The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) Guidelines, Six databases were searched for the text using various terms which include "oropharyngeal/head and neck cancer", "trismus/mouth opening" and the various treatment modalities. Included in the review were clinical studies (> or =10 patients). Three observers independently assessed the papers identified. Among the six studies reviewed, five showed a significantly worst outcome with regard to the quality-of-life questionnaire scores for a radiotherapy or surgery and radiotherapy (RT) ± chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy when compared to surgery alone. Only one study showed no significant difference between surgery alone and other treatment modalities. Subjective quality-of-life measures are a concurrent part of modern surgical practice. Although subjective measures were utilised to measure post operative trismus successfully, there was no consensus as to which treatment modality had overall better outcomes, with conflicting studies in keeping with the current debate in this field. Larger and higher quality studies are needed to compare all three treatment modalities.

  12. The influence of negative mood on heart rate complexity measures and baroreflex sensitivity in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köbele, Ralf; Koschke, Mandy; Schulz, Steffen; Wagner, Gerd; Yeragani, Shravya; Ramachandraiah, Chaitra T; Voss, Andreas; Yeragani, Vikram K; Bär, Karl-Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Decreased cardiac vagal function is linked with increased cardiac mortality and depression is associated with decreased heart rate variability. We have previously shown that the Mood Induction Procedure (MIP) in healthy subjects alters pain perception and thalamic activity during pain perception. To study the effect of negative emotion on heart rate variability and complexity measures as well as on baroreceptor sensitivity, as these parameters reflect cardiac autonomic function. We studied 20 healthy female controls before and after neutral MIP and 20 healthy female subjects before and after negative MIP. We investigated measures of valence of mood, heart rate variability and complexity and the baroreceptor sensitivity index. While there was a significant difference in the valence of mood between the neutral and the negative effect condition, there were no significant differences in any of the heart rate or baroreceptor sensitivity measures between the two groups. Our findings did not show any significant influence of acute negative MIP on heart rate variability and complexity measures and baroreceptor sensitivity, even though depressive disorder and stress are associated with decreased heart rate variability. These findings are discussed in the context of clinical depression and anxiety and the increased risk for cardiac mortality. In contrast to the presented results here, we have previously shown that MIP in healthy subjects alters pain perception and thalamic activity.

  13. Understanding excess skin in postbariatric patients: objective measurements and subjective experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biörserud, Christina; Olbers, Torsten; Staalesen, Trude; Elander, Anna; Olsén, Monika Fagevik

    2016-08-01

    Excess skin is a well-known side effect of massive weight loss after bariatric surgery. However, there is a lack of longitudinal follow-ups. The primary aims of this study were to investigate the development and amount of excess skin after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and to relate objective results to subjective experiences. University hospital. From 2009 to 2012, 200 patients were included and assessed with respect to excess skin before and 18 months after bariatric surgery. Patients were measured according to a standardized protocol and completed a questionnaire regarding their subjective experience of excess skin. A follow-up visit was completed in 149 patients (78%). All ptosis measurements decreased after weight reduction except for ptosis on the thighs. When comparing objective measurements with patients' subjective experience and discomfort from excess skin, we found little or low correlation in most body parts (rs .03-.67). The prediction analysis indicated that, for every centimeter of ptosis on the abdomen preoperatively, there was a 2-fold greater probability of having a postoperative ptosis on the abdomen of>3 cm (OR = 2.32, 1.76-3.07). The objective measurement of excess skin provides unique information in postbariatric patients' body habitus. Although the measured excess skin decreased compared with preoperative measurements, patients seem to become more aware of and disturbed and discomforted by it after the weight loss. Importantly, the objectively assessed measurements of excess skin correlated fairly with the perceived discomfort. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of a Bluetooth-implemented hearing aid on speech recognition performance: subjective and objective measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Beom; Chung, Won-Ho; Choi, Jeesun; Hong, Sung Hwa; Cho, Yang-Sun; Park, Gyuseok; Lee, Sangmin

    2014-06-01

    The object was to evaluate speech perception improvement through Bluetooth-implemented hearing aids in hearing-impaired adults. Thirty subjects with bilateral symmetric moderate sensorineural hearing loss participated in this study. A Bluetooth-implemented hearing aid was fitted unilaterally in all study subjects. Objective speech recognition score and subjective satisfaction were measured with a Bluetooth-implemented hearing aid to replace the acoustic connection from either a cellular phone or a loudspeaker system. In each system, participants were assigned to 4 conditions: wireless speech signal transmission into hearing aid (wireless mode) in quiet or noisy environment and conventional speech signal transmission using external microphone of hearing aid (conventional mode) in quiet or noisy environment. Also, participants completed questionnaires to investigate subjective satisfaction. Both cellular phone and loudspeaker system situation, participants showed improvements in sentence and word recognition scores with wireless mode compared to conventional mode in both quiet and noise conditions (P Bluetooth-implemented hearing aids helped to improve subjective and objective speech recognition performances in quiet and noisy environments during the use of electronic audio devices.

  15. Links between sleep and daytime behaviour problems in children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbensen, A J; Hoffman, E K; Beebe, D W; Byars, K C; Epstein, J

    2017-12-28

    In the general population, sleep problems have an impact on daytime performance. Despite sleep problems being common among children with Down syndrome, the impact of sleep problems on daytime behaviours in school-age children with Down syndrome is an understudied topic. Our study examined the relationship between parent-reported and actigraphy-measured sleep duration and sleep quality with parent and teacher reports of daytime behaviour problems among school-age children with Down syndrome. Thirty school-age children with Down syndrome wore an actigraph watch for a week at home at night. Their parent completed ratings of the child's sleep during that same week. Their parent and teacher completed a battery of measures to assess daytime behaviour. Parent reports of restless sleep behaviours on the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire, but not actigraph-measured sleep efficiency, was predictive of parent and teacher behavioural concerns on the Nisonger Child Behaviour Rating Form and the Vanderbilt ADHD Rating Scales. Actigraph-measured sleep period and parent-reported sleep duration on the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire was predictive of daytime parent-reported inattention. Actigraph-measured sleep period was predictive of parent-reported hyperactivity/impulsivity. The study findings suggest that sleep problems have complex relationships to both parent-reported and teacher-reported daytime behaviour concerns in children with Down syndrome. These findings have implications for understanding the factors impacting behavioural concerns and their treatment in school-age children with Down syndrome. © 2017 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Comparison between refraction measured by Spot Vision ScreeningTM and subjective clinical refractometry

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Lima de Jesus; Flávio Fernandes Villela; Luis Fernando Orlandin; Fernando Naves Eiji; Daniel Oliveira Dantas; Milton Ruiz Alves

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of Spot Vision ScreeningTM as an autorefractor by comparing refraction measurements to subjective clinical refractometry results in children and adult patients. METHODS: One-hundred and thirty-four eyes of 134 patients were submitted to refractometry by Spot and clinical refractometry under cycloplegia. Patients, students, physicians, staff and children of staff from the Hospital das Clínicas (School of Medicine, University of...

  17. Analysis of the Precautionary Saving Motive Based on a Subjective Measure : (SAVE 2005-2007)

    OpenAIRE

    Ziegelmeyer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The importance of the precautionary saving motive for households’ saving behaviour is unquestioned in the literature of the last two decades. However, the magnitude of precautionary savings and its influencing factors could not be satisfactorily determined. A subjective measure of the desired amount of precautionary savings in the German SAVE study 2005-2007 allows for the evaluation of these questions on a new basis without relying on a specific definition of wealth. This study supports the ...

  18. Psychological job strain, social support at work and daytime secretion of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in healthy female employees: cross-sectional analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Atsuhiko; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Mase, Junji; Ono, Yuichiro

    2015-11-10

    Evidence is limited concerning the influences of high psychological job strain and low social support at work on daytime secretion of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), which demonstrates anti-cortisol effects. We carried out a cross-sectional study to examine the associations of job strain and social support with daytime secretion amounts of DHEA and cortisol and daytime variation of the cortisol-to-DHEA ratio (C/D ratio) in healthy female workers. Study subjects comprised 115 healthy female nursery school teachers. Area under the curve with respect to ground (AUCG) of salivary DHEA, cortisol and C/D ratio was calculated for estimation of daytime secretion and variation. Social support scores were negatively associated with daytime DHEA secretion (standardized partial regression coefficient = -0.343, P cortisol secretion was additionally adjusted. Social support was not associated with daytime variation of the C/D ratio. Significant association between social support and daytime cortisol secretion was not confirmed. Job strain was not associated with DHEA, cortisol or the C/D ratio. In summary, we found that daytime DHEA secretion was increased in healthy workers with low social support, perhaps independent of daytime cortisol secretion.

  19. Nasolabial fold angle measurement using anterior segment optical coherence tomography in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Marcus C C; Aung, Han T; Aung, Tin; Looi, Audrey L G

    2009-01-01

    The human nasolabial fold angle (NFA) has been measured using MRI and photogrammetry and has been shown to decrease with age. The authors aimed to evaluate a novel method using optical coherence tomography to measure the NFA. In this cross-sectional observational series, the authors used anterior segment optical coherence tomography (ASOCT) to image the NFA of both cheeks of 126 subjects aged 21 to 79 years. A dental vinylpolysiloxane custom-designed mould was used as a chin rest. The mean of 3 scans on each side was calculated and analysis of variance, multiple comparisons, and multiple linear regression were carried out using SPSS 11.0. Sixty-one subject (48.4%) were men and 65 (51.6%) were women. Mean age was 50.6 +/- 16.8 years (range, 21-79 years). The ASOCT successfully imaged the NFA in all subjects. Mean right and left NFA were 144.4 degrees +/- 17.1 degrees and 145.4 degrees +/- 17.7 degrees. The NFA were dissimilar between the 6 age categories by decade (p NFA, accounting for 55% of NFA variation. Every year accounted for a decrease of 0.78 degrees (p NFA of 5.4 degrees (p = 0.007) and 4.0 degrees (p = 0.06) in the right and left cheeks, respectively. The NFA decreases with age and increases with male sex and can be measured with ASOCT accurately and easily.

  20. Can subjective comfort be used as a measure of plantar pressure in football boots?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okholm Kryger, Katrine; Jarratt, Vicky; Mitchell, Séan; Forrester, Steph

    2017-05-01

    Comfort has been shown to be the most desired football boot feature by players. Previous studies have shown discomfort to be related to increased plantar pressures for running shoes which, in some foot regions, has been suggested to be a causative factor in overuse injuries. This study examined the correlation between subjective comfort data and objective plantar pressure for football boots during football-specific drills. Eight male university football players were tested. Plantar pressure data were collected during four football-specific movements for each of three different football boots. The global and local peak pressures based on a nine-sectioned foot map were compared to subjective comfort measures recorded using a visual analogue scale for global discomfort and a discomfort foot map for local discomfort. A weak (rs = -0.126) yet significant (P comfort. The model only significantly predicted (P > 0.001) the outcome for two (medial and lateral forefoot) of the nine foot regions. Subjective comfort data is therefore not a reliable measure of increased plantar pressures for any foot region. The use of plantar pressure measures is therefore needed to optimise injury prevention when designing studded footwear.

  1. Adaptation profiles comprising objective and subjective measures in fibromyalgia: the al-Ándalus project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estévez-López, Fernando; Segura-Jiménez, Víctor; Álvarez-Gallardo, Inmaculada C; Borges-Cosic, Milkana; Pulido-Martos, Manuel; Carbonell-Baeza, Ana; Aparicio, Virginia A; Geenen, Rinie; Delgado-Fernández, Manuel

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify subgroups in terms of adaptation to FM and to test differences in FM severity between these subgroups. The al-Ándalus project made it possible to perform a comprehensive population-based cross-sectional study in 486 FM patients including multiple assessments of modifiable (could be targeted in therapy) resilience and vulnerability factors, measured by objective and subjective assessments, related to psychological and physical function. FM severity was assessed by means of FM impact (total score of the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire) and distress (Polysymptomatic Distress Scale of the modified 2011 preliminary criteria for FM). Exploratory factor analysis, cluster analysis and analysis of variance were conducted. Factor analysis yielded eight factors: three included objective measures (declarative memory, active lifestyle and objective physical fitness) and five included subjective measures (fatigue, psychological distress, catastrophizing, resilience and subjective physical fitness). Cluster analysis based on these eight factors identified five profiles: Adapted (16%), Fit (18%), Poor performer (20%), Positive (20%) and Maladapted (26%). Most profile comparisons revealed different levels of FM severity varying from Adapted (the most favourable profile) to Maladapted (the most unfavourable profile) with Fit, Poor performer and Positive obtaining intermediate positions. Heterogeneity of FM was shown by five clinically meaningful profiles of modifiable factors that were associated with FM severity. It is of clinical interest to examine whether these profiles are associated with FM prognosis and the effectiveness of interventions, which would enhance the development of customized interventions based on adaptation profiles in FM.

  2. Comparison of different pointing methods for sound localizability measurement in the vision impaired subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Atsunori; Ohsugi, Yudai; Yamamoto, Yuki; Nakamura, Takabun; Sugiura, Toshifumi; Tauchi, Masaki

    2007-05-01

    In order to find out the most suitable and accurate pointing methods to study the sound localizability of persons with visual impairment, we compared the accuracy of three different pointing methods for indicating the direction of sound sources in a semi-anechoic dark room. Six subjects with visual impairment (two totally blind and four with low vision) participated in this experiment. The three pointing methods employed were (1) directing the face, (2) directing the body trunk on a revolving chair and (3) indicating a tactile cue placed horizontally in front of the subject. Seven sound emitters were arranged in a semicircle 2.0 m from the subject, 0 degrees to +/-80 degrees of the subject's midline, at a height of 1.2 m. The accuracy of the pointing methods was evaluated by measuring the deviation between the angle of the target sound source and that of the subject's response. The result was that all methods indicated that as the angle of the sound source increased from midline, the accuracy decreased. The deviations recorded toward the left and the right of midline were symmetrical. In the whole frontal area (-80 degrees to +80 degrees from midline), both the tactile cue and the body trunk methods were more accurate than the face-pointing method. There was no significant difference in the center (-40 degrees to +40 degrees from midline). In the periphery (-80 degrees and +80 degrees ), the tactile cue pointing method was the most accurate of all and the body trunk method was the next best. These results suggest that the most suitable pointing methods to study the sound localizability of the frontal azimuth for subjects who are visually impaired are the tactile cue and the body trunk methods because of their higher accuracy in the periphery.

  3. Effects of sleep inertia after daytime naps vary with executive load and time of day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeger, John A; Lo, June C Y; Burns, Christopher G; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2011-04-01

    The effects of executive load on working memory performance during sleep inertia after morning or afternoon naps were assessed using a mixed design with nap/wake as a between-subjects factor and morning/afternoon condition as a within-subject factor. Thirty-two healthy adults (mean 22.5 ± 3.0 years) attended two laboratory sessions after a night of restricted sleep (6 hrs), and at first visit, were randomly assigned to the Nap or Wake group. Working memory (n-back) and subjective workload were assessed approximately 5 and 25 minutes after 90-minute morning and afternoon nap opportunities and at the corresponding times in the Wake condition. Actigraphically assessed nocturnal sleep duration, subjective sleepiness, and psychomotor vigilance performance before daytime assessments did not vary across conditions. Afternoon naps showed shorter EEG assessed sleep latencies, longer sleep duration, and more Slow Wave Sleep than morning naps. Working memory performance deteriorated, and subjective mental workload increased at higher executive loadings. After afternoon naps, participants performed less well on more executive-function intensive working memory tasks (i.e., 3-back), but waking and napping participants performed equally well on simpler tasks. After some 30 minutes of cognitive activity, there were no longer performance differences between the waking and napping groups. Subjective Task Difficulty and Mental Effort requirements were less affected by sleep inertia and dissociated from objective measures when participants had napped in the afternoon. We conclude that executive functions take longer to return to asymptotic performance after sleep than does performance of simpler tasks which are less reliant on executive functions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. The Evolution of Eupathics: The Historical Roots of Subjective Measures of Wellbeing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Angner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    This paper traces the historical roots of subjective measures of wellbeing, that is, measures designed to represent happiness, satisfaction, or other “positive” or desirable mental states. While it is often suggested that these measures are a modern invention, I argue that they have a long and rich history that conforms to Theodore M. Porter’s general account of measurement in social and behavioral science. Subjective measures emerged in marital success studies, educational psychology, and personality psychology in the 1920s and 30s, and were further shaped by the epidemiology of mental health, gerontology, and the social indicator movement in the 1960s and 70s. Consistent with Porter’s account, these measures emerged in applied rather than theoretical branches of social and behavioral science, and they did so not as a result of physics envy, but rather as a result of a moral impulse to improve society; quantification was intended to make up for perceived deficiencies in unaided human judgment; and radical disagreements about the nature of wellbeing did not impede efforts to measure it – indeed, in time, there was considerably more agreement about how to measure wellbeing than about how to define it.

  5. The reliability of side to side measurements of upper extremity activity levels in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amasay Tal

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In both clinical and occupational settings, ambulatory sensors are becoming common for assessing all day measurements of arm motion. In order for the motion of a healthy, contralateral side to be used as a control for the involved side, the inherent side to side differences in arm usage must be minimal. The goal of the present study was to determine the reliability of side to side measurements of upper extremity activity levels in healthy subjects. Methods Thirty two subjects with no upper extremity pathologies were studied. Each subject wore a triaxial accelerometer on both arms for three and a half hours. Motion was assessed using parameters previously reported in the literature. Side to side differences were compared with the intraclass correlation coefficient, standard error of the mean, minimal detectable change scores and a projected sample size analysis. Results The variables were ranked based on their percentage of minimal detectable change scores and sample sizes needed for paired t-tests. The order of these rankings was found to be identical and the top ranked parameters were activity counts per hour (MDC% = 9.5, n = 5, jerk time (MDC% = 15.8, n = 8 and percent time above 30 degrees (MDC% = 34.7, n = 9. Conclusions In general, the mean activity levels during daily activities were very similar between dominant and non-dominant arms. Specifically, activity counts per hour, jerk time, and percent time above 30 degrees were found to be the variables most likely to reveal significant difference or changes in both individuals and groups of subjects. The use of ambulatory measurements of upper extremity activity has very broad uses for occupational assessments, musculoskeletal injuries of the shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand as well as neurological pathologies.

  6. Daytime napping and mortality, with a special reference to cardiovascular disease: the JACC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Naohito; Iso, Hiroyasu; Seki, Nao; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Toyoshima, Hideaki; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2010-02-01

    Daytime napping is associated with elevated risk of all-cause mortality in the elderly. However, the association with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk is inconsistent. From 1988 to 1990, a total of 67 129 Japanese non-workers or daytime workers (27 755 men and 39 374 women) aged 40-79 years, without a history of stroke, heart disease or cancer, completed a lifestyle questionnaire. They were followed for mortality until the end of 2003. During the 879 244 person-year follow-up, 9643 deaths (2852 from CVD, 3643 from cancer, 2392 from other internal causes, 738 from external causes and 18 from unspecified causes) were observed. After adjustment for possible confounders, subjects with a daytime napping habit had elevated hazard ratios (HRs) for mortality from all causes [HR 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14-1.24, P napping was diminished among overweight subjects, but pronounced in those with weight loss after age 20 years, with non-regular employment, with lower education level and with a follow-up period napping is associated with elevated risk of CVD mortality as well as non-cardiovascular/non-cancer and external deaths. Daytime napping may elevate risk of CVD death through some biological effects but, to a larger extent, some comorbid disorders causing weight loss or associated with non-regular employment and low education level could explain this association.

  7. Clinical Implications of Daytime Sleepiness for the Academic Performance of Middle School Age Adolescents with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langberg, Joshua M.; Dvorsky, Melissa R.; Marshall, Stephen; Evans, Steven W.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relative impact of total time slept per night and daytime sleepiness on the academic functioning of 100 middle school age youth (Mage = 11.9) with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The primary goal of the study was to determine if total time slept per night and/or daytime sleepiness, as measured by youth self-report on the Pediatric Daytime Sleepiness Scale (PDSS), predicted academic functioning above and beyond symptoms of ADHD and relevant covariates, such as intelligence, achievement scores, and parent education level. Self-reported daytime sleepiness but not self-reported total time slept per night was significantly associated with all academic outcomes. When examined in a hierarchical regression model, self-reported daytime sleepiness significantly predicted parent-rated homework problems and academic impairment and teacher-rated academic competence above and beyond symptoms of ADHD and relevant covariates but did not predict GPA or teacher-rated academic impairment. The implications of these findings for better understanding the association between ADHD and sleep and the functional implications of this relationship are discussed. PMID:23509927

  8. The relationship between weight change and daytime sleepiness: the Sleep Heart Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Winda L; Orellana, Liliana; Shaw, Jonathan E; Wong, Evelyn; Peeters, Anna

    2017-08-01

    Through a causal framework, we aim to assess the association between weight change and daytime sleepiness, and the role of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in this relationship. From the Sleep Heart Health Study, we selected individuals who were: (1) 40-64 years old, with (2) body mass index (BMI) ≥18.5 kg/m2, (3) no history of stroke, treatment for OSA, and tracheostomy at baseline. We used multiple linear regression to assess the relationship between five-year weight change and daytime sleepiness (assessed through Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS)) at five years, adjusting for daytime sleepiness, demographics, diabetes, subjective sleep duration, sleep disturbance, smoking status, weight, and use of antidepressants and benzodiazepines at baseline, in those with complete data (N = 1468). We further assessed the potential mediating role of OSA in this relationship. At baseline, the study participants were on average 55 years old, 46% males, with mean BMI 28 kg/m2; and 25% had ESS>10. ESS at five years worsened by 0.36 units (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.12-0.61, p = 0.004) with every 10-kg weight gain. When stratified by sex, this relationship was only found in women (0.55, 95% CI 0.25-0.86, p weight change and daytime sleepiness was mediated by severity of OSA at five years. Weight gain has a detrimental effect on daytime sleepiness, mostly through pathways other than OSA. This study provides further evidence and understanding of the relationship between obesity and excessive daytime sleepiness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Measurements of potential differences in human subjects induced by motion in a superconducting magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frinak, S; Knight, R A; Liboff, A R

    1992-01-01

    We have attempted to measure the electromotive forces (emfs) induced in human beings moving at a constant speed in a highly dense magnetic field. Experiments were initially conducted on a set of models, and then directly on human subjects. The models consisted of single circular loops of Tygon tubing (I.D., 0.635 cm; O.D., 0.9525 cm) filled with normal saline solution, with circumferences of 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 cm. The models were connected to an amplifier via silver/silver-chloride electrodes. Each saline loop was mounted on a movable platform, with the plane of the loop perpendicular to the platform's axis; the platform was enabled to move at known constant speeds into and out of the bore of a 1.89-T magnet. The human subjects were then substituted for the saline loops, with the long axis parallel to the direction of motion, and with standard EKG electrodes placed at 180 degrees successively on the ankle, calf, lower thigh, upper thigh, chest, and head. In all cases, for human subjects and models, the peak induced voltage was directly proportional to the speed of movement and the square of the circumference of the bounded cross-sectional areas. Thus, for the saline loops, the correlation coefficient between induced voltage and circumference was .998, and for human subjects, .947. Under the loose assumption that for equal circumferences the bounded areas in human subjects were equal to those in the circular loops, the induced emfs in human subjects were consistently about 13% greater than those in the loops. At a mean speed of 1.18 m/s, the chest had a peak induced voltage of 260 mV, while the voltage at the ankle had a peak of 19.8 mV. The experimental data were used to estimate the corresponding induced-current density at the pericardium, 17 mA/m2. We conclude for a human subject moving at constant speed along the body's long axis into a magnetic field that Faraday's law is closely followed for various cross-sections of the body. Further, in those cases in

  10. Validation of subject-specific cardiovascular system models from porcine measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revie, James A; Stevenson, David J; Chase, J Geoffrey; Hann, Christopher E; Lambermont, Bernard C; Ghuysen, Alexandre; Kolh, Philippe; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Heldmann, Stefan; Desaive, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    A previously validated mathematical model of the cardiovascular system (CVS) is made subject-specific using an iterative, proportional gain-based identification method. Prior works utilised a complete set of experimentally measured data that is not clinically typical or applicable. In this paper, parameters are identified using proportional gain-based control and a minimal, clinically available set of measurements. The new method makes use of several intermediary steps through identification of smaller compartmental models of CVS to reduce the number of parameters identified simultaneously and increase the convergence stability of the method. This new, clinically relevant, minimal measurement approach is validated using a porcine model of acute pulmonary embolism (APE). Trials were performed on five pigs, each inserted with three autologous blood clots of decreasing size over a period of four to five hours. All experiments were reviewed and approved by the Ethics Committee of the Medical Faculty at the University of Liege, Belgium. Continuous aortic and pulmonary artery pressures (P(ao), P(pa)) were measured along with left and right ventricle pressure and volume waveforms. Subject-specific CVS models were identified from global end diastolic volume (GEDV), stroke volume (SV), P(ao), and P(pa) measurements, with the mean volumes and maximum pressures of the left and right ventricles used to verify the accuracy of the fitted models. The inputs (GEDV, SV, P(ao), P(pa)) used in the identification process were matched by the CVS model to errors pressures not used to fit the model compared experimental measurements to median absolute errors of 4.3% and 4.4%, which are equivalent to the measurement errors of currently used monitoring devices in the ICU (∼5-10%). These results validate the potential for implementing this approach in the intensive care unit. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A new device for measuring resting energy expenditure (REE) in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavolti, Marcella; Pietrobelli, Angelo; Dugoni, Manfredo; Poli, Marco; Romagnoli, Elisa; De Cristofaro, Paolo; Battistini, Nino C

    2007-06-01

    Lifestyle change targeted towards increasing daily resting energy expenditure (REE) is one of the cornerstones of obesity treatment. Measurements of energy expenditure and substrate utilization are essential to understanding the metabolic basis of obesity, and the physiological responses to perturbations in habitual food intake. REE is the largest part of human energy expenditure (60-70%) and an increase or decrease in REE would have a large impact on total energy. Accurate and easy-to-use methods for measuring REE are needed, to be applied by clinicians in daily clinical settings to assess the validity of a new instrument to estimate REE in normal weight, healthy adults. Ninety-nine subjects (52 females and 47 males) (mean+/-SD, age 38+/-14 years; body mass index (BMI) 23+/-3 kg/m(2)) were tested. REE was assessed using a Sensor Medics Vmax metabolic cart with a ventilated canopy and with the SenseWear armband. Body composition, percentage fat mass (%FM) and percentage fat free mass (%FFM) were assessed by skinfold thickness measurements (SF), bio-electrical impedance analysis (BIA) and air displacement plethysmography (BOD-POD). No significant difference was found among measurements of FFM using the three different techniques. Both SenseWear and Sensor Medics Vmax showed a high correlation, r=0.42 and r=0.40 (pBOD-POD correlated with SenseWear (r=0.42, pBOD-POD provide valid and reliable measurements of FFM. Our results suggest that the SenseWear armband is an acceptable device to accurately measure REE in healthy subjects. Its characteristics have the potential to reduce measurement times and make the SenseWear armband useful for epidemiological studies.

  12. Is there an association between subjective and objective measures of cognitive function in patients with affective disorders?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Anne M; Kessing, Lars V; Munkholm, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Background: Patients with affective disorders experience cognitive dysfunction in addition to their affective symptoms. The relationship between subjectively experienced and objectively measured cognitive function is controversial with several studies reporting no correlation between subjective...... and objective deficits. Aims: To investigate whether there is a correlation between subjectively reported and objectively measured cognitive function in patients with affective disorders, and whether subjective complaints predict objectively measured dysfunction. Methods: The study included 45 participants; 15...... with bipolar disorder (BD), 15 with unipolar disorder (UD) and 15 healthy individuals. Participants' subjectively experienced cognitive function and objective cognitive function were assessed with the Massachusetts General Hospital Cognitive and Physical Functioning Questionnaire (CPFQ) and the Screen...

  13. Measuring executive function in control subjects and TBI patients with question completion time (QCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, David L; Yund, E William; Wyma, John M; Ruff, Ron; Herron, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Questionnaire completion is a complex task that places demands on cognitive functions subserving reading, introspective memory, decision-making, and motor control. Although computerized questionnaires and surveys are used with increasing frequency in clinical practice, few studies have examined question completion time (QCT), the time required to complete each question. Here, we analyzed QCTs in 172 control subjects and 31 patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) who completed two computerized questionnaires, the 17-question Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Checklist (PCL) and the 25-question Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ). In control subjects, robust correlations were found between self-paced QCTs on the PCL and CFQ (r = 0.82). QCTs on individual questions correlated strongly with the number of words in the question, indicating the critical role of reading speed. QCTs increased significantly with age, and were reduced in females and in subjects with increased education and computer experience. QCT z-scores, corrected for age, education, computer use, and sex, correlated more strongly with each other than with the results of other cognitive tests. Patients with a history of severe TBI showed significantly delayed QCTs, but QCTs fell within the normal range in patients with a history of mild TBI. When questionnaires are used to gather relevant patient information, simultaneous QCT measures provide reliable and clinically sensitive measures of processing speed and executive function.

  14. The kinetic and kinematic stability measures in healthy adult subjects with and without flat foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Paul S; Zipple, J Timothy; Andraka, John M; Danial, Pamela

    2017-03-01

    Flat foot problems are associated with impaired mobility and postural stability. The purpose of this study was to compare the kinematic and kinetic indices during one leg standing between subjects with and without flat foot. Forty-four participants enrolled in the study, including 22 subjects with flat foot and 22 control subjects. The measurements included kinematic stability on the trunk as well as kinetic stability from a force plate. All participants were asked to maintain one leg standing with the contralateral hip and knee flexed to approximately 90° for 25seconds. The kinetic index decreased in the flat foot group (t=-5.08, p=0.001) during one leg standing without visual input. There were strong correlations between kinetic and kinematic stabilities (0.75-0.86) with visual input and moderate correlations (0.49-0.67) without visual input in the control group. The flat foot group exhibited a significantly decreased kinetic index without visual input. The more effective postural stability in the control group might be due to efficient compensatory strategies utilized without visual input to maintain one leg standing. These outcome measures could help to develop a practical test leading to kinematic postural changes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Subjectively and objectively measured sleep with and without posttraumatic stress disorder and trauma exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Ihori; Huntley, Edward; Lavela, Joseph; Mellman, Thomas A

    2012-07-01

    Although reports of sleep disturbances are common among individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), results of polysomnographic (PSG) studies have inconsistently documented abnormalities and have therefore suggested "sleep state misperception." The authors' study objectives were to compare sleep parameters measured objectively and subjectively in the laboratory and at home in civilians with and without trauma exposure and PTSD. Cross-sectional study. PSG recordings in a sleep laboratory and actigraphic recordings in participants' homes. One hundred three urban-residing African Americans with and without trauma exposure and PTSD who participated in a larger study. N/A. Sleep parameters (total sleep time [TST], sleep onset latency [SOL], and wake after sleep onset [WASO]) were assessed using laboratory PSG and home actigraphy. A sleep diary was completed in the morning after PSG and actigraphy recordings. Habitual TST, SOL, and WASO were assessed using a sleep questionnaire. The Clinician Administered PTSD Scale was administered to assess participants' trauma exposure and PTSD diagnostic status. Participants, regardless of their trauma exposure/PTSD status, underestimated WASO in the diary and questionnaire relative to actigraphy and overestimated SOL in the diary relative to PSG. Among participants with current PTSD, TST diary estimates did not differ from the actigraphy measure in contrast with those without current PTSD who overestimated TST. No other significant group differences in discrepancies between subjective and objective sleep measures were found. Discrepancies between subjectively and objectively measured sleep parameters were not associated with trauma exposure or PTSD. This challenges prior assertions that individuals with PTSD overreport their sleep disturbances.

  16. A review of subjective impact measures for use with children and adolescents with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Justin; Baker, Gus A

    2004-10-01

    To evaluate measures of epilepsy-specific impact currently available for use with children and adolescents. The relative merits of the different measures are examined. Four published epilepsy-specific impact measures, the Epilepsy and Learning Disabilities Quality of Life Scale (ELDQOL), the Health-related Quality of Life in Children with Epilepsy (HRQoLCE); the Impact of Childhood Neurologic Disability Scale (ICND), the Quality of Life in Epilepsy Inventory for Adolescents (QOLIE-AD-48), and the Quality of Life for Children with Epilepsy (QOLCE) were reviewed. There exist several shortcomings with the available measures on various psychometric criteria with not one of the currently available measures reaching acceptable psychometric standards in terms of reliability and validity. Of note are the particular inadequacies in the validation of scale content; with there being no investigation of the existence of age or ability effects for the items in any of the questionnaires reviewed. There is a clear demand for a psychometrically robust measure of subjective impact of epilepsy for children and adolescents, which is applicable to a wide age and ability range. At present, the efforts of the Canadian Pediatric Epilepsy Network with the recent publication of a novel measure holds much promise for the future. It is advocated that further efforts are made to further establish the psychometric properties of these scales and for their integration within a comprehensive outcome model for use in the evaluation of clinical interventions.

  17. Subjective and objective measurement of websites quality in a chemical industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Jillbert

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the Website of a chemical company, Deza, relative to strategy and Website quality. In an attempt to obtain both an objective and subjective measure of the quality of the Deza website, two assessment methods have been used. Firstly, a subjective assessment was conducted based on the WebQual survey instrument proposed by Barnes and Vidgen (2000. Secondly, a more objective assessment was conducted via an “informational content analysis”, based on the work of Carlson et. al. (2001. Analysis of the results of the WebQual survey suggest that overall, the Deza Website is perceived by the user as being of a higher quality than the Koppers Website, but a lower quality then the Nalon Website. The Information content analysis also ranks the Deza website as being superior to Koppers and inferior to Nalon.

  18. Daytime urinary incontinence among kindergarten children in aden governorate, 2003

    OpenAIRE

    Yousef Khalida; Basaleem Huda; Al-Sakkaf Khaled

    2010-01-01

    Daytime urinary incontinence is an involuntary or intentional voiding of urine in an awake child who is old enough to have developed control, and has a variable prevalence throughout the world. In Yemen, data regarding this problem are almost absent. In this study from the capital city of Aden, we aimed to: (1) determine the prevalence of daytime incontinence in kindergarten children aged 4-6 years, (2) identify the relation between daytime enuresis with personal and family characte-ristics o...

  19. Comparison of subjective and fully automated methods for measuring mammographic density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshina, Nataliia; Roman, Marta; Sebuødegård, Sofie; Waade, Gunvor G; Ursin, Giske; Hofvind, Solveig

    2018-02-01

    Background Breast radiologists of the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program subjectively classified mammographic density using a three-point scale between 1996 and 2012 and changed into the fourth edition of the BI-RADS classification since 2013. In 2015, an automated volumetric breast density assessment software was installed at two screening units. Purpose To compare volumetric breast density measurements from the automated method with two subjective methods: the three-point scale and the BI-RADS density classification. Material and Methods Information on subjective and automated density assessment was obtained from screening examinations of 3635 women recalled for further assessment due to positive screening mammography between 2007 and 2015. The score of the three-point scale (I = fatty; II = medium dense; III = dense) was available for 2310 women. The BI-RADS density score was provided for 1325 women. Mean volumetric breast density was estimated for each category of the subjective classifications. The automated software assigned volumetric breast density to four categories. The agreement between BI-RADS and volumetric breast density categories was assessed using weighted kappa (k w ). Results Mean volumetric breast density was 4.5%, 7.5%, and 13.4% for categories I, II, and III of the three-point scale, respectively, and 4.4%, 7.5%, 9.9%, and 13.9% for the BI-RADS density categories, respectively ( P for trend density categories was k w  = 0.5 (95% CI = 0.47-0.53; P density increased with increasing density category of the subjective classifications. The agreement between BI-RADS and volumetric breast density categories was moderate.

  20. When Thinking Impairs Sleep: Trait, Daytime and Nighttime Repetitive Thinking in Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancee, Jaap; Eisma, Maarten C; van Zanten, Kristopher B; Topper, Maurice

    2017-01-01

    We performed two studies in individuals with sleep problems to investigate trait, daytime, and nighttime repetitive thinking as risk factors for insomnia. In Study 1, 139 participants completed questionnaires on worry, rumination, insomnia, anxiety, depression, and a sleep diary. Trait rumination and trait worry were not associated with sleep impairment. In Study 2, 64 participants completed similar measures and a daytime and nighttime sleep-related worry diary. Only nighttime sleep-related worry was consistently associated with sleep impairment. Overall, results indicate that nighttime sleep-related worry is important in the maintenance of insomnia, whereas effects of trait and daytime repetitive thinking are more benign. Treatment for insomnia can potentially be improved by focusing more on nighttime sleep-related worry.

  1. Cognition and daytime functioning in sleep-related breathing disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Melinda L; Howard, Mark E; Barnes, Maree

    2011-01-01

    Sleep-related breathing disorders encompass a range of disorders in which abnormal ventilation occurs during sleep as a result of partial or complete obstruction of the upper airway, altered respiratory drive, abnormal chest wall movement, or respiratory muscle function. The most common of these is obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), occurring in both adults and children, and causing significant cognitive and daytime dysfunction and reduced quality of life. OSA patients experience repetitive brief cessation of breathing throughout the night, which causes intermittent hypoxemia (reductions in hemoglobin oxygen levels) and fragmented sleep patterns. These nocturnal events result in excessive daytime sleepiness, and changes in mood and cognition. Chronic excessive sleepiness during the day is a common symptom of sleep-related breathing disorders, which is assessed in sleep clinics both subjectively (questionnaire) and objectively (sleep latency tests). Mood changes are often reported by patients, including irritability, fatigue, depression, and anxiety. A wide range of cognitive deficits have been identified in untreated OSA patients, from attentional and vigilance, to memory and executive functions, and more complex tasks such as simulated driving. These changes are reflected in patient reports of difficulty in concentrating, increased forgetfulness, an inability to make decisions, and falling asleep at the wheel of a motor vehicle. These cognitive changes can also have significant downstream effects on daily functioning. Moderate to severe cases of the disorder are at a higher risk of having a motor vehicle accident, and may also have difficulties at work or school. A number of comorbidities may also influence the cognitive changes in OSA patients, including hypertension, diabetes, and stroke. These diseases can cause changes to neural vasculature and result in neural damage, leading to cognitive impairments. Examination of OSA patients using neuroimaging techniques such

  2. Daytime Ionosphere Retrieval Algorithm for the Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Andrew W.; Korpela, Eric J.; Sirk, Martin M.; England, Scott L.; Immel, Thomas J.

    2017-10-01

    The NASA Ionospheric Connection Explorer Extreme Ultraviolet spectrograph, ICON EUV, will measure altitude profiles of the daytime extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) OII emission near 83.4 and 61.7 nm that are used to determine density profiles and state parameters of the ionosphere. This paper describes the algorithm concept and approach to inverting these measured OII emission profiles to derive the associated O+ density profile from 150-450 km as a proxy for the electron content in the F-region of the ionosphere. The algorithm incorporates a bias evaluation and feedback step, developed at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory using data from the Special Sensor Ultraviolet Limb Imager (SSULI) and the Remote Atmospheric and Ionospheric Detection System (RAIDS) missions, that is able to effectively mitigate the effects of systematic instrument calibration errors and inaccuracies in the original photon source within the forward model. Results are presented from end-to-end simulations that convolved simulated airglow profiles with the expected instrument measurement response to produce profiles that were inverted with the algorithm to return data products for comparison to truth. Simulations of measurements over a representative ICON orbit show the algorithm is able to reproduce hmF2 values to better than 5 km accuracy, and NmF2 to better than 12% accuracy over a 12-second integration, and demonstrate that the ICON EUV instrument and daytime ionosphere algorithm can meet the ICON science objectives which require 20 km vertical resolution in hmF2 and 18% precision in NmF2.

  3. Beyond standard quality of life measures: the subjective experiences of living with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Barat J; Sirois, Fuschia M

    2008-08-01

    In order to facilitate our understanding of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients, it is critical to explore their subjective experiences with the disease. Research has suggested that current modes of assessing HRQoL (i.e., generic and disease-specific measures) may not fully represent all dimensions of patients' HRQoL. The purpose of this study was to examine IBD patients' subjective experiences of the daily impact of IBD, and categorize dimensions of their HRQoL affected by IBD, as identified by the patients themselves. Two hundred and eighty-two patients with IBD provided answers to the qualitative question "How has IBD affected your daily activities?" A content analysis using NVivo 2.0 was conducted on the participants' responses to this question to reveal dimensions of their HRQoL. The analysis yielded six dimensions and several subdimensions of HRQoL, including physical (systemic functioning, daily functioning, energy/vitality, pain), emotional, social, cognitive (functioning, attending to disease), self-regulation (taking control, loss of control, and neutral), and practical functioning. These results reflect previous findings, but also reveal several dimensions of HRQoL not included in current measures of HRQoL for IBD patients (i.e., cognitive, self-regulation, and practical). The implications of these findings for future measurement of HRQoL and research with IBD patients are discussed.

  4. Measurement of cortisol and testosterone in hair of obese and non-obese human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, J; Sauvé, B; Tokmakejian, S; Koren, G; Van Uum, S

    2014-06-01

    Hair analysis has been demonstrated to accurately reflect exposure to drug abuse, environmental toxins and exogenous hormones. We tested the feasibility of measuring cortisol and testosterone in hair of healthy and obese subjects. A modified immunoassay (ELISA) originally developed for saliva was used. Hair, urine and blood samples were collected from young non-obese and obese patients. Perceived stress (PSS) was measured using a validated questionnaire. There was no difference in PSS between non-obese and obese subjects. Hair cortisol levels were significantly correlated with weight (r = 0.27, p significance (p = 0.063). Hair cortisol levels did not correlate with age or urinary cortisol. There was a negative correlation between hair testosterone and age (r = -0.47, p significance (p = 0.098). The ratio of hair cortisol over hair testosterone (C/T) was higher in the obese group than in the young non-obese group. The C/T ratio correlated positively with age (r = 0.56, p significance. Hair cortisol levels increase, while hair testosterone levels decrease with obesity. The hair C/T ratio was significantly correlated with age, BMI and waist circumference better than hair cortisol or testosterone alone. As hair collection is non-invasive and is not influenced by moment-to-moment variations, the measurement of hormones in hair is a useful tool in research and possibly clinical practice. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Translating data and measurements from stratus to cirrus OCT in glaucoma patients and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiseliţă, Dorin; Pantalon, Anca Delia; Cantemir, Alina; Gălăţanu, Cătălina

    2016-01-01

    Aim: our study tried to find a mathematical conversion method of the measurements obtained in Time Domain (TD) OCT to Spectral Domain (SD) OCT. Material and method: A prospective randomized, double blind study that included 244 eyes, from 121 patients (normal subjects, glaucoma suspects, glaucoma), in whom we analyzed the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and the optic disc in the same session by using TD OCT (Stratus) and SD OCT (Cirrus), was performed. The means for RNFL thickness (overall value and per quadrants), neural area and cup/ disc (C/ D) ratio, were measured. Results: We found statistically significant differences between parameters measured in TD OCT and SD OCT (pOCT machines. Data dispersion showed a linear relation between measurements. One can use the following mathematical equations for conversion: Mean RNFL (Cirrus) = 15.77 + 0.748 x Mean RNFL (Stratus) Mean neural area (Cirrus) = 0.508 + 0.388 x Mean neural area (Stratus) Mean C/ D ratio (Cirrus) = 0.157 + 0.792 x Mean C/ D (Stratus) Conclusions: data based on our calculated mathematical conversion equations can be converted into SD OCT. Therefore, we offered a useful tool for the long term monitoring of our patients although the initial measurements in TD OCT made comparisons for patients later measured with SD OCT impossible. Abbreviations: RNFL = retinal nerve fiber layer, TD OCT = time domain optical coherence tomography, SD OCT = spectral domain optical coherence tomography, VF = visual field, CI = confidence interval, ISNT segments = inferior, superior, nasal, temporal segment.

  6. Measurements of exhaled nitric oxide in healthy subjects age 4 to 17 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchvald, Frederik; Baraldi, Eugenio; Carraro, Silvia

    2005-01-01

    NO was measured in healthy subjects of 4 to 17 years according to American Thoracic Society guidelines (single breath online, exhalation flow 50 mL/s) with a chemiluminescence analyzer (NIOX Exhaled Nitric Oxide Monitoring System, Aerocrine, Sweden) in 3 European and 2 US centers. Each child performed 3...... NO in 405 children was 9.7 ppb, and the upper 95% confidence limit was 25.2 ppb. FE NO increased significantly with age, and higher FE NO was seen in children with self-reported rhinitis/conjunctivitis or hay fever. The success rate was age-dependent and improved from 40% in the children 4 years old...

  7. Perception of depth distance of integral photography through the measurement of eye movement and subjective test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Sumio; Suzuki, Makoto; Park, Min-Chul

    2017-05-01

    We developed a measurement tool for binocular eye movement and examined the perception of depth distance in integral photography images, which is a type of three dimensional image, using the tool we developed. Furthermore, we evaluated the perception of the depth distance in integral photography images by the subjective test, and we considered the perception results of the depth distance, which were these two experimental results. Additionally, we examined the perception of the depth distance in the real objects, and compared with the results in the case of integral photography images and real objects.

  8. Personality dimensions measured by the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) in subjects with social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marteinsdottir, Ina; Tillfors, Maria; Furmark, Tomas; Anderberg, Ulla Maria; Ekselius, Lisa

    2003-01-01

    The present study investigated personality dimensions by means of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) in subjects with social phobia with or without a co-existing avoidant personality disorder. Thirty-one individuals with social phobia were recruited through advertisement and diagnosed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV I and II psychiatric disorders. Comorbid Axis I psychiatric disorders were diagnosed in 29% of the cases. Co-occurring personality disorders were present in 55.8% of the cases, and avoidant personality disorder in 48.4%. The social phobia subjects, as compared to healthy controls of the same age, scored significantly higher in the TCI dimension measuring Harm avoidance but significantly lower in Persistence, Self-directedness, Cooperativeness and Self-transcendence. Presence of avoidant personality disorders in the social phobia subjects was associated with significantly higher Harm avoidance, particularly on the subscale Shyness with strangers. In conclusion, individuals with social phobia were characterized by high comorbidity of avoidant personality disorder and deviations in TCI personality dimensions. Enhanced Harm avoidance was the most prominent personality trait. The observed deviations in TCI dimensions were primarily related to the social phobia itself and not to the presence of concurrent personality disorders.

  9. Circadian melatonin rhythm and excessive daytime sleepiness in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videnovic, Aleksandar; Noble, Charleston; Reid, Kathryn J; Peng, Jie; Turek, Fred W; Marconi, Angelica; Rademaker, Alfred W; Simuni, Tanya; Zadikoff, Cindy; Zee, Phyllis C

    2014-04-01

    Diurnal fluctuations of motor and nonmotor symptoms and a high prevalence of sleep-wake disturbances in Parkinson disease (PD) suggest a role of the circadian system in the modulation of these symptoms. However, surprisingly little is known regarding circadian function in PD and whether circadian dysfunction is involved in the development of sleep-wake disturbances in PD. To determine the relationship between the timing and amplitude of the 24-hour melatonin rhythm, a marker of endogenous circadian rhythmicity, with self-reported sleep quality, the severity of daytime sleepiness, and disease metrics. A cross-sectional study from January 1, 2009, through December 31, 2012, of 20 patients with PD receiving stable dopaminergic therapy and 15 age-matched control participants. Both groups underwent blood sampling for the measurement of serum melatonin levels at 30-minute intervals for 24 hours under modified constant routine conditions at the Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center of Northwestern University. Twenty-four hour monitoring of serum melatonin secretion. Clinical and demographic data, self-reported measures of sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) and daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale), and circadian markers of the melatonin rhythm, including the amplitude, area under the curve (AUC), and phase of the 24-hour rhythm. Patients with PD had blunted circadian rhythms of melatonin secretion compared with controls; the amplitude of the melatonin rhythm and the 24-hour AUC for circulating melatonin levels were significantly lower in PD patients (P Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores, levodopa equivalent dose, and global Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score in the PD group were not significantly related to measures of the melatonin circadian rhythm. Circadian dysfunction may underlie excessive sleepiness in PD. The nature of this association needs to be explored further in longitudinal studies. Approaches aimed to strengthen

  10. Chronotype, Light Exposure, Sleep, and Daytime Functioning in High School Students Attending Morning or Afternoon School Shifts: An Actigraphic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jeanne Sophie; Gaudreault, Michael M; Perron, Michel; Laberge, Luc

    2016-04-01

    Adolescent maturation is associated with delays of the endogenous circadian phase. Consequently, early school schedules may lead to a mismatch between internal and external time, which can be detrimental to adolescent sleep and health. In parallel, chronotype is known to play a role in adolescent health; evening chronotype adolescents are at higher risk for sleep problems and lower academic achievement. In the summer of 2008, Kénogami High School (Saguenay, Canada) was destroyed by fire. Kénogami students were subsequently relocated to Arvida High School (situated 5.3 km away) for the 2008-2009 academic year. A dual school schedule was implemented, with Arvida students attending a morning schedule (0740-1305 h) and Kénogami students an afternoon schedule (1325-1845 h). This study aimed to investigate the effects of such school schedules and chronotype on sleep, light exposure, and daytime functioning. Twenty-four morning and 33 afternoon schedule students wore an actigraph during 7 days to measure sleep and light exposure. Academic achievement was obtained from school. Subjects completed validated questionnaires on daytime sleepiness, psychological distress, social rhythms, school satisfaction, alcohol, and chronotype. Overall, afternoon schedule students had longer sleep duration, lower sleepiness, and lower light exposure than morning schedule students. Evening chronotypes (E-types) reported higher levels of sleepiness than morning chronotypes (M-types) in both morning and afternoon schedules. Furthermore, M-types attending the morning schedule reported higher sleepiness than M-types attending the afternoon schedule. No difference was found between morning and afternoon schedule students with regard to academic achievement, psychological distress, social rhythms, school satisfaction, and alcohol consumption. However, in both schedules, M-type had more regular social rhythms and lower alcohol consumption. In summary, this study emphasizes that an early school

  11. Age-specific differences between conventional and ambulatory daytime blood pressure values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conen, David; Aeschbacher, Stefanie; Thijs, Lutgarde

    2014-01-01

    Mean daytime ambulatory blood pressure (BP) values are considered to be lower than conventional BP values, but data on this relation among younger individuals <50 years are scarce. Conventional and 24-hour ambulatory BP were measured in 9550 individuals not taking antihypertensive treatment from ...

  12. Therapeutic misconception in research subjects: development and validation of a measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, Paul S; Anatchkova, Milena; Albert, Karen; Dunn, Laura B; Lidz, Charles W

    2012-12-01

    Therapeutic misconception (TM), which occurs when research subjects fail to appreciate the distinction between the imperatives of clinical research and ordinary treatment, may undercut the process of obtaining meaningful consent to clinical research participation. Previous studies have found that TM is widespread, but progress in addressing TM has been stymied by the absence of a validated method for assessing its presence. The goal of this study was to develop and validate a theoretically grounded measure of TM, assess its diagnostic accuracy, and test previous findings regarding TM's prevalence. A total of 220 participants were recruited from clinical trials at four academic medical centers in the United States. Participants completed a 28-item Likert-type questionnaire to assess the presence of beliefs associated with TM, and a semistructured TM interview designed to elicit their perceptions of the nature of the clinical trial in which they were participating. Data from the questionnaires were subjected to factor analysis, and items with poor factor loadings were excluded. This resulted in a 10-item scale, with three strongly correlated factors and excellent internal consistency; the fit indices of the model across 10 training sets were consistent with the original results, suggesting a stable factor solution. The scale was validated against the TM interview, with significantly higher scores among subjects coded as displaying evidence of TM. Receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis based on a 10-fold internal cross-validation yielded area under the ROC (AUC) = 0.682 for any evidence of TM. When sensitivity (0.72) and specificity (0.61) were both optimized, positive predictive value was 0.65 and negative predictive value was 0.68, with a positive likelihood ratio of 1.89 and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.47. In all, 50.5% (n = 101) of the participants manifested evidence of TM on the TM interview, a somewhat lower rate than in most previous studies. The

  13. Network, anatomical, and non-imaging measures for the prediction of ADHD diagnosis in individual subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason W Bohland

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain imaging methods have long held promise as diagnostic aids for neuropsychiatric conditions with complex behavioral phenotypes such as Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. This promise has largely been unrealized, at least partly due to the heterogeneity of clinical populations and the small sample size of many studies. A large, multi-center dataset provided by the ADHD-200 Consortium affords new opportunities to test methods for individual diagnosis based on MRI-observable structural brain attributes and functional interactions observable from resting state fMRI. In this study, we systematically calculated a large set of standard and new quantitative markers from individual subject datasets. These features (>12,000 per subject consisted of local anatomical attributes such as cortical thickness and structure volumes and both local and global resting state network measures. Three methods were used to compute graphs representing interdependencies between activations in different brain areas, and a full set of network features was derived from each. Of these, features derived from the inverse of the time series covariance matrix, under an L1-norm regularization penalty, proved most powerful. Anatomical and network feature sets were used individually, and combined with non-imaging phenotypic features from each subject. Machine learning algorithms were used to rank attributes, and performance was assessed under cross-validation and on a separate test set of 168 subjects for a variety of feature set combinations. While non-imaging features gave highest performance in cross-validation, the addition of imaging features in sufficient numbers led to improved generalization to new data. Stratification by gender also proved to be a fruitful strategy to improve classifier performance. We describe the overall approach used, compare the predictive power of different classes of features, and describe the most impactful features in relation to the

  14. Empirical Analysis of the Subjective Impressions and Objective Measures of Domain Scientists’ Analytical Judgment Using Visualizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasgupta, Aritra; Burrows, Susannah M.; Han, Kyungsik; Rasch, Philip J.

    2017-04-15

    Scientists working in a particular domain often adhere to conventional data analysis and presentation methods and this leads to familiarity with these methods over time. But does high familiarity always lead to better analytical judgment? This question is especially relevant when visualizations are used in scientific tasks, as there can be discrepancies between visualization best practices and domain conventions. However, there is little empirical evidence of the relationships between scientists’ subjective impressions about familiar and unfamiliar visualizations and objective measures of their effect on scientific judgment. To address this gap and to study these factors, we focus on the climate science domain, specifically on visualizations used for comparison of model performance. We present a comprehensive user study with 47 climate scientists where we explored the following factors: i) relationships between scientists’ familiarity, their perceived levels of com- fort, confidence, accuracy, and objective measures of accuracy, and ii) relationships among domain experience, visualization familiarity, and post-study preference.

  15. Measurement of dynamic ocular surface temperature in healthy subjects using a new thermography device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klamann, Matthias K J; Maier, Anna-Karina B; Gonnermann, Johannes; Klein, Julian P; Pleyer, Uwe

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the routine use and applicability of a new ocular thermography device (TG 1000; Tomey Corp, Nagoya, Japan) in healthy individuals. Sixty eyes of 30 healthy subjects were included in this prospective study. Intraobserver reproducibility was tested with an ocular surface-oriented infrared radiation thermographic device in a non-contact manner. Using a standard examination protocol, the ocular surface temperature was assessed by dynamic thermal imaging over a time period of 10 s. The procedure was repeated three times during a single session by one examiner. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated. Ocular surface temperature measurements were highly reproducible. The mean ocular surface temperature was 34.02°C ± 0.22. The ICC was 0.947%, 0.949%, and 0.955% for minimum, maximum, and mean temperatures, respectively. Ocular surface temperature measurements made using the Tomey TG 1000 in healthy subjects showed excellent intraobserver reproducibility. This novel non-invasive technique offers new options for increased understanding of the physiology of the ocular surface.

  16. A Novel Noninvasive Method for Measuring Fatigability of the Quadriceps Muscle in Noncooperating Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper B. Poulsen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Critical illness is associated with muscle weakness leading to long-term functional limitations. Objectives. To assess the reliability of a novel method for evaluating fatigability of the quadriceps muscle in noncooperating healthy subjects. Methods. On two occasions, separated by seven days, nonvoluntary isometric contractions (twitch and tetanic of the quadriceps femoris muscle evoked by transcutaneous electrical muscle stimulation were recorded in twelve healthy adults. For tetanic contractions, the Fatigue Index (ratio of peak torque values and the slope of the regression line of peak torque values were primary outcome measures. For twitch contractions, maximum peak torque and rise time were calculated. Relative (intraclass correlation, ICC3.1 and absolute (standard error of measurement, SEM reliability were assessed and minimum detectable change was calculated using a 95% confidence interval (MDC95%. Results. The Fatigue Index (ICC3.1, 0.84; MDC95%, 0.12 and the slope of the regression line (ICC3.1, 0.99; MDC95%, 0.03 showed substantial relative and absolute reliability during the first 15 and 30 contractions, respectively. Conclusion. This method for assessing fatigability of the quadriceps muscle produces reliable results in healthy subjects and may provide valuable data on quantitative changes in muscle working capacity and treatment effects in patients who are incapable of producing voluntary muscle contractions.

  17. Acute modafinil exposure reduces daytime sleepiness in abstinent methamphetamine-dependent volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, James J.; Jackson, Brian J.; Kalechstein, Ari D.; De La Garza, Richard; Chang, Lee C.; Newton, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of acute, oral modafinil (200 mg) exposure on daytime sleepiness in methamphetamine (Meth)-dependent individuals. Eighteen Meth-dependent subjects were enrolled in a 7-d inpatient study and were administered placebo or modafinil on day 6 and the counter-condition on day 7 (randomized) of the protocol. Subjects completed several subjective daily assessments (such as the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Beck Depression Inventory and visual analogue scale) throughout the protocol as well as objective assessments on days 5–7, when the Multiple Sleep Latency Test was performed. The results of the current study suggest that short-term abstinence from Meth is associated with increased daytime sleepiness and that a single dose of 200 mg modafinil reduces daytime somnolence in this population. In addition, a positive correlation was found between subjective reporting of the likelihood of taking a nap and craving and desire for Meth, as well as the likelihood of using Meth and whether Meth would make the participant feel better. The results of this study should be considered when investigating candidate medications for Meth-dependence, especially in those individuals who attribute their Meth use to overcoming deficits resulting from sleep abnormalities. PMID:22214752

  18. Daytime napping and its effects on alertness and short-term memory performance in shiftworkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härmä, M; Knauth, P; Ilmarinen, J

    1989-01-01

    Daytime napping and its effects on 145 female shiftworkers were studied by comparing the individual characteristics, alertness, and short-term memory performance of subjects who took or did not take naps. Of the subjects 56% (n = 82) took a nap before a night shift and 21% (n = 30) after a morning shift. After a morning shift, napping was more frequent among evening types and subjects living alone (not married). Before a night shift, daytime napping was not connected to individual characteristics, but the total sleep time of nappers during the preceding night was shorter than that of non-nappers. At 10.00 and at 04.00-08.00, at the end of the night shift, nappers were significantly more alert than subjects who had not taken naps. The length and timing of the daytime nap did not correlate to either alertness or performance during the following night. In a questionnaire, nappers before a night shift had less sleep disturbances than non-nappers.

  19. Age-related different relationships between ectopic adipose tissues and measures of central obesity in sedentary subjects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guglielmi, Valeria; Maresca, Luciano; D'Adamo, Monica; Di Roma, Mauro; Lanzillo, Chiara; Federici, Massimo; Lauro, Davide; Preziosi, Paolo; Bellia, Alfonso; Sbraccia, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    ... (SAT) were simultaneously measured by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and related to waist circumference measurements and age in 32 sedentary subjects without cardiovascular disease (18 men; 14 women; mean age 48.5 ± 14 years...

  20. Measurement of Drug Craving in Persian Speaking Subjects; a Review on Current Experiences and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoomeh Maarefvand

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug craving is considered as one of the main cores of drug dependency and addiction. Multidimensionality of drug craving, its cultural-bounded features and its intra individual rapidly changing nature makes it difficult to be measured. Nowadays, regarding different psychometric approaches, there are various instruments available for measurement of different aspects of drug craving but mainly for Latin-based languages in North America and European countries. High prevalence and special conditions, and unique subcultures in substance abuse and addiction in many countries, like Iran, make the design of culturally validated instruments for drug craving assessment priority. Materials and Methods: Comprehensive review on drug craving measurement instruments for Persian speaking subjects have been performed by searching in databases (ELSEVIER, Science Direct and Scientific Information Database (SID and investigating of related documents on regional experiences. Results: In this article seven main categories of drug craving instruments have been reviewed focusing on validated versions in Persian language including: self-reports, reinforcement “proxies”, drug self administration, psycho physiological responding, neurobiological responding, cognitive processing and expressive methods. Conclusion: Reviewing on weak and strength points of each instrument group and national and regional experiences shows that designing and validating a new series of ecologically-validated instruments for multidimensional measurement of drug craving in different addiction subcultures should be prioritized to cover current methodological gaps in substance abuse studies in Iran.

  1. Sleep and daytime sleepiness in methylphenidate medicated and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Excessive daytime sleepiness due to any cause can result in various symptoms similar to those used for the diagnosis of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A common treatment for children diagnosed with ADHD is methylphenidate which is also used to treat excessive daytime sleepiness. This paper ...

  2. Sleep and daytime sleepiness in methylphenidate medicated and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    daytime sleepiness were reported by the parents of the un-medicated children between the hours of 13:00 and 15:00, compared to the medicated children. ... leg syndrome, sleep-disordered breathing and snoring or sleep apnea, all of which ... associated with significantly greater anxiety, daytime fatigue, nocturnal enuresis ...

  3. 47 CFR 73.187 - Limitation on daytime radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Limitation on daytime radiation. 73.187 Section... BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.187 Limitation on daytime radiation. (a)(1) Except as..., subsequent changes of facilities which do not involve a change in frequency, an increase in radiation toward...

  4. Daytime napping associated with increased symptom severity in fibromyalgia syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theadom, Alice; Cropley, Mark; Kantermann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous qualitative research has revealed that people with fibromyalgia use daytime napping as a coping strategy for managing symptoms against clinical advice. Yet there is no evidence to suggest whether daytime napping is beneficial or detrimental for people with fibromyalgia. The

  5. Objective and subjective measures of the quality of managed care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnelle, J F; Ouslander, J G; Buchanan, J; Zellman, G; Farley, D; Hirsch, S H; Reuben, D B

    1999-04-01

    The number of nursing home (NH) residents enrolled in managed care plans (HMO) will increase, and there is concern that the quality of their medical care may be compromised by cost-containment pressures. In this study, we evaluated the medical care of residents enrolled in 3 health maintenance organizations (HMO) that developed specific long-term care programs. To compare the medical care received by NH residents enrolled in HMO and Fee-for-Service (FFS) plans with both objective process of care and consumer perception (subjective) measures. To describe the relationship between the objective and subjective measures. Number of primary care visits per month; process of medical care for 2 geriatric tracer conditions (falls, fevers); family and residents' perceptions of the adequacy of sickness episode management; and the frequency of primary provider visits. Quasi-experimental. HMO residents received more timely and appropriate responses to falls and fevers than did FFS residents. HMO residents also received more frequent routine visits by a primary care provider team consisting of a physician and nurse practitioner. Consumer perceptions of quality did not differ between the HMO and FFS groups. Families within both groups were significantly more positive than were residents about the frequency of visits by both physicians and nurse practitioners. Within the HMO group, both families and residents were more positive about the frequency of nurse practitioner visits than were physician visits even when the frequency of visits by the 2 providers were similar. Although the medical care received by HMO residents was better on most objective process measures than that received by FFS residents, consumer perceptions of care did not detect those differences. NH residents and families have different perceptions about the adequacy of visits by physicians and nurse practitioners, and both families and residents appear to have different expectations concerning how often they want

  6. Internal Lymphedema Correlates with Subjective and Objective Measures of Dysphagia in Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Leanne K; Ridner, Sheila H; Deng, Jie; Bartow, Carmin; Mannion, Kyle; Niermann, Ken; Gilbert, Jill; Dietrich, Mary S; Cmelak, Anthony J; Murphy, Barbara A

    2016-09-01

    Tumor/treatment-related internal lymphedema (IL) and/or external lymphedema (EL) are associated with functional deficits and increased symptom burden in head and neck cancer patients (HNCP). Previously, we noted association between EL/IL and patient-reported dysphagia using the Vanderbilt Head and Neck Symptom Survey (VHNSS) version 1.0. To determine the relationship between IL/EL and subjective and objective measures of swallowing function. Eighty-one HNCP completed: (1) VHNSS version 2.0, including 13 swallowing/nutrition-related questions grouped into three clusters: swallow solids (ss), swallow liquids (sl), and nutrition(nt); (2) physical assessment of EL using Foldi scale; (3) endoscopic assessment of IL using Patterson scale (n = 56); and (4) modified barium swallow study rated by dysphagia outcome and severity scale (DOSS) and in conjunction with a swallow evaluation by National Outcomes Measurement System (NOMS). Examinations were performed at varied time points to assess lymphedema spectrum, from baseline (n = 15, 18.1%) to 18 months post-therapy (n = 20, 24.1%). VHNSS swallow/nutrition items scores correlated with NOMS/DOSS ratings (p nutrition scores correlated with maximum grade of swelling for any single structure on Patterson scale: ss (0.43; p = 0.001); sl (0.38; p = 0.004); nt (0.41; p = 0.002). IL of aryepiglottic/pharyngoepiglottic folds, epiglottis, and pyriform sinus were most strongly correlated with VHNSS and NOMS ratings. NOMS/DOSS ratings correlated with EL (> = -0.34; p nutrition items and EL ( 0.20). IL correlated with subjective and objective measures of swallow dysfunction. Longitudinal analysis of trajectory and impact of IL/EL on dysphagia is ongoing.

  7. Vocal efficiency measurements in subjects with vocal polyps and nodules: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jack; Stern, Jennifer; Chen, Hui-Jun; Solomon, Nancy Pearl

    2004-04-01

    Vocal efficiency is a quantitative measure of the ability of the larynx to convert subglottal power to acoustic power. On the basis of the scant previous literature and clinical intuition, we tested the hypothesis that vocal efficiency, as an indicator of the functional status of the larynx, is abnormally reduced in persons with vocal nodules and polyps. Because the most difficult aspect of obtaining measures of vocal efficiency has been the determination of subglottal pressure, we applied a noninvasive airflow interruption technique for this purpose. Subjects with normal voices (n = 22), vocal polyps (n = 14), and vocal nodules (n = 16) phonated at different intensities into a mask connected by way of piping to a flow meter, a pressure transducer, and an acoustic microphone. Inflation of a balloon-type valve located within the piping provided interruption of phonation. The intraoral pressure plateau occurring during flow interruption was used to estimate subglottal pressure. Subglottal power and acoustic power were determined, and their quotient provided a measure of vocal efficiency. The vocal efficiency in the normal subjects averaged 1.15 x 10(-5) at 70 dB, 3.17 x 10(-5) at 75 dB, 7.52 x 10(-5) at 80 dB, and 1.41 x 10(-4) at 85 dB. The vocal efficiency in the patients with vocal polyps averaged 3.62 x 10(-6) at 70 dB, 8.34 x 10(-6) at 75 dB, 2.10 x 10(-5) at 80 dB, and 4.26 x 10(-5) at 85 dB. The vocal efficiency in the patients with vocal nodules averaged 4.32 x 10(-6) at 70 dB, 1.57 x 10(-5) at 75 dB, 4.26 x 10(-5) at 80 dB, and 8.34 x 10(-5) at 85 dB. As compared to the normal subjects, the patients with laryngeal polyps or vocal nodules had significantly reduced vocal efficiency. These results provide quantitative verification of the clinical impression of inefficient phonation in patients with mass lesions of the vocal folds.

  8. Daytime Sleepiness, Performance, Mood, Nocturnal Sleep: The Effect of Benzodiazepine and Caffeine on Their Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-01

    experimenter.Lpaced tasks and no change on subject-paced tasks. Possible causes for this effect are not clear. Carskadon et al. (28) found 18 that performance on a...there appears to be more than one type of daytime sleepiness. Broughton differentiated sleepiness with respect to cause , i.e., sleep loss vs path- 0ology...conclusions would be inappropriate. Thus, as it is necessary to have corroborative data before narcolepsy can be diagnosed from the appearance of MSLT

  9. Effect of respiratory pattern on automated clinical blood pressure measurement: an observational study with normotensive subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herakova, Natalia; Nwobodo, Nnenna Harmony Nzeribe; Wang, Ying; Chen, Fei; Zheng, Dingchang

    2017-01-01

    It has been reported that deep breathing could reduce blood pressures (BP) in general. It is also known that BP is decreased during inhalation and increased during exhalation. Therefore, the measured BPs could be potentially different during deep breathing with different lengths of inhalation and exhalation. This study aimed to quantitatively investigate the effect of different respiratory patterns on BPs. Forty healthy subjects (20 males and 20 females, aged from 18 to 60 years) were recruited. Systolic and diastolic BPs (SBP and DBP) were measured using a clinically validated automated BP device. There were two repeated measurement sessions for each subject. Within each session, eight BP measurements were performed, including 4 measurements during deep breathing with different respiratory patterns (Pattern 1: 4.5 s vs 4.5 s; Patter 2: 6 s vs 2 s; Pattern 3: 2 s vs 6 s; and Pattern 4: 1.5 s vs 1.5 s, respectively for the durations of inhalation and exhalation) and additional 4 measurements from 1 min after the four different respiratory patterns. At the beginning and end of the two repeated measurement sessions, there were two baseline BP measurements under resting condition. The key experimental results showed that overall automated SBP significantly decreased by 3.7 ± 5.7 mmHg, 3.9 ± 5.2 mmHg, 1.7 ± 5.9 mmHg and 3.3 ± 5.3 mmHg during deep breathing, respectively for Patterns 1, 2, 3 and 4 (all p Pattern 3). Similarly, the automated DBPs during deep breathing in pattern 1, 2 and 4 decreased by 3.7 ± 5.0 mmHg, 3.7 ± 4.9 mmHg and 4.6 ± 3.9 mmHg respectively (all p Pattern 3 with a decrease of 1.0 ± 4.3 mmHg, p = 0.14). Correspondingly, after deep breathing, automated BPs recovered back to normal with no significant difference in comparison with baseline BP (all p > 0.05, except for SBP in Pattern 4). In summary, this study has quantitatively demonstrated that the measured automated BPs decreased

  10. Daytime urinary incontinence among kindergarten children in aden governorate, 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Khalida

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Daytime urinary incontinence is an involuntary or intentional voiding of urine in an awake child who is old enough to have developed control, and has a variable prevalence throughout the world. In Yemen, data regarding this problem are almost absent. In this study from the capital city of Aden, we aimed to: (1 determine the prevalence of daytime incontinence in kindergarten children aged 4-6 years, (2 identify the relation between daytime enuresis with personal and family characte-ristics of the children studied, and (3 describe the severity and characteristics of daytime enuresis in the studied children. A cross-sectional comparative study was undertaken in all kindergarten children aged 4-6 years in Aden Governorate and 1061 responded. Data were obtained by using a precoded self-administered questionnaire completed by the parents. The questionnaire consisted of two parts: personal and family characteristics of the studied children and the presence of daytime incontinence. The second part was responded if there was history of daytime incontinence, and contained information on the severity and possible associated factors. Daytime incontinence was encountered in 34 cases (3.2%; 18 were females. Significant differences between cases and incontinence-free children were encountered in birth order and type of kindergarten (P < 0.05. Majority (85.3% had severe form of daytime incontinence. Bed wetting and combined day and night wetting were more frequent among males, whereas urinary symptoms (urgency, squatting, dysuria, dribbling were more frequent among females. Working mother and frightening and emotionally stressful events in the 6 months preceding the study were significantly associated with daytime incontinence, while parents′ education, punish-ment for daytime incontinence, and the presence of family history of incontinence were insignificant. In conclusion, this is the first study from Yemen reporting the prevalence of enuresis, similar to

  11. Effects of Background Music on Objective and Subjective Performance Measures in an Auditory BCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Sijie; Allison, Brendan Z; Kübler, Andrea; Cichocki, Andrzej; Wang, Xingyu; Jin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have explored brain computer interface (BCI) systems based on auditory stimuli, which could help patients with visual impairments. Usability and user satisfaction are important considerations in any BCI. Although background music can influence emotion and performance in other task environments, and many users may wish to listen to music while using a BCI, auditory, and other BCIs are typically studied without background music. Some work has explored the possibility of using polyphonic music in auditory BCI systems. However, this approach requires users with good musical skills, and has not been explored in online experiments. Our hypothesis was that an auditory BCI with background music would be preferred by subjects over a similar BCI without background music, without any difference in BCI performance. We introduce a simple paradigm (which does not require musical skill) using percussion instrument sound stimuli and background music, and evaluated it in both offline and online experiments. The result showed that subjects preferred the auditory BCI with background music. Different performance measures did not reveal any significant performance effect when comparing background music vs. no background. Since the addition of background music does not impair BCI performance but is preferred by users, auditory (and perhaps other) BCIs should consider including it. Our study also indicates that auditory BCIs can be effective even if the auditory channel is simultaneously otherwise engaged.

  12. Comparison between refraction measured by Spot Vision ScreeningTM and subjective clinical refractometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Lima de Jesus

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of Spot Vision ScreeningTM as an autorefractor by comparing refraction measurements to subjective clinical refractometry results in children and adult patients. METHODS: One-hundred and thirty-four eyes of 134 patients were submitted to refractometry by Spot and clinical refractometry under cycloplegia. Patients, students, physicians, staff and children of staff from the Hospital das Clínicas (School of Medicine, University of São Paulo aged 7-50 years without signs of ocular disease were examined. Only right-eye refraction data were analyzed. The findings were converted in magnitude vectors for analysis. RESULTS: The difference between Spot Vision ScreeningTM and subjective clinical refractometry expressed in spherical equivalents was +0.66±0.56 diopters (D, +0.16±0.27 D for the vector projected on the 90 axis and +0.02±0.15 D for the oblique vector. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the statistical significance of the difference between the two methods, we consider the difference non-relevant in a clinical setting, supporting the use of Spot Vision ScreeningTM as an ancillary method for estimating refraction.

  13. Comparison between refraction measured by Spot Vision Screening™ and subjective clinical refractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, Daniela Lima; Villela, Flávio Fernandes; Orlandin, Luis Fernando; Eiji, Fernando Naves; Dantas, Daniel Oliveira; Alves, Milton Ruiz

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of Spot Vision Screening™ as an autorefractor by comparing refraction measurements to subjective clinical refractometry results in children and adult patients. One-hundred and thirty-four eyes of 134 patients were submitted to refractometry by Spot and clinical refractometry under cycloplegia. Patients, students, physicians, staff and children of staff from the Hospital das Clínicas (School of Medicine, University of São Paulo) aged 7-50 years without signs of ocular disease were examined. Only right-eye refraction data were analyzed. The findings were converted in magnitude vectors for analysis. The difference between Spot Vision Screening™ and subjective clinical refractometry expressed in spherical equivalents was +0.66±0.56 diopters (D), +0.16±0.27 D for the vector projected on the 90 axis and +0.02±0.15 D for the oblique vector. Despite the statistical significance of the difference between the two methods, we consider the difference non-relevant in a clinical setting, supporting the use of Spot Vision Screening™ as an ancillary method for estimating refraction.

  14. Comparison between refraction measured by Spot Vision ScreeningTM and subjective clinical refractometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, Daniela Lima; Villela, Flávio Fernandes; Orlandin, Luis Fernando; Eiji, Fernando Naves; Dantas, Daniel Oliveira; Alves, Milton Ruiz

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of Spot Vision ScreeningTM as an autorefractor by comparing refraction measurements to subjective clinical refractometry results in children and adult patients. METHODS: One-hundred and thirty-four eyes of 134 patients were submitted to refractometry by Spot and clinical refractometry under cycloplegia. Patients, students, physicians, staff and children of staff from the Hospital das Clínicas (School of Medicine, University of São Paulo) aged 7-50 years without signs of ocular disease were examined. Only right-eye refraction data were analyzed. The findings were converted in magnitude vectors for analysis. RESULTS: The difference between Spot Vision ScreeningTM and subjective clinical refractometry expressed in spherical equivalents was +0.66±0.56 diopters (D), +0.16±0.27 D for the vector projected on the 90 axis and +0.02±0.15 D for the oblique vector. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the statistical significance of the difference between the two methods, we consider the difference non-relevant in a clinical setting, supporting the use of Spot Vision ScreeningTM as an ancillary method for estimating refraction. PMID:26934234

  15. A Systematic Review on Existing Measures for the Subjective Assessment of Rehabilitation and Assistive Robot Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiannis Koumpouros

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the current study is to identify and classify outcome measures currently used for the assessment of rehabilitation or assistive robot devices. We conducted a systematic review of the literature using PubMed, MEDLINE, CIRRIE, and Scopus databases for studies that assessed rehabilitation or assistive robot devices from 1980 through January 2016. In all, 31 articles met all inclusion criteria. Tailor-made questionnaires were the most commonly used tool at 66.7%, while the great majority (93.9% of the studies used nonvalidated instruments. The study reveals the absence of a standard scale which makes it difficult to compare the results from different researchers. There is a great need, therefore, for a valid and reliable instrument to be available for use by the intended end users for the subjective assessment of robot devices. The study concludes by identifying two scales that have been validated in general assistive technology devices and could support the scope of subjective assessment in rehabilitation or assistive robots (however, with limited coverage and a new one called PYTHEIA, recently published. The latter intends to close the gap and help researchers and developers to evaluate, assess, and produce products that satisfy the real needs of the end users.

  16. Longitudinal measurement equivalence of subjective language brokering experiences scale in Mexican American adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Yeong; Hou, Yang; Shen, Yishan; Zhang, Minyu

    2017-04-01

    Language brokering occurs frequently in immigrant families and can have significant implications for the well-being of family members involved. The present study aimed to develop and validate a measure that can be used to assess multiple dimensions of subjective language brokering experiences among Mexican American adolescents. Participants were 557 adolescent language brokers (54.2% female, Mage.wave1 = 12.96, SD = .94) in Mexican American families. Using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, we were able to identify 7 reliable subscales of language brokering: linguistic benefits, socioemotional benefits, efficacy, positive parent-child relationships, parental dependence, negative feelings , and centrality . Tests of factorial invariance show that these subscales demonstrate, at minimum, partial strict invariance across time and across experiences of translating for mothers and fathers, and in most cases, also across adolescent gender, nativity, and translation frequency. Thus, in general, the means of the subscales and the relations among the subscales with other variables can be compared across these different occasions and groups. Tests of criterion-related validity demonstrated that these subscales correlated, concurrently and longitudinally, with parental warmth and hostility, parent-child alienation, adolescent family obligation, depressive symptoms, resilience, and life meaning. This reliable and valid subjective language brokering experiences scale will be helpful for gaining a better understanding of adolescents' language brokering experiences with their mothers and fathers, and how such experiences may influence their development. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Effects of background music on objective and subjective performance measures in an auditory BCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijie Zhou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have explored brain computer interface (BCI systems based on auditory stimuli, which could help patients with visual impairments. Usability and user satisfaction are important considerations in any BCI. Although background music can influence emotion and performance in other task environments, and many users may wish to listen to music while using a BCI, auditory and other BCIs are typically studied without background music. Some work has explored the possibility of using polyphonic music in auditory BCI systems. However, this approach requires users with good musical skills, and has not been explored in online experiments. Our hypothesis was that an auditory BCI with background music would be preferred by subjects over a similar BCI without background music, without any difference in BCI performance. We introduce a simple paradigm (which does not require musical skill using percussion instrument sound stimuli and background music, and evaluated it in both offline and online experiments. The result showed that subjects preferred the auditory BCI with background music. Different performance measures did not reveal any significant performance effect when comparing background music vs. no background. Since the addition of background music does not impair BCI performance but is preferred by users, auditory (and perhaps other BCIs should consider including it. Our study also indicates that auditory BCIs can be effective even if the auditory channel is simultaneously otherwise engaged.

  18. A Systematic Review on Existing Measures for the Subjective Assessment of Rehabilitation and Assistive Robot Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumpouros, Yiannis

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the current study is to identify and classify outcome measures currently used for the assessment of rehabilitation or assistive robot devices. We conducted a systematic review of the literature using PubMed, MEDLINE, CIRRIE, and Scopus databases for studies that assessed rehabilitation or assistive robot devices from 1980 through January 2016. In all, 31 articles met all inclusion criteria. Tailor-made questionnaires were the most commonly used tool at 66.7%, while the great majority (93.9%) of the studies used nonvalidated instruments. The study reveals the absence of a standard scale which makes it difficult to compare the results from different researchers. There is a great need, therefore, for a valid and reliable instrument to be available for use by the intended end users for the subjective assessment of robot devices. The study concludes by identifying two scales that have been validated in general assistive technology devices and could support the scope of subjective assessment in rehabilitation or assistive robots (however, with limited coverage) and a new one called PYTHEIA, recently published. The latter intends to close the gap and help researchers and developers to evaluate, assess, and produce products that satisfy the real needs of the end users.

  19. Pipelines subject to slow landslide movements: Structural modeling vs field measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruschi, R.; Glavina, S.; Spinazze, M.; Tomassini, D. [Snamprogetti S.p.A., Fano (Italy); Bonanni, S.; Cuscuna, S. [Snam S.p.A., Milan (Italy)

    1996-12-01

    In recent years finite element techniques have been increasingly used to investigate the behavior of buried pipelines subject to soil movements. The use of these tools provides a rational basis for the definition of minimum wall thickness requirements in landslide crossings. Furthermore the design of mitigation measures or monitoring systems which control the development of undesirable strains in the pipe wall over time, requires a detailed structural modeling. The scope of this paper is to discuss the use of dedicated structural modeling with relevant calibration to field measurements. The strain measurements used were regularly gathered from pipe sections, in two different sites over a period of time long enough to record changes of axial strain due to soil movement. Detailed structural modeling of pipeline layout in both sites and for operating conditions, is applied. Numerical simulations show the influence of the distribution of soil movement acting on the pipeline with regards to the state of strain which can be developed in certain locations. The role of soil nature and direction of relative movements in the definition of loads transferred to the pipeline, is also discussed.

  20. Limitations of subjective cognitive load measures in simulation-based procedural training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naismith, Laura M; Cheung, Jeffrey J H; Ringsted, Charlotte; Cavalcanti, Rodrigo B

    2015-08-01

    The effective implementation of cognitive load theory (CLT) to optimise the instructional design of simulation-based training requires sensitive and reliable measures of cognitive load. This mixed-methods study assessed relationships between commonly used measures of total cognitive load and the extent to which these measures reflected participants' experiences of cognitive load in simulation-based procedural skills training. Two groups of medical residents (n = 38) completed three questionnaires after participating in simulation-based procedural skills training sessions: the Paas Cognitive Load Scale; the NASA Task Load Index (TLX), and a cognitive load component (CLC) questionnaire we developed to assess total cognitive load as the sum of intrinsic load (how complex the task is), extraneous load (how the task is presented) and germane load (how the learner processes the task for learning). We calculated Pearson's correlation coefficients to assess agreement among these instruments. Group interviews explored residents' perceptions about how the simulation sessions contributed to their total cognitive load. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and subjected to qualitative content analysis. Total cognitive load scores differed significantly according to the instrument used to assess them. In particular, there was poor agreement between the Paas Scale and the TLX. Quantitative and qualitative findings supported intrinsic cognitive load as synonymous with mental effort (Paas Scale), mental demand (TLX) and task difficulty and complexity (CLC questionnaire). Additional qualitative themes relating to extraneous and germane cognitive loads were not reflected in any of the questionnaires. The Paas Scale, TLX and CLC questionnaire appear to be interchangeable as measures of intrinsic cognitive load, but not of total cognitive load. A more complete understanding of the sources of extraneous and germane cognitive loads in simulation-based training contexts is

  1. In situ observation and measurement of composites subjected to extremely high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xufei; Yu, Helong; Zhang, Guobing; Su, Hengqiang; Tang, Hongxiang; Feng, Xue

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we develop an instrument to study the ablation and oxidation process of materials such as C/SiC (carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide composites) and ultra-high temperature ceramic in extremely high temperature environment. The instrument is integrated with high speed cameras with filtering lens, infrared thermometers and water vapor generator for image capture, temperature measurement, and humid atmosphere, respectively. The ablation process and thermal shock as well as the temperature on both sides of the specimen can be in situ monitored. The results show clearly the dynamic ablation and liquid oxide flowing. In addition, we develop an algorithm for the post-processing of the captured images to obtain the deformation of the specimens, in order to better understand the behavior of the specimen subjected to high temperature.

  2. Distortion-Product Otoacoustic Emission Measured Below 300 Hz in Normal-Hearing Human Subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Tornvig; Ordoñez Pizarro, Rodrigo Eduardo; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2017-01-01

    Physiological noise levels in the human ear canal often exceed naturally low levels of otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) near the threshold of hearing. Low-frequency noise, and electronic filtering to cope with it, has effectively limited the study of OAE to frequencies above about 500 Hz. Presently......, a custom-built low-frequency acoustic probe was put to use in 21 normal-hearing human subjects (of 34 recruited). Distortion-product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) was measured in the enclosed ear canal volume as the response to two simultaneously presented tones with frequencies f1 and f2. The stimulus...... known from higher frequencies. Toward low frequencies, however, the bell broadens and the optimal ratio increases proportionally to the bandwidth of an auditory filter as defined by the equivalent rectangular bandwidth. The DPOAE phase rotates monotonously as a function of the stimulus ratio, and its...

  3. Measuring the degradation level of polymer films subjected to partial discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozzo, R.; Gemme, C.; Guastavino, F. [Univ. of Genoa (Italy). Electrical Engineering Dept.; Tiemblo, P. [Inst. de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Polimeros, Madrid (Spain)

    1996-12-31

    Polymer films have been subjected to partial discharge (PD) aging. It is shown that statistical quantities derived from partial discharges patterns can be related to test conditions, film characteristics and degradation level. PDs have been measured by means of a digital system. Several resulting PD patterns have been elaborated and about 50 derived and statistical quantities have been obtained for each pattern. The effects of the test conditions on the derived quantities has been studied with relevance to the following items: To recognize the kind of film under test; to correlate the value of quantities with the degradation level of the film (i.e., to focus at the quantities which change with time); to find a link between the quantities values and the test ambient conditions (i.e., relative humidity); to determine the influence of the film thickness; and to evidence the effect of the voltage level.

  4. Neurobehavioral performance impairment in insomnia: relationships with self-reported sleep and daytime functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekleton, Julia A; Flynn-Evans, Erin E; Miller, Belinda; Epstein, Lawrence J; Kirsch, Douglas; Brogna, Lauren A; Burke, Liza M; Bremer, Erin; Murray, Jade M; Gehrman, Philip; Lockley, Steven W; Rajaratnam, Shantha M W

    2014-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of insomnia, daytime consequences of the disorder are poorly characterized. This study aimed to identify neurobehavioral impairments associated with insomnia, and to investigate relationships between these impairments and subjective ratings of sleep and daytime dysfunction. Cross-sectional, multicenter study. Three sleep laboratories in the USA and Australia. Seventy-six individuals who met the Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC) for Primary Insomnia, Psychophysiological Insomnia, Paradoxical Insomnia, and/or Idiopathic Childhood Insomnia (44F, 35.8 ± 12.0 years [mean ± SD]) and 20 healthy controls (14F, 34.8 ± 12.1 years). N/A. Participants completed a 7-day sleep-wake diary, questionnaires assessing daytime dysfunction, and a neurobehavioral test battery every 60-180 minutes during an afternoon/evening sleep laboratory visit. Included were tasks assessing sustained and switching attention, working memory, subjective sleepiness, and effort. Switching attention and working memory were significantly worse in insomnia patients than controls, while no differences were found for simple or complex sustained attention tasks. Poorer sustained attention in the control, but not the insomnia group, was significantly associated with increased subjective sleepiness. In insomnia patients, poorer sustained attention performance was associated with reduced health-related quality of life and increased insomnia severity. We found that insomnia patients exhibit deficits in higher level neurobehavioral functioning, but not in basic attention. The findings indicate that neurobehavioral deficits in insomnia are due to neurobiological alterations, rather than sleepiness resulting from chronic sleep deficiency.

  5. Human vestibular memory studied via measurement of the subjective horizontal during gondola centrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribukait, Arne

    2003-07-01

    Measurements of the subjective visual horizontal (SVH) were made in a large swing-out gondola centrifuge. Rotation of the centrifuge was anti-clockwise, as seen from above. Test subjects were seated upright in the gondola, facing forwards. In front of the subject, at a straight-ahead eye-level position, there was a narrow luminous line, which could be rotated, by remote control, about the visual axis. At gravitoinertial force levels of 1.1-1.3G the subjects were asked to indicate, by repeatedly setting the line in darkness, what they perceived as horizontal (the SVH). During gondola centrifugation, the head and body length axis is always parallel with the resultant gravitoinertial force vector (vectorial sum of earth gravity force and the centrifugal force) i.e., the horizontal plane of the head or body does not change with respect to the gravitoinertial horizontal. Hence, the otolith organs, as well as the somatosensory system, continually signal upright position. However, the swing-out of the gondola during acceleration of the centrifuge (25 degrees at 1.1G) is a roll (frontal plane) change-in-position stimulus to the vertical semicircular canals, thus creating an otolith-semicircular canal conflict. After acceleration of the centrifuge, the SVH was initially tilted up to 20 degrees to the right relative to the gravitoinertial horizontal. Since there was no roll-tilt stimulus to gravity receptors, this SVH tilt must be related to stimulation of the semicircular canals. However, it decayed much more slowly than any known effects of angular-velocity stimulation of the semicircular canals. The decay was bi-phasic with two time constants, the smaller in the region of 1-2 min, the other being too large to be reliably estimated on the basis of data collected during only 10 min. This persistence of the SVH tilt suggests a memory for angular changes in roll head position detected by the semicircular canals-a position-storage mechanism. Further, the SVH seems to be

  6. Excessive daytime sleepiness in multiple system atrophy (SLEEMSA study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-López, Claudia; Santamaría, Joan; Salamero, Manuel; Del Sorbo, Francesca; Albanese, Alberto; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa; Barone, Paolo; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Bloem, Bastiaan; Aarden, Willemijn; Canesi, Margherita; Antonini, Angelo; Duerr, Susanne; Wenning, Gregor K; Poewe, Werner; Rubino, Alfonso; Meco, Giuseppe; Schneider, Susanne A; Bhatia, Kailash P; Djaldetti, Ruth; Coelho, Miguel; Sampaio, Cristina; Cochen, Valerie; Hellriegel, Helge; Deuschl, Günther; Colosimo, Carlo; Marsili, Luca; Gasser, Thomas; Tolosa, Eduardo

    2011-02-01

    Sleep disorders are common in multiple system atrophy (MSA), but the prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is not well known. To assess the frequency and associations of EDS in MSA. Survey of EDS in consecutive patients with MSA and comparison with patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and individuals without known neurologic disease. Twelve tertiary referral centers. Eighty-six consecutive patients with MSA; 86 patients with PD matched for age, sex, and Hoehn and Yahr stage; and 86 healthy subject individuals matched for age and sex. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), modified ESS, Sudden Onset of Sleep Scale, Tandberg Sleepiness Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, disease severity, dopaminergic treatment amount, and presence of restless legs syndrome. Mean (SD) ESS scores were comparable in MSA (7.72 [5.05]) and PD (8.23 [4.62]) but were higher than in healthy subjects (4.52 [2.98]) (P 10) was present in 28% of patients with MSA, 29% of patients with PD, and 2% of healthy subjects (P < .001). In MSA, in contrast to PD, the amount of dopaminergic treatment was not correlated with EDS. Disease severity was weakly correlated with EDS in MSA and PD. Restless legs syndrome occurred in 28% of patients with MSA, 14% of patients with PD, and 7% of healthy subjects (P < .001). Multiple regression analysis (with 95% confidence intervals obtained using nonparametric bootstrapping) showed that sleep-disordered breathing and sleep efficiency predicted EDS in MSA and amount of dopaminergic treatment and presence of restless legs syndrome in PD. More than one-quarter of patients with MSA experience EDS, a frequency similar to that encountered in PD. In these 2 conditions, EDS seems to be associated with different causes.

  7. Temporal and Physiologic Measurements of Deglutition in the Upright and Supine Position with Videofluoroscopy (VFS) in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, H K; Khorsandi, A; Silberzweig, J; Kobren, A J; Urken, M L; Amin, M R; Branski, R C; Lazarus, C L

    2015-08-01

    Cross-sectional imaging has long been employed to examine swallowing in both the sagittal and axial planes. However, data regarding temporal swallow measures in the upright and supine positions are sparse, and none have employed the MBS impairment profile (MBSImP). We report temporal swallow measures, physiologic variables, and swallow safety of upright and supine swallowing in healthy subjects using videofluoroscopy (VFS). Twenty healthy subjects ages 21-40 underwent VFS study upright and supine. Subjects were viewed in the sagittal plane and swallowed 5 mL liquid and pudding barium. Oral transit time, pharyngeal delay time, pharyngeal response time, pharyngeal transit time, and total swallow duration were measured. Penetration/aspiration scores and 14 MBSImP variables were analyzed in both positions. All subjects completed swallows supine, although one aspirated on one liquid bolus. Temporal measures of swallowing were similar for pudding upright and supine. Pharyngeal phase swallow measures were longer for liquids in supine. MBSImP physiologic measures revealed a pharyngeal delay in both positions. Although Pen/Asp range was higher supine, more subjects penetrated upright. Temporal measures were increased for liquids in supine. Although Pen/Asp range was higher in supine, more subjects penetrated upright. These results provide support for cross-sectional supine imaging of swallowing for pudding, but perhaps not thin liquids for dysphagic patients. Slightly thicker liquids might prove reliable in supine without compromising swallow safety. Future research should examine swallow physiology in both positions in dysphagic and older healthy subjects.

  8. Daytime HONO vertical gradients during SHARP 2009 in Houston, TX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. W. Wong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous Acid (HONO plays an important role in tropospheric chemistry as a precursor of the hydroxyl radical (OH, the most important oxidizing agent in the atmosphere. Nevertheless, the formation mechanisms of HONO are still not completely understood. Recent field observations found unexpectedly high daytime HONO concentrations in both urban and rural areas, which point to unrecognized, most likely photolytically enhanced HONO sources. Several gas-phase, aerosol, and ground surface chemistry mechanisms have been proposed to explain elevated daytime HONO, but atmospheric evidence to favor one over the others is still weak. New information on whether HONO formation occurs in the gas-phase, on aerosol, or at the ground may be derived from observations of the vertical distribution of HONO and its precursor nitrogen dioxide, NO2, as well as from its dependence on solar irradiance or actinic flux.

    Here we present field observations of HONO, NO2 and other trace gases in three altitude intervals (30–70 m, 70–130 m and 130–300 m using UCLA's long path DOAS instrument, as well as in situ measurements of OH, NO, photolysis frequencies and solar irradiance, made in Houston, TX, during the Study of Houston Atmospheric Radical Precursor (SHARP experiment from 20 April to 30 May 2009. The observed HONO mixing ratios were often ten times larger than the expected photostationary state with OH and NO. Larger HONO mixing ratios observed near the ground than aloft imply, but do not clearly prove, that the daytime source of HONO was located at or near the ground. Using a pseudo steady-state (PSS approach, we calculated the missing daytime HONO formation rates, Punknown, on four sunny days. The NO2-normalized Punknown, Pnorm, showed a clear symmetrical diurnal variation with a maximum around noontime, which was well correlated with actinic flux (NO2 photolysis frequency and

  9. Pupil dilatation does affect some aspects of daytime driving performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, J M; Garth, D; Grounds, G; McKay, P; Mulvahil, A

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To examine the effects of pupil dilatation on driving performance and determine whether this was related to changes in standard measures of visual function. Methods: The driving and vision performance of 16 young, visually normal participants was measured with both normal and dilated pupils. Pupils were dilated with 1% tropicamide. Driving performance was measured under daytime conditions on a closed road circuit that was free of other vehicles and has been used in previous studies of driving performance. Measures included road sign detection and recognition, hazard detection and avoidance, gap perception and negotiation, driving reaction times and time to complete the circuit. Visual performance measures included high contrast visual acuity, Pelli-Robson letter contrast sensitivity, and glare sensitivity. Results: Pupil dilatation significantly (p<0.05) decreased the ability of participants to recognise low contrast hazards and avoid them, decreased their visual acuity and contrast sensitivity and increased glare sensitivity. The decreases in vision performance were not, however, significantly related to the decrement in driving performance. Conclusion: Pupil dilatation can impair selected aspects of driving and vision performance and patients should be cautioned about these possible effects. PMID:14609840

  10. Daytime sleep inertia in narcolepsy-cataplexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullington, J; Broughton, R

    1994-02-01

    Eight volunteers with narcolepsy-cataplexy participated in a study of scheduled naps and performance. Sleep inertia was examined following five "short" naps of 5% and a single "long" nap of 25% of total 24-hour sleep time as determined by prior sleep log data. Contrary to some subjective reports, short naps (mean duration of just under 30 minutes) were accompanied by sleep inertia in narcoleptics. As measured by the descending subtraction task, this sleep inertia was at times quite prolonged and lasted 20 minutes after waking from midday short naps, which ended on average at 1555 hours. In addition, sleep inertia, as measured by both the descending subtraction task and the four-choice reaction-time test, was evident throughout both afternoon and evening short naps; however, it was completely absent from reaction-time test results immediately following the single long nap, which ended on average at 1640 hours. Sleep inertia was maximum after slow-wave sleep arousals and was minimal or absent following the first short nap, which also contained the highest amount of rapid eye movement sleep of all naps.

  11. Use of memory strategies among younger and older adults: Results from objective and subjective measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Teixeira Fabricio

    Full Text Available Abstract Memory plays a fundamental role in the identity of people and in human life, as it enables us to interpret our surroundings and make decisions. It is known that the aging process can be accompanied by cognitive decline in some memory sub systems. However, the use of memory strategies can help encoding and retrieval of new information. Objective: The aim of this study was to identify and compare, using objective and subjective measures, which recall strategies are used spontaneously by young and older adults. Methods: Twenty-six first-year college students, and thirty-three seniors enrolled at the Third Age University of the same campus, completed a visual memory test including 18 black and white pictures, memorized a short story, and completed an open question about memory strategies, a memory check list to indicate strategies used, and a memory self-efficacy scale. The Bousfield categorization measure was also calculated from the recall protocol. Results: Young adults demonstrated better performance than the older adults on the memory tasks, and were also more confident. Both groups reported using similar strategies. Conclusion: Young and older adults seem to tackle memory tasks in similar ways but young adults outperform seniors.

  12. Relationship between Voice Complaints and Subjective and Objective Measures of Vocal Function in Iranian Female Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faham, Maryam; Jalilevand, Nahid; Torabinezhad, Farhad; Silverman, Erin Pearson; Ahmadi, Akram; Anaraki, Zahra Ghayoumi; Jafari, Narges

    2017-07-01

    Teachers are at high risk of developing voice problems because of the excessive vocal demands necessitated by their profession. Teachers' self-assessment of vocal complaints, combined with subjective and objective measures of voice, may enable better therapeutic decision-making. This investigation compared audio-perceptual assessment and acoustic variables in teachers with and without voice complaints. Ninety-nine teachers completed this cross-sectional study and were assigned to one of two groups: those "with voice complaint (VC)" and those "without voice complaint (W-VC)." Voice samples were collected during reading, counting, and vowel prolongation tasks. Teachers were also asked to document any voice symptoms they experienced. Voice samples were analyzed using Dr. Speech program (4th version; Tiger Ltd., USA), and labeled "normal" or "abnormal" according to the "grade" dimension "G" from GRBAS scale. Twenty-one teachers were assigned to the VC group based on self-assessment data. There were statistically significant differences between the two groups with regard to self-reported voice symptoms of hoarseness, breathiness, pitch breaks, and vocal fatigue (P Teachers with and without voice complaints differed in the incidence, but not type of voice symptoms. Teachers' voice complaints did not correspond to perceptual and acoustic measures. This suggests a potential unmet need for teachers to receive further education on voice disorders. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. All rights reserved.

  13. Impedance measures in analysis and characterization of multistable structures subjected to harmonic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harne, Ryan L.; Goodpaster, Benjamin A.

    2018-01-01

    Structural components susceptible to adverse, post-buckled dynamic behaviors have long challenged the success of applications requiring lightweight, slender curved structures, while researchers have begun to leverage such bistable systems in emerging applications for novel energy attenuation and shape-changing properties. To expedite development and deployment of these built-up platforms containing post-buckled constituents, efficient approaches are required to complement time-consuming full-field models in the prediction of the near- and far-from-equilibrium dynamics. This research meets the need by introducing a semi-analytical model framework to enable the characterization of steady-state responses in multi degree-of-freedom (DOF) and multistable structural systems subjected to harmonic excitation. In so doing, the pathway for assessing impedance measures is created here so as to identify how energy travels and returns within built-up multistable structures. Verified by simulations and qualitatively validated by experiments, the analysis is shown to accurately reproduce both near- and far-from-equilibrium responses including different classes of energetic snap-through dynamics that only exist in such multistable structures. A first look at the impedance measures of different dynamic regimes reveals a connection between damping in multistable structures and the sustainability of far-from-equilibrium oscillations.

  14. Normative data of cortical excitability measurements obtained by transcranial magnetic stimulation in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva, Ana Sofia; Galhardoni, Ricardo; Cury, Rubens Gisbert; Parravano, Daniella Cardoso; Correa, Guilherme; Araujo, Haniel; Cecilio, Sofia Barros; Raicher, Irina; Toledo, Diego; Silva, Valquíria; Marcolin, Marco Antonio; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Ciampi de Andrade, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    The assessment of cortical excitability (CE) measurements has been increasingly used in neuropsychiatric research. However, there is scant information on the normative values of these measurements, as well as the possible effect of hemisphere laterality, gender and age on these variables. To obtain normative data for CE measurements by transcranial magnetic stimulation, to assess inter-/intra-investigator variability and the influence of sex, age and oral contraception use. A sample of 216 healthy volunteers matched according to age and gender was evaluated. Bilateral rest motor thresholds, motor evoked potentials (MEP), intracortical inhibition and facilitation were measured in the first dorsal interosseous muscle area representation of the primary motor cortex with a circular transcranial magnetic stimulation coil delivering biphasic pulses. Normative data were obtained for 200 participants (in a 1:1 male:female ratio) in a balanced proportion between five age groups (18-30; 31-40; 41-50; 51-60; >60 years). Inter/intra-investigator variability was assessed in 20 healthy volunteers in two sessions performed within a 30-minute interval. Measurements were also performed in a subgroup of 16 healthy female volunteers, using oral contraception and during the menstrual phase. Age had a dichotomous effect on CE measurements, providing significantly different normative data for subjects 50 years old, with smaller MEP's and intracortical inhibition in older individuals. There were no differences between genders or between left and right hemispheres. Also, CE parameters did not significantly differ with use of contraceptive treatment compared to the menstrual phase of the cycle. The inter-/intra-investigator reliability assessment showed some variability that may not be clinically significant. Age had a non-linear effect on CE. There were non-significant differences between genders, hemispheres or with use of oral contraceptives. There was good inter

  15. Association between Daytime Napping and Chronic Diseases in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junmin; Kessler, Asia Sikora; Su, Dejun

    2016-03-01

    To explore the relationship between daytime napping and incidence of chronic diseases over the past 6 months among adults in China. Based on data collected from 13,469 respondents over age 40 in the Chinese Family Panel Studies in 2010, logistic regression models were estimated to examine the association between daytime napping and the incidence of any chronic diseases and 3 specific chronic diseases (hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease) after adjusting for confounders. Differences of risks by sex and age were also investigated. In the sample, 50.8% were women and 32.2% were over 60 years old. Adjusted estimates show respondents with daytime napping had elevated odds of developing any chronic diseases, hypertension, and diabetes compared to those who did not nap; having over 60 minutes of daytime napping had weaker association compared with shorter duration of daytime napping. The association between daytime napping and hypertension was found in women but not in men. Daytime napping appears to be associated with elevated risk of incidence of any chronic diseases, hypertension, and diabetes.

  16. Daytime napping associated with increased symptom severity in fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theadom, Alice; Cropley, Mark; Kantermann, Thomas

    2015-02-07

    Previous qualitative research has revealed that people with fibromyalgia use daytime napping as a coping strategy for managing symptoms against clinical advice. Yet there is no evidence to suggest whether daytime napping is beneficial or detrimental for people with fibromyalgia. The purpose of this study was to explore how people use daytime naps and to determine the links between daytime napping and symptom severity in fibromyalgia syndrome. A community based sample of 1044 adults who had been diagnosed with fibromyalgia syndrome by a clinician completed an online questionnaire. Associations between napping behavior, sleep quality and fibromyalgia symptoms were explored using Spearman correlations, with possible predictors of napping behaviour entered into a logistic regression model. Differences between participants who napped on a daily basis and those who napped less regularly, as well as nap duration were explored. Daytime napping was significantly associated with increased pain, depression, anxiety, fatigue, memory difficulties and sleep problems. Sleep problems and fatigue explained the greatest amount of variance in napping behaviour, p naps for >30 minutes had higher memory difficulties (t = -3.45) and levels of depression (t = -2.50) than those who napped for shorter periods (napping was linked with greater symptom severity in people with fibromyalgia. Given the common use of daytime napping in people with fibromyalgia evidence based guidelines on the use of daytime napping in people with chronic pain are urgently needed.

  17. Effects of acute 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine on sleep and daytime sleepiness in MDMA users: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Surilla; Johanson, Chris-Ellyn; Tancer, Manuel; Roehrs, Timothy

    2009-11-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) affects monoamine neurotransmitters that play a critical role in sleep and daytime alertness. However, the acute effects of MDMA on sleep and daytime sleepiness have not been studied under placebo-controlled conditions. This study was designed to establish the effects of acute MDMA or placebo administration and sleep restriction on sleep and daytime sleepiness. Participants with a history of MDMA use were studied on 3 sessions of 3 nights (baseline, treatment, and recovery) and 2 days (following night 2 and 3) per session. On treatment nights (night 2), participants received placebo or 2 mg/kg of MDMA or underwent a restricted bed schedule with placebo. Sleep restriction was a positive control to compare sleep loss and consequent sleepiness associated with MDMA use. The scheduled sleep period was 8 hours long on nonrestricted nights, and standard sleep recordings and daytime sleepiness tests were conducted. Age-matched controls received 1 night and day of standard sleep and daytime sleepiness testing. Sleep laboratory. Seven recreational MDMA-users and 13 matched control subjects. Acute MDMA shortened sleep primarily by increasing sleep latency, and it reduced stage 3/4 sleep and suppressed rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. The MDMA-reduced sleep time was not associated with increased daytime sleepiness the following day, as was seen in the sleep-restriction condition. Compared with control subjects, the MDMA users on the first night in the laboratory had shorter total sleep times and less stage 3/4 sleep. Average daily sleep latency on daytime sleepiness tests the day after nighttime placebo administration was increased in MDMA users compared with the control subjects, and MDMA users had an elevated number of sleep-onset REM periods on these tests, compared with control subjects. Acute MDMA administration disrupts sleep and REM sleep, specifically, without producing daytime sleepiness such as sleep restriction does. Compared

  18. Across-subject calibration of an instrumented glove to measure hand movement for clinical purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia-Ibáñez, Verónica; Vergara, Margarita; Buffi, James H; Murray, Wendy M; Sancho-Bru, Joaquín L

    2017-05-01

    Motion capture of all degrees of freedom of the hand collected during performance of daily living activities remains challenging. Instrumented gloves are an attractive option because of their higher ease of use. However, subject-specific calibration of gloves is lengthy and has limitations for individuals with disabilities. Here, a calibration procedure is presented, consisting in the recording of just a simple hand position so as to allow capture of the kinematics of 16 hand joints during daily life activities even in case of severe injured hands. 'across-subject gains' were obtained by averaging the gains obtained from a detailed subject-specific calibration involving 44 registrations that was repeated three times on multiple days to 6 subjects. In additional 4 subjects, joint angles that resulted from applying the 'across-subject calibration' or the subject-specific calibration were compared. Global errors associated with the 'across-subject calibration' relative to the detailed, subject-specific protocol were small (bias: 0.49°; precision: 4.45°) and comparable to those that resulted from repeating the detailed protocol with the same subject on multiple days (0.36°; 3.50°). Furthermore, in one subject, performance of the 'across-subject calibration' was directly compared to another fast calibration method, expressed relative to a videogrammetric protocol as a gold-standard, yielding better results.

  19. Daytime urinary incontinence among kindergarten children in Aden Governorate, 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Khalida Anwer; Basaleem, Huda Omer; Al-Sakkaf, Khaled Abdulla Zain

    2010-11-01

    Daytime urinary incontinence is an involuntary or intentional voiding of urine in an awake child who is old enough to have developed control, and has a variable prevalence throughout the world. In Yemen, data regarding this problem are almost absent. In this study from the capital city of Aden, we aimed to: (1) determine the prevalence of daytime incontinence in kindergarten children aged 4-6 years, (2) identify the relation between daytime enuresis with personal and family characteristics of the children studied, and (3) describe the severity and characteristics of daytime enuresis in the studied children. A cross-sectional comparative study was undertaken in all kindergarten children aged 4-6 years in Aden Governorate and 1061 responded. Data were obtained by using a precoded self-administered questionnaire completed by the parents. The questionnaire consisted of two parts: personal and family characteristics of the studied children and the presence of daytime incontinence. The second part was responded if there was history of daytime incontinence, and contained information on the severity and possible associated factors. Daytime incontinence was encountered in 34 cases (3.2%); 18 were females. Significant differences between cases and incontinence-free children were encountered in birth order and type of kindergarten (P incontinence. Bed wetting and combined day and night wetting were more frequent among males, whereas urinary symptoms (urgency, squatting, dysuria, dribbling) were more frequent among females. Working mother and frightening and emotionally stressful events in the 6 months preceding the study were significantly associated with daytime incontinence, while parents' education, punishment for daytime incontinence, and the presence of family history of incontinence were insignificant. In conclusion, this is the first study from Yemen reporting the prevalence of enuresis, similar to previous reports. Further studies are needed to explore this problem in

  20. Is the Epworth Sleepiness Scale a useful tool for screening excessive daytime sleepiness in commercial drivers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiardi, Simone; La Morgia, Chiara; Sciamanna, Lucia; Gerosa, Alberto; Cirignotta, Fabio; Mondini, Susanna

    2018-01-01

    The significant social and economic impact of excessive daytime sleepiness makes sleep evaluation a primary medical need in commercial drivers. However, the best screening tool is still matter of debate. In our cohort of 221 commercial drivers, only ten (4.5%) had Epworth Sleepiness Scale scores indicative of excessive daytime sleepiness. These findings and the lack of concordance in estimating excessive daytime sleepiness among commercial drivers in previous studies using the same psychometric measure indicate that the Epworth Sleepiness Scale is not a reliable tool. This may be due to the low internal consistency of the scale in non-clinical samples and the possible intentional underscoring of sleepiness due to a perceived threat of driver's license suspension. Moreover, the reliability of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale results may be strongly influenced by the administration setting. The clinical application of inexpensive less time-consuming new tools like performance tests should be considered for the objective evaluation of excessive daytime sleepiness in commercial drivers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Typical disturbances of the daytime equatorial F region observed with a high-resolution HF radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Blanc

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available HF radar measurements were performed near the magnetic equator in Africa (Korhogo 9°24'63''N–5°37'38''W during the International Equatorial Electrojet Year (1993–1994. The HF radar is a high-resolution zenithal radar. It gives ionograms, Doppler spectra and echo parameters at several frequencies simultaneously. This paper presents a comparative study of the daytime ionospheric structures observed during 3 days selected as representative of different magnetic conditions, given by magnetometer measurements. Broad Doppler spectra, large echo width, and amplitude fluctuations revealed small-scale instability processes up to the F-region peak. The height variations measured at different altitudes showed gravity waves and larger-scale disturbances related to solar daytime influence and equatorial electric fields. The possibility of retrieving the ionospheric electric fields from these Doppler or height variation measurements in the presence of the other possible equatorial ionospheric disturbances is discussed.

  2. [Excessive Daytime Sleepiness, Poor Quality Sleep, and Low Academic Performance in Medical Students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Duque, Manuel Enrique; Echeverri Chabur, Jorge Enrique; Machado-Alba, Jorge Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Quality of sleep and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) affect cognitive ability and performance of medical students. This study attempts to determine the prevalence of EDS, sleep quality, and assess their association with poor academic performance in this population. A descriptive, observational study was conducted on a random sample of 217 medical students from the Universidad Tecnológica de Pereira, who completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire and the Epworth sleepiness scale. Sociodemographic, clinic and academic variables were also measured. Multivariate analyses for poor academic performance were performed. The included students had a mean age of 21.7±3.3 years, of whom 59.4% were men. Almost half (49.8%) had EDS criteria, and 79.3% were poor sleepers (PSQI ≥ 5), while 43.3% had poor academic performance during the last semester. The bivariate analysis showed that having used tobacco or alcohol until intoxicated, fairly bad subjective sleep quality, sleep efficiency < 65%, and being a poor sleeper were associated with increased risk of low performance. Sleep efficiency < 65% was statistically associated with poor academic performance (P=.024; OR = 4.23; 95% CI, 1.12-15.42) in the multivariate analysis. A poor sleep quality determined by low efficiency was related to poor academic achievement at the end of semester in medical students. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Restless legs syndrome and daytime sleepiness are prominent in myotonic dystrophy type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Erek M; Shepard, Paul W; St Louis, Erik K; Dueffert, Lucas G; Slocumb, Nancy; McCarter, Stuart J; Silber, Michael H; Boeve, Bradley F; Olson, Eric J; Somers, Virend K; Milone, Margherita

    2013-07-09

    Although sleep disturbances are common in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), sleep disturbances in myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) have not been well-characterized. We aimed to determine the frequency of sleep disturbances in DM2. We conducted a case-control study of 54 genetically confirmed DM2 subjects and 104 medical controls without DM1 or DM2, and surveyed common sleep disturbances, including symptoms of probable restless legs syndrome (RLS), excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), sleep quality, fatigue, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), probable REM sleep behavior disorder (pRBD), and pain. Thirty patients with DM2 and 43 controls responded to the survey. Group comparisons with parametric statistical tests and multiple linear and logistic regression analyses were conducted for the dependent variables of EDS and poor sleep quality. The mean ages of patients with DM2 and controls were 63.8 and 64.5 years, respectively. Significant sleep disturbances in patients with DM2 compared to controls included probable RLS (60.0% vs 14.0%, p DM2 diagnosis (p DM2, while OSA and pRBD symptoms are not. EDS was independently associated with DM2 diagnosis, suggesting possible primary CNS hypersomnia mechanisms. Further studies utilizing objective sleep measures are needed to better characterize sleep comorbidities in DM2.

  4. Sleep Restriction Therapy for Insomnia is Associated with Reduced Objective Total Sleep Time, Increased Daytime Somnolence, and Objectively Impaired Vigilance: Implications for the Clinical Management of Insomnia Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Simon D.; Miller, Christopher B.; Rogers, Zoe; Siriwardena, A. Niroshan; MacMahon, Kenneth M.; Espie, Colin A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate whether sleep restriction therapy (SRT) is associated with reduced objective total sleep time (TST), increased daytime somnolence, and impaired vigilance. Design: Within-subject, noncontrolled treatment investigation. Setting: Sleep research laboratory. Participants: Sixteen patients [10 female, mean age = 47.1 (10.8) y] with well-defined psychophysiological insomnia (PI), reporting TST ≤ 6 h. Interventions: Patients were treated with single-component SRT over a 4-w protocol, sleeping in the laboratory for 2 nights prior to treatment initiation and for 3 nights (SRT night 1, 8, 22) during the acute interventional phase. The psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) was completed at seven defined time points [day 0 (baseline), day 1,7,8,21,22 (acute treatment) and day 84 (3 mo)]. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) was completed at baseline, w 1-4, and 3 mo. Measurement and results: Subjective sleep outcomes and global insomnia severity significantly improved before and after SRT. There was, however, a robust decrease in PSG-defined TST during acute implementation of SRT, by an average of 91 min on night 1, 78 min on night 8, and 69 min on night 22, relative to baseline (P treatment (at four of five assessment points, all P sleep restriction therapy is associated with reduced objective total sleep time, increased daytime sleepiness, and objective performance impairment. Our data have important implications for implementation guidelines around the safe and effective delivery of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia. Citation: Kyle SD; Miller CB; Rogers Z; Siriwardena AN; MacMahon KM; Espie CA. Sleep restriction therapy for insomnia is associated with reduced objective total sleep time, increased daytime somnolence, and objectively impaired vigilance: implications for the clinical management of insomnia disorder. SLEEP 2014;37(2):229-237. PMID:24497651

  5. Comparability of Automated Office Blood Pressure to Daytime 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringrose, Jennifer S; Cena, Jonathan; Ip, Shannon; Morales, Fraulein; Hamilton, Peter; Padwal, Raj

    2017-10-05

    Clinical practice guidelines endorse automated office blood pressure (AOBP) measurement as the preferred in-office measurement modality. However, recent data indicate that this method may underestimate daytime ambulatory BP. The objective of this study was to further assess the comparability of mean AOBP and daytime ambulatory BP in clinical practice. A retrospective cross-sectional chart review was conducted of 96 consecutive patients referred from primary or specialty care practices to a tertiary care ambulatory BP monitoring service. Six AOBP readings were taken using an appropriately cuffed BpTRU (BpTRU Medical Devices, Coquitlam, Canada) device on the nondominant arm and no rest period (first reading discarded). Twenty-four-hour ambulatory BP monitoring was then performed. Between-group means were compared with paired t tests. The proportion of patients with differences of ≥ 5, 10, and 15 mm Hg was tabulated. Mean age was 52.6 ± 16.7 years, 60% were women, and 79% had previously diagnosed hypertension. Mean AOBPs were 130.8 ± 15.5/82.3 ± 10.7 mm Hg, and mean daytime ambulatory BPs were 142.8 ± 14.9/83.9 ± 11.2 mm Hg (difference of -11.9 ± 13.5/-1.6 ± 7.6; P ambulatory BP levels ≥ 135 mm Hg. The proportions of patients with systolic or diastolic BP differences of ≥ 5, 10 and 15 mm Hg were 89%, 52%, and 33%, respectively. Mean AOBP underestimates daytime ambulatory BP. Variability between the 2 methods is high. These findings do not support the premise that AOBP closely approximates daytime ambulatory BP. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Estimating daytime ecosystem respiration from eddy-flux data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Dan; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Herbst, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    To understand what governs the patterns of net ecosystem exchange of CO2, an understanding of factors influencing the component fluxes, ecosystem respiration and gross primary production is needed. In the present paper, we introduce an alternative method for estimating daytime ecosystem respiration...... based on whole ecosystem fluxes from a linear regression of photosynthetic photon flux density data vs. daytime net ecosystem exchange data at forest ecosystem level. This method is based on the principles of the Kok-method applied at leaf level for estimating daytime respiration. We demonstrate...... the method with field data and provide a discussion of the limitations of the method....

  7. Subjective Sleep Complaints in Pediatric Depression: A Controlled Study and Comparison with EEG Measures of Sleep and Waking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertocci, Michele A.; Dahl, Ronald E.; Williamson, Douglas E.; Iosif, Ana-Maria; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David; Ryan, Neal D.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Children with major depressive disorder (MDD) often complain of sleep disturbances; however, polysomnographic studies have failed to find objective evidence of these disturbances. This article examines subjective sleep reports of children with MDD and healthy controls focusing on comparing subjective and objective sleep measures.…

  8. Association of Musculoskeletal Joint Pain With Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Daytime Sleepiness, and Poor Sleep Quality in Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Joule J; Appleton, Sarah L; Gill, Tiffany K; Vakulin, Andrew; Wittert, Gary A; Antic, Nick A; Taylor, Anne W; Adams, Robert J; Hill, Catherine L

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the association of musculoskeletal pain with objectively determined obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and subjective sleep measures in a population-based sample. Participants were community-dwelling men (n = 360) age ≥35 years from the Men Androgen Inflammation Lifestyle Environment and Stress (MAILES) study. Shoulder, back, hip, knee, hand, and foot pain were assessed by computer-assisted telephone interview or self-completed questionnaire. OSA was determined with full in-home unattended polysomnography (Embletta X100) scored by 2007 American Academy of Sleep Medicine alternative criteria. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale assessed daytime sleepiness and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index assessed sleep quality. OSA was not associated with the presence of any joint pain (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.03 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.61-1.76]). There was no association between OSA and pain in any specific joint (shoulder, back, hip, knee, hand, or foot), nor was the number of joints in pain associated with OSA. There was, similarly, no association between pain variables and excessive daytime sleepiness, except for hand pain (OR 3.10 [95% CI 1.50-6.39]). However, pain was associated with poor sleep quality: any pain (OR 2.19 [95% CI 1.25-3.82]), shoulder pain (OR 2.16 [95% CI 1.25-3.75]), back pain (OR 2.24 [95% CI 1.41-3.55]), and foot pain (OR 2.47 [95% CI 1.43-4.26]). The number of painful joints was also associated with poor sleep quality (5-6 joints versus no joints OR 7.34 [95% CI 2.30-23.42]). No association between OSA and pain or between daytime sleepiness and pain was found. Consistent with previous reports, poor sleep quality was associated with musculoskeletal pain in this population sample. The etiologic differences between OSA-related sleep disruption and poor subjective sleep quality require further investigation. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  9. Daytime Secretion of Salivary Cortisol and Alpha-Amylase in Preschool-Aged Children with Autism and Typically Developing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Sharon A.; Corbett, Blythe A.; Granger, Douglas A.; Boyce, W. Thomas; Anders, Thomas F.; Tager, Ira B.

    2012-01-01

    We examined daytime salivary cortisol and salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) secretion levels and variability in preschool-aged children with autism (AUT) and typically developing children (TYP). Fifty-two subjects (26 AUT and 26 TYP) were enrolled. Salivary samples were obtained at waking, midday, and bedtime on two consecutive days at three phases…

  10. Excessive Daytime Sleepiness and Epilepsy: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre S. Giorelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Sleep complaints are common in patients with epilepsy (PWE. Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS is one of the most reported complaints and its impact is still a matter of debate. Objective. Evaluate the relationship between EDS and epilepsy, with emphasis on prevalence, assessment, and causes. Methods. A systematic review on PubMed database in the last 10 years (2002 to 2012. The search returned 53 articles and 34 were considered relevant. After citation analysis, 3 more articles were included. Results. Most studies were cross-sectional and questionnaire based. 14 papers addressed EDS as the primary endpoint. 14 adult and 3 children studies used subjective and objective analysis as methodology. The number of studies increased throughout the decade, with 21 in the last 5 years. Adult studies represent almost three times the number of children studies. EDS prevalence in PWE varies from 10 to 47.5%. Prevalence was higher in developing countries. Conclusion. EDS seems to be related more frequently to undiagnosed sleep disorders than to epilepsy-related factors, and although it affects the quality of life of PWE, it can be improved by treating comorbid primary sleep disorders.

  11. Excessive daytime sleepiness and epilepsy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorelli, Andre S; Passos, Pâmela; Carnaval, Thiago; Gomes, Marleide da Mota

    2013-01-01

    Background. Sleep complaints are common in patients with epilepsy (PWE). Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is one of the most reported complaints and its impact is still a matter of debate. Objective. Evaluate the relationship between EDS and epilepsy, with emphasis on prevalence, assessment, and causes. Methods. A systematic review on PubMed database in the last 10 years (2002 to 2012). The search returned 53 articles and 34 were considered relevant. After citation analysis, 3 more articles were included. Results. Most studies were cross-sectional and questionnaire based. 14 papers addressed EDS as the primary endpoint. 14 adult and 3 children studies used subjective and objective analysis as methodology. The number of studies increased throughout the decade, with 21 in the last 5 years. Adult studies represent almost three times the number of children studies. EDS prevalence in PWE varies from 10 to 47.5%. Prevalence was higher in developing countries. Conclusion. EDS seems to be related more frequently to undiagnosed sleep disorders than to epilepsy-related factors, and although it affects the quality of life of PWE, it can be improved by treating comorbid primary sleep disorders.

  12. Longitudinal changes in ultrasound measurements: a parallel study in subjects with genetic disorders and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halaba, Zenon; Pyrkosz, Antoni; Adamczyk, Piotr; Drozdzowska, Bogna; Pluskiewicz, Wojciech

    2006-03-01

    Disturbances in skeletal status in subjects with genetic disorder may increase their fracture risk. The aim of the study was longitudinal observation of phalangeal speed of sound changes across the bone over a period of 2 y in 24 patients (14 boys and 10 girls, mean age 9.63 +/- 1.8 y.) and 24 age-matched healthy controls (14 boys and 10 girls, mean age 9.65 +/- 1.71 y.). Weight and height did not differ between patients and controls at baseline and follow-up. Patients with the following disorders were evaluated: 7 with Down syndrome, 6 nonspecific mental retardations of unknown etiology, 5 Martin-Bell syndrome and 6 with other diseases. In patients and controls, no factors potentially influencing bone metabolism (except for genetic disorder) were present. Bone status was assessed by quantitative ultrasound at hand phalanges using DBM Sonic 1200 (IGEA, Carpi, Italy), which measures amplitude-dependent speed of sound (Ad-SoS [m/s]). At baseline, Ad-SoS and Z-score were significantly lower in patients than in controls (1892 +/- 51 m/s versus 1936 +/- 43 m/s, p Z-score increased significantly in patients (1892 +/- 51 m/s to 1934 +/- 48 m/s, p Z-Score were significantly lower in patients (p Z-score weight did not differ between patients and control, and height increased more in controls (13.2 +/- 2.8 cm versus 11.4 +/- 5.9 cm, p over a period of observation. In conclusion, despite comparable improvement in measured ultrasound parameter in patients and controls observed over a study duration, the difference between them remained stable.

  13. Temperature measurement and control system for transtibial prostheses: Single subject clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoseiri, Kamiar; Zheng, Yong Ping; Leung, Aaron K L; Rahgozar, Mehdi; Aminian, Gholamreza; Masoumi, Mehdi; Safari, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-05

    The snug fit of a prosthetic socket over the residual limb can disturb thermal balance and put skin integrity in jeopardy by providing an unpleasant and infectious environment. The prototype of a temperature measurement and control (TM&C) system was previously introduced to resolve thermal problems related to prostheses. This study evaluates its clinical application in a setting with reversal, single subject design. The TM&C system was installed on a fabricated prosthetic socket of a man with unilateral transtibial amputation. Skin temperature of the residual limb without prosthesis at baseline and with prosthesis during rest and walking was evaluated. The thermal sense and thermal comfort of the participant were also evaluated. The results showed different skin temperature around the residual limb with a temperature decrease tendency from proximal to distal. The TM&C system decreased skin temperature rise after prosthesis wearing. The same situation occurred during walking, but the thermal power of the TM&C system was insufficient to overcome heat build-up in some regions of the residual limb. The participant reported no significant change of thermal sense and thermal comfort. Further investigations are warranted to examine thermography pattern of the residual limb, thermal sense, and thermal comfort in people with amputation.

  14. Measuring Numeracy in a Community College Context: Assessing the Reliability of the Subjective Numeracy Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate S. Wolfe

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, our goals were to assess the suitability of the Subjective Numeracy Scale (SNS, developed for health-care use, in a new context with predominantly minority students at a South Bronx community college and to identify any race/ ethnicity, gender, and ESL enrollment effects. The scale assesses perceptions of quantitative reasoning skills and preferences for data presentation. This scale was given to a convenience sample of students in behavioral sciences classes. Results show that the SNS scale was reliable with our sample using the full thirteen-question scale or the shorter eight-item version. Gender, race/ ethnicity, and English as a Second Language (ESL are related to perceptions of QR/QL. This study may help researchers see the SNS as a reliable instrument across samples and as a way to measure numeracy. The results of the multivariate analyses raise questions for future research about cultural differences for numerical presentation among these ethnic groups and our international student population.

  15. Thermoluminescent properties of Dy doped calcium borate based glass for dose measurement subjected to photon irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajuddin H. A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the thermoluminescent (TL dosimetric properties of calcium borate glass with various dopant concentration of dysprosium (Dy. Calcium borate glass is a new potential material to be used in radiation measurement with absorption coefficient that is close to human bone. A series of glasses based on chemical equation xCaO-(100-x B2O3 system, x = 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 (0< x <100 % weight have been prepared by melt quenching method. The X-ray diffraction analysis of glass samples were carried out and the result showed a broad peak, which confirmed the amorphous nature of the glass. The 70B2O3-30CaO glass sample was found as the most stable among other glass samples studied. Present work focuses on 70B2O3-30CaO glass of (0.01-0.4 mol% Dy-doped in order to investigate the thermoluminescence (TL properties, in particular, dose-response and fading. The glass samples were irradiated to dose range of 0.5-4.0 Gy subjected to 6MV photon irradiations of LINAC Primus MLC 3339. TL response of 0.3 mol% Dy-doped 70B2O3-30CaO glass was found to produce highest response, with good linear dose- response relationship.

  16. Interactions of Subjective and Objective Measures of Fatigue Defined in the Context of Brain Control of Locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzer, Roee; Yuan, Jennifer; Verghese, Joe; Mahoney, Jeannette R; Izzetoglu, Meltem; Wang, Cuiling

    2017-03-01

    Fatigue adversely impacts quality of life in old age. The relationship between subjective and objective measurements of fatigue, however, is poorly understood. We examined whether subjective fatigue moderated the expression of objective fatigue during locomotion. Associations between objective and subjective measures of fatigue were predicted to manifest only under dual-task conditions that maximized cognitive demands. Participants were 314 nondemented older adults (age = 76.8±6.7 years; % female = 56). Functional near-infrared spectroscopy was used to assess oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2) levels during walking. A 4×14-foot Zeno electronic walkway was utilized to assess stride velocity (cm/s). Objective fatigue was operationalized as attenuation in HbO2 levels and decline in stride velocity (cm/s) during six continuous straight walks under single- (normal-walk) and dual-task (walk-while-talk) conditions. The Brief Fatigue Inventory assessed subjective fatigue. Worse subjective fatigue was associated with attenuated increase in HbO2 levels (estimate = 0.175; p .05) from normal-walk to walk-while-talk conditions. Objective fatigue did not manifest and was not associated with subjective fatigue during the course of normal-walk. Worse subjective fatigue was associated with attenuated HbO2 levels in the fourth (estimate = -0.178; p subjective and objective measurements of fatigue as defined in the context of attention-demanding locomotion.

  17. Increased daytime sleepiness in Parkinson's disease: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Högl, Birgit; Seppi, Klaus; Brandauer, Elisabeth; Glatzl, Susanne; Frauscher, Birgit; Niedermüller, Ulrike; Wenning, Gregor; Poewe, Werner

    2003-03-01

    We evaluated the frequency and severity of excessive daytime sleepiness in an outpatient population with Parkinson's disease in comparison to age-matched controls and examined its relationship with antiparkinsonian drug therapy and sleep history. Increased daytime sleepiness and involuntary sleep episodes have been described in Parkinson's disease, but the etiology is not completely understood. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), a validated questionnaire for daytime sleepiness, was prospectively administered to 99 consecutive outpatients with Parkinson's disease and 44 age-matched controls. In addition, a short sleep-screening questionnaire was used. The ESS revealed significantly increased daytime sleepiness in PD patients compared to controls (7.5 +/- 4.6 vs. 5.8 +/- 3.0, P = 0.013). The ESS score was abnormally high (10 or more) in 33 % of PD patients and 11.4% of controls (P = 0.001). ESS was not different between PD patients on levodopa monotherapy and those on levodopa and dopamine agonists, or between patients taking ergoline or non-ergoline dopamine agonists. In PD patients and in controls, sleepiness was significantly associated with reported heavy snoring. Increased daytime sleepiness is more frequent in patients with PD than in elderly controls. Similar to controls, increased daytime sleepiness in PD patients is correlated with heavy snoring. Copyright 2002 Movement Disorder Society

  18. Nitrous acid (HONO) nocturnal surface deposition and daytime acid displacement: An alternative mechanism contributing to the unknown daytime HONO source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, J. G.; VandenBoer, T. C.; Roberts, J. M.; Young, C. J.; Brown, S. S.; Markovic, M. Z.; Talukdar, R. K.

    2012-12-01

    Measurements of HONO were made during two intensive field campaigns: NACHTT 2011 in Erie, CO and CalNex 2010 in Bakersfield, CA. These field data and results from a flow tube study provide a new perspective on the interactions of HONO with ground surfaces. Integrated atmospheric column measurements of HONO and NO2 during NACHTT provided clear evidence that the ground surface dominates HONO production and loss at night. Simultaneous measurements of the gas and particle phases made by an Ambient Ion Monitor - Ion Chromatography (AIM-IC) system during CalNex demonstrated the potential for reactive uptake of HONO on mineral dust/soil as a nocturnal sink. Similarly, the potential for nitrite salts to react with strong acids, displacing HONO during the day was suggested by this dataset. Lab study results confirmed that HONO reacts irreversibly with carbonate salts and real soil extracts. Relative humidity-dependent reactive uptake coefficients were derived. Subsequent release of HONO by displacement reactions with HNO3 and HCl was also demonstrated. Together, these field and lab studies contribute to a new picture of HONO surface interactions by providing i) a more explicit description of the nocturnal HONO sink that also is a surface reservoir and ii) a new mechanism for daytime HONO formation that does not require NO2.

  19. Subjective and objective measures of adaptation and readaptation to night work on an oil rig in the North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Stangenes, Kristine; Oyane, Nicolas; Forberg, Knut; Lowden, Arne; Holsten, Fred; Akerstedt, Torbjørn

    2006-06-01

    To study the adaptation and readaptation processes to 1 week of night work (6:30 PM to 6:30 AM) followed by 1 week of day work (6:30 AM to 6:30 PM). Part of a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover field study. Here, data from the placebo arm are presented. Oil rig in the North Sea. Work schedule: 2 weeks on a 12-hour shift, with the first week on the night shift and the second week on the day shift. Subjects complaining about problems with adjusting to shift work. Seventeen workers completed the study. N/A. Subjective and objective measures of sleepiness (Karolinska Sleepiness Scale and simple serial reaction time test) and sleep (diary and actigraphy). Both subjective and objective measures improved gradually during night work. The return to day work after 1 week on the night shift led to a clear increase in subjective sleepiness and worsening of sleep parameters. During the week on the day shift, sleepiness and sleep gradually improved, similar to the improvement seen during night work. The workers indicated that the day shift was worse than the night shift on some of the measures, e.g., sleep length was significantly longer during the night-shift period. This is one of few studies showing how shift workers in a real-life setting adjust to night work. Both subjective and objective sleepiness and subjective sleep improved across days. The effects were especially pronounced for the subjective data.

  20. Within-subject variation in BOLD-fMRI signal changes across repeated measurements: Quantification and implications for sample size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandbelt, B.B.; Gladwin, T.E.; Raemaekers, M.; Buuren, M. van; Neggers, S.F.W.; Kahn, R.S.; Ramsey, N.F.; Vink, M.

    2008-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be used to detect experimental effects on brain activity across measurements. The success of such studies depends on the size of the experimental effect, the reliability of the measurements, and the number of subjects. Here, we report on the stability

  1. Inter-relationships between objective and subjective measures of the residential environment among urban African American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealy-Jefferson, Shawnita; Messer, Lynne; Slaughter-Acey, Jaime; Misra, Dawn P

    2017-03-01

    The inter-relationships between objective (census based) and subjective (resident reported) measures of the residential environment is understudied in African American (AA) populations. Using data from the Life Influences on Fetal Environments Study (2009-2011; n = 1387) of AA women, we quantified the area-level variation in subjective reports of residential healthy food availability, walkability, safety, and disorder that can be accounted for with an objective neighborhood disadvantage index (NDI). Two-level generalized linear models estimated associations between objective and subjective measures of the residential environment, accounting for individual-level covariates. In unconditional models, intraclass correlation coefficients for block-group variance in subjective reports ranged from 11% (healthy food availability) to 30% (safety). Models accounting for the NDI (vs. both NDI and individual-level covariates) accounted for more variance in healthy food availability (23% vs. 8%) and social disorder (40% vs. 38%). The NDI and individual-level variables accounted for 39% and 51% of the area-level variation in walkability and safety, respectively. Associations between subjective and objective measures of the residential environment were significant and in the expected direction. Future studies on neighborhood effects on health, especially among AAs, should include a wide range of residential environment measures, including subjective, objective, and spatial contextual variables. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Coffee versus Caffeine: Effects on Subjective and Behavioral Measures of Alertness

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-12

    particular attention to the impulsivity subscale of the Eysenck Personality Inventory ( Eysenck & Eysenck , 1964). Impulsivity is a construct related to...and only significant in one of the experiments (Exp.3). In a similar study, Anderson & Revelle (1982) again gave subjects the Eysenck Personality...Inventory ( Eysenck & Eysenck , 1964) and divided them into high and low impulsive groups based on a median split. Baseline caffeine intake of subjects

  3. Effects of a single night of postpartum sleep on childless women's daytime functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBean, Amanda L; Kinsey, Steven G; Montgomery-Downs, Hawley E

    2016-03-15

    The maternal postpartum period is characterized by sleep fragmentation, which is associated with daytime impairment, mental health disturbances, and changes in melatonin patterns. In addition to sleep fragmentation, women undergo a complex set of physiological and environmental changes upon entering the postpartum period, confounding our understanding of effects of postpartum sleep disturbance. The primary study aim was to understand the basic impact of a single night of postpartum-like sleep fragmentation on sleep architecture, nocturnal melatonin levels, mood, daytime sleepiness, and neurobehavioral performance. For one week prior to entry into the laboratory, eleven healthy nulliparous women kept a stable sleep-wake schedule (verified via actigraphy). Participants contributed three consecutive nights of laboratory overnight polysomnography: (1) a habituation/sleep disorder screening night; (2) a baseline night; and (3) a sleep fragmentation night, when participants were awakened three times for ~30min each. Self-reported sleep quality and mood (Profile of Mood States survey) both decreased significantly after sleep fragmentation compared to baseline measurements. Unexpectedly, daytime sleepiness (Multiple Sleep Latency Test) decreased significantly after sleep fragmentation. Experimental fragmentation had no significant effect on time spent in nocturnal sleep stages, urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin concentration, or psychomotor vigilance test performance. Participants continued to provide actigraphy data, and daily PVTs and self-reported sleep quality assessments at home for one week following sleep fragmentation; these assessments did not differ from baseline values. While there were no changes in measured physiological components of a single night of postpartum-like experimental sleep fragmentation, there were decreases in self-reported measures of mood and sleep quality. Future research should examine the effects of multiple nights of modeling postpartum

  4. Objective-subjective disparity in cancer-related cognitive impairment: does the use of change measures help reconcile the difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Farrell, Erin; Smith, Andra; Collins, Barbara

    2017-10-01

    Studies to date have found little correlation between subjective and objective measures of cognitive function in cancer patients, making it difficult to interpret the significance of their cognitive complaints. The purpose of this study was to determine if a stronger correlation would be obtained using measures of cognitive change rather than static scores. Sixty women with early stage breast cancer underwent repeated cognitive assessment over the course of chemotherapy with a neuropsychological test battery (objective measure) and with the FACT-Cog (subjective measure). Their results were compared to 60 healthy women matched on age and education and assessed at similar intervals. We used multilevel modeling, with FACT-Cog as the dependent measure and ordinary least squares slopes of a neuropsychological summary score as the independent variable, to evaluate the co-variation between the subjective and objective measures over time RESULTS: Measures of both objective and subjective cognitive function declined over the course of chemotherapy in the breast cancer patients but there was no significant relationship between them, even when using change measures. Change in objective cognitive function was not related to change in anxiety or fatigue scores but the decline in perceived cognitive function was associated with greater anxiety and fatigue. The discrepancy in objective and subjective measures of cognition in breast cancer patients cannot be accounted for in terms of a failure to use change measures. Although the results are negative, we contend that this is the more appropriate methodology for analyzing cancer-related changes in cognition. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Do Subjective Measures Improve the Ability to Identify Limited Health Literacy in a Clinical Setting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Melody S; Griffey, Richard T; Carpenter, Christopher R; Blanchard, Melvin; Kaphingst, Kimberly A

    2015-01-01

    Existing health literacy assessments developed for research purposes have constraints that limit their utility for clinical practice, including time requirements and administration protocols. The Brief Health Literacy Screen (BHLS) consists of 3 self-administered Single-Item Literacy Screener (SILS) questions and obviates these clinical barriers. We assessed whether the addition of SILS items or the BHLS to patient demographics readily available in ambulatory clinical settings reaching underserved patients improves the ability to identify limited health literacy. We analyzed data from 2 cross-sectional convenience samples of patients from an urban academic emergency department (n = 425) and a primary care clinic (n = 486) in St. Louis, Missouri. Across samples, health literacy was assessed using the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine-Revised (REALM-R), Newest Vital Sign (NVS), and the BHLS. Our analytic sample consisted of 911 adult patients, who were primarily female (62%), black (66%), and had at least a high school education (82%); 456 were randomly assigned to the estimation sample and 455 to the validation sample. The analysis showed that the best REALM-R estimation model contained age, sex, education, race, and 1 SILS item (difficulty understanding written information). In validation analysis this model had a sensitivity of 62%, specificity of 81%, a positive likelihood ratio (LR(+)) of 3.26, and a negative likelihood ratio (LR(-)) of 0.47; there was a 28% misclassification rate. The best NVS estimation model contained the BHLS, age, sex, education and race; this model had a sensitivity of 77%, specificity of 72%, LR(+) of 2.75, LR(-) of 0.32, and a misclassification rate of 25%. Findings suggest that the BHLS and SILS items improve the ability to identify patients with limited health literacy compared with demographic predictors alone. However, despite being easier to administer in clinical settings, subjective estimates of health literacy have

  6. The prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness among academic physicians and its impact on the quality of life and occupational performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozder, Aclan; Eker, Hasan Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disorders can affect health and occupational performance of physicians as well as outcomes in patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) measured by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) among academic physicians at a tertiary academic medical center in an urban area in the northwest region of Turkey, and to establish a relationship between the self-perceived sleepiness and the quality of life using the EuroQol-5 dimensions (EQ-5D). A questionnaire prepared by the researchers after scanning the literature on the subject was e-mailed to the academic physicians of a tertiary academic medical center in Istanbul. The ESS and the EQ-5D were also included in the survey. The e-mail database of the institution directory was used to compile a list of active academic physicians who practiced clinical medicine. Paired and independent t tests were used for the data analysis at a significance level of p rate. There were 84 (33.3%) female and 168 (66.7%) male academic physicians participating in the study. One hundred and eight out of 252 (42.8%) academic physicians were taking night calls (p sleep and 84 (33.3%) reported napping daily (p 10) (p quality of life (p poor quality of life and daytime sleepiness. There was also a positive relationship between habitual napping and being sleepy during the day. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  7. The prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness among academic physicians and its impact on the quality of life and occupational performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aclan Ozder

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Sleep disorders can affect health and occupational performance of physicians as well as outcomes in patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS measured by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS among academic physicians at a tertiary academic medical center in an urban area in the northwest region of Turkey, and to establish a relationship between the self-perceived sleepiness and the quality of life using the EuroQol-5 dimensions (EQ-5D. Material and Methods: A questionnaire prepared by the researchers after scanning the literature on the subject was e-mailed to the academic physicians of a tertiary academic medical center in Istanbul. The ESS and the EQ-5D were also included in the survey. The e-mail database of the institution directory was used to compile a list of active academic physicians who practiced clinical medicine. Paired and independent t tests were used for the data analysis at a significance level of p 10 (p < 0.001. In the case of the EQ-5D index and visual analogue scale of the EQ-5D questionnaire (EQ-5D VAS, the status of sleepiness of academic physicians was associated with a poorer quality of life (p < 0.001. Conclusions: More than a 1/4 of the academic physicians suffered from sleepiness. There was an association between the poor quality of life and daytime sleepiness. There was also a positive relationship between habitual napping and being sleepy during the day.

  8. ESTADIUS: A High Motion "One Arcsec" Daytime Attitude Estimation System for Stratospheric Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montel, J.; Andre, Y.; Mirc, F.; Etcheto, P.; Evrard, J.; Bray, N.; Saccoccio, M.; Tomasini, L.; Perot, E.

    2015-09-01

    ESTADIUS is an autonomous, accurate and daytime attitude estimation system, for stratospheric balloons that require a high level of attitude measurement and stability. The system has been developed by CNES. ESTADIUS is based on star sensor an pyrometer data fusion within an extended Kalman filter. The star sensor is composed of a 16 MPixels visible-CCD camera and a large aperture camera lens (focal length of 135mm, aperture f/1.8, 10ºx15º field of view or FOV) which provides very accurate stars measurements due to very low pixel angular size. This also allows detecting stars against a bright sky background. The pyrometer is a 0.01º/h performance class Fiber Optic Gyroscope (FOG). The system is adapted to work down to an altitude of ~25km, even under high cinematic conditions. Key elements of ESTADIUS are: daytime conditions use (as well as night time), autonomy (automatic recognition of constellations), high angular rate robustness (a few deg/s thanks to the high performance of attitude propagation), stray-light robustness (thanks to a high performance baffle), high accuracy (CIDRE will use the system ESTADIUS is probably the first autonomous, large FOV, daytime stellar attitude measurement system. This paper details the technical features and in-flight results.

  9. Daytime Raman lidar for water vapor and ozone concentration measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Duk Hyeon; Cha, Hyung Ki; Lee, Jong Min [Laboratory for QuantumOptics, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of); Veselovskii, I. [Physcis Instrumentation Center of General Physcis Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-11-15

    A Raman lidar system based on a quadrupled Nd : Yagi laser monitors the Raman signals from N{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O molecules. To suppress the elastic backscatter, a specially designed liquid absorption edge filter is used. The water vapor concentration is calculated from the radio of water and nitrogen Raman signals. Ozone concentration is evaluated from nitrogen and oxygen Raman returns by applying Dial technique. The obtained ozone profiles can be used for water vapor data correction.

  10. Objective Versus Subjective Measures of Executive Functions: Predictors of Participation and Quality of Life in Parkinson Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlagsma, Thialda T; Koerts, Janneke; Tucha, Oliver; Dijkstra, Hilde T; Duits, Annelien A; van Laar, Teus; Spikman, Jacoba M

    2017-11-01

    To determine whether objective (neuropsychological tests) and subjective measures (questionnaires) of executive functions (EFs) are associated in patients with Parkinson disease (PD), and to determine to what extent level of participation and quality of life (QoL) of patients with PD can be predicted by these measures of EFs. Correlational research design (case-control and prediction design). Departments of neuropsychology of 3 medical centers. A sample (N=136) of patients with PD (n=42) and their relatives, and controls without PD (n=94). Not applicable. A test battery measuring EFs. In addition, patients, their relatives, and controls completed the Dysexecutive Questionnaire, Brock Adaptive Functioning Questionnaire, and Barkley Deficits in Executive Functioning Scale - time management questionnaires measuring complaints about EFs. Participation and QoL were measured with the Impact on Participation and Autonomy scale and the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39, respectively. Patients with PD showed impairments in EFs on objective tests and reported significantly more complaints about EFs than did controls without PD. No associations were found between patients' performances on objective and subjective measures of EFs. However, both objective and subjective measures predicted patients' level of participation. In addition, subjective measures of EFs predicted QoL in patients with PD. These findings show that objective and subjective measures of EFs are not interchangeable and that both approaches predict level of participation and QoL in patients with PD. However, within this context, sex needs to be taken into account. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Energy cost of walking measurements in subjects with lower limb amputations: a comparison study between floor and treadmill test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traballesi, Marco; Porcacchia, Paolo; Averna, Tiziano; Brunelli, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    Measuring the energy cost of walking (ECW) is a valid way of assessing the walking efficiency of subjects who were prosthetic users following lower limb amputation. The aim of this study was to determine whether, in these subjects, treadmill and floor ECW measurements are comparable. We tested 24 subjects who had undergone unilateral lower limb amputations for vascular diseases as they walked at a self-selected comfortable speed on the floor and on a treadmill. The tests were conducted at the end of rehabilitative treatment to fit prosthesis. Eight subjects underwent transtibial and 16 transfemoral amputation. The measurements were taken with a portable gas analyzer. The self-selected comfortable speed on the treadmill was significantly lower than that on the floor, where the patients adopted the aid they normally used for walking; oxygen consumption was the same in the two tests. Therefore, for both transtibial and transfemoral patients, ECW was greater during walking on the treadmill. Steady-state heart rate did not differ in the two tests. The data show that the ECW values of the amputated subjects obtained on the treadmill at the end of rehabilitation did not correspond with those they obtained on the floor. The floor test is the one that may better reflect walking with prostheses and aids in everyday life, in subjects with dysvascular lower limb amputation, using the prosthesis for a short time.

  12. Evaluation of Subjective Measurement Systems with Focus on Workmanship Scratches and Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzgerald, Jesse

    2011-02-24

    The presence of workmanship defects at the Kansas City Plant (KCP) is not a new problem nor is it an easy one to remedy. The lack of well defined parameters, subjective evaluations, and operator dependency makes this problem difficult to analyze. At the time of project assignment, workmanship defects comprised approximately 50% of all non-conformance reports for internally produced products. Not all of these non-conformances result in product rejections, thus inferring that inconsistency in evaluations were present. The purpose of this study was to identify a method for evaluating an operator’s ability to properly characterize subjective defects. Since the scope of the project was limited to no funding, scratch depth was selected as the only criteria to evaluate. It was determined that the introduction of a reference standard coupled with a predefined gate-sorting technique approved by the customer can statistically improve an operators ability to perform subjective evaluations.

  13. Clinical implications of daytime sleepiness for the academic performance of middle school-aged adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langberg, Joshua M; Dvorsky, Melissa R; Marshall, Stephen; Evans, Steven W

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the relative impact of total time slept per night and daytime sleepiness on the academic functioning of 100 middle school-aged youth (mean age = 11.9) with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The primary goal of the study was to determine if total time slept per night and/or daytime sleepiness, as measured by youth self-report on the Pediatric Daytime Sleepiness Scale (PDSS), predicted academic functioning above and beyond symptoms of ADHD and relevant covariates, such as intelligence, achievement scores and parent education level. Self-reported daytime sleepiness but not self-reported total time slept per night was associated significantly with all academic outcomes. When examined in a hierarchical regression model, self-reported daytime sleepiness significantly predicted parent-rated homework problems and academic impairment and teacher-rated academic competence above and beyond symptoms of ADHD and relevant covariates, but did not predict grade point average or teacher-rated academic impairment. The implications of these findings for understanding more clearly the association between ADHD and sleep and the functional implications of this relationship are discussed. © 2013 European Sleep Research Society.

  14. Increased Daytime Sleepiness in Patients with Childhood Craniopharyngioma and Hypothalamic Tumor Involvement: Review of the Literature and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann L. Müller

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Childhood craniopharyngiomas are rare embryogenic malformations of the sellar region, presumably derived from Rathke cleft epithelium. The overall survival rates after neurosurgical intervention and/or irradiation are high (92%. However, the quality of survival is frequently impaired due to endocrine deficiencies, sleep disturbances, daytime sleepiness, and severe obesity caused by hypothalamic lesions. Based on self-assessment using nutritional diaries, caloric intake was similar in patients and BMI-matched controls. Analyses of physical activity by accelerometric measurements showed a markedly lower level of physical activity. Significant daytime sleepiness and disturbances of circadian rhythms have been demonstrated in obese childhood craniopharyngioma patients. Daytime sleepiness and obesity in these patients were both correlated with low nocturnal and early morning melatonin levels. Polysomnographic studies in patients with severe daytime sleepiness revealed sleeping patterns typical for secondary narcolepsy. Reports on a beneficial effect of treatment with central stimulating agents supported the hypothesis that secondary narcolepsy should be considered as a rare cause for severe daytime sleepiness in patients with childhood craniopharyngioma.

  15. Sleep habits, insomnia, and daytime sleepiness in a large and healthy community-based sample of New Zealanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsmore, Bradley R; Grunstein, Ronald R; Fransen, Marlene; Woodward, Mark; Norton, Robyn; Ameratunga, Shanthi

    2013-06-15

    To determine the relationship between sleep complaints, primary insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and lifestyle factors in a large community-based sample. Cross-sectional study. Blood donor sites in New Zealand. 22,389 individuals aged 16-84 years volunteering to donate blood. N/A. A comprehensive self-administered questionnaire including personal demographics and validated questions assessing sleep disorders (snoring, apnea), sleep complaints (sleep quantity, sleep dissatisfaction), insomnia symptoms, excessive daytime sleepiness, mood, and lifestyle factors such as work patterns, smoking, alcohol, and illicit substance use. Additionally, direct measurements of height and weight were obtained. One in three participants report healthy sample) was associated with insomnia (odds ratio [OR] 1.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.50 to 2.05), depression (OR 2.01, CI 1.74 to 2.32), and sleep disordered breathing (OR 1.92, CI 1.59 to 2.32). Long work hours, alcohol dependence, and rotating work shifts also increase the risk of daytime sleepiness. Even in this relatively young, healthy, non-clinical sample, sleep complaints and primary insomnia with subsequent excess daytime sleepiness were common. There were clear associations between many personal and lifestyle factors-such as depression, long work hours, alcohol dependence, and rotating shift work-and sleep problems or excessive daytime sleepiness.

  16. Daytime napping and mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Guochao; Wang, Yi; Tao, TieHong; Ying, Jun; Zhao, Yong

    2015-07-01

    The association between daytime napping and mortality remains controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis to examine the associations between daytime napping and the risks of death from all causes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer. PubMed and Embase databases were searched through 19 September 2014. Prospective cohort studies that provided risk estimates of daytime napping and mortality were eligible for our meta-analysis. Two investigators independently performed study screening and data extraction. A random-effects model was used to estimate the combined effect size. Subgroup analyses were conducted to identify potential effect modifiers. Twelve studies, involving 130,068 subjects, 49,791 nappers, and 19,059 deaths, were included. Our meta-analysis showed that daytime napping was associated with an increased risk of death from all causes [n = 9 studies; hazard ratio (HR), 1.22; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.14-1.31; I(2) = 42.5%]. No significant associations between daytime napping and the risks of death from CVD (n = 6 studies; HR, 1.20; 95% CI, 0.96-1.50; I(2) = 75.0%) and cancer (n = 4 studies; HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.99-1.15; I(2) = 8.9%) were found. There were no significant differences in risks of all-cause and CVD mortality between subgroups stratified by the prevalence of napping, follow-up duration, outcome assessment, age, and sex. Daytime napping is a predictor of increased all-cause mortality but not of CVD and cancer mortality. However, our findings should be treated with caution because of limited numbers of included studies and potential biases. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Daytime Sleepiness in Men During Early Fatherhood: Implications for Work Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, Gary; Van Vorst, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    This study measured the daytime sleepiness (DS) and work safety of fathers during the first 12 weeks of their babies' lives (i.e., early fatherhood). A questionnaire was developed using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), the Safety Behaviour at Work Scale, a self-reported sleep history, and a work-related incident history. Of the 221 participants, the vast majority reported they experienced less than 6 hours of interrupted sleep per night during the 12 weeks of the study, and an increasing frequency and severity of DS. The study also revealed an inverse correlation between ESS and Safety Behaviour at Work scores; fathers were 14% more likely to report a near-miss accident at work at 12 weeks. This study posits that antenatal classes and assessment of fathers' sleepiness at work by occupational health practitioners could assist fathers in reducing daytime sleepiness and mitigating the risk of workplace incidents. © 2015 The Author(s).

  18. Objective Versus Subjective Measurement of Stress and Social Support: Combat-Related Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Zahava; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Studied combat intensity, social support, and related stress reactions among soldiers who fought in the 1982 Israeli-Lebanon War, comparing those who experienced combat stress reaction (N=382) and those who did not (N=344). Subjective indicators were found to be stronger predictors than were objective indicators. Combat stress reaction was clearly…

  19. Application of LaserBreath-001 for breath acetone measurement in subjects with diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhennan; Sun, Meixiu; Chen, Zhuying; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2016-11-01

    Breath acetone is a promising biomarker of diabetes mellitus. With an integrated standalone, on-site cavity ringdown breath acetone analyzer, LaserBreath-001, we tested breath samples from 23 type 1 diabetic (T1D) patients, 312 type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients, 52 healthy subjects. In the cross-sectional studies, the obtained breath acetone concentrations were higher in the diabetic subjects compared with those in the control group. No correlation between breath acetone and simultaneous BG was observed in the T1D, T2D, and healthy subjects. A moderate positive correlation between the mean individual breath acetone concentrations and the mean individual BG levels was observed in the 20 T1D patients without ketoacidosis. In a longitudinal study, the breath acetone concentrations in a T1D patient with ketoacidosis decreased significantly and remained stable during the 5-day hospitalization. The results from a relatively large number of subjects tested indicate that an elevated mean breath acetone concentration exists in diabetic patients in general. Although many physiological parameters affect breath acetone concentrations, fast (diabetic screening and management under a specifically controlled condition.

  20. Sex differences in subjective and actigraphic sleep measures: A population-based study of elderly persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, J.F. van den; Miedema, H.M.E.; Tulen, J.H.M.; Hofman, A.; Neven, A.K.; Tiemeier, H.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate and explain sex differences in subjective and actigraphic sleep parameters in community-dwelling elderly persons. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: The study was embedded in the Rotterdam Study, a population-based study. Participants: Nine hundred fifty-six

  1. [Measuring facial paralysis using the three-dimensional dynamic quantitative analysis system of facial motion: correlation with subjective grading systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y; Feng, G D; Wu, H Y; Zhuang, Y; Gao, Z Q

    2016-07-07

    The aim of this study was to measure the facial motion of patients with facial paralysis using a three-dimensional dynamic quantitative analysis system of facial motion (3D ASFM) and analyze its correlation with subjective grading systems. We included 30 healthy volunteers and 50 patients with unilateral facial paralysis. After placing landmarks on the faces, the facial motions of the patients were measured using the 3D ASFM. The regional symmetry ratios(SRs) and gross scores of different parameters were calculated. Then a comparison with four subjective grading systems(House-Brackmann, Sunnybrook, Facial Nerve Grading System 2.0, Fisch) was performed. The entire test could be completed within five minutes. The normal range of healthy volunteers were obtained, the gross score of which was 91.9±1.5. The SRs of the maximal moving distance(MMD) were most strongly correlated with regional subjective grading systems, followed by the SRs of the maximal moving velocity (MMV). The SRs of the maximal moving acceleration (MMA) were either poorly correlated or uncorrelated with the subjective grading systems. Moreover, the Spearman coefficients with four subjective grading systems were -0.630(House-Brackmann), -0.728(Facial Nerve Grading System 2.0), 0.697(Sunnybrook), and 0.617(Fisch)respectively(Pfacial paralysis. It not only overcomes the shortcomings of conventional subjective grading systems, but also correlates well with them.

  2. Minimal Effect of Daytime Napping Behavior on Nocturnal Sleep in Pregnant Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Rebecca M.; Wood, Annette; Okun, Michele L.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To assess whether daytime naps negatively impact nocturnal sleep. Design: Longitudinal, prospective cohort design. Participants: 161 pregnant women recruited and evaluated in early gestation (10–20 weeks). Measurements and Results: Daily sleep information was collected in three 2-week periods (10–12, 14–16, and 18–20 weeks gestation) with a daily sleep diary and an actigraph. The average number of naps, as well as the average length of each nap, were calculated from sleep diaries. Women were categorized first as non nappers (0 naps/2-week period), moderate nappers (1–3 naps/2-week period), or frequent nappers (≥ 4 naps/2-week period). Then, based on the average nap length, they were categorized as short (nap group and time, and time by nap group interactions. Women who took naps had a decrease in diary-assessed nocturnal TST, but not actigraphy-assessed TST. This observation was group- and time-specific. There were no other group differences. Women who napped ≥ 90 min had poorer diary-assessed SE and lower diary-assessed TST than those who took shorter naps. Length of nap was not associated with any other sleep measures. Conclusions: The number of daytime naps have minimal impact on nocturnal sleep parameters; however, long nappers did exhibit modestly impaired sleep continuity and sleep quality. Overall, we propose that daytime naps provide a beneficial countermeasure to the sleep disruption commonly reported by pregnant women. This may be clinically beneficial given that sleep continuity and quality are important correlates of pregnancy outcomes. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 593. Citation: Ebert RM, Wood A, Okun ML. Minimal effect of daytime napping behavior on nocturnal sleep in pregnant women. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(6):635–643. PMID:25766712

  3. Gustatory Salivation Is Associated with Body Mass Index, Daytime Sleepiness, and Snoring in Healthy Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Satoshi; Hong, Guang; Iwasaki, Koh; Izumi, Masayuki; Matsuyama, Yusuke; Chiba, Mirei; Toda, Takashi; Kudo, Tada-Aki

    2016-10-01

    The taste detection system for oral fatty acid may be related to obesity. In addition, sleep is intrinsically and closely related to food intake and metabolism. However, the association of gustatory salivation with body mass index (BMI), daytime sleepiness, or sleep habits is largely unknown. Therefore, we evaluated the relationship between gustatory salivation and BMI, Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS, a daytime sleepiness scale) or sleep habits among 26 healthy young individuals (20 males and 6 females; mean age: 26.0 ± 4.3 years). We also measured the saliva flow rate (SFR) that was induced by gum-chewing or each of three prototypical tastants (acetic acid, sucrose, and NaCl). Further, the SFR was induced by fatty acid, provided as oleic acid (OA) homogenized in non-fat milk. All participants showed normal rates of salivation during resting and gum-chewing states. The increase in the SFR induced by OA, but not by each of the three tastants, was associated with BMI. Moreover, both daytime sleepiness level and frequency of snoring were associated with the increase in the SFR induced by NaCl. These results suggest that BMI is associated with salivation induced by oral fatty acid exposure. Additionally, the regulatory mechanism for the NaCl-induced salivation reflex may have a relationship with impairments of the respiratory control system that are related to snoring during sleep and lead to daytime sleepiness because of insufficient sleep. Thus, measurement of gustatory salivation might contribute to the evaluation and prevention of obesity and sleep-related breathing disorders.

  4. Heart rate variability during daytime naps in healthy adults: Autonomic profile and short-term reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellini, Nicola; Whitehurst, Lauren N; McDevitt, Elizabeth A; Mednick, Sara C

    2016-04-01

    In healthy individuals, a reduction in cardiovascular output and a shift to parasympathetic/vagal dominant activity is observed across nocturnal sleep. This cardiac autonomic profile, often measured by heart rate variability (HRV), has been associated with significant benefits for the cardiovascular system. However, little is known about the autonomic profile during daytime sleep. Here, we investigated the autonomic profile and short-term reliability of HRV during daytime naps in 66 healthy young adults. Participants took an 80-120 min polysomnographically recorded nap at 1:30 pm. Beat-by-beat RR interval values (RR), high (HF) and low frequency (LF) power, total power (TP), HF normalized units (HF(nu)), and the LF/HF ratio were obtained for 5 min during presleep wakefulness and during nap sleep stages (N2, N3, REM). A subsample of 37 participants took two additional naps with 2 weeks between recordings. We observed lengthening of the RR, higher HF and HF(nu), and lower LF/HF during NREM, compared with REM and wake, and a marked reduction of LF and TP during N3. Intraclass correlation coefficients highlighted a short-term stability of RR and HF ranging across sleep stages between 0.52-0.76 and 0.52-0.80, respectively. Our results suggest that daytime napping in healthy young adults is associated with dynamic changes in the autonomic profile, similar to those seen during nocturnal sleep. Moreover, a reliable intraindividual measure of autonomic cardiac activity can be obtained by just a single daytime nap depending on specific parameters and recording purposes. Nap methodology may be a new and promising tool to explore sleep-dependent, autonomic fluctuations in healthy and at-risk populations. © 2015 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  5. A comparative study of autokeratometric and Scheimpflug keratometric measurements of the anterior corneal surface: results for a single subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mathebula

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available One purpose of the broader study was to determine whether keratometric measurements obtained with an autokeratometer (Nidek ARK-700 would be comparable with those measured using the Oculus Pentacam(model 70700. Ten healthy subjects without ocular abnormality, no previous or current contact lens wear or history of ocular surgery were recruited and at least 43 successive keratometric measurements were obtained for the right eye of each subject using both instruments, namely the autokeratometer and the Pentacam. This paper will concern itself with data from only one of the ten subjects involved, namely Subject 1. The corneal powers were analyzed using multivariate methods for analyzing dioptric power. Scatter plots and meridional profiles of skewness and kurtosis were used to compare the results for the two instruments. Mean dioptric powers in conventional and scientific notation were determined.The results for this subject indicated that there was a statistically significant difference between the autokeratometry and the Pentacam. Although the means  between the two instruments were found to be significantly different at a 95% level of confidence, there was minimal clinical difference between the means of the two instruments. That is, this preliminary investigation suggests that in normal eyes, clinically, keratometric results obtained by means of an autokeratometer and a Pentacam are reasonably similar and can be used interchangeably.

  6. A novel noninvasive method for measuring fatigability of the quadriceps muscle in noncooperating healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jesper Brøndum; Rose, Martin Høyer; Møller, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    days, nonvoluntary isometric contractions (twitch and tetanic) of the quadriceps femoris muscle evoked by transcutaneous electrical muscle stimulation were recorded in twelve healthy adults. For tetanic contractions, the Fatigue Index (ratio of peak torque values) and the slope of the regression line......Background. Critical illness is associated with muscle weakness leading to long-term functional limitations. Objectives. To assess the reliability of a novel method for evaluating fatigability of the quadriceps muscle in noncooperating healthy subjects. Methods. On two occasions, separated by seven...... fatigability of the quadriceps muscle produces reliable results in healthy subjects and may provide valuable data on quantitative changes in muscle working capacity and treatment effects in patients who are incapable of producing voluntary muscle contractions....

  7. Measurement of effective alveolar carbon dioxide tension during spontaneous breathing in normal subjects and patients with chronic airways obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordanoglou, J; Koulouris, N; Kyroussis, D; Rapakoulias, P; Vassalos, P; Madianos, J

    1995-03-01

    The measurement of effective alveolar carbon dioxide tension (PA-CO2eff) is still a matter of debate. It has, however, become common practice to use arterial instead of alveolar CO2 tension for computing alveolar oxygen tension (PAO2) and physiological dead space, not only in normal subjects but also in patients. The purpose of this study was to estimate alveolar CO2 tension during spontaneous breathing with a new bedside technique which is simple and non-invasive, and to compare these values with arterial CO2 tension measured in normal subjects and patients with chronic airways obstruction. The subjects breathed quietly through the equipment assembly (mouthpiece, monitoring ring, Fleisch transducer head) connected to a pneumotachograph and a fast response infrared CO2 analyser. The method is a computerised calculation of the volume weighted effective alveolar CO2 tension obtained from the simultaneously recorded expiratory flow and CO2 concentration versus time curves. An arterial blood sample was taken to measure PaCO2 for comparison during the study. The results showed a mean difference (PACO2eff-PaCO2) of -0.205 kPa in 20 normal subjects and -0.460 kPa in 46 patients. The 95% confidence interval of the bias was -0.029 to -0.379 kPa in normal subjects and -0.213 to -0.707 kPa in patients. The limits of agreement between PACO2eff and PaCO2 were 0.526 to -0.935 in normal subjects and 1.170 to -2.088 in patients. The volume weighted effective alveolar PCO2 in normal subjects and patients with chronic airways obstruction is lower than the arterial PCO2 and is recommended as a better estimate in the classical equations for estimating dead space and intrapulmonary shunt.

  8. Changes after voice therapy in objective and subjective voice measurements of pediatric patients with vocal nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezcaner, Ciler Zahide; Karatayli Ozgursoy, Selmin; Ozgursoy, Selmin Karatayli; Sati, Isil; Dursun, Gursel

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the efficiency of the voice therapy in children with vocal nodules by using the acoustic analysis and subjective assessment. Thirty-nine patients with vocal fold nodules, aged between 7 and 14, were included in the study. Each subject had voice therapy led by an experienced voice therapist once a week. All diagnostic and follow-up workouts were performed before the voice therapy and after the third or the sixth month. Transoral and/or transnasal videostroboscopic examination and acoustic analysis were achieved using multi-dimensional voice program (MDVP) and subjective analysis with GRBAS scale. As for the perceptual assessment, the difference was significant for four parameters out of five. A significant improvement was found in the acoustic analysis parameters of jitter, shimmer, and noise-to-harmonic ratio. The voice therapy which was planned according to patients' needs, age, compliance and response to therapy had positive effects on pediatric patients with vocal nodules. Acoustic analysis and GRBAS may be used successfully in the follow-up of pediatric vocal nodule treatment.

  9. Investigations of conjugate MSTIDS over the Brazilian sector during daytime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonah, O. F.; Kherani, E. A.; De Paula, E. R.

    2017-09-01

    This study focuses on the daytime medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) observed at conjugate hemispheres. It is the first time that the geomagnetical conjugate daytime MSTIDs are observed over the South America sector. To observe the MSTID characteristics, we used detrended total electron content (TEC) derived from Global Navigation Satellite Systems receivers located at Brazilian sector covering the Northern and Southern Hemispheres along the same magnetic meridian. The geographic grid of 1°N to 14°S in latitude and 60°S to 50°S in longitude was selected for this study. The cross-correlation method between two latitudes and longitudes in time was used to observe the propagation of the MSTID waves. The following features are noted: (a) MSTIDs are well developed at both hemispheres; (b) the peak MSTIDs amplitudes vary from one hemisphere to another; hence, we suppose that MSTIDs generated in Southern Hemisphere or Northern Hemisphere mirrored in the conjugate hemisphere; (c) the gravity wave-induced electric fields from one hemisphere map along the field lines and generate the mirrored MSTIDs in the conjugate region. To investigate the hemispheric mapping mechanism, a rough approximation for the integrated field line conductivity ratio of E and F regions is calculated using digisonde E and F region parameters. We noted that during the period of mapping the decrease in E region conductivity results in an increase in total conductivity. This shows that the E region was partially short circuited; hence, electric field generated at F region could map to the conjugate hemisphere during daytime: daytime MSTIDs at conjugate regions; mechanisms responsible for daytime electrified MSTIDs; gravity wave-induced electric field role in daytime MSTIDs.

  10. Measuring Cognitive Load during Simulation-Based Psychomotor Skills Training: Sensitivity of Secondary-Task Performance and Subjective Ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji, Faizal A.; Khan, Rabia; Regehr, Glenn; Drake, James; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Dubrowski, Adam

    2015-01-01

    As interest in applying cognitive load theory (CLT) to the study and design of pedagogic and technological approaches in healthcare simulation grows, suitable measures of cognitive load (CL) are needed. Here, we report a two-phased study investigating the sensitivity of subjective ratings of mental effort (SRME) and secondary-task performance…

  11. The Beck depression inventory as a measure of subjective well-being : A cross-national study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hemert, D.A.; van de Vijver, F.J.R.; Poortinga, Y.H.

    2002-01-01

    The present study examined the question whether the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), which is one of the most widely used instruments to assess depression, can be used to measure differences in subjective well-being at national level. In order to establish the meaning of depression scores at country

  12. Sonographic measurements of low-echoic synovial area in the dorsal aspect of metatarsophalangeal joints in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraga, Masao; Ikeda, Kei; Shigeta, Koichiro; Sato, Akito; Yoshitama, Tamami; Hara, Ryota; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2015-05-01

    Assessment of synovitis in the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints with ultrasound has been shown to improve the accuracy of assessment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the presence of intraarticular low-echoic synovial area (LESA) in the MTP joints in healthy subjects complicates the sonographic assessment of these joints. Healthy subjects with no arthritic symptoms in their MTP joints were recruited. All subjects completed a questionnaire and underwent physical examination and sonographic assessment. LESAs in the dorsal aspect of all MTP joints were measured in the longitudinal view. One thousand non-arthritic MTP joints in 100 healthy subjects (female 73, mean age 41.0 years old) were evaluated. Measurable LESAs were identified in all joints assessed. Mean length of LESA in each of the 1st-5th MTP joints was 17.8, 13.9, 11.9, 10.6, and 9.2 mm, respectively, whereas mean thickness was 2.4, 2.4, 1.8, 1.2, and 0.8 mm, respectively. Multivariate linear regression models identified the difference between 1st and 5th MTP joints as the most independently influential factor on the measurement of LESA. Our data provide the normal reference values for the measurements of LESA in Japanese, which should be taken into consideration when the synovitis in MTP joints is evaluated with ultrasound.

  13. Validation of reaction time as a measure of cognitive function and quality of life in healthy subjects and patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lene Holm; Sorensen, Janice Marie; Rask, Ingeborg Krarup

    2011-01-01

    Malnutrition is a common problem in hospitalized patients and is related to decreased cognitive function and impaired quality of life (QoL). We investigated the validity of reaction time as a simple bedside tool for measuring cognitive function in healthy subjects and patients, and additionally...

  14. Non-invasive perilymphatic pressure measurement in normal hearing subjects using the MMS-10 tympanic displacement analyser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosingh, HJ; Wit, HP; Albers, FWJ

    The MMS-10 Tympanic Displacement Analyser (TDA) is a new device to measure the perilymphatic pressure of the human inner ear in a non-invasive way. In this study, the instrument was used in 50 normal hearing subjects (100 ears) in three different conditions: i) sitting upright and supine; ii) in the

  15. Time-course analysis of stretch reflexes in hemiparetic subjects using an on-line spasticity measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, M S; Chen, J J; Lee, H M; Lin, T S; Lin, C C; Huang, Y Z

    2000-02-01

    Spasticity after a stroke is usually assessed in a score form by subjectively determining the resistance of a joint to an externally imposed passive movement. This work presents a spasticity measurement system for on-line quantifying the stretch reflex of paretic limbs. Four different constant stretch velocities in a ramp-and-hold mode are used to elicit the stretch reflex of the elbow joint in spastic subjects. The subjects are tested at supine position with the upper limb stretched towards the ground, in contrast with the horizontally stretched movement used in other studies. By subtracting the baseline torque, reflex torque measured at a selected low stretch velocity of 5 deg/sec, the influence of gravity torque and inertial in vertical stretching mode can be minimized. The averaged speed-dependent reflex torque (ASRT), defined as the measured torque deviated from the baseline torque, is used for quantifying the spastic hypertonia. Four subjects having incurred cerebrovascular accident (CVA) are recruited for time-course study in which the measurements are taken at 72 hours, one week, one month, three months, and six months after onset of stroke. During the development of spasticity, the changes of ASRT and velocity sensitivity of ASRT of the involved and the intact elbow joints are discussed.

  16. Non-steady wind turbine response to daytime atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Tarak N; Herrig, Andreas; Brasseur, James G

    2017-04-13

    Relevant to drivetrain bearing fatigue failures, we analyse non-steady wind turbine responses from interactions between energy-dominant daytime atmospheric turbulence eddies and the rotating blades of a GE 1.5 MW wind turbine using a unique dataset from a GE field experiment and computer simulation. Time-resolved local velocity data were collected at the leading and trailing edges of an instrumented blade together with generator power, revolutions per minute, pitch and yaw. Wind velocity and temperature were measured upwind on a meteorological tower. The stability state and other atmospheric conditions during the field experiment were replicated with a large-eddy simulation in which was embedded a GE 1.5 MW wind turbine rotor modelled with an advanced actuator line method. Both datasets identify three important response time scales: advective passage of energy-dominant eddies (≈25-50 s), blade rotation (once per revolution (1P), ≈3 s) and sub-1P scale (<1 s) response to internal eddy structure. Large-amplitude short-time ramp-like and oscillatory load fluctuations result in response to temporal changes in velocity vector inclination in the aerofoil plane, modulated by eddy passage at longer time scales. Generator power responds strongly to large-eddy wind modulations. We show that internal dynamics of the blade boundary layer near the trailing edge is temporally modulated by the non-steady external flow that was measured at the leading edge, as well as blade-generated turbulence motions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  17. Effects of Blast Exposure on Subjective and Objective Sleep Measures in Combat Veterans with and without PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Ryan P J; Paul, Benjamin T E; Mammen, Oommen; Khan, Hassen; Cieply, Marissa A; Germain, Anne

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which self-reported exposure to blast during deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan affects subjective and objective sleep measures in service members and veterans with and without posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Seventy-one medication-free service members and veterans (mean age = 29.47 ± 5.76 years old; 85% men) completed self-report sleep measures and overnight polysomnographic studies. Four multivariate analyses of variance (MANOVAs) were conducted to examine the impact of blast exposure and PTSD on subjective sleep measures, measures of sleep continuity, non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep parameters, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep parameters. There was no significant Blast × PTSD interaction on subjective sleep measures. Rather, PTSD had a main effect on insomnia severity, sleep quality, and disruptive nocturnal behaviors. There was no significant Blast × PTSD interaction, nor were there main effects of PTSD or Blast on measures of sleep continuity and NREM sleep. A significant PTSD × Blast interaction effect was found for REM fragmentation. The results suggest that, although persistent concussive symptoms following blast exposure are associated with sleep disturbances, self-reported blast exposure without concurrent symptoms does not appear to contribute to poor sleep quality, insomnia, and disruptive nocturnal disturbances beyond the effects of PTSD. Reduced REM sleep fragmentation may be a sensitive index of the synergetic effects of both psychological and physical insults. © 2016 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  18. Validation Study of a General Subject-matter Interest Measure: The Individual Interest Questionnaire (IIQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome I. Rotgans

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion and relevance: The results suggest that the IIQ is a reliable and valid instrument to measure individual interest across different disciplines and demonstrated adequate predictive validity for cognitive engagement and on-task behaviors and attitudes. The IIQ fills the gap in the literature for a generic instrument to measure individual interest.

  19. Prediction of walking speed using single stance force or pressure measurements in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijsers, N.L.W.; Stolwijk, N.M.; Renzenbrink, G.J.; Duysens, J.

    2016-01-01

    Walking speed is one of the best measures of overall walking capacity. In plantar pressure measurements, walking speed can be assessed using contact time, but it is only moderately correlated with walking speed. The center of pressure might be of more value to indicate walking speed since walking

  20. Question order sensitivity of subjective well-being measures: focus on life satisfaction, self-rated health, and subjective life expectancy in survey instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sunghee; McClain, Colleen; Webster, Noah; Han, Saram

    2016-10-01

    This study examines the effect of question context created by order in questionnaires on three subjective well-being measures: life satisfaction, self-rated health, and subjective life expectancy. We conducted two Web survey experiments. The first experiment (n = 648) altered the order of life satisfaction and self-rated health: (1) life satisfaction asked immediately after self-rated health; (2) self-rated health immediately after life satisfaction; and (3) two items placed apart. We examined their correlation coefficient by experimental condition and further examined its interaction with objective health. The second experiment (n = 479) asked life expectancy before and after parental mortality questions. Responses to life expectancy were compared by order using ANOVA, and we examined interaction with parental mortality status using ANCOVA. Additionally, response time and probes were examined. Correlation coefficients between self-rated health and life satisfaction differed significantly by order: 0.313 (life satisfaction first), 0.508 (apart), and 0.643 (self-rated health first). Differences were larger among respondents with chronic conditions. Response times were the shortest when self-rated health was asked first. When life expectancy asked after parental mortality questions, respondents reported considering parents more for answering life expectancy; and respondents with deceased parents reported significantly lower expectancy, but not those whose parents were alive. Question context effects exist. Findings suggest placing life satisfaction and self-rated health apart to avoid artificial attenuation or inflation in their association. Asking about parental mortality prior to life expectancy appears advantageous as this leads respondents to consider parental longevity more, an important factor for true longevity.

  1. Foveal slope measurements in subjects with high-risk of age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Raman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent reports indicated that the slope of the foveal depression influences the macular pigment (MP spatial profile. MP has been shown to confer possible protection against age-related macular degeneration (ARMD because of its antioxidant properties. Aims: To study the configuration of foveal slope and the foveal thickness in fellow eyes of subjects with unilateral neovascular ARMD. Settings and design: Case-control series. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 30 cases aged >50, who had unilateral choroidal neovascular membrane (CNVM or disciform scar in the fellow eye and 29 controls aged >50, who had no sign of ARMD in the either eye. Using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, foveal thickness at different locations including the central subfield foveal thickness (CSFT was noted. The foveal slopes were calculated in the six radial scans (between 0.25° and 1° retinal eccentricity as well as the 3D scan. Results: Cases had a significantly higher CSFT when compared to controls (215.1 ± 36.19 μ vs. 193.0 ± 17.38 μ, P = 0.004. On the 3D scan, the cases had shallower superior (cases 1.32 ± 0.32 vs. controls 1.45 ± 0.13, P = 0.04 and temporal slopes (cases 1.27 ± 0.21 vs. controls 1.39 ± 0.12, P = 0.01 in comparison to the controls. Conclusions: We noted a shallower superior and temporal foveal slope and a higher CSFT in the fellow eyes of subjects with a unilateral neovascular ARMD. Prospective studies observing the development of CNVM in subjects with altered foveal slope might provide more information on this optical coherence tomography finding.

  2. Simple anthropometric measures correlate with metabolic risk indicators as strongly as magnetic resonance imaging-measured adipose tissue depots in both HIV-infected and control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherzer, Rebecca; Shen, Wei; Bacchetti, Peter; Kotler, Donald; Lewis, Cora E; Shlipak, Michael G; Heymsfield, Steven B; Grunfeld, Carl

    2008-06-01

    Studies in persons without HIV infection have compared percentage body fat (%BF) and waist circumference as markers of risk for the complications of excess adiposity, but only limited study has been conducted in HIV-infected subjects. We compared anthropometric and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based adiposity measures as correlates of metabolic complications of adiposity in HIV-infected and control subjects. The study was a cross-sectional analysis of 666 HIV-positive and 242 control subjects in the Fat Redistribution and Metabolic Change in HIV Infection (FRAM) study assessing body mass index (BMI), waist (WC) and hip (HC) circumferences, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), %BF, and MRI-measured regional adipose tissue. Study outcomes were 3 metabolic risk variables [homeostatic model assessment (HOMA), triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol]. Analyses were stratified by sex and HIV status and adjusted for demographic, lifestyle, and HIV-related factors. In HIV-infected and control subjects, univariate associations with HOMA, triglycerides, and HDL were strongest for WC, MRI-measured visceral adipose tissue, and WHR; in all cases, differences in correlation between the strongest measures for each outcome were small (r measures, and the magnitudes of differences were small (adjusted R(2) measures with HOMA, triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol are approximately as strong as MRI-measured whole-body adipose tissue depots in both HIV-infected and control subjects.

  3. Daytime warming has stronger negative effects on soil nematodes than night-time warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiumin; Wang, Kehong; Song, Lihong; Wang, Xuefeng; Wu, Donghui

    2017-03-20

    Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, that is, stronger warming during night-time than during daytime. Here we focus on how soil nematodes respond to the current asymmetric warming. A field infrared heating experiment was performed in the western of the Songnen Plain, Northeast China. Three warming modes, i.e. daytime warming, night-time warming and diurnal warming, were taken to perform the asymmetric warming condition. Our results showed that the daytime and diurnal warming treatment significantly decreased soil nematodes density, and night-time warming treatment marginally affected the density. The response of bacterivorous nematode and fungivorous nematode to experimental warming showed the same trend with the total density. Redundancy analysis revealed an opposite effect of soil moisture and soil temperature, and the most important of soil moisture and temperature in night-time among the measured environment factors, affecting soil nematode community. Our findings suggested that daily minimum temperature and warming induced drying are most important factors affecting soil nematode community under the current global asymmetric warming.

  4. Daytime warming has stronger negative effects on soil nematodes than night-time warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiumin; Wang, Kehong; Song, Lihong; Wang, Xuefeng; Wu, Donghui

    2017-03-07

    Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, that is, stronger warming during night-time than during daytime. Here we focus on how soil nematodes respond to the current asymmetric warming. A field infrared heating experiment was performed in the western of the Songnen Plain, Northeast China. Three warming modes, i.e. daytime warming, night-time warming and diurnal warming, were taken to perform the asymmetric warming condition. Our results showed that the daytime and diurnal warming treatment significantly decreased soil nematodes density, and night-time warming treatment marginally affected the density. The response of bacterivorous nematode and fungivorous nematode to experimental warming showed the same trend with the total density. Redundancy analysis revealed an opposite effect of soil moisture and soil temperature, and the most important of soil moisture and temperature in night-time among the measured environment factors, affecting soil nematode community. Our findings suggested that daily minimum temperature and warming induced drying are most important factors affecting soil nematode community under the current global asymmetric warming.

  5. Examination of daytime sleepiness and cognitive performance testing in patients with primary insomnia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Liu

    Full Text Available While individuals with insomnia consistently complain of cognitive impairment, previous studies on the effect of insomnia on objective measures of cognitive function have obtained ambiguous results. The relationship between daytime sleepiness and cognitive manifestations in insomnia patients is not clear.Thirty-six primary insomnia patients (PIPs and 26 good sleep controls (GSCs with age and gender matched manner were included in the study. Participants underwent an overnight polysomnography followed by a multiple sleep latency test (MSLT and an examination of the attention network test (ANT. ANT reflected three attentional networks including alerting, orienting and executive control. According to whether accompanied with excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS, the insomnia group were subdivided into PIPs with EDS (n = 12, score on MSLT<10 min and PIPs without EDS (n = 24, score on MSLT≥10 min.PIPs only performed worse on executive control function than GSCs in ANT. PIPs with EDS had longer overall reaction time (RT related to PIPs without EDS. Further analyses with Pearson correlation analysis showed a significant negative correlation between the overall RT and MSLT latency in insomniacs (r = -0.444, p<0.01, whereas no such correlation was found in controls.Results suggest that PIPs do show executive control function deficits compared with GSCs. Daytime sleepiness in terms of MSLT latency was associated with poor cognitive manifestations in patients with insomnia.

  6. [SLEEP QUALITY, EXCESSIVE DAYTIME SLEEPINESS AND INSOMNIA IN CHILEAN PARALYMPIC ATHLETES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán Agüero, Samuel; Arroyo Jofre, Patricio; Varas Standen, Camila; Herrera-Valenzuela, Tomas; Moya Cantillana, Cristobal; Pereira Robledo, Rodolfo; Valdés-Badilla, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    the sleep takes part in diverse biological and physiological functions, associating his restriction, with minor performance in the sport, nevertheless the quantity and quality of sleep is not known in paralympic athletes. to determine the sleep quality, insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness in Chilean paralympic athletes. descriptive transverse Study, the sample included 33 paralympic athletes (24.2% women), those who were practicing swimming, tennis of table, football 5, powerlifting and tennis chair. The studied variables measured up across two surveys of dream: the Questionnaire of Insomnia and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. the paralympic athletes sleep were 6.9 } 1.4 hours, 27.7% presents daytime sleepiness, 69.6 % insomnia (Survey of insomnia =7), whereas 78.7 % exhibits a bad sleep quality. The age showed a positive correlation with latency to the sleep (r=0.417 *), the insomnia with latency to the sleep (r=0.462 **), the Pittsburg score was correlated negatively by the sleep duration (r =-0.323) and latency to the sleep is correlated positively by the Pittsburgh score (r=0.603 **). the chilean paralympic athletes, present a low sleep quality, insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness, situation that might influence negatively the sports performance. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  7. Different melatonin rhythms and sleep-wake rhythms in patients on peritoneal dialysis, daytime hemodialysis and nocturnal hemodialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, B.C.P.; Nagtegaal, J.E.; Hagen, E.C.; ter Wee, P.M.; Kerkhof, G.A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Little comparative data on sleep-wake rhythms in different dialysis groups exist. The aim of this study was to investigate sleep-wake parameters measured with actigraphy and sleep questionnaires as well as melatonin rhythms in automated peritoneal dialysis, conventional daytime

  8. Rapid-Eye-Movement-Sleep (REM Associated Enhancement of Working Memory Performance after a Daytime Nap.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Yuet Ying Lau

    Full Text Available The main objective was to study the impact of a daytime sleep opportunity on working memory and the mechanism behind such impact. This study adopted an experimental design in a sleep research laboratory. Eighty healthy college students (Age:17-23, 36 males were randomized to either have a polysomnography-monitored daytime sleep opportunity (Nap-group, n=40 or stay awake (Wake-group, n=40 between the two assessment sessions. All participants completed a sleep diary and wore an actigraph-watch for 5 days before and one day after the assessment sessions. They completed the state-measurement of sleepiness and affect, in addition to a psychomotor vigilance test and a working memory task before and after the nap/wake sessions. The two groups did not differ in their sleep characteristics prior to and after the lab visit. The Nap-group had higher accuracy on the working memory task, fewer lapses on the psychomotor vigilance test and lower state-sleepiness than the Wake-group. Within the Nap-group, working memory accuracy was positively correlated with duration of rapid eye movement sleep (REM and total sleep time during the nap. Our findings suggested that "sleep gain" during a daytime sleep opportunity had significant positive impact on working memory performance, without affecting subsequent nighttime sleep in young adult, and such impact was associated with the duration of REM. While REM abnormality has long been noted in pathological conditions (e.g. depression, which are also presented with cognitive dysfunctions (e.g. working memory deficits, this was the first evidence showing working memory enhancement associated with REM in daytime napping in college students, who likely had habitual short sleep duration but were otherwise generally healthy.

  9. Rapid-Eye-Movement-Sleep (REM) Associated Enhancement of Working Memory Performance after a Daytime Nap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Esther Yuet Ying; Wong, Mark Lawrence; Lau, Kristy Nga Ting; Hui, Florence Wai Ying; Tseng, Chia-huei

    2015-01-01

    The main objective was to study the impact of a daytime sleep opportunity on working memory and the mechanism behind such impact. This study adopted an experimental design in a sleep research laboratory. Eighty healthy college students (Age:17-23, 36 males) were randomized to either have a polysomnography-monitored daytime sleep opportunity (Nap-group, n=40) or stay awake (Wake-group, n=40) between the two assessment sessions. All participants completed a sleep diary and wore an actigraph-watch for 5 days before and one day after the assessment sessions. They completed the state-measurement of sleepiness and affect, in addition to a psychomotor vigilance test and a working memory task before and after the nap/wake sessions. The two groups did not differ in their sleep characteristics prior to and after the lab visit. The Nap-group had higher accuracy on the working memory task, fewer lapses on the psychomotor vigilance test and lower state-sleepiness than the Wake-group. Within the Nap-group, working memory accuracy was positively correlated with duration of rapid eye movement sleep (REM) and total sleep time during the nap. Our findings suggested that "sleep gain" during a daytime sleep opportunity had significant positive impact on working memory performance, without affecting subsequent nighttime sleep in young adult, and such impact was associated with the duration of REM. While REM abnormality has long been noted in pathological conditions (e.g. depression), which are also presented with cognitive dysfunctions (e.g. working memory deficits), this was the first evidence showing working memory enhancement associated with REM in daytime napping in college students, who likely had habitual short sleep duration but were otherwise generally healthy.

  10. Cognitive Components Predict Virtual Reality-Induced Analgesia: Repeated Measures in Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naor Demeter

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Virtual reality (VR is an advanced and useful technology in the distraction from pain. The efficacy of VR for reducing pain is well established. Yet, the literature analyzing the unique attributes of VR which impact pain reduction is scarce. The present study evaluated the effect of two VR environments on experimental pain levels. Both VR environments are games used with an EyeToy application which is part of the video capture VR family. The VR environments were analyzed by expert occupational therapists using a method of activity analysis, allowing for a thorough evaluation of the VR activity performance requirements. The VR environments were found to differ in the cognitive load (CL demands they apply upon subjects. Sixty-two healthy students underwent psychophysical thermal pain tests, followed by exposure to tonic heat stimulation under one of three conditions: Low CL (LCL VR, high CL (HCL VR, and control. In addition, following participation in VR, the subjects completed a self-feedback inventory evaluating their experience in VR. The results showed significantly greater pain reduction during both VR conditions compared to the control condition (p = 0.001. Hierarchical regression revealed cognitive components which were evaluated in the self-feedback inventory to be predictive factors for pain reduction only during the high cognitive load (HCL VR environment (20.2%. CL involved in VR may predict the extent of pain decrease, a finding that should be considered in future clinical and laboratory research.

  11. Reproducibility and repeatability of foveal avascular zone area measurements using swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Toto, Lisa; Mattei, Peter A; Di Nicola, Marta; Zecca, Isaia A L; Carpineto, Paolo; Di Antonio, Luca

    2017-05-11

    To assess the reproducibility and repeatability of foveal avascular zone (FAZ) area measurements using swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography (SS-OCTA) in healthy subjects. Sixty-four eyes of 64 healthy volunteers were randomly subjected to FAZ area measurements using SS-OCTA by 2 examiners in 2 different sessions. The FAZ areas measured by the first and second observer were 0.269 ± 0.092 mm2 and 0.270 ± 0.090 mm2, respectively. Within subjects, the coefficients of variations were 2.44% (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.95% to 2.93%) and 2.66% (95% CI 2.00% to 3.31%) for the first and second observers, respectively. The coefficient of repeatability average measurements of FAZ area were 0.021 mm2 and 0.024 mm2. The intraclass correlation coefficient values were 0.993 (95% CI 0.989 to 0.996) and 0.991 (95% CI 0.986 to 0.995). Interobserver and intraobserver concordance correlation coefficients ranged from 0.998 (95% CI 0.997 to 0.999) to 0.999 (95% CI 0.998 to 0.999) and from 0.989 (95% CI 0.982 to 0.993) to 0.987 (95% CI 0.979 to 0.992), respectively. The FAZ area measurements by means of SS-OCTA showed high reproducibility and repeatability in healthy eyes.

  12. Wealth, justice and freedom: Objective and subjective measures predicting poor mental health in a study across eight countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten, Saskia; Velten, Julia; Neher, Torsten; Margraf, Jürgen

    2017-12-01

    Macro-level factors (MF) such as wealth, justice and freedom measured with objective country-level indicators (objective MF), for instance the Gross Domestic Product (GDP), have been investigated in relation to health and well-being, but rarely in connection with depression, anxiety and stress subsumed as poor mental health. Also, a combination of different objective MF and of how individuals perceive those MF (subjective MF) has not been taken into consideration. In the present study, we combined subjective and objective measures of wealth, justice and freedom and examined their relationship with poor mental health. Population-based interviews were conducted in France, Germany, Poland, Russia, Spain, Sweden, U.K. and U.S.A. (n ≈ 1000 per country). GDP, GINI coefficient, Justice Index and Freedom Index were used as objective MF, whereas subjective MF were perceived wealth, justice and freedom measured at the individual level. Poor mental health was assessed as a combination of symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress. In a random-intercept-model, GINI coefficient and Freedom Index were significant positive country-level, and perceived wealth, justice, and freedom significant negative individual-level predictors of symptoms of poor mental health. Multiple subjective and objective MF should be combined to assess the macrosystem's relationship with poor mental health more precisely. The relationship between MF and poor mental health indicates that the macrosystem should be taken into account as relevant context for mental health problems, too.

  13. Association of daytime sleepiness with nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happe, Svenja; Baier, Paul Christian; Helmschmied, Kathrin; Meller, Johannes; Tatsch, Klaus; Paulus, Walter

    2007-08-01

    Many patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) report daytime sleepiness. Its etiology, however, is still not fully understood. The aim of this study was to examine if the amount of nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration is associated with subjective daytime sleepiness in patients with PD. We investigated 21 patients with PD clinically and by means of [(123)I] FP-CIT-SPECT (DaTSCAN(R)). Each patient filled in the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS), the Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS), and the self-rating depression scale according to Zung (SDS) to assess sleepiness, sleep quality, and depressive symptoms. The mean specific dopamine transporter binding in the 21 PD patients (60.8 +/- 10.4 years, nine females, median Hoehn and Yahr stage 2.0) was decreased. Nine patients were in Hoehn and Yahr stage 1 (58.7 +/- 6.6 years, four females; ESS score 7.4 +/- 4.5; PDSS score 105.1 +/- 30.9), the other 12 patients were in Hoehn and Yahr stage 2 (62.4 +/- 12.6 years, five females; ESS score 6.7 +/- 4.7, PDSS score 97.1 +/- 25.6). Age, gender, ESS, and PDSS scores were not significantly different in both groups. However, ESS scores showed an inverse correlation with mean DAT binding in the striatum (r = -0.627, p = 0.03), the caudate nucleus (r = -0.708, p = 0.01), and the putamen (r = -0.599, p = 0.04) in patients with Hoehn and Yahr stage 2. There was no correlation of the ESS score with age, disease duration, UPDRS motor score, PDSS score, or depression score. Subjective daytime sleepiness seems to be associated with dopaminergic nigrostriatal degeneration in early PD.

  14. Meta-analysis of self-reported daytime napping and risk of cardiovascular or all-cause mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaokun; Zhang, Qi; Shang, Xiaoming

    2015-05-04

    Whether self-reported daytime napping is an independent predictor of cardiovascular or all-cause mortality remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate self-reported daytime napping and risk of cardiovascular or all-cause mortality by conducting a meta-analysis. A computerized literature search of PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library was conducted up to May 2014. Only prospective studies reporting risk ratio (RR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) of cardiovascular or all-cause mortality with respect to baseline self-reported daytime napping were included. Seven studies with 98,163 subjects were included. Self-reported daytime napping was associated with a greater risk of all-cause mortality (RR 1.15; 95% CI 1.07-1.24) compared with non-nappers. Risk of all-cause mortality appeared to be more pronounced among persons with nap duration >60 min (RR 1.15; 95% CI 1.04-1.27) than persons with nap duration napping is a mild but statistically significant predictor for all-cause mortality, but not for cardiovascular mortality. However, whether the risk is attributable to excessive sleep duration or napping alone remains controversial. More prospective studies stratified by sleep duration, napping periods, or age are needed.

  15. Gender differences in excessive daytime sleepiness among Japanese workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Yuriko; Minowa, Masumi

    2003-02-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is serious concern in the workplace with respect to errors, accidents, absenteeism, reduced productivity and impaired personal or professional life. Previous community studies found a female preponderance of EDS, however, there is little research on EDS and gender in occupational settings. We examined the gender differences in prevalence and risk factors of EDS among employees working at a telecommunications company in the Tokyo metropolitan area. Our outcome measure of EDS was the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). A self-administered questionnaire on health and sleep including ESS was distributed to 5,571 workers between December 1999 and January 2000, and 5,072 responses were returned (91.0%). A total of 4,722 full-time, non-manual and non-shift employees aged 20-59 were used for analysis (3,909 men and 813 women). Chi-squared tests and multiple logistic regression analyses were applied for examining the gender differences in the prevalence and risk factors of EDS. The prevalence rates of EDS were 13.3% for women and 7.2% for men (Pgenders, and being married worked as a protective factor against EDS for men alone. It is obvious that a ban on overtime work and a provision of mental health hygiene are the general strategies for reducing EDS at worksites. In the case of women, we suggest the formation of effective strategies for improving women's status at home and in the workplace must also be a solution for the prevention of EDS (e.g. promoting gender equality in the division of labor at home and strengthening family care policies for working women).

  16. Subjective and Objective Measures in the Treatment of Hemifacial Spasm With OnabotulinumtoxinA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chundury, Rao V; D'Angelo, Alexander S; Couch, Steven M; Holds, John B

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the Sunnybrook Facial Grading System (SFGS) and Facial Clinimetric Evaluation (FaCE) Scale Instrument outcomes when treating hemifacial spasm (HFS) with onabotulinumtoxinA. An Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective review of records of 66 HFS patients treated with onabotulinumtoxinA. SFGS and FaCE surveys were completed prior to onabotulinumtoxinA therapy and at 1 month follow up. Surveys were analyzed for differences using paired Student t tests, with statistical significance set at p < 0.05. Correlations were determined using Spearman correlation (rs), with coefficients of ≥0.40 or ≤-0.40 considered significant. There were 22 complete data sets. SFGS composite score improved from mean, 56.9 (SD, 12.3) to 63.6 (SD, 12.3), p < 0.01. SFGS subdomain synkinesis score significantly improved (p < 0.01). The FaCE scale subdomain oral function significantly worsened (p = 0.05). The Δ pre-/post-SFGS composite score did not correlate with the Δ pre-/post-FaCE composite score (rs = 0.24). There was a significant positive correlation between SFGS composite score and FaCE social function score (rs = 0.462, p = 0.03) and between SFGS voluntary movement score and FaCE social function score (rs = 0.477, p = 0.03). Subgroup analysis of single FaCE questions demonstrated no statistical change in subjective dry eye (p = 0.30). There was an improvement in social functioning in treated HFS patients, which positively correlated with improvement in overall objective voluntary facial movement. There was no statistical difference in subjective dry eye symptoms. The overall SFGS composite score improved following treatment of HFS with botulinum toxin. This information can be used when counseling expected outcomes in HFS patients treated with onabotulinumtoxinA.

  17. Benefits of a short, practical questionnaire to measure subjective perception of nasal appearance after aesthetic rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohuis, Peter J F M; Hakim, Sara; Duivesteijn, Wouter; Knobbe, Arno; Tasman, Abel-Jan

    2013-12-01

    The authors tested a short, practically designed questionnaire to assess changes in subjective perception of nasal appearance in patients before and after aesthetic rhinoplasty. A prospective cohort study was conducted in a group of 121 patients who desired aesthetic rhinoplasty and were operated on by one surgeon. The questionnaire contained five questions (E1-E5) based on a five-point Likert scale and a visual analogue scale (range, 0 to 10). Two questions were designed as trick questions to help the surgeon screen for signs of body dysmorphic disorder. All patients rated the appearance of their nose as improved after surgery. The visual analogue scale revealed a Gaussian curve of normal distribution (range, 0.5 to 10) around a significant improvement (mean, 4.36 points, p = 0.018). Also, question E1, question E2, and the sum of questions E1 through E5 showed a statistically significant improvement after surgery (p = 1.74 × 10, p = 4.29 × 10, and p = 9.23 × 10, respectively). The authors found a linear relationship between preoperative score on the trick questions and postoperative increase in visual analogue scale score. Test-retest reliability could be investigated in 74 of 121 patients (61 percent) and showed a positive correlation between postoperative (1 year after surgery) and repostoperative response (2 to 4 years after surgery). The authors concluded that a surgeon performing aesthetic rhinoplasty can benefit from using this questionnaire. It is simple, takes no more than 2 minutes to complete, and provides helpful subjective information regarding patients' preoperative nasal appearance and postoperative surgical outcome. Therapeutic, IV.

  18. Sleep and daytime sleepiness in methylphenidate medicated and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sleep and daytime sleepiness in methylphenidate medicated and un-medicated children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) ... with ADHD taking methylphenidate, there was a significant increase in sleepiness a few hours after taking the medication, which may then have a significant impact on their learning.

  19. Excessive daytime sleepiness and hepatic encephalopathy: it is worth asking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rui, Michele; Schiff, Sami; Aprile, Daniele; Angeli, Paolo; Bombonato, Giancarlo; Bolognesi, Massimo; Sacerdoti, David; Gatta, Angelo; Merkel, Carlo; Amodio, Piero; Montagnese, Sara

    2013-06-01

    The relationship between hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and the sleep-wake disturbances exhibited by patients with cirrhosis remains debated. The aim of this study was to examine the usefulness of sleep-wake interview within the context of HE assessment. One-hundred-and-six cirrhotic patients were asked three yes/no questions investigating the presence of difficulty falling asleep, night awakenings and daytime sleepiness. All underwent formal HE assessment, quantitative electroencephalography and standardised psychometry. Fifty-eight were monitored for 8 ± 6 months in relation to the occurrence of HE. Patients complaining of daytime sleepiness (n = 75, 71 %) had slower EEGs than those who did not report it (relative alpha power: 37 ± 19 vs. 48 ± 17 %, p history (72 vs. 45 %, p < 0.05). Finally, the absence of excessive daytime sleepiness had a Negative Predictive Value of 92 % (64-100) in relation to the development of HE during the follow-up period. These data support the appropriateness of adding a yes/no question on the presence of excessive daytime sleepiness to routine assessment of patients with cirrhosis, to help identify those who do not need further, formal HE screening.

  20. Visual perception and daytime running lights DRL : a literature study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagenzieker, M.P.

    1990-01-01

    As part of the discussion on whether daytime running lights (DRL) should be introduced in the Netherlands as a rule of conduct, arguments - pro and con - often relate to visual perception. Vehicles would be more conspicuous as a result of DRL, would be detected sooner and /or be better recognised,

  1. High‑risk of obstructive sleep apnea and excessive daytime ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The burden of obstructive sleep apnea among commercial drivers in Nigeria is not known. Aim: To assess the prevalence of high risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) among intra‑city commercial drivers. Setting and Design: A descriptive cross‑sectional study in three ...

  2. Daytime variations in temperature, dissolved oxygen and ph in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Daytime variations in temperature, dissolved oxygen concentration and pH were investigated at 3-hourly intervals from 6a.m. to 6 p.m. January had the lowest temperature values, while at noon; September and January had the lowest air and pond water temperature values respectively.Dissolved oxygen increase from 6a.m.

  3. Daytime passerine migrants over the Sahara — are these diurnal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    When crossing the Sahara it was expected that nocturnal migrants would continue their flight into the day. We investigated whether migration taking place in the Sahara during daytime comprises the normal diurnal migrant species or the nocturnal ones prolonging their flight into the day. Birds departing from the Sahel in ...

  4. Excessive daytime sleepiness in multiple system atrophy (SLEEMSA study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno-Lopez, C.; Santamaria, J.; Salamero, M.; Del Sorbo, F.; Albanese, A.; Pellecchia, M.T.; Barone, P.; Overeem, S.; Bloem, B.R.; Aarden, W.C.C.A.; Canesi, M.; Antonini, A.; Duerr, S.; Wenning, G.K.; Poewe, W.; Rubino, A.; Meco, G.; Schneider, S.A.; Bhatia, K.P.; Djaldetti, R.; Coelho, M.; Sampaio, C.; Cochen, V.; Hellriegel, H.; Deuschl, G.; Colosimo, C.; Marsili, L.; Gasser, T.; Tolosa, E.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sleep disorders are common in multiple system atrophy (MSA), but the prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is not well known. OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency and associations of EDS in MSA. DESIGN: Survey of EDS in consecutive patients with MSA and comparison with patients

  5. Daytime encopresis associated with gland mal epileptic seizures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sphincteric incontinence of stool and urine are not unusual features of generalised epileptic seizures. Isolated secondary encopresis as a manifestation of an epileptic seizure is unusual. This report is of, a four year old boy, with daytime secondary non-retentive encopresis. The onset of encopresis was preceded by several ...

  6. Color the night : applying daytime colors to nighttime imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.

    2003-01-01

    We present a method to give (fused) multiband night-time imagery a natural day-time color appearance. For input, the method requires a false color RGB image that is produced by mapping 3 individual bands (or the first 3 principal components) of a multiband nightvision system to the respective

  7. The effects of receiver placement on probe microphone, performance, and subjective measures with open canal hearing instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alworth, Lynzee N; Plyler, Patrick N; Reber, Monika Bertges; Johnstone, Patti M

    2010-04-01

    Open canal hearing instruments differ in method of sound delivery to the ear canal, distance between the microphone and the receiver, and physical size of the devices. Moreover, RITA (receiver in the aid) and RITE (receiver in the ear) hearing instruments may also differ in terms of retention and comfort as well as ease of use and care for certain individuals. What remains unclear, however, is if any or all of the abovementioned factors contribute to hearing aid outcome. To determine the effect of receiver location on performance and/or preference of listeners using open canal hearing instruments. An experimental study in which subjects were exposed to a repeated measures design. Twenty-five adult listeners with mild sloping to moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss (mean age 67 yr). Participants completed two six-week trial periods for each device type. Probe microphone, objective, and subjective measures (quiet, noise) were conducted unaided and aided at the end of each trial period. Occlusion effect results were not significantly different between the RITA and RITE instruments; however, frequency range was extended in the RITE instruments, resulting in significantly greater maximum gain for the RITE instruments than the RITA instruments at 4000 and 6000 Hz. Objective performance in quiet or in noise was unaffected by receiver location. Subjective measures revealed significantly greater satisfaction ratings for the RITE than for the RITA instruments. Similarly, preference in quiet and overall preference were significantly greater for the RITE than for the RITA instruments. Although no occlusion differences were noted between instruments, the RITE did demonstrate a significant difference in reserve gain before feedback at 4000 and 6000 Hz. Objectively; no positive benefit was noted between unaided and aided conditions on speech recognition tests. These results suggest that such testing may not be sensitive enough to determine aided benefit with open canal

  8. Effect of Single Administration of Coffee on Pupil Size and Ocular Wavefront Aberration Measurements in Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handan Bardak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available No study has so far evaluated the impact of coffee drinking on ocular wavefront aberration (OWA measurements. This study presents novel findings regarding the OWA of the eye following coffee intake. We aimed to evaluate the acute changes in pupil size and OWA of the eye after single administration of coffee. A total of 30 otherwise healthy participants were included in this prospective study. All subjects drank a cup of coffee containing 57 mg caffeine. Measurements of pupil size, total coma (TC, total trefoil (TF, total spherical aberration (TSA, and total higher order aberration (HOA were performed before and at 5 minutes, at 30 minutes, and at 4 hours after coffee drinking using a wavefront aberrometer device (Irx3, Imagine Eyes, Orsay, France. The mean age of the study population was 20.30 ± 2.74 years. Pupil size did not show a significant change during the measurements (p>0.05. A significant increase was observed in TF and HOA measurements following coffee intake (p=0.029 and p=0.009, resp.. Single administration of coffee results in significant increase in TF and total HOAs in healthy subjects without any effect on pupil diameter. Ultrastructural changes in the cornea following coffee intake might be of relevance to the alterations in ocular aberrations in healthy subjects.

  9. Comparison between ankle proprioception measurements and postural sway test for evaluating ankle instability in subjects with functional ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Yong; Choi, Jong-Duk

    2016-01-01

    It is important to establish the effective evaluation approaches that are appropriate for measuring ankle proprioception. But, only a few studies used more than one test procedure simultaneously to identify proprioceptive deficits. Further, no data are available on the correlations between the measures of ankle proprioception and postural sway (PS) test in subjects with functional ankle instability (FAI). The aim of this study was to identify the relationship between ankle proprioception measurements and PS test in subjects with FAI. Of the 79 subjects enrolled in the case-control study, 40 had FAI and 39 were control subjects. Ankle proprioception was evaluated by the angle reproduction (AR), force matching (FM), and the muscle reaction (MR) to sudden ankle inversion tests. For the AR and FM tests, absolute errors (AE) of ankle plantarflexion, dorsiflexion, inversion, and eversion directions were calculated. For the MR test, reaction times and activation of tibialis anterior (TA), peroneus longus (PL), and peroneus brevis (PB) muscles were measured during sudden ankle inversion with a 30° tilting angle. The PS test was investigated by using a force platform during single-limb standing test. Three trials were performed and averaged in each test. Reaction time of the PL (p = 0.006), a variable of MR test, and plantarflexion (p = 0.001, p = 0.009) and eversion (p = 0.016, p = 0.039) error variables of the AR and FM tests differed significantly between the control and FAI groups. Moreover, these variables (r = -0.381 ∼ 0.788, p proprioception measurements were more sensitive and discriminative than others, and could be useful to assess ankle instability, particularly if the method is to be applied in clinical studies and laboratory settings.

  10. Relationship Between Pretraining Subjective Wellness Measures, Player Load, and Rating-of-Perceived-Exertion Training Load in American College Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govus, Andrew D; Coutts, Aaron; Duffield, Rob; Murray, Andrew; Fullagar, Hugh

    2018-01-01

    The relationship between pretraining subjective wellness and external and internal training load in American college football is unclear. To examine the relationship of pretraining subjective wellness (sleep quality, muscle soreness, energy, wellness Z score) with player load and session rating of perceived exertion (s-RPE-TL) in American college football players. Subjective wellness (measured using 5-point, Likert-scale questionnaires), external load (derived from GPS and accelerometry), and s-RPE-TL were collected during 3 typical training sessions per week for the second half of an American college football season (8 wk). The relationship of pretraining subjective wellness with player load and s-RPE training load was analyzed using linear mixed models with a random intercept for athlete and a random slope for training session. Standardized mean differences (SMDs) denote the effect magnitude. A 1-unit increase in wellness Z score and energy was associated with trivial 2.3% (90% confidence interval [CI] 0.5, 4.2; SMD 0.12) and 2.6% (90% CI 0.1, 5.2; SMD 0.13) increases in player load, respectively. A 1-unit increase in muscle soreness (players felt less sore) corresponded to a trivial 4.4% (90% CI -8.4, -0.3; SMD -0.05) decrease in s-RPE training load. Measuring pretraining subjective wellness may provide information about players' capacity to perform in a training session and could be a key determinant of their response to the imposed training demands American college football. Hence, monitoring subjective wellness may aid in the individualization of training prescription in American college football players.

  11. Automated short-axis cardiac magnetic resonance image acquisitions: accuracy of left ventricular dimension measurements in normal subjects and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilouchkine, Mikhail G; Westenberg, Jos J M; Reiber, Johan H C; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F

    2004-12-01

    This study investigates the use of an automated observer-independent planning system for short-axis cardiovascular magnetic resonance (MR) acquisitions in the clinical environment. The capacity of the automated method to produce accurate measurements of left ventricular dimensions and function was quantitatively assessed in normal subjects and patients. Fourteen healthy volunteers and 8 patients underwent cardiovascular MR (CMR) acquisitions for ventricular function assessment. Short-axis datasets of the left ventricle (LV) were acquired in 2 ways: manually planned and generated in an automatic fashion. End-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), ejection fraction (EF), and left ventricular mass (LVM) were derived from the 2 datasets. The agreement between the manual and automatic planning methods was assessed. The mean differences between the manual and automated CMR planning methods for the normal subjects and patients were 5.89 mL and 1.93 mL (EDV), 1.14 mL and -0.41 mL (ESV), 0.81% and 0.89% (EF), and 4.35 g and 3.88 g (LVM), respectively. There was no significant difference in ESV and EF. LVM significantly differed in both groups, whereas EDV was significantly different in the normal subjects and insignificantly different in the patients. The variability coefficients were 2.8 and 3.59 (EDV), 3.3 and 5.03 (ESV), 1.79 and 2.65 (EF), and 4.36 and 2.27 (LVM) for the normal subjects and patients, respectively. The mean angular deviation of the LV axes turned out to be 8.58 +/- 5.76 degrees for the normal subjects and 8.35 +/- 5.15 degrees for the patients. Automated CMR planning method can provide accurate measurements of LV dimensions in normal subjects and patients, and therefore, can be used in the clinical environment for functional assessment of the human cardiovascular system.

  12. Effect of quality of life measures on the decision to remove third molars in subjects with mild pericoronitis symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dana T; Phillips, Ceib; Proffit, William R; Koroluk, Lorne D; White, Raymond P

    2014-07-01

    To assess how quality of life (QoL) measures affect the decision for third molar (3M) removal in patients with mild symptoms of pericoronitis. Healthy subjects, aged 18 to 35 years, with mild symptoms of pericoronitis were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved study. The demographic, clinical, and QoL data were collected at enrollment. The subjects voluntarily scheduled surgery for 3M removal. The principal outcome variable was their decision to undergo or not undergo surgery within 6 months of enrollment. The possible predictor variables in a multivariate logistic regression analysis were the demographic characteristics, dental insurance, and QoL measures. The mean age of the 113 subjects was 23.2 ± 3.8 years. Of the 113 subjects, 79 elected to undergo 3M removal within 6 months of enrollment (removed group) and 34 elected to retain their 3M at 6 months after enrollment (retained group). A significantly greater proportion of the removed group were white (58% vs 35%; P = .03) and reported having at least "a little trouble" with opening their mouths (38% vs 18%; P = .04) and taking part in social life (27% vs 6%; P = .01). The multivariate logistic regression model suggested the odds of electing 3M removal within 6 months of enrollment were greater for those who were white (odds ratio [OR] 2.69, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14 to 6.32) and those who had at least "a little trouble" with interactions in their social life (OR 3.22, 95% CI 1.08 to 9.58). In subjects with mild pericoronitis symptoms, experiencing problems with oral function and lifestyle, factors not often considered by clinicians, were significantly associated with subjects' decision for early 3M removal. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The effect of subjective awareness measures on performance in artificial grammar learning task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanchei, Ivan I; Moroshkina, Nadezhda V

    2018-01-01

    Systematic research into implicit learning requires well-developed awareness-measurement techniques. Recently, trial-by-trial measures have been widely used. However, they can increase complexity of a study because they are an additional experimental variable. We tested the effects of these measures on performance in artificial grammar learning study. Four groups of participants were assigned to different awareness measures conditions: confidence ratings, post-decision wagering, decision strategy attribution or none. Decision-strategy-attribution participants demonstrated better grammar learning and longer response times compared to controls. They also exhibited a conservative bias. Grammaticality by itself was a stronger predictor of strings endorsement in decision-strategy-attribution group compared to other groups. Confidence ratings and post-decision wagering only affected the response times. These results were supported by an additional experiment that used a balanced chunk strength design. We conclude that a decision-strategy-attribution procedure may force participants to adopt an analytical decision-making strategy and rely mostly on conscious knowledge of artificial grammar. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Measuring craving: An attempt to connect subjective craving with cue reactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooteman, W.; Koeter, M.W.J.; Vserheul, R.; Schippers, G.M.; van den Brink, W.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Better insight into craving may contribute to the development of more efficient relapse prevention strategies. Inconsistent findings on the relation between craving and relapse may be due to difficulties in the measurement of craving. These difficulties are accounted for by 3

  15. Influence of academic examination stress on hematological measurements in subjectively healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, M; Van Der Planken, M; Van Gastel, A; Bruyland, K; Van Hunsel, F; Neels, H; Hendriks, D; Wauters, A; Demedts, P; Janca, A; Scharpé, S

    1998-09-21

    Some recent reports showed that a brief exposure to a mental stressor during 3-20 min may induce hematological changes in humans. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of academic examination stress on erythron variables, such as the number of red blood cells (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Ht), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean cell Hb (MCH), mean cell Hb concentration (MCHC), RBC distribution width (RDW), and serum iron and transferrin (Tf). The above variables were determined in 41 students in three conditions, i.e. the stress condition (the day before a difficult oral exam) and two baseline conditions, i.e. a few weeks earlier and later. At the same occasions, subjects completed the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), the state version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Academic examination stress significantly increased Ht, Hb, MCV, MCH and MCHC and significantly decreased RDW. There were significant relationships between the stress-induced changes in the PSS, STAI and POMS scores and those in Ht, Hb, MCV and MCH (allpositive) and RDW (negative). It is concluded that academic examination stress induces significant hematological changes indicative of an increased number of large RBC and increased hemoglobinisation, which cannot be explained by shifts of fluid out of the intravascular space, concentrating non-diffusible blood constituents.

  16. Long-Term Single and Joint Effects of Excessive Daytime Napping on the HOMA-IR Index and Glycosylated Hemoglobin

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xue; Pang, Xiuyu; Zhang, Qiao; Qu, Qiannuo; Hou, Zhigang; Liu, Zhipeng; Lv, Lin; Na, Guanqiong; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Changhao; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This prospective cohort study was conducted to assess the duration of daytime napping and its effect combined with night sleep deprivation on the risk of developing high HOMA-IR (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance) index and disadvantageous changes in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. A total of 5845 diabetes-free subjects (2736 women and 3109 men), 30 to 65 years of age, were targeted for this cohort study since 2008. Multiple adjusted Cox regression models wer...

  17. Degradation data analysis based on a generalized Wiener process subject to measurement error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junxing; Wang, Zhihua; Zhang, Yongbo; Fu, Huimin; Liu, Chengrui; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2017-09-01

    Wiener processes have received considerable attention in degradation modeling over the last two decades. In this paper, we propose a generalized Wiener process degradation model that takes unit-to-unit variation, time-correlated structure and measurement error into considerations simultaneously. The constructed methodology subsumes a series of models studied in the literature as limiting cases. A simple method is given to determine the transformed time scale forms of the Wiener process degradation model. Then model parameters can be estimated based on a maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method. The cumulative distribution function (CDF) and the probability distribution function (PDF) of the Wiener process with measurement errors are given based on the concept of the first hitting time (FHT). The percentiles of performance degradation (PD) and failure time distribution (FTD) are also obtained. Finally, a comprehensive simulation study is accomplished to demonstrate the necessity of incorporating measurement errors in the degradation model and the efficiency of the proposed model. Two illustrative real applications involving the degradation of carbon-film resistors and the wear of sliding metal are given. The comparative results show that the constructed approach can derive a reasonable result and an enhanced inference precision.

  18. An experiential thinking style: its facets and relations with objective and subjective criterion measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Paul; Epstein, Seymour

    2011-10-01

    In Study 1, an experiential factor divided into the following 3 factors when 3 or more factors were extracted: intuition, emotionality, and imagination; whereas a rational factor retained its coherence. In Study 2, an experiential but not a rational thinking style was positively associated with performance measures of creativity, humor, aesthetic judgment, and intuition and with self-report measures of empathy and social popularity. A rational thinking style was associated with several measures of adjustment. Both thinking styles were positively related to personal growth. Support was provided from several sources for the discriminant validity of the experiential facets. In a third study, the independence of the 2 thinking styles and of gender differences in self-reported data were verified by observations by others of participants' thinking styles. The importance of identifying facets of an experiential thinking style and of discovering previously unrecognized favorable attributes of this thinking style was discussed. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Personality © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A History of In Vivo Neutron Activation Analysis in Measurement of Aluminum in Human Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Hedieh K; Chettle, David R

    2016-01-01

    Aluminum, as an abundant metal, has gained widespread use in human life, entering the body predominantly as an additive to various foods and drinking water. Other major sources of exposure to aluminum include medical, cosmetic, and occupational routes. As a common environmental toxin, with well-known roles in several medical conditions such as dialysis encephalopathy, aluminum is considered a potential candidate in the causality of Alzheimer's disease. Aluminum mostly accumulates in the bone, which makes bone an indicator of the body burden of aluminum and an ideal organ as a proxy for the brain. Most of the techniques developed for measuring aluminum include bone biopsy, which requires invasive measures, causing inconvenience for the patients. There has been a considerable effort in developing non-invasive approaches, which allow for monitoring aluminum levels for medical and occupational purposes in larger populations. In vivo neutron activation analysis, a method based on nuclear activation of isotopes of elements in the body and their subsequent detection, has proven to be an invaluable tool for this purpose. There are definite challenges in developing in vivo non-invasive techniques capable of detecting low levels of aluminum in healthy individuals and aluminum-exposed populations. The following review examines the method of in vivo neutron activation analysis in the context of aluminum measurement in humans focusing on different neutron sources, interference from other activation products, and the improvements made in minimum detectable limits and patient dose over the past few decades.

  20. Subjective reports versus objective measurement of sleep latency and sleep duration in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Danielle L; Fung, Alison; Walker, Susan P; Barnes, Maree

    2013-01-01

    This study compared self-reported sleep latency (SL) and total sleep time (TST) to objective measures on polysomnography (PSG) during pregnancy. Thirty-three women in the third trimester (T3) of pregnancy, 16 women in the first trimester (T1) of pregnancy, and 15 non-pregnant women underwent overnight PSG, and shortly after awakening reported their perceived SL and TST. Results showed that, on average, the T3 group slightly overestimated their TSTs, whereas the T1 and non-pregnant groups underestimated TSTs when compared with objective measurement. All groups overestimated SL, and perceived SL was closest to the first epoch of 10 min of uninterrupted sleep or the first epoch of slow-wave sleep, rather than the first epoch of sleep (the current definition used for diagnostic sleep studies). The wide variation in discrepancies between estimation and PSG measurement for both TST and SL shows that self-reports made by both pregnant and non-pregnant women tend to be unreliable, which has important implications both clinically and for the many studies based on self-reported sleep patterns in pregnancy.

  1. Morning Cortisol Levels and Perceived Stress in Irregular Shift Workers Compared with Regular Daytime Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harri Lindholm

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The 24/7 work environment and irregular shifts may markedly enhance the psychological pressure of media work. Changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis reflect adaptation to stress. We analysed the correlation between subjective stress, sleep, salivary cortisol, and melatonin hormones among Finnish media workers with regular daytime work (RDW and with irregular shift work (ISW while controlling confounders. From 874 employees with regular daytime work or with irregular shift work, 70 employees from both groups were randomly selected. The final number of employees with a complete salivary cortisol profile was 66 in the RDW group and 65 in the ISW group. Five saliva samples were gathered from each subject before and during a working day. The salivary cortisol level of the sample taken 60 minutes after awakening (T1 was compared to the salivary cortisol level taken immediately after awakening (T0, T1/T0 ratio. The ratio was higher in the ISW group than in RDW group. Irregular shift work (P<0.001, severe stress (P<0.05, and less sleep (P<0.05 were independently associated with an augmented cortisol response after awakening. A stressful work environment and irregular shift work enhance cortisol excretion after waking. In the long run, this may become detrimental to health.

  2. Correlation of climbing perception and eye movements during daytime and nighttime takeoffs using a flight simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Atsushi; Wada, Yoshiro; Shimizu, Naoki; Inui, Takuo; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    This study suggests that the subjective climbing perception can be quantitatively evaluated using values calculated from induced eye movements, and the findings may aid in the detection of pilots who are susceptible to spatial disorientation in a screening test. The climbing perception experienced by a pilot during takeoff at night is stronger than that experienced during the day. To investigate this illusion, this study assessed eye movements and analyzed their correlation with subjective climbing perception during daytime and nighttime takeoffs. Eight male volunteers participated in this study. A simulated aircraft takeoff environment was created using a flight simulator and the maximum slow-phase velocities and vestibulo-ocular reflex gain of vertical eye movements were calculated during takeoff simulation. Four of the eight participants reported that their perception of climbing at night was stronger, while the other four reported that there was no difference between day and night. These perceptions were correlated with eye movements; participants with a small difference in the maximum slow-phase velocities of their downward eye movements between daytime and nighttime takeoffs indicated that their perception of climbing was the same under the two conditions.

  3. Colors of the daytime overcast sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Raymond L., Jr.; Hernández-Andrés, Javier

    2005-09-01

    Time-series measurements of daylight (skylight plus direct sunlight) spectra beneath overcast skies reveal an unexpectedly wide gamut of pastel colors. Analyses of these spectra indicate that at visible wavelengths, overcasts are far from spectrally neutral transmitters of the daylight incident on their tops. Colorimetric analyses show that overcasts make daylight bluer and that the amount of bluing increases with cloud optical depth. Simulations using the radiative-transfer model MODTRAN4 help explain the observed bluing: multiple scattering within optically thick clouds greatly enhances spectrally selective absorption by water droplets. However, other factors affecting overcast colors seen from below range from minimal (cloud-top heights) to moot (surface colors).

  4. Wealth, justice and freedom: Objective and subjective measures predicting poor mental health in a study across eight countries

    OpenAIRE

    Saskia Scholten; Julia Velten; Torsten Neher; Jürgen Margraf

    2017-01-01

    Background: Macro-level factors (MF) such as wealth, justice and freedom measured with objective country-level indicators (objective MF), for instance the Gross Domestic Product (GDP), have been investigated in relation to health and well-being, but rarely in connection with depression, anxiety and stress subsumed as poor mental health. Also, a combination of different objective MF and of how individuals perceive those MF (subjective MF) has not been taken into consideration. In the present s...

  5. Wealth, justice and freedom: Objective and subjective measures predicting poor mental health in a study across eight countries

    OpenAIRE

    Scholten, Saskia; Velten, Julia; Neher, Torsten; Margraf, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Background Macro-level factors (MF) such as wealth, justice and freedom measured with objective country-level indicators (objective MF), for instance the Gross Domestic Product (GDP), have been investigated in relation to health and well-being, but rarely in connection with depression, anxiety and stress subsumed as poor mental health. Also, a combination of different objective MF and of how individuals perceive those MF (subjective MF) has not been taken into consideration. In the present st...

  6. Fatigue in Emergency Services Operations: Assessment of the Optimal Objective and Subjective Measures Using a Simulated Wildfire Deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally A. Ferguson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Under controlled laboratory conditions, neurobehavioral assays such as the Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT are sensitive to increasing levels of fatigue, and in general, tend to correlate with subjective ratings. However, laboratory studies specifically curtail physical activity, potentially limiting the applicability of such findings to field settings that involve physical work. In addition, laboratory studies typically involve healthy young male participants that are not always representative of a typical working population. In order to determine whether these findings extend to field-like conditions, we put 88 Australian volunteer firefighters through a multi-day firefighting simulation. Participants were required to perform real-world physical and cognitive tasks under conditions of elevated temperature and moderate sleep restriction. We aimed to examine changes in fatigue in an effort to determine the optimum objective and subjective measures. Objective and subjective tests were sensitive to fatigue outside laboratory conditions. The PVT was the most sensitive assay of objective fatigue, with the Samn-Perelli fatigue scale the most sensitive of the subjective measures. The Samn-Perilli fatigue scale correlated best with PVT performance, but explained a small amount of variance. Although the Samn-Perelli scale can be easily administered in the field, the wide range of individual variance limits its efficacy as a once-off assessment tool. Rather, fatigue measures should be applied as a component of a broader fatigue risk management system. Findings provide firefighting agencies, and other occupations involving physical work, guidance as to the most sensitive and specific measures for assessing fatigue in their personnel.

  7. Objectively measured sedentary behaviour and moderate and vigorous physical activity in different school subjects: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Mooses, Kerli; M?gi, Katrin; Riso, Eva-Maria; Kalma, Maarja; Kaasik, Priit; Kull, Merike

    2017-01-01

    Background Evidence shows the positive influence of moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and negative influence of sedentary time on health and academic achievement. Although schools can significantly contribute to overall physical activity, little is known about MVPA and sedentary behaviour in different school subjects in different grades. Methods Physical activity of 646 students from 18 schools (94 classes) and from three school stages (grades 1?9, aged 7?16) was measured with ac...

  8. Objectively measured sedentary behaviour and moderate and vigorous physical activity in different school subjects: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Kerli Mooses; Katrin Mägi; Eva-Maria Riso; Maarja Kalma; Priit Kaasik; Merike Kull

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Evidence shows the positive influence of moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and negative influence of sedentary time on health and academic achievement. Although schools can significantly contribute to overall physical activity, little is known about MVPA and sedentary behaviour in different school subjects in different grades. Methods Physical activity of 646 students from 18 schools (94 classes) and from three school stages (grades 1–9, aged 7–16) was measure...

  9. Measuring Treatment Outcomes in Comorbid Insomnia and Fibromyalgia: Concordance of Subjective and Objective Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Jennifer M; Crew, Earl C; Krietsch, Kendra; Roth, Alicia J; Vatthauer, Karlyn; Robinson, Michael E; Staud, Roland; Berry, Richard B; McCrae, Christina S

    2016-02-01

    In insomnia, actigraphy tends to underestimate wake time compared to diaries and PSG. When chronic pain co-occurs with insomnia, sleep may be more fragmented, including more movement and arousals. However, individuals may not be consciously aware of these arousals. We examined the baseline concordance of diaries, actigraphy, and PSG as well as the ability of each assessment method to detect changes in sleep following cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). Adults with insomnia and fibromyalgia (n = 113) were randomized to CBT-I, CBT for pain, or waitlist control. At baseline and posttreatment, participants completed one night of PSG and two weeks of diaries/actigraphy. At baseline, objective measures estimated lower SOL, higher TST, and higher SE than diaries (ps treatment-related changes. PSG values did not change significantly for any sleep parameters. However, diaries showed improvements in SOL, WASO, and SE, and actigraphy also detected the WASO and SE improvements (ps insomnia. However, actigraphy showed greater sensitivity to treatment-related changes than PSG; PSG failed to detect any improvements, but actigraphy demonstrated changes in WASO and SE, which were also found with diaries. In comorbid insomnia/fibromyalgia, actigraphy may therefore have utility in measuring treatment outcomes. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  10. Subjective sleep characteristics associated with anxiety and depression in older adults: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, Olivier; Lorrain, Dominique; Belleville, Geneviève; Grenier, Sébastien; Préville, Michel

    2014-12-01

    Sleep complaints are often associated with anxiety and depression, but the specific complaints related to each syndrome are poorly characterized, especially in older adults. The objective was to identify subjective sleep characteristics specific to anxiety and depression in this population. A random sample of 2393 individuals aged 65 years or older was used. Anxiety and depression were categorized using DSM-V criteria for phobias, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, unspecified anxiety disorder, major depressive episode, and depressive episode with insufficient symptoms. Subjective sleep characteristics were measured using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Logistic regression models predicting anxiety or depression were used to determine the independent sleep characteristics associated with each syndrome adjusting for age, sex, education level, cognitive functioning, anxiolytic/sedative/hypnotic use, antidepressants use, subjective health, chronic diseases, cardiovascular conditions, and anxiety or depression (as appropriate). Nearly all Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index subscales were significantly associated with anxiety, but these subscales shared variance and only sleep duration in hours, sleep disturbance score, and daytime functioning score were independently related to anxiety. Within these significant subscales, the main specific sleep complaints associated with anxiety were daytime sleepiness and sleep disturbances related to coughing/snoring, feeling cold, and bad dreams. The use of sleeping medication was the only specific sleep characteristic associated with depression. These results suggest that in older adults, symptoms of short sleep duration, daytime sleepiness and sleep disturbances are independently related to anxiety while the use of sleep medication is independently associated to depression. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Effects of day-time exposure to different light intensities on light-induced melatonin suppression at night.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozaki, Tomoaki; Kubokawa, Ayaka; Taketomi, Ryunosuke; Hatae, Keisuke

    2015-07-04

    Bright nocturnal light has been known to suppress melatonin secretion. However, bright light exposure during the day-time might reduce light-induced melatonin suppression (LIMS) at night. The effective proportion of day-time light to night-time light is unclear; however, only a few studies on accurately controlling both day- and night-time conditions have been conducted. This study aims to evaluate the effect of different day-time light intensities on LIMS. Twelve male subjects between the ages of 19 and 23 years (mean ± S.D., 20.8 ± 1.1) gave informed consent to participate in this study. They were exposed to various light conditions (light conditions). They were then exposed to bright light (300 lx) again between 01:00 and 02:30 (night-time light exposure). They provided saliva samples before (00:55) and after night-time light exposure (02:30). A one-tailed paired t test yielded significant decrements of melatonin concentration after night-time light exposure under day-time dim, 100- and 300-lx light conditions. No significant differences exist in melatonin concentration between pre- and post-night-time light exposure under day-time 900- and 2700-lx light conditions. Present findings suggest the amount of light exposure needed to prevent LIMS caused by ordinary nocturnal light in individuals who have a general life rhythm (sleep/wake schedule). These findings may be useful in implementing artificial light environments for humans in, for example, hospitals and underground shopping malls.

  12. Food Addiction: definition, measurement and prevalence in healthy subjects and in patients with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperatori, Claudio; Fabbricatore, Mariantonietta; Vumbaca, Viviana; Innamorati, Marco; Contardi, Anna; Farina, Benedetto

    2016-01-01

    The construct of “Food Addiction” (FA) has been introduced in the last decades to better understand abnormal eating patterns in obese and overweight people and in patients with Eating Disorders (EDs). Despite a substantial parallelism between drug addiction and FA, there is still no agreement in considering FA an independent ED or a useful convincing concept. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to aggregate available data, in order to increase knowledge about: 1) definition, measurement and general features of FA; 2) prevalence of FA in clinical and non-clinical samples. Available data suggest that FA seems to be a transnosografic construct and exists in all EDs, with higher prevalence in Bulimia Nervosa. Although the discussion on the autonomous diagnosis of FA within EDs remains open, studies have reported that comorbidity between FA and other EDs is associated with worse clinical conditions and symptoms, justifying, as a result, the usefulness of assessing and treating this condition.

  13. Association of Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea With Cognitive Performance, Excessive Daytime Sleepiness, and Quality of Life in the General Population: The Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun; Thomas, Robert J; Yun, Chang-Ho; Au, Rhoda; Lee, Seung Ku; Lee, Sunghee; Shin, Chol

    2017-05-01

    Research points to impaired cognitive performance in sleep clinic patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, inconsistent findings from various epidemiologic studies make this relationship less generalizable. The current study investigated the association between OSA and functional outcome measures, such as cognition, daytime sleepiness, and quality of life, in a Korean general population sample. A total of 1492 participants from the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES) were included in the analyses. The presence of OSA measured by overnight polysomnography (PSG) was defined by apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) >5. Cognitive performance was determined with scores from a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. Excessive daytime sleepiness and quality of life were additionally measured through subjective reports. After adjusting for various demographic and medical characteristics, OSA was independently associated with lower performance in the Digit Symbol Test (52.73 ± 17.08 vs. 58.72 ± 18.03, OSA vs. not, p = .02). Hypoxia measures were not related to cognitive performance. OSA was associated with higher odds of displaying excessive daytime sleepiness (odds ratio = 1.72, 95% CI: 1.05-2.80), but there was no significant relationship between OSA and quality of life. Cognition was unexpectedly unaffected overall. However, OSA was associated with impairment in a multidomain test that taps skills generally associated with frontal lobe function. The results suggest that research on protective and adaptive brain mechanisms to OSA stress can provide unique insights into the brain-sleep interface. As the study runs longitudinally, it will enable future studies on the impact of OSA on cognitive decline.

  14. Effector cell mediated cytotoxicity measured by intracellular Granzyme B release in HIV infected subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahajan Supriya D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL activity is currently believed to be one of the key immunologic mechanisms responsible for the prevention or attenuation of HIV-1 infection. The induction of CD8+ T cell activation may also result in the production of soluble or non-classical lytic factors that are associated with protection from infection or slower disease progression. Traditionally, CD8+ CTL responses have been measured by the classic chromium release assay, monitoring the ability of T cells (Effector cells to lyse radiolabelled HLA – matched “target cells” that express the appropriate antigen-MHC complex. This method is not only labor intensive, semi quantitative assay at best, but also needs fresh, non-cryopreserved cells. Recently, cytokine specific ELISPOT assays or tetrameric MHC-I/ peptide complexes have utilized to directly quantitate circulating CD8+ effector cells, and these assays are more sensitive, quantitative and reproducible than the traditional CTL lysis assay and can also be performed on cryopreserved cells. Although these are reproducible assays for the assessment of soluble antiviral activity secreted by activated T cell populations they can be extremely expensive to perform. We have used FACS Analysis to measure Granzyme B release as a function of cell mediated cytotoxicity. This method helps quantitate the CTL activity and also identifies the phenotype of the cells elucidating this immune response. The method described not only monitors immunological response but also is also simple to perform, precise and extremely time efficient and is ideal for screening a large number of samples.

  15. Long-Term Single and Joint Effects of Excessive Daytime Napping on the HOMA-IR Index and Glycosylated Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Pang, Xiuyu; Zhang, Qiao; Qu, Qiannuo; Hou, Zhigang; Liu, Zhipeng; Lv, Lin; Na, Guanqiong; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Changhao; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This prospective cohort study was conducted to assess the duration of daytime napping and its effect combined with night sleep deprivation on the risk of developing high HOMA-IR (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance) index and disadvantageous changes in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. A total of 5845 diabetes-free subjects (2736 women and 3109 men), 30 to 65 years of age, were targeted for this cohort study since 2008. Multiple adjusted Cox regression models were performed to evaluate the single and joint effects of daytime napping on the risk of an elevated HbA1c level and high HOMA-IR index. After an average of 4.5 years of follow-up, >30 minutes of daytime napping was significantly associated with an increased risk of an elevated HbA1c level (>6.5%) in men and women (all P trend naps or >30 minutes napping and the combination of no sleep deprivation with >30 minutes daytime napping were all associated with an HbA1c level >6.5% (HR = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.24–3.51; HR = 4.00, 95% CI = 2.03–7.90; and HR = 2.05, 95% CI = 1.29–3.27, respectively). No sleep deprivation combined with >30 minutes daytime napping correlated with a high risk of an HbA1c level between 5.7% and 6.4% and high HOMA-IR index (HR = 2.12, 95% CI = 1.48–3.02; and HR = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.10–1.65, respectively). Daytime napping >30 minutes was associated with a high risk of an elevated HbA1c level and high HOMA-IR index. No sleep deprivation combined with napping >30 minutes carries a risk of abnormal glucose metabolism. Sleep deprivation combined with brief daytime napping <30 minutes was not associated with a risk for an elevated HbA1c level and high HOMA-IR index. PMID:26844520

  16. Psychometric Properties of Turkish Version of Pediatric Daytime Sleepiness Scale (PDSS-T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Bektas, PhD, RN

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: The study's results showed that PDSS-T is a valid and reliable instrument for detecting Turkish-speaking children's and adolescents' daytime sleepiness. PDSS-T is convenient for professionals to prevent and manage daytime sleepiness.

  17. Comparing the Effects of Nocturnal Sleep and Daytime Napping on Declarative Memory Consolidation: e108100

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    June C Lo; Derk-Jan Dijk; John A Groeger

    2014-01-01

    ...) and a 2-hour interval involving either daytime napping or wakefulness (experiment 2). Beneficial effects of post-learning nocturnal sleep and daytime napping were greater for unrelated word pairs (Cohen's d = 0.71 and 0.68...

  18. Comparing the effects of nocturnal sleep and daytime napping on declarative memory consolidation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lo, June C; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Groeger, John A

    2014-01-01

    ...) and a 2-hour interval involving either daytime napping or wakefulness (experiment 2). Beneficial effects of post-learning nocturnal sleep and daytime napping were greater for unrelated word pairs (Cohen's d=0.71 and 0.68...

  19. The Association between Daytime Napping and Cognitive Functioning in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: e0117136

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zoe M Gotts; Jason G Ellis; Vincent Deary; Nicola Barclay; Julia L Newton

    2015-01-01

    ...) has not been examined directly, nor has the impact of daytime napping. This study aimed to examine self-reported sleep in patients with CFS and explore whether sleep quality and daytime napping, specific patient characteristics...

  20. The association between daytime napping and cognitive functioning in chronic fatigue syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gotts, Zoe M; Ellis, Jason G; Deary, Vincent; Barclay, Nicola; Newton, Julia L

    2015-01-01

    ...) has not been examined directly, nor has the impact of daytime napping. This study aimed to examine self-reported sleep in patients with CFS and explore whether sleep quality and daytime napping, specific patient characteristics...

  1. Effect of inspiration on airway dimensions measured in maximal inspiration CT images of subjects without airflow limitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Jens; Raket, Lars Lau; Nielsen, Mads [University of Copenhagen, Department of Computer Science, Copenhagen (Denmark); Wille, Mathilde M.W.; Dirksen, Asger [University of Copenhagen, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Gentofte Hospital, Hellerup (Denmark); Feragen, Aasa [University of Copenhagen, Department of Computer Science, Copenhagen (Denmark); Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems and Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tuebingen (Germany); Pedersen, Jesper H. [Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Department of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery RT, Copenhagen (Denmark); Bruijne, Marleen de [University of Copenhagen, Department of Computer Science, Copenhagen (Denmark); Erasmus MC Rotterdam, Departments of Medical Informatics and Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-09-15

    To study the effect of inspiration on airway dimensions measured in voluntary inspiration breath-hold examinations. 961 subjects with normal spirometry were selected from the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial. Subjects were examined annually for five years with low-dose CT. Automated software was utilized to segment lungs and airways, identify segmental bronchi, and match airway branches in all images of the same subject. Inspiration level was defined as segmented total lung volume (TLV) divided by predicted total lung capacity (pTLC). Mixed-effects models were used to predict relative change in lumen diameter (ALD) and wall thickness (AWT) in airways of generation 0 (trachea) to 7 and segmental bronchi (R1-R10 and L1-L10) from relative changes in inspiration level. Relative changes in ALD were related to relative changes in TLV/pTLC, and this distensibility increased with generation (p < 0.001). Relative changes in AWT were inversely related to relative changes in TLV/pTLC in generation 3-7 (p < 0.001). Segmental bronchi were widely dispersed in terms of ALD (5.7 ± 0.7 mm), AWT (0.86 ± 0.07 mm), and distensibility (23.5 ± 7.7 %). Subjects who inspire more deeply prior to imaging have larger ALD and smaller AWT. This effect is more pronounced in higher-generation airways. Therefore, adjustment of inspiration level is necessary to accurately assess airway dimensions. (orig.)

  2. Observer Design for One-Sided Lipschitz Nonlinear Systems Subject to Measurement Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohaira Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel nonlinear observer-design approach to one-sided Lipschitz nonlinear systems in the presence of output delays. The crux of the approach is to overcome the practical consequences of time delays, encountered due to distant sensor position and time lag in measurement, for estimation of physical and engineering nonlinear system states. A Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional is employed, the time derivative of which is solved using Jensen’s inequality, one-sided Lipschitz condition, and quadratic inner-boundedness, and, accordingly, design conditions for delay-range-dependent nonlinear observer for delayed one-sided Lipschitz systems are derived. Further, novel solutions to the problems of delay-dependent observer synthesis of one-sided Lipschitz models and delay-range-dependent state estimation of linear and Lipschitz nonlinear systems are deduced from the present delay-range-dependent technique. An observer formulation methodology for retrieval of one-sided Lipschitz nonlinear-system states, which is robust against L2 norm-bounded perturbations, is devised. The resultant design conditions, in contrast to the conventional procedures, can be solved via less conservative linear matrix inequality- (LMI- based routines that succeed by virtue of additional LMI variables, meaningful transformations, and cone complementary linearization algorithm. Numerical examples are worked out to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed observer-synthesis approach for delayed one-sided Lipschitz systems.

  3. Comparing the Effects of Nocturnal Sleep and Daytime Napping on Declarative Memory Consolidation

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, June C.; Dijk, Derk-Jan; John A Groeger

    2014-01-01

    Nocturnal sleep and daytime napping facilitate memory consolidation for semantically related and unrelated word pairs. We contrasted forgetting of both kinds of materials across a 12-hour interval involving either nocturnal sleep or daytime wakefulness (experiment 1) and a 2-hour interval involving either daytime napping or wakefulness (experiment 2). Beneficial effects of post-learning nocturnal sleep and daytime napping were greater for unrelated word pairs (Cohen’s d = 0.71 and 0.68) than ...

  4. Detailed budget analysis of HONO in central London reveals a missing daytime source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of HONO were carried out at an urban background site near central London as part of the Clean air for London (ClearfLo project in summer 2012. Data were collected from 22 July to 18 August 2014, with peak values of up to 1.8 ppbV at night and non-zero values of between 0.2 and 0.6 ppbV seen during the day. A wide range of other gas phase, aerosol, radiation, and meteorological measurements were made concurrently at the same site, allowing a detailed analysis of the chemistry to be carried out. The peak HONO/NOx ratio of 0.04 is seen at  ∼  02:00 UTC, with the presence of a second, daytime, peak in HONO/NOx of similar magnitude to the night-time peak, suggesting a significant secondary daytime HONO source. A photostationary state calculation of HONO involving formation from the reaction of OH and NO and loss from photolysis, reaction with OH, and dry deposition shows a significant underestimation during the day, with calculated values being close to 0, compared to the measurement average of 0.4 ppbV at midday. The addition of further HONO sources from the literature, including dark conversion of NO2 on surfaces, direct emission, photolysis of ortho-substituted nitrophenols, the postulated formation from the reaction of HO2 ×  H2O with NO2, photolysis of adsorbed HNO3 on ground and aerosols, and HONO produced by photosensitized conversion of NO2 on the surface increases the daytime modelled HONO to 0.1 ppbV, still leaving a significant missing daytime source. The missing HONO is plotted against a series of parameters including NO2 and OH reactivity (used as a proxy for organic material, with little correlation seen. Much better correlation is observed with the product of these species with j(NO2, in particular NO2 and the product of NO2 with OH reactivity. This suggests the missing HONO source is in some way related to NO2 and also requires sunlight. Increasing the photosensitized surface conversion rate of NO2 by a

  5. Subjective and objective napping and sleep in older adults: are evening naps "bad" for nighttime sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dautovich, Natalie D; McCrae, Christina S; Rowe, Meredeth

    2008-09-01

    To compare objective and subjective measurements of napping and to examine the relationship between evening napping and nocturnal sleep in older adults. For 12 days, participants wore actigraphs and completed sleep diaries. Community. One hundred individuals who napped, aged 60 to 89 (including good and poor sleepers with typical age-related medical comorbidities). Twelve days of sleep diary and actigraphy provided subjective and objective napping and sleep data. Evening naps (within 2 hours of bedtime) were characteristic of the sample, with peak nap time occurring between 20:30 and 21:00 (average nap time occurred between 14:30 and 15:00). Two categories of nappers were identified: those who took daytime and evening naps and daytime-only. No participants napped during the evening only. Day-and-evening nappers significantly underreported evening napping and demonstrated lower objectively measured sleep onset latencies (20.0 vs 26.5 minutes), less wake after sleep onset (51.4 vs 72.8 minutes), and higher sleep efficiencies (76.8 vs 82%) than daytime-only nappers. Day and evening napping was prevalent in this sample of community-dwelling good and poor sleepers but was not associated with impaired nocturnal sleep. Although the elimination or restriction of napping is a common element of cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia, these results suggest that a uniform recommendation to restrict or eliminate napping (particularly evening napping) may not meet the needs of all older individuals with insomnia.

  6. Subject-enabled analytics model on measurement statistics in health risk expert system for public health informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chi-Jung; Kuo, Yu-Chen; Hsieh, Yun-Yu; Li, Tsai-Chung; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Liang, Wen-Miin; Liao, Li-Na; Li, Chia-Ing; Lin, Hsueh-Chun

    2017-11-01

    This study applied open source technology to establish a subject-enabled analytics model that can enhance measurement statistics of case studies with the public health data in cloud computing. The infrastructure of the proposed model comprises three domains: 1) the health measurement data warehouse (HMDW) for the case study repository, 2) the self-developed modules of online health risk information statistics (HRIStat) for cloud computing, and 3) the prototype of a Web-based process automation system in statistics (PASIS) for the health risk assessment of case studies with subject-enabled evaluation. The system design employed freeware including Java applications, MySQL, and R packages to drive a health risk expert system (HRES). In the design, the HRIStat modules enforce the typical analytics methods for biomedical statistics, and the PASIS interfaces enable process automation of the HRES for cloud computing. The Web-based model supports both modes, step-by-step analysis and auto-computing process, respectively for preliminary evaluation and real time computation. The proposed model was evaluated by computing prior researches in relation to the epidemiological measurement of diseases that were caused by either heavy metal exposures in the environment or clinical complications in hospital. The simulation validity was approved by the commercial statistics software. The model was installed in a stand-alone computer and in a cloud-server workstation to verify computing performance for a data amount of more than 230K sets. Both setups reached efficiency of about 105 sets per second. The Web-based PASIS interface can be used for cloud computing, and the HRIStat module can be flexibly expanded with advanced subjects for measurement statistics. The analytics procedure of the HRES prototype is capable of providing assessment criteria prior to estimating the potential risk to public health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of optic area measurement using fundus photography and optical coherence tomography between optic nerve head drusen and control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Rodríguez, Patricia; Gili, Pablo; Martín-Ríos, María Dolores; Grifol-Clar, Eulalia

    2013-03-01

    To compare optic disc area measurement between optic nerve head drusen (ONHD) and control subjects using fundus photography, time-domain optical coherence tomography (TD-OCT) and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). We also made a comparison between each of the three techniques. We performed our study on 66 eyes (66 patients) with ONHD and 70 healthy control subjects (70 controls) with colour ocular fundus photography at 20º (Zeiss FF 450 IR plus), TD-OCT (Stratus OCT) with the Fast Optic Disc protocol and SD-OCT (Cirrus OCT) with the Optic Disc Cube 200 × 200 protocol for measurement of the optic disc area. The measurements were made by two observers and in each measurement a correction of the image magnification factor was performed. Measurement comparison using the Student's t-test/Mann-Whitney U test, the intraclass correlation coefficient, Pearson/Spearman rank correlation coefficient and the Bland-Altman plot was performed in the statistical analysis. Mean and standard deviation (SD) of the optic disc area in ONHD and in controls was 2.38 (0.54) mm(2) and 2.54 (0.42) mm(2), respectively with fundus photography; 2.01 (0.56) mm(2) and 1.66 (0.37) mm(2), respectively with TD-OCT, and 2.03 (0.49) mm(2) and 1.75 (0.38) mm(2), respectively with SD-OCT. In ONHD and controls, repeatability of optic disc area measurement was excellent with fundus photography and optical coherence tomography (TD-OCT and SD-OCT), but with a low degree of agreement between both techniques. Optic disc area measurement is smaller in ONHD compared to healthy subjects with fundus photography, unlike time-domain and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography in which the reverse is true. Both techniques offer good repeatability, but a low degree of correlation and agreement, which means that optic disc area measurement is not interchangeable or comparable between techniques. Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2013 The College of Optometrists.

  8. A comparison of sleep and daytime sleepiness in depressed and non-depressed mothers during the early postpartum period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chiu-Mieh; Carter, Patricia A; Guo, Jong-Long

    2004-12-01

    Taiwanese mothers have identified insufficient sleep as a major manifestation of postpartum depression. Few studies have thoroughly examined the relationship between sleep and depression during the early postpartum period, however. The objectives of this study were to compare the characteristics of both the postpartum sleep and daytime sleepiness of depressed first-time mothers and of their non-depressed counterparts, and to determine the factors that significantly increased mothers' risks of being depressed. A non-probability sample of 163 first-time mothers completed a questionnaire between the 13th and 20th days of the postpartum period. The Center of Epidemiological Studies- Depression and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index were used to measure mothers' experiences of depression symptoms and sleep. Daytime sleepiness was estimated in four ways, derived from the Roy Adaptation Model. The results indicated that the depressed mothers had poorer sleep quality than the non-depressed mothers, slept less efficiently, reported more sleep disturbances, and exhibited more daytime dysfunctions. Mothers who frequently perceived their daytime sleepiness to be affected by infant-care performance were more likely to be depressed. The study' s findings support the view that there is a connection between depression and poor sleep among postpartum mothers in Taiwan, and indicate that depressed mothers' experiences of poor sleep are multi-faceted, and not simply a matter of insufficient sleep.

  9. Analysis of misclassified correlated binary data using a multivariate probit model when covariates are subject to measurement error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Surupa; Banerjee, Tathagata

    2009-06-01

    A multivariate probit model for correlated binary responses given the predictors of interest has been considered. Some of the responses are subject to classification errors and hence are not directly observable. Also measurements on some of the predictors are not available; instead the measurements on its surrogate are available. However, the conditional distribution of the unobservable predictors given the surrogate is completely specified. Models are proposed taking into account either or both of these sources of errors. Likelihood-based methodologies are proposed to fit these models. To ascertain the effect of ignoring classification errors and/or measurement error on the estimates of the regression and correlation parameters, a sensitivity study is carried out through simulation. Finally, the proposed methodology is illustrated through an example.

  10. Subjective Cognitive Decline in Older Adults: An Overview of Self-Report Measures Used Across 19 International Research Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Laura A.; Smart, Colette M.; Crane, Paul K.; Amariglio, Rebecca E.; Berman, Lorin M.; Boada, Mercè; Buckley, Rachel F.; Chételat, Gaël; Dubois, Bruno; Ellis, Kathryn A.; Gifford, Katherine A.; Jefferson, Angela L.; Jessen, Frank; Katz, Mindy J.; Lipton, Richard B.; Luck, Tobias; Maruff, Paul; Mielke, Michelle M.; Molinuevo, José Luis; Naeem, Farnia; Perrotin, Audrey; Petersen, Ronald C.; Rami, Lorena; Reisberg, Barry; Rentz, Dorene M.; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G.; Risacher, Shannon L.; Rodriguez, Octavio; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Slavin, Melissa J.; Snitz, Beth E.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Tandetnik, Caroline; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; Wagner, Michael; Wolfsgruber, Steffen; Sikkes, Sietske A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Research increasingly suggests that subjective cognitive decline (SCD) in older adults, in the absence of objective cognitive dysfunction or depression, may be a harbinger of non-normative cognitive decline and eventual progression to dementia. Little is known, however, about the key features of self-report measures currently used to assess SCD. The Subjective Cognitive Decline Initiative (SCD-I) Working Group is an international consortium established to develop a conceptual framework and research criteria for SCD (Jessen et al., 2014, Alzheimers Dement 10, 844–852). In the current study we systematically compared cognitive self-report items used by 19 SCD-I Working Group studies, representing 8 countries and 5 languages. We identified 34 self-report measures comprising 640 cognitive self-report items. There was little overlap among measures—approximately 75% of measures were used by only one study. Wide variation existed in response options and item content. Items pertaining to the memory domain predominated, accounting for about 60% of items surveyed, followed by executive function and attention, with 16% and 11% of the items, respectively. Items relating to memory for the names of people and the placement of common objects were represented on the greatest percentage of measures (56% each). Working group members reported that instrument selection decisions were often based on practical considerations beyond the study of SCD specifically, such as availability and brevity of measures. Results document the heterogeneity of approaches across studies to the emerging construct of SCD. We offer preliminary recommendations for instrument selection and future research directions including identifying items and measure formats associated with important clinical outcomes. PMID:26402085

  11. Factors that differentially affect daytime and nighttime sleep in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi eIshimoto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Rest in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has key characteristics of mammalian sleep and is thus considered as a fly version of sleep. Drosophila sleep has been studied extensively, with the aim of gaining fundamental insights into the evolutionarily conserved functions of sleep as well as the mechanisms that regulate it. An interesting question that has not yet been addressed is whether fly sleep can be classified into distinct sleep types, each having particular biological roles—like REM and non-REM sleep in birds and mammals. Typically, Drosophila sleep displays a bimodal pattern, consisting of distinct daytime and nighttime components. Notably, daytime and nighttime sleep differ with respect to a number of qualities, such as sleep bout lengths and arousal thresholds. In this short review, we describe several genetic and environmental factors that differentially affect daytime and nighttime sleep, highlighting the observations suggesting the notion that these temporally distinct components of Drosophila sleep may have unique biological functions and be regulated by different homeostatic regulatory mechanisms.

  12. Daytime Thermal Anisotropy of Urban Neighbourhoods: Morphological Causation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Scott Krayenhoff

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface temperature is a key variable in boundary-layer meteorology and is typically acquired by remote observation of emitted thermal radiation. However, the three-dimensional structure of cities complicates matters: uneven solar heating of urban facets produces an “effective anisotropy” of surface thermal emission at the neighbourhood scale. Remotely-sensed urban surface temperature varies with sensor view angle as a consequence. The authors combine a microscale urban surface temperature model with a thermal remote sensing model to predict the effective anisotropy of simplified neighbourhood configurations. The former model provides detailed surface temperature distributions for a range of “urban” forms, and the remote sensing model computes aggregate temperatures for multiple view angles. The combined model’s ability to reproduce observed anisotropy is evaluated against measurements from a neighbourhood in Vancouver, Canada. As in previous modeling studies, anisotropy is underestimated. Addition of moderate coverages of small (sub-facet scale structure can account for much of the missing anisotropy. Subsequently, over 1900 sensitivity simulations are performed with the model combination, and the dependence of daytime effective thermal anisotropy on diurnal solar path (i.e., latitude and time of day and blunt neighbourhood form is assessed. The range of effective anisotropy, as well as the maximum difference from nadir-observed brightness temperature, peak for moderate building-height-to-spacing ratios (H/W, and scale with canyon (between-building area; dispersed high-rise urban forms generate maximum anisotropy. Maximum anisotropy increases with solar elevation and scales with shortwave irradiance. Moreover, it depends linearly on H/W for H/W < 1.25, with a slope that depends on maximum off-nadir sensor angle. Decreasing minimum brightness temperature is primarily responsible for this linear growth of maximum anisotropy. These

  13. Significantly Reduced Blood Pressure Measurement Variability for Both Normotensive and Hypertensive Subjects: Effect of Polynomial Curve Fitting of Oscillometric Pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fangwei; Chen, Fei; Zhu, Mingping; Chen, Aiqing; Zheng, Dingchang

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to compare within-subject blood pressure (BP) variabilities from different measurement techniques. Cuff pressures from three repeated BP measurements were obtained from 30 normotensive and 30 hypertensive subjects. Automatic BPs were determined from the pulses with normalised peak amplitude larger than a threshold (0.5 for SBP, 0.7 for DBP, and 1.0 for MAP). They were also determined from cuff pressures associated with the above thresholds on a fitted curve polynomial curve of the oscillometric pulse peaks. Finally, the standard deviation (SD) of three repeats and its coefficient of variability (CV) were compared between the two automatic techniques. For the normotensive group, polynomial curve fitting significantly reduced SD of repeats from 3.6 to 2.5 mmHg for SBP and from 3.7 to 2.1 mmHg for MAP and reduced CV from 3.0% to 2.2% for SBP and from 4.3% to 2.4% for MAP (all P oscillometric pulses had the ability to reduce automatic BP measurement variability.

  14. Automation of Methods for the Subjective Measuring of Factors in the Operation of Automated Information Systems by Means of VBA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmila V. Gorbatova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the process of assessing the effectiveness of the operation of automated information systems in colleges using the method of pairwise comparison and discusses numerical representations used with the above method. The author lists methods for the subjective measuring of the effective operation of automated information systems. The article proposes a way to automate the methods that makes it possible to simplify performing calculations and reduce the amount of time it takes to determine the outcome of a specific task. The author provides an algorithm with the results of work carried out.

  15. Evaluation of changes in birefringence for samples subjected to various stress sources measured with polarization-sensitive OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnowski, Karol; Li, Qingyun; Villiger, Martin; Sampson, David D.

    2017-04-01

    Polarization-sensitive OCT (PS-OCT) has proven useful in determining the stress-induced birefringence of non-biological materials, but such utility in biological tissues subjected to stress has not been well studied yet. To study stress-induced birefringence of biological tissues, we use a swept-source PS-OCT system with passively depth-encoded, orthogonal polarization states in the illumination path and polarization-diversity detection and a Mueller formalism in post-processing. We present measurements of stress-induced changes in the birefringence of non-biological and biological samples that provide useful benchmarks in further assessing the utility of this approach.

  16. Measurement of effective alveolar carbon dioxide tension during spontaneous breathing in normal subjects and patients with chronic airways obstruction.

    OpenAIRE

    Jordanoglou, J.; Koulouris, N; Kyroussis, D.; Rapakoulias, P.; Vassalos, P.; Madianos, J.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The measurement of effective alveolar carbon dioxide tension (PA-CO2eff) is still a matter of debate. It has, however, become common practice to use arterial instead of alveolar CO2 tension for computing alveolar oxygen tension (PAO2) and physiological dead space, not only in normal subjects but also in patients. The purpose of this study was to estimate alveolar CO2 tension during spontaneous breathing with a new bedside technique which is simple and non-invasive, and to compare ...

  17. Effects of different sleep restriction protocols on sleep architecture and daytime vigilance in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H; Stone, W S; Hsi, X; Zhuang, J; Huang, L; Yin, Y; Zhang, L; Zhao, Z

    2010-01-01

    Sleep is regulated by complex biological systems and environmental influences, neither of which is fully clarified. This study demonstrates differential effects of partial sleep deprivation (SD) on sleep architecture and psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) performance using two different protocols (sequentially) that each restricted daily sleep to 3 hours in healthy adult men. The protocols differed only in the period of sleep restriction; in one, sleep was restricted to a 3-hour block from 12:00 AM to 3:00 AM, and in the other, sleep was restricted to a block from 3:00 AM to 6:00 AM. Subjects in the earlier sleep restriction period showed a significantly lower percentage of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep after 4 days (17.0 vs. 25.7 %) and a longer latency to the onset of REM sleep (L-REM) after 1 day (78.8 vs. 45.5 min) than they did in the later sleep restriction period. Reaction times on PVT performance were also better (i.e. shorter) in the earlier SR period on day 4 (249.8 vs. 272 ms). These data support the view that earlier-night sleep may be more beneficial for daytime vigilance than later-night sleep. The study also showed that cumulative declines in daytime vigilance resulted from loss of total sleep time, rather than from specific stages, and underscored the reversibility of SR effects with greater amounts of sleep.

  18. Measuring the subjective: revisiting the psychometric properties of three rating scales that assess the acute effects of hallucinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouso, José Carlos; Pedrero-Pérez, Eduardo José; Gandy, Sam; Alcázar-Córcoles, Miguel Ángel

    2016-09-01

    In the present study we explored the psychometric properties of three widely used questionnaires to assess the subjective effects of hallucinogens: the Hallucinogen Rating Scale (HRS), the Mystical Experience Questionnaire (MEQ), and the Addiction Research Center Inventory (ARCI). These three questionnaires were administered to a sample of 158 subjects (100 men) after taking ayahuasca, a hallucinogen whose main active component is N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT). A confirmatory factorial study was conducted to check the adjustment of previous data obtained via theoretical proposals. When this was not possible, we used an exploratory factor analysis without restrictions, based on tetrachoric and polychoric matrices and correlations. Our results sparsely match the theoretical proposals of the authors, perhaps because previous studies have not always employed psychometric methods appropriate to the data obtained. However, these data should be considered preliminary, pending larger samples to confirm or reject the proposed structures obtained. It is crucial that instruments of sufficiently precise measurement are utilized to make sense of the information obtained in the study of the subjective effects of psychedelic drugs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Simultaneous measures of kinematics and fMRI: relation between movement parameters and activation maps in healthy subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolla, M.; Casellato, C.; Ferrante, S.; Ferrigno, G.; Baselli, G.; Molteni, F.; Martegani, A.; Frattini, T.; Pedrocchi, A.

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this study was to identify on healthy subjects the correlation between motor performances and brain activation maps, by the simultaneous use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and optoelectronic motion analysis system. The specific goal was to individuate how amplitude affects the related cerebral flow maps in active, passive and electrical stimulated (FES) movements. Ankle DorsiFlexion (ADF) was chosen as analyzed task because of its importance in the gait cycle. Firstly FES compatibility with fMRI images acquisition was assessed, both for the safety of the subject and of the device, and for mutual disturbances evaluation. We identified the experimental protocol so as to optimize the measured cerebral maps and the repeatability of the results. Intra-subject analysis of movement parameters along with brain activation mapping was performed. First level analysis to compare different execution modalities have been studied and preliminary qualitative results are reported. The long term application is the exploitation of the combined system in the evaluation of neurological patients where the definition of the motor tasks could be only partially accomplished depending on the patient residual functionality.

  20. Daytime O/N2 Retrieval Algorithm for the Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Andrew W.; Meier, R. R.; England, Scott L.; Mende, Stephen B.; Frey, Harald U.; Immel, Thomas J.

    2018-02-01

    The NASA Ionospheric Connection Explorer Far-Ultraviolet spectrometer, ICON FUV, will measure altitude profiles of the daytime far-ultraviolet (FUV) OI 135.6 nm and N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) band emissions that are used to determine thermospheric density profiles and state parameters related to thermospheric composition; specifically the thermospheric column O/N2 ratio (symbolized as ΣO/N2). This paper describes the algorithm concept that has been adapted and updated from one previously applied with success to limb data from the Global Ultraviolet Imager (GUVI) on the NASA Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) mission. We also describe the requirements that are imposed on the ICON FUV to measure ΣO/N2 over any 500-km sample in daytime with a precision of better than 8.7%. We present results from orbit-simulation testing that demonstrates that the ICON FUV and our thermospheric composition retrieval algorithm can meet these requirements and provide the measurements necessary to address ICON science objectives.

  1. Precise Astronomical Azimuth Determination By Qdaedalus System to the Sun, Moon, and Planets in Daytime Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völgyesi, L.; Tóth, G.; Bürki, B.; Guillaume, S.

    2014-12-01

    The traditional method of astronomical azimuth determination involves measurements at night to stars (Polaris). QDAEDALUS, developed by the team of the Geodesy and Geodynamics Lab (GGL, led by Prof. M. Rothacher) of ETH Zürich is a unique system combining Total Stations and modern CCD technique. It provides precise astronomical azimuths within 15 minutes of observation time at night. Furthermore, observations in daytime conditions are a challenging requirement in practice of Astro-geodetic azimuth determination. In order to perform daylight measurements, the QDAEDALUS system has been improved by allowing precise azimuth measurements to Sun, Moon, and Planets in daylight conditions by expanding the processing software with precise solar, lunar, and planetary ephemerides. With such functionality the system has a unique capability to measure astronomical azimuths with an accuracy of 0.3-0.5 arcsecs in normal daylight conditions within 20 to 25 minutes of measurement time.

  2. Objectively measured sedentary behaviour and moderate and vigorous physical activity in different school subjects: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerli Mooses

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence shows the positive influence of moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA and negative influence of sedentary time on health and academic achievement. Although schools can significantly contribute to overall physical activity, little is known about MVPA and sedentary behaviour in different school subjects in different grades. Methods Physical activity of 646 students from 18 schools (94 classes and from three school stages (grades 1–9, aged 7–16 was measured with accelerometry for 5 school days. Time and proportion of MVPA and sedentary time, also average sedentary bout length was calculated for native language (Estonian, mathematics, science, foreign language, music and crafts lessons. Results A total of 6363 lessons were measured, with lesson duration of 45 min. The average lesson time MVPA remained below 2.2 min in all school stages and in all subjects. Students in grades 4–6 had greatest decline in the proportion of lesson time MVPA in science (β = −1.9, 95%CI −3.1– -0.6 and music (−1.2, −2.1– -0.4 and in grades 7–9 in music (−1.7, −3.1– -0.3 lessons compared to grades 1–3. In grades 1–3 students spent on average 76% of lesson time (34.0 ± 7.0 min as sedentary, whereas in grades 7–9 the average proportion of sedentary time was 87% (38.9 ± 5.7 min. An average sedentary bout length increased from 13 min in grades 1–3 to 20 min in grades 7–9. An increase in sedentary bout length from grades 1–3 compared to grades 7–9 was present in most subjects, except crafts, with smallest increase in foreign language (6 min, 3.5–8.9 and greatest in music lessons (16.6 min, 11.9–21.3. Lessons with prolonged sedentary bouts formed a maximum 36% of all lessons in grades 1–3 and 73% in grades 7–9. Conclusion The long sedentary time, bout length and low MVPA in most subjects were unfavourable in respect of both health and academic achievement. Significantly

  3. Objectively measured sedentary behaviour and moderate and vigorous physical activity in different school subjects: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooses, Kerli; Mägi, Katrin; Riso, Eva-Maria; Kalma, Maarja; Kaasik, Priit; Kull, Merike

    2017-01-23

    Evidence shows the positive influence of moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and negative influence of sedentary time on health and academic achievement. Although schools can significantly contribute to overall physical activity, little is known about MVPA and sedentary behaviour in different school subjects in different grades. Physical activity of 646 students from 18 schools (94 classes) and from three school stages (grades 1-9, aged 7-16) was measured with accelerometry for 5 school days. Time and proportion of MVPA and sedentary time, also average sedentary bout length was calculated for native language (Estonian), mathematics, science, foreign language, music and crafts lessons. A total of 6363 lessons were measured, with lesson duration of 45 min. The average lesson time MVPA remained below 2.2 min in all school stages and in all subjects. Students in grades 4-6 had greatest decline in the proportion of lesson time MVPA in science (β = -1.9, 95%CI -3.1- -0.6) and music (-1.2, -2.1- -0.4) and in grades 7-9 in music (-1.7, -3.1- -0.3) lessons compared to grades 1-3. In grades 1-3 students spent on average 76% of lesson time (34.0 ± 7.0 min) as sedentary, whereas in grades 7-9 the average proportion of sedentary time was 87% (38.9 ± 5.7 min). An average sedentary bout length increased from 13 min in grades 1-3 to 20 min in grades 7-9. An increase in sedentary bout length from grades 1-3 compared to grades 7-9 was present in most subjects, except crafts, with smallest increase in foreign language (6 min, 3.5-8.9) and greatest in music lessons (16.6 min, 11.9-21.3). Lessons with prolonged sedentary bouts formed a maximum 36% of all lessons in grades 1-3 and 73% in grades 7-9. The long sedentary time, bout length and low MVPA in most subjects were unfavourable in respect of both health and academic achievement. Significantly increasing sedentary time and sedentary bout length in older school stages highlights the need for

  4. Oral Appliance Therapy in Patients With Daytime Sleepiness and Snoring or Mild to Moderate Sleep Apnea: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, Marie; Carlberg, Bo; Forsgren, Lars; Olsson, Tommy; Stenlund, Hans; Franklin, Karl A

    2015-08-01

    Oral appliances that move the mandible forward during sleep are suggested as treatment for mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea. To test whether an adjustable, custom-made oral appliance improves daytime sleepiness and quality of life in patients with daytime sleepiness and snoring or mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea. Ninety-six patients with daytime sleepiness and an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) lower than 30 were included in a randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel trial in Umeå, Sweden, from May 2007 through August 2011. Four months' intervention with an oral appliance or a placebo device. Daytime sleepiness was measured with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale, and the Oxford Sleep Resistance (OSLER) test. Quality of life was assessed with the Short-Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36) and the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ). Secondary outcomes included the apnea-hypopnea index, headaches, symptoms of restless legs, and insomnia. Oral appliance therapy was not associated with improvements in daytime sleepiness from baseline to 4-month follow-up when compared with the placebo device; Epworth score >10: 53% at baseline to 24% at follow-up for the oral appliance group vs 54% at baseline to 40% at follow-up for the placebo device group, P = .11; median (IQR) for Karolinska score ≥7/wk: 10 (8 to 14) at baseline to 7 (4 to 9) at follow-up for the oral appliance group vs 12 (6 to 15) at baseline to 8 (5 to 12) at follow-up for the placebo device group, P = .11; mean between-group difference in OSLER test, -2.4 min (95% CI, -6.3 to 1.4). The mean between-group difference for the total FOSQ score was insignificant (-1.2 [95% CI, -2.5 to 0.1]). No domain of the SF-36 differed significantly between the groups. The AHI was below 5 in 49% of patients using the active appliance and in 11% using placebo, with an odds ratio of 7.8 (95% CI, 2.6-23.5) and a number needed to treat of 3. Snoring (P oral appliance

  5. Lack of agreement between objective and subjective measures in the evaluation of masticatory function: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroni-Pereira, Aline; Marquezin, Maria Carolina Salomé; Araujo, Darlle Santos; Pereira, Luciano José; Bommarito, Silvana; Castelo, Paula Midori

    2018-02-01

    The evaluation of mastication is important to understand the masticatory behavior and diagnose feeding difficulties. The objective of this preliminary study was to verify if there is agreement between objective and subjective validated methods of chewing evaluation in a convenience sample which consisted of 32 adolescents (mean 15.5years), complete permanent dentition and free of tooth decay. The Quality of Masticatory Function Questionnaire with the Food-Mastication, Habits, Meat, Fruit and Vegetables domains was used in the subjective evaluation. The objective aspects consisted of maximum bite force (BF) and masticatory performance (MP) by mastication of cubes of test-material and sieving to determine the median particle size (X50) and distribution in the sieves ("b"), and by the colorimetric method using colorchangeable chewing gum. Data were submitted to exploratory analysis, normality test and correlation tests (Pearson/Spearman). The correlation between BF and X50 (r=-0.43; p=0.02) and between BF and MP chewing gum (r=0.53; p=0.002) was significant with large effect size. The MP evaluated by chewing gum correlated with X50 (r=-0.34; p=0.055), but not with "b" (r=-0.06; p=0.73), while "b" correlated only with X50 (r=0.52, p=0.002). No significant correlation was observed between the objective measures and the total score of the subjective evaluation; only a negative correlation was observed between "b" and Meat domain (r=-0.40; p=0.023). The objective methods showed moderate correlation with each other and no agreement between the objective and subjective methods was observed in this sample of healthy adolescents, emphasizing the importance of both aspects in the evaluation of masticatory function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Objective and Subjective Socioeconomic Gradients Exist for Sleep in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrin, Denise C.; McGrath, Jennifer J.; Quon, Elizabeth C.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Socioeconomic position (SEP) is inversely associated with many health outcomes, yielding a socioeconomic gradient in health. In adults, low SEP is associated with short sleep duration, poorer sleep quality, and difficulty initiating and maintaining sleep. Relatively little is known about this relation in youth. The aim of the present study was to examine whether socioeconomic gradients exist for various sleep indices among a healthy sample of children and adolescents. Method Participants took part in the larger Healthy Heart Project and included 239 youth (69.6% Caucasian; 45.6% female), aged 8–17 years (M =12.6, SD =1.9). Parental income and education were used to measure objective SEP. The Subjective Social Status Scale-Youth Version was used to measure subjective SEP. Sleep duration, sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, and sleep disturbances were assessed through self- and parent-report. Results In children, objective SEP was related with sleep duration (β =.35, p <.01), although subjective SEP was related with daytime sleepiness (βavg =.33, p <.01) and parent-reported sleep duration (β =.23, p <.05). In adolescents, subjective SEPwas related with sleep quality (β =.28, p <.01) and parent-reported sleep duration (β = −.18, p <.05), even after controlling for objective SEP. Conclusions Socioeconomic gradients were observed for multiple sleep measures in youth. Objective parental SEP was related with sleep complaints (e.g., sleep disturbances), and subjective SEP was related with sleep quality and daytime sleepiness. Findings suggest sleep may be one pathway underlying the socioeconomic gradient in health. Future research should aim to elucidate how distinct sleep constructs may explain how socioeconomic status “gets under the skin” to affect health. PMID:23730721

  7. Using light scattering to measure the response of individual ultrasound contrast microbubbles subjected to pulsed ultrasound in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jingfeng; Matula, Thomas J.

    2004-11-01

    Light scattering was used to measure the radial pulsations of individual ultrasound contrast microbubbles subjected to pulsed ultrasound. Highly diluted Optison® or Sonazoid® microbubbles were injected into either a water bath or an aqueous solution containing small quantities of xanthan gum. Individual microbubbles were insonified by ultrasound pulses from either a commercial diagnostic ultrasound machine or a single element transducer. The instantaneous response curves of the microbubbles were measured. Linear and nonlinear microbubble oscillations were observed. Good agreement was obtained by fitting a bubble dynamics model to the data. The pulse-to-pulse evolution of individual microbubbles was investigated, the results of which suggest that the shell can be semipermeable, and possibly weaken with subsequent pulses. There is a high potential that light scattering can be used to optimize diagnostic ultrasound techniques, understand microbubble evolution, and obtain specific information about shell parameters. .

  8. Frequency-domain photon migration measurements of normal and malignant tissue optical properties in a human subject

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishkin, J.B.; Coquoz, O.; Anderson, E.R.; Brenner, M.; Tromberg, B.J. [Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California at Irvine, 1002 Health Sciences Road East, Irvine, California 92612 (United States)]|[EA Photonics, 2515 Fisk Lane, Redondo Beach, California 90278 (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A 1-GHz multifrequency, multiwavelength frequency-domain photon migration instrument is used to measure quantitatively the optical absorption ({mu}{sub a}) and effective optical scattering ({mu}{sub s}{sup {prime}}) of normal and malignant tissues in a human subject. Large ellipsoidal ({approximately}10-cm major axis, {approximately}6-cm minor axes) subcutaneous malignant lesions were compared with adjacent normal sites in the abdomen and back. Absorption coefficients recorded at 674, 811, 849, and 956 nm were used to calculate tissue hemoglobin concentration (oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and total), water concentration, hemoglobin oxygen saturation, and blood volume fraction {ital in vivo}. Our results show that the normal and the malignant tissues measured in the patient have clearly resolvable optical and physiological property differences that may be broadly useful in identifying and characterizing tumors.{copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  9. Effect of Kinesiology Tape on Measurements of Balance in Subjects With Chronic Ankle Instability: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-la-Torre-Domingo, Carlos; Alguacil-Diego, Isabel M; Molina-Rueda, Francisco; López-Román, Antonio; Fernández-Carnero, Josué

    2015-12-01

    To examine the immediate and prolonged effects (7d) of Kinesiology Tape (KT) on balance in subjects with chronic ankle instability using computerized dynamic posturography (CDP). A 7-day follow-up, single-blind randomized controlled trial. University community. Subjects (N=36) were screened for possible eligibility criteria, and 30 successfully completed the study protocol. Of these, 15 were randomly assigned to the experimental group (KT: 5 men, 10 women), and 15 were assigned to the control group (placebo tape: 10 men, 5 women). The experimental group was taped for a lateral ankle sprain with KT. In the control group, a placebo tape was used. Balance was assessed under the following 3 conditions: without taping, immediately after application, and after 7 days of use. The CDP device used in this study was the Smart Equitest version 8.2. CDP analysis was conducted using the Sensory Organization Test (SOT). As primaries outcome measures, the composite SOT score and composite SOT strategy were chosen. The partial score for SOT condition 2 and its strategy were considered as the secondary outcomes measures. Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrated that there was not a significant interaction between group and time in the composite SOT score (F=.239; P=.73), SOT condition 2 (F=.333; P=.705), and SOT strategy 2 (F=.899; P=.43). Additionally, repeated-measures ANOVA showed a significant effect for time (composite SOT score: F=40.69; P≤.01; SOT condition 2: F=4.61; P=.014; SOT strategy 2: F=.899; P=.413; composite SOT strategy: F=15.14; P≤.01). Specifically, post hoc analysis showed that both groups obtained improvements in composite SOT scores immediately after tape application and 7 days of use. According to our results, the SOT scores of both the KT and control groups improved during follow-up. No differences between them were observed during the follow-up in most balance measurements. The observed changes may be related to a subjective increase

  10. Prediction of periodontopathic bacteria in dental plaque of periodontal healthy subjects by measurement of volatile sulfur compounds in mouth air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Mitsuo; Ohara-Nemoto, Yuko; Takahashi, Masahiro; Kishi, Kayo; Kimura, Shigenobu; Aizawa, Fumie; Yonemitsu, Masami

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether measurements of volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) are useful to predict colonization of periodontopathic bacteria. For this purpose, we assessed the relationships among distributions of 4 species of periodontopathic bacteria in tongue coating and dental plaque, oral conditions including VSC concentration in mouth air, and smoking habit of periodontal healthy young subjects. The subjects were 108 young adults (mean age, 23.5±2.56 years) without clinical periodontal pockets. Information regarding smoking habit was obtained by interview. After VSC concentration in mouth, air was measured with a portable sulfide monitor (Halimeter(®)), non-stimulated saliva flow and dental caries status were assessed, and tongue coating and dental plaque samples were collected from the subjects. The tongue coating samples were weighed to determine the amount. The colonization of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Prevotella intermedia, and Treponema denticola in both tongue coating and plaque samples was investigated using species-specific polymerase chain reaction assays. Significant relationships were observed between the colonization of periodontopathic bacteria in tongue coating and plaque samples, especially that of P. gingivalis. VSC concentration showed the most significant association with colonization of P. gingivalis in both tongue coating and dental plaque. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the adjusted partial correlation coefficient [Exp(B)] values for VSC concentration with the colonization of P. gingivalis, P. intermedia, and T. denticola in dental plaque were 135, 35.4 and 10.4, respectively. In addition, smoking habit was also shown to be a significant variable in regression models [Exp(B)=6.19, 8.92 and 2.53, respectively]. Therefore, receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to predict the colonization of periodontal bacteria in dental plaque in the subjects divided by smoking

  11. The Fluctuation of Intraocular Pressure Measured by a Contact Lens Sensor in Normal-Tension Glaucoma Patients and Nonglaucoma Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tojo, Naoki; Abe, Shinya; Ishida, Masaaki; Yagou, Takaaki; Hayashi, Atsushi

    2017-03-01

    We compared the fluctuation of intraocular pressure (IOP) in normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) patients and individuals with nonglaucoma eyes. We obtained continuous IOP values using a SENSIMED Triggerfish contact lens sensor. The eyes of 12 nonglaucoma subjects and 14 NTG patients were examined. In all 26 subjects, the IOP fluctuation was measured continuously for 24 hours with a contact lens sensor. We evaluated the range of IOP fluctuations over the 24-hour period separately for diurnal IOP and nocturnal IOP and identified each subject's maximum value. The range of IOP fluctuation were analyzed, cutoff level of IOP fluctuation was calculated using receiver operating characteristic curve analyses. The mean IOP in the NTG eyes was 11.5±2.4 mm Hg and that in the nonglaucoma eyes was 12.7±2.0 mm Hg, a nonsignificantly difference (P=0.175). The 24-hour range of IOP fluctuations in the NTG group was significantly larger than that of the nonglaucoma group (P=0.007). The percentage of NTG patients who had the peak time of IOP fluctuation during nocturnal sleep was 57.1%, whereas the corresponding rate for the nonglaucoma eyes was 91.7%. The cutoff level of IOP fluctuation for glaucoma was 442 mVeq (sensitivity=1.00; specificity=0.571). The range of IOP fluctuation was larger in the eyes with NTG than in the nonglaucoma eyes. This larger fluctuation might be one of the reasons underlying the aggravation of the visual field by NTG. Measurements of 24-hour continuous IOP might be one of the useful methods to distinguish NTG from nonglaucoma eyes.

  12. Love as a subjective corrlate of interpersonal relationships: attempts of defining of the concepts and methods of measurment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Zolotnyik

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to overview the scientific study of the phenomenon of love. Attempts of scientific knowledge presented by developed by sociologists and psychologists love theories, which defined, classified and measure this phenomenon. The paper proposed to review the most popular theory of love studying: the triangular theory of love for Robert J. Sternberg, classification styles love for John Alan Lee and transformational concept of A.Giddens. The importance of studying this subject is explained by the subjective definition by respondents of the role of love as correlates of interpersonal relationships. Love is considered as a factor that acts as a marriage motive and components, which ensures its durability. The complexity of the scientific understanding of love is the absence of clear empirical referents for fixation. The examined theory reaffirms their scientific hypotheses through the use of specific methods of measurement. It is offered for review: Scale of love and sympathy by Z.Rubin, Love Attitude Scale by Hendrick C. and Hendrick S. and scale of romantic relationships by Munro­Adams. These methodologies are widely used in modern scientific research, been undergo with modifications and adaptation depending on the cultural characteristics of the respondents. The phenomenon of love needs more scientific study with the aim of further categorization, require range of techniques selection and should be included  as a component in the sociological survey of interpersonal relationships.

  13. Minimal Effect of Daytime Napping Behavior on Nocturnal Sleep in Pregnant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Rebecca M; Wood, Annette; Okun, Michele L

    2015-06-15

    To assess whether daytime naps negatively impact nocturnal sleep. Longitudinal, prospective cohort design. 161 pregnant women recruited and evaluated in early gestation (10-20 weeks). Daily sleep information was collected in three 2-week periods (10-12, 14-16, and 18-20 weeks gestation) with a daily sleep diary and an actigraph. The average number of naps, as well as the average length of each nap, were calculated from sleep diaries. Women were categorized first as non nappers (0 naps/2-week period), moderate nappers (1-3 naps/2-week period), or frequent nappers (≥ 4 naps/2-week period). Then, based on the average nap length, they were categorized as short (effects of nap group and time, and time by nap group interactions. Women who took naps had a decrease in diary-assessed nocturnal TST, but not actigraphy-assessed TST. This observation was group- and time-specific. There were no other group differences. Women who napped ≥ 90 min had poorer diary-assessed SE and lower diary-assessed TST than those who took shorter naps. Length of nap was not associated with any other sleep measures. The number of daytime naps have minimal impact on nocturnal sleep parameters; however, long nappers did exhibit modestly impaired sleep continuity and sleep quality. Overall, we propose that daytime naps provide a beneficial countermeasure to the sleep disruption commonly reported by pregnant women. This may be clinically beneficial given that sleep continuity and quality are important correlates of pregnancy outcomes. A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 593. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  14. Natural History of Excessive Daytime Sleepiness: Role of Obesity, Weight Loss, Depression, and Sleep Propensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Vgontzas, Alexandros N.; Kritikou, Ilia; Calhoun, Susan L.; Liao, Duanping; Bixler, Edward O.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is highly prevalent in the general population and is associated with occupational and public safety hazards. However, no study has examined the clinical and polysomnographic (PSG) predictors of the natural history of EDS. Design: Representative longitudinal study. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Participants: From a random, general population sample of 1,741 individuals of the Penn State Adult Cohort, 1,395 were followed up after 7.5 years. Measurements and Results: Full medical evaluation and 1-night PSG at baseline and standardized telephone interview at follow-up. The incidence of EDS was 8.2%, while its persistence and remission were 38% and 62%, respectively. Obesity and weight gain were associated with the incidence and persistence of EDS, while weight loss was associated with its remission. Significant interactions between depression and PSG parameters on incident EDS showed that, in depressed individuals, incident EDS was associated with sleep disturbances, while in non-depressed individuals, incident EDS was associated with increased physiologic sleep propensity. Diabetes, allergy/asthma, anemia, and sleep complaints also predicted the natural history of EDS. Conclusions: Obesity, a disorder of epidemic proportions, is a major risk factor for the incidence and chronicity of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), while weight loss is associated with its remission. Interestingly, objective sleep disturbances predict incident EDS in depressed individuals, whereas physiologic sleep propensity predicts incident EDS in those without depression. Weight management and treatment of depression and sleep disorders should be part of public health policies. Citation: Fernandez-Mendoza J, Vgontzas AN, Kritikou I, Calhoun SL, Liao D, Bixler EO. Natural history of excessive daytime sleepiness: role of obesity, weight loss, depression, and sleep propensity. SLEEP 2015;38(3):351–360. PMID:25581913

  15. Sex differences in objective measures of sleep in post-traumatic stress disorder and healthy control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Anne; Metzler, Thomas J; Ruoff, Leslie M; Inslicht, Sabra S; Rao, Madhu; Talbot, Lisa S; Neylan, Thomas C

    2013-12-01

    A growing literature shows prominent sex effects for risk for post-traumatic stress disorder and associated medical comorbid burden. Previous research indicates that post-traumatic stress disorder is associated with reduced slow wave sleep, which may have implications for overall health, and abnormalities in rapid eye movement sleep, which have been implicated in specific post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms, but most research has been conducted in male subjects. We therefore sought to compare objective measures of sleep in male and female post-traumatic stress disorder subjects with age- and sex-matched control subjects. We used a cross-sectional, 2 × 2 design (post-traumatic stress disorder/control × female/male) involving83 medically healthy, non-medicated adults aged 19-39 years in the inpatient sleep laboratory. Visual electroencephalographic analysis demonstrated that post-traumatic stress disorder was associated with lower slow wave sleep duration (F(3,82)  = 7.63, P = 0.007) and slow wave sleep percentage (F(3,82)  = 6.11, P = 0.016). There was also a group × sex interaction effect for rapid eye movement sleep duration (F(3,82)  = 4.08, P = 0.047) and rapid eye movement sleep percentage (F(3,82)  = 4.30, P = 0.041), explained by greater rapid eye movement sleep in post-traumatic stress disorder females compared to control females, a difference not seen in male subjects. Quantitative electroencephalography analysis demonstrated that post-traumatic stress disorder was associated with lower energy in the delta spectrum (F(3,82)  = 6.79, P = 0.011) in non-rapid eye movement sleep. Slow wave sleep and delta findings were more pronounced in males. Removal of post-traumatic stress disorder subjects with comorbid major depressive disorder, who had greater post-traumatic stress disorder severity, strengthened delta effects but reduced rapid eye movement effects to non-significance. These findings support previous evidence that post

  16. New measures of upper esophageal sphincter distensibility and opening patterns during swallowing in healthy subjects using EndoFLIP®

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Regan, J

    2013-01-01

    Background  This paper aims to measure upper esophageal sphincter (UES) distensibility and extent and duration of UES opening during swallowing in healthy subjects using EndoFLIP(®) . Methods  Fourteen healthy subjects (20-50 years) were recruited. An EndoFLIP(®) probe was passed trans-orally and the probe balloon was positioned across the UES. Two 20-mL ramp distensions were completed and UES cross-sectional area (CSA) and intra-balloon pressure (IBP) were evaluated. At 12-mL balloon volume, subjects completed dry, 5- and 10-mL liquid swallows and extent (mm) and duration (s) of UES opening and minimum IBP (mmHg) were analyzed across swallows. Key Results  Thirteen subjects completed the study protocol. A significant change in UES CSA (P < .001) and IBP (P < .000) was observed during 20-mL distension. UES CSA increased up to 10-mL distension (P < .001), from which point IBP raised significantly (P = 0.004). There were significant changes in UES diameter (mm) (P < .000) and minimum IBP (mmHg) (P < .000) during swallowing events. Resting UES diameter (4.9 mm; IQR 0.02) and minimum IBP (18.8 mmHg; IQR 2.64) changed significantly during dry (9.6 mm; IQR 1.3: P < .001) (3.6 mmHg; IQR 4.1: P = 0.002); 5 mL (8.61 mm; IQR 2.7: P < .001) (4.8 mmHg; IQR 5.7: P < .001) and 10-mL swallows (8.3 mm; IQR 1.6: P < 0.001) (3 mmHg; 4.6: P < .001). Median duration of UES opening was 0.5 s across dry and liquid swallows (P = 0.91). Color contour plots of EndoFLIP(®) data capture novel information regarding pharyngo-esophageal events during swallowing. Conclusions & Inferences  Authors obtained three different types of quantitative data (CSA, IBP, and timing) regarding UES distensibility and UES opening patterns during swallowing in healthy adults using only one device (EndoFLIP(®) ). This new measure of swallowing offers fresh information regarding UES dynamics which may ultimately improve patient

  17. Significantly Reduced Blood Pressure Measurement Variability for Both Normotensive and Hypertensive Subjects: Effect of Polynomial Curve Fitting of Oscillometric Pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangwei Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare within-subject blood pressure (BP variabilities from different measurement techniques. Cuff pressures from three repeated BP measurements were obtained from 30 normotensive and 30 hypertensive subjects. Automatic BPs were determined from the pulses with normalised peak amplitude larger than a threshold (0.5 for SBP, 0.7 for DBP, and 1.0 for MAP. They were also determined from cuff pressures associated with the above thresholds on a fitted curve polynomial curve of the oscillometric pulse peaks. Finally, the standard deviation (SD of three repeats and its coefficient of variability (CV were compared between the two automatic techniques. For the normotensive group, polynomial curve fitting significantly reduced SD of repeats from 3.6 to 2.5 mmHg for SBP and from 3.7 to 2.1 mmHg for MAP and reduced CV from 3.0% to 2.2% for SBP and from 4.3% to 2.4% for MAP (all P<0.01. For the hypertensive group, SD of repeats decreased from 6.5 to 5.5 mmHg for SBP and from 6.7 to 4.2 mmHg for MAP, and CV decreased from 4.2% to 3.6% for SBP and from 5.8% to 3.8% for MAP (all P<0.05. In conclusion, polynomial curve fitting of oscillometric pulses had the ability to reduce automatic BP measurement variability.

  18. Comparison of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and magnetic resonance imaging-measured adipose tissue depots in HIV-infected and control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherzer, Rebecca; Shen, Wei; Bacchetti, Peter; Kotler, Donald; Lewis, Cora E; Shlipak, Michael G; Punyanitya, Mark; Heymsfield, Steven B; Grunfeld, Carl

    2008-10-01

    Studies in persons without HIV infection have compared adipose tissue measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but no such study has been conducted in HIV-infected (HIV+) subjects, who have a high prevalence of regional fat loss. We compared DXA- with MRI-measured trunk, leg, arm, and total fat in HIV+ and control subjects. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted in 877 HIV+ subjects and 260 control subjects in FRAM (Study of Fat Redistribution and Metabolic Change in HIV Infection), stratified by sex and HIV status. Univariate associations of DXA with MRI were strongest for total and trunk fat (r > or = 0.92) and slightly weaker for leg (r > or = 0.87) and arm (r > or = 0.71) fat. The average estimated limb fat was substantially greater for DXA than for MRI for HIV+ and control men and women (all P < 0.0001). Less of a difference was observed in trunk fat measured by DXA and MRI, but the difference was still statistically significant (P < 0.0001). Bland-Altman plots showed increasing differences and variability. Greater average limb fat in control and HIV+ subjects (both P < 0.0001) was associated with greater differences between DXA and MRI measurements. Because the control subjects had more limb fat than did the HIV+ subjects, greater amounts of fat were measured by DXA than by MRI when control subjects were compared with HIV+ subjects. More HIV+ subjects had leg fat in the bottom decile of the control subjects by DXA than by MRI (P < 0.0001). Although DXA- and MRI-measured adipose tissue depots correlate strongly in HIV+ and control subjects, differences increase as average fat increases, particularly for limb fat. DXA may estimate a higher prevalence of peripheral lipoatrophy than does MRI in HIV+ subjects.

  19. Diabetic Foot Prevention: Repeatability of the Loran Platform Plantar Pressure and Load Distribution Measurements in Nondiabetic Subjects during Bipedal Standing—A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Zequera

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to assess the repeatability of the Loran Platform and evaluate the variability of plantar pressure and postural balance, during barefoot standing in nondiabetic subjects, for future diabetic foot clinical evaluation. Measurements were taken for eight nondiabetic subjects (4 females, 4 males, aged 47±7.2 years who had no musculoskeletal symptoms. Five variables were measured with the platform in the barefoot standing position. Ten measurements were taken using two different techniques for feet and posture positioning, during three sessions, once a week. For most measurements, no significant effect over time was found with Student's t-test (P<.000125. The ANOVA test of statistical significance confirmed that measurement differences between subjects showed higher variations than measurements taken from the same subject (P<.001. The measurements taken by the Loran Platform system were found to be repeatable.

  20. Prevalence of Hand-transmitted Vibration Exposure among Grass-cutting Workers using Objective and Subjective Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmir, N. A.; Yahya, M. N.

    2017-01-01

    Extended exposure to hand-transmitted vibration from vibrating machine is associated with an increased occurrence of symptoms of occupational disease related to hand disorder. The present case study is to determine the prevalence and correlation of significant subjective as well as objective variables that induce to hand arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) among hand-held grass-cutting workers in Malaysia. Thus, recommendations are made for grass-cutting workers and grass maintenance service management based on findings. A cross sectional study using adopted subjective Hand Arm Vibration Exposure Risk Assessment (HAVERA) questionnaire from Vibration Injury Network on hand disorder signs and symptoms was distributed to a sample of one hundred and sixty eight male workers from grass and turf maintenance industry that use vibrating machine as part of their work. For objective measure, hand-transmitted vibration measurement was collected on site during operation by the following ISO 5349-1, 2001. Two groups were identified in this research comprising of high exposure group and low-moderate exposure group. Workers also gave information about their personal identification, social history, workers’ health, occupational history and machine safety inspection. There was positive HAVS symptoms relationship between the low-moderate exposure group and high exposure group among hand-held grass-cutting workers. The prevalence ratio (PR) was considered high for experiencing white colour change at fingers and fingers go numb which are 3.63 (1.41 to 9.39) and 4.24 (2.18 to 8.27), respectively. The estimated daily vibration exposure, A(8) differs between 2.1 to 20.7 ms-2 for right hand while 2.7 to 29.1 ms-2 for left hand. The subjects claimed that the feel of numbness at left hand is much stronger compared to right hand. The results suggest that HAVS is diagnosed in Malaysia especially in agriculture sector. The A(8) indicates that the exposure value is more than exposure limit value

  1. Sleep complaints and daytime sleepiness among pharmaceutical students in Tripoli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef A. Taher

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effect of sleep difficulties has achieved a great deal of attention recently, with university students considered as a homogenized population, particularly affected by sleep habits. Aim: The objective of this study was to investigate whether Libyan college students experience sleep disturbance during their academic programmes. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in the college of Pharmacy, Tripoli University, during February 2010. A total of 201 students, including 179 females (89.05% and 22 males (10.95%, were recruited from different academic levels. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire and included a number of life-style variables. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS was used for the assessment of daytime sleepiness. Results: This study showed that the total sleep time (TST on a weeknight was 6.40 h and 67 students reported napping during daytime. The TST plus naps totalled 7.39 h. Out of eight possible dozing situations, we found that the mean score for ESS was 8.78. In addition, 79 students showed an ESS score of >10. Furthermore, our results showed that the majority of students (>92% reported poor sleep satisfaction with quality and duration of sleep hours. Thinking about difficulty of study but not increasing education programs or tea/coffee consumption is associated with sleep difficulties reported. Moreover, 77.6% of students reported an irregular sleep–wake schedule. Conclusion: These findings indicate that students experienced excessive daytime sleepiness. The TST of pharmaceutical students in Libya, as in other developing countries, is less than those reported by Western students. Students experienced various environmental demands during their college years and, their quality of sleep was negatively affected.

  2. A toolkit for clinical statisticians to fix problems based on biomarker measurements subject to instrumental limitations: from repeated measurement techniques to a hybrid pooled-unpooled design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vexler, Albert; Tao, Ge; Chen, Xiwei

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to review and examine different methods in order to display correct and efficient statistical techniques based on complete/incomplete data subject to different sorts of measurement error (ME) problems. Instrument inaccuracies, biological variations, and/or errors in questionnaire-based self-report data can lead to significant MEs in various clinical experiments. Ignoring MEs can cause bias or inconsistency of statistical inferences. The biostatistical literature well addresses two categories of MEs: errors related to additive models and errors caused by the limit of detection (LOD). Several statistical approaches have been developed to analyze data affected by MEs, including the parametric/nonparametric likelihood methodologies, Bayesian methods, the single and multiple imputation techniques, and the repeated measurement design of experiment. We present a novel hybrid pooled-unpooled design as one of the strategies to provide correct statistical inferences when data is subject to MEs. This hybrid design and the classical techniques are compared to show the advantages and disadvantages of the considered methods.

  3. Nomogram for the height of the daytime mixed layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyren, K.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1999-01-01

    A method to construct a nomogram of the daytime mixed-layer-height evolution is presented. The nomogram will be specific for a given location and land surface type and is intended to be an easy tool to achieve a general understanding of mixed-layer behaviour. Also it is a pedagogical graphical one......-pager that displays the bulk of data that controls the evolution of the mixed layer. Nomograms from northern, central and southern Europe are presented and discussed. Comparison with data from two sites shows good agreement although the nomograms overestimated the mixing height when it was low....

  4. Wrist flexion and extension torques measured by highly sensitive dynamometer in healthy subjects from 5 to 80 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decostre, Valérie; Canal, Aurélie; Ollivier, Gwenn; Ledoux, Isabelle; Moraux, Amélie; Doppler, Valérie; Payan, Christine Anne Mary; Hogrel, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-31

    Wrist movements become impaired with disease progression in various neuromuscular disorders. With the development of new therapies, thorough measurement of muscle strength is crucial to document natural disease progression and to assess treatment efficacy. We developed a new dynamometer enabling wrist flexion and extension torque measurement with high sensitivity. The aims of the present study were to collect norms for healthy children and adults, to compute predictive equations, to assess the reliability of the measurements and to test the feasibility of using the device in patients with a neuromuscular disease. The peak isometric torque of wrist flexion and extension was measured with the MyoWrist dynamometer in 345 healthy subjects aged between 5 and 80 years old and in 9 patients with limb girdle muscle dystrophy type 2 C (LGMD2C) aged between 16 and 38 years old. Predictive equations are proposed for the wrist flexion and extension strength in children and adults. Intra-rater and inter-rater reliability was good with ICCs higher than 0.9 for both wrist flexion and extension. However, retest values were significantly higher by 4% than test results. The dynamometer was applied with no difficulty to patients with LGMD2C and was sensitive enough to detect strength as weak as 0.82 N.m. From our models, we quantified the mean strength of wrist extension in LGMD2C patients to 39 ± 17% of their predicted values. The MyoWrist dynamometer provides reliable and sensitive measurement of both wrist flexion and extension torques. However, a training session is recommended before starting a study as a small but significant learning effect was observed. Strength deficit can be quantified from predictive equations that were computed from norms of healthy children and adults.

  5. The value of the acoustic voice quality index as a measure of dysphonia severity in subjects speaking different languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryn, Youri; De Bodt, Marc; Barsties, Ben; Roy, Nelson

    2014-06-01

    The Acoustic Voice Quality Index (AVQI) is a relatively new clinical method to quantify dysphonia severity. Since it partially relies on continuous speech, its performance may vary with voice-related phonetic differences and thus across languages. The present investigation therefore assessed the AVQI's performance in English, Dutch, German, and French. Fifty subjects were recorded reading sentences in the four languages, as well as producing a sustained vowel. These recordings were later edited to calculate the AVQI. The samples were also perceptually rated on overall dysphonia severity by three experienced voice clinicians. The AVQI's cross-linguistic concurrent validity and diagnostic precision were assessed. The results support earlier data, and confirm good cross-linguistic validity and diagnostic accuracy. Although no statistical differences were observed between languages, the AVQI performed better in English and German and less well in French. These results validate the AVQI as a potentially robust and objective dysphonia severity measure across languages.

  6. The influence of N-acetylcysteine on the measurement of prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, S; Hansen, A B

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate whether the infusion of N-acetylcysteine decreased the measurement of prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) in healthy persons. N-acetylcysteine was administered intraveneously 10 mg kg-1 as a loading dose and then at a rate of 10...... mg kg-1 h-1 for 32 h in six male subjects. The intrinsic, extrinsic and common pathway of coagulation were monitored with activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and prothrombin time, respectively. In addition, the extrinsic coagulation pathway was monitored with the clotting activity of single...... factors II, VII, and X. No effect on the intrinsic coagulation pathway was observed. There was a significant and rapid decrease in prothrombin time. Coagulation factors II, VII and X, the three components of prothrombin time, decreased significantly to different degrees. We conclude that infusion of N...

  7. Relationship between knee kinetic outcome measures in vertical counter movement jumps and self-reported function in ACL reconstructed subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brekke, Anders Falk

    2014-01-01

    and Traumatology, Odense University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark Introduction: Altered loading pattern of the medial aspect of the knee has been associated with the development of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are associated......Relationship between knee kinetic outcome measures in counter movement jumps and self-reported function in ACL reconstructed subjects Brekke AF1,2, Nielsen DB2, Holsgaard-Larsen A2 1School of physiotherapy, University College Zealand, Denmark 2Orthopaedic Research Unit, Department of Orthopaedics...... with early-onset OA with associated pain, functional limitations, and decreased quality of life. However, specific knee loading pattern of the medial aspect has not been investigated during different jump-tasks in ACL-reconstructed patients. The purpose was to investigate potential kinetic differences...

  8. The effect of valgus braces on medial compartment load of the knee joint - in vivo load measurements in three subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzner, Ines; Küther, Steffen; Heinlein, Bernd; Dymke, Jörn; Bender, Alwina; Halder, Andreas M; Bergmann, Georg

    2011-04-29

    Knee osteoarthritis occurs predominately at the medial compartment. To unload the affected compartment, valgus braces are used which induce an additional valgus moment in order to shift the load more laterally. Until now the biomechanical effect of braces was mainly evaluated by measuring changes in external knee adduction moments. The aim of this study was to investigate if and to which extent the medial compartment load is reduced in vivo when wearing valgus braces. Six components of joint contact load were measured in vivo in three subjects, using instrumented, telemeterized knee implants. From the forces and moments the medio-lateral force distribution was calculated. Two braces, MOS Genu (Bauerfeind AG) and Genu Arthro (Otto Bock) were investigated in neutral, 4° and 8° valgus adjustment during walking, stair ascending and descending. During walking with the MOS brace in 4°/8° valgus adjustment, medial forces were reduced by 24%/30% on average at terminal stance. During walking with the GA in the 8° valgus position, medial forces were reduced by only 7%. During stair ascending/descending significant reductions of 26%/24% were only observed with the MOS (8°). The load reducing ability of the two investigated valgus braces was confirmed in three subjects. However, the load reduction depends on the brace stiffness and its valgus adjustment and varies strongly inter-individually. Valgus adjustments of 8° might, especially with the MOS brace, not be tolerated by patients for a long time. Medial load reductions of more than 25% can therefore probably not be expected in clinical practise. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantitative analysis of fluorescence lifetime measurements of the macula using the fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscope in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dysli, Chantal; Quellec, Gwénolé; Abegg, Mathias; Menke, Marcel N; Wolf-Schnurrbusch, Ute; Kowal, Jens; Blatz, Johannes; La Schiazza, Olivier; Leichtle, Alexander B; Wolf, Sebastian; Zinkernagel, Martin S

    2014-04-03

    Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) cannot only be characterized by the intensity or the emission spectrum, but also by its lifetime. As the lifetime of a fluorescent molecule is sensitive to its local microenvironment, this technique may provide more information than fundus autofluorescence imaging. We report here the characteristics and repeatability of FAF lifetime measurements of the human macula using a new fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscope (FLIO). A total of 31 healthy phakic subjects were included in this study with an age range from 22 to 61 years. For image acquisition, a fluorescence lifetime ophthalmoscope based on a Heidelberg Engineering Spectralis system was used. Fluorescence lifetime maps of the retina were recorded in a short- (498-560 nm) and a long- (560-720 nm) spectral channel. For quantification of fluorescence lifetimes a standard ETDRS grid was used. Mean fluorescence lifetimes were shortest in the fovea, with 208 picoseconds for the short-spectral channel and 239 picoseconds for the long-spectral channel, respectively. Fluorescence lifetimes increased from the central area to the outer ring of the ETDRS grid. The test-retest reliability of FLIO was very high for all ETDRS areas (Spearman's ρ = 0.80 for the short- and 0.97 for the long-spectral channel, P macula in healthy subjects. By using a custom-built software, we were able to quantify fluorescence lifetimes within the ETDRS grid. Establishing a clinically accessible standard against which to measure FAF lifetimes within the retina is a prerequisite for future studies in retinal disease.

  10. Reproducibility of heart rate variability parameters measured in healthy subjects at rest and after a postural change maneuver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.M. Dantas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV provides important information about cardiac autonomic modulation. Since it is a noninvasive and inexpensive method, HRV has been used to evaluate several parameters of cardiovascular health. However, the internal reproducibility of this method has been challenged in some studies. Our aim was to determine the intra-individual reproducibility of HRV parameters in short-term recordings obtained in supine and orthostatic positions. Electrocardiographic (ECG recordings were obtained from 30 healthy subjects (20-49 years, 14 men using a digital apparatus (sampling ratio = 250 Hz. ECG was recorded for 10 min in the supine position and for 10 min in the orthostatic position. The procedure was repeated 2-3 h later. Time and frequency domain analyses were performed. Frequency domain included low (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz and high frequency (HF, 0.15-0.4 Hz bands. Power spectral analysis was performed by the autoregressive method and model order was set at 16. Intra-subject agreement was assessed by linear regression analysis, test of difference in variances and limits of agreement. Most HRV measures (pNN50, RMSSD, LF, HF, and LF/HF ratio were reproducible independent of body position. Better correlation indexes (r > 0.6 were obtained in the orthostatic position. Bland-Altman plots revealed that most values were inside the agreement limits, indicating concordance between measures. Only SDNN and NNv in the supine position were not reproducible. Our results showed reproducibility of HRV parameters when recorded in the same individual with a short time between two exams. The increased sympathetic activity occurring in the orthostatic position probably facilitates reproducibility of the HRV indexes.

  11. Factors related with the ability to maintain wakefulness in the daytime after fast and forward rotating shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-San Chang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore changes in cognitive function, sleep propensity, and sleep-related hormones (growth hormone, cortisol, prolactin, and thyrotropin and to investigate the factors related to the ability to maintain wakefulness in the daytime after one block of fast forward rotating shift work (2 days, 2 evenings, and 2 nights. Twenty female nurses (mean age: 26.0 ± 2.0 years; range: 22–30 years were recruited from an acute psychiatric ward. The nurses completed the Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT, State Anxiety Inventory (SAI, Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS, Digit Symbol Substitution Test, Symbol Searching Test, Taiwan University Attention Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST, and Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT four times throughout the day at 2-hour intervals, and their hormone levels were measured at the same time. There was no time of day effect on sleep propensity as measured by the MWT or MSLT despite an increase in self-reported sleepiness. Anxiety state and neuropsychological tasks, including executive function, attention, and perceptual and motor abilities were not affected during the daytime sleep restriction period. The number of omissions and perceptual and motor abilities showed a practice effect. The thyrotropin levels were significantly elevated, and cortisol levels significantly decreased during the daytime sleep restriction period. There were no significant changes in growth hormone or prolactin throughout the daytime period. Age was negatively associated with the mean sleep latency (MSL of the MWT and positively associated with the MSL of the MSLT. The perseverative errors in WCST and SSS scores were negatively associated with the MSL of the MWT. SAI scores and thyrotropin levels were positively associated with the MSL of the MWT. In conclusion, there was no change in sleep propensity in the daytime after one block of rotating shift work. An attempt to preserve daytime alertness was also related

  12. The Role of Daytime Sleepiness in Psychosocial Outcomes after Treatment for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

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    Esther Yuet Ying Lau

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the role of daytime sleepiness and sleep quality in psychosocial outcomes of patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP. Thirty-seven individuals with moderate to severe OSA and compliant with CPAP treatment for at least 3 months were compared to 27 age- and education-matched healthy controls. The OSA group and the control group were studied with overnight polysomnography (PSG and compared on measures of daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale, sleep quality (Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index, mood (Beck Depression Inventory, Profile of Mood States, and functional outcomes (Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire. After CPAP treatment, the OSA group improved on sleep quality and sleepiness. As a group, they did not differ from controls on sleep architecture after CPAP. The OSA group also showed significant improvements in functional outcomes and was comparable to controls on mood and functional outcomes. Persistent difficulties included lowered activity level and residual sleepiness in some individuals. Sleepiness was found to be a significant predictor of mood and affective states, while both sleepiness and sleep quality predicted functional outcomes. These results highlight the importance of assessment and intervention targeting psychosocial functioning and sleepiness in individuals with OSA after treatment.

  13. Supraclavicular skin temperature as a measure of 18F-FDG uptake by BAT in human subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariëtte R Boon

    Full Text Available Brown adipose tissue (BAT has emerged as a novel player in energy homeostasis in humans and is considered a potential new target for combating obesity and related diseases. The current 'gold standard' for quantification of BAT volume and activity is cold-induced 18F-FDG uptake in BAT. However, use of this technique is limited by cost and radiation exposure. Given the fact that BAT is a thermogenic tissue, mainly located in the supraclavicular region, the aim of the current study was to investigate whether cold-induced supraclavicular skin temperature and core body temperature may be alternative markers of BAT activation in humans.BAT volume and activity were measured in 24 healthy lean adolescent males (mean age 24.1±0.8 years, using cold-induced 18F-FDG uptake with PET-CT. Core body temperature was measured continuously in the small intestine with use of an ingestible telemetric capsule and skin temperature was measured by eighteen wireless iButtons attached to the skin following ISO-defined locations.Proximal and distal (hand/feet skin temperatures markedly decreased upon cold exposure, while supraclavicular skin temperature significantly increased (35.2±0.1 vs. 35.5±0.1°C, p = 0.001. Furthermore, cold-induced supraclavicular skin temperature positively correlated with both total (R2 = 0.28, P = 0.010 and clavicular BAT volume (R2 = 0.20, P = 0.030 and clavicular SUVmax (R2 = 0.27, P = 0.010, while core body temperature did not.Supraclavicular skin temperature as measured by iButtons may have predictive value for BAT detection in adult humans. This is highly desirable considering the increasing interest in pharmacological interventions to stimulate BAT in human subjects.NTR 2473.

  14. Effect of postprandial hyperglycaemia in non-invasive measurement of cerebral metabolic rate of glucose in non-diabetic subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchida, Tatsuro; Itoh, Harumi [Department of Radiology, Fukui Medical University, Matsuoka (Japan); Sadato, Norihiro; Nishizawa, Sadahiko; Yonekura, Yoshiharu [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Fukui Medical University (Japan)

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of postprandial hyperglycaemia (HG) on the non-invasive measurement of cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRGlc). Five patients who had a meal within an hour before a fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) examination were recruited in this study. They underwent intermittent arterial blood sampling (measured input function), and, based on this sampling, CMRGlc was calculated using an autoradiographic method (CMRGlc{sub real}). Simulated input functions were generated based on standardised input function, body surface area and net injected dose of FDG, and simulated CMRGlc (CMRGlc{sub sim}) was also calculated. Percent error of the area under the curve (AUC) between measured (AUC{sub real}) and simulated input function (AUC{sub IFsim}) and percent error between CMRGlc{sub real} and CMRGlc{sub sim} were calculated. These values were compared with those obtained from a previous study conducted under fasting conditions (F). The serum glucose level in the HG group was significantly higher than that in the F group (165{+-}69 vs 100{+-}9 mg/dl, P=0.0007). Percent errors of AUC and CMRGlc in grey matter and white matter in HG were significantly higher than those in F (12.9%{+-}1.3% vs 3.5%{+-}2.2% in AUC, P=0.0015; 18.2%{+-}2.2% vs 2.9%{+-}1.9% in CMRGlc in grey matter, P=0.0028; 24.0%{+-}4.6% vs 3.4%{+-}2.2% in CMRGlc in white matter, P=0.0028). It is concluded that a non-invasive method of measuring CMRGlc should be applied only in non-diabetic subjects under fasting conditions. (orig.)

  15. Comprehensively Measuring Health-Related Subjective Well-Being: Dimensionality Analysis for Improved Outcome Assessment in Health Economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Marieke; Emons, Wilco H M; Plantinga, Arnoud; Pietersma, Suzanne; van den Hout, Wilbert B; Stiggelbout, Anne M; van den Akker-van Marle, M Elske

    2016-01-01

    Allocation of inevitably limited financial resources for health care requires assessment of an intervention's effectiveness. Interventions likely affect quality of life (QOL) more broadly than is measurable with commonly used health-related QOL utility scales. In line with the World Health Organization's definition of health, a recent Delphi procedure showed that assessment needs to put more emphasis on mental and social dimensions. To identify the core dimensions of health-related subjective well-being (HR-SWB) for a new, more comprehensive outcome measure. We formulated items for each domain of an initial Delphi-based set of 21 domains of HR-SWB. We tested these items in a large sample (N = 1143) and used dimensionality analyses to find a smaller number of latent factors. Exploratory factor analysis suggested a five-factor model, which explained 65% of the total variance. Factors related to physical independence, positive affect, negative affect, autonomy, and personal growth. Correlations between the factors ranged from 0.19 to 0.59. A closer inspection of the factors revealed an overlap between the newly identified core dimensions of HR-SWB and the validation scales, but the dimensions of HR-SWB also seemed to reflect additional aspects. This shows that the dimensions of HR-SWB we identified go beyond the existing health-related QOL instruments. We identified a set of five key dimensions to be included in a new, comprehensive measure of HR-SWB that reliably captures these dimensions and fills in the gaps of the existent measures used in economic evaluations. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Supraclavicular skin temperature as a measure of 18F-FDG uptake by BAT in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Mariëtte R; Bakker, Leontine E H; van der Linden, Rianne A D; Pereira Arias-Bouda, Lenka; Smit, Frits; Verberne, Hein J; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D; Jazet, Ingrid M; Rensen, Patrick C N

    2014-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has emerged as a novel player in energy homeostasis in humans and is considered a potential new target for combating obesity and related diseases. The current 'gold standard' for quantification of BAT volume and activity is cold-induced 18F-FDG uptake in BAT. However, use of this technique is limited by cost and radiation exposure. Given the fact that BAT is a thermogenic tissue, mainly located in the supraclavicular region, the aim of the current study was to investigate whether cold-induced supraclavicular skin temperature and core body temperature may be alternative markers of BAT activation in humans. BAT volume and activity were measured in 24 healthy lean adolescent males (mean age 24.1±0.8 years), using cold-induced 18F-FDG uptake with PET-CT. Core body temperature was measured continuously in the small intestine with use of an ingestible telemetric capsule and skin temperature was measured by eighteen wireless iButtons attached to the skin following ISO-defined locations. Proximal and distal (hand/feet) skin temperatures markedly decreased upon cold exposure, while supraclavicular skin temperature significantly increased (35.2±0.1 vs. 35.5±0.1°C, p = 0.001). Furthermore, cold-induced supraclavicular skin temperature positively correlated with both total (R2 = 0.28, P = 0.010) and clavicular BAT volume (R2 = 0.20, P = 0.030) and clavicular SUVmax (R2 = 0.27, P = 0.010), while core body temperature did not. Supraclavicular skin temperature as measured by iButtons may have predictive value for BAT detection in adult humans. This is highly desirable considering the increasing interest in pharmacological interventions to stimulate BAT in human subjects. NTR 2473.

  17. Markers When Feeding Is Restricted to Two Daytime Hours

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    Julieta B. Rivera-Zavala

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Restricted feeding (RF during daytime is associated with anticipatory activity before feeding, marked hyperphagia after mealtime, adjustments in hepatic metabolism, and the expression of a food-entrained oscillator (FEO. 24 h rhythmicity of liver PPARα, β, and γ, peroxisomal markers (PMP70, AOX, and catalase, and free fatty acids (FFAs during RF was evaluated. The effect of fasting-refeeding was also studied. Results showed (1 higher levels of FFA before feeding, (2 a shift of PPARα and PPARγ before and of PPARβ peaks after feeding, (3 an increase in peroxisomal markers, (4 a shift of PMP70 and AOX peaks before feeding, and of maximal catalase activity in the dark period, (5 changes in the fasting-refeeding response, and (6 high correlations (>0.9 of serum corticosterone with PPARα and PPARγ and of PMP70 with PPARβ. In conclusion, 24 h rhythmicity of FFA, liver PPARs, and peroxisomal markers are biochemical adaptations associated with daytime RF and FEO expression.

  18. Daytime Solar Heating of Photovoltaic Arrays in Low Density Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galofaro, J.; Vayner, B.; Ferguson, D.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the current work is to determine the out-gassing rate of H2O molecules for a solar array placed under daytime solar heating (full sunlight) conditions typically encountered in a Low Earth Orbital (LEO) environment. Arc rates are established for individual arrays held at 14 C and are used as a baseline for future comparisons. Radiated thermal solar flux incident to the array is simulated by mounting a stainless steel panel equipped with resistive heating elements several centimeters behind the array. A thermal plot of the heater plate temperature and the array temperature as a function of heating time is then obtained. A mass spectrometer is used to record the levels of partial pressure of water vapor in the test chamber after each of the 5 heating/cooling cycles. Each of the heating cycles was set to time duration of 40 minutes to simulate the daytime solar heat flux to the array over a single orbit. Finally the array is cooled back to ambient temperature after 5 complete cycles and the arc rates of the solar arrays is retested. A comparison of the various data is presented with rather some unexpected results.

  19. A Statistical Method and Tool to Account for Indirect Calorimetry Differential Measurement Error in a Single-Subject Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenan, Matthew S

    2016-01-01

    Indirect calorimetry and oxygen consumption (VO2) are accepted tools in human physiology research. It has been shown that indirect calorimetry systems exhibit differential measurement error, where the error of a device is systematically different depending on the volume of gas flow. Moreover, systems commonly report multiple decimal places of precision, giving the clinician a false sense of device accuracy. The purpose of this manuscript is to demonstrate the use of a novel statistical tool which models the reliability of two specific indirect calorimetry systems, Douglas bag and Parvomedics 2400 TrueOne, as univariate normal distributions and implements the distribution overlapping coefficient to determine the likelihood that two VO2 measures are the same. A command line implementation of the tool is available for the R programming language as well as a web-based graphical user interface (GUI). This tool is valuable for clinicians performing a single-subject analysis as well as researchers interested in determining if their observed differences exceed the error of the device.

  20. Exercise responsive genes measured in peripheral blood of women with chronic fatigue syndrome and matched control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whistler, Toni; Jones, James F; Unger, Elizabeth R; Vernon, Suzanne D

    2005-03-24

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is defined by debilitating fatigue that is exacerbated by physical or mental exertion. To search for markers of CFS-associated post-exertional fatigue, we measured peripheral blood gene expression profiles of women with CFS and matched controls before and after exercise challenge. Women with CFS and healthy, age-matched, sedentary controls were exercised on a stationary bicycle at 70% of their predicted maximum workload. Blood was obtained before and after the challenge, total RNA was extracted from mononuclear cells, and signal intensity of the labeled cDNA hybridized to a 3800-gene oligonucleotide microarray was measured. We identified differences in gene expression among and between subject groups before and after exercise challenge and evaluated differences in terms of Gene Ontology categories. Exercise-responsive genes differed between CFS patients and controls. These were in genes classified in chromatin and nucleosome assembly, cytoplasmic vesicles, membrane transport, and G protein-coupled receptor ontologies. Differences in ion transport and ion channel activity were evident at baseline and were exaggerated after exercise, as evidenced by greater numbers of differentially expressed genes in these molecular functions. These results highlight the potential use of an exercise challenge combined with microarray gene expression analysis in identifying gene ontologies associated with CFS.

  1. Exercise responsive genes measured in peripheral blood of women with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and matched control subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unger Elizabeth R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is defined by debilitating fatigue that is exacerbated by physical or mental exertion. To search for markers of CFS-associated post-exertional fatigue, we measured peripheral blood gene expression profiles of women with CFS and matched controls before and after exercise challenge. Results Women with CFS and healthy, age-matched, sedentary controls were exercised on a stationary bicycle at 70% of their predicted maximum workload. Blood was obtained before and after the challenge, total RNA was extracted from mononuclear cells, and signal intensity of the labeled cDNA hybridized to a 3800-gene oligonucleotide microarray was measured. We identified differences in gene expression among and between subject groups before and after exercise challenge and evaluated differences in terms of Gene Ontology categories. Exercise-responsive genes differed between CFS patients and controls. These were in genes classified in chromatin and nucleosome assembly, cytoplasmic vesicles, membrane transport, and G protein-coupled receptor ontologies. Differences in ion transport and ion channel activity were evident at baseline and were exaggerated after exercise, as evidenced by greater numbers of differentially expressed genes in these molecular functions. Conclusion These results highlight the potential use of an exercise challenge combined with microarray gene expression analysis in identifying gene ontologies associated with CFS.

  2. Measuring cognitive load during simulation-based psychomotor skills training: sensitivity of secondary-task performance and subjective ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji, Faizal A; Khan, Rabia; Regehr, Glenn; Drake, James; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Dubrowski, Adam

    2015-12-01

    As interest in applying cognitive load theory (CLT) to the study and design of pedagogic and technological approaches in healthcare simulation grows, suitable measures of cognitive load (CL) are needed. Here, we report a two-phased study investigating the sensitivity of subjective ratings of mental effort (SRME) and secondary-task performance (signal detection rate, SDR and recognition reaction time, RRT) as measures of CL. In phase 1 of the study, novice learners and expert surgeons attempted a visual-monitoring task under two conditions: single-task (monitoring a virtual patient's heart-rate) and dual-task (tying surgical knots on a bench-top simulator while monitoring the virtual patient's heart-rate). Novices demonstrated higher mental effort and inferior secondary-task performance on the dual-task compared to experts (RRT 1.76 vs. 0.73, p = 0.012; SDR 0.27 vs. 0.97, p instructional design research are discussed.

  3. Continuous positive airway pressure improves sleep and daytime sleepiness in patients with Parkinson disease and sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neikrug, Ariel B; Liu, Lianqi; Avanzino, Julie A; Maglione, Jeanne E; Natarajan, Loki; Bradley, Lenette; Maugeri, Alex; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Palmer, Barton W; Loredo, Jose S; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), common in Parkinson disease (PD), contributes to sleep disturbances and daytime sleepiness. We assessed the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on OSA, sleep, and daytime sleepiness in patients with PD. This was a randomized placebo-controlled, crossover design. Patients with PD and OSA were randomized into 6 w of therapeutic treatment or 3 w of placebo followed by 3 w of therapeutic treatment. Patients were evaluated by polysomnography (PSG) and multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) pretreatment (baseline), after 3 w, and after 6 w of CPAP treatment. Analyses included mixed models, paired analysis, and within-group analyses comparing 3 w to 6 w of treatment. Sleep laboratory. Thirty-eight patients with PD (mean age = 67.2 ± 9.2 y; 12 females). Continuous positive airway pressure. PSG OUTCOME MEASURES: sleep efficiency, %sleep stages (N1, N2, N3, R), arousal index, apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), and % time oxygen saturation sleep-onset latency (MSL). There were significant group-by-time interactions for AHI (P treatment of OSA, improvement in nighttime oxygenation, and in deepening sleep. The paired sample analyses revealed that 3 w of therapeutic treatment resulted in significant decreases in arousal index (t = 3.4, P = 0.002). All improvements after 3 w were maintained at 6 w. Finally, 3 w of therapeutic CPAP also resulted in overall decreases in daytime sleepiness (P = 0.011). Therapeutic continuous positive airway pressure versus placebo was effective in reducing apnea events, improving oxygen saturation, and deepening sleep in patients with Parkinson disease and obstructive sleep apnea. Additionally, arousal index was reduced and effects were maintained at 6 weeks. Finally, 3 weeks of continuous positive airway pressure treatment resulted in reduced daytime sleepiness measured by multiple sleep latency test. These results emphasize the importance of identifying and treating obstructive sleep apnea in patients with

  4. Daytime warming has stronger negative effects on soil nematodes than night-time warming

    OpenAIRE

    Xiumin Yan; Kehong Wang; Lihong Song; Xuefeng Wang; Donghui Wu

    2017-01-01

    Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, that is, stronger warming during night-time than during daytime. Here we focus on how soil nematodes respond to the current asymmetric warming. A field infrared heating experiment was performed in the western of the Songnen Plain, Northeast China. Three warming modes, i.e. daytime warming, night-time warming and diurnal warming, were taken to perform the asymmetric warming condition. Our results showed that the daytime and diurnal warming treatmen...

  5. Objective and subjective measures of sleepiness, and their associations with on-road driving events in shift workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ftouni, Suzanne; Sletten, Tracey L; Howard, Mark; Anderson, Clare; Lenné, Michael G; Lockley, Steven W; Rajaratnam, Shantha M W

    2013-02-01

    To assess the relationships between sleepiness and the incidence of adverse driving events in nurses commuting to and from night and rotating shifts, 27 rotating and permanent night shift-working nurses were asked to complete daily sleep and duty logs, and wear wrist-activity monitors for 2 weeks (369 driving sessions). During all commutes, ocular measures of drowsiness, including the Johns Drowsiness Scale score, were assessed using the Optalert™ system. Participants self-reported their subjective sleepiness at the beginning and end of each drive, and any events that occurred during the drive. Rotating shift nurses reported higher levels of sleepiness compared with permanent night shift nurses. In both shift-working groups, self-reported sleepiness, drowsiness and drive events were significantly higher during commutes following night shifts compared with commutes before night shifts. Strong associations were found between objective drowsiness and increased odds of driving events during commutes following night shifts. Maximum total blink duration (mean = 7.96 s) during the drive and pre-drive Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (mean = 5.0) were associated with greater incidence of sleep-related events [OR, 5.35 (95% CI, 1.32, 21.60), OR, 1.69 (95% CI, 1.04, 2.73), respectively]. Inattention was strongly associated with a Johns Drowsiness Scale score equal to or above 4.5 [OR, 4.58 (95% CI, 1.26-16.69)]. Hazardous driving events were more likely to occur when drivers had been awake for 16 h or more [OR, 4.50 (95% CI, 1.81, 11.16)]. Under real-world driving conditions, shift-working nurses experience high levels of drowsiness as indicated by ocular measures, which are associated with impaired driving performance following night shift work. © 2012 European Sleep Research Society.

  6. Measuring Mentalizing Ability: A Within-Subject Comparison between an Explicit and Implicit Version of a Ball Detection Task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabel D Nijhof

    Full Text Available The concept of mentalizing has been widely studied, but almost exclusively through tasks with explicit instructions. Recent studies suggest that people also mentalize on a more implicit level. However, to our knowledge, no study to date has directly contrasted the effects of implicit and explicit mentalizing processes on an implicit dependent measure within-subjects. We implemented this by using two versions of an object detection task, differing only on secondary catch questions. We hypothesized that if explicit mentalizing relies on complementary processes beyond those underlying implicit mentalizing, this would be reflected in enhanced belief effects in the explicit version. Twenty-eight healthy adults watched movies in which, during the first phase, both they themselves and another agent formed a belief about the location of a ball, and although irrelevant, these beliefs could influence their ball detection reaction times in the second phase. After this response phase, there were occasional catch questions that were different for the explicit and implicit task version. Finally, self-report measures of autism spectrum disorder (ASD symptomatology were included, as the literature suggests that ASD is related to a specific deficit in implicit mentalizing. Both in the explicit and implicit version, belief conditions had a significant effect on reaction times, with responses being slower when neither the participant nor the other agent expected the ball to be present compared to all other conditions. Importantly, after the implicit version, participants reported no explicit mentalizing awareness. In our neurotypical sample, ASD symptoms were not found to correlate with either explicit or implicit mentalizing. In conclusion, the reaction time patterns in the explicit and implicit version of the task show strikingly similar effects of mentalizing, indicating that participants processed beliefs to the same extent regardless of whether they

  7. Measuring Mentalizing Ability: A Within-Subject Comparison between an Explicit and Implicit Version of a Ball Detection Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhof, Annabel D; Brass, Marcel; Bardi, Lara; Wiersema, Jan R

    2016-01-01

    The concept of mentalizing has been widely studied, but almost exclusively through tasks with explicit instructions. Recent studies suggest that people also mentalize on a more implicit level. However, to our knowledge, no study to date has directly contrasted the effects of implicit and explicit mentalizing processes on an implicit dependent measure within-subjects. We implemented this by using two versions of an object detection task, differing only on secondary catch questions. We hypothesized that if explicit mentalizing relies on complementary processes beyond those underlying implicit mentalizing, this would be reflected in enhanced belief effects in the explicit version. Twenty-eight healthy adults watched movies in which, during the first phase, both they themselves and another agent formed a belief about the location of a ball, and although irrelevant, these beliefs could influence their ball detection reaction times in the second phase. After this response phase, there were occasional catch questions that were different for the explicit and implicit task version. Finally, self-report measures of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptomatology were included, as the literature suggests that ASD is related to a specific deficit in implicit mentalizing. Both in the explicit and implicit version, belief conditions had a significant effect on reaction times, with responses being slower when neither the participant nor the other agent expected the ball to be present compared to all other conditions. Importantly, after the implicit version, participants reported no explicit mentalizing awareness. In our neurotypical sample, ASD symptoms were not found to correlate with either explicit or implicit mentalizing. In conclusion, the reaction time patterns in the explicit and implicit version of the task show strikingly similar effects of mentalizing, indicating that participants processed beliefs to the same extent regardless of whether they mentalized explicitly or

  8. Midazolam daytime residual effect evaluated by the multiple sleep latency test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Reimão

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available Daytime sleepiness after ingestion of midazolam as a hypnotic was quantitatively studied employing the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT. We evaluated 20 healthy volunteers, 10 of which received a single oral dose of midazolam (15 mg, one tablet and 10 of which received placebo, in a double-blind design. Tablets were administered at 2200 h, bedtime. On the following day, all subjects were submitted to a clinical evaluation, a subjective checklist and the MSLT. The mean age was 34.7 + 8.9 years in the midazolam and 38.0+10.6 years in the placebo groups (n.s.. Sex and weight distributions were similar in both groups (n.s.. Clinical evaluation and subjective symptom checklist did not make evident significant differences between midazolam and placebo groups (n.s.. The MSTL was performed at 0900, 1100, 1300, 1500 and 1700 h. Mean sleep latencies were 12.0, 12.7, 8.0, 13.5, 17.0 min in the midazolam group; mean sleep latencies were 13.8, 9.0, 6.9, 9.5, 13.6 min in the placebo group (n.s.. In the single dose, double-blind design here evaluated, midazolam did not show differences in relation to placebo on the following day, detectable by the MSLT.

  9. The alerting effects of caffeine, bright light and face washing after a short daytime nap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Mitsuo; Masuda, Akiko; Hori, Tadao

    2003-12-01

    The present study examined whether the combination of a short daytime nap with caffeine, bright light and face washing was effective against mid-afternoon sleepiness. Ten young healthy adults participated in 5 experimental conditions; those experiments were-Nap only: taking a 20 min nap; Caffeine+Nap: taking 200 mg of caffeine followed by a nap; Nap+Bright-light: being exposed to 2000 lx of bright light for 1 min immediately after napping; Nap+Face-washing: washing their faces immediately after napping; and No-Nap: taking a rest without sleep. These naps were taken at 12:40 hours. The subjects engaged in computer tasks for 15 min before napping and for 1 h after napping. Caffeine+Nap was the most effective for subjective sleepiness and performance level; its effects lasted throughout 1 h after napping. Nap+Bright-light was comparable with Caffeine+Nap, except for performance level. Nap+Face-washing showed mild and transient effects, however, it suppressed subjective sleepiness immediately after napping. The effects of a short nap against mid-afternoon sleepiness could be enhanced by combining caffeine intake, exposure to bright light, or face washing. The present study would provide effective countermeasures against mid-afternoon sleepiness and sleepiness related accidents.

  10. Irregular sleep habits of parents are associated with increased sleep problems and daytime sleepiness of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komada, Yoko; Adachi, Naomi; Matsuura, Noriko; Mizuno, Koh; Hirose, Kazuhiro; Aritomi, Ryoji; Shirakawa, Shuichiro

    2009-10-01

    Longitudinal studies in Japan indicate that nocturnal sleep onset has become later and sleep duration has been progressively shortened. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between sleep patterns and sleep problems among children, and to determine the association between parents and their children's sleep habits. Questionnaires about sleep problems and life habits were administered to families living in Tokyo metropolitan areas of Japan. We analyzed the data of pre-school-age (1-5 years old; n = 319, including 175 girls) and elementary school-age children (6-11 years; n = 217, including 116 girls) as well as their parents (402 mothers: 37.0 +/- 4.9 years, 402 fathers: 39.0 +/- 5.9 years). Subjects were categorized as morning (evening) type when they answered their lifestyle habit as "definitely or moderately morning (evening) type". Sleep was categorized into regular, irregular, and intermediate from the sleeping-waking regularity scores. The frequency of daytime dozing is significantly high in children with evening-irregular sleep. Moreover, mothers of children (aged 1-5 and 6-11 years) with evening-irregular sleep have significantly more irregular sleep habits than those of children with morning-regular sleep. Likewise, fathers of children (aged 1-5 years) with evening-irregular sleep have significantly more irregular sleep habits. Thus, irregular late bedtime of parents is associated with sleep problems, daytime sleepiness, and irregular dietary habits of children. Mothers' sleep habits have a stronger influence on their children's sleep than fathers'. Our study indicates the importance of promoting sleep hygiene that encourages healthy sleep for all family members.

  11. Daytime napping and risk of type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo-Chong; Liu, Meng-Meng; Chen, Li-Hua; Xu, Jia-Ying; Hidayat, Khemayanto; Li, Fu-Rong; Qin, Li-Qiang

    2017-06-13

    Prospective studies reported inconsistent findings on the relationship between daytime napping and risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Categorized and dose-response meta-analyses were performed to quantify this relation. Potentially eligible studies were identified by searching PubMed and Embase databases. Dose-response effects were assessed by the generalized least squares trend estimation and study-specific summary relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed with a random-effects model. Seven prospective studies including one US, four European, and two Chinese cohorts involving 249,077 participants and 13,237 cases of T2D were included. The overall analyses showed a 17% increased risk of T2D when comparing habitual nappers with non-nappers (RR = 1.17, 95% CI 1.08-1.27). By region, the summary RR was 1.21 (95% CI 1.17-1.26), 1.15 (95% CI 1.03-1.30) and 1.23 (95% CI 0.87-1.73) for the US, European, and Chinese studies, respectively. Limiting to five studies that excluded subjects with known major chronic disorders yielded a summary RR of 1.16 (95% CI 1.03-1.30). A dose-response analysis suggested an 11% (95% CI 7-16%) increased T2D risk for each increment in daytime napping of 30 min/day and, despite no evidence for nonlinearity (P nonlinearity = 0.65), the increased risk of T2D for short nap (napping is associated with an increased risk of T2D. Given the limited number of cohorts and inconsistency in terms of methodological and population characteristics across these cohorts, residual confounders and/or reverse causality cannot be fully addressed, and our findings should be interpreted with great caution. Future well-designed prospective studies are still warranted.

  12. Poachers and Poverty: Assessing Objective and Subjective Measures of Poverty among Illegal Hunters Outside Ruaha National Park, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli J Knapp

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Illegal hunters in Africa may be making rational decisions about the hunting activities they partake in. These decisions could be linked to their socioeconomic status and the livelihood opportunities available to them. In particular, poverty is widely considered the leading driver that causes a household's inhabitants to take up poaching in protected areas. Programs aiming to protect vulnerable wildlife populations by mitigating poaching have historically relied upon income-based poverty metrics in efforts to reduce regional poverty and incentivise local inhabitants to discontinue poaching activities. Because such data sets that deal with poachers directly are rare, assumptions about the role of poverty, and the extent of poverty, that drives poaching have been hard to test. This study uses a unique sample of 173 self-admitted poachers living in villages adjacent to Ruaha National Park in Tanzania to explore the influence of poverty on poaching. Results indicated high demographic and household economy heterogeneity amon