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Sample records for subjects magnetic stimulation

  1. Action-blindsight in healthy subjects after transcranial magnetic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mark Schram; Kristiansen, Lasse; Rowe, James B.

    2008-01-01

    Clinical cases of blindsight have shown that visually guided movements can be accomplished without conscious visual perception. Here, we show that blindsight can be induced in healthy subjects by using transcranial magnetic stimulation over the visual cortex. Transcranial magnetic stimulation blo...

  2. Magnetic Vestibular Stimulation in Subjects with Unilateral Labyrinthine Disorders

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    Bryan Kevin Ward

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We recently discovered that static magnetic fields from high-strength MRI machines induce nystagmus in all normal humans, and that a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD Lorentz force, derived from ionic currents in the endolymph and pushing on the cupula, best explains this effect. Individuals with no labyrinthine function have no nystagmus. The influence of magnetic vestibular stimulation (MVS in individuals with unilateral loss of labyrinthine function is unknown and may provide insight into mechanism of MVS. These individuals should experience MVS, but with differences consistent with their residual labyrinthine function. We recorded eye movements in the static magnetic field of a 7T MRI machine in nine individuals with unilateral labyrinthine hypofunction, as determined by head impulse testing and vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP. Eye movements were recorded using infrared videooculography. Static head positions were varied in pitch with the body supine, and slow-phase eye velocity (SPV was assessed. All subjects exhibited predominantly horizontal nystagmus after entering the magnet head-first, lying supine. The SPV direction reversed when entering feet-first. Pitching chin-to-chest caused subjects to reach a null point for horizontal SPV. Right unilateral vestibular hypofunction (UVH subjects developed slow-phase-up nystagmus and left UVH subjects, slow-phase-down nystagmus. Vertical and torsional components were consistent with superior semicircular canal excitation or inhibition, respectively, of the intact ear. These findings provide compelling support for the hypothesis that MVS is a result of a Lorentz force and suggest that the function of individual structures within the labyrinth can be assessed with MVS. As a novel method of comfortable and sustained labyrinthine stimulation, MVS can provide new insights into vestibular physiology and pathophysiology.

  3. Interaction of transcranial magnetic stimulation and electrical transmastoid stimulation in human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Janet L; Petersen, Nicolas Caesar; Butler, Jane E

    2002-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation activates corticospinal neurones directly and transsynaptically and hence, activates motoneurones and results in a response in the muscle. Transmastoid stimulation results in a similar muscle response through activation of axons in the spinal cord. This study......-wave, facilitation still occurred at ISIs of -6 and -5 ms and depression of the paired response at ISIs of 0, 1, 4 and 5 ms. The interaction of the response to transmastoid stimulation with the multiple descending volleys elicited by magnetic stimulation of the cortex is complex. However, depression of the response...

  4. Comparison of the pedalling performance induced by magnetic and electrical stimulation cycle ergometry in able-bodied subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szecsi, J; Straube, A; Fornusek, C

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the mechanical power and work generated by able-bodied subjects during functional magnetic stimulation (FMS) vs. functional electrical stimulation (FES) induced ergometer training conditions. Both stimulation methods were applied at a 30 Hz frequency to the quadriceps muscles of 22 healthy able-bodied subjects to induce cycling for 4× four minutes or until exhaustion. FMS was performed via large surface, cooled coils, while FES was applied with a typical stimulation setup used for cycling. Significantly more (pstimulation induced pain and fatigue mechanisms of the neuromuscular system. Copyright © 2013 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on mood in healthy subjects

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    Virginie Moulier

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: High frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC has shown significant efficiency in the treatment of resistant depression. However in healthy subjects, the effects of rTMS remain unclear. Objective: Our aim was to determine the impact of 10 sessions of rTMS applied to the DLPFC on mood and emotion recognition in healthy subjects. Design: In a randomised double-blind study, 20 subjects received 10 daily sessions of active (10 Hz frequency or sham rTMS. The TMS coil was positioned on the left DLPFC through neuronavigation. Several dimensions of mood and emotion processing were assessed at baseline and after rTMS with clinical scales, visual analogue scales (VASs, and the Ekman 60 faces test. Results: The 10 rTMS sessions targeting the DLPFC were well tolerated. No significant difference was found between the active group and the control group for clinical scales and the Ekman 60 faces test. Compared to the control group, the active rTMS group presented a significant improvement in their adaptation to daily life, which was assessed through VAS. Conclusion: This study did not show any deleterious effect on mood and emotion recognition of 10 sessions of rTMS applied on the DLPFC in healthy subjects. This study also suggested a positive effect of rTMS on quality of life.

  6. Synchronization of neuron population subject to steady DC electric field induced by magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kai; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile

    2013-06-01

    Electric fields, which are ubiquitous in the context of neurons, are induced either by external electromagnetic fields or by endogenous electric activities. Clinical evidences point out that magnetic stimulation can induce an electric field that modulates rhythmic activity of special brain tissue, which are associated with most brain functions, including normal and pathological physiological mechanisms. Recently, the studies about the relationship between clinical treatment for psychiatric disorders and magnetic stimulation have been investigated extensively. However, further development of these techniques is limited due to the lack of understanding of the underlying mechanisms supporting the interaction between the electric field induced by magnetic stimulus and brain tissue. In this paper, the effects of steady DC electric field induced by magnetic stimulation on the coherence of an interneuronal network are investigated. Different behaviors have been observed in the network with different topologies (i.e., random and small-world network, modular network). It is found that the coherence displays a peak or a plateau when the induced electric field varies between the parameter range we defined. The coherence of the neuronal systems depends extensively on the network structure and parameters. All these parameters play a key role in determining the range for the induced electric field to synchronize network activities. The presented results could have important implications for the scientific theoretical studies regarding the effects of magnetic stimulation on human brain.

  7. Mapping of cortical language function by functional magnetic resonance imaging and repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation in 40 healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollmann, Nico; Ille, Sebastian; Boeckh-Behrens, Tobias; Ringel, Florian; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2016-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is considered to be the standard method regarding non-invasive language mapping. However, repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) gains increasing importance with respect to that purpose. However, comparisons between both methods are sparse. We performed fMRI and rTMS language mapping of the left hemisphere in 40 healthy, right-handed subjects in combination with the tasks that are most commonly used in the neurosurgical context (fMRI: word-generation = WGEN task; rTMS: object-naming = ON task). Different rTMS error rate thresholds (ERTs) were calculated, and Cohen's kappa coefficient and the cortical parcellation system (CPS) were used for systematic comparison of the two techniques. Overall, mean kappa coefficients were low, revealing no distinct agreement. We found the highest agreement for both techniques when using the 2-out-of-3 rule (CPS region defined as language positive in terms of rTMS if at least 2 out of 3 stimulations led to a naming error). However, kappa for this threshold was only 0.24 (kappa of <0, 0.01-0.20, 0.21-0.40, 0.41-0.60, 0.61-0.80 and 0.81-0.99 indicate less than chance, slight, fair, moderate, substantial and almost perfect agreement, respectively). Because of the inherent differences in the underlying physiology of fMRI and rTMS, the different tasks used and the impossibility of verifying the results via direct cortical stimulation (DCS) in the population of healthy volunteers, one must exercise caution in drawing conclusions about the relative usefulness of each technique for language mapping. Nevertheless, this study yields valuable insights into these two mapping techniques for the most common language tasks currently used in neurosurgical practice.

  8. Suppression of EMG activity by transcranial magnetic stimulation in human subjects during walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nicolas Caesar; Butler, Jane E; Marchand-Pauvert, Veronique

    2001-01-01

    1. The involvement of the motor cortex during human walking was evaluated using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex at a variety of intensities. Recordings of EMG activity in tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus muscles during walking were rectified and averaged. 2. TMS of lo...

  9. Normative data of cortical excitability measurements obtained by transcranial magnetic stimulation in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva, Ana Sofia; Galhardoni, Ricardo; Cury, Rubens Gisbert; Parravano, Daniella Cardoso; Correa, Guilherme; Araujo, Haniel; Cecilio, Sofia Barros; Raicher, Irina; Toledo, Diego; Silva, Valquíria; Marcolin, Marco Antonio; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Ciampi de Andrade, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    The assessment of cortical excitability (CE) measurements has been increasingly used in neuropsychiatric research. However, there is scant information on the normative values of these measurements, as well as the possible effect of hemisphere laterality, gender and age on these variables. To obtain normative data for CE measurements by transcranial magnetic stimulation, to assess inter-/intra-investigator variability and the influence of sex, age and oral contraception use. A sample of 216 healthy volunteers matched according to age and gender was evaluated. Bilateral rest motor thresholds, motor evoked potentials (MEP), intracortical inhibition and facilitation were measured in the first dorsal interosseous muscle area representation of the primary motor cortex with a circular transcranial magnetic stimulation coil delivering biphasic pulses. Normative data were obtained for 200 participants (in a 1:1 male:female ratio) in a balanced proportion between five age groups (18-30; 31-40; 41-50; 51-60; >60 years). Inter/intra-investigator variability was assessed in 20 healthy volunteers in two sessions performed within a 30-minute interval. Measurements were also performed in a subgroup of 16 healthy female volunteers, using oral contraception and during the menstrual phase. Age had a dichotomous effect on CE measurements, providing significantly different normative data for subjects 50 years old, with smaller MEP's and intracortical inhibition in older individuals. There were no differences between genders or between left and right hemispheres. Also, CE parameters did not significantly differ with use of contraceptive treatment compared to the menstrual phase of the cycle. The inter-/intra-investigator reliability assessment showed some variability that may not be clinically significant. Age had a non-linear effect on CE. There were non-significant differences between genders, hemispheres or with use of oral contraceptives. There was good inter

  10. Failure of activation of spinal motoneurones after muscle fatigue in healthy subjects studied by transcranial magnetic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Birgit; Westlund, Barbro; Krarup, Christian

    2003-01-01

    response depression. Overall, the results suggest that the outflow from the motor cortex could become insufficient to drive all spinal MNs to discharge when the muscle is fatigued and that complex interactions between failure of activation and compensatory mechanisms to maintain motor unit activation occur......During a sustained maximal effort a progressive decline in the ability to drive motoneurones (MNs) develops. We used the recently developed triple stimulation technique (TST) to study corticospinal conduction after fatiguing exercise in healthy subjects. This method employs a collision technique...... to estimate the proportion of motor units activated by a transcranial magnetic stimulus. Following a sustained contraction of the abductor digiti minimi muscle at 50 % maximal force maintained to exhaustion there was an immediate reduction of the TST response from > 95 % to about 60 %. This effect recovered...

  11. Increased probability of repetitive spinal motoneuron activation by transcranial magnetic stimulation after muscle fatigue in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Birgit; Felding, Ulrik Ascanius; Krarup, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Triple stimulation technique (TST) has previously shown that transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) fails to activate a proportion of spinal motoneurons (MNs) during motor fatigue. The TST response depression without attenuation of the conventional motor evoked potential suggested increased prob...... the muscle is fatigued. Repetitive MN firing may provide an adaptive mechanism to maintain motor unit activation and task performance during sustained voluntary activity.......Triple stimulation technique (TST) has previously shown that transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) fails to activate a proportion of spinal motoneurons (MNs) during motor fatigue. The TST response depression without attenuation of the conventional motor evoked potential suggested increased...... probability of repetitive spinal MN activation during exercise even if some MNs failed to discharge by the brain stimulus. Here we used a modified TST (Quadruple stimulation; QuadS and Quintuple stimulation; QuintS) to examine the influence of fatiguing exercise on second and third MN discharges after...

  12. Safety and Tolerability of Theta Burst Stimulation versus Single and Paired Pulse Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: A Comparative Study of 165 Pediatric Subjects

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    Yaejee H Hong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although single- and paired-pulse (sp/pp transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS studies are considered minimal risk in adults and children, the safety profile for theta-burst TMS (TBS is unknown.Objective: In this comparative analysis, we explored the rate, severity, and specific symptoms of TMS-related adverse effects (AEs between sp/ppTMS and TBS in subjects between ages 6 and 18 years.Method: Data from 165 participants from 2009-2014 were analyzed. Assessment of AEs was performed based on baseline and post-TMS administration of a symptom-based questionnaire that rated AEs on a 5-level ordinal scale (minimal, mild, moderate, marked, severe. AE rates and severity were compared using Chi Square or Fisher’s Exact Test depending on data characteristics.Result: Overall, no seizures or severe-rated AEs were reported by 165 pediatric participants. The rate of AE in all TBS sessions was 10.5% (n=76, 95% CI: 4.7 - 19.7%, whereas the rate of AE in all sp/ppTMS sessions was 12.4% (n=89, 95% CI: 6.3 - 21.0%. There was no statistical difference in AE rates between TBS and sp/ppTMS (p=0.71. In all sp/ppTMS and TBS sessions, 20 subjects reported a total of 35 AEs, among these 31 (~88.6% were rated as minimal or mild. There was no difference in the severity of AE between TBS and sp/ppTMS (p=1.0. Only one of 76 TBS participants reported an AE rated as more than minimal/mild.Conclusion: Our comparative analysis showed that TBS appears to be as safe as sp/ppTMS in terms of AE rate and severity. This report supports further investigation of TBS in children.

  13. Effects of Force Load, Muscle Fatigue, and Magnetic Stimulation on Surface Electromyography during Side Arm Lateral Raise Task: A Preliminary Study with Healthy Subjects

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    Liu Cao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to quantitatively investigate the effects of force load, muscle fatigue, and extremely low-frequency (ELF magnetic stimulation on surface electromyography (SEMG signal features during side arm lateral raise task. SEMG signals were recorded from 18 healthy subjects on the anterior deltoid using a BIOSEMI ActiveTwo system during side lateral raise task (with the right arm 90 degrees away from the body with three different loads on the forearm (0 kg, 1 kg, and 3 kg; their order was randomized between subjects. The arm maintained the loads until the subject felt exhausted. The first 10 s recording for each load was regarded as nonfatigue status and the last 10 s before the subject was exhausted was regarded as fatigue status. The subject was then given a five-minute resting between different loads. Two days later, the same experiment was repeated on every subject, and this time the ELF magnetic stimulation was applied to the subject’s deltoid muscle during the five-minute rest period. Three commonly used SEMG features, root mean square (RMS, median frequency (MDF, and sample entropy (SampEn, were analyzed and compared between different loads, nonfatigue/fatigue status, and ELF stimulation and no stimulation. Variance analysis results showed that the effect of force load on RMS was significant (p0.05. In comparison with nonfatigue status, for all the different force loads with and without ELF stimulation, RMS was significantly larger at fatigue (all p<0.001 and MDF and SampEn were significantly smaller (all p<0.001.

  14. Modulating phonemic fluency performance in healthy subjects with transcranial magnetic stimulation over the left or right lateral frontal cortex.

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    Smirni, Daniela; Turriziani, Patrizia; Mangano, Giuseppa Renata; Bracco, Martina; Oliveri, Massimiliano; Cipolotti, Lisa

    2017-07-28

    A growing body of evidence have suggested that non-invasive brain stimulation techniques, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), can improve the performance of aphasic patients in language tasks. For example, application of inhibitory rTMS or tDCs over the right frontal lobe of dysphasic patients resulted in improved naming abilities. Several studies have also reported that in healthy controls (HC) tDCS application over the left prefrontal cortex (PFC) improve performance in naming and semantic fluency tasks. The aim of this study was to investigate in HC, for the first time, the effects of inhibitory repetitive TMS (rTMS) over left and right lateral frontal cortex (BA 47) on two phonemic fluency tasks (FAS or FPL). 44 right-handed HCs were administered rTMS or sham over the left or right lateral frontal cortex in two separate testing sessions, with a 24h interval, followed by the two phonemic fluency tasks. To account for possible practice effects, an additional 22 HCs were tested on only the phonemic fluency task across two sessions with no stimulation. We found that rTMS-inhibition over the left lateral frontal cortex significantly worsened phonemic fluency performance when compared to sham. In contrast, rTMS-inhibition over the right lateral frontal cortex significantly improved phonemic fluency performance when compared to sham. These results were not accounted for practice effects. We speculated that rTMS over the right lateral frontal cortex may induce plastic neural changes to the left lateral frontal cortex by suppressing interhemispheric inhibitory interactions. This resulted in an increased excitability (disinhibition) of the contralateral unstimulated left lateral frontal cortex, consequently enhancing phonemic fluency performance. Conversely, application of rTMS over the left lateral frontal cortex may induce a temporary, virtual lesion, with effects similar to those reported in left frontal

  15. Failure of activation of spinal motoneurones after muscle fatigue in healthy subjects studied by transcranial magnetic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Birgit; Westlund, Barbro; Krarup, Christian

    2003-01-01

    During a sustained maximal effort a progressive decline in the ability to drive motoneurones (MNs) develops. We used the recently developed triple stimulation technique (TST) to study corticospinal conduction after fatiguing exercise in healthy subjects. This method employs a collision technique...... to control levels within 1 min and implies that a decreased number of spinal MNs were excited. Additional TST experiments after maximal and submaximal efforts showed that the decrease in size of the TST response was related to duration and strength of exercise. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) after...... response depression. Overall, the results suggest that the outflow from the motor cortex could become insufficient to drive all spinal MNs to discharge when the muscle is fatigued and that complex interactions between failure of activation and compensatory mechanisms to maintain motor unit activation occur...

  16. Neuro magnetic stimulation: Engineering aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mutawaly, Nafia

    Magnetic nerve stimulation has proven to be an effective, non-invasive technique to excite peripheral and central nervous systems. In this technique, the excitement of the neural tissue depends on exposure to a transient magnetic field generated by passing a high pulse of current through a coil. By positioning the coil in a specific orientation over the targeted tissue, the transient magnetic field will induce an electric field in the conductive milieu of the body. If this field reaches a certain threshold within a specific time period, neural depolarization is then evident. The primary objective of this thesis is the development and testing of new coil designs that can focus the magnetic field more effectively. Two such coils have been built. The first coil has an air core, while the other has a magnetic core. The magnetic fields of these coils, applied to the human upper limb, have been determined theoretically, and the results compared to the field generated by the most common commercial coil, the Figure-8 coil. To design these coils and to test them experimentally, a current pulse generator has been designed and built. Further, a novel measurement system using surface mount inductances and a computer based data acquisition system has been designed and built. The experimental results confirm the theoretical findings, that the air core coil is slightly better than the Figure-8, as far as field strength and focality are concerned. In addition, the experimental results, prove that the coil with the ferromagnetic core, is superior. The second objective is to investigate the effect of stimulus waveforms theoretically, experimentally, and through in vivo study. The goals of the study are to establish a quantitative relationship among various waveforms and to investigate the effect of these waveforms in determining the site of stimulation. Accordingly, a multi subject trial was conducted: a Figure-8 coil was applied to the median nerve of ten subjects at the upper limb

  17. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Schizophrenia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dougall, Nadine; Maayan, Nicola; Soares-Weiser, Karla; McDermott, Lisa M; McIntosh, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    .... One proposed alternative to drug treatments is transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). To date, many research trials to assess effectiveness of TMS for people with symptoms of schizophrenia have been conducted worldwide...

  18. A single-subject study to evaluate the inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with traditional dysphagia therapy in patients with post-stroke dysphagia.

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    Ghelichi, Leila; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi; Jalaie, Shohreh; Nakhostin-Ansari, Noureddin; Forogh, Bijan; Mehrpour, Masoud

    2016-07-06

    Post-stroke dysphagia is common and is associated with the development of pneumonia. To investigate the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) combined with traditional dysphagia therapy (TDT) on swallowing function in patients with post-stroke dysphagia. In this single-subject study, four patients with dysphagia post-stroke included. The patients received the rTMS applied to the intact cerebral hemisphere at 1 Hz with train of 1200 for 5 consecutive days combined with TDT 3 days per week for 6 weeks. The main outcome measure was the Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability (MASA). Measurements were taken before, after the end of 5(th), 10(th), 15(th) treatment sessions, and after the end of the treatment (18(th) session). The MASA scores improved in all patients following treatment. The maximum and minimum change in level between the baseline phase and treatment phase was +84 and +36. The greatest percentage improvement was observed after 5(th) treatment sessions ranging between 11 and 35%. The treatment trend was upward shown by the directions of the slopes indicated by positive values (+9.1-+20.7). The dysphagia was resolved after 10(th) treatment session in all participants. The aspiration resolved in two participants after the 5(th) treatment session and resolved in another 2 participants after the 10(th) treatment session. The combination therapy of rTMS plus TDT improved swallowing function in patients with post-stroke dysphagia. Further research with a larger sample size is recommended.

  19. Magnetic Stimulation and Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-14

    significant respiratory pressures (maximum expiratory pressure, MEP), flow (peak expiratory plow, PEF ), and volumes (expiratory reserve volume, ERV...subjects. Similar increases were also observed in PEF and ERV. The improvements seen in respiratory function returned back to baseline two weeks after...FMS conditioning protocol was stopped. Patient #1 MEP (cmH2O) PEF (L/sec) ERV (liter) Baseline 76 6.01 0.53 2 wk 84 6.16 0.59 4 wk 83 7.65

  20. Numerical dosimetry of transcranial magnetic stimulation coils

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    Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2014-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive neuromodulation technique capable of stimulating neurons by means of electromagnetic induction. TMS can be used to map brain function and shows promise for the diagnosis and treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Calculation of fields induced in the brain are necessary to accurately identify stimulated neural tissue during TMS. This allows the development of novel TMS coil designs capable of stimulating deeper brain regions and increasing the localization of stimulation that can be achieved. We have performed numerical calculations of magnetic and electric field with high-resolution anatomically realistic human head models to find these stimulated brain regions for a variety of proposed TMS coil designs. The realistic head models contain heterogeneous tissue structures and electrical conductivities, yielding superior results to those obtained from the simplified homogeneous head models that are commonly employed. The attenuation of electric field as a function of depth in the brain and the localization of stimulating field have been methodically investigated. In addition to providing a quantitative comparison of different TMS coil designs the variation of induced field between subjects has been investigated. We also show the differences in induced fields between adult, adolescent and child head models to preemptively identify potential safety issues in the application of pediatric TMS.

  1. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Garvey, Marjorie A.; Mall, Volker

    2008-01-01

    Developmental disabilities (e.g. attention deficit disorder; cerebral palsy) are frequently associated with deviations of the typical pattern of motor skill maturation. Neurophysiologic tools, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which probe motor cortex function, can potentially provide insights into both typical neuromotor maturation and the mechanisms underlying the motor skill deficits in children with developmental disabilities. These insights may set the stage for finding ef...

  2. Benefits of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS for Spastic Subjects: Clinical, Functional, and Biomechanical Parameters for Lower Limb and Walking in Five Hemiparetic Patients

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    Luc Terreaux

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Spasticity is a disabling symptom resulting from reorganization of spinal reflexes no longer inhibited by supraspinal control. Several studies have demonstrated interest in repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in spastic patients. We conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blind crossover study on five spastic hemiparetic patients to determine whether this type of stimulation of the premotor cortex can provide a clinical benefit. Material and Methods. Two stimulation frequencies (1 Hz and 10 Hz were tested versus placebo. Patients were assessed clinically, by quantitative analysis of walking and measurement of neuromechanical parameters (H and T reflexes, musculoarticular stiffness of the ankle. Results. No change was observed after placebo and 10 Hz protocols. Clinical parameters were not significantly modified after 1 Hz stimulation, apart from a tendency towards improved recruitment of antagonist muscles on the Fügl-Meyer scale. Only cadence and recurvatum were significantly modified on quantitative analysis of walking. Neuromechanical parameters were modified with significant decreases in Hmax⁡ /Mmax⁡ and T/Mmax⁡ ratios and stiffness indices 9 days or 31 days after initiation of TMS. Conclusion. This preliminary study supports the efficacy of low-frequency TMS to reduce reflex excitability and stiffness of ankle plantar flexors, while clinical signs of spasticity were not significantly modified.

  3. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in adolescent depression.

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    Loo, Colleen; McFarquhar, Tara; Walter, Garry

    2006-03-01

    There are few safe and effective biological treatments for major depression in adolescents. We aimed to report the use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) as a treatment for adolescents with this condition. The first two subjects in a double-blind, sham-controlled trial of rTMS that is evaluating the efficacy and safety of rTMS in depressed adolescents are described. Clinical response was assessed at baseline and at the end of each week. The following scales were used: Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, Clinical Global Impression-Severity Scale, Beck Depression Inventory and Centre for Epidemiological Studies - Depression - Child Scale. A battery of cognitive tests was also used at several intervals to measure potential change in neuropsychological functioning. Random allocation of both subjects was to active treatment. Both subjects improved to a clinically significant degree with rTMS treatment and reported no adverse effects. Neuropsychological testing did not demonstrate any deterioration in the domains of functioning tested. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation shows early promise as a treatment for major depression in adolescents. Well-designed, sham-controlled studies are now indicated to test the efficacy and safety of rTMS in these patients.

  4. Novel transcranial magnetic stimulation coil for mice

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    March, Stephen; Stark, Spencer; Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2014-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) shows potential for non-invasive treatment of various neurological disorders. Significant work has been performed on the design of coils used for TMS on human subjects but few reports have been made on the design of coils for use on the brains of animals such as mice. This work is needed as TMS studies utilizing mice can allow rapid preclinical development of TMS for human disorders but the coil designs developed for use on humans are inadequate for optimal stimulation of the much smaller mouse brain. A novel TMS coil has been developed with the goal of inducing strong and focused electric fields for the stimulation of small animals such as mice. Calculations of induced electric fields were performed utilizing an MRI derived inhomogeneous model of an adult male mouse. Mechanical and thermal analysis of this new TMS helmet-coil design have also been performed at anticipated TMS operating conditions to ensure mechanical stability of the new coil and establish expected linear attraction and rotational force values. Calculated temperature increases for typical stimulation periods indicate the helmet-coil system is capable of operating within established medical standards. A prototype of the coil has been fabricated and characterization results are presented.

  5. Treatment Pulse Application for Magnetic Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Seob Choi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment and diagnosis can be made in difficult areas simply by changing the output pulse form of the magnetic stimulation device. However, there is a limitation in the range of treatments and diagnoses of a conventional sinusoidal stimulation treatment pulse because the intensity, width, and form of the pulse must be changed according to the lesion type. This paper reports a multidischarge method, where the stimulation coils were driven in sequence via multiple switching control. The limitation of the existing simple sinusoidal pulse form could be overcome by changing the intensity, width, and form of the pulse. In this study, a new sequential discharge method was proposed to freely alter the pulse width. The output characteristics of the stimulation treatment pulse were examined according to the trigger signal delay applied to the switch at each stage by applying a range of superposition pulses to the magnetic simulation device, which is widely used in industry and medicine.

  6. Differential activation of nerve fibers with magnetic stimulation in humans

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    Olree Kenneth S

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Earlier observations in our lab had indicated that large, time-varying magnetic fields could elicit action potentials that travel in only one direction in at least some of the myelinated axons in peripheral nerves. The objective of this study was to collect quantitative evidence for magnetically induced unidirectional action potentials in peripheral nerves of human subjects. A magnetic coil was maneuvered to a location on the upper arm where physical effects consistent with the creation of unidirectional action potentials were observed. Electromyographic (EMG and somatosensory evoked potential (SEP recordings were then made from a total of 20 subjects during stimulation with the magnetic coil. Results The relative amplitudes of the EMG and SEP signals changed oppositely when the current direction in the magnetic coil was reversed. This effect was consistent with current direction in the coil relative to the arm for all subjects. Conclusion A differential evocation of motor and sensory fibers was demonstrated and indicates that it may be possible to induce unidirectional action potentials in myelinated peripheral nerve fibers with magnetic stimulation.

  7. Field modeling for transcranial magnetic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thielscher, Axel; Antunes, Andre; Saturnino, Guilherme B

    2015-01-01

    Electric field calculations based on numerical methods and increasingly realistic head models are more and more used in research on Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). However, they are still far from being established as standard tools for the planning and analysis in practical applications...

  8. [Transcranial magnetic stimulation used in psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouché, Christophe; Marigaux, Sandrine; Pattedoie, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation is a non-invasive treatment technique, using electromagnetism properties. It has been used for around twenty years in neurology (treatment of neuropathic pain, certain abnormal movements, Parkinson's disease), and in psychiatry (obsessive compulsive disorder, hallucinations, mood disorders, etc.). The presence and support of a nurse during the sessions is essential. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Recovery Effect of the Muscle Fatigue by the Magnetic Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Kousuke; Nuruki, Atsuo; Tsujimura, Sei-Ichi; Tamari, Youzou; Yunokuchi, Kazutomo

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of magnetic stimulation for muscle fatigue. The six healthy subjects participated in the experiment with the repetition grasp using a hand dynamometer. The measurement of EMG (electromyography) and MMG (mechanomyography) is performed on the left forearm. All subjects performed MVC (maximum voluntary contraction), and repeated exercise in 80%MVC after the MVC measurement. The repetition task was entered when display muscular strength deteriorated. We used an EMG and MMG for the measurement of the muscle fatigue. Provided EMG and MMG waves were calculated integral calculus value (iEMG, and iMMG). The result of iEMG and iMMG were divided by muscular strength, because we calculate integral calculus value per the unit display muscular strength. The result of our study, we found recovery effect by the magnetic stimulation in voluntarily muscular strength and iEMG. However, we can not found in a figure of iMMG.

  10. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex impairs theory of mind learning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lev-Ran, S; Shamay-Tsoory, S G; Zangen, A; Levkovitz, Y

    2012-01-01

    .... This study utilized slow repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the VMPFC in 13 healthy subjects in order to test whether normal functioning of the VMPFC is necessary for ToM functioning...

  11. BRAIN PLASTICITY INVESTIGATED WITH TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION IN HEALTHY HUMANS AND IN PATIENTS WITH MOVEMENT DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    Suppa, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Investigating mechanisms of short-term and long-term synaptic plasticity in primary motor cortex with the transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) technique in healthy subjects and in patients with different types of movement disorders.

  12. Comparison of Coil Designs for Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Priyam; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2015-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive treatment for neurological disorders using time varying magnetic field. The electric field generated by the time varying magnetic field is used to depolarize the brain neurons which can lead to measurable effects. TMS provides a surgical free method for the treatment of neurological brain disorders like depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury and Parkinson's disease. Before using TMS on human subjects, it is appropriate that its effects are verified on animals such as mice. The magnetic field intensity and stimulated region of the brain can be controlled by the shape, position and current in the coils. There are few reports on the designs of the coils for mice. In this paper, different types of coils are developed and compared using an anatomically realistic mouse model derived from MRI images. Parameters such as focality, depth of the stimulation, electric field strength on the scalp and in the deep brain regions, are taken into account. These parameters will help researchers to determine the most suitable coil design according to their need. This should result in improvements in treatment of specific disorders. Carver Charitable Trust.

  13. Improved discrimination of visual stimuli following repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L Waterston

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS at certain frequencies increases thresholds for motor-evoked potentials and phosphenes following stimulation of cortex. Consequently rTMS is often assumed to introduce a "virtual lesion" in stimulated brain regions, with correspondingly diminished behavioral performance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we investigated the effects of rTMS to visual cortex on subjects' ability to perform visual psychophysical tasks. Contrary to expectations of a visual deficit, we find that rTMS often improves the discrimination of visual features. For coarse orientation tasks, discrimination of a static stimulus improved consistently following theta-burst stimulation of the occipital lobe. Using a reaction-time task, we found that these improvements occurred throughout the visual field and lasted beyond one hour post-rTMS. Low-frequency (1 Hz stimulation yielded similar improvements. In contrast, we did not find consistent effects of rTMS on performance in a fine orientation discrimination task. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Overall our results suggest that rTMS generally improves or has no effect on visual acuity, with the nature of the effect depending on the type of stimulation and the task. We interpret our results in the context of an ideal-observer model of visual perception.

  14. Transcranial magnetic stimulation after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Basem I; Carmody, Margaret A; Zhang, Xiaoming; Lin, Vernon W; Steinmetz, Michael P

    2015-02-01

    To review the basic principles and techniques of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and provide information and evidence regarding its applications in spinal cord injury clinical rehabilitation. A review of the available current and historical literature regarding TMS was conducted, and a discussion of its potential use in spinal cord injury rehabilitation is presented. TMS provides reliable information about the functional integrity and conduction properties of the corticospinal tracts and motor control in the diagnostic and prognostic assessment of various neurological disorders. It allows one to follow the evolution of motor control and to evaluate the effects of different therapeutic procedures. Motor-evoked potentials can be useful in follow-up evaluation of motor function during treatment and rehabilitation, specifically in patients with spinal cord injury and stroke. Although studies regarding somatomotor functional recovery after spinal cord injury have shown promise, more trials are required to provide strong and substantial evidence. TMS is a promising noninvasive tool for the treatment of spasticity, neuropathic pain, and somatomotor deficit after spinal cord injury. Further investigation is needed to demonstrate whether different protocols and applications of stimulation, as well as alternative cortical sites of stimulation, may induce more pronounced and beneficial clinical effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswa Ranjan Mishra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is a non-invasive and relatively painless tool that has been used to study various cognitive functions as well as to understand the brain-behavior relationship in normal individuals as well as in those with various neuropsychiatric disorders. It has also been used as a therapeutic tool in various neuropsychiatric disorders because of its ability to specifically modulate distinct brain areas. Studies have shown that repeated stimulation at low frequency produces long-lasting inhibition, which is called as long-term depression, whereas repeated high-frequency stimulation can produce excitation through long-term potentiation. This paper reviews the current status of rTMS as an investigative and therapeutic modality in various neuropsychiatric disorders. It has been used to study the cortical and subcortical functions, neural plasticity and brain mapping in normal individuals and in various neuropsychiatric disorders. rTMS has been most promising in the treatment of depression, with an overall milder adverse effect profile compared with electroconvulsive therapy. In other neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, mania, epilepsy and substance abuse, it has been found to be useful, although further studies are required to establish therapeutic efficacy. It appears to be ineffective in the treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder. There is a paucity of studies of efficacy and safety of rTMS in pediatric and geriatric population. Although it appears safe, further research is required to optimize its efficacy and reduce the side-effects. Magnetic seizure therapy, which involves producing seizures akin to electroconvulsive therapy, appears to be of comparable efficacy in the treatment of depression with less cognitive adverse effects.

  16. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in the treatment of substance addiction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gorelick, David A; Zangen, Abraham; George, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive method of brain stimulation used to treat a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, but is still in the early stages of study as addiction treatment...

  17. Illusory sensation of movement induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mark Schram; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Grey, Michael James

    2010-01-01

    Human movement sense relies on both somatosensory feedback and on knowledge of the motor commands used to produce the movement. We have induced a movement illusion using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over primary motor cortex and dorsal premotor cortex in the absence of limb moveme...... premotor cortex stimulation was less affected by sensory and motor deprivation than was primary motor cortex stimulation. We propose that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over dorsal premotor cortex produces a corollary discharge that is perceived as movement....

  18. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Aphasia Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeser, Margaret A.; Martin, Paula I; Ho, Michael; Treglia, Ethan; Kaplan, Elina; Bhashir, Shahid; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been reported to improve naming in chronic stroke patients with nonfluent aphasia since 2005. In Part 1, we review the rationale for applying slow, 1 Hz, rTMS to the undamaged right hemisphere in chronic nonfluent aphasia patients following a left hemisphere stroke; and present a TMS protocol used with these patients that is associated with long-term, improved naming post- TMS. In Part, 2 we present results from a case study with chronic nonfluent aphasia where TMS treatments were followed immediately by speech therapy (constraint-induced language therapy). In Part 3, some possible mechanisms associated with improvement following a series of TMS treatments in stroke patients with aphasia are discussed. PMID:22202188

  19. Transcranial magnetic stimulation reveals cortical hyperexcitability in episodic cluster headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Guiseppe; Brighina, Filippo; Brancato, Sara; Valentino, Francesca; Indovino, Serena; Fierro, Brigida

    2015-01-01

    Evidence shows involvement of the cerebral cortex in the pathophysiology of cluster headache (CH). Here we investigated cortical excitability in episodic CH patients by using transcranial magnetic stimulation. In 25 patients with episodic CH and 13 healthy subjects we evaluated the motor cortical response to single-pulse (ie, motor threshold, input-output curves, cortical silent period) and paired-pulse (ie, intracortical facilitation, short intracortical inhibition) transcranial magnetic stimulation in both hemispheres. Thirteen patients were evaluated outside bout and the remaining 12 patients inside bout. Our results showed increased slope of the input-output curves after stimulation of both hemispheres in patients outside bout and in the hemisphere contralateral to the headache side in patients inside bout. Increased intracortical facilitation was observed in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the headache side in patients evaluated both outside and inside bout; reduced short intracortical inhibition was observed in patients inside bout ipsilateral to the side of pain. In conclusion, we provide evidence of increased cortical excitability in episodic CH both outside and inside bout, especially in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the side of headache attacks. Our results suggest that an abnormal regulation of cortical excitability could be involved in the pathophysiology of CH. We investigated cortical excitability in episodic cluster headache by using transcranial magnetic stimulation, providing evidence of cortical hyperexcitability in patients both inside and outside bout. We suggest that an abnormal state of cortical excitability could be involved in the pathophysiology of the disease. Copyright © 2015 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Magnetic stimulation studies of visual cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, V; Cowey, A

    1998-03-01

    The panoply of non-invasive techniques for brain imaging is responsible for much of the current excitement in cognitive neuroscience; sensory, perceptual and cognitive behaviour can now be correlated with cerebral blood flow as assessed by functional imaging, the electrical fields generated by populations of neurons or changes in magnetic fields created by electrical activity. Correlations between localized brain activity and behaviour, however, do not of themselves establish that any brain area is necessary for a particular task; necessity is the domain of the lesion technique. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a technique that can be used non-invasively to produce reversible functional disruption and has already been used to investigate visual detection, discrimination, attention and plasticity. The power of TMS as a `lesion' technique lies in the opportunity to combine reversible disruption with high degrees of spatial and temporal resolution. In this review we trace some of the major developments in the use of TMS as a technique for the investigation of visual cognition.

  1. Responses to lumbar magnetic stimulation in newborns with spina bifida.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerdink, N.; Pasman, J.W.; Roeleveld, N.; Rotteveel, J.J.; Mullaart, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    Searching for a tool to quantify motor impairment in spina bifida, transcranial and lumbar magnetic stimulation were applied in affected newborn infants. Lumbar magnetic stimulation resulted in motor evoked potentials in both the quadriceps muscle and the tibialis anterior muscle in most (11/13)

  2. Electronically switchable sham transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiko Hoeft

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is increasingly being used to demonstrate the causal links between brain and behavior in humans. Further, extensive clinical trials are being conducted to investigate the therapeutic role of TMS in disorders such as depression. Because TMS causes strong peripheral effects such as auditory clicks and muscle twitches, experimental artifacts such as subject bias and placebo effect are clear concerns. Several sham TMS methods have been developed, but none of the techniques allows one to intermix real and sham TMS on a trial-by-trial basis in a double-blind manner. We have developed an attachment that allows fast, automated switching between Standard TMS and two types of control TMS (Sham and Reverse without movement of the coil or reconfiguration of the setup. We validate the setup by performing mathematical modeling, search-coil and physiological measurements. To see if the stimulus conditions can be blinded, we conduct perceptual discrimination and sensory perception studies. We verify that the physical properties of the stimulus are appropriate, and that successive stimuli do not contaminate each other. We find that the threshold for motor activation is significantly higher for Reversed than for Standard stimulation, and that Sham stimulation entirely fails to activate muscle potentials. Subjects and experimenters perform poorly at discriminating between Sham and Standard TMS with a figure-of-eight coil, and between Reverse and Standard TMS with a circular coil. Our results raise the possibility of utilizing this technique for a wide range of applications.

  3. Computational analysis of transcranial magnetic stimulation in the presence of deep brain stimulation probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syeda, F.; Holloway, K.; El-Gendy, A. A.; Hadimani, R. L.

    2017-05-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation is an emerging non-invasive treatment for depression, Parkinson's disease, and a variety of other neurological disorders. Many Parkinson's patients receive the treatment known as Deep Brain Stimulation, but often require additional therapy for speech and swallowing impairment. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation has been explored as a possible treatment by stimulating the mouth motor area of the brain. We have calculated induced electric field, magnetic field, and temperature distributions in the brain using finite element analysis and anatomically realistic heterogeneous head models fitted with Deep Brain Stimulation leads. A Figure of 8 coil, current of 5000 A, and frequency of 2.5 kHz are used as simulation parameters. Results suggest that Deep Brain Stimulation leads cause surrounding tissues to experience slightly increased E-field (Δ Emax =30 V/m), but not exceeding the nominal values induced in brain tissue by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation without leads (215 V/m). The maximum temperature in the brain tissues surrounding leads did not change significantly from the normal human body temperature of 37 °C. Therefore, we ascertain that Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in the mouth motor area may stimulate brain tissue surrounding Deep Brain Stimulation leads, but will not cause tissue damage.

  4. Healthy subjects with a family history of alcoholism show increased stimulative subjective effects of alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderpalm Gordh, Anna H V; Söderpalm, Bo

    2011-08-01

    Research has shown that subjects with a family history positive (FHP) of alcoholism are at increased risk for alcoholism and that this group reacts differently to alcohol than family history negative (FHN) subjects. These different levels of sensitivity may make FHP persons more likely to consume alcohol. Here, we tested the hypothesis that subjects FHP for type 1 alcoholism (according to Cloninger) are more sensitive than control subjects to the stimulative, properties of alcohol following a single moderate dose of alcohol. Fifty-one healthy men and women (22 FHP and 29 FHN) participated in 2 laboratory sessions, in which they consumed a beverage containing ethanol (0.6 g/kg in juice) or placebo (juice alone) in a randomized order. Primary dependent measures were self-report questionnaires of mood states. Subjects with family history of type 1 alcoholism showed increased stimulative responses and an elevated positive mood state after ethanol compared to controls. At this moderate dose, ethanol increased stimulative subjective responses in individuals who were "family history positive." This enhanced sensitivity could motivate to exaggerated drinking and thereby increase the risk for developing alcoholism. Copyright © 2011 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  5. Left prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holi, Matti M; Eronen, Markku; Toivonen, Kari; Toivonen, Päivi; Marttunen, Mauri; Naukkarinen, Hannu

    2004-01-01

    In a double-blind, controlled study, we examined the therapeutic effects of high-frequency left prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on schizophrenia symptoms. A total of 22 chronic hospitalized schizophrenia patients were randomly assigned to 2 weeks (10 sessions) of real or sham rTMS. rTMS was given with the following parameters: 20 trains of 5-second 10-Hz stimulation at 100 percent motor threshold, 30 seconds apart. Effects on positive and negative symptoms, self-reported symptoms, rough neuropsychological functioning, and hormones were assessed. Although there was a significant improvement in both groups in most of the symptom measures, no real differences were found between the groups. A decrease of more than 20 percent in the total PANSS score was found in 7 control subjects but only 1 subject from the real rTMS group. There was no change in hormone levels or neuropsychological functioning, measured by the MMSE, in either group. Left prefrontal rTMS (with the used parameters) seems to produce a significant nonspecific effect of the treatment procedure but no therapeutic effect in the most chronic and severely ill schizophrenia patients.

  6. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation in motor rehabilitation after stroke: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klomjai, W; Lackmy-Vallée, A; Roche, N; Pradat-Diehl, P; Marchand-Pauvert, V; Katz, R

    2015-09-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of adult motor disability. The number of stroke survivors is increasing in industrialized countries, and despite available treatments used in rehabilitation, the recovery of motor functions after stroke is often incomplete. Studies in the 1980s showed that non-invasive brain stimulation (mainly repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation [rTMS] and transcranial direct current stimulation [tDCS]) could modulate cortical excitability and induce plasticity in healthy humans. These findings have opened the way to the therapeutic use of the 2 techniques for stroke. The mechanisms underlying the cortical effect of rTMS and tDCS differ. This paper summarizes data obtained in healthy subjects and gives a general review of the use of rTMS and tDCS in stroke patients with altered motor functions. From 1988 to 2012, approximately 1400 publications were devoted to the study of non-invasive brain stimulation in humans. However, for stroke patients with limb motor deficit, only 141 publications have been devoted to the effects of rTMS and 132 to those of tDCS. The Cochrane review devoted to the effects of rTMS found 19 randomized controlled trials involving 588 patients, and that devoted to tDCS found 18 randomized controlled trials involving 450 patients. Without doubt, rTMS and tDCS contribute to physiological and pathophysiological studies in motor control. However, despite the increasing number of studies devoted to the possible therapeutic use of non-invasive brain stimulation to improve motor recovery after stroke, further studies will be necessary to specify their use in rehabilitation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Preoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwigsen, G.; Siebner, Hartwig R.; Stippich, C.

    2010-01-01

    of essential cortex, it cannot provide information preoperatively for surgical planning.Brain imaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), magnetoencephalography (MEG) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are increasingly being used to localize functionally critical cortical...

  8. Enhanced accuracy in novel mirror drawing after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced proprioceptive deafferentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Christensen, Lars O.D.; Lee, Ji-hang

    2004-01-01

    a performance benefit. In this study, we tested whether deafferentation induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can improve mirror tracing skills in normal subjects. Hand trajectory error during novel mirror drawing was compared across two groups of subjects that received either 1 Hz r......TMS over the somatosensory cortex contralateral to the hand or sham stimulation. Mirror tracing was more accurate after rTMS than after sham stimulation. Using a position-matching task, we confirmed that rTMS reduced proprioceptive acuity and that this reduction was largest when the coil was placed...

  9. Developments in deep brain stimulation using time dependent magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowther, L.J.; Nlebedim, I.C.; Jiles, D.C.

    2012-03-07

    The effect of head model complexity upon the strength of field in different brain regions for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been investigated. Experimental measurements were used to verify the validity of magnetic field calculations and induced electric field calculations for three 3D human head models of varying complexity. Results show the inability for simplified head models to accurately determine the site of high fields that lead to neuronal stimulation and highlight the necessity for realistic head modeling for TMS applications.

  10. Mechanisms of magnetic stimulation of central nervous system neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Pashut

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is a stimulation method in which a magnetic coil generates a magnetic field in an area of interest in the brain. This magnetic field induces an electric field that modulates neuronal activity. The spatial distribution of the induced electric field is determined by the geometry and location of the coil relative to the brain. Although TMS has been used for several decades, the biophysical basis underlying the stimulation of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS is still unknown. To address this problem we developed a numerical scheme enabling us to combine realistic magnetic stimulation (MS with compartmental modeling of neurons with arbitrary morphology. The induced electric field for each location in space was combined with standard compartmental modeling software to calculate the membrane current generated by the electromagnetic field for each segment of the neuron. In agreement with previous studies, the simulations suggested that peripheral axons were excited by the spatial gradients of the induced electric field. In both peripheral and central neurons, MS amplitude required for action potential generation was inversely proportional to the square of the diameter of the stimulated compartment. Due to the importance of the fiber's diameter, magnetic stimulation of CNS neurons depolarized the soma followed by initiation of an action potential in the initial segment of the axon. Passive dendrites affect this process primarily as current sinks, not sources. The simulations predict that neurons with low current threshold are more susceptible to magnetic stimulation. Moreover, they suggest that MS does not directly trigger dendritic regenerative mechanisms. These insights into the mechanism of MS may be relevant for the design of multi-intensity TMS protocols, may facilitate the construction of magnetic stimulators, and may aid the interpretation of results of TMS of the CNS.

  11. Motor cortex-induced plasticity by noninvasive brain stimulation: a comparison between transcranial direct current stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simis, Marcel; Adeyemo, Bamidele O; Medeiros, Liciane F; Miraval, Forella; Gagliardi, Rubens J; Fregni, Felipe

    2013-12-04

    The aim of this study was to test and compare the effects of a within-subject design of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) [coupled with sham transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS)] and tDCS (coupled with sham rTMS) on the motor cortex excitability and also compare the results against sham tDCS/sham rTMS. We conducted a double-blinded, randomized, sham-controlled, cross-over trial. Eleven right-handed, healthy individuals (five women, mean age: 39.8 years, SD 13.4) received the three interventions (cross-over design) in a randomized order: (a) high-frequency (HF) rTMS (+sham tDCS), (b) anodal tDCS (+sham rTMS), and (c) sham stimulation (sham rTMS+sham tDCS). Cortical excitability measurements [motor threshold, motor evoked potential (MEP), intracortical facilitation and inhibition, and transcallosal inhibition] and motor behavioral assessments were used as outcome measures. Between-group analysis of variance showed that MEP amplitude after HF rTMS was significantly higher than MEP amplitude after anodal tDCS (P=0.001). Post-hoc analysis showed a significant increase in MEP amplitude after HF rTMS (25.3%, P=0.036) and a significant decrease in MEP amplitude after anodal tDCS (-32.7%, P=0.001). There was a similar increase in motor function as indexed by Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test in the two active groups compared with sham stimulation. In conclusion, here, we showed that although both techniques induced similar motor gains, they induce opposing results in cortical excitability. HF rTMS is associated with an increase in corticospinal excitability, whereas 20 min of tDCS induces the opposite effect. We discuss potential implications of these results to future clinical experiments using rTMS or tDCS for motor function enhancement.

  12. Paired associative stimulation targeting the tibialis anterior muscle using either mono or biphasic transcranial magnetic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Paired associative stimulation (PAS) protocols induce plastic changes within the motor cortex. The objectives of this study were to investigate PAS effects targeting the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle using a biphasic transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulse form and, to determine whether...

  13. Illusory sensation of movement induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Schram Christensen

    Full Text Available Human movement sense relies on both somatosensory feedback and on knowledge of the motor commands used to produce the movement. We have induced a movement illusion using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over primary motor cortex and dorsal premotor cortex in the absence of limb movement and its associated somatosensory feedback. Afferent and efferent neural signalling was abolished in the arm with ischemic nerve block, and in the leg with spinal nerve block. Movement sensation was assessed following trains of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation applied over primary motor cortex, dorsal premotor cortex, and a control area (posterior parietal cortex. Magnetic stimulation over primary motor cortex and dorsal premotor cortex produced a movement sensation that was significantly greater than stimulation over the control region. Movement sensation after dorsal premotor cortex stimulation was less affected by sensory and motor deprivation than was primary motor cortex stimulation. We propose that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over dorsal premotor cortex produces a corollary discharge that is perceived as movement.

  14. Effect of Parkinson's Disease in Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syeda, Farheen; Magsood, Hamzah; Lee, Erik; El-Gendy, Ahmed; Jiles, David; Hadimani, Ravi

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation is a non-invasive clinical therapy used to treat depression and migraine, and shows further promise as treatment for Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and other neurological disorders. However, it is yet unclear as to how anatomical differences may affect stimulation from this treatment. We use finite element analysis to model and analyze the results of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in various head models. A number of heterogeneous head models have been developed using MRI data of real patients, including healthy individuals as well as patients of Parkinson's disease. Simulations of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation performed on 22 anatomically different models highlight the differences in induced stimulation. A standard Figure of 8 coil is used with frequency 2.5 kHz, placed 5 mm above the head. We compare cortical stimulation, volume of brain tissue stimulated, specificity, and maximum E-field induced in the brain for models ranging from ages 20 to 60. Results show that stimulation varies drastically between patients of the same age and health status depending upon brain-scalp distance, which is not necessarily a linear progression with age.

  15. In vitro magnetic stimulation: a simple stimulation device to deliver defined low intensity electromagnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Grehl

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive electromagnetic field brain stimulation (NIBS appears to benefit human neurological and psychiatric conditions, although the optimal stimulation parameters and underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Although in vitro studies have begun to elucidate cellular mechanisms, stimulation is delivered by a range of coils (from commercially available human stimulation coils to laboratory-built circuits so that the electromagnetic fields induced within the tissue to produce the reported effects are ill-defined.Here we develop a simple in vitro stimulation device with plug-and-play features that allow delivery of a range of stimulation parameters. We chose to test low intensity repetitive magnetic stimulation (LI-rMS delivered at 3 frequencies to hindbrain explant cultures containing the olivocerebellar pathway. We used computational modelling to define the parameters of a stimulation circuit and coil that deliver a unidirectional homogeneous magnetic field of known intensity and direction, and therefore a predictable electric field, to the target. We built the coil to be compatible with culture requirements: stimulation within an incubator; a flat surface allowing consistent position and magnetic field direction; location outside the culture plate to maintain sterility and no heating or vibration. Measurements at the explant confirmed the induced magnetic field was homogenous and matched the simulation results. To validate our system we investigated biological effects following LI-rMS at 1 Hz, 10 Hz and biomimetic high frequency (BHFS, which we have previously shown induces neural circuit reorganisation. We found that gene expression was modified by LI-rMS in a frequency-related manner. Four hours after a single 10-minute stimulation session, the number of c-fos positive cells increased, indicating that our stimulation activated the tissue. Also, after 14 days of LI-rMS, the expression of genes normally present in the tissue was differentially

  16. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to the Primary Motor Cortex Interferes with Motor Learning by Observing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Liana E.; Wilson, Elizabeth T.; Gribble, Paul L.

    2009-01-01

    Neural representations of novel motor skills can be acquired through visual observation. We used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to test the idea that this "motor learning by observing" is based on engagement of neural processes for learning in the primary motor cortex (M1). Human subjects who observed another person learning…

  17. Role of the prefrontal cortex in the control of express saccades. A transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müri, R M; Rivaud, S; Gaymard, B; Ploner, C J; Vermersch, A I; Hess, C W; Pierrot-Deseilligny, C

    1999-02-01

    Single pulse transcranial magnet stimulation (TMS) was applied in five subjects during a saccadic gap task, i.e. with a temporal gap of 200 ms between the extinguishing of the central fixation point and the appearance of the lateral target. In all subjects, a significant increase of contralateral express saccades was found when TMS was applied over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DPFC) at the end of the gap of 200 ms. Earlier stimulation over the DPFC during the gap had no significant effect. Furthermore, stimulation over the posterior parietal cortex with the same time intervals, and stimulation during a no gap task had no significant influence on express saccades. These results suggest that TMS is capable of interfering specifically with the functioning of the DPFC, probably by inhibition of this region. Possibly such stimulation of the DPFC reduces the inhibition by this region onto the superior colliculus, which results in a facilitation of express saccades.

  18. MAGNETIC VERSUS ELECTRICAL STIMULATION IN THE INTERPOLATION TWITCH TECHNIQUE OF ELBOW FLEXORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia I. Lampropoulou

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The study compared peripheral magnetic with electrical stimulation of the biceps brachii m. (BB in the single pulse Interpolation Twitch Technique (ITT. 14 healthy participants (31±7 years participated in a within-subjects repeated-measures design study. Single, constant-current electrical and magnetic stimuli were delivered over the motor point of BB with supramaximal intensity (20% above maximum at rest and at various levels of voluntary contraction. Force measurements from right elbow isometric flexion and muscle electromyograms (EMG from the BB, the triceps brachii m. (TB and the abductor pollicis brevis m. (APB were obtained. The twitch forces at rest and maximal contractions, the twitch force-voluntary force relationship, the M-waves and the voluntary activation (VA of BB between magnetic and electrical stimulation were compared. The mean amplitude of the twitches evoked at MVC was not significantly different between electrical (0.62 ± 0.49 N and magnetic (0.81 ± 0.49 N stimulation (p > 0.05, and the maximum VA of BB was comparable between electrical (95% and magnetic (93% stimulation (p > 0. 05. No differences (p >0.05 were revealed in the BB M-waves between electrical (13.47 ± 0.49 mV.ms and magnetic (12.61 ± 0.58 mV.ms stimulation. The TB M-waves were also similar (p > 0.05 but electrically evoked APB M-waves were significantly larger than those evoked by magnetic stimulation (p < 0.05. The twitch-voluntary force relationship over the range of MVCs was best described by non-linear functions for both electrical and magnetic stimulation. The electrically evoked resting twitches were consistently larger in amplitude than the magnetically evoked ones (mean difference 3.1 ± 3.34 N, p < 0.05. Reduction of the inter-electrodes distance reduced the twitch amplitude by 6.5 ± 6.2 N (p < 0.05. The fundamental similarities in voluntary activation assessment of BB with peripheral electrical and magnetic stimulation point towards a promising

  19. Measuring magnetic field vector by stimulated Raman transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenli; Wei, Rong, E-mail: weirong@siom.ac.cn; Lin, Jinda; Wang, Yuzhu [Key Laboratory for Quantum Optics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Dong, Richang; Zou, Fan; Chen, Tingting [Key Laboratory for Quantum Optics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2016-03-21

    We present a method for measuring the magnetic field vector in an atomic fountain by probing the line strength of stimulated Raman transitions. The relative line strength for a Λ-type level system with an existing magnetic field is theoretically analyzed. The magnetic field vector measured by our proposed method is consistent well with that by the traditional bias magnetic field method with an axial resolution of 6.1 mrad and a radial resolution of 0.16 rad. Dependences of the Raman transitions on laser polarization schemes are also analyzed. Our method offers the potential advantages for magnetic field measurement without requiring additional bias fields, beyond the limitation of magnetic field intensity, and extending the spatial measurement range. The proposed method can be widely used for measuring magnetic field vector in other precision measurement fields.

  20. Non-invasive brain stimulation: enhancing motor and cognitive functions in healthy old subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximo Zimerman

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Healthy aging is accompanied by changes in cognitive and motor functions that result in impairment of activities of daily living. This process involves a number of modifications in the brain and is associated with metabolic, structural and physiological changes; some of these serving as adaptive responses to the functional declines. Up to date there are no universally accepted strategies to ameliorate declining functions in this population. An essential basis to develop such strategies is a better understanding of neuroplastic changes during healthy aging. In this context, non-invasive brain stimulation techniques, such as transcranial direct current or transcranial magnetic stimulation, provide an attractive option to modulate cortical neuronal assemblies, even with subsequent changes in neuroplasticity. Thus, in the present review we discuss the use of these techniques as a tool to study underlying cortical mechanisms during healthy aging and as an interventional strategy to enhance declining functions and learning abilities in aged subjects.

  1. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation-coil design with improved focality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, P.; Lee, E. G.; Hadimani, R. L.; Jiles, D. C.

    2017-05-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a technique for neuromodulation that can be used as a non-invasive therapy for various neurological disorders. In TMS, a time varying magnetic field generated from an electromagnetic coil placed on the scalp is used to induce an electric field inside the brain. TMS coil geometry plays an important role in determining the focality and depth of penetration of the induced electric field responsible for stimulation. Clinicians and basic scientists are interested in stimulating a localized area of the brain, while minimizing the stimulation of surrounding neural networks. In this paper, a novel coil has been proposed, namely Quadruple Butterfly Coil (QBC) with an improved focality over the commercial Figure-8 coil. Finite element simulations were conducted with both the QBC and the conventional Figure-8 coil. The two coil's stimulation profiles were assessed with 50 anatomically realistic MRI derived head models. The coils were positioned on the vertex and the scalp over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to stimulate the brain. Computer modeling of the coils has been done to determine the parameters of interest-volume of stimulation, maximum electric field, location of maximum electric field and area of stimulation across all 50 head models for both coils.

  2. Where does transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) stimulate? Modelling of induced field maps for some common cortical and cerebellar targets.

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    Bijsterbosch, Janine D; Barker, Anthony T; Lee, Kwang-Hyuk; Woodruff, P W R

    2012-07-01

    Computational models have been be used to estimate the electric and magnetic fields induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and can provide valuable insights into the location and spatial distribution of TMS stimulation. However, there has been little translation of these findings into practical TMS research. This study uses the International 10-20 EEG electrode placement system to position a standard figure-of-eight TMS coil over 13 commonly adopted targets. Using a finite element method and an anatomically detailed and realistic head model, this study provides the first pictorial and numerical atlas of TMS-induced electric fields for a range of coil positions. The results highlight the importance of subject-specific gyral folding patterns and of local thickness of subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Our modelling shows that high electric fields occur primarily on the peaks of those gyri which have only a thin layer of CSF above them. These findings have important implications for inter-individual generalizability of the TMS-induced electric field. We propose that, in order to determine with accuracy the site of stimulation for an individual subject, it is necessary to solve the electric field distribution using subject-specific anatomy obtained from a high-resolution imaging modality such as MRI.

  3. Modulation of motor cortex excitability by paired peripheral and transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumru, Hatice; Albu, Sergiu; Rothwell, John; Leon, Daniel; Flores, Cecilia; Opisso, Eloy; Tormos, Josep Maria; Valls-Sole, Josep

    2017-10-01

    Repetitive application of peripheral electrical stimuli paired with transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of M1 cortex at low frequency, known as paired associative stimulation (PAS), is an effective method to induce motor cortex plasticity in humans. Here we investigated the effects of repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation (rPMS) combined with low frequency rTMS ('magnetic-PAS') on intracortical and corticospinal excitability and whether those changes were widespread or circumscribed to the cortical area controlling the stimulated muscle. Eleven healthy subjects underwent three 10min stimulation sessions: 10HzrPMS alone, applied in trains of 5 stimuli every 10s (60 trains) on the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle; rTMS alone at an intensity 120% of ECR threshold, applied over motor cortex of ECR and at a frequency of 0.1Hz (60 stimuli) and magnetic PAS, i.e., paired rPMS and rTMS. We recorded motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from ECR and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscles. We measured resting motor threshold, motor evoked potentials (MEP) amplitude at 120% of RMT, short intracortical inhibition (SICI) at interstimulus interval (ISI) of 2ms and intracortical facilitation (ICF) at an ISI of 15ms before and immediately after each intervention. Magnetic-PAS, but not rTMS or rPMS applied separately, increased MEP amplitude and reduced short intracortical inhibition in ECR but not in FDI muscle. Magnetic-PAS can increase corticospinal excitability and reduce intracortical inhibition. The effects may be specific for the area of cortical representation of the stimulated muscle. Application of magnetic-PAS might be relevant for motor rehabilitation. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. All rights reserved.

  4. Ataxic hemiparesis: neurophysiological analysis by cerebellar transcranial magnetic stimulation.

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    Kikuchi, Saeko; Mochizuki, Hitoshi; Moriya, Arata; Nakatani-Enomoto, Setsu; Nakamura, Koichiro; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate physiological mechanisms underlying ataxia in patients with ataxic hemiparesis. Subjects were three patients with ataxic hemiparesis, whose responsible lesion was located at the posterior limb of internal capsule (case 1), thalamus (case 2), or pre- and post-central gyri (case 3). Paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) technique was used to evaluate connectivity between the cerebellum and contralateral motor cortex. The conditioning cerebellar stimulus was given over the cerebellum and the test stimulus over the primary motor cortex. We studied how the conditioning stimulus modulated motor evoked potentials (MEPs) to the cortical test stimulus. In non-ataxic limbs, the cerebellar stimulus normally suppressed cortical MEPs. In ataxic limbs, the cerebellar inhibition was not elicited in patients with a lesion at the posterior limb of internal capsule (case 1) or thalamus (case 2). In contrast, normal cerebellar inhibition was elicited in the ataxic limb in a patient with a lesion at sensori-motor cortex (case 3). Lesions at the internal capsule and thalamus involved the cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathways and reduced the cerebellar suppression effect. On the other hand, a lesion at the pre- and post-central gyri should affect cortico-pontine pathway but not involve the cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathways. This lack of cerebello-talamo-cortical pathway involvement may explain normal suppression in this patient. The cerebellar TMS method can differentiate cerebellar efferent ataxic hemiparesis from cerebellar afferent ataxic hemiparesis.

  5. Use of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Treatment in Psychiatry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleman, Andre

    The potential of noninvasive neurostimulation by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for improving psychiatric disorders has been studied increasingly over the past two decades. This is especially the case for major depression and for auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia.

  6. Magnetic stimulation at acupoints relieves mental fatigue: An Event Related Potential (P300) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuo; Qiao, Yanyun; Wang, Lei; Hao, Pengru

    2017-07-20

    Mental fatigue caused by continuous cognitive tasks represents one of the most worrying modern health problems. Event Related Potential (ERP) P300 is thought to be associated with cognitive function. This study aimed at characterizing the neural activity correlated with the attentional processes and exploring a novelty method which combine the magnetic stimulation and acupoint to relieve mental fatigue caused by continuous cognitive tasks. P300 (P3a and P3b) were extracted at three points: when subjects felt relaxed, at the point of mental fatigue, and after the subjects were stimulated at acupoints. The amplitudes and latencies of P3a and P3b were analyzed statistically. Among the four features (P3a amplitude, P3a latency, P3b amplitude, and P3b latency), only P3b amplitude was found to have a significant difference between the resting state and the mental fatigue state. And P3b amplitude significantly increased after magnetic stimulation at the acupoints. Subjects experiencing mental fatigue demonstrated a significant decrease in P3b amplitude in the parietal region, suggesting attenuation of resource allocation for selective attention. P3b amplitude significantly increased after magnetic stimulation at acupoints indicating that this strategy can be used to improve selective attention and relieve mental fatigue.

  7. [Fundamentals and Clinical Applications of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Neuropsychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavera, Mayra; Silva, Federico; García, Ronald; Rueda, Ligia; Carrillo, Sandra

    2014-03-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive method for stimulation of brain that is based on the ability of a generated magnetic field to penetrate skull and brain meninges, inducing an electric current in the brain tissues that produces neuronal depolarization. TMS can be applied as single pulse of stimulation, pairs of stimuli separated by variable intervals to the same or different brain areas, or as trains of repetitive stimuli at various frequencies. Its mechanism of action is currently unknown. Repetitive TMS can modify the excitability of the cerebral cortex, and has been postulated as a diagnostic and therapeutic tool in the area of neuropsychiatry. The aim of this article is to review the knowledge of the TMS as regards its basic principles, pathophysiological mechanism, and its usefulness in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Transmembrane potential induced in a spherical cell model under low-frequency magnetic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hui; Cotic, Marija; Carlen, Peter L.

    2007-09-01

    Time-varying magnetic fields can induce electric fields in the neuronal tissue, a phenomenon that has been recently explored in clinical applications such as peripheral nerve stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation. Although the transmembrane potential induced during direct electric stimulation has already been the subject of a number of theoretical studies, an analytical solution for the magnetically induced transmembrane potential change is still unavailable. In addition, although several studies have analyzed the impact of stimulation parameters, including stimulation intensity and frequency, as well as coil design and position, on the amount of tissue polarization, the effects of tissue non-homogeneity on cell polarization have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we have derived an analytical expression for the transmembrane potential induced by a low-frequency magnetic field in a spherical neuronal structure. This model is representative of a spherical cell body or any neuronal structure of a similar shape. The model cell is located in an extracellular medium and possesses a low-conductive membrane and an internal cytoplasm. These three regions represent the basic tissue non-homogeneity of a neuron at a microscopic level. The sensitivity of the induced transmembrane potential to the coil position and to the geometrical and electrical parameters of the model structure was studied in a broad physiologically relevant range. Our results demonstrate that the structure is regionally polarized, with the pattern of polarization depending on the relative positioning between the model cell and the stimulation coil. In addition, both the geometrical and electrical parameters of the structure affect the amount of polarization. These results may be generalized to other neuronal tissues that possess similar non-homogenous properties, but different shapes, such as an axon. Our results support the idea that aside from coil design and position, tissue non

  9. New therapeutic perspectives in neurorehabilitation: transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STANESCU Ioana

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is a non-invasive tool for the electrical stimulation of neural tissue, including the cerebral cortex, and is an excellent method to study brain physiology. Trains of stimuli (repetitive TMS can modify excitability of the cerebral cortex at the stimulated site and also at remote areas along anatomo-functional connexions. Repetitive TMS is used to modulate cortical excitability in a frequency-dependent manner, for a period of time that outlasts the duration of stimulation, inducing plastic changes in the brain. Repetitive TMS may become an additional tool for early rehabilitation and might be useful for promoting cortical plasticity in neurologic patients. Its utility have been demonstrated by many clinical studies in various disabling conditions, as stroke, Parkinson disease, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injuries, and many more, where rTMS opens a new field of therapeutic possibilities.

  10. Effects of Theta Burst Stimulation on Suprahyoid Motor Cortex Excitability in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tuo; Jiang, Lisheng; Dou, Zulin; Wu, Cheng; Liu, Feng; Xu, Guangqing; Lan, Yue

    Continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) and intermittent TBS (iTBS) are powerful patterns of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), with substantial potential for motor function rehabilitation post-stroke. However, TBS of suprahyoid motor cortex excitability has not been investigated. This study investigated TBS effects on suprahyoid motor cortex excitability and its potential mechanisms in healthy subjects. Thirty-five healthy subjects (23 females; mean age = 21.66 ± 1.66 years) completed three TBS protocols on separate days, separated by at least one week. A stereotaxic neuronavigation system facilitated accurate TMS positioning. Left and right suprahyoid motor evoked potentials (SMEP) were recorded using single-pulse TMS from the contralateral suprahyoid motor cortex before stimulation (baseline) and 0, 15, and 30 min after stimulation. The SMEP latency and amplitude were analyzed via repeated measures analysis of variance. cTBS suppressed ipsilateral suprahyoid motor cortex excitability and activated the contralateral suprahyoid motor cortex. iTBS facilitated ipsilateral suprahyoid motor cortex excitability; however, it did not affect the contralateral excitability. iTBS eliminated the inhibitory effect caused by cTBS applied to the contralateral suprahyoid motor cortex. TBS had no significant effect on the latencies of bilateral SMEP. TBS effects on suprahyoid motor cortex excitability lasted a minimum of 30 min. TBS effectively regulates suprahyoid motor cortex excitability. Suppression of excitability in one hemisphere leads to further activation of the corresponding contralateral motor cortex. iTBS reverses the inhibitory effect induced by cTBS of the contralateral suprahyoid motor cortex. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Peripheral nerve magnetic stimulation: influence of tissue non-homogeneity

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    Papazov Sava P

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peripheral nerves are situated in a highly non-homogeneous environment, including muscles, bones, blood vessels, etc. Time-varying magnetic field stimulation of the median and ulnar nerves in the carpal region is studied, with special consideration of the influence of non-homogeneities. Methods A detailed three-dimensional finite element model (FEM of the anatomy of the wrist region was built to assess the induced currents distribution by external magnetic stimulation. The electromagnetic field distribution in the non-homogeneous domain was defined as an internal Dirichlet problem using the finite element method. The boundary conditions were obtained by analysis of the vector potential field excited by external current-driven coils. Results The results include evaluation and graphical representation of the induced current field distribution at various stimulation coil positions. Comparative study for the real non-homogeneous structure with anisotropic conductivities of the tissues and a mock homogeneous media is also presented. The possibility of achieving selective stimulation of either of the two nerves is assessed. Conclusion The model developed could be useful in theoretical prediction of the current distribution in the nerves during diagnostic stimulation and therapeutic procedures involving electromagnetic excitation. The errors in applying homogeneous domain modeling rather than real non-homogeneous biological structures are demonstrated. The practical implications of the applied approach are valid for any arbitrary weakly conductive medium.

  12. Approximating transcranial magnetic stimulation with electric stimulation in mouse: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Walter L; Lee, Won Hee; Peterchev, Angel V

    2014-01-01

    Rodent models are valuable for preclinical examination of novel therapeutic techniques, including transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). However, comparison of TMS effects in rodents and humans is confounded by inaccurate scaling of the spatial extent of the induced electric field in rodents. The electric field is substantially less focal in rodent models of TMS due to the technical restrictions of making very small coils that can handle the currents required for TMS. We examine the electric field distributions generated by various electrode configurations of electric stimulation in an inhomogeneous high-resolution finite element mouse model, and show that the electric field distributions produced by human TMS can be approximated by electric stimulation in mouse. Based on these results and the limits of magnetic stimulation in mice, we argue that the most practical and accurate way to model focal TMS in mice is electric stimulation through either cortical surface electrodes or electrodes implanted halfway through the mouse cranium. This approach could allow much more accurate approximation of the human TMS electric field focality and strength than that offered by TMS in mouse, enabling, for example, focal targeting of specific cortical regions, which is common in human TMS paradigms.

  13. Modulation of sensorimotor cortex by repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen eGallasch

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examines with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS and with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI whether 20 min of repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation (rPMS has a facilitating effect on associated motor controlling regions. Trains of rPMS with a stimulus intensity of 150% of the motor threshold were applied over right hand flexor muscles of healthy volunteers. First, with TMS, 10 Hz versus 25 Hz rPMS was examined and compared to a control group. Single and paired pulse motor evoked potentials (MEPs from flexor carpi radialis (FCR and extensor carpi radialis (ECR muscles were recorded at baseline (T0, post rPMS (T1, 30 min post (T2, 1h post (T3 and 2h post rPMS (T4. Then, with fMRI, 25 Hz rPMS was compared to sham stimulation by utilizing a finger tapping activation paradigm. Changes in BOLD contrast were examined at baseline (PRE, post rPMS (POST1 and 1h post rPMS (POST2. With TMS facilitation was observed in the target muscle (FCR following 25 Hz rPMS: MEP recruitment curves were increased at T1, T2 and T3, and intracortical facilitation was increased at T1 and T2. No effects were observed following 10 Hz rPMS. With fMRI the BOLD contrast at the left sensorimotor area was increased at POST1. Compared to inductions protocols based on transcutaneous electrical stimulation and mechanical stimulation, the rPMS induced effects appeared shorter lasting.

  14. Deep brain transcranial magnetic stimulation using variable "Halo coil" system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Y.; Hadimani, R. L.; Crowther, L. J.; Xu, Z.; Qu, J.; Jiles, D. C.

    2015-05-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation has the potential to treat various neurological disorders non-invasively and safely. The "Halo coil" configuration can stimulate deeper regions of the brain with lower surface to deep-brain field ratio compared to other coil configurations. The existing "Halo coil" configuration is fixed and is limited in varying the site of stimulation in the brain. We have developed a new system based on the current "Halo coil" design along with a graphical user interface system that enables the larger coil to rotate along the transverse plane. The new system can also enable vertical movement of larger coil. Thus, this adjustable "Halo coil" configuration can stimulate different regions of the brain by adjusting the position and orientation of the larger coil on the head. We have calculated magnetic and electric fields inside a MRI-derived heterogeneous head model for various positions and orientations of the coil. We have also investigated the mechanical and thermal stability of the adjustable "Halo coil" configuration for various positions and orientations of the coil to ensure safe operation of the system.

  15. Water flow patterns induced by bridge oscillation of magnetic fluid between two permanent magnets subjected to alternating magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudo, Seiichi, E-mail: sudo@akita-pu.ac.jp [Faculty of Systems Science and Technology, Akita Prefectural University, Ebinokuchi 84-4, Yurihonjo 015-0055 (Japan); Yamamoto, Kazuki [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Ishimoto, Yukitaka; Nix, Stephanie [Faculty of Systems Science and Technology, Akita Prefectural University, Ebinokuchi 84-4, Yurihonjo 015-0055 (Japan)

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes the characteristics of water flow induced by the bridge oscillation of magnetic fluid between two permanent magnets subject to an external alternating magnetic field. The magnetic fluid bridge is formed in the space between a pair of identical coaxial cylindrical permanent magnets submerged in water. The direction of alternating magnetic field is parallel /antiparallel to the magnetic field produced by two permanent magnets. The magnetic fluid bridge responds to the external alternating magnetic field with harmonic oscillation. The oscillation of magnetic fluid bridge generates water flow around the bridge. Water flow is visualized using a thin milk film at the container bottom. Water flows are observed with a high-speed video camera analysis system. The experimental results show that the flow pattern induced by the bridge oscillation depends on the Keulegan–Carpenter number.

  16. Magnetic field strength and reproducibility of neodymium magnets useful for transcranial static magnetic field stimulation of the human cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivadulla, Casto; Foffani, Guglielmo; Oliviero, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    The application of transcranial static magnetic field stimulation (tSMS) in humans reduces the excitability of the motor cortex for a few minutes after the end of stimulation. However, when tSMS is applied in humans, the cortex is at least 2 cm away, so most of the strength of the magnetic field will not reach the target. The main objective of the study was to measure the strength and reproducibility of static magnetic fields produced by commercial neodymium magnets. We measured the strength and reproducibility of static magnetic fields produced by four different types of neodymium cylindrical magnets using a magnetic field-to-voltage transducer. Magnetic field strength depended on magnet size. At distances magnetic field strength was affected by the presence of central holes (potentially useful for recording electroencephalograms). At distances >1.5 cm, the measurements made on the cylinder axis and 1.5 cm off the axis were comparable. The reproducibility of the results (i.e., the consistency of the field strength across magnets of the same size) was very high. These measurements offer a quantitative empirical reference for developing devices useful for tSMS protocols in both humans and animals. © 2013 International Neuromodulation Society.

  17. Comparison of coil designs for peripheral magnetic muscle stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, S. M.; Herzog, H.-G.; Gattinger, N.; Gleich, B.

    2011-10-01

    The recent application of magnetic stimulation in rehabilitation is often said to solve key drawbacks of the established electrical method. Magnetic fields cause less pain, allow principally a better penetration of inhomogeneous biologic tissue and do not require skin contact. However, in most studies the evoked muscle force has been disappointing. In this paper, a comparison of a classical round circular geometry, a commercial muscle-stimulation coil and a novel design is presented, with special emphasis on the physical field properties. These systems show markedly different force responses for the same magnetic energy and highlight the enormous potential of different coil geometries. The new design resulted in a slope of the force recruiting curve being more than two and a half times higher than the other coils. The data were analyzed with respect to the underlying physical causes and field conditions. After a parameter-extraction approach, the results for the three coils span a two-dimensional space with clearly distinguishable degrees of freedom, which can be manipulated nearly separately and reflect the two main features of a field; the peak amplitude and its decay with the distance.

  18. Solving the orientation specific constraints in transcranial magnetic stimulation by rotating fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assaf Rotem

    Full Text Available Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS is a promising technology for both neurology and psychiatry. Positive treatment outcome has been reported, for instance in double blind, multi-center studies on depression. Nonetheless, the application of TMS towards studying and treating brain disorders is still limited by inter-subject variability and lack of model systems accessible to TMS. The latter are required to obtain a deeper understanding of the biophysical foundations of TMS so that the stimulus protocol can be optimized for maximal brain response, while inter-subject variability hinders precise and reliable delivery of stimuli across subjects. Recent studies showed that both of these limitations are in part due to the angular sensitivity of TMS. Thus, a technique that would eradicate the need for precise angular orientation of the coil would improve both the inter-subject reliability of TMS and its effectiveness in model systems. We show here how rotation of the stimulating field relieves the angular sensitivity of TMS and provides improvements in both issues. Field rotation is attained by superposing the fields of two coils positioned orthogonal to each other and operated with a relative phase shift in time. Rotating field TMS (rfTMS efficiently stimulates both cultured hippocampal networks and rat motor cortex, two neuronal systems that are notoriously difficult to excite magnetically. This opens the possibility of pharmacological and invasive TMS experiments in these model systems. Application of rfTMS to human subjects overcomes the orientation dependence of standard TMS. Thus, rfTMS yields optimal targeting of brain regions where correct orientation cannot be determined (e.g., via motor feedback and will enable stimulation in brain regions where a preferred axonal orientation does not exist.

  19. Peripheral magnetic stimulation to decrease spasticity in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamand, Véronique H; Beaulieu, Louis-David; Nadeau, Line; Schneider, Cyril

    2012-11-01

    Muscle spasticity in pediatric cerebral palsy limits movement and disrupts motor performance, thus its reduction is important in rehabilitation to optimize functional motor development. Our pilot study used repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation, because this emerging technology influences spinal and cerebral synaptic transmission, and its antispastic effects were reported in adult neurologic populations. We tested whether five sessions of tibial and common peroneal nerve stimulation exerted acute and long-term effects on spasticity of the ankle plantar flexor muscles in five spastic diparetic children (mean age, 8 years and 3 months; standard deviation, 1 year and 10 months). Muscle resistance to fast stretching was measured with a manual dynamometer as a spasticity indicator. A progressive decrease was observed for the more impaired leg, reaching significance at the third session. This sustained reduction of spasticity may reflect that the peripheral stimulation improved the controls over the spinal circuitry. It thus suggests that a massive stimulation-induced recruitment of sensory afferents may be able to influence central nervous system plasticity in pediatric cerebral palsy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Sensorimotor Integration During Motor Learning: Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matur, Zeliha; Öge, A Emre

    2017-12-01

    The effect of sensory signals coming from skin and muscle afferents on the sensorimotor cortical networks is entitled as sensory-motor integration (SMI). SMI can be studied electrophysiologically by the motor cortex excitability changes in response to peripheral sensory stimulation. These changes include the periods of short afferent inhibition (SAI), afferent facilitation (AF), and late afferent inhibition (LAI). During the early period of motor skill acquisition, motor cortex excitability increases and changes occur in the area covered by the relevant zone of the motor cortex. In the late period, these give place to the morphological changes, such as synaptogenesis. SAI decreases during learning the motor skills, while LAI increases during motor activity. In this review, the role of SMI in the process of motor learning and transcranial magnetic stimulation techniques performed for studying SMI is summarized.

  1. Magnetic stimulation for non-homogeneous biological structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papazov Sava P

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Magnetic stimulation has gained relatively wide application in studying nervous system structures. This technology has the advantage of reduced excitation of sensory nerve endings, and hence results in quasi-painless action. It has become clinically accepted modality for brain stimulation. However, theoretical and practical solutions for assessment of induced current distribution need more detailed and accurate consideration. Some possible analyses are proposed for distribution of the current induced from excitation current contours of different shape and disposition. Relatively non-difficult solutions are shown, applicable for two- and three-dimensional analysis. Methods The boundary conditions for field analysis by the internal Dirichlet problem are introduced, based on the vector potential field excited by external current coils. The feedback from the induced eddy currents is neglected. Finite element modeling is applied for obtaining the electromagnetic fields distribution in a non-homogeneous domain. Results The distributions were obtained in a non-homogeneous structure comprised of homogeneous layers. A tendency was found of the induced currents to follow paths in lower resistivity layers, deviating from the expected theoretical course for a homogeneous domain. Current density concentrations occur at the boundary between layers, suggesting the possibility for focusing on, or predicting of, a zone of stimulation. Conclusion The theoretical basis and simplified approach for generation of 3D FEM networks for magnetic stimulation analysis are presented, applicable in non-homogeneous and non-linear media. The inconveniences of introducing external excitation currents are avoided. Thus, the possibilities are improved for analysis of distributions induced by time-varying currents from contours of various geometry and position with respect to the medium.

  2. 3D Biomimetic Magnetic Structures for Static Magnetic Field Stimulation of Osteogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Alexandra Paun

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We designed, fabricated and optimized 3D biomimetic magnetic structures that stimulate the osteogenesis in static magnetic fields. The structures were fabricated by direct laser writing via two-photon polymerization of IP-L780 photopolymer and were based on ellipsoidal, hexagonal units organized in a multilayered architecture. The magnetic activity of the structures was assured by coating with a thin layer of collagen-chitosan-hydroxyapatite-magnetic nanoparticles composite. In vitro experiments using MG-63 osteoblast-like cells for 3D structures with gradients of pore size helped us to find an optimum pore size between 20–40 µm. Starting from optimized 3D structures, we evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively the effects of static magnetic fields of up to 250 mT on cell proliferation and differentiation, by ALP (alkaline phosphatase production, Alizarin Red and osteocalcin secretion measurements. We demonstrated that the synergic effect of 3D structure optimization and static magnetic stimulation enhances the bone regeneration by a factor greater than 2 as compared with the same structure in the absence of a magnetic field.

  3. 3D Biomimetic Magnetic Structures for Static Magnetic Field Stimulation of Osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paun, Irina Alexandra; Popescu, Roxana Cristina; Calin, Bogdan Stefanita; Mustaciosu, Cosmin Catalin; Dinescu, Maria; Luculescu, Catalin Romeo

    2018-02-07

    We designed, fabricated and optimized 3D biomimetic magnetic structures that stimulate the osteogenesis in static magnetic fields. The structures were fabricated by direct laser writing via two-photon polymerization of IP-L780 photopolymer and were based on ellipsoidal, hexagonal units organized in a multilayered architecture. The magnetic activity of the structures was assured by coating with a thin layer of collagen-chitosan-hydroxyapatite-magnetic nanoparticles composite. In vitro experiments using MG-63 osteoblast-like cells for 3D structures with gradients of pore size helped us to find an optimum pore size between 20-40 µm. Starting from optimized 3D structures, we evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively the effects of static magnetic fields of up to 250 mT on cell proliferation and differentiation, by ALP (alkaline phosphatase) production, Alizarin Red and osteocalcin secretion measurements. We demonstrated that the synergic effect of 3D structure optimization and static magnetic stimulation enhances the bone regeneration by a factor greater than 2 as compared with the same structure in the absence of a magnetic field.

  4. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Michael

    2009-12-01

    The cause of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS), a chronic motor and vocal tic disorder of childhood onset, remains unknown. Abnormalities in basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuits presumably play an important role in the pathophysiology underlying the involuntary tics. The use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), a noninvasive and painless tool to examine the excitability of several different circuits in the human motor cortex has advanced our understanding of the pathophysiology. Motor thresholds are similar in GTS and healthy subjects; in the resting state, recruitment of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) above threshold is more gradual in patients than controls. In contrast, recruitment of MEPs during preactivation is similar in both groups, as is the duration of the cortical silent period. This suggests that the distribution of excitability in the corticospinal system in patients at rest is different to that in healthy individuals. Importantly, correlation analysis showed that reduced levels of excitability at rest relate, in pure GTS patients, to video ratings of complex tics, and hand and finger tics, with less excitability predicting fewer tics. The correlations disappear for measures made during voluntary activation. This suggests that this is an adaptive response to abnormal basal ganglia-motor cortex inputs in an effort to reduce unwanted movements, a notion supported by electroencephalography-coherence studies that show increased cortico-cortical coupling. Compared to the healthy control group, short intracortical inhibition (SICI) thresholds are similar. However, above-threshold SICI recruitment and sensory afferent inhibition (SAI), a paradigm to examine sensory motor integration, are reduced in patients. This is consistent with the suggestion that reduced excitability of cortical inhibition is one factor that contributes to the difficulty that patients have in suppressing involuntary tics. In addition the reduced SAI indicates that impaired

  5. Adaptation to Cortical Noise Induced by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to the Occipital Lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Heslip

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is increasingly used as a method to modify and study functional brain activity. However, results from various studies have produced conflicting theories on how TMS of cortical tissue influences ongoing visual processing. To investigate this issue, single pulse TMS was applied over left V1 in five healthy subjects during an orientation discrimination task (vertical vs. horizontal using a Gabor patch (2 c/deg, presented 6° in the right visual field. Stimulus contrast was set to each individual's threshold, measured in the absence of TMS. When TMS was applied over V1 performance decreased in all observers (by 1.2–8.7% compared to accuracy levels obtained during stimulation of a control site (Cz. Crucially, accuracy levels during V1 stimulation gradually improved across blocks of 200 trials in some subjects, whereas performance remained stable during control site stimulation. In contrast, this pattern of recovery was not found in an analogous backward masking paradigm, using a brief visual noise mask instead of a TMS pulse. These results show that that the magnitude of TMS disruption can dissipate with repeated stimulation. This suggests that future studies using this technique should minimise the length of TMS exposure within each session to maximise its effectiveness. Our results show that the visual system can adapt dynamically to increased internal noise levels, minimising the impact of TMS induced cortical activity on sensory judgments.

  6. Slow frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation affects reaction times, but not priming effects, in a masked prime task.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlaghecken, F.; Munchau, A.; Bloem, B.R.; Rothwell, J.C.; Eimer, M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Slow frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) reduces motor cortex excitability, but it is unclear whether this has behavioural consequences in healthy subjects. METHODS: We examined the effects of 1 Hz rTMS (train of 20 min; stimulus intensity 80% of active motor

  7. Multichannel SQUID system for measurement of spinal cord evoked magnetic field for supine subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Y; Kawai, J; Miyamoto, M; Uehara, G; Ogata, H [Applied Electronics Laboratory, Kanazawa Institute of Technology, 3 Amaike, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-1331 (Japan); Kawabata, S [Section of Orthopaedic and Spinal Surgery, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8519 (Japan)

    2008-02-01

    A SQUID biomagnetometer system for cervical spinal cord evoked field (SCEF) was developed to investigate a non-invasive diagnosis of function of the spinal cord. The measurement system was characterized by a uniquely shaped cryostat designed for supine subjects. The cryostat has a vertical cylindrical main body whose dimensions are 500 mm in diameter and 940 mm in height and a horizontal protrusion from the side surface with 390 mm of length. The sensor array of 35 LTS-SQUID vector gradiometers directed vertically upward is installed in the end of the protruded part. Subjects lie on a bed in supine position with the head running off the edge of the bed and the back of the neck supported on the upper surface of the protruded part of the cryostat standing beside the bed. This structure readily enables the sensor array to approach close to the neck of the supine subject. The subjects can keep their posture stable during the measurement. We demonstrated the cervical SCEF was successfully detected from a healthy subject who was given electric stimulation to the median nerve at the wrist. The intensity of the evoked magnetic field was 40-70 fT in amplitude. The neural signal propagating along the spinal cord was magnetically observed from the investigation of the transition of the magnetic field distribution.

  8. Subject-controlled stimulation of dorsal genital nerve to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opisso, Eloy; Borau, Albert; Rijkhoff, Nico J M

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the effects of subject controlled dorsal genital nerve (DGN) electrical stimulation on neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) in subjects at home. Subjects underwent a 5-day study at home with DGN stimulation. Stimulation was provided with surface electrodes placed either on the dorsal penile shaft in males and on or close to the clitoris in females. The days 1 and 5 were with no stimulation whereas days 2-4 were with stimulation. Two urodynamic studies were performed at the beginning and at the end of the study. A bladder diary was obtained. Eleven subjects with NDO and with urge incontinence were included. One subject stopped the protocol before the end of the 5-day trial and two did not undergo the second urodynamic study. The subjects showed a statistically significant increase in bladder capacities compared to baseline (P = 0.047). Mean volume per day voided significantly increased over the study within the subjects. Differences between day 1 and day 5 were statistically significant (P = 0.028). The feasibility and the globally positive outcomes of the study indicate that the stimulation of the dorsal genital nerve can be an option for the treatment of the NDO. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Determination of stimulation focality in heterogeneous head models during transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Erik; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2015-03-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is an increasingly popular tool used by both the scientific and medical community to understand and treat the brain. TMS has the potential to help people with a wide range of diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and PTSD, while currently being used to treat people with chronic, drug-resistant depression. Through computer simulations, we are able to see the electric field that TMS induces in anatomical human models, but there is no measure to quantify this electric field in a way that relates to a specific patient undergoing TMS therapy. We propose a way to quantify the focality of the induced electric field in a heterogeneous head model during TMS by relating the surface area of the brain being stimulated to the total volume of the brain being stimulated. This figure would be obtained by conducting finite element analysis (FEA) simulations of TMS therapy on a patient specific head model. Using this figure to assist in TMS therapy will allow clinicians and researchers to more accurately stimulate the desired region of a patient's brain and be more equipped to do comparative studies on the effects of TMS across different patients. This work was funded by the Carver Charitable Trust.

  10. Effect of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on motor cortical excitability and sensory nerve conduction velocity in subacute-stage incomplete spinal cord injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyun Gyu; Ji, Sang-Goo; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to determine whether repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation can improve sensory recovery of the lower extremities in subacute-stage spinal cord injury patients. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted on 20 subjects with diagnosed paraplegia due to spinal cord injury. These 20 subjects were allocated to an experimental group of 10 subjects that underwent active repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation or to a control group of 10 subjects that underwent sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. The SCI patients in the experimental group underwent active repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and conventional rehabilitation therapy, whereas the spinal cord injury patients in the control group underwent sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and conventional rehabilitation therapy. Participants in both groups received therapy five days per week for six-weeks. Latency, amplitude, and sensory nerve conduction velocity were assessed before and after the six week therapy period. [Results] A significant intergroup difference was observed for posttreatment velocity gains, but no significant intergroup difference was observed for amplitude or latency. [Conclusion] repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation may be improve sensory recovery of the lower extremities in subacute-stage spinal cord injury patients.

  11. Dance combined with magnetic pulse stimulates the ability of walk and balance in elder people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Song, Qing-Hua; Xu, Rong-Mei; Guo, Yan-Hua; Wang, Feng; Hu, Jian-Ping; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Li-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Observe the treatment effect on elderly people's waling and balance ability under the stimulation and intervention of waving dance combined with magnetic pulse. 96 elderly people are Involved in the research and the random number table method is divided into observation group and control group; there are 48 people in each group. The control group on the basis of routine daily activities increase waving dance for training treatment; the observation group take training treatment together with the control group, plus magnetic pulse for stimulation treatment. Inspection and control shall be made to relevant indicators of subject's walk and balance ability at the time when they are selected and after they go through 6-month treatment. after 6-month treatment, we found that indicators of walk and balance ability of these two groups of patients have been improved to different extent compared to those indicators when selected (all Pelderly people's walk and balance ability, and the improvement effect could be ever more significant when combined treatment with magnetic pulse stimulation. Such effect is obviously better than the effect improved only by waving dance.

  12. MUNIX and incremental stimulation MUNE in ALS patients and control subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furtula, Jasna; Johnsen, Birger; Christensen, Peter Broegger

    2013-01-01

    This study compares the new Motor Unit Number Estimation (MUNE) technique, MUNIX, with the more common incremental stimulation MUNE (IS-MUNE) with respect to reproducibility in healthy subjects and as potential biomarker of disease progression in patients with ALS.......This study compares the new Motor Unit Number Estimation (MUNE) technique, MUNIX, with the more common incremental stimulation MUNE (IS-MUNE) with respect to reproducibility in healthy subjects and as potential biomarker of disease progression in patients with ALS....

  13. Potential interests and limits of magnetic and electrical stimulation techniques to assess neuromuscular fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, G Y; Bachasson, D; Temesi, J; Wuyam, B; Féasson, L; Vergès, S; Lévy, P

    2012-12-01

    Neuromuscular function can change under different conditions such as ageing, training/detraining, long-term spaceflight, environmental conditions (e.g. hypoxia, hyperthermia), disease, therapy/retraining programs and also with the appearance of fatigue. Neuromuscular fatigue can be defined as any decrease in maximal voluntary strength or power. There is no standardized method to induce fatigue and various protocols involving different contraction patterns (such as sustained or intermittent submaximal isometric or dynamic contractions on isokinetic or custom chairs) have been used. Probably due to lack of motivation/cooperation, results of fatigue resistance protocols are more variable in patients than in healthy subjects. Magnetic and electrical stimulation techniques allow non-invasive assessment of central and peripheral origins of fatigue. They also allow investigation of different types of muscle fatigue when combining various types of stimulation with force/surface EMG measurements. Since maximal electrical stimuli may be uncomfortable or even sometimes painful, several alternative methods have been recently proposed: submaximal muscle stimulation, low/high-frequency paired pulses instead of tetanic stimuli and the use of magnetic stimulation at the peripheral level. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Field Distribution of Transcranial Static Magnetic Stimulation in Realistic Human Head Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharayil, Joseph J; Goetz, Stefan M; Bernabei, John M; Peterchev, Angel V

    2017-10-10

    The objective of this work was to characterize the magnetic field (B-field) that arises in a human brain model from the application of transcranial static magnetic field stimulation (tSMS). The spatial distribution of the B-field magnitude and gradient of a cylindrical, 5.08 cm × 2.54 cm NdFeB magnet were simulated in air and in a human head model using the finite element method and calibrated with measurements in air. The B-field was simulated for magnet placements over prefrontal, motor, sensory, and visual cortex targets. The impact of magnetic susceptibility of head tissues on the B-field was quantified. Peak B-field magnitude and gradient respectively ranged from 179-245 mT and from 13.3-19.0 T/m across the cortical targets. B-field magnitude, focality, and gradient decreased with magnet-cortex distance. The variation in B-field strength and gradient across the anatomical targets largely arose from the magnet-cortex distance. Head magnetic susceptibilities had negligible impact on the B-field characteristics. The half-maximum focality of the tSMS B-field ranged from 7-12 cm3 . This is the first presentation and characterization of the three-dimensional (3D) spatial distribution of the B-field generated in a human brain model by tSMS. These data can provide quantitative dosing guidance for tSMS applications across various cortical targets and subjects. The finding that the B-field gradient is high near the magnet edges should be considered in studies where neural tissue is placed close to the magnet. The observation that susceptibility has negligible effects confirms assumptions in the literature. © 2017 International Neuromodulation Society.

  15. Magnetic Nanoparticles: A Subject for Both Fundamental Research and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bedanta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Single domain magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs have been a vivid subject of intense research for the last fifty years. Preparation of magnetic nanoparticles and nanostructures has been achieved by both bottom-up and top-down approaches. Single domain MNPs show Néel-Brown-like relaxation. The Stoner-Wohlfarth model describes the angular dependence of the switching of the magnetization of a single domain particle in applied magnetic fields. By varying the spacing between the particles, the inter-particle interactions can be tuned. This leads to various supermagnetic states such as superparamagnetism, superspin glass, and superferromagnetism. Recently, the study of the magnetization dynamics of such single domain MNPs has attracted particular attention, and observations of various collective spin wave modes in patterned nanomagnet arrays have opened new avenues for on-chip microwave communications. MNPs have the potential for various other applications such as future recording media and in medicine. We will discuss the various aspects involved in the research on MNPs.

  16. Viscoelastic performance of dielectric elastomer subject to different voltage stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Junjie; Zhang, Yuqing; Liu, Lei; Li, Bo; Chen, Hualing

    2017-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer (DE) is capable of giant deformation subject to an electric field, and demonstrates significant advantages in the potentially application of soft machines with muscle-like characteristics. Due to an inherent property of all macromolecular materials, DE exhibits strong viscoelastic properties. Viscoelasticity could cause a time-dependent deformation and lower the response speed and energy conversion efficiency of DE based actuators, thus strongly affect its electromechanical performance and applications. Combining with the rheological model of viscoelastic relaxation, the viscoelastic performance of a VHB membrane in a circular actuator configuration undergoing separately constant, ramp and sinusoidal voltages are analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical results indicated that DE could attain a big deformation under a small constant voltage with a longer time or under a big voltage with a shorter time. The model also showed that a higher critical stretch could be achieved by applying ramping voltage with a lower rate and the stretch magnitude under sinusoidal voltage is much larger at a relatively low frequency. Finally, experiments were designed to validate the simulation and show well consistent with the simulation results.

  17. Comparison of the induced fields using different coil configurations during deep transcranial magnetic stimulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mai Lu; Shoogo Ueno

    2017-01-01

    Stimulation of deeper brain structures by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) plays a role in the study of reward and motivation mechanisms, which may be beneficial in the treatment of several neurological and psychiatric disorders...

  18. Quiet transcranial magnetic stimulation: Status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterchev, Angel V; Murphy, David L K; Goetz, Stefan M

    2015-01-01

    A significant limitation of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is that the magnetic pulse delivery is associated with a loud clicking sound as high as 140 dB resulting from electromagnetic forces. The loud noise significantly impedes both basic research and clinical applications of TMS. It effectively makes TMS less focal since every click activates auditory cortex, brainstem, and other connected regions, synchronously with the magnetic pulse. The repetitive clicking sound can induce neuromodulation that can interfere with and confound the intended effects at the TMS target. As well, there are known concerns regarding blinding of TMS studies, hearing loss, induction of tinnitus, as well as tolerability. Addressing this need, we are developing a quiet TMS (qTMS) device that incorporates two key concepts: First, the dominant frequency components of the TMS pulse sound (typically 2-5 kHz) are shifted to higher frequencies that are above the human hearing upper threshold of about 20 kHz. Second, the TMS coil is designed electrically and mechanically to generate suprathreshold electric field pulses while minimizing the sound emitted at audible frequencies (sound reduction and suprathreshold pulse amplitudes.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging safety of deep brain stimulator devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluigbo, Chima O; Rezai, Ali R

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the standard of care for the evaluation of different neurological disorders of the brain and spinal cord due to its multiplanar capabilities and excellent soft tissue resolution. With the large and increasing population of patients with implanted deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices, a significant proportion of these patients with chronic neurological diseases require evaluation of their primary neurological disease processes by MRI. The presence of an implanted DBS device in a magnetic resonance environment presents potential hazards. These include the potential for induction of electrical currents or heating in DBS devices, which can result in neurological tissue injury, magnetic field-induced device migration, or disruption of the operational aspects of the devices. In this chapter, we review the basic physics of potential interactions of the MRI environment with implanted DBS devices, summarize results from phantom studies and clinical series, and discuss present recommendations for safe MRI in patients with implanted DBS devices. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Magnetic Vestibular Stimulation (MVS) As a Technique for Understanding the Normal and Diseased Labyrinth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Bryan K; Otero-Millan, Jorge; Jareonsettasin, Prem; Schubert, Michael C; Roberts, Dale C; Zee, David S

    2017-01-01

    Humans often experience dizziness and vertigo around strong static magnetic fields such as those present in an MRI scanner. Recent evidence supports the idea that this effect is the result of inner ear vestibular stimulation and that the mechanism is a magnetohydrodynamic force (Lorentz force) that is generated by the interactions between normal ionic currents in the inner ear endolymph and the strong static magnetic field of MRI machines. While in the MRI, the Lorentz force displaces the cupula of the lateral and anterior semicircular canals, as if the head was rotating with a constant acceleration. If a human subject's eye movements are recorded when they are in darkness in an MRI machine (i.e., without fixation), there is a persistent nystagmus that diminishes but does not completely disappear over time. When the person exits the magnetic field, there is a transient aftereffect (nystagmus beating in the opposite direction) that reflects adaptation that occurred in the MRI. This magnetic vestibular stimulation (MVS) is a useful technique for exploring set-point adaptation, the process by which the brain adapts to a change in its environment, which in this case is vestibular imbalance. Here, we review the mechanism of MVS, how MVS produces a unique stimulus to the labyrinth that allows us to explore set-point adaptation, and how this technique might apply to the understanding and treatment of vestibular and other neurological disorders.

  1. Effect of Low-Level Laser Stimulation on EEG Power in Normal Subjects with Closed Eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jih-Huah Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study, we found that the low-level laser (LLL stimulation at the palm with a frequency of 10 Hz was able to induce significant brain activation in normal subjects with opened eyes. However, the electroencephalography (EEG changes to LLL stimulation in subjects with closed eyes have not been studied. In the present study, the laser array stimulator was applied to deliver insensible laser stimulations to the palm of the tested subjects with closed eyes (the laser group. The EEG activities before, during, and after the laser stimulation were collected. The EEG amplitude powers of each EEG frequency band at 19 locations were calculated. These power data were then analyzed by SPSS software using repeated-measure ANOVAs and appropriate posthoc tests. We found a pronounced decrease in the EEG power in alpha-bandwidth during laser simulation and then less decrease in the EEG power in delta-bandwidth in normal subjects with laser stimulation. The EEG power in beta-bandwidth in the right occipital area also decreased significantly in the laser group. We suggest that LLL stimulation might be conducive to falling into sleep in patients with sleep problems.

  2. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the human spinal cord during vibration stimulation of different dermatomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Jane M; Stroman, Patrick W; Kollias, Spyros S

    2008-03-01

    We investigated noninvasively areas of the healthy human spinal cord that become active in response to vibration stimulation of different dermatomes using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The objectives of this study were to: (1) examine the patterns of consistent activity in the spinal cord during vibration stimulation of the skin, and (2) investigate the rostrocaudal distribution of active pixels when stimulation was applied to different dermatomes. FMRI of the cervical and lumbar spinal cord of seven healthy human subjects was carried out during vibration stimulation of six different dermatomes. In separate experiments, vibratory stimulation (about 50 Hz) was applied to the right biceps, wrist, palm, patella, Achilles tendon and left palm. The segmental distribution of activity observed by fMRI corresponded well with known spinal cord neuroanatomy. The peak number of active pixels was observed at the expected level of the spinal cord with some activity in the adjacent segments. The rostrocaudal distribution of activity was observed to correspond to the dermatome being stimulated. Cross-sectional localization of activity was primarily in dorsal areas but also spread into ventral and intermediate areas of the gray matter and a distinct laterality ipsilateral to the stimulated limb was not observed. We demonstrated that fMRI can detect a dermatome-dependent pattern of spinal cord activity during vibratory stimulation and can be used as a passive stimulus for the noninvasive assessment of the functional integrity of the human spinal cord. Demonstration of cross-sectional selectivity of the activation awaits further methodological and experimental refinements.

  3. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the human spinal cord during vibration stimulation of different dermatomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, Jane M. [University Hospital of Zurich, Institute of Neuroradiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Manitoba, Department of Physiology, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Stroman, Patrick W. [Queen' s University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Kollias, Spyros S. [University Hospital of Zurich, Institute of Neuroradiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2008-03-15

    We investigated noninvasively areas of the healthy human spinal cord that become active in response to vibration stimulation of different dermatomes using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The objectives of this study were to: (1) examine the patterns of consistent activity in the spinal cord during vibration stimulation of the skin, and (2) investigate the rostrocaudal distribution of active pixels when stimulation was applied to different dermatomes. FMRI of the cervical and lumbar spinal cord of seven healthy human subjects was carried out during vibration stimulation of six different dermatomes. In separate experiments, vibratory stimulation (about 50 Hz) was applied to the right biceps, wrist, palm, patella, Achilles tendon and left palm. The segmental distribution of activity observed by fMRI corresponded well with known spinal cord neuroanatomy. The peak number of active pixels was observed at the expected level of the spinal cord with some activity in the adjacent segments. The rostrocaudal distribution of activity was observed to correspond to the dermatome being stimulated. Cross-sectional localization of activity was primarily in dorsal areas but also spread into ventral and intermediate areas of the gray matter and a distinct laterality ipsilateral to the stimulated limb was not observed. We demonstrated that fMRI can detect a dermatome-dependent pattern of spinal cord activity during vibratory stimulation and can be used as a passive stimulus for the noninvasive assessment of the functional integrity of the human spinal cord. Demonstration of cross-sectional selectivity of the activation awaits further methodological and experimental refinements. (orig.)

  4. Lateralized effect of rapid-rate transcranial magnetic stimulation of the prefrontal cortex on mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Leone, A; Catalá, M D; Pascual-Leone Pascual, A

    1996-02-01

    We studied the effects of rapid-rate transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of different scalp positions on mood. Ten normal volunteers rated themselves before and after rTMS on five analog scales labeled "Tristeza" (Sadness), "Ansiedad" (Anxiety), "Alegria" (Happiness), "Cansancio" (Tiredness), and "Dolor/Malestar" (Pain/Discomfort). rTMS was applied to the right lateral prefrontal, left prefrontal, or midline frontal cortex in trains of 5 seconds' duration at 10 Hz and 110% of the subject's motor threshold intensity. Each stimulation position received 10 trains separated by a 25-second pause. No clinically apparent mood changes were evoked by rTMS to any of the scalp positions in any subject. However, left prefrontal rTMS resulted in a significant increase in the Sadness ratings (Tristeza) and a significant decrease in the Happiness ratings ("Alegria") as compared with right prefrontal and midfrontal cortex stimulation. These results show differential effects of rTMS of left and right prefrontal cortex stimulation on mood and illustrate the lateralized control of mood in normal volunteers.

  5. Origin of the low-level EMG during the silent period following transcranial magnetic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butler, Jane E; Petersen, Nicolas C; Herbert, Robert D

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The cortical silent period refers to a period of near silence in the electromyogram (EMG) after transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex during contraction. However, low-level EMG of unknown origin is often present. We hypothesised that it arises through spinal...... reflexes. Sudden lengthening of the muscle as force drops during the silent period could excite muscle spindles and facilitate motoneurones. METHODS: Subjects (n=8) performed maximal isometric, shortening and lengthening contractions of the elbow flexors during which TMS (90-100% output) was delivered over...

  6. Effects of Night Sleep on Motor Learning Using Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Hae Jin; Park, Yong Won; Jeong, Dae Ho; Jung, Han Young

    2012-01-01

    ... (transcranial magnetic stimulation) and finger tapping performance. Eight volunteers were enrolled to investigate the effects of day wake or night sleep on motor learning and finger performance...

  7. Spontaneously Fluctuating Motor Cortex Excitability in Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood: A Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stern, William M; Desikan, Mahalekshmi; Hoad, Damon; Jaffer, Fatima; Strigaro, Gionata; Sander, Josemir W; Rothwell, John C; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2016-01-01

    .... Nine people with alternating hemiplegia of childhood were recruited; eight were successfully tested using transcranial magnetic stimulation to study motor cortex excitability, using single and paired pulse paradigms...

  8. Methods of high current magnetic field generator for transcranial magnetic stimulation application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouda, N. R., E-mail: nybouda@iastate.edu; Pritchard, J.; Weber, R. J.; Mina, M. [Department of Electrical and Computer engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    This paper describes the design procedures and underlying concepts of a novel High Current Magnetic Field Generator (HCMFG) with adjustable pulse width for transcranial magnetic stimulation applications. This is achieved by utilizing two different switching devices, the MOSFET and insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT). Results indicate that currents as high as ±1200 A can be generated with inputs of +/−20 V. Special attention to tradeoffs between field generators utilizing IGBT circuits (HCMFG{sub 1}) and MOSFET circuits (HCMFG{sub 2}) was considered. The theory of operation, design, experimental results, and electronic setup are presented and analyzed.

  9. High permeability cores to optimize the stimulation of deeply located brain regions using transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvador, R; Miranda, P C [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Roth, Y [Advanced Technology Center, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer (Israel); Zangen, A [Neurobiology Department, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)], E-mail: rnsalvador@fc.ul.pt

    2009-05-21

    Efficient stimulation of deeply located brain regions with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) poses many challenges, arising from the fact that the induced field decays rapidly and becomes less focal with depth. We propose a new method to improve the efficiency of TMS of deep brain regions that combines high permeability cores, to increase focality and field intensity, with a coil specifically designed to induce a field that decays slowly with increasing depth. The performance of the proposed design was investigated using the finite element method to determine the total electric field induced by this coil/core arrangement on a realistically shaped homogeneous head model. The calculations show that the inclusion of the cores increases the field's magnitude by as much as 25% while also decreasing the field's decay with depth along specific directions. The focality, as measured by the area where the field's norm is greater than 1/{radical}2 of its maximum value, is also improved by as much as 15% with some core arrangements. The coil's inductance is not significantly increased by the cores. These results show that the presence of the cores might make this specially designed coil even more suited for the effective stimulation of deep brain regions.

  10. Arm movement maps evoked by cortical magnetic stimulation in a robotic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Lush, L M; Judkins, T N; Wittenberg, G F

    2010-02-03

    Many neurological diseases result in a severe inability to reach for which there is no proven therapy. Promising new interventions to address reaching rehabilitation using robotic training devices are currently under investigation in clinical trials but the neural mechanisms that underlie these interventions are not understood. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) may be used to probe such mechanisms quickly and non-invasively, by mapping muscle and movement representations in the primary motor cortex (M1). Here we investigate movement maps in healthy young subjects at rest using TMS in the robotic environment, with the goal of determining the range of TMS accessible movements, as a starting point for the study of cortical plasticity in combination with robotic therapy. We systematically stimulated the left motor cortex of 14 normal volunteers while the right hand and forearm rested in the cradle of a two degree-of-freedom planar rehabilitation robot (IMT). Maps were created by applying 10 stimuli at each of nine locations (3x3 cm(2) grid) centered on the M1 movement hotspot for each subject, defined as the stimulation location that elicited robot cradle movements of the greatest distance. TMS-evoked movement kinematics were measured by the robotic encoders and ranged in magnitude from 0 to 3 cm. Movement maps varied by subject and by location within a subject. However, movements were very consistent within a single stimulation location for a given subject. Movement vectors remained relatively constant (limited to arm movements in the robotic reaching trainer, and thus may provide a real-time, non-invasive platform for neurophysiology based evaluation and therapy in motor rehabilitation settings. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. POSSIBLE MECHANISMS UNDERLYING THE THERAPEUTIC EFFECTS OF TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eChervyakov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is an effective method used to diagnose and treat many neurological disorders. Although repetitive TMS (rTMS has been used to treat a variety of serious pathological conditions including stroke, depression, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, pain, and migraines, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the effects of long-term TMS remain unclear. In the present review, the effects of rTMS on neurotransmitters and synaptic plasticity are described, including the classic interpretations of TMS effects on synaptic plasticity via long-term potentiation (LTP and long-term depression (LTD. We also discuss the effects of rTMS on the genetic apparatus of neurons, glial cells and the prevention of neuronal death. The neurotrophic effects of rTMS on dendritic growth and sprouting and neurotrophic factors are described, including change in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF concentration under the influence of rTMS. Also, non-classical effects of TMS related to biophysical effects of magnetic fields are described, including the quantum effects, the magnetic spin effects, genetic magnetoreception, the macromolecular effects of TMS, and the electromagnetic theory of consciousness. Finally, we discuss possible interpretations of TMS effects according to dynamical systems theory. Evidence suggests that a rTMS-induced magnetic field should be considered a separate physical factor that can be impactful at the subatomic level and that rTMS is capable of significantly altering the reactivity of molecules (radicals. It is thought that these factors underlie the therapeutic benefits of therapy with TMS. Future research on these mechanisms will be instrumental to the development of more powerful and reliable TMS treatment protocols.

  12. Is cognitive control automatic? New insights from transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cona, G; Treccani, B; Umiltà, C A

    2016-10-01

    Cognitive control has been classically considered as a flexible process engaged to pursue intentional behaviors, as distinct from automatic processes, which are unintentional, inflexible, and triggered by unconscious mechanisms. Our study challenged this view, showing that such a distinction may not be so clear-cut. We analyzed motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation to investigate the neurocognitive mechanisms occurring in a conflict task during trials that either required or did not require a response. We observed a Simon effect on MEPs and sequential modulations of such effects on both kinds of trials. Sequential modulations are usually explained as resulting from the engagement of intentional control mechanisms. Our findings rule against this idea, suggesting that these effects are the result of a mechanism that detects and resolves conflict even when there is no intention to select any response. Accordingly, cognitive control also seems to operate without intention, acting in an automatic fashion.

  13. Analysis and Optimisation of Pulse Dynamics for Magnetic Stimulation

    CERN Document Server

    Goetz, Stefan M; Gerhofer, Manuel G; Weyh, Thomas; Herzog, Hans-Georg

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic stimulation is a standard tool in brain research and many fields of neurology, as well as psychiatry. From a physical perspective, one key aspect of this method is the inefficiency of available setups. Whereas the spatial field properties have been studied rather intensively with coil designs, the dynamics have been neglected almost completely for a long time. Instead, the devices and their technology defined the waveform. Here, an analysis of the waveform space is performed. Based on these data, an appropriate optimisation approach is outlined which makes use of a modern nonlinear axon description of a mammalian motor nerve. The approach is based on a hybrid global-local method; different coordinate systems for describing the continuous waveforms in a limited parameter space are defined for sufficient stability. The results of the numeric setup suggest that there is plenty of room for waveforms with higher efficiency than the traditional shapes. One class of such pulses is analysed further. Although...

  14. 3-dimensional modeling of transcranial magnetic stimulation: Design and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Felipe Santiago

    Over the past three decades, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has emerged as an effective tool for many research, diagnostic and therapeutic applications in humans. TMS delivers highly localized brain stimulations via non-invasive externally applied magnetic fields. This non-invasive, painless technique provides researchers and clinicians a unique tool capable of stimulating both the central and peripheral nervous systems. However, a complete analysis of the macroscopic electric fields produced by TMS has not yet been performed. In this dissertation, we present a thorough examination of the total electric field induced by TMS in air and a realistic head model with clinically relevant coil poses. In the first chapter, a detailed account of TMS coil wiring geometry was shown to provide significant improvements in the accuracy of primary E-field calculations. Three-dimensional models which accounted for the TMS coil's wire width, height, shape and number of turns clearly improved the fit of calculated-to-measured E-fields near the coil body. Detailed primary E-field models were accurate up to the surface of the coil body (within 0.5% of measured values) whereas simple models were often inadequate (up to 32% different from measured). In the second chapter, we addressed the importance of the secondary E-field created by surface charge accumulation during TMS using the boundary element method (BEM). 3-D models were developed using simple head geometries in order to test the model and compare it with measured values. The effects of tissue geometry, size and conductivity were also investigated. Finally, a realistic head model was used to assess the effect of multiple surfaces on the total E-field. We found that secondary E-fields have the greatest impact at areas in close proximity to each tissue layer. Throughout the head, the secondary E-field magnitudes were predominantly between 25% and 45% of the primary E-fields magnitude. The direction of the secondary E

  15. Modulating functional and dysfunctional mentalizing by transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias eSchuwerk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Mentalizing, the ability to attribute mental states to others and oneself, is a cognitive function with high relevance for social interactions. Recent neuroscientific research has increasingly contributed to attempts to decompose this complex social cognitive function into constituting neurocognitive building blocks. Additionally, clinical research that focuses on social cognition to find links between impaired social functioning and neurophysiological deviations has accumulated evidence that mentalizing is affected in most psychiatric disorders. Recently, both lines of research have started to employ transcranial magnetic stimulation: the first to modulate mentalizing in order to specify its neurocognitive components, the latter to treat impaired mentalizing in clinical conditions. This review integrates findings of these two different approaches to draw a more detailed picture of the neurocognitive basis of mentalizing and its deviations in psychiatric disorders. Moreover, we evaluate the effectiveness of hitherto employed stimulation techniques and protocols, paradigms and outcome measures. Based on this overview we highlight new directions for future research on the neurocognitive basis of functional and dysfunctional social cognition.

  16. Magnetic stimulation of the spine: the role of tissues and their modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efthimiadis, K G; Samaras, T [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Polyzoidis, K S, E-mail: theosama@auth.g [1st Neurosurgical Department, AHEPA University Hospital, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2010-05-07

    Numerical modelling of magnetic stimulation in the spine is a scarce subject in the literature, although it has been gaining clinical acceptance. In the present work we present the results from a simplified computational model of the spine. The results indicate that it is necessary to use a numerical technique for solving the problem, which takes into account tissue dispersion and both dielectric properties (conductivity and permittivity), since a difference of 14% in the induced electric fields was found when displacement currents were included. With respect to the role of tissues in stimulation efficiency, it was confirmed that water-rich tissues lead to a shielding effect of the spinal cord. However, this effect becomes smaller at the height of the intervertebral discs, resulting in an increase of the field inside the spine.

  17. Assessing motor function in young children with transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana, Shalini; Rezaie, Roozbeh; McAfee, Samuel S; Choudhri, Asim F; Babajani-Feremi, Abbas; Fulton, Stephen; Boop, Frederick A; Wheless, James W; Papanicolaou, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    Accurate noninvasive assessment of motor function using functional MRI (fMRI) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a challenge in patients who are very young or who are developmentally delayed. In such cases, passive mapping of the sensorimotor cortex is performed under sedation. We examined the feasibility of using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a motor mapping tool in awake children younger than 3 years of age. Six children underwent motor mapping with TMS while awake as well as passive sensorimotor mapping under conscious sedation with MEG during tactile stimulation (n = 5) and fMRI during passive hand movements (n = 4). Stimulation of the motor cortex via TMS successfully elicited evoked responses in contralateral hand muscles in 5 patients. The location of primary motor cortex in the precentral gyrus identified by TMS corresponded with the postcentral location of the primary sensory cortex identified by MEG in 2 patients and to the sensorimotor cortex identified by fMRI in 3 children. In this cohort, we demonstrate that TMS can illuminate abnormalities in motor physiology including motor reorganization. We also demonstrate the feasibility of using TMS-derived contralateral silent periods to approximate the location of motor cortex in the absence of an evoked response. When compared to chronological age, performance functioning level appears to be better in predicting successful mapping outcome with TMS. Our findings indicate that awake TMS is a safe alternative to MEG and fMRI performed under sedation to localize the motor cortex and provides additional insight into the underlying pathophysiology and motor plasticity in toddlers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the brain: guidelines for pain treatment research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Max M.; Treister, Roi; Raij, Tommi; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Park, Lawrence; Nurmikko, Turo; Lenz, Fred; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Lang, Magdalena; Hallett, Mark; Fox, Michael; Cudkowicz, Merit; Costello, Ann; Carr, Daniel B.; Ayache, Samar S.; Oaklander, Anne Louise

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recognizing that electrically stimulating the motor cortex could relieve chronic pain sparked development of noninvasive technologies. In transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), electromagnetic coils held against the scalp influence underlying cortical firing. Multiday repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can induce long-lasting, potentially therapeutic brain plasticity. Nearby ferromagnetic or electronic implants are contraindications. Adverse effects are minimal, primarily headaches. Single provoked seizures are very rare. Transcranial magnetic stimulation devices are marketed for depression and migraine in the United States and for various indications elsewhere. Although multiple studies report that high-frequency rTMS of the motor cortex reduces neuropathic pain, their quality has been insufficient to support Food and Drug Administration application. Harvard's Radcliffe Institute therefore sponsored a workshop to solicit advice from experts in TMS, pain research, and clinical trials. They recommended that researchers standardize and document all TMS parameters and improve strategies for sham and double blinding. Subjects should have common well-characterized pain conditions amenable to motor cortex rTMS and studies should be adequately powered. They recommended standardized assessment tools (eg, NIH's PROMIS) plus validated condition-specific instruments and consensus-recommended metrics (eg, IMMPACT). Outcomes should include pain intensity and qualities, patient and clinician impression of change, and proportions achieving 30% and 50% pain relief. Secondary outcomes could include function, mood, sleep, and/or quality of life. Minimum required elements include sample sources, sizes, and demographics, recruitment methods, inclusion and exclusion criteria, baseline and posttreatment means and SD, adverse effects, safety concerns, discontinuations, and medication-usage records. Outcomes should be monitored for at least 3 months after

  19. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: A Neuroscientific Probe of Cortical Function in Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, Shawn M.; Freitas, Catarina; Oberman, Lindsay; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a neuropsychiatric tool that can serve as a useful method to better understand the neurobiology of cognitive function, behavior, and emotional processing. The purpose of this paper is to examine the utility of TMS as a means of measuring neocortical function in neuropsychiatric disorders in general, and schizophrenia in particular, for the Cognitive Neuroscience Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (CNTRICS) initiative. When incorporating TMS paradigms in research studies, methodological considerations include technical aspects of TMS, cohort selection and confounding factors, and subject safety. Available evidence suggests benefits of TMS alone or in combination with neurophysiologic and neuroimaging methods, including positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), functional MRI (fMRI), functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), magnetoencephalography (MEG), and electroencephalography (EEG), to explore neocortical function. With the multiple TMS techniques including single-pulse, paired-pulse, paired associative stimulation, and repetitive TMS and theta burst stimulation, combined with neurophysiologic and neuroimaging methods, there exists a plethora of TMS experimental paradigms to modulate different neocortical physiologic processes. Specifically, TMS can measure cortical excitability, intracortical inhibitory and excitatory mechanisms, and local and network cortical plasticity. Coupled with functional and electrophysiological modalities, TMS can provide insight into the mechanisms underlying healthy neurodevelopment and aging, as well as neuropsychiatric pathology. Thus, TMS could be a useful tool in the CNTRICS armamentarium of biomarker methods. Future investigations are warranted to optimize TMS methodologies for this purpose. PMID:21571254

  20. Dynamic aftereffects in supplementary motor network following inhibitory transcranial magnetic stimulation protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Gong-Jun; Yu, Fengqiong; Liao, Wei; Wang, Kai

    2017-04-01

    The supplementary motor area (SMA) is a key node of the motor network. Inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the SMA can potentially improve movement disorders. However, the aftereffects of inhibitory rTMS on brain function remain largely unknown. Using a single-blind, crossover within-subject design, we investigated the role of aftereffects with two inhibitory rTMS protocols [1800 pulses of either 1-Hz repetitive stimulation or continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS)] on the left SMA. A total of 19 healthy volunteers participated in the rTMS sessions on 2 separate days. Firstly, short-term aftereffects were estimated at three levels (functional connectivity, local activity, and network properties) by comparing the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging datasets (9min) acquired before and after each rTMS session. Local activity and network properties were not significantly altered by either protocol. Functional connectivity within the SMA network was increased (in the left paracentral gyrus) by 1-Hz stimulation and decreased (in the left inferior frontal gyrus and SMA/middle cingulate cortex) by cTBS. The subsequent three-way analysis of variance (site×time×protocol) did not show a significant interaction effect or "protocol" main effect, suggesting that the two protocols share an underlying mechanism. Secondly, sliding-window analysis was used to evaluate the dynamic features of aftereffects in the ~29min after the end of stimulation. Aftereffects were maintained for a maximum of 9.8 and 6.6min after the 1-Hz and cTBS protocols, respectively. In summary, this study revealed topographical and temporal aftereffects in the SMA network following inhibitory rTMS protocols, providing valuable information for their application in future neuroscience and clinical studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Repetitive spinal motor neuron discharges following single transcranial magnetic stimulation: relation to dexterity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Z'Graggen, W J; Humm, A M; Oppliger-Bachmann, S; Hosang, M; Rösler, K M

    2008-07-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation allows to study the properties of the human corticospinal tract non-invasively. After a single transcranial magnetic stimulus, spinal motor neurons (MNs) sometimes fire not just once, but repetitively. The biological significance of such repetitive MN discharges (repMNDs) is unknown. To study the relation of repMNDs to other measures of cortico-muscular excitability and to physiological measures of the skill for finely tuned precision movements, we used a previously described quadruple stimulation (QuadS) technique (Z'Graggen et al. 2005) to quantify the amount of repMNDs in abductor digiti minimi muscles (ADMs) on both sides of 20 right-handed healthy subjects. Skillfulness for finger precision movements of both hands was assessed using a finger tapping task. In 16 subjects, a follow-up examination was performed after training of either precision movements (n = 8) or force (n = 8) of the left ADM. The size of the QuadS response (amplitude and area ratios) was greater in the dominant right hand than in the left hand (QuadS amplitude ratio: 47.1 +/- 18.1 versus 37.7 +/- 22.0%, Wilcoxon test: P skills training but not after force training supports the hypothesis of a supraspinal origin of repMNDs.

  2. How does transcranial magnetic stimulation modify neuronal activity in the brain? Implications for studies of cognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebner, Hartwig R; Hartwigsen, Gesa; Kassuba, Tanja

    2009-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) uses a magnetic field to "carry" a short lasting electrical current pulse into the brain where it stimulates neurones, particularly in superficial regions of cerebral cortex. TMS can interfere with cognitive functions in two ways. A high intensity TMS pulse...

  3. Conditioning stimulus can influence an external urethral sphincter contraction evoked by a magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wefer, Bjoern; Reitz, André; Knapp, Peter A; Bannowsky, Andreas; Juenemann, Klaus-Peter; Schurch, Brigitte

    2005-01-01

    To study the effect of a conditioning stimulus on an external urethral sphincter (EUS)contraction evoked by a magnetic stimulation at different time intervals. Seven healthy male volunteers underwent EUS pressure measurement. At baseline, magnetic stimulation of the lumbosacral spinal cord above the motor threshold was performed and evoked EUS pressure responses were recorded. The lumbosacral magnetic stimulation was repeated with same intensity, while a selective electrical dorsal penile nerve stimulation below the bulbocavernosus reflex (BCR) threshold was preceding at five different intervals (10, 20, 30, 50, 100 msec). The protocol was performed with empty and full bladder (BLA), and baseline responses were statistically compared to those with combined stimulation. When the dorsal penile nerve electrical stimulation preceded the lumbosacral magnetic stimulation by 20 msec (P=0.0048), 50 msec (P=0.0039), or 100 msec (P=0.0002), the amplitudes of the EUS pressure response with empty BLA were significantly reduced compared to lumbosacral magnetic stimulation alone. With a filled BLA, the amplitudes of the EUS were significantly reduced only at an interval of 50 msec (Pstimulation seems to have the capacity to inhibit the external urethral sphincter contraction induced by a magnetic stimulation. The inhibitory effect seems to depend on the latency between the peripheral and lumbosacral stimulation as well as on the degree of BLA filling. It remains to be proved if the neuromodulative effect of the conditional stimulus occurs at a spinal or supraspinal level. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Paired Associative Stimulation Targeting the Tibialis Anterior Muscle using either Mono or Biphasic Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Stevenson, Andrew J. T.

    2017-01-01

    Paired associative stimulation (PAS) protocols induce plastic changes within the motor cortex. The objectives of this study were to investigate PAS effects targeting the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle using a biphasic transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulse form and, to determine whether a reduced intensity of this pulse would lead to significant changes as has been reported for hand muscles using a monophasic TMS pulse. Three interventions were investigated: (1) suprathreshold PAbi-PAS (n = 11); (2) suprathreshold PAmono-PAS (n = 11) where PAS was applied using a biphasic or monophasic pulse form at 120% resting motor threshold (RMT); (3) subthreshold PAbi-PAS (n = 10) where PAS was applied as for (1) at 95% active motor threshold (AMT). The peak-to-peak motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were quantified prior to, immediately following, and 30 min after the cessation of the intervention. TA MEP size increased significantly for all interventions immediately post (61% for suprathreshold PAbi-PAS, 83% for suprathreshold PAmono-PAS, 55% for subthreshold PAbi-PAS) and 30 min after the cessation of the intervention (123% for suprathreshold PAbi-PAS, 105% for suprathreshold PAmono-PAS, 80% for subthreshold PAbi-PAS. PAS using a biphasic pulse form at subthreshold intensities induces similar effects to conventional PAS. PMID:28473764

  5. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Deep Brain Stimulation in the treatment of alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba-Ferrara, L; Fernandez, F; Salas, R; de Erausquin, G A

    2014-12-01

    Alcohol dependence is a major social, economic, and public health problem. Alcoholism can lead to damage of the gastrointestinal, nervous, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems and it can be lethal, costing hundreds of billions to the health care system. Despite the existence of cognitive-behavioral therapy, psychosocial interventions, and spiritually integrated treatment to treat it, alcohol dependence has a high relapse rate and poor prognosis, albeit with high interindividual variability. In this review, we discuss the use of two neuromodulation techniques, namely repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and deep brain stimulation (DBS), and their advantages and disadvantages compared to first-line pharmacological treatment for alcohol dependence. We also discuss rTMS and DBS targets for alcohol dependence treatment, considering experimental animal and human evidence, with careful consideration of methodological issues preventing the identification of feasible targets for neuromodulation treatments, as well as inter-individual variability factors influencing alcoholism prognosis. Lastly, we anticipate future research aiming to tailor the treatment to each individual patient by combining neurofunctional, neuroanatomical and neurodisruptive techniques optimizing the outcome.

  6. Neuronavigated vs. conventional repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation method for virtual lesioning on the Broca's area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woo Jin; Min, Yu Sun; Yang, Eun Joo; Paik, Nam-Jong

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) using a neuronavigational TMS system (nTMS) to the Broca's area would elicit greater virtual aphasia than rTMS using the conventional TMS method (cTMS). Eighteen healthy subjects underwent a randomized crossover experiment to induce virtual aphasia by targeting the Brodmann area 44 and 45 for nTMS, and F3 of international 10-20 system for cTMS. Reaction time for a picture naming task and the reaction duration for a six-digit number naming task were measured before and after each session of stimulation, and compared between the cTMS and nTMS. The stability of the coil positioning on the target was measured by depicting the variability of talairach coordinates (x, y, z) of the sampled stimulation localizations. At baseline, outcome variables were comparable between cTMS and nTMS. nTMS induced significant delays in reaction time from 944.0 ± 203.4 msec to 1304.6 ± 215.7 msec (p Broca's area, resulting in delayed verbal reaction time as well as more accurate targeting of the intended stimulation location, demonstrating superiority of nTMS over cTMS for therapeutic use of rTMS in neurorehabilitation. © 2013 International Neuromodulation Society.

  7. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and BDNF plasma levels in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelucci, Francesco; Oliviero, Antonio; Pilato, Fabio; Saturno, Eleonora; Dileone, Michele; Versace, Viviana; Musumeci, Gabriella; Batocchi, Anna P; Tonali, Pietro A; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo

    2004-03-22

    Low- and high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the motor cortex results in lasting changes of excitatory neurotransmission. We investigated the effects of suprathreshold 1 Hz rTMS on brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plasma levels in 10 healthy subjects and effects of either 1 Hz or 20 Hz rTMS in four amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. BDNF levels were progressively decreased by 1 Hz rTMS in healthy subjects; there was no effect of 1 Hz rTMS on BDNF plasma levels in ALS patients, an effect probably due to the loss of motor cortex pyramidal cells. High frequency rTMS determined a transitory decrease in BDNF plasma levels. Cumulatively these findings suggest that rTMS might influence the BDNF production by interfering with neuronal activity.

  8. Non-invasive mapping of bilateral motor speech areas using navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation and functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könönen, Mervi; Tamsi, Niko; Säisänen, Laura; Kemppainen, Samuli; Määttä, Sara; Julkunen, Petro; Jutila, Leena; Äikiä, Marja; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Niskanen, Eini; Vanninen, Ritva; Karjalainen, Pasi; Mervaala, Esa

    2015-06-15

    Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) is a modern precise method to activate and study cortical functions noninvasively. We hypothesized that a combination of nTMS and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) could clarify the localization of functional areas involved with motor control and production of speech. Navigated repetitive TMS (rTMS) with short bursts was used to map speech areas on both hemispheres by inducing speech disruption during number recitation tasks in healthy volunteers. Two experienced video reviewers, blinded to the stimulated area, graded each trial offline according to possible speech disruption. The locations of speech disrupting nTMS trials were overlaid with fMRI activations of word generation task. Speech disruptions were produced on both hemispheres by nTMS, though there were more disruptive stimulation sites on the left hemisphere. Grade of the disruptions varied from subjective sensation to mild objectively recognizable disruption up to total speech arrest. The distribution of locations in which speech disruptions could be elicited varied among individuals. On the left hemisphere the locations of disturbing rTMS bursts with reviewers' verification followed the areas of fMRI activation. Similar pattern was not observed on the right hemisphere. The reviewer-verified speech disruptions induced by nTMS provided clinically relevant information, and fMRI might explain further the function of the cortical area. nTMS and fMRI complement each other, and their combination should be advocated when assessing individual localization of speech network. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Brain SPECT guided repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in treatment resistant major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Shailesh; Chadda, Rakesh K; Kumar, Nand; Bal, C S

    2016-06-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has emerged as a potential treatment in treatment resistant major depressive disorder (MDD). However, there is no consensus about the exact site of stimulation for rTMS. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) offers a potential technique in deciding the site of stimulation. The present study was conducted to assess the difference in outcome of brain SPECT assisted rTMS versus standard protocol of twenty sessions of high frequency rTMS as add on treatment in 20 patients with treatment resistant MDD, given over a period of 4 weeks. Thirteen subjects (group I) received high frequency rTMS over an area of hypoperfusion in the prefrontal cortex, as identified on SPECT, whereas 7 subjects (group II) were administered rTMS in the left dorsoslateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) area. Improvement was monitored using standardized instruments. Patients in the group I showed a significantly better response compared to those in the group II. In group I, 46% of the subjects were responders on MADRS, 38% on BDI and 77% on CGI. The parallel figures of responders in Group II were 0% on MADRS, 14% on BDI and 43% on CGI. There were no remitters in the study. No significant untoward side effects were noticed. The study had limitations of a small sample size and non-controlled design, and all the subjects were also receiving the standard antidepressant therapy. Administration of rTMS over brain SPECT specified area of hypoperfusion may have a better clinical outcome compared to the standard protocol. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Reduced cortical inhibition in violent offenders: a study with transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp-Wiegmann, Florence; Rösler, Michael; Römer, Konstanze D; Schneider, Marc; Baumgart, Sibylle; Retz, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Aggression and violent behaviour are often regarded as a threat to society. Therefore, understanding violent behaviour has high social relevance. We performed a study with transcranial magnetic stimulation on a sample of violent offenders in order to measure cortical inhibition in the motor neuron system that is part of the frontal cortex. To investigate intracortical inhibition and intracortical facilitation, we conducted paired-pulse stimulation according to the technique of Kujirai and his group (see Method). The investigation sample comprised 62 right-handers: 32 prisoners who had committed severe violent crimes and 30 controls with no history of violence. All subjects were male and matched for age. Using the paired-pulse paradigm with interstimulus intervals (ISI) of 1-15 ms, a reduced cortical inhibition (ISI: 3 ms) was found in the left cortex of violent offenders compared with control subjects. These findings corroborate the hypothesis of inhibition deficits and frontal cortex dysfunction in violent offenders when compared with non-violent control subjects. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Tickling the brain: studying visual sensation, perception and cognition by transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowey, A; Walsh, V

    2001-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a means of stimulating the brain from outside the skull with little, and occasionally no discomfort for the subject. A single TMS pulse, lasting less than 1 ms, can briefly disrupt the normal activity of a targeted region of the brain for tens of milliseconds, allowing the effects of disruption on specific perceptual and cognitive tasks to be measured behaviorally. Rapid, repeated pulses can disrupt activity for correspondingly longer periods. The reversibility of the effects make it possible to create 'virtual patients' who can be tested in the same way as actual patients with real brain damage in order to explore regional functional specialization. Although several aspects of TMS continue to be evaluated, such as its safety, the extent and localization of the effective region of induced electrical current, the importance of the waveform of the pulse, the configuration and positioning of the coil, its productivity has been firmly established in little more than 10 years of systematic use. Examples of the latter are given from investigations of the nature of visual phosphenes produced by TMS applied to different regions of the visual cortex in normal subjects and subjects with occipital or ocular damage in an attempt to reveal the role of visual cortex in visual awareness.

  12. Unraveling the cellular and molecular mechanisms of repetitive magnetic stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian eMüller-Dahlhaus

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite numerous clinical studies, which have investigated the therapeutic potential of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS in various brain diseases, our knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying rTMS-based therapies remains limited. Thus, a deeper understanding of rTMS-induced neural plasticity is required to optimize current treatment protocols. Studies in small animals or appropriate in vitro preparations (including models of brain diseases provide highly useful experimental approaches in this context. State-of-the-art electrophysiological and live-cell imaging techniques that are well established in basic neuroscience can help answering some of the major questions in the field, such as (i which neural structures are activated during TMS, (ii how does rTMS induce Hebbian plasticity, and (iii are other forms of plasticity (e.g., metaplasticity, structural plasticity induced by rTMS? We argue that data gained from these studies will support the development of more effective and specific applications of rTMS in clinical practice.

  13. Effect of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Neuronal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsal, Ahmet; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2013-03-01

    The human brain contains around 100 billion nerve cells controlling our day to day activities. Consequently, brain disorders often result in impairments such as paralysis, loss of coordination and seizure. It has been said that 1 in 5 Americans suffer some diagnosable mental disorder. There is an urgent need to understand the disorders, prevent them and if possible, develop permanent cure for them. As a result, a significant amount of research activities is being directed towards brain research. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a promising tool for diagnosing and treating brain disorders. It is a non-invasive treatment method that produces a current flow in the brain which excites the neurons. Even though TMS has been verified to have advantageous effects on various brain related disorders, there have not been enough studies on the impact of TMS on cells. In this study, we are investigating the electrophysiological effects of TMS on one dimensional neuronal culture grown in a circular pathway. Electrical currents are produced on the neuronal networks depending on the directionality of the applied field. This aids in understanding how neuronal networks react under TMS treatment.

  14. Research with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in the Treatment of Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Paula I; Naeser, Margaret A.; Ho, Michael; Treglia, Ethan; Kaplan, Elina; Baker, Errol H.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been used to improve language behavior, including naming, in stroke patients with chronic, nonfluent aphasia. Part 1 of this paper reviews functional imaging studies related to language recovery in aphasia. Part 2 reviews the rationale for using rTMS to treat nonfluent aphasia (based on functional imaging); and presents our current rTMS protocol. We present language results from our rTMS studies, and imaging results from overt naming fMRI scans obtained pre- and post- a series of rTMS treatments. Part 3 presents results from a pilot study where rTMS treatments were followed immediately by constraint-induced language therapy. Part 4 reviews our diffusion tensor imaging study that examined possible connectivity of arcuate fasciculus to different parts of Broca’s area (pars triangularis, PTr; pars opercularis, POp); and to ventral premotor cortex (vPMC). The potential role of mirror neurons in R POp and vPMC in aphasia recovery is discussed. PMID:19818232

  15. Treatment of Depersonalization Disorder With Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karris, Bianca C; Capobianco, Marc; Wei, Xin; Ross, Lesley

    2017-03-01

    High frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2008 to treat major depressive disorder in those who did not respond to at least 1 antidepressant trial. Previous studies have shown that both high frequency rTMS to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and low frequency rTMS to the right DLPFC have antidepressant efficacy in treatment-resistant depression. Although rTMS has been widely used in the treatment of depression, very few studies of rTMS in patients with depersonalization disorder (DPD) have been published so far. DPD involves persistent or recurrent experiences of unreality and feelings of detachment causing distress or functional impairment while insight remains intact. The prevalence of DPD is approximately 1% to 2%. Studies of the pharmacological treatment of DPD are limited, and medications have proven to be of limited benefit. We present the case of a 30-year-old man with major depressive disorder and DPD who did not respond to pharmacotherapy. After the patient was treated with low frequency rTMS to the right DLPFC followed by high frequency rTMS to the left DLPFC, there was a significant reduction in his depersonalization symptoms. Given its effectiveness in our patient, the use of both low frequency rTMS to the right DLPFC and high frequency rTMS to the left DLPFC for treatment of DPD should be further explored.

  16. An evaluation of factors affecting duration of treatment with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roni Broder Cohen

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects of repetitive transcranialmagnetic stimulation in patients with major depression who weresubmitted to this treatment during the period from 2000 to 2006.Methods: A retrospective study with 204 patients who underwenttreatment with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, collectingdata from those who experienced remission (defined as a HDRS scoreequal to or lower than 7. The patients were followed for up to 6 monthsafter treatment. Mean duration of remission for this cohort of patientswas 70.2 (± 58.4 days. Results: The only variable associated withthe duration of remission in the linear regression model was numberof repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation sessions. Conclusion:Our findings suggest that the greater the number of sessions, the longerthe duration of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation effects.Consequently, future research investigating the effects of repetitivetranscranial magnetic stimulation should explore this variable in orderto maximize the therapeutic effects of this new brain stimulationtechnique.

  17. Magnetic and electric stimulation to elicit the masseteric exteroceptive suppression period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komiyama, Osamu; Wang, Kelun; Svensson, Peter

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The present study compared the perception of electric and magnetic stimuli for reflex appearance threshold (RT) and reflex saturation threshold (RS) of the exteroceptive suppression reflex (ES) in the masseter muscle. METHODS: Twelve healthy males and 12 females (age: 24.2+/-3.2 years...... and RS for the early and late ES (ES1 and ES2, respectively). RESULTS: ES2 had a lower RT and RS compared to ES1 in electric and magnetic stimulation. Significantly lower NRS values at RT and RS were found with painless magnetic stimulation compared to electric stimulation (p...: In contrast to electrical stimulation, both ES1 and ES2 appeared and saturated with painless magnetic stimuli. SIGNIFICANCE: The present results indicate that both ES1 and ES2 have a non-nociceptive origin. Painless magnetic stimuli will be an advantage in ES reflex examinations for various orofacial pain...

  18. Temporal interactions during paired-electrode stimulation in two retinal prosthesis subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsager, Alan; Boynton, Geoffrey M; Greenberg, Robert J; Fine, Ione

    2011-01-01

    Since 2002, six blind patients have undergone implantation of an epiretinal 4 × 4 electrode array designed to directly stimulate the remaining cells of the retina after severe photoreceptor degeneration due to retinitis pigmentosa. This study was conducted to investigate how the brightness of percepts is affected by pulse timing across electrodes in two of these patients. Subjects compared the perceived brightness of a standard stimulus (synchronous pulse trains presented across pairs of electrodes) to the perceived brightness of a test stimulus (pulse trains across the electrode pair phase shifted by 0.075, 0.375, 1.8, or 9 ms). The current amplitude necessary for each phase-shifted test stimulus to match the brightness of the standard was determined. Depending on the electrode pair, interactions between electrodes were either facilitatory (the perceived brightness produced by stimulating the pair of electrodes was greater than that produced by stimulating either electrode alone) or suppressive (the perceived brightness produced by stimulating the pair of electrodes was less than that produced by stimulating either electrode alone). The amount of interaction between electrodes decreased as a function of increased separation both in time (the phase-shift between pulse trains) and space (center-to-center distance between the electrode pair). For visual prostheses to represent visual scenes that are changing in both space and time requires the development of spatiotemporal models describing the effects of stimulation across multiple electrodes. During multielectrode stimulation, interactions between electrodes have a significant influence on subjective brightness that includes both facilitatory and suppressive effects, and these interactions can be described with a simple computational model. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00279500.).

  19. Bone conduction hearing sensitivity in normal-hearing subjects: transcutaneous stimulation at BAHA vs BCI position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinfeldt, Sabine; Håkansson, Bo; Taghavi, Hamidreza; Eeg-Olofsson, Måns

    2014-06-01

    Bone conduction (BC) stimulation closer to the cochlea has previously been shown to give higher cochlear promontory acceleration measured by laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV). This study is investigating whether stimulation closer to the cochlea also gives improved hearing sensitivity. Furthermore, the study compares shifts in hearing sensitivity (BC thresholds) and ear-canal sound pressure (ECSP). BC hearing thresholds and ECSP have been measured for stimulation at two positions: the existing bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) position, and a new bone conduction implant (BCI) position that is located closer to the cochlea. The measurements were made on 20 normal-hearing subjects. Depending on frequency, the ipsilateral hearing threshold was 3-14 dB better, and the ipsilateral ECSP was 2-12 dB higher for the BCI than for the BAHA position, with no significant differences between threshold and ECSP shifts at group level for most frequencies, and individually only for some subjects. It was found that both the objective ECSP and the subjective hearing threshold measurements gave similar improvement as previous LDV measurements for stimulation closer to the cochlea. One exception was that the LDV measurements did not show the improved sensitivity for frequencies below 500 Hz found here.

  20. Lipoic Acid Stimulates cAMP Production in Healthy Control and Secondary Progressive MS Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Sarah E; Yadav, Vijayshree; Kerns, Amelia R; Tsang, Catherine; Markwardt, Sheila; Kim, Edward; Spain, Rebecca; Bourdette, Dennis; Salinthone, Sonemany

    2017-11-15

    Lipoic acid (LA) exhibits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties; supplementation reduces disease severity and T lymphocyte migration into the central nervous system in a murine model of multiple sclerosis (MS), and administration in secondary progressive MS (SPMS) subjects reduces brain atrophy compared to placebo. The mechanism of action (MOA) of LA's efficacy in suppression of MS pathology is incompletely understood. LA stimulates production of the immunomodulator cyclic AMP (cAMP) in vitro. To determine whether cAMP could be involved in the MOA of LA in vivo, we performed a clinical trial to examine whether LA stimulates cAMP production in healthy control and MS subjects, and whether there are differences in the bioavailability of LA between groups. We administered 1200 mg of oral LA to healthy control, relapsing remitting MS (RRMS) and SPMS subjects, and measured plasma LA and cAMP levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). There were no significant differences between the groups in pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters. Healthy and SPMS subjects had increased cAMP at 2 and 4 h post-LA treatment compared to baseline, while RRMS subjects showed decreases in cAMP. Additionally, plasma concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, a known cAMP stimulator) were significantly lower in female RRMS subjects compared to female HC and SPMS subjects 4 h after LA ingestion. These data indicate that cAMP could be part of the MOA of LA in SPMS, and that there is a divergent response to LA in RRMS subjects that may have implications in the efficacy of immunomodulatory drugs. This clinical trial, "Defining the Anti-inflammatory Role of Lipoic Acid in Multiple Sclerosis," NCT00997438, is registered at https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/record/NCT00997438 .

  1. Variability of insulin-stimulated myocardial glucose uptake in healthy elderly subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Klaus F; Hove, Jens D; Freiberg, Jacob

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess regional and global variability of insulin-stimulated myocardial glucose uptake in healthy elderly subjects and to evaluate potentially responsible factors. Twenty men with a mean age of 64 years, no history of cardiovascular disease, and normal blood pressure......, bicycle exercise test, electrocardiogram and echocardiography were studied [ P(coronary artery disease) ... rest and hyperaemic blood flow during dipyridamole infusion were measured with nitrogen-13 ammonia and positron emission tomography in 16 left ventricular myocardial segments. Intra-individual and inter-individual variability of insulin-stimulated myocardial glucose uptake [relative dispersion...

  2. Fundamentals of Transcranial Electric and Magnetic Stimulation Dose: Definition, Selection, and Reporting Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterchev, Angel V.; Wagner, Timothy A.; Miranda, Pedro C.; Nitsche, Michael A.; Paulus, Walter; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Bikson, Marom

    2011-01-01

    The growing use of transcranial electric and magnetic (EM) brain stimulation in basic research and in clinical applications necessitates a clear understanding of what constitutes the dose of EM stimulation and how it should be reported. The biological effects of EM stimulation are mediated through an electromagnetic field injected (via electric stimulation) or induced (via magnetic stimulation) in the body. Therefore, transcranial EM stimulation dose ought to be defined by all parameters of the stimulation device that affect the electromagnetic field generated in the body, including the stimulation electrode or coil configuration parameters: shape, size, position, and electrical properties, as well as the electrode or coil current (or voltage) waveform parameters: pulse shape, amplitude, width, polarity, and repetition frequency; duration of and interval between bursts or trains of pulses; total number of pulses; and interval between stimulation sessions and total number of sessions. Knowledge of the electromagnetic field generated in the body may not be sufficient but is necessary to understand the biological effects of EM stimulation. We believe that reporting of EM stimulation dose should be guided by the principle of reproducibility: sufficient information about the stimulation parameters should be provided so that the dose can be replicated. This paper provides fundamental definition and principles for reporting of dose that encompass any transcranial EM brain stimulation protocol. PMID:22305345

  3. Motor cortex hyperexcitability to transcranial magnetic stimulation in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lazzaro, V; Oliviero, A; Pilato, F; Saturno, E; Dileone, M; Marra, C; Daniele, A; Ghirlanda, S; Gainotti, G; Tonali, P A

    2004-04-01

    Recent transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies demonstrate that motor cortex excitability is increased in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and that intracortical inhibitory phenomena are impaired. The aim of the present study was to determine whether hyperexcitability is due to the impairment of intracortical inhibitory circuits or to an independent abnormality of excitatory circuits. We assessed the excitability of the motor cortex with TMS in 28 patients with AD using several TMS paradigms and compared the data of cortical excitability (evaluated by measuring resting motor threshold) with the amount of motor cortex disinhibition as evaluated using the test for motor cortex cholinergic inhibition (short latency afferent inhibition) and GABAergic inhibition (short latency intracortical inhibition). The data in AD patients were also compared with that from 12 age matched healthy individuals. The mean resting motor threshold was significantly lower in AD patients than in controls. The amount of short latency afferent inhibition was significantly smaller in AD patients than in normal controls. There was also a tendency for AD patients to have less pronounced short latency intracortical inhibition than controls, but this difference was not significant. There was no correlation between resting motor threshold and measures of either short latency afferent or intracortical inhibition (r = -0.19 and 0.18 respectively, NS). In 14 AD patients the electrophysiological study was repeated after a single oral dose of the cholinesterase inhibitor rivastigmine. Resting motor threshold was not significantly modified by the administration of rivastigmine. In contrast, short latency afferent inhibition from the median nerve was significantly increased by the administration of rivastigmine. The change in threshold did not seem to correlate with dysfunction of inhibitory intracortical cholinergic and GABAergic circuits, nor with the central cholinergic activity. We propose that the

  4. Stimulating Conversation: Enhancement of Elicited Propositional Speech in a Patient with Chronic Nonfluent Aphasia Following Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Roy H.; Sanders, Linda; Benson, Jennifer; Faseyitan, Olufunsho; Norise, Catherine; Naeser, Margaret; Martin, Paula; Coslett, H. Branch

    2010-01-01

    Although evidence suggests that patients with left hemisphere strokes and nonfluent aphasia who receive 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the intact right inferior frontal gyrus experience persistent benefits in naming, it remains unclear whether the effects of rTMS in these patients generalize to other language abilities. We report a subject with chronic nonfluent aphasia who showed stable deficits of elicited propositional speech over the course of five years, and received 1200 pulses of 1 Hz rTMS daily for 10 days at a site identified as being optimally responsive to rTMS in this patient. Consistent with prior studies there was improvement in object naming, with a statistically significant improvement in action naming. Improvement was also demonstrated in picture description at 2, 6, and 10 months after rTMS with respect to the number of narrative words and nouns, sentence length, and use of closed class words. Compared to his baseline performance, the patient showed significant improvement on the Western Aphasia Battery subscale for spontaneous speech. These findings suggest that manipulation of the intact contralesional cortex in patients with nonfluent aphasia may result in language benefits that generalize beyond naming to include other aspects of language production. PMID:20159655

  5. Evaluation method for in situ electric field in standardized human brain for different transcranial magnetic stimulation coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwahashi, Masahiro; Gomez-Tames, Jose; Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa

    2017-03-21

    This study proposes a method to evaluate the electric field induced in the brain by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to realize focal stimulation in the target area considering the inter-subject difference of the brain anatomy. The TMS is a non-invasive technique used for treatment/diagnosis, and it works by inducing an electric field in a specific area of the brain via a coil-induced magnetic field. Recent studies that report on the electric field distribution in the brain induced by TMS coils have been limited to simplified human brain models or a small number of detailed human brain models. Until now, no method has been developed that appropriately evaluates the coil performance for a group of subjects. In this study, we first compare the magnetic field and the magnetic vector potential distributions to determine if they can be used as predictors of the TMS focality derived from the electric field distribution. Next, the hotspots of the electric field on the brain surface of ten subjects using six coils are compared. Further, decisive physical factors affecting the focality of the induced electric field by different coils are discussed by registering the computed electric field in a standard brain space for the first time, so as to evaluate coil characteristics for a large population of subjects. The computational results suggest that the induced electric field in the target area cannot be generalized without considering the morphological variability of the human brain. Moreover, there was no remarkable difference between the various coils, although focality could be improved to a certain extent by modifying the coil design (e.g., coil radius). Finally, the focality estimated by the electric field was more correlated with the magnetic vector potential than the magnetic field in a homogeneous sphere.

  6. Evaluation method for in situ electric field in standardized human brain for different transcranial magnetic stimulation coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwahashi, Masahiro; Gomez-Tames, Jose; Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa

    2017-03-01

    This study proposes a method to evaluate the electric field induced in the brain by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to realize focal stimulation in the target area considering the inter-subject difference of the brain anatomy. The TMS is a non-invasive technique used for treatment/diagnosis, and it works by inducing an electric field in a specific area of the brain via a coil-induced magnetic field. Recent studies that report on the electric field distribution in the brain induced by TMS coils have been limited to simplified human brain models or a small number of detailed human brain models. Until now, no method has been developed that appropriately evaluates the coil performance for a group of subjects. In this study, we first compare the magnetic field and the magnetic vector potential distributions to determine if they can be used as predictors of the TMS focality derived from the electric field distribution. Next, the hotspots of the electric field on the brain surface of ten subjects using six coils are compared. Further, decisive physical factors affecting the focality of the induced electric field by different coils are discussed by registering the computed electric field in a standard brain space for the first time, so as to evaluate coil characteristics for a large population of subjects. The computational results suggest that the induced electric field in the target area cannot be generalized without considering the morphological variability of the human brain. Moreover, there was no remarkable difference between the various coils, although focality could be improved to a certain extent by modifying the coil design (e.g., coil radius). Finally, the focality estimated by the electric field was more correlated with the magnetic vector potential than the magnetic field in a homogeneous sphere.

  7. Studies on magnetism and bioelectromagnetics for 45 years: from magnetic analog memory to human brain stimulation and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Shoogo

    2012-01-01

    Forty-five years of studies on magnetism and bioelectromagnetics, in our laboratory, are presented. This article is prepared for the d'Arsonval Award Lecture. After a short introduction of our early work on magnetic analog memory, we review and discuss the following topics: (1) Magnetic nerve stimulation and localized transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the human brain by figure-eight coils; (2) Measurements of weak magnetic fields generated from the brain by superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) systems, called magnetoencephalography (MEG), and its application in functional brain studies; (3) New methods of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the imaging of impedance of the brain, called impedance MRI, and the imaging of neuronal current activities in the brain, called current MRI; (4) Cancer therapy and other medical treatments by pulsed magnetic fields; (5) Effects of static magnetic fields and magnetic control of cell orientation and cell growth; and (6) Effects of radio frequency magnetic fields and control of iron ion release and uptake from and into ferritins, iron cage proteins. These bioelectromagnetic studies have opened new horizons in magnetism and medicine, in particular for brain research and treatment of ailments such as depression, Parkinson's, and Alzheimer's diseases. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Brain State-Dependent Transcranial Magnetic Closed-Loop Stimulation Controlled by Sensorimotor Desynchronization Induces Robust Increase of Corticospinal Excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Dominic; Naros, Georgios; Bauer, Robert; Khademi, Fatemeh; Leão, Maria Teresa; Ziemann, Ulf; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Desynchronization of sensorimotor rhythmic activity increases instantaneous corticospinal excitability, as indexed by amplitudes of motor-evoked potentials (MEP) elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The accumulative effect of cortical stimulation in conjunction with sensorimotor desynchronization is, however, unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of repetitive pairing event-related desynchronization (ERD) with TMS of the precentral gyrus on corticospinal excitability. Closed-loop single-pulse TMS was controlled by beta-band (16-22 Hz) ERD during motor-imagery of finger extension and applied within a brain-computer interface environment in eleven healthy subjects. The same number and pattern of stimuli were applied in a control group of eleven subjects during rest, i.e. independent of ERD. To probe for plasticity resistant to depotentiation, stimulation protocols were followed by a depotentiation task. Brain state-dependent application of approximately 300 TMS pulses during beta-ERD resulted in a significant increase of corticospinal excitability. By contrast, the identical stimulation pattern applied independent of beta-ERD in the control experiment resulted in a decrease of corticospinal excitability. These effects persisted beyond the period of stimulation and the depotentiation task. These results could be instrumental in developing new therapeutic approaches such as the application of closed-loop stimulation in the context of neurorehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Combining Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Electroencephalography May Contribute to Assess the Severity of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petro Julkunen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common form of old age dementia, and mild cognitive impairment (MCI often precedes AD. In our previous study (Julkunen et al. 2008, we found that the combination of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS and electroencephalography (EEG was able to find distinct differences in AD and MCI patients as compared to controls. Here, we reanalyzed the small sample data from our previous study with the aim to test the sensitivity of the TMS-EEG characteristics to discriminate control subjects (n=4 from MCI (n=5 and AD (n=5 subjects. Furthermore, we investigated how the TMS-EEG response characteristics related to the scores of the dementia rating scales used to evaluate the severity of cognitive decline in these subjects. We found that the TMS-EEG response P30 amplitude correlated with cognitive decline and showed good specificity and sensitivity in identifying healthy subjects from those with MCI or AD. Given the small sample size, further studies may be needed to confirm the results.

  10. Emotional stimuli modulate readiness for action: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, Anouk M; van den Wildenberg, Wery P M; van Stegeren, Anda H; Hajcak, Greg; Ridderinkhof, K Richard

    2010-05-01

    Emotional stimuli may prime the motor system and facilitate action readiness. Direct evidence for this effect has been shown by recent studies using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). When administered over the primary motor cortex involved in responding, TMS pulses elicit motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) in the represented muscles. The amplitudes of these MEPs reflect the state of corticospinal excitability. Here, we investigated the dynamic effects of induced emotions on action readiness, as reflected by corticospinal excitability. Subjects performed a choice task while viewing task-irrelevant emotional and neutral pictures. The pattern of MEP amplitudes showed a typical increase as the TMS pulse was presented closer in time to the imminent response. This dynamic pattern was amplified by both pleasant and unpleasant emotional stimuli, but more so when unpleasant pictures were viewed. These patterns present novel evidence in support of the notion that emotional stimuli modulate action readiness.

  11. Evidence-based guidelines on the therapeutic use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; André-Obadia, Nathalie; Antal, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    A group of European experts was commissioned to establish guidelines on the therapeutic use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) from evidence published up until March 2014, regarding pain, movement disorders, stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy...

  12. Deep transcranial magnetic stimulation as a treatment for psychiatric disorders: a comprehensive review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bersani, F S; Minichino, A; Enticott, P G; Mazzarini, L; Khan, N; Antonacci, G; Raccah, R N; Salviati, M; Delle Chiaie, R; Bersani, G; Fitzgerald, P B; Biondi, M

    2013-01-01

    Deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a technique of neuromodulation and neurostimulation based on the principle of electromagnetic induction of an electric field in the brain. The coil (H-coil...

  13. Magnetic stimulation for stress urinary incontinence: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lim, Renly; Liong, Men Long; Leong, Wing Seng; Khan, Nurzalina Abdul Karim; Yuen, Kah Hay

    2015-01-01

    There is currently a lack of randomized, sham-controlled trials that are adequately powered, using validated outcomes, to allow for firm recommendations on the use of magnetic stimulation for stress urinary incontinence...

  14. Calculating the induced electromagnetic fields in real human head by deep transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mai; Ueno, Shoogo

    2013-01-01

    Stimulation of deeper brain structures by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) may be beneficial in the treatment of several neurological and psychiatric disorders. This paper presents numerical simulation of deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS) by considering double cone, H-and Halo coils. Three-dimensional distributions of the induced fields i.e. magnetic flux density, current density and electric fields in realistic head model by dTMS coils were calculated by impedance method and the results were compared with that of figure-of-eight coil. It was found that double cone and H-coils have significantly deep field penetration at the expense of induced higher and wider spread electrical fields in superficial cortical regions. The Halo coil working with a circular coil carrying currents in opposite directions provides a flexible way to stimulate deep brain structures with much lower stimulation in superficial brain tissues.

  15. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation:a Novel Approach for Treating Oropharyngeal Dysphagia

    OpenAIRE

    Michou, Emilia; Raginis-Zborowska, Alicja; Watanabe, Masahiro; Lodhi, Taha; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, a technique used to produce human central neurostimulation, has attracted increased interest and been applied experimentally in the treatment of dysphagia. This review presents a synopsis of the current research for the application of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on dysphagia. Here, we review the mechanisms underlying the effects of rTMS and the results from studies on both healthy volunteers and dysphagic p...

  16. Striatal dopamine release induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over dorsolateral prefrontal cortex: effect of aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Seong Ae; Cho, Sang Soo; Yoon, Eun Jin; Kim, Ji Sun; Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    We previously demonstrated dopamine (DA) release in the bilateral striatal regions following prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in young subjects. Several lines of evidence support substantial age-related changes in human dopaminergic neurotransmission. One possible explanation is alteration of cortico striatal neural connection with aging. Therefore, we investigated how frontal activation by rTMS influences striatal DA release in the elderly with SPECT measurements of striatal binding of [123I]iodobenzamide (lBZM), a DA D2 receptor radioligand that is sensitive to endogenous DA. Five healthy elderly male subjects (age, 64 3 y) were studied with brain [123I]IBZM SPECT under three conditions (resting, sham stimulation, and active rTMS over left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC)), while receiving a bolus plus constant infusion of [123I]IBZM. rTMS session consisted of three blocks. In each block, 15 trains of 2 sec duration were delivered with 10 Hz stimulation frequency and 100% motor threshold. Striatal V3', calculated as (striatal - occipital)/occipital radioactivity, was measured under equilibrium condition at baseline and after sham and active rTMS. Sham stimulation did not affect striatal V3'. rTMS over left DLPFC induced no significant change in V3' in the right striatum compared with baseline condition (0.91 0.25 vs. 0.96 0.25, P = NS). Interestingly, left striatal V3' showed a significant increase after rTMS over left DLPFC compared with sham condition (1.09 0.33 vs. 0.93 0.27, P < 0.05; 17.0 11.1% increase). These results are discrepant from previous ones from young subjects, who showed frontal rTMS-induced reduction of striatal V3', indicating rTMS-induced striatal DA release. We found no significant striatal DA release induced by rTMS over DLPFC in healthy elderly subjects using in vivo binding competition techniques. These results may support an altered cortico striatal circuit in normal aging.

  17. Practical assessment of preoperative functional mapping techniques: navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation and functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangraviti, Antonella; Casali, Cecilia; Cordella, Roberto; Legnani, Federico Giuseppe; Mattei, Luca; Prada, Francesco; Saladino, Andrea; Contarino, Valeria Elisa; Perin, Alessandro; DiMeco, Francesco

    2013-09-01

    Preoperative brain mapping is vital to improve the outcome of patients with tumors located in eloquent areas. While functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) remains the most commonly used preoperative mapping technique, navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) has recently been proposed as a new preoperative method for the clinical and surgical management of such patients. This study aims at evaluating the impact of nTMS as a routine examination and its ultimate contribution to patient outcome. We performed a preliminary prospective study on eight patients harboring a cerebral lesion in eloquent motor areas. Each patient underwent preoperative cortical brain mapping via both fMRI and nTMS; then, we assessed the reliability of both methods by comparing them with intraoperative mapping by direct cortical stimulation (DCS). This study suggests that nTMS was more accurate than fMRI in detecting the true cortical motor area when compared with DCS data, with a mean of deviation ± confidence interval (CI) of 8.47 ± 4.6 mm between nTMS and DCS and of 12.9 ± 5.7 mm between fMRI and DCS (p < 0.05). The results indicated that within the limits of our statistical sample, nTMS was found to be a useful, reliable, and non-invasive option for preoperative planning as well as for the identification of the motor strip; in addition, it usually has short processing times and is very well tolerated by patients, thereby increasing their compliance and possibly improving surgical outcome.

  18. No modulatory effects by transcranial static magnetic field stimulation of human motor and somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufner, Marco; Brückner, Sabrina; Kammer, Thomas

    Recently, it was reported that the application of a static magnetic field by placing a strong permanent magnet over the scalp for 10 min led to an inhibition of motor cortex excitability for at least 6 min after removing the magnet. When placing the magnet over the somatosensory cortex, a similar inhibitory after effect could be observed as well. Our aim was to replicate the inhibitory effects of transcranial static magnetic field stimulation in the motor and somatosensory system. The modulatory effect of static magnetic field stimulation was investigated in three experiments. In two experiments motor cortex excitability was measured before and after 10 or 15 min of magnet application, respectively. The second experiment included a sham condition and was designed in a double-blinded manner. In a third experiment, paired-pulse SSEPs were measured pre and four times post positioning the magnet over the somatosensory cortex for 10 min on both hemispheres, respectively. The SSEPs of the non stimulated hemisphere served as control condition. We did not observe any systematic effect of the static magnetic field neither on motor cortex excitability nor on SSEPs. Moreover, no SSEP paired-pulse suppression was found. We provide a detailed analysis of possible confounding factors and differences to previous studies on tSMS. After all, our results could not confirm the static magnetic field effect. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Reference values and clinical application of magnetic peripheral nerve stimulation in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Soens, Iris; Struys, Michel M. R. F.; Bhatti, Sofie F. M.; Van Ham, Luc M. L.

    Magnetic stimulation of radial (RN) and sciatic (SN) nerves was performed bilaterally in 40 healthy cats. Reference values for onset latency and peak-to-peak amplitude of magnetic motor evoked potentials (MMEPs) were obtained and compared with values of electric motor evoked potentials (EMEPs) in

  20. Effects of force load, muscle fatigue and extremely low frequency magnetic stimulation on EEG signals during side arm lateral raise task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Cao, Liu; Hao, Dongmei; Rong, Yao; Yang, Lin; Zhang, Song; Chen, Fei; Zheng, Dingchang

    2017-05-01

    This study was to quantitatively investigate the effects of force load, muscle fatigue and extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic stimulation on electroencephalography (EEG) signal features during side arm lateral raise task. EEG signals were recorded by a BIOSEMI Active Two system with Pin-Type active-electrodes from 18 healthy subjects when they performed the right arm side lateral raise task (90° away from the body) with three different loads (0 kg, 1 kg and 3 kg; their order was randomized among the subjects) on the forearm. The arm maintained the loads until the subject felt exhausted. The first 10 s recording for each load was regarded as non-fatigue status and the last 10 s before the subject was exhausted as fatigue status. The subject was then given a 5 min resting between different loads. Two days later, the same experiment was performed on each subject except that ELF magnetic stimulation was applied to the subject's deltoid muscle during the 5 min resting period. EEG features from C3 and C4 electrodes including the power of alpha, beta and gamma and sample entropy were analyzed and compared between different loads, non-fatigue/fatigue status, and with/without ELF magnetic stimulation. The key results were associated with the change of the power of alpha band. From both C3-EEG and C4-EEG, with 1 kg and 3 kg force loads, the power of alpha band was significantly smaller than that from 0 kg for both non-fatigue and fatigue periods (all p    0.05 for all the force loads except C4-EEG with ELF simulation). The power of alpha band at fatigue status was significantly increased for both C3-EEG and C4-EEG when compared with the non-fatigue status (p  EEG). With magnetic stimulation, the powers of alpha from C3-EEG and C4-EEG were significantly decreased than without stimulation (all p    0.05, except between non-fatigue and fatigue with magnetic stimulation in gamma band of C3-EEG at 1 kg, and in the SampEn at 1

  1. Computer-controlled stimulation for functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of the neonatal olfactory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arichi, T; Gordon-Williams, R; Allievi, A; Groves, A M; Burdet, E; Edwards, A D

    2013-09-01

    Olfactory sensation is highly functional early in human neonatal life, with studies suggesting that odours can influence behaviour and infant-mother bonding. Due to its good spatial properties, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) contrast functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has the potential to rapidly advance our understanding of the neural activity which underlies the development of olfactory perception in this key period. We aimed to design an 'olfactometer' specifically for use with neonatal subjects for fMRI studies of odour perception. We describe a fully automated and programmable, fMRI compatible system capable of presenting odorant liquids. To prevent contamination of the system and minimize between-subject infective risk, the majority of the olfactometer is constructed from single-use, readily available clinical equipment. The system was used to present the odour of infant formula milk in a validation group of seven neonatal subjects at term equivalent postmenstrual age (median age 40 weeks). A safe, reliable and reproducible pattern of stimulation was delivered leading to well-localized positive BOLD functional responses in the piriform cortex, amygdala, thalamus, insular cortex and cerebellum. The described system is therefore suitable for detailed studies of the ontology of olfactory sensation and perception during early human brain development. ©2013 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Assessment of abdominal muscle function in individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury above T6 in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerkefors, Anna; Squair, Jordan W; Chua, Romeo; Lam, Tania; Chen, Zhen; Carpenter, Mark G

    2015-02-01

    To use transcranial magnetic stimulation and electromyography to assess the potential for preserved function in the abdominal muscles in individuals classified with motor-complete spinal cord injury above T6. Five individuals with spinal cord injury (C5-T3) and 5 able-bodied individuals. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was delivered over the abdominal region of primary motor cortex during resting and sub-maximal (or attempted) contractions. Surface electromyography was used to record motor-evoked potentials as well as maximal voluntary (or attempted) contractions in the abdominal muscles and the diaphragm. Responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in the abdominal muscles occurred in all spinal cord injury subjects. Latencies of muscle response onsets were similar in both groups; however, peak-to-peak amplitudes were smaller in the spinal cord injury group. During maximal voluntary (or attempted) contractions all spinal cord injury subjects were able to elicit electromyography activity above resting levels in more than one abdominal muscle across tasks. Individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury above T6 were able to activate abdominal muscles in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation and during maximal voluntary (or attempted) contractions. The activation was induced directly through corticospinal pathways, and not indirectly by stretch reflex activations of the diaphragm. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and electromyography measurements provide a useful method to assess motor preservation of abdominal muscles in persons with spinal cord injury.

  3. Cervical spinal functional magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal cord injured patient during electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Ye-Xi; Li, Zhi-Yang; Shen, Zhi-Wei; Kong, Kang-Mei; Wu, Ren-Hua

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the spatial distribution and signal intensity changes following spinal cord activation in patients with spinal cord injury. This study used spinal functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) based on signal enhancement by extra-vascular water protons (SEEP) to assess elicited responses during subcutaneous electrical stimulation at the right elbow and right thumb in the cervical spinal cord. Seven healthy volunteers and seven patients with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) were included in this study. Significant functional activation was observed mainly in the right side of the spinal cord at the level of the C5-C6 cervical vertebra in both the axial and sagittal planes. A higher percentage of signal changes (4.66 ± 2.08 % in injured subjects vs. 2.78 ± 1.66 % in normal) and more average activation voxels (4.69 ± 2.59 in injured subjects vs. 2.56 ± 1.13 in normal subject) in axial plane at the C5-C6 cervical vertebra with a statistically significant difference. The same trends were observed in the sagittal plane with higher percentage of signal changes and more average activation voxels, though no statistically significant difference compared with the control group. Spinal SEEP fMRI is a powerful noninvasive method for the study of local neuronal activation in the human spinal cord, which may be of clinical value for evaluating the effectiveness of interventions aimed at promoting recovery of function using electrical stimulation.

  4. The effects of combined repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation on motor function in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Tae Gun; Park, Eunhee; Kang, Chung; Chang, Won Hyuk; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2016-11-22

    Both transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), when provided to stroke patients in combination with motor training, enhance therapeutic efficacy and motor function. However, the majority of previous studies have only examined a single treatment modality. The authors investigated the modulating influence of combination dual-mode brain stimulation upon bihemispheric stimulation with motor training in stroke patients. Twenty stroke patients with hemiparesis underwent five randomly arranged sessions of diverse combinations of rTMS and tDCS. We applied cathodal or anodal tDCS over the contralesional primary motor cortex (cM1) and 10 Hz rTMS over the ipsilesional primary motor cortex (iM1) in a simultaneous or preconditioning method including sham stimulation. Immediately after dual-mode stimulation, sequential hand motor training was performed for 5 minutes. The total pulses of rTMS and the duration of tDCS and motor training were the same for all sessions. Cortical excitability and sequential motor performance were evaluated before and after each session. Motor function and corticomotor excitability following simultaneous stimulation via cathodal tDCS over the cM1 combined with 10 Hz rTMS over the iM1 were significantly increased after the intervention, with significantly greater motor improvement than seen with other treatment conditions (P stimulation of cathodal tDCS and 10 Hz rTMS results in better motor performance in stroke patients than other combination methods. This result seemed to be related to effective modulation of interhemispheric imbalance of cortical excitability by dual-mode stimulation.

  5. Determinants of the induction of cortical plasticity by non-invasive brain stimulation in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridding, M C; Ziemann, U

    2010-07-01

    The ability to induce cortical plasticity with non-invasive brain stimulation (NBS) techniques has provided novel and exciting opportunities for examining the role of the human cortex during a variety of behaviours. Additionally, and importantly, the induction of lasting changes in cortical excitability can, under some conditions, reversibly modify behaviour and interact with normal learning. Such findings have driven a large number of recent studies examining whether by using such approaches it might be possible to induce functionally significant changes in patients with a large variety of neurological and psychiatric conditions including stroke, Parkinson's disease and depression. However, even in neurologically normal subjects the variability in the neurophysiological and behavioural response to such brain stimulation techniques is high. This variability at present limits the therapeutic usefulness of these techniques. The cause of this variability is multifactorial and to some degree still unknown. However, a number of factors that can influence the induction of plasticity have been identified. This review will summarise what is known about the causes of variability in healthy subjects and propose additional factors that are likely to be important determinants. A greater understanding of these determinants is critical for optimising the therapeutic applications of non-invasive brain stimulation techniques.

  6. Phantom Limb Pain: Low Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Unaffected Hemisphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Di Rollo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Phantom limb pain is very common after limb amputation and is often difficult to treat. The motor cortex stimulation is a valid treatment for deafferentation pain that does not respond to conventional pain treatment, with relief for 50% to 70% of patients. This treatment is invasive as it uses implanted epidural electrodes. Cortical stimulation can be performed noninvasively by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS. The stimulation of the hemisphere that isn't involved in phantom limb (unaffected hemisphere, remains unexplored. We report a case of phantom limb pain treated with 1 Hz rTMS stimulation over motor cortex in unaffected hemisphere. This stimulation produces a relevant clinical improvement of phantom limb pain; however, further studies are necessary to determine the efficacy of the method and the stimulation parameters.

  7. The reliability of topographic measurements from navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation in healthy volunteers and tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdunczyk, Anna; Fleischmann, Robert; Schulz, Juliane; Vajkoczy, Peter; Picht, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) is increasingly being used for preoperative mapping of the motor cortex. Any new technology should undergo rigorous validation before being widely adopted in routine clinical practice. The aim of this experimental study was to assess the intraexaminer and interexaminer reliability of topographic mapping with nTMS. nTMS mapping of the motor cortex for the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle was performed by an expert and a novice examiner, twice in ten healthy volunteers and once in ten tumor patients. The distances between the centers-of-gravity and hotspots were calculated, as were coefficients of variation. This study also compared orthogonal versus variable orientation of the stimulation coil. The mean (range) distance between centers-of-gravity for the expert examiner in the test-retest protocol with healthy volunteers was 4.40 (1.86-7.68) mm. The mean (range) distance between centers-of-gravity for the expert vs. novice examiner was 4.89 (2.39-9.22) mm. There were no significant differences in this result between healthy volunteers and tumor patients. nTMS is sufficiently reliable for clinical use, but examiners should make efforts to minimize sources of error. The reliability of nTMS in tumor patients appears comparable to healthy subjects.

  8. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Reveals Executive Control Dissociation in the Rostral Prefrontal Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijiang He

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Although previous studies have shown that the rostral prefrontal cortex (rPFC plays a crucial role in executive tasks, the various functions of the rPFC in the humans are still understudied. Here we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS with continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS to interfere with the executive control functions of the right rostrolateral PFC (RLPFC or the right rostromedial PFC (RMPFC. Subjects performed a task-switching paradigm, which included spatial detection (SD, prospective memory (PM and working memory (WM tasks, after cTBS. The performance of 18 healthy volunteers was evaluated on different days after cTBS over the right RLPFC, the right RMPFC, and the vertex (serving as a control site. The application of cTBS over the RLPFC significantly increased the switching costs (SCs of the error rates (ERs when switching to the PM task, while RMPFC-cTBS decreased SCs of ERs when switching to the WM task, compared with the control vertex site. These findings provide evidence for a differential role of the RLPFC and the RMPFC in executive functions, with a specific involvement of the RLPFC and the RMPFC in PM, and WM, respectively.

  9. Visual hallucinations in dementia with Lewy bodies: transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, John-Paul; Firbank, Michael; Barnett, Nicola; Pearce, Sarah; Livingstone, Anthea; Mosimann, Urs; Eyre, Janet; McKeith, Ian G; O'Brien, John T

    2011-12-01

    The aetiology of visual hallucinations is poorly understood in dementia with Lewy bodies. Pathological alterations in visual cortical excitability may be one contributory mechanism. To determine visual cortical excitability in people with dementia with Lewy bodies compared with aged-matched controls and also the relationship between visual cortical excitability and visual hallucinations in dementia with Lewy bodies. Visual cortical excitability was determined by using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applied to the occiput to elicit phosphenes (transient subjective visual responses) in 21 patients with dementia with Lewy bodies and 19 age-matched controls. Phosphene parameters were similar between both groups. However, in the patients with dementia with Lewy bodies, TMS measures of visual cortical excitability correlated strongly with the severity of visual hallucinations (P = 0.005). Six patients with dementia with Lewy bodies experienced visual hallucination-like phosphenes (for example, seeing people or figures on stimulation) compared with none of the controls (P = 0.02). Increased visual cortical excitability in dementia with Lewy bodies does not appear to explain visual hallucinations but it may be a marker for their severity.

  10. Can repetitive magnetic stimulation improve cognition in schizophrenia? Pilot data from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Mera S; Farzan, Faranak; Rajji, Tarek K; Voineskos, Aristotle N; Blumberger, Daniel M; Arenovich, Tamara; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Daskalakis, Zafiris J

    2013-03-15

    Working memory represents a core cognitive domain that is impaired in schizophrenia for which there are currently no satisfactory treatments. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) targeted over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex has been shown to modulate neurophysiological mechanisms linked to working memory in schizophrenia and improves working memory performance in healthy subjects and might therefore represent a treatment modality for schizophrenia patients. The objectives were to evaluate the effects of rTMS on working memory performance in schizophrenia patients and evaluate whether rTMS normalizes performance to healthy subject levels. In a 4-week randomized double-blind sham-controlled pilot study design, 27 medicated schizophrenia patients were tested at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (a university teaching hospital that provides psychiatric care to a large urban catchment area and serves as a tertiary referral center for the province of Ontario). Patients performed the verbal working memory n-back task before and after rTMS magnetic resonance image targeted bilaterally sequentially to left and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex 750 pulses/side at 20 Hz for 20 treatments. The main outcome measure was mean magnitude of change in the n-back accuracy for target responses with active (n = 13) or sham (n = 12) rTMS treatment course. The rTMS significantly improved 3-back accuracy for targets compared with placebo sham (Cohen's d = .92). The improvement in 3-back accuracy was also found to be at a level comparable to healthy subjects. These pilot data suggest that bilateral rTMS might be a novel, efficacious, and safe treatment for working memory deficits in patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of anatomical variability in brain on transcranial magnetic stimulation treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syeda, F.; Magsood, H.; Lee, E. G.; El-Gendy, A. A.; Jiles, D. C.; Hadimani, R. L.

    2017-05-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation is a non-invasive clinical therapy used to treat depression and migraine, and shows further promise as treatment for Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and other neurological disorders. However, it is yet unclear as to how anatomical differences may affect stimulation from this treatment. We use finite element analysis to model and analyze the results of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in various head models. A number of heterogeneous head models have been developed using MRI data of real patients, including healthy individuals as well as patients of Parkinson's disease. Simulations of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation performed on 22 anatomically different models highlight the differences in induced stimulation. A standard Figure of 8 coil is used with frequency 2.5 kHz, placed 5 mm above the head. We compare cortical stimulation, volume of brain tissue stimulated, specificity, and maximum E-field induced in the brain for models ranging from ages 20 to 60. Results show that stimulation varies drastically between patients of the same age and health status depending upon brain-scalp distance, which is not necessarily a linear progression with age.

  12. Influence of repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation on neural plasticity in the motor cortex related to swallowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momosaki, Ryo; Kakuda, Wataru; Yamada, Naoki; Abo, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation at two different frequencies (20 and 30 Hz) on cortical excitability in motor areas related to swallowing in healthy individuals. The study participants were 10 healthy normal volunteers (two women and eight men, age range 25-36 years). Repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation was applied to the submandibular muscle using a parabolic coil at the site where contraction of the suprahyoid muscles was elicited. Stimulation was continued for 10 min (total 1200 pulses) at 20 Hz on 1 day and at 30 Hz on another day, with the stimulation strength set at 90% of the intensity that elicited pain. The motor-evoked potential amplitude of suprahyoid muscles was assessed before, immediately after, and 30 min after stimulation. Stimulations at both 20 and 30 Hz significantly increased motor-evoked potential amplitude (Pstimulation. The motor-evoked potential amplitude immediately after stimulation was not significantly different between the 20 and 30 Hz frequencies. The results indicated that repetitive magnetic stimulation increased motor-evoked potential amplitude of swallowing muscles, suggesting facilitation of the motor cortex related to swallowing in healthy individuals.

  13. Mechanisms of magnetic stimulation of central nervous system neurons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pashut, Tamar; Wolfus, Shuki; Friedman, Alex; Lavidor, Michal; Bar-Gad, Izhar; Yeshurun, Yosef; Korngreen, Alon

    2011-01-01

    .... This magnetic field induces an electric field that modulates neuronal activity. The spatial distribution of the induced electric field is determined by the geometry and location of the coil relative to the brain...

  14. Effect of tone-based sound stimulation on balance performance of normal subjects: preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnacco, Guido; Klotzek, Adam S; Carrick, Frederick R; Wright, Cameron H G; Oggero, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Sound is known to affect the human brain, hence sound or music therapy is sometimes used to improve a subject's physicaland mental health. In this study, the effects sound stimulation has on balance were investigated by means of computerizeddynamic posturography tests performed with eyes closed on an unstable surface using a CAPS® system, exceeding theInternational Society for Posture and Gait Research (ISPGR) recommended metrological performance standards. Subjectswere tested without listening to any music (baseline), listening to “pure music”, and listening to the same music with differenttones embedded into it (one for each key). We found that different subjects react differently to different tones. Music alonedid not have a statistically significant effect on balance compared to the baseline, but the “best” tone significantly improvedbalance compared to the baseline or the “pure music” conditions. Furthermore, the “worst” tone reduced the balancecompared to “pure music”, but the reduction was not statistically significant relative to the baseline. The results thereforeindicate that, at least relative to balance performance, the tone-based sound stimulation we investigated is effective andinherently safe, but that tone selection depends on the individual subject.

  15. Low-frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation over left dorsal premotor cortex improves the dynamic control of visuospatially cued actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ward, Nick S; Bestmann, Sven; Hartwigsen, Gesa

    2010-01-01

    Left rostral dorsal premotor cortex (rPMd) and supramarginal gyrus (SMG) have been implicated in the dynamic control of actions. In 12 right-handed healthy individuals, we applied 30 min of low-frequency (1 Hz) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over left rPMd to investigate...... the involvement of left rPMd and SMG in the rapid adjustment of actions guided by visuospatial cues. After rTMS, subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while making spatially congruent button presses with the right or left index finger in response to a left- or right-sided target. Subjects were...... that left rPMd and SMG-AIP contribute toward dynamic control of actions and demonstrate that low-frequency rTMS can enhance functional coupling between task-relevant brain regions and improve some aspects of motor performance....

  16. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation as an adjuvant method in the treatment of depression: Preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovičić Milica

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is a method of brain stimulation which is increasingly used in both clinical practice and research. Up-to-date studies have pointed out a potential antidepressive effect of rTMS, but definitive superiority over placebo has not yet been confirmed. Objective. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of rTMS as an adjuvant treatment with antidepressants during 18 weeks of evaluation starting from the initial application of the protocol. Methods. Four patients with the diagnosis of moderate/severe major depression were included in the study. The protocol involved 2000 stimuli per day (rTMS frequency of 10 Hz, intensity of 120% motor threshold administered over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC for 15 days. Subjective and objective depressive symptoms were measured before the initiation of rTMS and repeatedly evaluated at week 3, 6, 12 and 18 from the beginning of the stimulation. Results. After completion of rTMS protocol two patients demonstrated a reduction of depressive symptoms that was sustained throughout the 15-week follow-up period. One patient showed a tendency of remission during the first 12 weeks of the study, but relapsed in week 18. One patient showed no significant symptom reduction at any point of follow-up. Conclusion. Preliminary findings suggest that rTMS has a good tolerability and can be efficient in accelerating the effect of antidepressants, particularly in individuals with shorter duration of depressive episodes and moderate symptom severity. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III41029 i br. ON175090

  17. Heat generation and nanoscale thermal transport in thermo-magnetic genetic cellular stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Rahul; Castellanos-Rubio, Idoia; Pralle, Arnd

    Magnetic nanoparticles act as heat sources, when exposed to alternating magnetic fields, creating steep temperature gradients around them. We studied the capabilities of various geometrical distribution of such particles to be efficient transducers for stimulating cellular signaling, upon magnetic field application. We tagged synthesized core-shell nanoparticles with fluorescent dye molecules and attached them via membrane proteins, effectively creating a sheet of particles, wrapped around the cellular membrane. Exploiting the thermo-sensitivity of fluorescent proteins, we systematically studied temporal evolution of temperature gradients with magnetic fields, by monitoring fluorescence intensity changes on the particles confined to particular geometrical arrangements, on cells as well as in fabricated polymer matrices. We also studied the impact of magnetic dipolar interactions on heat generation in tightly packed self-assemblies, like particle chains in magnetotactic bacteria. Lastly, we show how nanoparticles can be targeted with specificity to deep brain neurons to evoke remotely stimulated behavioral changes in awake mice.

  18. Comparison of neuropathology in Parkinson's disease subjects with and without deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Gian D; Ouyang, Bichun; Serrano, Geidy; Shill, Holly A; Goetz, Christopher; Stebbins, Glenn; Metman, Leo Verhagen; Driver-Dunckley, Erika; Mehta, Shyamal H; Caviness, John N; Sabbagh, Marwan N; Adler, Charles H; Beach, Thomas G

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this postmortem study was to compare, in Parkinson's disease subjects with and without bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS), the loss of pigmented neurons within the substantia nigra and pathological alpha-synuclein density within the SN and other brain regions. PD subjects were identified from the Arizona Study of Aging and Neurodegenerative Disorders database (STN-DBS = 11, non-DBS = 156). Pigmented neuron loss scores within the substantia nigra as well as alpha-synuclein density scores within the substantia nigra and 9 other brain regions were compared, the latter individually and in summary as the Lewy body brain load score. DBS subjects had higher alpha-synuclein density scores within the substantia nigra, olfactory bulb, and locus ceruleus, as well as higher total Lewy body brain load scores when compared with non-DBS subjects. No differences in substantia nigra pigmented neuron loss scores were found. STN-DBS subjects tend to have higher alpha-synuclein density scores, but do not have a differential loss of substantia nigra pigmented neurons. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  19. Enhancement of iron content in spinach plants stimulated by magnetic nano particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yulianto, Agus; Astuti, Budi; Amalia, Saptaria Rosa [Physics Department, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Universitas Negeri Semarang (Indonesia)

    2016-04-19

    In our previous study, the iron content in spinach plants could be detected by magnetic susceptibility values. In the present work, magnetic nano particles were found from the iron sand. The magnetic nano particles are synthesis by using co-precipitation process and sol-gel technique. The stimulation of magnetic nano particles in the plant has been done by the provision of magnetic nano particles in growing media. After certain time, plant samples was characterized using susceptibility-meter MS2B and atomic absorption spectroscopy to measure the magnetic susceptibility and the amount of iron content that absorbed of the plant, respectively. The iron content in the spinach plants was increased when the magnetic nano particles was injected in the growing media.

  20. Enhancement of iron content in spinach plants stimulated by magnetic nano particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulianto, Agus; Astuti, Budi; Amalia, Saptaria Rosa

    2016-04-01

    In our previous study, the iron content in spinach plants could be detected by magnetic susceptibility values. In the present work, magnetic nano particles were found from the iron sand. The magnetic nano particles are synthesis by using co-precipitation process and sol-gel technique. The stimulation of magnetic nano particles in the plant has been done by the provision of magnetic nano particles in growing media. After certain time, plant samples was characterized using susceptibility-meter MS2B and atomic absorption spectroscopy to measure the magnetic susceptibility and the amount of iron content that absorbed of the plant, respectively. The iron content in the spinach plants was increased when the magnetic nano particles was injected in the growing media.

  1. Modulation of thermal somatosensory thresholds within local and remote spinal dermatomes following cervical repetitive magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albu, Sergiu; Gómez-Soriano, Julio; Bravo-Esteban, Elisabeth; Palazon, Ramiro; Kumru, Hatice; Avila-Martin, Gerardo; Galán-Arriero, Iriana; Taylor, Julian

    2013-10-25

    Repetitive magnetic stimulation (rMS) modulates thermal somatosensory function at both low (0.2-1.0Hz) and high (5.0-20.0Hz) frequencies within the conditioned dermatome. However the effects of 1Hz and 20Hz cervical (C6-C7) rMS on thermosensory thresholds and contact heat evoked potentials (CHEPs) tested within local and remote spinal dermatomes are not known. Thirty healthy subjects participated in the study. Warm and cold detection threshold, heat and cold pain thresholds, and Cz/Fz CHEPs were evaluated within the C6, T10 and extrasegmental V3 control dermatome, before and after random assignment of subjects to sham, 1 or 20Hz C6-C7 rMS. Following both 1 and 20Hz cervical rMS, warm detection threshold increased within the local C6 dermatome. Furthermore 1Hz cervical rMS increased warm detection threshold within the remote T10 dermatome, but not within the V3-trigeminal control area. Cervical rMS failed to modulate cold detection threshold, heat and cold pain threshold or Cz/Fz CHEP amplitude from the dermatomal test sites. Both 1 and 20Hz cervical rMS modulated warm detection threshold within the locally conditioned C6 dermatome. The concomitant increase in warm detection threshold within the T10 dermatome following 1Hz rMS provides evidence for remote neuromodulation of thermosensory function via intraspinal control mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Transcranial magnetic stimulation identifies cortical excitability changes in monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khedr, E M; Abo-Elfetoh, N; Elbeh, K A; Baky, A A; Gamal, R M; El Hammady, D; Korashy, F

    2015-05-01

    A limited number of electroencephalography (EEG) studies in nocturnal enuresis (NE) have reported cortical dysmaturity. The aim of the present study was to test this notion by examining cortical excitability in subjects with nocturnal enuresis (NE) using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). We investigated 41 patients with NE meeting the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for NE, and 18 age- and sex-matched controls. Each subject was assessed clinically regarding frequency, duration of enuresis and Health Survey Measurement. Neurophysiological measures included resting and active motor thresholds (RMT, AMT), motor evoked potentials (MEP) of upper and lower limbs, cortical silent period duration (CSP) and transcallosal inhibition (TCI), in the upper limbs. Patients had a significantly lower Health Survey Measurement score for both physical and mental health components compared to the control group. RMT and AMT of both upper and lower limbs as well as the duration of the CSP and TCI were significantly reduced compared with the control group. There was significant positive correlation between RMT, AMT and Health Survey Measurement scores, especially Social Functioning. Patients with nocturnal enuresis are characterized by pathologically increased excitability and reduced inhibitory processing in the motor cortex, which could contribute to the pathogenesis of nocturnal enuresis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Origin of facilitation of motor-evoked potentials after paired magnetic stimulation: direct recording of epidural activity in conscious humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lazzaro, V; Pilato, F; Oliviero, A; Dileone, M; Saturno, E; Mazzone, P; Insola, A; Profice, P; Ranieri, F; Capone, F; Tonali, P A; Rothwell, J C

    2006-10-01

    A magnetic transcranial conditioning stimulus given over the motor cortex at intensities below active threshold for obtaining motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) facilitates EMG responses evoked at rest in hand muscles by a suprathreshold magnetic stimulus given 10-25 ms later. This is known as intracortical facilitation (ICF). We recorded descending volleys produced by single and paired magnetic motor cortex stimulation through high cervical epidural electrodes implanted for pain relief in six conscious patients. At interstimulus intervals (ISIs) of 10 and 15 ms, although MEP was facilitated, there was no change in the amplitude or number of descending volleys. An additional I wave sometimes was observed at 25 ms ISI. In one subject, we also evaluated the effects of reversing the direction of the induced current in the brain. At 10 ms ISI, the facilitation of the MEPs disappeared and was replaced by slight suppression; at 2 ms ISI, there was a pronounced facilitation of epidural volleys. Subsequent experiments on healthy subjects showed that a conditioning stimulus capable of producing ICF of MEPs had no effect on the EMG response evoked by transmastoidal electrical stimulation of corticospinal tract. We conclude that ICF occurs because either 1) the conditioning stimulus has a (thus far undetected) effect on spinal cord excitability that increases its response to the same amplitude test volley or 2) that it can alter the composition (but not the amplitude) of the descending volleys set up by the test stimulus such that a larger proportion of the activity is destined for the target muscle.

  4. Using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to study the underlying neural mechanisms of human motor learning and memory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Censor, Nitzan; Cohen, Leonardo G

    2011-01-01

    .... Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), a safe non‐invasive brain stimulation technique, enables the study of the functional role of specific cortical areas by evaluating the behavioural consequences of selective modulation of activity...

  5. Theta Burst Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Auditory Verbal Hallucinations : Negative Findings From a Double-Blind-Randomized Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koops, Sanne; van Dellen, Edwin; Schutte, Maya J L; Nieuwdorp, Wendy; Neggers, Sebastiaan F W; Sommer, Iris E C

    BACKGROUND: Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) in schizophrenia are resistant to antipsychotic medication in approximately 25% of patients. Treatment with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for refractory AVH has shown varying results. A stimulation protocol using continuous theta

  6. Real-time visualization of magnetic flux densities for transcranial magnetic stimulation on commodity and fully immersive VR systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalivarapu, Vijay K.; Serrate, Ciro; Hadimani, Ravi L.

    2017-05-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive procedure that uses time varying short pulses of magnetic fields to stimulate nerve cells in the brain. In this method, a magnetic field generator ("TMS coil") produces small electric fields in the region of the brain via electromagnetic induction. This technique can be used to excite or inhibit firing of neurons, which can then be used for treatment of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, stroke, migraine, and depression. It is however challenging to focus the induced electric field from TMS coils to smaller regions of the brain. Since electric and magnetic fields are governed by laws of electromagnetism, it is possible to numerically simulate and visualize these fields to accurately determine the site of maximum stimulation and also to develop TMS coils that can focus the fields on the targeted regions. However, current software to compute and visualize these fields are not real-time and can work for only one position/orientation of TMS coil, severely limiting their usage. This paper describes the development of an application that computes magnetic flux densities (h-fields) and visualizes their distribution for different TMS coil position/orientations in real-time using GPU shaders. The application is developed for desktop, commodity VR (HTC Vive), and fully immersive VR CAVETM systems, for use by researchers, scientists, and medical professionals to quickly and effectively view the distribution of h-fields from MRI brain scans.

  7. The effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on depression, visual perception, and activities of daily living in stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ko-Un; Kim, Soo-Han; An, Tae-Gyu

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study aimed to investigate the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on visual perception, depression, and activities of daily livings (ADLs) in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-four stroke patients were divided equally into an experimental group that underwent rTMS and a control group that underwent mock rTMS. Changes in patient visual perception, depression, and ADLs were evaluated. All subjects underwent treatment for 20 minutes, ...

  8. Insulin-stimulated glucose transport in circulating mononuclear cells from nondiabetic and IDDM subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneman, D; Zinman, B; Elliott, M E; Bilan, P J; Klip, A

    1992-02-01

    The objectives of this study were 1) to evaluate glucose transport and its regulation by insulin in easily accessible human cells, 2) to investigate the glucose transporter isoforms involved, and 3) to establish whether a defect in glucose transport is associated with peripheral insulin resistance, which is common in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) patients. We measured 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) uptake in circulating mononuclear cells from 23 nondiabetic adults, 16 adults with IDDM, and 10 children with IDDM. Circulating mononuclear cells were separated from whole blood by Ficoll gradients and incubated with +/- 1 nM insulin. 2-DG uptake was measured after incubation with [3H]2-DG and cell separation through corn oil-phthalate. Cytochalasin B-inhibitable 2-DG uptake (basal and insulin stimulated) was higher in control than in IDDM subjects (P less than 0.001). Insulin significantly increased 2-DG uptake or 3-O-methylglucose uptake in both groups. Basal and insulin-stimulated 2-DG uptake was similar for adults and children with IDDM and did not correlate with age or body mass index in any group or disease duration, insulin dosage, or HbA1c in IDDM. In separated monocytes and lymphocytes, 2-DG uptake increased in response to insulin only in the monocyte population. Insulin dose-response curves indicated maximal stimulation of hexose uptake at 1-2 nM insulin for both control and diabetic subjects and demonstrated a significant decrease in maximal insulin response in the latter. Immunoblotting with specific antibodies revealed that circulating mononuclear cells and separated monocytes express the GLUT1 but not the GLUT4 isoform of the glucose transporter.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Magnetic Stimulation of One-Dimensional Neuronal Cultures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rotem, Assaf; Moses, Elisha

    2008-01-01

    ... induced electric field. This fact has remained a puzzle over the past two decades, with surprisingly little mention in the TMS literature. It has generally been ascribed among practitioners to the high sensitivity of finding the precise direction in which the magnetic coil should be placed over the brain, and perhaps to an enhanced sensitivity to mag...

  10. Muscle training with repetitive magnetic stimulation of the quadriceps in severe COPD patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bustamante, Víctor; de Santa María, Elena López; Gorostiza, Amaia; Jiménez, Unai; Gáldiz, Juan B

    2010-01-01

    .... Quadriceps muscle strength and endurance measurements, quality-of-life questionnaires (SF36, SGRQ) and a six-minute walking test were all carried out before and after the training period in the stimulated and control subjects...

  11. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Over Bilateral Hemispheres Enhances Motor Function and Training Effect of Paretic Hand in Patients After Stroke

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Takeuchi, Naoyuki; Tada, Takeo; Toshima, Masahiko; Matsuo, Yuichiro; Ikoma, Katsunori

    2009-01-01

    ... or decreasing the excitability of the unaffected hemisphere. We investigated whether bilateral repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation might improve the paretic hand in patients after stroke. Design...

  12. Spontaneously Fluctuating Motor Cortex Excitability in Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood: A Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study: e0151667

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    William M Stern; Mahalekshmi Desikan; Damon Hoad; Fatima Jaffer; Gionata Strigaro; Josemir W Sander; John C Rothwell; Sanjay M Sisodiya

    2016-01-01

    .... Nine people with alternating hemiplegia of childhood were recruited; eight were successfully tested using transcranial magnetic stimulation to study motor cortex excitability, using single and paired pulse paradigms...

  13. Effects of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on event-related potential P300

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, Tetsuya; Sato, Aya; Iwahashi, Masakuni; Iramina, Keiji

    2012-04-01

    The present study analyzed the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on brain activity. P300 latency of event-related potential (ERP) was used to evaluate the effects of low-frequency and short-term rTMS by stimulating the supramarginal gyrus (SMG), which is considered to be the related area of P300 origin. In addition, the prolonged stimulation effects on P300 latency were analyzed after applying rTMS. A figure-eight coil was used to stimulate left-right SMG, and intensity of magnetic stimulation was 80% of motor threshold. A total of 100 magnetic pulses were applied for rTMS. The effects of stimulus frequency at 0.5 or 1 Hz were determined. Following rTMS, an odd-ball task was performed and P300 latency of ERP was measured. The odd-ball task was performed at 5, 10, and 15 min post-rTMS. ERP was measured prior to magnetic stimulation as a control. Electroencephalograph (EEG) was measured at Fz, Cz, and Pz that were indicated by the international 10-20 electrode system. Results demonstrated that different effects on P300 latency occurred between 0.5-1 Hz rTMS. With 1 Hz low-frequency magnetic stimulation to the left SMG, P300 latency decreased. Compared to the control, the latency time difference was approximately 15 ms at Cz. This decrease continued for approximately 10 min post-rTMS. In contrast, 0.5 Hz rTMS resulted in delayed P300 latency. Compared to the control, the latency time difference was approximately 20 ms at Fz, and this delayed effect continued for approximately 15 min post-rTMS. Results demonstrated that P300 latency varied according to rTMS frequency. Furthermore, the duration of the effect was not similar for stimulus frequency of low-frequency rTMS.

  14. Low-frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation is beneficial for enhancing synaptic plasticity in the aging brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhan-Chi; Luan, Feng; Xie, Chun-Yan; Geng, Dan-Dan; Wang, Yan-Yong; Ma, Jun

    2015-06-01

    In the aging brain, cognitive function gradually declines and causes a progressive reduction in the structural and functional plasticity of the hippocampus. Transcranial magnetic stimulation is an emerging and novel neurological and psychiatric tool used to investigate the neurobiology of cognitive function. Recent studies have demonstrated that low-frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation (≤1 Hz) ameliorates synaptic plasticity and spatial cognitive deficits in learning-impaired mice. However, the mechanisms by which this treatment improves these deficits during normal aging are still unknown. Therefore, the current study investigated the effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation on the brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal pathway, synaptic protein markers, and spatial memory behavior in the hippocampus of normal aged mice. The study also investigated the downstream regulator, Fyn kinase, and the downstream effectors, synaptophysin and growth-associated protein 43 (both synaptic markers), to determine the possible mechanisms by which transcranial magnetic stimulation regulates cognitive capacity. Transcranial magnetic stimulation with low intensity (110% average resting motor threshold intensity, 1 Hz) increased mRNA and protein levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B, and Fyn in the hippocampus of aged mice. The treatment also upregulated the mRNA and protein expression of synaptophysin and growth-associated protein 43 in the hippocampus of these mice. In conclusion, brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling may play an important role in sustaining and regulating structural synaptic plasticity induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation in the hippocampus of aging mice, and Fyn may be critical during this regulation. These responses may change the structural plasticity of the aging hippocampus, thereby improving cognitive function.

  15. Low-frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation is beneficial for enhancing synaptic plasticity in the aging brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan-chi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the aging brain, cognitive function gradually declines and causes a progressive reduction in the structural and functional plasticity of the hippocampus. Transcranial magnetic stimulation is an emerging and novel neurological and psychiatric tool used to investigate the neurobiology of cognitive function. Recent studies have demonstrated that low-frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation (≤1 Hz ameliorates synaptic plasticity and spatial cognitive deficits in learning-impaired mice. However, the mechanisms by which this treatment improves these deficits during normal aging are still unknown. Therefore, the current study investigated the effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation on the brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal pathway, synaptic protein markers, and spatial memory behavior in the hippocampus of normal aged mice. The study also investigated the downstream regulator, Fyn kinase, and the downstream effectors, synaptophysin and growth-associated protein 43 (both synaptic markers, to determine the possible mechanisms by which transcranial magnetic stimulation regulates cognitive capacity. Transcranial magnetic stimulation with low intensity (110% average resting motor threshold intensity, 1 Hz increased mRNA and protein levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B, and Fyn in the hippocampus of aged mice. The treatment also upregulated the mRNA and protein expression of synaptophysin and growth-associated protein 43 in the hippocampus of these mice. In conclusion, brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling may play an important role in sustaining and regulating structural synaptic plasticity induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation in the hippocampus of aging mice, and Fyn may be critical during this regulation. These responses may change the structural plasticity of the aging hippocampus, thereby improving cognitive function.

  16. [Study of the facial nerve motor pathway with the transcranial cerebral magnetic stimulation technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barona, R; Escudero, J; López-Trigo, J; Escudero, M; Armengot, M

    1992-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation method permits the study of the facial nerve in all its aspects (motor cortex-alpha moto-neurone-facial muscle) in an non invasive and painless way. We studied 12 patients using two levels of stimuli, the first was at an occipital level and the second at the primary motor cortex in the frontal lobe. We compared the results of this technique with those obtained by electric stimulation of the nerve.

  17. Impact of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Functional Movement Disorders: Cortical Modulation or a Behavioral Effect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béatrice Garcin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionRecent studies suggest that repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS improves functional movement disorders (FMDs, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The objective was to determine whether the beneficial action of TMS in patients with FMDs is due to cortical neuromodulation or rather to a cognitive-behavioral effect.MethodConsecutive patients with FMDs underwent repeated low-frequency (0.25 Hz magnetic stimulation over the cortex contralateral to the symptoms or over the spinal roots [root magnetic stimulation (RMS] homolateral to the symptoms. The patients were randomized into two groups: group 1 received RMS on day 1 and TMS on day 2, while group 2 received the same treatments in reverse order. We blindly assessed the severity of movement disorders before and after each stimulation session.ResultsWe studied 33 patients with FMDs (dystonia, tremor, myoclonus, Parkinsonism, or stereotypies. The median symptom duration was 2.9 years. The magnetic stimulation sessions led to a significant improvement (>50% in 22 patients (66%. We found no difference between TMS and RMS.ConclusionWe suggest that the therapeutic benefit of TMS in patients with FMDs is due more to a cognitive-behavioral effect than to cortical neuromodulation.

  18. Anorectal stimulation causes increased colonic motor activity in subjects with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsten, Mark A; Singal, Ashwani K; Monga, Amit; Chaparala, Geeta; Khan, Amir M; Palmon, Ron; Mendoza, John Reagan D; Lirio, Juan P; Rosman, Alan S; Spungen, Ann; Bauman, William A

    2007-01-01

    Difficulty with evacuation (DWE) is a major problem after spinal cord injury (SCI). Stimulation of the anal canal and lower rectum, accomplished using a gloved finger (so-called digital rectal stimulation or DRS) is often used as an adjunct to laxatives and enemas to facilitate bowel evacuation. However, the basis for the efficacy of DRS is not known. This study assessed the effect of DRS on colonic motility. Six subjects with SCI were studied several hours after a bowel care session. Colonic motility was assessed using a manometric catheter (affixed endoscopically to the splenic flexure) at baseline, during DRS, and after DRS. In addition, evacuation of barium oatmeal paste (with the consistency of stool and introduced into the rectum and descending colon) was assessed simultaneously using fluoroscopic techniques. The mean number (+/- SEM) of peristaltic waves per minute increased from 0 at baseline to 1.9 (+/- 0.5/min) during DRS and 1.5 (+/- 0.3/min) during the period immediately after cessation of DRS (P < 0.05). The mean amplitude (+/- SEM) of the peristaltic contractions was 43.4 (+/- 2.2) mmHg. The frequency of contractions, as well as amplitude of contractions, during or immediately after DRS was not significantly different. These manometric changes in response to DRS were accompanied by expulsion of barium oatmeal paste in every subject by the fifth DRS. DRS causes left-sided colonic activity in subjects with SCI. At least in part, an anorectal colonic reflex that results in enhanced contractions of the descending colon and rectum may contribute to bowel evacuation in individuals with SCI.

  19. Targeted therapies using electrical and magnetic neural stimulation for the treatment of chronic pain in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Duarte, Ingrid; Morse, Leslie R; Alam, Mahtab; Bikson, Marom; Zafonte, Ross; Fregni, Felipe

    2014-01-15

    Chronic neuropathic pain is one of the most common and disabling symptoms in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Over two-thirds of subjects with SCI suffer from chronic pain influencing quality of life, rehabilitation, and recovery. Given the refractoriness of chronic pain to most pharmacological treatments, the majority of individuals with SCI report worsening of this condition over time. Moreover, only 4-6% of patients in this cohort report improvement. Novel treatments targeting mechanisms associated with pain-maladaptive plasticity, such as electromagnetic neural stimulation, may be desirable to improve outcomes. To date, few, small clinical trials have assessed the effects of invasive and noninvasive nervous system stimulation on pain after SCI. We aimed to review initial efficacy, safety and potential predictors of response by assessing the effects of neural stimulation techniques to treat SCI pain. A literature search was performed using the PubMed database including studies using the following targeted stimulation strategies: transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS), High Definition tDCS (HD-tDCS), repetitive Transcranial Magnetical Stimulation (rTMS), Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES), Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS), Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) and Motor Cortex Stimulation (MCS), published prior to June of 2012. We included studies from 1998 to 2012. Eight clinical trials and one naturalistic observational study (nine studies in total) met the inclusion criteria. Among the clinical trials, three studies assessed the effects of tDCS, two of CES, two of rTMS and one of TENS. The naturalistic study investigated the analgesic effects of SCS. No clinical trials for epidural motor cortex stimulation (MCS) or HD-tDCS were found. Parameters of stimulation and also clinical characteristics varied significantly across studies. Three out of eight studies showed larger effects sizes (0.73, 0.88 and 1.86 respectively) for pain

  20. A novel approach for documenting naming errors induced by navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lioumis, Pantelis; Zhdanov, Andrey; Mäkelä, Niko; Lehtinen, Henri; Wilenius, Juha; Neuvonen, Tuomas; Hannula, Henri; Deletis, Vedran; Picht, Thomas; Mäkelä, Jyrki P

    2012-03-15

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is widely used both in basic research and in clinical practice. TMS has been utilized in studies of functional organization of speech in healthy volunteers. Navigated TMS (nTMS) allows preoperative mapping of the motor cortex for surgical planning. Recording behavioral responses to nTMS in the speech-related cortical network in a manner that allows off-line review of performance might increase utility of nTMS both for scientific and clinical purposes, e.g., for a careful preoperative planning. Four subjects participated in the study. The subjects named pictures of objects presented every 2-3s on a computer screen. One-second trains of 5 pulses were applied by nTMS 300ms after the presentation of pictures. The nTMS and stimulus presentation screens were cloned. A commercial digital camera was utilized to record the subject's performance and the screen clones. Delays between presentation, audio and video signals were eliminated by carefully tested combination of displays and camera. An experienced neuropsychologist studied the videos and classified the errors evoked by nTMS during the object naming. Complete anomias, semantic, phonological and performance errors were observed during nTMS of left fronto-parieto-temporal cortical regions. Several errors were detected only in the video classification. nTMS combined with synchronized video recording provides an accurate monitoring tool of behavioral TMS experiments. This experimental setup can be particularly useful for high-quality cognitive paradigms and for clinical purposes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessment of Diaphragm and External Intercostals Fatigue from Surface EMG using Cervical Magnetic Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ju Chang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed: (1 to test the reliability of surface electromyography (sEMG recording of the diaphragm and external intercostals contractions response to cervical magnetic stimulation (CMS, (2 to examine the amount and the types of inspiratory muscle fatigue that developed after maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV maneuvers.Ten male college students without physical disability (22.1±2.0 years old participated in the study and each completed a control (quiet breathing trial and a fatigue (MVV maneuvers trial sequentially. In the quiet breathing trial, the subjects maintained quiet breathing for five minutes. The subjects performed five maximal static inspiratory efforts and received five CMS before and after the quiet breathing. In the MVV trial, subjects performed five maximal inspiratory efforts and received five CMS before, immediately after, and ten minutes after two sets of MVV maneuvers performed five minutes apart. Maximal inspiratory pressure (PImax, sEMG of diaphragm and external intercostals during maximal static inspiratory efforts and during CMS were recorded. In the quiet breathing trial, high intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC=0.95-0.99 were observed in all the variables. In the MVV trial, the PImax, the EMG amplitude and the median power frequency during maximal static inspiratory efforts significantly decreased in both the diaphragm and the external intercostals immediately after the MVV maneuvers Sensors 2008, 8 2175 (P 0.05. It is concluded that the sEMG recordings of the diaphragm during maximal static inspiratory efforts and in response to CMS allow reproducible sequential assessment of diaphragm contractility. MVV maneuvers resulted in inspiratory muscles fatigue, possibly central fatigue.

  2. FDTD-based Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation model applied to specific neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanjul-Vélez, Félix; Salas-García, Irene; Ortega-Quijano, Noé; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive treatment of neurodegenerative diseases is particularly challenging in Western countries, where the population age is increasing. In this work, magnetic propagation in human head is modelled by Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method, taking into account specific characteristics of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) in neurodegenerative diseases. It uses a realistic high-resolution three-dimensional human head mesh. The numerical method is applied to the analysis of magnetic radiation distribution in the brain using two realistic magnetic source models: a circular coil and a figure-8 coil commonly employed in TMS. The complete model was applied to the study of magnetic stimulation in Alzheimer and Parkinson Diseases (AD, PD). The results show the electrical field distribution when magnetic stimulation is supplied to those brain areas of specific interest for each particular disease. Thereby the current approach entails a high potential for the establishment of the current underdeveloped TMS dosimetry in its emerging application to AD and PD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Promotes Frontal Compensatory Mechanisms in Healthy Elderly Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Cespón

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is potentially useful to improve working memory. In the present study, young and elderly subjects performed a working memory task (n-back task during an electroencephalogram recording before and after receiving anodal, cathodal, and sham tDCS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. We investigated modulations of behavioral performance and electrophysiological correlates of working memory processes (frontal and parietal P300 event-related potentials. A strong tendency to modulated working memory performance was observed after the application of tDCS. In detail, young, but not elderly, subjects benefited from additional practice in the absence of real tDCS, as indicated by their more accurate responses after sham tDCS. The cathodal tDCS had no effect in any group of participants. Importantly, anodal tDCS improved accuracy in elderly. Moreover, increased accuracy after anodal tDCS was correlated with a larger frontal P300 amplitude. These findings suggest that, in elderly subjects, improved working memory after anodal tDCS applied over the left DLPFC may be related to the promotion of frontal compensatory mechanisms, which are related to attentional processes.

  4. Subjective stimulant and sedative effects of alcohol during early drinking experiences predict alcohol involvement in treated adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tammy; Martin, Christopher S

    2009-09-01

    Research on low subjective response to alcohol has focused primarily on alcohol's sedative effects during early drinking experiences. This study examined subjective response to both stimulant and sedative effects of alcohol during initial drinking experiences as predictors of treated adolescents' severity of alcohol involvement before treatment and over 1-year follow-up. Adolescents (N = 169) recruited from addictions treatment reported on the number of drinks needed to obtain stimulant and sedative effects of alcohol for early and heavy drinking periods. The number of drinks needed to obtain stimulant and sedative effects, as well as the degree of stimulant and sedative effect obtained, were examined as predictors of adolescents' alcohol involvement at baseline (before treatment) and 1-year follow-up. During early drinking experiences, females reported a greater degree of sedative effect compared with males; there was no gender difference in degree of stimulant effect reported during early drinking experiences. Both early subjective stimulant and sedative effects of alcohol predicted the usual number of drinks needed to become intoxicated and the maximum drinking quantity per day before treatment. However, at 1-year follow-up, only early sedative effects predicted 1-year outcomes. Study findings suggest potentially important roles for both early subjective stimulant and sedative effects of alcohol in relation to adolescent alcohol involvement.

  5. Germination of grass seeds subjected to stationary magnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Florez Garcia, Mercedes; Martinez Ramirez, Elvira; Carbonell Padrino, Maria Victoria

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to determine and quantify the effect produced by a stationary magnetic field in germination of patrense seeds (Festuca arundinacea and Medicago sativa, L). Seeds were exposed to 250 mT during different periods of time: 10 minutes, 20 minutes, 1 hour, 24 hours or in a chronic way, doses (B1-B5). Parameters used were average germination time (AGT) and the necessary time for germination of 1, 10, 25, 50 and 75% of seeds (T1 - T7S). According to results obtai...

  6. UNANSWERED QUESTIONS IN THE TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH DEPRESSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morvai, Szabolcs; Nagy, Attila; Kovács, Attila; Móre, Csaba E; Berecz, Roland; Frecska, Ede

    2016-01-30

    According to the WHO fact sheet depression is a common mental disorder affecting 350 million people of all ages worldwide. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a technique which allows the investigator to stimulate and study cortical functions in healthy subjects and patients suffering from various mental and neurological disorders. In the early 1990s, studies revealed that it is possible to evoke long term mood changes in healthy volunteers by rapid rate repetitive, TMS (rTMS) over the frontal cortex. Subsequent studies involving depressed patients found frontal cortical rTMS administered daily to be clinically effective. In the past two decades, numerous trials examined the therapeutic potential of rTMS application in the treatment of mood disorders with constantly evolving treatment protocols. The aim of this paper is to review the literature of the past two decades, focusing on trials addressing the efficacy and safety of rTMS in depressed patients. Our primary goal is to evaluate the results in order to direct future studies which may help investigators in the development of treatment protocols suitable in hospital settings. The time is not far when TMS devices will be used routinely by practitioners primarily for therapeutic purpose rather than clinical research. To our knowledge, a widely accepted "gold standard" that would offer the highest efficacy, with the best tolerability has not been established yet. In order to approach this goal, the most important factors to be addressed by further studies are: localization, frequency, intensity, concurrent medication, maintenance treatments, number of pulses, trains, unilateral, or bilateral mode of application.

  7. No Effect of Cathodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Fear Memory in Healthy Human Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Mungee

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies have demonstrated that fear memories can be modified using non-invasive methods. Recently, we demonstrated that anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is capable of enhancing fear memories. Here, we examined the effects of cathodal tDCS of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during fear reconsolidation in humans. Methods: Seventeen young, healthy subjects were randomly assigned to two groups, which underwent fear conditioning with mild electric stimuli paired with a visual stimulus. Twenty-four hours later, both groups were shown a reminder of the conditioned fearful stimulus. Shortly thereafter, they received either tDCS (right prefrontal—cathodal, left supraorbital—anodal for 20 min at 1 mA, or sham stimulation. A day later, fear responses of both groups were compared. Results: On Day 3, during fear response assessment, there were no significant differences between the tDCS and sham group (p > 0.05. Conclusion: We conclude that cathodal tDCS of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (right prefrontal—cathodal, left supraorbital—anodal did not influence fear memories.

  8. Effects of short and prolonged transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation on heart rate variability in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Couck, M; Cserjesi, R; Caers, R; Zijlstra, W P; Widjaja, D; Wolf, N; Luminet, O; Ellrich, J; Gidron, Y

    2017-03-01

    The vagus nerve is strategically located in the body, and has multiple homeostatic and health-promoting effects. Low vagal activity predicts onset and progression of diseases. These are the reasons to activate this nerve. This study examined the effects of transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (t-VNS) on a main index of vagal activity, namely heart rate variability (HRV). In Study 1, we compared short (10min) left versus right ear t-VNS versus sham (no stimulation) in a within-subjects experimental design. Results revealed significant increases in only one HRV parameter (standard deviation of the RR intervals (SDNN)) following right-ear t-VNS. Study 2 examined the prolonged effects of t-VNS (1h) in the right ear. Compared to baseline, right-t-VNS significantly increased the LF and LF/HF components of HRV, and SDNN in women, but not in men. These results show limited effects of t-VNS on HRV, and are discussed in light of neuroanatomical and statistical considerations and future directions are proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Testing a neurobiological model of depersonalization disorder using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Emma-Louise; Sierra, Mauricio; Van den Eynde, Frederique; Rothwell, John C; David, Anthony S

    2014-01-01

    Depersonalization disorder (DPD) includes changes in subjective experiencing of self, encompassing emotional numbing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has pointed to ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) inhibition of insula as a neurocognitive correlate of the disorder. We hypothesized that inhibition to right VLPFC using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) would lead to increased arousal and reduced symptoms. Patients with medication-resistant DSM-IV DPD (N = 17) and controls (N = 20) were randomized to receive one session of right-sided rTMS to VLPFC or temporo-parietal junction (TPJ). 1 Hz rTMS was guided using neuronavigation and delivered for 15 min. Co-primary outcomes were: (a) maximum skin conductance capacity, and (b) reduction in depersonalization symptoms (Cambridge Depersonalisation Scale (CDS) [state version]). Secondary outcomes included spontaneous fluctuations (SFs) and event-related skin conductance responses. In patients with DPD, rTMS to VLPFC led to increased electrodermal capacity, namely maximum skin conductance deflections. Patients but not controls also showed increased SFs post rTMS. Patients who had either VLPFC or TPJ rTMS showed a similar significant reduction in symptoms. Event-related electrodermal activity did not change. A single session of right-sided rTMS to VLPFC (but not TPJ) significantly increased physiological arousal capacity supporting our model regarding the relevance of increased VLPFC activity to emotional numbing in DPD. rTMS to both sites led to reduced depersonalization scores but since this was independent of physiological arousal, this may be a non-specific effect. TMS is a potential therapeutic option for DPD; modulation of VLPFC, if replicated, is a plausible mechanism. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Quantification and improvement of speech transmission performance using headphones in acoustic stimulated functional magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Ken ichiro; Takatsu, Yasuo; Miyati, Tosiaki; Kimura, Tetsuya

    2014-10-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has made a major contribution to the understanding of higher brain function, but fMRI with auditory stimulation, used in the planning of brain tumor surgery, is often inaccurate because there is a risk that the sounds used in the trial may not be correctly transmitted to the subjects due to acoustic noise. This prompted us to devise a method of digitizing sound transmission ability from the accuracy rate of 67 syllables, classified into three types. We evaluated this with and without acoustic noise during imaging. We also improved the structure of the headphones and compared their sound transmission ability with that of conventional headphones attached to an MRI device (a GE Signa HDxt 3.0 T). We calculated and compared the sound transmission ability of the conventional headphones with that of the improved model. The 95 percent upper confidence limit (UCL) was used as the threshold for accuracy rate of hearing for both headphone models. There was a statistically significant difference between the conventional model and the improved model during imaging (p < 0.01). The rate of accuracy of the improved model was 16 percent higher. 29 and 22 syllables were accurate at a 95% UCL in the improved model and the conventional model, respectively. This study revealed the evaluation system used in this study to be useful for correctly identifying syllables during fMRI.

  11. Can transcranial magnetic stimulation be used to evaluate patients with narcolepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumari, Anupa A; Khan, Fayaz R; Varma, Ravi Prasad; Radhakrishnan, Ashalatha

    2013-08-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare, chronic sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy and other manifestations of dissociated rapid eye movement in sleep. We assessed the utility of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as an objective tool to elucidate the cortical excitability changes and also to analyze its role in assessing the treatment efficacy in narcolepsy. Eight patients with narcolepsy under our regular follow-up from 2000 to 2009 at our Sleep disorder clinic were chosen. All of them underwent polysomnography, multiple sleep latency tests and TMS. Resting motor threshold (RMT), cortical silent period (CSP) and central motor conduction time (CMCT) were assessed using TMS in both drug-naïve and post-treatment states. Eight controls were also subjected to all the three investigations. Appropriate statistical methods were used. The mean RMT (%) pre-treatment was higher in narcolepsy patients than that in controls, and it normalized following treatment. CSP and CMCT were unaffected in narcolepsy patients as compared to controls. This study shows that the cortical excitability is significantly low in narcolepsy patients. This motor cortex hypoexcitability becomes normal with the institution of treatment, pari passu with the control of symptoms. In future, TMS may be considered as an effective tool for documenting the treatment efficacy in patients with narcolepsy.

  12. Factor Analysis of Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to the Temporoparietal Junction for Tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. We investigated factors that contribute to suppression of tinnitus after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS. Methods. A total of 289 patients with tinnitus underwent active 1 Hz rTMS in the left temporoparietal region. A visual analog scale (VAS was used to assess tinnitus loudness. All participants were interviewed regarding age, gender, tinnitus duration, laterality and pitch, audiometric parameters, sleep, and so forth. The resting motor thresholds (RMTs were measured in all patients and 30 age- and gender-matched volunteers. Results. With respect to different factors that contribute to tinnitus suppression, we found improvement in the following domains: shorter duration, normal hearing (OR: 3.25, 95%CI: 2.01–5.27, p=0.001, and without sleep disturbance (OR: 2.51, 95%CI: 1.56–4.1, p=0.005 adjusted for age and gender. The patients with tinnitus lasting less than 1 year were more likely to show suppression of tinnitus (OR: 2.77, 95%CI: 1.48–5.19, p=0.002 compared to those with tinnitus lasting more than 5 years. Tinnitus patients had significantly lower RMTs compared with healthy volunteers. Conclusion. Active low-frequency rTMS results in a significant reduction in the loudness of tinnitus. Significant tinnitus suppression was shown in subjects with shorter tinnitus duration, with normal hearing, and without sleep disturbance.

  13. Effects of right parietal transcranial magnetic stimulation on object identification and orientation judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Irina M; Benito, Claire T; Ruzzoli, Manuela; Miniussi, Carlo

    2008-05-01

    We investigated the role played by the right parietal lobe in object identification and the ability to interpret object orientation, using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to momentarily interfere with ongoing cortical activity. Short trains of TMS pulses (12 Hz) were applied to a site overlying the right intraparietal sulcus/inferior parietal lobe while subjects performed either object identification tasks (i.e., picture-word verification and categorizing objects as natural or manufactured) or object orientation judgment tasks (i.e., picture-arrow verification and deciding whether an object was rotated clockwise or counterclockwise). Across different tasks, right parietal TMS impaired orientation judgments, but facilitated object identification, compared to TMS applied to a brain vertex control site. These complementary findings demonstrate that the right parietal lobe--a region belonging to the dorsal visual stream--is critical for processing the spatial attributes of objects, but not their identity. The observed improvement in object recognition, however, suggests an indirect role for the right parietal lobe in object recognition. We propose that this involves the creation of a spatial reference frame for the object, which allows interaction with the object and the individuation of specific viewing instances.

  14. Somatosensory evoked magnetic fields elicited by dorsal penile, posterior tibial and median nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, H; Namima, T; Aizawa, M; Uchi, K; Kaiho, Y; Yoshikawa, K; Orikasa, S; Nakasato, N

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study is to localize the primary sensory cortex of urogenital organs in the human brain. Using a newly developed MRI-linked magnetoencephalography system, we measured somatosensory evoked magnetic fields (SEFs) for unilateral stimuli on the dorsal penile nerve (DPN), posterior tibial nerve (PTN) and median nerve (MN). In five healthy male subjects, SEFs were clearly observed. Peak latency of the first cortical components were 63.8 +/- 9.2 ms for DPN, 39.8 +/- 3.0 ms for PTN and 20.7 +/- 0.7 ms for MN stimuli. Peak amplitude of the first cortical components were 63.1 +/- 10.8 fT for DPN, 160.2 +/- 50.1 fT for PTN and 335.2 +/- 70.3 fT for MN stimuli. Isofield map for the peak latencies indicated a single dipolar pattern for DPN as well as for PTN and MN stimuli. Using a single current dipole model, all SEF sources were localized on the contralateral central sulcus to the stimuli, indicating the primary sensory cortex. The DPN sources were localized on the interhemispheric surfaces, corresponding to previous speculations by direct cerebral stimulation. This non-invasive SEF technique promises further brain functional mapping for the urogenital organs.

  15. Update on repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in obsessive-compulsive disorder: different targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, R.M.; Figee, M.; Vulink, N.; Denys, D.

    2011-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic, disabling disorder. Ten percent of patients remain treatment refractory despite several treatments. For these severe, treatment-refractory patients, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been suggested as a treatment option. Since

  16. Tibialis anterior stretch reflex in early stance is suppressed by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuur, Abraham T; Christensen, Mark Schram; Sinkjær, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Abstract A rapid plantar flexion perturbation in the early stance phase of walking elicits a large stretch reflex in tibialis anterior (TA). In this study we use repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) to test if this response is mediated through a transcortical pathway. TA stretch...

  17. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Negative Symptoms of Schizophrenia : Review and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dlabac-de Lange, Jozarni J.; Knegtering, Rikus; Aleman, Andre

    Background: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been proposed as a treatment for the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. During the past decade, several trials have reported on the efficacy of rTMS treatment; however, the results were inconsistent. Objective: To assess the

  18. Transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced 'visual echoes' are generated in early visual cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jolij, Jacob; Lamme, Victor A. F.

    2010-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the early visual areas can trigger perception of a flash of light, a so-called phosphene. Here we show that a very brief presentation of a stimulus can modulate features of a subsequent TMS-induced phosphene, to a level that participants mistake phosphenes

  19. How Reproducible Are Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation-Induced MEPs in Subacute Stroke?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoonhorst, Maurits H. W. J.; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; van den Berg, Peter S. P.; Emmelot, Cornelis H.; Kwakkel, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and total motor conduction time (TMCT) induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are used to make assumptions about the prognosis of motor outcome after stroke. Understanding the different sources of variability is fundamental to the concept of

  20. Emotional stimuli modulate readiness for action : a transcranial magnetic stimulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, Anouk M; van den Wildenberg, Wery P M; van Stegeren, Anda H; Hajcak, Greg; Ridderinkhof, K Richard

    Emotional stimuli may prime the motor system and facilitate action readiness. Direct evidence for this effect has been shown by recent studies using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). When administered over the primary motor cortex involved in responding, TMS pulses elicit motor-evoked

  1. Emotional stimuli modulate readiness for action: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, A.M.; van den Wildenberg, W.P.M.; van Stegeren, A.H.; Hajcak, G.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.

    2010-01-01

    Emotional stimuli may prime the motor system and facilitate action readiness. Direct evidence for this effect has been shown by recent studies using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). When administered over the primary motor cortex involved in responding, TMS pulses elicit motor-evoked

  2. Accelerated high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation enhances motor activity in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Arfani, Anissa; Parthoens, Joke; Demuyser, Thomas; Servaes, Stijn; De Coninck, Mattias; De Deyn, Peter Paul; Van Dam, Debby; Wyckhuys, Tine; Baeken, Chris; Smolders, Ilse; Staelens, Steven

    2017-01-01

    High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) is currently accepted as an evidence-based treatment option for treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Additionally, HF-rTMS showed beneficial effects on psychomotor retardation in patients. The classical HF-rTMS paradigms however

  3. The Cerebellum in Emotion Regulation: A Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutter, D.J.L.G.; Honk, E.J. van

    2009-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the cerebellum may play a role in the regulation of emotion. The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that inhibition of cerebellar function using slow repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) would lead to increased negative mood as a

  4. Motor pathway excitability in ATP13A2 mutation carriers: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zittel, S.; Kroeger, J.; Vegt, J.P.M. van der; Siebner, H.R.; Bruggemann, N.; Ramirez, A.; Behrens, M.I.; Gerloff, C.; Baumer, T.; Klein, C.; Munchau, A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe excitability of motor pathways in Kufor-Rakeb syndrome (PARK9), an autosomal recessive nigro-striatal-pallidal-pyramidal neurodegeneration caused by a mutation in the ATP13A2 gene, using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). METHODS: Five members of a Chilean family with an

  5. Functional Assessment of Corticospinal Conduction with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: Basic Principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groppa, S.; Peller, M.; Siebner, Hartwig R.

    2010-01-01

    Here we review how transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is used in clinical practice to examine the functional integrity of the fast conducting fibres of the human corticomotor path ways. We first summarise the technical and physiological principles of TMS that are relevant to its clinical use...

  6. Shifts in connectivity during procedural learning after motor cortex stimulation: A combined transcranial magnetic stimulation/functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Adam; Song, Sunbin; Bageac, Devin; Knutson, Kristine M; Keisler, Aysha; Saad, Ziad S; Gotts, Stephen J; Wassermann, Eric M; Wilkinson, Leonora

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), of which continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) is a common form, has been used to inhibit cortical areas during investigations of their function. cTBS applied to the primary motor area (M1) depresses motor output excitability via a local effect and impairs procedural motor learning. This could be due to an effect on M1 itself and/or to changes in its connectivity with other nodes in the learning network. To investigate this issue, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure changes in brain activation and connectivity during implicit procedural learning after real and sham cTBS of M1. Compared to sham, real cTBS impaired motor sequence learning, but caused no local or distant changes in brain activation. Rather, it reduced functional connectivity between motor (M1, dorsal premotor & supplementary motor areas) and visual (superior & inferior occipital gyri) areas. It also increased connectivity between frontal associative (superior & inferior frontal gyri), cingulate (dorsal & middle cingulate), and temporal areas. This potentially compensatory shift in coupling, from a motor-based learning network to an associative learning network accounts for the behavioral effects of cTBS of M1. The findings suggest that the inhibitory TMS affects behavior via relatively subtle and distributed effects on connectivity within networks, rather than by taking the stimulated area "offline". Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex affects strategic decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van 't Wout, Mascha; Kahn, René S; Sanfey, Alan G; Aleman, André

    2005-11-07

    Although decision-making is typically seen as a rational process, emotions play a role in tasks that include unfairness. Recently, activation in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during offers experienced as unfair in the Ultimatum Game was suggested to subserve goal maintenance in this task. This is restricted to correlational evidence, however, and it remains unclear whether the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is crucial for strategic decision-making. The present study used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in order to investigate the causal role of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in strategic decision-making in the Ultimatum Game. The results showed that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex resulted in an altered decision-making strategy compared with sham stimulation. We conclude that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is causally implicated in strategic decision-making in healthy human study participants.

  8. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: An Automated Procedure to Obtain Coil-specific Models for Field Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Ewald, Lars; Siebner, Hartwig R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Field calculations for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are increasingly implemented online in neuronavigation systems and in more realistic offline approaches based on finite-element methods. They are often based on simplified and/or non-validated models of the magnetic vector...... potential of the TMS coils. Objective: To develop an approach to reconstruct the magnetic vector potential based on automated measurements. Methods: We implemented a setup that simultaneously measures the three components of the magnetic field with high spatial resolution. This is complemented by a novel...... approach to determine the magnetic vector potential via volume integration of the measured field. Results: The integration approach reproduces the vector potential with very good accuracy. The vector potential distribution of a standard figure-of-eight shaped coil determined with our setup corresponds well...

  9. A systematic review for the antidepressant effects of sleep deprivation with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qing; Li, Guangming; Wang, Anguo; Liu, Tao; Feng, Shenggang; Guo, Zhiwei; Chen, Huaping; He, Bin; McClure, Morgan A; Ou, Jun; Xing, Guoqiang; Mu, Qiwen

    2015-11-14

    Sleep deprivation (SD) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) have been commonly used to treat depression. Recent studies suggest that co-therapy with rTMS and SD may produce better therapeutic effects than either therapy alone. Therefore, this study was to review the current findings to determine if rTMS can augment the therapeutic effects of SD on depression. Embase, JSTOR, Medline, PubMed, ScienceDirect, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for clinical studies published between January 1985 and March 2015 using the search term "rTMS/repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation AND sleep deprivation AND depress*". Only randomized and sham-controlled trials (RCTs) involving the combined use of rTMS and SD in depression patients were included in this systematic review. The scores of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression were extracted as primary outcome measures. Three RCTs with 72 patients that met the inclusion criteria were included for the systematic review. One of the trials reported skewed data and was described alone. The other two studies, which involved 30 patients in the experimental group (SD + active rTMS) and 22 patients in the control group (SD + sham rTMS), reported normally distributed data. The primary outcome measures showed different results among the three publications: two of which showed great difference between the experimental and the control subjects, and the other one showed non-significant antidepressant effect of rTMS on SD. In addition, two of the included studies reported secondary outcome measures with Clinical Global Impression Rating Scale and a self-reported well-being scale which presented good improvement for the depressive patients in the experiment group when compared with the control. The follow-up assessments in two studies indicated maintained results with the immediate measurements. From this study, an overview of the publications concerning the combined use of rTMS and

  10. Establishment of a novel in vitro test setup for electric and magnetic stimulation of human osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunert, P C; Jonitz-Heincke, A; Su, Y; Souffrant, R; Hansmann, D; Ewald, H; Krüger, A; Mittelmeier, W; Bader, R

    2014-11-01

    When large defects occur, bone regeneration can be supported by bone grafting and biophysical stimuli like electric and magnetic stimulation (EMS). Clinically established EMS modes are external coils and surgical implants like an electroinductive screw system, which combines a magnetic and electric field, e.g., for the treatment of avascular bone necrosis or pseudarthrosis. For optimization of this implant system, an in vitro test setup was designed to investigate effects of EMS on human osteoblasts on different 3D scaffolds (based on calcium phosphate and collagen). Prior to the cell experiments, numerical simulations of the setup, as well as experimental validation, via measurements of the electric parameters induced by EMS were conducted. Human osteoblasts (3 × 10(5) cells) were seeded onto the scaffolds and cultivated. After 24 h, screw implants (Stryker ASNIS III s-series) were centered in the scaffolds, and EMS was applied (3 × 45 min per day at 20 Hz) for 3 days. Cell viability and collagen type 1 (Col1) synthesis were determined subsequently. Numerical simulation and validation showed an adequate distribution of the electric field within the scaffolds. Experimental measurements of the electric potential revealed only minimal deviation from the simulation. Cell response to stimulation varied with scaffold material and mode of stimulation. EMS-stimulated cells exhibited a significant decrease of metabolic activity in particular on collagen scaffolds. In contrast, the Col1/metabolic activity ratio was significantly increased on collagen and non-sintered calcium phosphate scaffolds after 3 days. Exclusive magnetic stimulation showed similar but nonsignificant tendencies in metabolic activity and Col1 synthesis. The cell tests demonstrate that the new test setup is a valuable tool for in vitro testing and parameter optimization of the clinically used electroinductive screw system. It combines magnetic and electric stimulation, allowing in vitro investigations

  11. Whole-hand water flow stimulation increases motor cortical excitability: a study of transcranial magnetic stimulation and movement-related cortical potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Daisuke; Yamashiro, Koya; Onishi, Hideaki; Yasuhiro, Baba; Shimoyama, Yoshimitsu; Maruyama, Atsuo

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies examining the influence of afferent stimulation on corticospinal excitability have demonstrated that the intensity of afferent stimulation and the nature of the afferents targeted (cutaneous/proprioceptive) determine the effects. In this study, we assessed the effects of whole-hand water immersion (WI) and water flow stimulation (WF) on corticospinal excitability and intracortical circuits by measuring motor evoked potential (MEP) recruitment curves and conditioned MEP amplitudes. We further investigated whether whole-hand WF modulated movement-related cortical activity. Ten healthy subjects participated in three experiments, comprising the immersion of participants' right hands with (whole-hand WF) or without (whole-hand WI) water flow, and no immersion (control). We evaluated MEP recruitment curves produced by a single transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulse at increasing stimulus intensities, short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), and intracortical facilitation (ICF) using the paired TMS technique before and after 15 min of intervention. Movement-related cortical potentials (MRCPs) were evaluated to examine primary motor cortex, supplementary motor area, and somatosensory cortex excitability upon movement before and after whole-hand WF. After whole-hand WF, the slope of the MEP recruitment curve significantly increased, whereas SICI decreased and ICF increased in the contralateral motor cortex. The amplitude of the Bereitschaftspotential, negative slope, and motor potential of MRCPs significantly increased after whole-hand WF. We demonstrated that whole-hand WF increased corticospinal excitability, decreased SICI, and increased ICF, although whole-hand WI did not change corticospinal excitability and intracortical circuits. Whole-hand WF modulated movement-related cortical activity, increasing motor cortex activation for the planning and execution of voluntary movements. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Effect of Deep Intramuscular Stimulation and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Neurophysiological Biomarkers in Chronic Myofascial Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Liciane F; Caumo, Wolnei; Dussán-Sarria, Jairo; Deitos, Alicia; Brietzke, Aline; Laste, Gabriela; Campos-Carraro, Cristina; de Souza, Andressa; Scarabelot, Vanessa L; Cioato, Stefania G; Vercelino, Rafael; de Castro, Alexandre L; Araújo, Alex Sander; Belló-Klein, Adriane; Fregni, Felipe; Torres, Iraci L S

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to assess the neuromodulation techniques effects (repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation [rTMS] and deep intramuscular stimulation therapy [DIMST]) on pain intensity, peripheral, and neurophysiological biomarkers chronic myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) patients. Randomized, double blind, factorial design, and controlled placebo-sham clinical trial. Clinical trial in the Laboratory of Pain and Neuromodulation at Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (NCT02381171). We recruited women aged between 19- and 75-year old, with MPS diagnosis. Patients were randomized into four groups: rTMS + DIMST, rTMS + sham-DIMST, sham-rTMS + DIMST, sham-rTMS + sham-DIMST; and received 10 sessions for 20 minutes each one (rTMS and DIMST). Pain was assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS); neurophysiological parameters were assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation; biochemical parameters were: BDNF, S100β, lactate dehydrogenase, inflammatory (TNF-α, IL6, and IL10), and oxidative stress parameters. We observed the pain relief assessed by VAS immediately assessed before and after the intervention (P 0.05). Our findings add additional evidence about rTMS and DIMST in relieving pain in MPS patients without synergistic effect. No peripheral biomarkers reflected the analgesic effect of both techniques; including those related to cellular damage. Additionally, one neurophysiological parameter (increased MEP amplitude) needs to be investigated. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Academy of Pain Medicine. 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. A Randomised Controlled Trial of Neuronavigated Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS in Anorexia Nervosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica McClelland

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa (AN is associated with morbid fear of fatness, extreme food restriction and altered self-regulation. Neuroimaging data implicate fronto-striatal circuitry, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC.In this double-blind parallel group study, we investigated the effects of one session of sham-controlled high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS to the left DLPFC (l-DLPFC in 60 individuals with AN. A food exposure task was administered before and after the procedure to elicit AN-related symptoms.The primary outcome measure was 'core AN symptoms', a variable which combined several subjective AN-related experiences. The effects of rTMS on other measures of psychopathology (e.g. mood, temporal discounting (TD; intertemporal choice behaviour and on salivary cortisol concentrations were also investigated. Safety, tolerability and acceptability were assessed.Fourty-nine participants completed the study. Whilst there were no interaction effects of rTMS on core AN symptoms, there was a trend for group differences (p = 0.056: after controlling for pre-rTMS scores, individuals who received real rTMS had reduced symptoms post-rTMS and at 24-hour follow-up, relative to those who received sham stimulation. Other psychopathology was not altered differentially following real/sham rTMS. In relation to TD, there was an interaction trend (p = 0.060: real versus sham rTMS resulted in reduced rates of TD (more reflective choice behaviour. Salivary cortisol concentrations were unchanged by stimulation. rTMS was safe, well-tolerated and was considered an acceptable intervention.This study provides modest evidence that rTMS to the l-DLPFC transiently reduces core symptoms of AN and encourages prudent decision making. Importantly, individuals with AN considered rTMS to be a viable treatment option. These findings require replication in multiple-session studies to evaluate therapeutic efficacy

  14. Primary Motor Cortex Excitability in Karate Athletes: A Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monda, Vincenzo; Valenzano, Anna; Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Salerno, Monica; Sessa, Francesco; Triggiani, Antonio I; Viggiano, Andrea; Capranica, Laura; Marsala, Gabriella; De Luca, Vincenzo; Cipolloni, Luigi; Ruberto, Maria; Precenzano, Francesco; Carotenuto, Marco; Zammit, Christian; Gelzo, Monica; Monda, Marcellino; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Messina, Giovanni; Messina, Antonietta

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The mechanisms involved in the coordination of muscle activity are not completely known: to investigate adaptive changes in human motor cortex Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was often used. The sport models are frequently used to study how the training may affect the corticospinal system excitability: Karate represents a valuable sport model for this kind of investigations for its high levels of coordination required to athletes. This study was aimed at examining possible changes in the resting motor threshold (rMT) and in the corticospinal response in karate athletes, and at determining whether athletes are characterized by a specific value of rMT. Methods: We recruited 25 right-handed young karate athletes and 25 matched non-athletes. TMS was applied to primary motor cortex (M1). Motor evoked potential (MEP) were recorded by two electrodes placed above the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle. We considered MEP latencies and amplitudes at rMT, 110% of rMT, and 120% of rMT. Results: The two groups were similar for age (p > 0.05), height (p > 0.05) and body mass (p > 0.05). The TMS had a 70-mm figure-of-eight coil and a maximum output of 2.2 T, placed over the left motor cortex. During the stimulation, a mechanical arm kept the coil tangential to the scalp, with the handle at 45° respect to the midline. The SofTaxic navigator system (E.M.S. Italy, www.emsmedical.net) was used in order to correctly identifying and repeating the stimulation for every subject. Compared to non-athletes, athletes showed a lower resting motor threshold (p < 0.001). Furthermore, athletes had a lower MEP latency (p < 0.001) and a higher MEP amplitude (p < 0.001) compared to non-athletes. Moreover, a ROC curve for rMT was found significant (area: 0.907; sensitivity 84%, specificity 76%). Conclusions: As the main finding, the present study showed significant differences in cortical excitability between athletes and non-athletes. The training can improve cortical

  15. Transcranial magnetic stimulation reveals the content of visual short-term memory in the visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvanto, Juha; Cattaneo, Zaira

    2010-05-01

    Cortical areas involved in sensory analysis are also believed to be involved in short-term storage of that sensory information. Here we investigated whether transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can reveal the content of visual short-term memory (VSTM) by bringing this information to visual awareness. Subjects were presented with two random-dot displays (moving either to the left or to the right) and they were required to maintain one of these in VSTM. In Experiment 1, TMS was applied over the motion-selective area V5/MT+ above phosphene threshold during the maintenance phase. The reported phosphene contained motion features of the memory item, when the phosphene spatially overlapped with memory item. Specifically, phosphene motion was enhanced when the memory item moved in the same direction as the subjects' V5/MT+ baseline phosphene, whereas it was reduced when the motion direction of the memory item was incongruent with that of the baseline V5/MT+ phosphene. There was no effect on phosphene reports when there was no spatial overlap between the phosphene and the memory item. In Experiment 2, VSTM maintenance did not influence the appearance of phosphenes induced from the lateral occipital region. These interactions between VSTM maintenance and phosphene appearance demonstrate that activity in V5/MT+ reflects the motion qualities of items maintained in VSTM. Furthermore, these results also demonstrate that information in VSTM can modulate the pattern of visual activation reaching awareness, providing evidence for the view that overlapping neuronal populations are involved in conscious visual perception and VSTM. 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Occipital transcranial magnetic stimulation discriminates transient neurological symptoms of vascular origin from migraine aura without headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeije, Gilles; Fogang, Yannick; Ligot, Noémie; Mavroudakis, Nicolas

    2017-09-01

    The diagnosis of transient neurological attacks (TNA) relies on medical history. Transient ischemic attack is often considered until proven otherwise, because of lack of objective paraclinical tools that can help discriminate TIA from differential diagnoses such as migraine aura. This may lead to needless and potentially harmful stroke secondary prevention in many cases. This study aimed at determining the yield of occipital transcranial magnetic stimulation (oTMS) in discriminating TNA of vascular origin from migraine aura without headache (MAWH). Ten patients with acute TNA of vascular origin and ten patients with migraine aura without headache (MAWH), without prior history of migrainous headache, were prospectively included. TNA of vascular origin were considered for individuals presenting unilateral focal symptoms with full resolution within 24hours and positive diffusion weighted imaging (DWI+). For individuals with MAWH, diagnostic criteria were either ICHD-III beta or Fischer criteria for a first episode of MAWH. All participants underwent one session of oTMS. Induction and threshold of phosphene induction were recorded. In TNA of vascular origin, MRI disclosed cortical lesions in nine and one sub-cortical lesion. Phosphenes were induced in 9/10 subjects with MAWH with a mean threshold of 66% of the maximal intensity, whereas oTMS induced phosphenes in only one subject with TNA of vascular origin at a threshold of 85%. In this pilot study, oTMS was found to be an effective tool to discriminate between MAWH and transient neurological symptoms of vascular origin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Non-invasive electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain, spinal cord, roots and peripheral nerves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossini, P M; Burke, D; Chen, R

    2015-01-01

    These guidelines provide an up-date of previous IFCN report on "Non-invasive electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain, spinal cord and roots: basic principles and procedures for routine clinical application" (Rossini et al., 1994). A new Committee, composed of international experts, some...... theoretical, physiological and practical aspects of non-invasive stimulation of brain, spinal cord, nerve roots and peripheral nerves in the light of more updated knowledge, and include some recent extensions and developments....... of whom were in the panel of the 1994 "Report", was selected to produce a current state-of-the-art review of non-invasive stimulation both for clinical application and research in neuroscience. Since 1994, the international scientific community has seen a rapid increase in non-invasive brain stimulation...

  18. Binaural hearing ability with mastoid applied bilateral bone conduction stimulation in normal hearing subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenfelt, Stefan; Zeitooni, Mehrnaz

    2013-07-01

    The ability to use binaural cues when stimulation was by bilaterally applied bone conduction (BC) transducers was investigated in 20 normal hearing participants. The results with BC stimulation were compared with normal air conduction (AC) stimulation through earphones. The binaural hearing ability was tested by spatial release from masking, binaural intelligibility level difference (BILD), binaural masking level difference (BMLD) using chirp stimulation, and test of the precedence effect. In all tests, the participants revealed a benefit of bilateral BC stimulation indicating use of binaural cues. In the speech based tests, the binaural benefit for BC stimulation was approximately half that with AC stimulation. For the BC BMLD test with chirp stimulation, there were indications of superposition of the ipsilateral and contralateral pathways at the cochlear level affecting the results. The precedence effect test indicated significantly worse results for BC stimulation than for AC stimulation with low-frequency stimulation while they were close for high-frequency stimulation; broad-band stimulation gave results that were slightly worse than the high-frequency results.

  19. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) with auditory stimulation in songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ruijssevelt, Lisbeth; De Groof, Geert; Van der Kant, Anne; Poirier, Colline; Van Audekerke, Johan; Verhoye, Marleen; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2013-06-03

    The neurobiology of birdsong, as a model for human speech, is a pronounced area of research in behavioral neuroscience. Whereas electrophysiology and molecular approaches allow the investigation of either different stimuli on few neurons, or one stimulus in large parts of the brain, blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) allows combining both advantages, i.e. compare the neural activation induced by different stimuli in the entire brain at once. fMRI in songbirds is challenging because of the small size of their brains and because their bones and especially their skull comprise numerous air cavities, inducing important susceptibility artifacts. Gradient-echo (GE) BOLD fMRI has been successfully applied to songbirds (1-5) (for a review, see (6)). These studies focused on the primary and secondary auditory brain areas, which are regions free of susceptibility artifacts. However, because processes of interest may occur beyond these regions, whole brain BOLD fMRI is required using an MRI sequence less susceptible to these artifacts. This can be achieved by using spin-echo (SE) BOLD fMRI (7,8) . In this article, we describe how to use this technique in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), which are small songbirds with a bodyweight of 15-25 g extensively studied in behavioral neurosciences of birdsong. The main topic of fMRI studies on songbirds is song perception and song learning. The auditory nature of the stimuli combined with the weak BOLD sensitivity of SE (compared to GE) based fMRI sequences makes the implementation of this technique very challenging.

  20. An investigation into the induced electric fields from transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadimani, Ravi; Lee, Erik; Duffy, Walter; Waris, Mohammed; Siddiqui, Waquar; Islam, Faisal; Rajamani, Mahesh; Nathan, Ryan; Jiles, David; David C Jiles Team; Walter Duffy Collaboration

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a promising tool for noninvasive brain stimulation that has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of major depressive disorder. To stimulate the brain, TMS uses large, transient pulses of magnetic field to induce an electric field in the head. This transient magnetic field is large enough to cause the depolarization of cortical neurons and initiate a synaptic signal transmission. For this study, 50 unique head models were created from MRI images. Previous simulation studies have primarily used a single head model, and thus give a limited image of the induced electric field from TMS. This study uses finite element analysis simulations on 50 unique, heterogeneous head models to better investigate the relationship between TMS and the electric field induced in brain tissues. Results showed a significant variation in the strength of the induced electric field in the brain, which can be reasonably predicted by the distance from the TMS coil to the stimulated brain. Further, it was seen that some models had high electric field intensities in over five times as much brain volume as other models.

  1. A novel approach for monitoring writing interferences during navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation mappings of writing related cortical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogić Vidaković, Maja; Gabelica, Dragan; Vujović, Igor; Šoda, Joško; Batarelo, Nikolina; Džimbeg, Andrija; Zmajević Schönwald, Marina; Rotim, Krešimir; Đogaš, Zoran

    2015-11-30

    It has recently been shown that navigated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) is useful in preoperative neurosurgical mapping of motor and language brain areas. In TMS mapping of motor cortices the evoked responses can be quantitatively monitored by electromyographic (EMG) recordings. No such setup exists for monitoring of writing during nTMS mappings of writing related cortical areas. We present a novel approach for monitoring writing during nTMS mappings of motor writing related cortical areas. To our best knowledge, this is the first demonstration of quantitative monitoring of motor evoked responses from hand by EMG, and of pen related activity during writing with our custom made pen, together with the application of chronometric TMS design and patterned protocol of rTMS. The method was applied in four healthy subjects participating in writing during nTMS mapping of the premotor cortical area corresponding to BA 6 and close to the superior frontal sulcus. The results showed that stimulation impaired writing in all subjects. The corresponding spectra of measured signal related to writing movements was observed in the frequency band 0-20 Hz. Magnetic stimulation affected writing by suppressing normal writing frequency band. The proposed setup for monitoring of writing provides additional quantitative data for monitoring and the analysis of rTMS induced writing response modifications. The setup can be useful for investigation of neurophysiologic mechanisms of writing, for therapeutic effects of nTMS, and in preoperative mapping of language cortical areas in patients undergoing brain surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Gravity dependence of the effect of optokinetic stimulation on the subjective visual vertical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Bryan K; Bockisch, Christopher J; Caramia, Nicoletta; Bertolini, Giovanni; Tarnutzer, Alexander Andrea

    2017-05-01

    Accurate and precise estimates of direction of gravity are essential for spatial orientation. According to Bayesian theory, multisensory vestibular, visual, and proprioceptive input is centrally integrated in a weighted fashion based on the reliability of the component sensory signals. For otolithic input, a decreasing signal-to-noise ratio was demonstrated with increasing roll angle. We hypothesized that the weights of vestibular (otolithic) and extravestibular (visual/proprioceptive) sensors are roll-angle dependent and predicted an increased weight of extravestibular cues with increasing roll angle, potentially following the Bayesian hypothesis. To probe this concept, the subjective visual vertical (SVV) was assessed in different roll positions (≤ ± 120°, steps = 30°, n = 10) with/without presenting an optokinetic stimulus (velocity = ± 60°/s). The optokinetic stimulus biased the SVV toward the direction of stimulus rotation for roll angles ≥ ± 30° (P integration when estimating direction of gravity with optokinetic stimulation. Visual input was weighted more when vestibular input became less reliable, i.e., at larger roll-tilt angles. However, according to Bayesian theory, the variability of combined cues is always lower than the variability of each source cue. If the observed increase in variability, although nonsignificant, is true, either it must depend on an additional source of variability, added after SVV computation, or it would conflict with the Bayesian hypothesis.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Applying a rotating optokinetic stimulus while recording the subjective visual vertical in different whole body roll angles, we noted the optokinetic-induced bias to correlate with the roll angle. These findings allow the hypothesis that the established optimal weighting of single-sensory cues depending on their reliability to estimate direction of gravity could be extended to a bias caused by visual self-motion stimuli. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological

  3. The role of pulse shape in motor cortex transcranial magnetic stimulation using full-sine stimuli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delvendahl, Igor; Gattinger, Norbert; Berger, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    A full-sine (biphasic) pulse waveform is most commonly used for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), but little is known about how variations in duration or amplitude of distinct pulse segments influence the effectiveness of a single TMS pulse to elicit a corticomotor response. Using...... a novel TMS device, we systematically varied the configuration of full-sine pulses to assess the impact of configuration changes on resting motor threshold (RMT) as measure of stimulation effectiveness with single-pulse TMS of the non-dominant motor hand area (M1). In young healthy volunteers, we (i...

  4. Directional migration and transcriptional analysis of oligodendrocyte precursors subjected to stimulation of electrical signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongchao; Wang, Xinkun; Yao, Li

    2015-10-15

    Loss of oligodendrocytes as the result of central nervous system disease causes demyelination that impairs axon function. Effective directional migration of endogenous or grafted oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) to a lesion is crucial in the neural remyelination process. In this study, the migration of OPCs in electric fields (EFs) was investigated. We found that OPCs migrated anodally in applied EFs, and the directedness and displacement of anodal migration increased significantly when the EF strength increased from 50 to 200 mV/mm. However, EFs did not significantly affect the cell migration speed. The transcriptome of OPCs subjected to EF stimulation (100 and 200 mV/mm) was analyzed using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), and results were verified by the reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. A Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis revealed that the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway that signals cell migration was significantly upregulated in cells treated with an EF of 200 mV/mm compared with control cells. Gene ontology enrichment analysis showed the downregulation of differentially expressed genes in chemotaxis. This study suggests that an applied EF is an effective cue to guiding OPC migration in neural regeneration and that transcriptional analysis contributes to the understanding of the mechanism of EF-guided cell migration. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Contactless Remote Induction of Shear Waves in Soft Tissues Using a Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Device

    CERN Document Server

    Grasland-Mongrain, Pol; Tang, An; Catheline, Stefan; Cloutier, Guy

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the first observation of shear wave induced remotely within soft tissues. It was performed through the combination of a transcranial magnetic stimulation device and a permanent magnet. A physical model based on Maxwell and Navier equations was developed. Experiments were performed on a cryogel phantom and a chicken breast sample. Using an ultrafast ultrasound scanner, shear waves of respective amplitude of 5 and 0.5 micrometers were observed. Experimental and numerical results were in good agreement. This study constitutes the framework of an alternative shear wave elastography method.

  6. Stimulated Raman forward scattering of a laser in a plasma with transverse magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassoon, Khaleel; Salih, Hyder [School of Applied Sciences, University of Technology, Baghdad (Iraq); Tripathi, V K [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)], E-mail: kihassoun@yahoo.com

    2009-12-15

    The effect of a transverse static magnetic field on stimulated Raman forward scattering (SRFS) of a laser in a plasma is studied. The x-mode excites an upper hybrid wave and two localized Stokes/anti-Stokes sidebands. The laser and the sideband exert a ponderomotive force on electrons driving the upper hybrid wave. The latter couples with the pump to drive the sidebands. The growth rate of SRFS monotonically increases by applying a static magnetic field. It also increases with the pump amplitude; however, the dependence is slower than linear.

  7. Stimulated Raman forward scattering of a laser in a plasma with transverse magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassoon, Khaleel; Salih, Hyder; Tripathi, V. K.

    2009-12-01

    The effect of a transverse static magnetic field on stimulated Raman forward scattering (SRFS) of a laser in a plasma is studied. The x-mode excites an upper hybrid wave and two localized Stokes/anti-Stokes sidebands. The laser and the sideband exert a ponderomotive force on electrons driving the upper hybrid wave. The latter couples with the pump to drive the sidebands. The growth rate of SRFS monotonically increases by applying a static magnetic field. It also increases with the pump amplitude; however, the dependence is slower than linear.

  8. Transcranial magnetic stimulation, deep brain stimulation and personal identity: ethical questions, and neuroethical approaches for medical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jotterand, Fabrice; Giordano, James

    2011-10-01

    Neurotechnology provides means to engage micro- and macrostructural networks of the brain to both mitigate the manifestations of several neurological and psychiatric disorders, and alter cognition and motoric activity. Such capacity also generates questions of how these interventions may affect personal identity. This paper discusses the ethical implications regarding changes to personal identity that arise from the therapeutic use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and deep brain stimulation (DBS) technologies. In addition, we raise the question of whether changes in personal identity, as a side effect of these interventions, are ethically acceptable and whether such alterations of personality foster patients' sense of well-being and autonomy. First, we provide a series of case vignettes that afford an overview of the ways that various neurological interventions can affect personal identity. Second, we offer a brief working definition of personal identity in order to delineate an ethical framework that we deem necessary for the responsible use of neurostimulation technologies. In so doing, we argue that neurostimulation therapy, as a doctoring act, should be directed, and adherent to goals of restoring and/or preserving patients' personal identity. To this end, we offer an ethical framework that we believe enables sound decisions about the right and good use of TMS and DBS.

  9. The Hand Motor Hotspot is not Always Located in the Hand Knob: A Neuronavigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahdab, Rechdi; Ayache, Samar S; Brugières, Pierre; Farhat, Wassim H; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal

    2016-07-01

    The hand motor hot spot (hMHS) is one of the most salient parameters in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) practice, notably used for targeting. It is commonly accepted that the hMHS corresponds to the hand representation within the primary motor cortex (M1). Anatomical and imaging studies locate this representation in a region of the central sulcus called the "hand knob". The aim of this study was to determine if the hMHS location corresponds to its expected location at the hand knob. Twelve healthy volunteers and eleven patients with chronic neuropathic pain of various origins, but not related to a brain lesion, were enrolled. Morphological magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was normal in all participants. Both hemispheres were studied in all participants except four (two patients and two healthy subjects). Cortical mapping of the hand motor area was conducted using a TMS-dedicated navigation system and recording motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the contralateral first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle. We then determined the anatomical position of the hMHS, defined as the stimulation site providing the largest FDI-MEPs. In 45 % of hemispheres of normal subjects and 25 % of hemispheres of pain patients, the hMHS was located over the central sulcus, most frequently at the level of the hand knob. However, in the other cases, the hMHS was located outside M1, most frequently anteriorly over the precentral or middle frontal gyrus. This study shows that the hMHS does not always correspond to the hand knob and M1 location in healthy subjects or patients. Therefore, image-guided navigation is needed to improve the anatomical accuracy of TMS targeting, even for M1.

  10. Comparison of electrical nerve stimulation, electrical muscle stimulation and magnetic nerve stimulation to assess the neuromuscular function of the plantar flexor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyroud, Daria; Temesi, John; Millet, Guillaume Y; Verges, Samuel; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Kayser, Bengt; Place, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    As it might lead to less discomfort, magnetic nerve stimulation (MNS) is increasingly used as an alternative to electrical stimulation methods. Yet, MNS and electrical nerve stimulation (ENS) and electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) have not been formally compared for the evaluation of plantar flexor neuromuscular function. We quantified plantar flexor neuromuscular function with ENS, EMS and MNS in 10 volunteers in fresh and fatigued muscles. Central alterations were assessed through changes in voluntary activation level (VAL) and peripheral function through changes in M-wave, twitch and doublet (PS100) amplitudes. Discomfort associated with 100-Hz paired stimuli delivered with each method was evaluated on a 10-cm visual analog scale. VAL, agonist and antagonist M-wave amplitudes and PS100 were similar between the different methods in both fresh and fatigued states. Potentiated peak twitch was lower in EMS compared to ENS, whereas no difference was found between ENS and MNS for any parameter. Discomfort associated with MNS (1.5 ± 1.4 cm) was significantly less compared to ENS (5.5 ± 1.9 cm) and EMS (4.2 ± 2.6 cm) (p evaluate neuromuscular properties, MNS, EMS and ENS can be used interchangeably for plantar flexor neuromuscular function assessment as they provide similar evaluation of central and peripheral factors in unfatigued and fatigued states. Importantly, electrical current spread to antagonist muscles was similar between the three methods while discomfort from MNS was much less compared to ENS and EMS. MNS may be potentially employed to assess neuromuscular function of plantar flexor muscles in fragile populations.

  11. Repetition suppression in transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced motor-evoked potentials is modulated by cortical inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallioniemi, E; Pääkkönen, A; Julkunen, P

    2015-12-03

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be applied to modulate cortical phenomena. The modulation effect is dependent on the applied stimulation frequency. Repetition suppression (RS) has been demonstrated in the motor system using TMS with short suprathreshold 1-Hz stimulation trains repeated at long inter-train intervals. RS has been reported to occur in the resting motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) with respect to the first pulse in a train of stimuli. Although this RS in the motor system has been described in previous studies, the neuronal origin of the phenomenon is still poorly understood. The present study evaluated RS in three TMS-induced motor responses; resting and active MEPs as well as corticospinal silent periods (SPs) in order to clarify the mechanism behind TMS-induced RS. We studied 10 healthy right-handed subjects using trains of four stimuli with stimulation intensities of 120% of the resting motor threshold (rMT) and 120% of the silent period threshold for an SP duration of 30 ms (SPT30). Inter-trial interval was 20s, with a 1-s inter-stimulus interval within the trains. We confirmed that RS appears in resting MEPs (p 0.792). SPs, on the contrary, lengthened (p stimulation intensities exhibited a similar trend; however, the SPT30 evoked a more profound inhibitory effect compared to that achieved by rMT. Moreover, the resting MEP amplitudes and SP durations correlated (rho ⩽ -0.674, p < 0.001) and the pre-TMS EMG level did not differ between stimuli in resting MEPs (F = 0.0, p ⩾ 0.999). These results imply that the attenuation of response size seen in resting MEPs might originate from increasing activity of inhibitory GABAergic interneurons which relay the characteristics of SPs. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Use and Abuse of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to Modulate Corticospinal Excitability in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin E Héroux

    Full Text Available The magnitude and direction of reported physiological effects induced using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS to modulate human motor cortical excitability have proven difficult to replicate routinely. We conducted an online survey on the prevalence and possible causes of these reproducibility issues. A total of 153 researchers were identified via their publications and invited to complete an anonymous internet-based survey that asked about their experience trying to reproduce published findings for various TMS protocols. The prevalence of questionable research practices known to contribute to low reproducibility was also determined. We received 47 completed surveys from researchers with an average of 16.4 published papers (95% CI 10.8-22.0 that used TMS to modulate motor cortical excitability. Respondents also had a mean of 4.0 (2.5-5.7 relevant completed studies that would never be published. Across a range of TMS protocols, 45-60% of respondents found similar results to those in the original publications; the other respondents were able to reproduce the original effects only sometimes or not at all. Only 20% of respondents used formal power calculations to determine study sample sizes. Others relied on previously published studies (25%, personal experience (24% or flexible post-hoc criteria (41%. Approximately 44% of respondents knew researchers who engaged in questionable research practices (range 30–81%, yet only 18% admitted to engaging in them (range 6–38% [corrected]. These practices included screening subjects to find those that respond in a desired way to a TMS protocol, selectively reporting results and rejecting data based on a gut feeling. In a sample of 56 published papers that were inspected, not a single questionable research practice was reported. Our survey revealed that approximately 50% of researchers are unable to reproduce published TMS effects. Researchers need to start increasing study sample size and eliminating

  13. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation affects behavior by biasing endogenous cortical oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massihullah Hamidi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A governing assumption about repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS has been that it interferes with task-related neuronal activity – in effect, by “injecting noise” into the brain – and thereby disrupts behavior. Recent reports of rTMS-produced behavioral enhancement, however, call this assumption into question. We investigated the neurophysiological effects of rTMS delivered during the delay period of a visual working memory task by simultaneously recording brain activity with electroencephalography (EEG. Subjects performed visual working memory for locations or for shapes, and in half the trials a 10-Hz train of rTMS was delivered to the superior parietal lobule or a control brain area. The wide range of individual differences in the effects of rTMS on task accuracy, from improvement to impairment, was predicted by individual differences in the effect of rTMS on power in the alpha-band of the EEG (~ 10 Hz: a decrease in alpha-band power corresponded to improved performance, whereas an increase in alpha-band power corresponded to the opposite. The EEG effect was localized to cortical sources encompassing the frontal eye fields and the intraparietal sulcus, and was specific to task (location, but not object memory and to rTMS target (superior parietal lobule, not control area. Furthermore, for the same task condition, rTMS-induced changes in cross-frequency phase synchrony between alpha- and gamma-band (> 40 Hz oscillations predicted changes in behavior. These results suggest that alpha-band oscillations play an active role cognitive processes and do not simply reflect absence of processing. Furthermore, this study shows that the complex effects of rTMS on behavior can result from biasing endogenous patterns of network-level oscillations.

  14. PERIPHERAL APPLICATION OF REPETITIVE PULSE MAGNETIC STIMULATION ON JOINT CONTRACTURE FOR MOBILITY RESTORATION: CONTROLLED RANDOMIZED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efthimios J. Kouloulas

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Joint contracture is a limitation in the passive or active range of motion (ROM of a joint, where in addition to the mobility limiting factor the pain is also present. Repetitive pulsed Magnetic Stimulation (rPMS appears to be an effective, non-invasive and safety solution for treating this condition. Therefore aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of rPMS in treating joint contracture. Methods: 30 subjects with joint contracture in the knee were enrolled in this study and divided respectively into Treatment and Control group. The treatment group were delivered with rPMS therapy. The control group was delivered with conventional physiotherapy method (ultrasound. The primary outcome measurements were: 1. Mobility evaluation by goniometry (ROM in degrees while performing flexion and Patient Functional Assessment Questionnaire (PFAQ for ability to perform Activities of Daily Living (ADL and 2. Pain evaluation by 10-point Visual Analog Scale (VAS for pain perception. Absence of adverse events was set as a secondary measure. Results: The results of the study show statistical difference (p<0.05 between the levels of improvement of all studied parameters while comparing between both groups. The results suggest greater immobility restoration and pain relieving effect of the rPMS in comparison to conventional physiotherapy method. Conclusion: rPMS an effective and safe non-invasive method for mobility restoration and pain relief in case of joint contractures. This study suggests the method as beneficial and quality of life ameliorating among patients suffering from immobilized joints accompanied by pain.

  15. Direct eye contact enhances mirroring of others' movements: A transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinsen, Jellina; Bernaerts, Sylvie; Wang, Yin; de Beukelaar, Toon T; Cuypers, Koen; Swinnen, Stephan P; Alaerts, Kaat

    2017-01-27

    Direct eye contact is a powerful social cue to regulate interpersonal interactions. Previous behavioral studies showed a link between eye contact and motor mimicry, indicating that the automatic mimicry of observed hand movements is significantly enhanced when direct eye contact exists between the observer and the observed model. In the present study, we aim to investigate the neurophysiological basis of the previously reported behavioral enhancements. Here, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was applied to assess changes in cortico-motor excitability at the level of the primary motor cortex (M1) to explore whether and how the motor system is facilitated from observing others' hand movements and, in particular, how this process is modulated by eye contact. To do so, motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were collected from two hand muscles while participants received single-pulse TMS and naturally observed video clips of an actor showing hand opening movements or static hands. During the observation, either direct or averted eye gaze was established between the subject and the observed actor. Our findings show a clear effect of eye gaze on observation-induced motor facilitation. This indicates that the mapping or 'mirroring' of others' movements is significantly enhanced when movement observation is accompanied by direct eye gaze compared to averted eye gaze. Our results support the notion that eye contact is a powerful social signal with the ability to direct human non-verbal social behavior. Furthermore, our findings are important for understanding the role of the mirror motor system in the mapping of socially relevant actions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Successful use of transcranial magnetic stimulation in difficult to treat hypersexual disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adarsh Tripathi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypersexual disorder has phenomenological resemblance with impulsive-compulsive spectrum disorders. Inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS over the supplementary motor area (SMA has been found to be effective in the management of impulsive-compulsive behaviors. Inhibitory rTMS over SMA may be helpful in hypersexual disorder. We highlight here a case of hypersexual disorder (excessive sexual drive who failed to respond adequately to the conventional pharmacological treatment and responded with rTMS augmentation.

  17. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: A Neuroscientific Probe of Cortical Function in Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    McClintock, Shawn M.; Freitas, Catarina; Oberman, Lindsay; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a neuropsychiatric tool that can serve as a useful method to better understand the neurobiology of cognitive function, behavior, and emotional processing. The purpose of this paper is to examine the utility of TMS as a means of measuring neocortical function in neuropsychiatric disorders in general, and schizophrenia in particular, for the Cognitive Neuroscience Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (CNTRICS) initiative. When incor...

  18. Excitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to left dorsal premotor cortex enhances motor consolidation of new skills

    OpenAIRE

    Boyd Lara A; Linsdell Meghan A

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Following practice of skilled movements, changes continue to take place in the brain that both strengthen and modify memory for motor learning. These changes represent motor memory consolidation a process whereby new memories are transformed from a fragile to a more permanent, robust and stable state. In the present study, the neural correlates of motor memory consolidation were probed using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to the dorsal premotor cortex ...

  19. Neurocognitive Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Wall, Christopher A.; Croarkin, Paul E.; McClintock, Shawn M.; Murphy, Lauren L.; Bandel, Lorelei A.; Sim, Leslie A.; Sampson, Shirlene M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: It is estimated that 30–40% of adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) do not receive full benefit from current antidepressant therapies. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a novel therapy approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to treat adults with MDD. Research suggests rTMS is not associated with adverse neurocognitive effects in adult populations; however, there is no documentation of its neurocognitive effects in adolescents. This is a sec...

  20. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induces oscillatory power changes in chronic tinnitus

    OpenAIRE

    Martin eSchecklmann; Astrid eLehner; Judith eGollmitzer; Eldrid eSchmidt; Winfried eSchlee; Berthold eLangguth

    2015-01-01

    Chronic tinnitus is associated with neuroplastic changes in auditory and non-auditory cortical areas. About 10 years ago, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of auditory and prefrontal cortex was introduced as potential treatment for tinnitus. The resulting changes in tinnitus loudness are interpreted in the context of rTMS induced activity changes (neuroplasticity). Here, we investigate the effect of single rTMS sessions on oscillatory power to probe the capacity of rTMS to i...

  1. Spontaneously Fluctuating Motor Cortex Excitability in Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood: A Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study

    OpenAIRE

    Stern, William M; Mahalekshmi Desikan; Damon Hoad; Fatima Jaffer; Gionata Strigaro; Sander, Josemir W.; Rothwell, John C; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alternating hemiplegia of childhood is a very rare and serious neurodevelopmental syndrome; its genetic basis has recently been established. Its characteristic features include typically-unprovoked episodes of hemiplegia and other transient or more persistent neurological abnormalities. METHODS: We used transcranial magnetic stimulation to assess the effect of the condition on motor cortex neurophysiology both during and between attacks of hemiplegia. Nine people with alternating ...

  2. Bilateral Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of the Prefrontal Cortex reduces cocaine intake: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Bolloni

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic cocaine consumption is associated to a decrease in mesolimbic dopamine transmission that maintains drug intake. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS is gaining reliability a useful therapeutic tool in drug addiction since it can modulate cortico-limbic activity resulting in reduction of drug craving. Aims: In the present study we investigated the therapeutic effect of bilateral TMS of prefrontal cortex (PFC in reducing cocaine intake, in a sample of treatment-seeking patients with current cocaine use disorder (DSM-V. Methods: 10 cocaine addicts (DSM-V were randomly assigned to the active or sham stimulation protocol in a double-blind experimental design. Twelve repetitive TMS (rTMS sessions were administered 3 times a week for 4 weeks at 100% of motor threshold, over bilateral PFC. Cocaine intake (ng/mg was assessed by hair analysis at baseline (before treatment, T0, after one month (end of treatment, T1, 3 (T2 and 6 (T3 months later. All subjects received psychological support weekly. Results: The two-way ANOVA for repeated measures did not show a significant effect of the interaction between time and treatment (F4,32= 0.35; p=.87. Despite that result indicated no difference in the effect of the two conditions (active vs sham along time, a decreasing trend in cocaine consumption in active TMS group (F3,23=3.42; p=.04 vs sham (F3,15=1.88; p=.20 was observed when we performed exploratory analysis with time as factor . Indeed, Post-hoc comparisons showed a significant reduction in the amount of cocaine detected from the onset to three months later (T0-T2; p=.02 and to the end of treatment (T0-T3; p=.01 in addicts from the active group. Conclusions: Bilateral rTMS of PFC at 10 Hz did not show a significant effect on cocaine intake compared to sham. However, a long-term reduction in cocaine intake in active TMS treated patients was observed when we considered the time as factor. Further studies are required to confirm these

  3. Differential effects of painful and non-painful stimulation on tactile processing in fibromyalgia syndrome and subjects with masochistic behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Pollok

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In healthy subjects repeated tactile stimulation in a conditioning test stimulation paradigm yields attenuation of primary (S1 and secondary (S2 somatosensory cortical activation, whereas a preceding painful stimulus results in facilitation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Since previous data suggest that cognitive processes might affect somatosensory processing in S1, the present study aims at investigating to what extent cortical reactivity is altered by the subjective estimation of pain. To this end, the effect of painful and tactile stimulation on processing of subsequently applied tactile stimuli was investigated in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS and in subjects with masochistic behaviour (MB by means of a 122-channel whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG system. Ten patients fulfilling the criteria for the diagnosis of FMS, 10 subjects with MB and 20 control subjects matched with respect to age, gender and handedness participated in the present study. Tactile or brief painful cutaneous laser stimuli were applied as conditioning stimulus (CS followed by a tactile test stimulus (TS 500 ms later. While in FMS patients significant attenuation following conditioning tactile stimulation was evident, no facilitation following painful stimulation was found. By contrast, in subjects with MB no attenuation but significant facilitation occurred. Attenuation as well as facilitation applied to cortical responses occurring at about 70 ms but not to early S1 or S2 responses. Additionally, in FMS patients the amount of attenuation was inversely correlated with catastrophizing tendency. CONCLUSION: The present results imply altered cortical reactivity of the primary somatosensory cortex in FMS patients and MB possibly reflecting differences of individual pain experience.

  4. Assessment and modulation of neuroplasticity in rehabilitation with transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Shahid; Mizrahi, Ilan; Weaver, Kayleen; Fregni, Felipe; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Despite intensive efforts towards the improvement of outcomes after acquired brain injury functional recovery is often limited. One reasons is the challenge in assessing and guiding plasticity after brain injury. In this context, Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) - a noninvasive tool of brain stimulation - could play a major role. TMS has shown to be a reliable tool to measure plastic changes in the motor cortex associated with interventions in the motor system; such as motor training and motor cortex stimulation. In addition, as illustrated by the experience in promoting recovery from stroke, TMS a promising therapeutic tool to minimize motor, speech, cognitive, and mood deficits. In this review, we will focus on stroke to discuss how TMS can provide insights into the mechanisms of neurological recovery, and can be used for measurement and modulation of plasticity after an acquired brain insult. PMID:21172687

  5. Effect of magnetic stimulation on the contractile activity of the rectum in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafik, A

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic stimulation (MS) produces its effect, according to Faraday's law, by creating an electric field which can stimulate the neuromuscular tissues. The current study investigates, to our knowledge for the first time, the effect of MS on rectal pressure and evacuation with a view on its possible application in emptying the inertic or neuropathic rectum. The rectal, rectal neck and vesical pressures as well as the EMG activity of the two rectus abdominis muscles were recorded during sacral MS with a magnetic coil while the rectum was empty and while filled. Stimulation parameters were set at 70% intensity, 20 Hz frequency and 1- to 5-second burst length. Sacral MS of both the filled and empty rectum effected a significant increase in rectal (p<0.01) and vesical (p<0.01) pressures and a decrease in rectal neck pressure (p<0.01). Rectal evacuation of the filled rectum using intermittent stimulation was achieved in all animals. Sacral MS resulted in a rectal evacuation. It is a simple, easy and noninvasive method that might prove applicable in the treatment of inertic constipation and neuropathic rectum.

  6. Cortical plasticity induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation during wakefulness affects electroencephalogram activity during sleep.

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    Luigi De Gennaro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sleep electroencephalogram (EEG brain oscillations in the low-frequency range show local signs of homeostatic regulation after learning. Such increases and decreases of slow wave activity are limited to the cortical regions involved in specific task performance during wakefulness. Here, we test the hypothesis that reorganization of motor cortex produced by long-term potentiation (LTP affects EEG activity of this brain area during subsequent sleep. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By pairing median nerve stimulation with transcranial magnetic stimulation over the contralateral motor cortex, one can potentiate the motor output, which is presumed to reflect plasticity of the neural circuitry. This paired associative stimulation increases M1 cortical excitability at interstimulus intervals of 25 ms. We compared the scalp distribution of sleep EEG power following paired associative stimulation at 25 ms to that following a control paradigm with 50 ms intervals. It is shown that the experimental manipulation by paired associative stimulation at 25 ms induces a 48% increase in amplitude of motor evoked potentials. This LTP-like potentiation, induced during waking, affects delta and theta EEG power in both REM and non-REM sleep, measured during the following night. Slow-wave activity increases in some frontal and prefrontal derivations and decreases at sites neighboring and contralateral to the stimulated motor cortex. The magnitude of increased amplitudes of motor evoked potentials by the paired associative stimulation at 25 ms predicts enhancements of slow-wave activity in prefrontal regions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: An LTP-like paradigm, presumably inducing increased synaptic strength, leads to changes in local sleep regulation, as indexed by EEG slow-wave activity. Enhancement and depression of slow-wave activity are interpreted in terms of a simultaneous activation of both excitatory and inhibitory circuits consequent to the paired

  7. MagPy: A Python toolbox for controlling Magstim transcranial magnetic stimulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, Nicolas A

    2017-01-30

    To date, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies manipulating stimulation parameters have largely used blocked paradigms. However, altering these parameters on a trial-by-trial basis in Magstim stimulators is complicated by the need to send regular (1Hz) commands to the stimulator. Additionally, effecting such control interferes with the ability to send TMS pulses or simultaneously present stimuli with high-temporal precision. This manuscript presents the MagPy toolbox, a Python software package that provides full control over Magstim stimulators via the serial port. It is able to maintain this control with no impact on concurrent processing, such as stimulus delivery. In addition, a specially-designed "QuickFire" serial cable is specified that allows MagPy to trigger TMS pulses with very low-latency. In a series of experimental simulations, MagPy was able to maintain uninterrupted remote control over the connected Magstim stimulator across all testing sessions. In addition, having MagPy enabled had no effect on stimulus timing - all stimuli were presented for precisely the duration specified. Finally, using the QuickFire cable, MagPy was able to elicit TMS pulses with sub-millisecond latencies. The MagPy toolbox allows for experiments that require manipulating stimulation parameters from trial to trial. Furthermore, it can achieve this in contexts that require tight control over timing, such as those seeking to combine TMS with fMRI or EEG. Together, the MagPy toolbox and QuickFire serial cable provide an effective means for controlling Magstim stimulators during experiments while ensuring high-precision timing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of disruption of prefrontal cortical function with transcranial magnetic stimulation on visual working memory

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    Elizabeth S Lorenc

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is proposed that feedback signals from the prefrontal cortex (PFC to extrastriate cortex are essential for goal-directed processing, maintenance, and selection of information in visual working memory (VWM. In a previous study, we found that disruption of PFC function with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS in healthy individuals impaired behavioral performance on a face/scene matching task and decreased category-specific tuning in extrastriate cortex as measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. In this study, we investigated the effect of disruption of left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG function on the fidelity of neural representations of two distinct information codes: (1 the stimulus category and (2 the goal-relevance of viewed stimuli. During fMRI scanning, subjects were presented face and scene images in pseudo-random order and instructed to remember either faces or scenes. Within both anatomical and functional regions of interest, a multi-voxel pattern classifier was used to quantitatively assess the fidelity of activity patterns representing stimulus category: whether a face or a scene was presented on each trial, and goal relevance, whether the presented image was task relevant (i.e. a face is relevant in a Remember Faces block, but irrelevant in a Remember Scenes block. We found a reduction in the fidelity of the stimulus category code in visual cortex after left IFG disruption, providing causal evidence that lateral PFC modulates object category codes in visual cortex during VWM. In addition, we found that IFG disruption caused a reduction in the fidelity of the goal relevance code in a distributed set of brain regions. These results suggest that the IFG is involved in determining the task-relevance of visual input and communicating that information to a network of regions involved in further processing during VWM. Finally, we found that participants who exhibited greater fidelity of the goal relevance code in the

  9. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation of the undamaged brain to identify lesion sites that predict language outcome after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorca-Puls, Diego L; Gajardo-Vidal, Andrea; Seghier, Mohamed L; Leff, Alexander P; Sethi, Varun; Prejawa, Susan; Hope, Thomas M H; Devlin, Joseph T; Price, Cathy J

    2017-06-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation focused on either the left anterior supramarginal gyrus or opercular part of the left inferior frontal gyrus has been reported to transiently impair the ability to perform phonological more than semantic tasks. Here we tested whether phonological processing abilities were also impaired following lesions to these regions in right-handed, English speaking adults, who were investigated at least 1 year after a left-hemisphere stroke. When our regions of interest were limited to 0.5 cm3 of grey matter centred around sites that had been identified with transcranial magnetic stimulation-based functional localization, phonological impairments were observed in 74% (40/54) of patients with damage to the regions and 21% (21/100) of patients sparing these regions. This classification accuracy was better than that observed when using regions of interest centred on activation sites in previous functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of phonological processing, or transcranial magnetic stimulation sites that did not use functional localization. New regions of interest were generated by redefining the borders of each of the transcranial magnetic stimulation sites to include areas that were consistently damaged in the patients with phonological impairments. This increased the incidence of phonological impairments in the presence of damage to 85% (46/54) and also reduced the incidence of phonological impairments in the absence of damage to 15% (15/100). The difference in phonological processing abilities between those with and without damage to these 'transcranial magnetic stimulation-guided' regions remained highly significant even after controlling for the effect of lesion size. The classification accuracy of the transcranial magnetic stimulation-guided regions was validated in a second sample of 108 patients and found to be better than that for (i) functional magnetic resonance imaging-guided regions; (ii) a region identified from an

  10. Transcranial magnetic stimulation modulation of corticospinal excitability by targeting cortical I-waves with biphasic paired-pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallioniemi, Elisa; Savolainen, Petri; Järnefelt, Gustaf; Koskenkorva, Päivi; Karhu, Jari; Julkunen, Petro

    2017-10-20

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) induced I-wave behavior can be demonstrated at neuronal population level using paired-pulses and by observing short-interval cortical facilitation (SICF). Advancements in stimulator technology have made it possible to apply biphasic paired-pulses to induce SICF. Our aim was to characterize the SICF I-wave interaction by biphasic paired-pulses with the ultimate objective to enhance TMS effects via SICF in various TMS-applications. We used biphasic paired-pulses in 15 volunteers to characterize corticospinal SICF using various 1.2-8.0ms inter-stimulus intervals, and measuring SICF input-output response. SICF interaction with the first I-wave (I1) was observed in the output responses (motor evoked potentials; MEPs) in all subjects. Most subjects (≥80%) also exhibited later SICF I-wave interaction. SICF at I1 was present at all applied intensities below 140% of resting motor threshold. At I2, we observed SICF only with intensities just above motor threshold. Biphasic paired-pulses can reliably induce SICF shown by the facilitatory I-wave interaction, and could therefore be applied with repetitive bursts to enhance responsiveness to TMS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation to the prefrontal or parietal cortex does not impair metacognitive visual awareness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Bor

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging studies commonly associate dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and posterior parietal cortex with conscious perception. However, such studies only investigate correlation, rather than causation. In addition, many studies conflate objective performance with subjective awareness. In an influential recent paper, Rounis and colleagues addressed these issues by showing that continuous theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (cTBS applied to the DLPFC impaired metacognitive (subjective awareness for a perceptual task, while objective performance was kept constant. We attempted to replicate this finding, with minor modifications, including an active cTBS control site. Using a between-subjects design for both DLPFC and posterior parietal cortices, we found no evidence of a cTBS-induced metacognitive impairment. In a second experiment, we devised a highly rigorous within-subjects cTBS design for DLPFC, but again failed to find any evidence of metacognitive impairment. One crucial difference between our results and the Rounis study is our strict exclusion of data deemed unsuitable for a signal detection theory analysis. Indeed, when we included this unstable data, a significant, though invalid, metacognitive impairment was found. These results cast doubt on previous findings relating metacognitive awareness to DLPFC, and inform the current debate concerning whether or not prefrontal regions are preferentially implicated in conscious perception.

  12. Association of intracortical inhibition with social cognition deficits in schizophrenia: Findings from a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Urvakhsh Meherwan; Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Basavaraju, Rakshathi; Gangadhar, Bangalore N

    2014-09-01

    Abnormal cortical-inhibition has been hypothesized to underlie social-cognition deficits in schizophrenia. Studies using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a neurophysiological probe have demonstrated cortical-inhibition deficits in this group. We compared TMS-measured short- and long-interval intracortical-inhibition (SICI & LICI) in antipsychotic-naïve (n=33) and medicated (n=21) schizophrenia patients and in healthy comparison subjects (n=45). We also studied the association between cortical-inhibition and social-cognition deficits in the patients. Antipsychotic-naïve patients had significant deficits in SICI (i.e., less inhibitory response). In this group, SICI had significant inverse correlations with emotion processing and a global social-cognition score. Impaired intracortical-inhibition may thus contribute to social-cognition deficits in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Improves Handwriting in Parkinson’s Disease

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    Bubblepreet K. Randhawa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Parkinson disease (PD is characterized by hypometric movements resulting from loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. PD leads to decreased activation of the supplementary motor area (SMA; the net result of these changes is a poverty of movement. The present study determined the impact of 5 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS over the SMA on a fine motor movement, handwriting (writing cursive “l”s, and on cortical excitability, in individuals with PD. Methods. In a cross-over design, ten individuals with PD were randomized to receive either 5 Hz or control stimulation over the SMA. Immediately following brain stimulation right handed writing was assessed. Results. 5 Hz stimulation increased vertical size of handwriting and diminished axial pressure. In addition, 5 Hz rTMS significantly decreased the threshold for excitability in the primary motor cortex. Conclusions. These data suggest that in the short term 5 Hz rTMS benefits functional fine motor task performance, perhaps by altering cortical excitability across a network of brain regions. Further, these data may provide the foundation for a larger investigation of the effects of noninvasive brain stimulation over the SMA in individuals with PD.

  14. Assessment of Effective Connectivity and Plasticity With Dual-Coil Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafleur, Louis-Philippe; Tremblay, Sara; Whittingstall, Kevin; Lepage, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how different brain regions interact with one another is at the heart of current endeavors in cognitive and basic neuroscience. Unlike most neuroimaging techniques, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) allows the establishment of causal relationships in the study of the functional architecture of the human brain. While this tool is increasingly used to probe the functional and causal nature of the associations between brain regions, a comprehensive guide documenting the various existing stimulation protocols is currently lacking, limiting its use. The main objective of the current work is to characterize the various dual-coil TMS protocols used to probe effective connectivity and plasticity within the motor system. In addition, we want to propose a short TMS battery that could be used in clinical and research settings. Articles using dual-coil TMS indexed in PubMed and Medline published between 1990 and 2015 were included in the review. A wide range of stimulation parameters has been used to probe connectivity and plasticity. However, a few protocols have been shown to produce robust effects, mostly inhibitory in nature. Dual-coil TMS offers the distinctive opportunity to investigate effective connectivity and plasticity between different parts of the brain. Sites of stimulation, stimulation intensity, inter-stimulus interval and coil orientation are crucial factors to consider when using this technique. We propose a brief battery of tests that could be used to assess effective brain connectivity in clinical populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Reduced neuronal activity in language-related regions after transcranial magnetic stimulation therapy for auditory verbal hallucinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Jochen; Homan, Philipp; Jann, Kay; Federspiel, Andrea; Flury, Richard; Hauf, Martinus; Strik, Werner; Dierks, Thomas; Hubl, Daniela

    2013-03-15

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a novel therapeutic approach, used in patients with pharmacoresistant auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH). To investigate the neurobiological effects of TMS on AVH, we measured cerebral blood flow with pseudo-continuous magnetic resonance-arterial spin labeling 20 ± 6 hours before and after TMS treatment. Thirty patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were investigated. Fifteen patients received a 10-day TMS treatment to the left temporoparietal cortex, and 15 received the standard treatment. The stimulation location was chosen according to an individually determined language region determined by a functional magnetic resonance imaging language paradigm, which identified the sensorimotor language area, area Spt (sylvian parietotemporal), as the target region. TMS-treated patients showed positive clinical effects, which were indicated by a reduction in AVH scores (p ≤ .001). Cerebral blood flow was significantly decreased in the primary auditory cortex (p ≤ .001), left Broca's area (p ≤ .001), and cingulate gyrus (p ≤ .001). In control subjects, neither positive clinical effects nor cerebral blood flow decreases were detected. The decrease in cerebral blood flow in the primary auditory cortex correlated with the decrease in AVH scores (p ≤ .001). TMS reverses hyperactivity of language regions involved in the emergence of AVH. Area Spt acts as a gateway to the hallucination-generating cerebral network. Successful therapy corresponded to decreased cerebral blood flow in the primary auditory cortex, supporting its crucial role in triggering AVH and contributing to the physical quality of the false perceptions. Copyright © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Localized stimulation of the human brain and spinal cord by a pair of opposing pulsed magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, S.; Matsuda, T.; Hiwaki, O.

    1990-05-01

    A method of localized stimulation of the human brain and spinal cord is proposed. The basic idea is to concentrate induced eddy currents locally in the vicinity of a target by a pair of opposing pulsed magnetic fields. A pair of coils are positioned outside the head in the opposite directions around a target. The eddy currents induced at the target are expected to flow together, which results in an increased current flow at the target. A figure-eight coil is designed, and the magnetic brain stimulation is carried out using ourselves as volunteers. The results show that the selective stimulation of the brain is realized with a 5-mm resolution. The functional mapping of the human motor cortex related to the hand, arm, and foot areas is obtained. It is also obtained that an optimum direction of stimulating currents for neural excitation exists in each functional area in the cortex. Magnetic stimulation of the spinal cord is carried out by the same method as used in the brain stimulation. Rabbits are used in the experiments. A figure-eight coil is positioned on the surface of the spine. Shifting the stimulating points on the spine, electromyographic (EMG) signals are recorded from limb muscles. The EMG signals are clearly responding to the stimulation at a segment which innervates limb muscles, whereas no EMG signals are obtained by stimulation of segments higher than the critical segment. It is also obtained that the amplitude of the EMG signals varies with the direction of stimulating currents.

  17. Interdisciplinary approaches of transcranial magnetic stimulation applied to a respiratory neuronal circuitry model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Vinit

    Full Text Available Respiratory related diseases associated with the neuronal control of breathing represent life-threatening issues and to date, no effective therapeutics are available to enhance the impaired function. The aim of this study was to determine whether a preclinical respiratory model could be used for further studies to develop a non-invasive therapeutic tool applied to rat diaphragmatic neuronal circuitry. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS was performed on adult male Sprague-Dawley rats using a human figure-of-eight coil. The largest diaphragmatic motor evoked potentials (MEPdia were recorded when the center of the coil was positioned 6 mm caudal from Bregma, involving a stimulation of respiratory supraspinal pathways. Magnetic shielding of the coil with mu metal reduced magnetic field intensities and improved focality with increased motor threshold and lower amplitude recruitment curve. Moreover, transynaptic neuroanatomical tracing with pseudorabies virus (applied to the diaphragm suggest that connections exist between the motor cortex, the periaqueductal grey cell regions, several brainstem neurons and spinal phrenic motoneurons (distributed in the C3-4 spinal cord. These results reveal the anatomical substrate through which supraspinal stimulation can convey descending action potential volleys to the spinal motoneurons (directly or indirectly. We conclude that MEPdia following a single pulse of TMS can be successfully recorded in the rat and may be used in the assessment of respiratory supraspinal plasticity. Supraspinal non-invasive stimulations aimed to neuromodulate respiratory circuitry will enable new avenues of research into neuroplasticity and the development of therapies for respiratory dysfunction associated with neural injury and disease (e.g. spinal cord injury, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  18. Effects of Bilateral Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Post-Stroke Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eunhee; Kim, Min Su; Chang, Won Hyuk; Oh, Su Mi; Kim, Yun Kwan; Lee, Ahee; Kim, Yun-Hee

    Optimal protocol of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on post-stroke dysphagia remains uncertain with regard to its clinical efficacy. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of high-frequency rTMS at the bilateral motor cortices over the cortical representation of the mylohyoid muscles in the patients with post-stroke dysphagia. This study was a single-blind, randomized controlled study with a blinded observer. Thirty-five stroke patients were randomly divided into three intervention groups: the bilateral stimulation group, the unilateral stimulation group, and the sham stimulation group. For the bilateral stimulation group, 500 pulses of 10 Hz rTMS over the ipsilesional and 500 pulses of 10 Hz rTMS over the contralesional motor cortices over the cortical areas that project to the mylohyoid muscles were administered daily for 2 consecutive weeks. For the unilateral stimulation group, 500 pulses of 10 Hz rTMS over the ipsilesional motor cortex over the cortical representation of the mylohyoid muscle and the same amount of sham rTMS over the contralesional hemisphere were applied. For the sham stimulation group, sham rTMS was applied at the bilateral motor cortices. Clinical swallowing function and videofluoroscopic swallowing studies were assessed before the intervention (T0), immediately after the intervention (T1) and 3 weeks after the intervention (T2) using Clinical Dysphagia Scale (CDS), Dysphagia Outcome and Severity Scale (DOSS), Penetration Aspiration Scale (PAS), and Videofluoroscopic Dysphagia Scale (VDS). There were significant time and intervention interaction effects in the CDS, DOSS, PAS, and VDS scores (p dysphagia therapies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Transcranial direct current stimulation improves the QT variability index and autonomic cardiac control in healthy subjects older than 60 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piccirillo G

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Gianfranco Piccirillo,1 Cristina Ottaviani,2 Claudia Fiorucci,1 Nicola Petrocchi,2 Federica Moscucci,1 Claudia Di Iorio,1 Fabiola Mastropietri,1 Ilaria Parrotta,1 Matteo Pascucci,1 Damiano Magrì3 1Department of Cardiovascular, Respiratory, Nephrological, Anestesiological and Geriatric Sciences, “Sapienza” University, 2Neuroimaging Laboratory, IRCCS Santa Lucia Foundation, 3Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Rome, Italy Background: Noninvasive brain stimulation technique is an interesting tool to investigate the causal relation between cortical functioning and autonomic nervous system (ANS responses. Objective: The objective of this report is to evaluate whether anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS over the temporal cortex influences short-period temporal ventricular repolarization dispersion and cardiovascular ANS control in elderly subjects. Subjects and methods: In 50 healthy subjects (29 subjects younger than 60 years and 21 subjects older than 60 years matched for gender, short-period RR and systolic blood pressure spectral variability, QT variability index (QTVI, and noninvasive hemodynamic data were obtained during anodal tDCS or sham stimulation. Results: In the older group, the QTVI, low-frequency (LF power expressed in normalized units, the ratio between LF and high-frequency (HF power, and systemic peripheral resistances decreased, whereas HF power expressed in normalized units and α HF power increased during the active compared to the sham condition (P<0.05. Conclusion: In healthy subjects older than 60 years, tDCS elicits cardiovascular and autonomic changes. Particularly, it improves temporal ventricular repolarization dispersion, reduces sinus sympathetic activity and systemic peripheral resistance, and increases vagal sinus activity and baroreflex sensitivity. Keywords: transcranial direct current stimulation, QT variability, heart rate variability

  20. Strong static magnetic fields elicit swimming behaviors consistent with direct vestibular stimulation in adult zebrafish.

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    Bryan K Ward

    Full Text Available Zebrafish (Danio rerio offer advantages as model animals for studies of inner ear development, genetics and ototoxicity. However, traditional assessment of vestibular function in this species using the vestibulo-ocular reflex requires agar-immobilization of individual fish and specialized video, which are difficult and labor-intensive. We report that using a static magnetic field to directly stimulate the zebrafish labyrinth results in an efficient, quantitative behavioral assay in free-swimming fish. We recently observed that humans have sustained nystagmus in high strength magnetic fields, and we attributed this observation to magnetohydrodynamic forces acting on the labyrinths. Here, fish were individually introduced into the center of a vertical 11.7T magnetic field bore for 2-minute intervals, and their movements were tracked. To assess for heading preference relative to a magnetic field, fish were also placed in a horizontally oriented 4.7T magnet in infrared (IR light. A sub-population was tested again in the magnet after gentamicin bath to ablate lateral line hair cell function. Free-swimming adult zebrafish exhibited markedly altered swimming behavior while in strong static magnetic fields, independent of vision or lateral line function. Two-thirds of fish showed increased swimming velocity or consistent looping/rolling behavior throughout exposure to a strong, vertically oriented magnetic field. Fish also demonstrated altered swimming behavior in a strong horizontally oriented field, demonstrating in most cases preferred swimming direction with respect to the field. These findings could be adapted for 'high-throughput' investigations of the effects of environmental manipulations as well as for changes that occur during development on vestibular function in zebrafish.

  1. Role of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) in Treatment of Addiction and Related Disorders: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makani, Ramkrishna; Pradhan, Basant; Shah, Umang; Parikh, Tapan

    2017-11-29

    Addiction and related disorders are devastating with their tremendous social, psychological, and physical consequences for which development of optimally effective treatments are long overdue. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is relatively safe and is becoming an emerging therapeutic tool for these conditions. This systematic review was conducted using PubMed, PsycINFO, PsychiatryOnline and Cochrane Library ranging from year 2001 to 2017. Our search retrieved 70 related articles of which, based on the Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT) guidelines, 33 indicated Level-1 study quality and class-B strength of recommendation for rTMS in nicotine addiction (effective in 218/289 subjects who received rTMS as found in 11 studies). Level-2/Class-B evidence was found for alcohol and cocaine addictions (Alcohol: effective in 126/193 subjects who received rTMS as found in 8 studies; Cocaine: effective in 86/128 subjects, as found in 5 studies). For food cravings, Level-3/Class-B evidence was noted (effective in 134/169, found in 7 studies). However, the evidence was limited to Level-3/Class-C for heroin (10/20 subjects received active rTMS, effective in 1 study), methamphetamine (33/48 subjects received active rTMS, effective in 2 studies), cannabis (18/18 subjects received active rTMS, effective in 1 study), and pathological gambling (31/31 subjects received active rTMS, effective in 2 studies). rTMS may serve as an emerging therapeutic option for addiction and related disorders. The major lacunae include important methodological limitations and dearth of knowledge about precise mechanism of action that need to be addressed in the future studies. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Patch-clamp recordings of rat neurons from acute brain slices of the somatosensory cortex during magnetic stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Tamar ePashut; Dafna eMagidov; Hana eBen-Porat; Shuki eWolfus; Alex eFriedman; Eli ePerel; Michal eLavidor; Izhar eBar‐Gad; Yosef eYeshurun; Alon eKorngreen

    2014-01-01

    Although transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a popular tool for both basic research and clinical applications, its actions on nerve cells are only partially understood. We have previously predicted, using compartmental modeling, that magnetic stimulation of central nervous system neurons depolarized the soma followed by initiation of an action potential in the initial segment of the axon. The simulations also predict that neurons with low current threshold are more susceptible to magne...

  3. Enhanced accuracy in novel mirror drawing after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced proprioceptive deafferentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Christensen, Lars O.D.; Lee, Ji-hang

    2004-01-01

    When performing visually guided actions under conditions of perturbed visual feedback, e.g., in a mirror or a video camera, there is a spatial conflict between visual and proprioceptive information. Recent studies have shown that subjects without proprioception avoid this conflict and show......TMS over the somatosensory cortex contralateral to the hand or sham stimulation. Mirror tracing was more accurate after rTMS than after sham stimulation. Using a position-matching task, we confirmed that rTMS reduced proprioceptive acuity and that this reduction was largest when the coil was placed...

  4. The precuneus and visuospatial attention in near and far space: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahayana, Indra T; Tcheang, Lili; Chen, Chiao-Yun; Juan, Chi-Hung; Muggleton, Neil G

    2014-01-01

    There is a large body of evidence for the involvement of the parietal cortex in orientation and navigation in space. This has been supplemented by investigation of the contribution of a number of subregions using transcranial magnetic stimulation. The role of the precuneus area, located in the medial plane of posterior parietal cortex (PPC), in visuospatial functions is not well understood. We investigated the contribution of this area using the landmark task. Participants were asked to make forced-choice judgments of which side of prebisected line was longer for near and far viewing conditions (70 and 180 cm, respectively). Online 10 Hz, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) was delivered for 500 ms over the right precuneus, rPPC and vertex (control), in separate blocks of trials. The rPPC stimulation was used as a positive control, having previously resulted in "neglect like" spatial bias effects in a number of studies. A no-TMS condition showed a leftward spatial bias (pseudoneglect) for near space judgments but not for far space and was used as the baseline. Precuneus stimulation resulted in rightward spatial bias from the midpoint in near space similar to the rPPC neglect-like effect. No significant effects were seen with vertex stimulation. This study shows that precuneus, like other parietal areas, is involved in visuospatial functions. Further work is required to clarify how the contribution of this area differs from other parietal regions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Determinants of the induction of cortical plasticity by non‐invasive brain stimulation in healthy subjects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ridding, M. C; Ziemann, U

    2010-01-01

    The ability to induce cortical plasticity with non‐invasive brain stimulation (NBS) techniques has provided novel and exciting opportunities for examining the role of the human cortex during a variety of behaviours...

  6. Enhancement of motor learning by focal intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) of either the primary motor (M1) or somatosensory area (S1) in healthy human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platz, Thomas; Adler-Wiebe, Marija; Roschka, Sybille; Lotze, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Motor rehabilitation after brain damage relies on motor re-learning as induced by specific training. Non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) can alter cortical excitability and thereby has a potential to enhance subsequent training-induced learning. Knowledge about any priming effects of NIBS on motor learning in healthy subjects can help to design targeted therapeutic applications in brain-damaged subjects. To examine whether complex motor learning in healthy subjects can be enhanced by intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) to primary motor or sensory cortical areas. Eighteen young healthy subjects trained eight different arm motor tasks (arm ability training, AAT) once a day for 5 days using their left non-dominant arm. Except for day 1 (baseline), training was performed after applying an excitatory form of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (iTBS) to either (I) right M1 or (II) S1, or (III) sham stimulation to the right M1. Subjects were randomly assigned to conditions I, II, or III. A principal component analysis of the motor behaviour data suggested eight independent motor abilities corresponding to the 8 trained tasks. AAT induced substantial motor learning across abilities with generalisation to a non-trained test of finger dexterity (Nine-Hole-Peg-Test, NHPT). Participants receiving iTBS (to either M1 or S1) showed better performance with the AAT tasks over the period of training compared to sham stimulation as well as a bigger improvement with the generalisation task (NHPT) for the trained left hand after training completion. Priming with an excitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation as iTBS of either M1 or S1 can enhance motor learning across different sensorimotor abilities.

  7. Encouragement of Enzyme Reaction Utilizing Heat Generation from Ferromagnetic Particles Subjected to an AC Magnetic Field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Suzuki

    Full Text Available We propose a method of activating an enzyme utilizing heat generation from ferromagnetic particles under an ac magnetic field. We immobilize α-amylase on the surface of ferromagnetic particles and analyze its activity. We find that when α-amylase/ferromagnetic particle hybrids, that is, ferromagnetic particles, on which α-amylase molecules are immobilized, are subjected to an ac magnetic field, the particles generate heat and as a result, α-amylase on the particles is heated up and activated. We next prepare a solution, in which α-amylase/ferromagnetic particle hybrids and free, nonimmobilized chitinase are dispersed, and analyze their activities. We find that when the solution is subjected to an ac magnetic field, the activity of α-amylase immobilized on the particles increases, whereas that of free chitinase hardly changes; in other words, only α-amylase immobilized on the particles is selectively activated due to heat generation from the particles.

  8. Influence of transcranial magnetic stimulation on spike-wave discharges in a genetic model of absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godlevsky, L.S. prof. dr.; Kobolev, E.V.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Coenen, A.M.L.; Stepanenko, K.I.; Smirnov, I.V.

    2006-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) impulses, (0.5 Hz, 3 impulses) were presented at threshold intensity to male WAG/Rij rats. One group received stimuli, which involved motor responses of hindlimbs, rats of the second group received sham stimulation. Electrocorticograms (ECoG) were recorded

  9. Extended Remediation of Sleep Deprived-Induced Working Memory Deficits Using fMRI-guided Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luber, Bruce; Steffener, Jason; Tucker, Adrienne; Habeck, Christian; Peterchev, Angel V.; Deng, Zhi-De; Basner, Robert C.; Stern, Yaakov; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: We attempted to prevent the development of working memory (WM) impairments caused by sleep deprivation using fMRI-guided repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Novel aspects of our fMRI-guided rTMS paradigm included the use of sophisticated covariance methods to identify functional networks in imaging data, and the use of fMRI-targeted rTMS concurrent with task performance to modulate plasticity effects over a longer term. Design: Between-groups mixed model. Setting: TMS, MRI, and sleep laboratory study. Participants: 27 subjects (13 receiving Active rTMS, and 14 Sham) completed the sleep deprivation protocol, with another 21 (10 Active, 11 Sham) non-sleep deprived subjects run in a second experiment. Interventions: Our previous covariance analysis had identified a network, including occipital cortex, which demonstrated individual differences in resilience to the deleterious effects of sleep deprivation on WM performance. Five Hz rTMS was applied to left lateral occipital cortex while subjects performed a WM task during 4 sessions over the course of 2 days of total sleep deprivation. Measurements and Results: At the end of the sleep deprivation period, Sham sleep deprived subjects exhibited degraded performance in the WM task. In contrast, those receiving Active rTMS did not show the slowing and lapsing typical in sleep deprivation, and instead performed similarly to non- sleep deprived subjects. Importantly, the Active sleep deprivation group showed rTMS-induced facilitation of WM performance a full 18 hours after the last rTMS session. Conclusions: Over the course of sleep deprivation, these results indicate that rTMS applied concurrently with WM task performance affected neural circuitry involved in WM to prevent its full impact. Citation: Luber B; Steffener J; Tucker A; Habeck C; Peterchev AV; Deng ZD; Basner RC; Stern Y; Lisanby SH. Extended remediation of sleep deprived-induced working memory deficits using f

  10. Neural adaptations to strength training: moving beyond transcranial magnetic stimulation and reflex studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, T J; Selvanayagam, V S; Riek, S; Semmler, J G

    2011-06-01

    It has long been believed that training for increased strength not only affects muscle tissue, but also results in adaptive changes in the central nervous system. However, only in the last 10 years has the use of methods to study the neurophysiological details of putative neural adaptations to training become widespread. There are now many published reports that have used single motor unit recordings, electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves, and non-invasive stimulation of the human brain [i.e. transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)] to study neural responses to strength training. In this review, we aim to summarize what has been learned from single motor unit, reflex and TMS studies, and identify the most promising avenues to advance our conceptual understanding with these methods. We also consider the few strength training studies that have employed alternative neurophysiological techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography. The nature of the information that these techniques can provide, as well as their major technical and conceptual pitfalls, are briefly described. The overall conclusion of the review is that the current evidence regarding neural adaptations to strength training is inconsistent and incomplete. In order to move forward in our understanding, it will be necessary to design studies that are based on a rigorous consideration of the limitations of the available techniques, and that are specifically targeted to address important conceptual questions. © 2011 The Authors. Acta Physiologica © 2011 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  11. Safety of transcranial magnetic stimulation: review of international guidelines and new findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Suponeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is a rapidly developing method of neuromodulation. The use of TMS has increased significantly in both research and clinical practice. This allows not only to better understand this method, but also assess possible risks and consequences for both healthy individuals and patients. In 1998 and 2009 safety, ethical considerations, and application guidelines for the use of TMS in clinical practice and research were published. These recommendations are now the basis for safe application of the method in clinical practice and research. Safety of brain stimulation includes several aspects: the prevention and treatment of adverse effects, the strategy of patient and stimulation protocols selection, as well as safety and monitoring procedures. The most common adverse effects of TMS include headache and neck pain, syncope, transient hearing impairment. The risk of epileptic seizureis extremely low and can be minimized by careful selection of patients and the use of safe stimulation protocols. Careful selection of patients is important, taking into account a large number of factors that influence the risk of adverse effects. These factors are considered in the questionnaires to identify limitations and absolute or relative contraindications to TMS. Another important part of TMS safety is the choice of the stimulation protocol and parameters such as intensity, frequency, duration of one train of stimuli, and the interstimulus interval. Currently, the recommended limits of stimulation parameters are covered in the safety guidelines. It is also necessary to follow the procedure, including the monitoring the patient's condition during TMS and the providing qualified assistance in case of adverse effects.

  12. A stereotactic method for image-guided transcranial magnetic stimulation validated with fMRI and motor-evoked potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neggers, S.F.W.; Langerak, T.R.; Schutter, D.J.L.G.; Mandl, R.C.W.; Ramsey, N.F.; Lemmens, P.J.J.; Postma, A.

    2004-01-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) delivers short magnetic pulses that penetrate the skull unattenuated, disrupting neural processing in a noninvasive, reversible way. To disrupt specific neural processes, coil placement over the proper site is critical. Therefore, a neural navigator (NeNa) was

  13. Subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Vega Encabo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I claim that subjectivity is a way of being that is constituted through a set of practices in which the self is subject to the dangers of fictionalizing and plotting her life and self-image. I examine some ways of becoming subject through narratives and through theatrical performance before others. Through these practices, a real and active subjectivity is revealed, capable of self-knowledge and self-transformation. 

  14. Calcium dependent plasticity applied to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation with a neural field model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M T; Fung, P K; Robinson, P A; Shemmell, J; Reynolds, J N J

    2016-08-01

    The calcium dependent plasticity (CaDP) approach to the modeling of synaptic weight change is applied using a neural field approach to realistic repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) protocols. A spatially-symmetric nonlinear neural field model consisting of populations of excitatory and inhibitory neurons is used. The plasticity between excitatory cell populations is then evaluated using a CaDP approach that incorporates metaplasticity. The direction and size of the plasticity (potentiation or depression) depends on both the amplitude of stimulation and duration of the protocol. The breaks in the inhibitory theta-burst stimulation protocol are crucial to ensuring that the stimulation bursts are potentiating in nature. Tuning the parameters of a spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) window with a Monte Carlo approach to maximize agreement between STDP predictions and the CaDP results reproduces a realistically-shaped window with two regions of depression in agreement with the existing literature. Developing understanding of how TMS interacts with cells at a network level may be important for future investigation.

  15. Effects of exercise and electrical stimulation on lumbar stabilization in asymptomatic subjects: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Sevil; Temucin, Cagrı Mesut; Nurlu, Gulay; Kaya, Derya Ozer; Kose, Nezire; Gunduz, Arzu Guclu

    2013-01-01

    Segmental stabilization training and electrical stimulation are used as a treatment for patients with low back pain. There is limited information on the efficacy of two interventions in the literature. In this study, the efficacy of the two interventions on the multifidus muscle activation and fatigue, segmental stabilization training and electrical stimulation, were examined and compared. Our sample consists of 30 asymptomatic individuals, randomly assigned to one of three groups: the group that was given segmental stabilization training, the group that was given electrical stimulation and the control group that received no treatment. The muscle activity and fatigability of the multifidus were recorded by the surface electromyography before and after the intervention. No difference is detected for any of the multifidus muscle activation and fatigue characteristics either within or between groups. Both techniques did not improve multifidus activation capacity. An effort at submaximal and maximal level affects and increases the activity of multifidus.

  16. Inter-individual variability in optimal current direction for transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Braet, Wouter; McAllister, Craig

    2007-01-01

    , stimulation in the majority of participants was most effective when the first current pulse flowed towards postero-lateral in the brain. However, in four participants, the optimal coil orientation deviated from this pattern. A principal component analysis using all eight orientations suggests that in our......We evaluated inter-individual variability in optimal current direction for biphasic transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex. Motor threshold for first dorsal interosseus was detected visually at eight coil orientations in 45 degrees increments. Each participant (n=13) completed...... two experimental sessions. One participant with low test-retest correlation (Pearson's rdetection of motor threshold was compared to EMG detection; motor thresholds were very similar and highly correlated (0.94-0.99). Similar with previous studies...

  17. A Novel Transcranial Magnetic Stimulator Inducing Near Rectangular Pulses with Controllable Pulse Width (cTMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalinous, Reza; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2013-01-01

    A novel transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) device with controllable pulse width (PW) and near rectangular pulse shape (cTMS) is described. The cTMS device uses an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) with appropriate snubbers to switch coil currents up to 7 kA, enabling PW control from 5 μs to over 100 μs. The near-rectangular induced electric field pulses use 22–34% less energy and generate 67–72% less coil heating compared to matched conventional cosine pulses. CTMS is used to stimulate rhesus monkey motor cortex in vivo with PWs of 20 to 100 μs, demonstrating the expected decrease of threshold pulse amplitude with increasing PW. The technological solutions used in the cTMS prototype can expand functionality, and reduce power consumption and coil heating in TMS, enhancing its research and therapeutic applications. PMID:18232369

  18. The efficiency of simultaneous binaural ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials: a comparative study with monaural acoustic stimulation in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Beom; Ban, Jae Ho

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the test-retest reliability and convenience of simultaneous binaural acoustic-evoked ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMP). Thirteen healthy subjects with no history of ear diseases participated in this study. All subjects underwent oVEMP test with both separated monaural acoustic stimulation and simultaneous binaural acoustic stimulation. For evaluating test-retest reliability, three repetitive sessions were performed in each ear for calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for both monaural and binaural tests. We analyzed data from the biphasic n1-p1 complex, such as latency of peak, inter-peak amplitude, and asymmetric ratio of amplitude in both ears. Finally, we checked the total time required to complete each test for evaluating test convenience. No significant difference was observed in amplitude and asymmetric ratio in comparison between monaural and binaural oVEMP. However, latency was slightly delayed in binaural oVEMP. In test-retest reliability analysis, binaural oVEMP showed excellent ICC values ranging from 0.68 to 0.98 in latency, asymmetric ratio, and inter-peak amplitude. Additionally, the test time was shorter in binaural than monaural oVEMP. oVEMP elicited from binaural acoustic stimulation yields similar satisfactory results as monaural stimulation. Further, excellent test-retest reliability and shorter test time were achieved in binaural than in monaural oVEMP.

  19. Sensor probes and phantoms for advanced transcranial magnetic stimulation system developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qinglei; Patel, Prashil; Trivedi, Sudhir; Du, Xiaoming; Hong, Elliot; Choa, Fow-Sen

    2015-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has become one of the most widely used noninvasive method for brain tissue stimulation and has been used as a treatment tool for various neurological and psychiatric disorders including migraine, stroke, Parkinson's disease, dystonia, tinnitus and depression. In the process of developing advanced TMS deep brain stimulation tools, we need first to develop field measurement devices like sensory probes and brain phantoms, which can be used to calibrate the TMS systems. Currently there are commercially available DC magnetic or electric filed measurement sensors, but there is no instrument to measure transient fields. In our study, we used a commercial figure-8 shaped TMS coil to generate transient magnetic field and followed induced field and current. The coil was driven by power amplified signal from a pulse generator with tunable pulse rate, amplitude, and duration. In order to obtain a 3D plot of induced vector electric field, many types of probes were designed to detect single component of electric-field vectors along x, y and z axis in the space around TMS coil. We found that resistor probes has an optimized signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) near 3k ohm but it signal output is too weak compared with other techniques. We also found that inductor probes can have very high output for Curl E measurement, but it is not the E-field distribution we are interested in. Probes with electrical wire wrapped around iron coil can directly measure induced E-field with high sensitivity, which matched computer simulation results.

  20. Magnetic stimulation of the cavernous nerve for the treatment of erectile dysfunction in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafik, A; el-Sibai, O; Shafik, A A

    2000-06-01

    A recent study in dogs has demonstrated that magnetic stimulation (MS) of the cavernous nerve produced an increase of the intracorporeal pressure and full penile erection. In view of these results, we tested the possible application of this procedure in humans with erectile dysfunction (ED). The study comprised 32 patients with ED (age 38.3 +/- 9.6 y) and 20 healthy volunteers (age 36.8 +/- 8.8 y). Routine erectile function tests suggested that impotence was neurogenic. A magnetic coil was placed over the dorsal aspect of the penis in the vicinity of the symphysis pubis. MS was performed using a stimulation of 40% intensity, 20 Hz frequency, 50 s on and 50 s off for 10 minutes duration. In the healthy volunteers, the coil was placed as aforementioned but was not activated. The intracorporeal pressure was recorded and penile tumescence and rigidity observed during MS in the patients and without stimulation in the controls. MS led to gradual increase in length and diameter of the penis until full erection was achieved; the penis became firm, rigid and pulsatile. The intracorporeal pressure increased significantly (P stimulation, penile erection and intracorporeal pressure returned to baseline after a mean of 22.7 +/- 3.2 s. Penile and pressure response to MS was resumed after an off-time of 50 s. The response was reproducible infinitely if the off-time was observed. The controls showed no penile tumescence or rigidity or increase of the intracorporeal pressure. In conclusion, MS of the cavernous nerve is effective in inducing penile rigidity. It is a simple, easy and non-invasive method which has no adverse effects. It might prove to be suitable for application in patients with ED.

  1. Chaotic dynamics and basin erosion in nanomagnets subject to time-harmonic magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aquino, M., E-mail: daquino@uniparthenope.it [Engineering Department, University of Naples “Parthenope”, 80143 Naples (Italy); Quercia, A.; Serpico, C. [DIETI, University of Naples Federico II, 80125 Naples (Italy); Bertotti, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, 10135 Torino (Italy); Mayergoyz, I.D. [ECE Department and UMIACS, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Perna, S. [DIETI, University of Naples Federico II, 80125 Naples (Italy); Ansalone, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, 10135 Torino (Italy)

    2016-04-01

    Magnetization dynamics in uniformly magnetized particles subject to time-harmonic (AC) external fields is considered. The study is focused on the behavior of the AC-driven dynamics close to saddle equilibria. It happens that such dynamics has chaotic nature at moderately low power level, due to the heteroclinic tangle phenomenon which is produced by the combined effect of AC-excitations and saddle type dynamics. By using analytical theory for the threshold AC excitation amplitudes necessary to create the heteroclinic tangle together with numerical simulations, we quantify and show how the tangle produces the erosion of the safe basin around the stable equilibria.

  2. Vacuum arcing behavior between transverse magnetic field contacts subjected to variable axial magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Hui; Wang, Jianhua; Liu, Zhiyuan, E-mail: liuzy@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Geng, Yingsan; Wang, Zhenxing; Yan, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2016-06-15

    The objective of this work is to reveal the effects of an axial magnetic field (AMF) on the vacuum arc characteristics between transverse magnetic field (TMF) contacts. These vacuum arc characteristics include the vacuum arcing behavior and the arc voltage waveform. In the experiments, an external AMF was applied to a pair of TMF contacts. The external AMF flux density B{sub AMF} can be adjusted from 0 to 110 mT. The arc current in the tests varied over a range from 0 to 20 kA rms at 45 Hz. The contact material was CuCr25 (25% Cr). A high-speed charge-coupled device video camera was used to record the vacuum arc evolution. The experimental results show that the application of the AMF effectively reduces the TMF arc voltage noise component and reduces the formation of liquid metal drops between the contacts. The diffuse arc duration increases linearly with increasing AMF flux density, but it also decreases linearly with increasing arc current under application of the external AMF. The results also indicate that the diffuse arc duration before the current zero is usually more than 1 ms under the condition that the value of the AMF per kiloampere is more than 2.0 mT/kA. Finally, under application of the AMF, the arc column of the TMF contacts may constrict and remain in the center region without transverse rotation. Therefore, the combined TMF–AMF contacts should be designed such that they guarantee that the AMF is not so strong as to oppose transverse rotation of the arc column.

  3. Robust real-time robot-world calibration for robotized transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Lars; Ernst, Floris; Schlaefer, Alexander; Schweikard, Achim

    2011-12-01

    For robotized transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), the magnetic coil is placed on the patient's head by a robot. As the robotized TMS system requires tracking of head movements, robot and tracking camera need to be calibrated. However, for robotized TMS in a clinical setting, such calibration is required frequently. Mounting/unmounting a marker to the end effector and moving the robot into different poses is impractical. Moreover, if either system is moved during treatment, recalibration is required. To overcome this limitation, we propose to directly track a marker at link three of the articulated arm. Using forward kinematics and a constant marker transform to link three, the calibration can be performed instantly. Our experimental results indicate an accuracy similar to standard hand-eye calibration approaches. It also outperforms classical hand-held navigated TMS systems. This robust online calibration greatly enhances the system's user-friendliness and safety. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Patch-clamp recordings of rat neurons from acute brain slices of the somatosensory cortex during magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashut, Tamar; Magidov, Dafna; Ben-Porat, Hana; Wolfus, Shuki; Friedman, Alex; Perel, Eli; Lavidor, Michal; Bar-Gad, Izhar; Yeshurun, Yosef; Korngreen, Alon

    2014-01-01

    Although transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a popular tool for both basic research and clinical applications, its actions on nerve cells are only partially understood. We have previously predicted, using compartmental modeling, that magnetic stimulation of central nervous system neurons depolarized the soma followed by initiation of an action potential in the initial segment of the axon. The simulations also predict that neurons with low current threshold are more susceptible to magnetic stimulation. Here we tested these theoretical predictions by combining in vitro patch-clamp recordings from rat brain slices with magnetic stimulation and compartmental modeling. In agreement with the modeling, our recordings demonstrate the dependence of magnetic stimulation-triggered action potentials on the type and state of the neuron and its orientation within the magnetic field. Our results suggest that the observed effects of TMS are deeply rooted in the biophysical properties of single neurons in the central nervous system and provide a framework both for interpreting existing TMS data and developing new simulation-based tools and therapies.

  5. Patch-clamp recordings of rat neurons from acute brain slices of the somatosensory cortex during magnetic stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar ePashut

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Although transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is a popular tool for both basic research and clinical applications, its actions on nerve cells are only partially understood. We have previously predicted, using compartmental modeling, that magnetic stimulation of central nervous system neurons depolarized the soma followed by initiation of an action potential in the initial segment of the axon. The simulations also predict that neurons with low current threshold are more susceptible to magnetic stimulation. Here we tested these theoretical predictions by combining in vitro patch-clamp recordings from rat brain slices with magnetic stimulation and compartmental modeling. In agreement with the modeling, our recordings demonstrate the dependence of magnetic stimulation-triggered action potentials on the type and state of the neuron and its orientation within the magnetic field. Our results suggest that the observed effects of TMS are deeply rooted in the biophysical properties of single neurons in the central nervous system and provide a framework both for interpreting existing TMS data and developing new simulation-based tools and therapies.

  6. Thyroid peroxidase antibodies, levels of thyroid stimulating hormone and development of hypothyroidism in euthyroid subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, A.; Links, T.P.; de Jong-van den Berg, L.T.; Gans, R.O.; Wolffenbuttel, B.H.; Bakker, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) have been found to be related to the levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and to predict future development of thyroid failure in selected populations. We investigated these relations in a euthyroid general population. Design: Cross-sectional

  7. Food cravings and the effects of left prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation using an improved sham condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly eBarth

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined whether a single session of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS of the left prefrontal cortex would inhibit food cravings in healthy women who endorsed frequent food cravings. Ten participants viewed images of food and completed ratings for food cravings before and after receiving either real or sham rTMS over the left prefrontal cortex (10Hz, 100% rMT, 10 seconds-on, 20 seconds-off for 15 minutes; 3000 pulses. Sham TMS was matched with real TMS with respect to perceived painfulness of the stimulation. Each participant received both real and sham rTMS in random order and were blind to the condition in a within-subject cross-over design. With an improved sham control condition, prefrontal rTMS inhibited food cravings no better than sham rTMS. The mild pain from the real and sham rTMS may distract or inhibit food craving, and the decreased craving may not be caused by the effect of rTMS itself. Further studies are needed to elucidate whether rTMS has any true effects on food craving and whether painful stimuli inhibit food or other cravings. A sham condition which matches the painfulness is important to understand the true effects of TMS on behaviors and diseases.

  8. Modulation of the Left Prefrontal Cortex with High Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Facilitates Gait in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer M. Burhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is a chronic central nervous system (CNS demyelinating disease. Gait abnormalities are common and disabling in patients with MS with limited treatment options available. Emerging evidence suggests a role of prefrontal attention networks in modulating gait. High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is known to enhance cortical excitability in stimulated cortex and its correlates. We investigated the effect of high-frequency left prefrontal rTMS on gait parameters in a 51-year-old Caucasian male with chronic relapsing/remitting MS with residual disabling attention and gait symptoms. Patient received 6 Hz, rTMS at 90% motor threshold using figure of eight coil centered on F3 location (using 10-20 electroencephalography (EEG lead localization system. GAITRite gait analysis system was used to collect objective gait measures before and after one session and in another occasion three consecutive daily sessions of rTMS. Two-tailed within subject repeated measure t-test showed significant enhancement in ambulation time, gait velocity, and cadence after three consecutive daily sessions of rTMS. Modulating left prefrontal cortex excitability using rTMS resulted in significant change in gait parameters after three sessions. To our knowledge, this is the first report that demonstrates the effect of rTMS applied to the prefrontal cortex on gait in MS patients.

  9. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Affects Performance of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task during Provision of Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hyun Ko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Early functional neuroimaging studies of tasks evaluating executive processes, such as the Wisconsin card sorting task (WCST, only assessed trials in blocks that may contain a large amount of different cognitive processes. More recently, we showed using event-related fMRI that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DL-PFC significantly increased activity during feedback but not matching periods of the WCST, consistent with its proposed role in the monitoring of information in working memory. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is a method that allows to disrupt processing within a given cortical region and to affect task performance for which this region is significantly solicited. Here we applied rTMS to test the hypothesis that the DL-PFC stimulation influences monitoring of working memory without interfering with other executive functions. We applied rTMS to the right DL-PFC and the vertex (control site in different time points of the WCST. When rTMS was applied to the DL-PFC specifically during the period when subjects were receiving feedback regarding their previous response, WCST performance deteriorated, while rTMS did not affect performance during matching either when maintaining set or during set-shifting. This selective impairment of the DL-PFC is consistent with its proposed role in monitoring of events in working memory.

  10. Impairment of preoperative language mapping by lesion location: a functional magnetic resonance imaging, navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation, and direct cortical stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ille, Sebastian; Sollmann, Nico; Hauck, Theresa; Maurer, Stefanie; Tanigawa, Noriko; Obermueller, Thomas; Negwer, Chiara; Droese, Doris; Boeckh-Behrens, Tobias; Meyer, Bernhard; Ringel, Florian; Krieg, Sandro M

    2015-08-01

    Language mapping by repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is increasingly used and has already replaced functional MRI (fMRI) in some institutions for preoperative mapping of neurosurgical patients. Yet some factors affect the concordance of both methods with direct cortical stimulation (DCS), most likely by lesions affecting cortical oxygenation levels. Therefore, the impairment of the accuracy of rTMS and fMRI was analyzed and compared with DCS during awake surgery in patients with intraparenchymal lesions. Language mapping was performed by DCS, rTMS, and fMRI using an object-naming task in 27 patients with left-sided perisylvian lesions, and the induced language errors of each method were assigned to the cortical parcellation system. Subsequently, the receiver operating characteristics were calculated for rTMS and fMRI and compared with DCS as ground truth for regions with (w/) and without (w/o) the lesion in the mapped regions. The w/ subgroup revealed a sensitivity of 100% (w/o 100%), a specificity of 8% (w/o 5%), a positive predictive value of 34% (w/o: 53%), and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 100% (w/o: 100%) for the comparison of rTMS versus DCS. Findings for the comparison of fMRI versus DCS within the w/ subgroup revealed a sensitivity of 32% (w/o: 62%), a specificity of 88% (w/o: 60%), a positive predictive value of 56% (w/o: 62%), and a NPV of 73% (w/o: 60%). Although strengths and weaknesses exist for both rTMS and fMRI, the results show that rTMS is less affected by a brain lesion than fMRI, especially when performing mapping of language-negative cortical regions based on sensitivity and NPV.

  11. Noninvasive brain stimulation with transcranial magnetic or direct current stimulation (TMS/tDCS)-From insights into human memory to therapy of its dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparing, Roland; Mottaghy, Felix M

    2008-04-01

    Noninvasive stimulation of the brain by means of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has driven important discoveries in the field of human memory functions. Stand-alone or in combination with other brain mapping techniques noninvasive brain stimulation can assess issues such as location and timing of brain activity, connectivity and plasticity of neural circuits and functional relevance of a circumscribed brain area to a given cognitive task. In this emerging field, major advances in technology have been made in a relatively short period. New stimulation protocols and, especially, the progress in the application of tDCS have made it possible to obtain longer and much clearer inhibitory or facilitatory effects even after the stimulation has ceased. In this introductory review, we outline the basic principles, discuss technical limitations and describe how noninvasive brain stimulation can be used to study human memory functions in vivo. Though improvement of cognitive functions through noninvasive brain stimulation is promising, it still remains an exciting challenge to extend the use of TMS and tDCS from research tools in neuroscience to the treatment of neurological and psychiatric patients.

  12. Normative Values for Intertrial Variability of Motor Responses to Nerve Root and Transcranial Stimulation: A Condition for Follow-Up Studies in Individual Subjects.

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    Walter Troni

    Full Text Available Intertrial variability (ITV of motor responses to peripheral (CMAP and transcranial (MEP stimulation prevents their use in follow-up studies. Our purpose was to develop strategies to reduce and measure CMAP and MEP ITV to guide long-term monitoring of conduction slowing and conduction failure of peripheral and central motor pathway in the individual patient.Maximal compound muscle action potentials to High Voltage Electrical Stimulation (HVES of lumbo-sacral nerve roots (r-CMAP and activated, averaged motor evoked potentials (MEPs to Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS using double cone coil were recorded from 10 proximal and distal muscle districts of lower limbs. The procedure was repeated twice, 1-2 days apart, in 30 subjects, including healthy volunteers and clinically stable multiple sclerosis patients, using constant stimulating and recording sites and adopting a standardized procedure of voluntary activation. ITV for latency and area indexes and for the ratio between MEP and r-CMAP areas (a-Ratio was expressed as Relative Intertrial Variation (RIV, 5th-95th percentile. As an inverse correlation between the size of area and ITV was found, raw ITV values were normalized as a function of area to make them comparable with one another.All RIV values for latencies were significantly below the optimum threshold of ± 10%, with the exception of r-CMAP latencies recorded from Vastus Lateralis muscle. RIVs for a-Ratio, the most important index of central conduction failure, ranged from a maximum of -25.3% to +32.2% (Vastus Medialis to a minimum of -15.0% to + 17.4% (Flexor Hallucis Brevis.The described procedure represents an effort to lower as much as possible variability of motor responses in serial recording; the reported ITV normative values are the necessary premise to detect significant changes of motor conduction slowing and failure in the individual patient in follow-up studies.

  13. Normative Values for Intertrial Variability of Motor Responses to Nerve Root and Transcranial Stimulation: A Condition for Follow-Up Studies in Individual Subjects

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    Malucchi, Simona; Capobianco, Marco; Sperli, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Objective Intertrial variability (ITV) of motor responses to peripheral (CMAP) and transcranial (MEP) stimulation prevents their use in follow-up studies. Our purpose was to develop strategies to reduce and measure CMAP and MEP ITV to guide long-term monitoring of conduction slowing and conduction failure of peripheral and central motor pathway in the individual patient. Methods Maximal compound muscle action potentials to High Voltage Electrical Stimulation (HVES) of lumbo-sacral nerve roots (r-CMAP) and activated, averaged motor evoked potentials (MEPs) to Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) using double cone coil were recorded from 10 proximal and distal muscle districts of lower limbs. The procedure was repeated twice, 1–2 days apart, in 30 subjects, including healthy volunteers and clinically stable multiple sclerosis patients, using constant stimulating and recording sites and adopting a standardized procedure of voluntary activation. ITV for latency and area indexes and for the ratio between MEP and r-CMAP areas (a-Ratio) was expressed as Relative Intertrial Variation (RIV, 5th-95th percentile). As an inverse correlation between the size of area and ITV was found, raw ITV values were normalized as a function of area to make them comparable with one another. Results All RIV values for latencies were significantly below the optimum threshold of ± 10%, with the exception of r-CMAP latencies recorded from Vastus Lateralis muscle. RIVs for a-Ratio, the most important index of central conduction failure, ranged from a maximum of -25.3% to +32.2% (Vastus Medialis) to a minimum of -15.0% to + 17.4% (Flexor Hallucis Brevis). Conclusions The described procedure represents an effort to lower as much as possible variability of motor responses in serial recording; the reported ITV normative values are the necessary premise to detect significant changes of motor conduction slowing and failure in the individual patient in follow-up studies. PMID:27182973

  14. Multicenter study of subjective acceptance during magnetic resonance imaging at 7 and 9.4 T.

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    Rauschenberg, Jaane; Nagel, Armin M; Ladd, Susanne C; Theysohn, Jens M; Ladd, Mark E; Möller, Harald E; Trampel, Robert; Turner, Robert; Pohmann, Rolf; Scheffler, Klaus; Brechmann, André; Stadler, Jörg; Felder, Jörg; Shah, N Jon; Semmler, Wolfhard

    2014-05-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the subjective discomfort and sensory side effects during ultrahigh field (UHF) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations in a large-scale study and to evaluate differences between magnetic resonance (MR) sites. Four MR sites with a 7-T MR system and 2 MR sites with a 9.4-T MR system participated in this multicenter study with a total number of 3457 completed questionnaires on causes of discomfort and sensations during the examination. For a pooled retrospective analysis of the results from the partially different questionnaires, all data were adapted to an answer option with a 4-point scale (0 = no discomfort/side effect, 3 = very unpleasant/very strong sensation). To differentiate effects evoked by the low-frequency time-varying magnetic fields due to movement through the static magnetic field, most questionnaires separated the manifestation of sensory side effects during movement on the patient table from manifestation while lying still in the isocenter. In general, a high acceptance of UHF examinations was found, where in 82% of the completed questionnaires, the subjects stated the examination to be at least tolerable. Although in 7.6% of the questionnaires, subjects felt discomfort during the examination, only 0.9% of the image acquisitions had to be terminated prematurely. No adverse events occurred in any of the examinations. Only 1% of the subjects were unwilling to undergo further UHF MRI examinations. Examination duration was the most complained cause of discomfort, followed by acoustic noise and lying still. All magnetic-field-related sensations were more pronounced when moving the patient table versus the isocenter position (19%/2% of the subjects felt unpleasant vertigo during the moving/stationary state). In general, vertigo was the most often stated sensory side effect and was more pronounced at 9.4 T compared with 7 T. However, the results varied substantially among the different sites. The high levels

  15. Motor Cortex Reorganization and Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Pain-A Methodological Study.

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    Nurmikko, Turo; MacIver, Kathryn; Bresnahan, Rebecca; Hird, Emily; Nelson, Andrew; Sacco, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Somatotopic reorganization of primary motor cortex (M1) has been described in several neurological conditions associated with chronic pain. We hypothesized that such reorganization impacts on the mechanisms of M1 stimulation induced analgesia and may either compromise the treatment effect of or provide an alternative target site for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). The aim of the study was to compare pain relief following rTMS of the standard motor "hotspot" with that of the reorganized area. We used TMS motor mapping in 30 patients to establish the location of the standard motor "hotspot" (site A) and an alternative site located in the reorganized area (site B), both within M1. Where TMS mapping was not possible (N = 8) we determined the location of the two sites using task-related fMRI. We compared the analgesic effect on neuropathic pain of 5 sessions of navigated rTMS applied over (i) site A, (ii) site B, and (iii) occipital fissure (SHAM stimulation site). Total Pain Relief (TOTPAR) was determined as the difference in average weekly pain scores between baseline and following each rTMS cycle, over three weeks. Data from 27 patients was analyzed. rTMS of sites A and B resulted in greater TOTPAR than that of SHAM. No difference was seen between sites A and B. Responders (≥15% pain relief) were seen in both groups, with partial overlap only. Addition of stimulation over site B improved the responder rate by 58% compared with site A. In an open-label extension study of five sessions of rTMS aimed at the optimized target site, 8/11 responders and 1/12 nonresponders reported pain relief. Cortical reorganization may provide a more effective stimulation target for rTMS in some individuals with neuropathic pain. © 2016 International Neuromodulation Society.

  16. Effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation on P300 of event-related potential.

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    Iwahashi, M; Katayama, Y; Ueno, S; Iramina, K

    2009-01-01

    When the odd stimulation is presented, the positive component of electroencephalograph is induced at around 300 ms after the odd stimulation. This positive component is called P300. Many studies suggest that P300 may result from the summation of activity from multiple generators located in widespread cortical and subcortical areas. However, there is still no conclusive indication of the sources of P300. In this paper, we focus on the left supramaginal gyrus as one of the sources of P300. We investigated the temporal aspect of this area using TMS (transcranial magnetic stimulation). We investigated the relationship between the latency of the P300 and an effect of TMS when the left supramarginal gyrus was stimulated by TMS. In our previous study, we reported a method of removing stimulus artifact during TMS with Sample-and-Hold circuit and electroencephalogram (EEG) activity evoked by TMS could be measured successfully. In addition to this method, independent component analysis (ICA) was also applied to recorded EEG data in order to remove the stimulus artifact by off-line analysis. By using these methods, short latency (P300 was delayed around 50 ms. Difference of the peak latency between the control measurement and the case of TMS applying at 150 ms was not significant. However, the differences of the peak latency of the control measurement and the peak latency of the measurement in the cases of TMS applying at 200 ms and 250 ms was significant (p<0.05). We considered that this delay was due to inhibiting to recognize the target stimulation.

  17. Extended remediation of sleep deprived-induced working memory deficits using fMRI-guided transcranial magnetic stimulation.

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    Luber, Bruce; Steffener, Jason; Tucker, Adrienne; Habeck, Christian; Peterchev, Angel V; Deng, Zhi-De; Basner, Robert C; Stern, Yaakov; Lisanby, Sarah H

    2013-06-01

    We attempted to prevent the development of working memory (WM) impairments caused by sleep deprivation using fMRI-guided repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Novel aspects of our fMRI-guided rTMS paradigm included the use of sophisticated covariance methods to identify functional networks in imaging data, and the use of fMRI-targeted rTMS concurrent with task performance to modulate plasticity effects over a longer term. Between-groups mixed model. TMS, MRI, and sleep laboratory study. 27 subjects (13 receiving Active rTMS, and 14 Sham) completed the sleep deprivation protocol, with another 21 (10 Active, 11 Sham) non-sleep deprived subjects run in a second experiment. Our previous covariance analysis had identified a network, including occipital cortex, which demonstrated individual differences in resilience to the deleterious effects of sleep deprivation on WM performance. Five Hz rTMS was applied to left lateral occipital cortex while subjects performed a WM task during 4 sessions over the course of 2 days of total sleep deprivation. At the end of the sleep deprivation period, Sham sleep deprived subjects exhibited degraded performance in the WM task. In contrast, those receiving Active rTMS did not show the slowing and lapsing typical in sleep deprivation, and instead performed similarly to non- sleep deprived subjects. Importantly, the Active sleep deprivation group showed rTMS-induced facilitation of WM performance a full 18 hours after the last rTMS session. Over the course of sleep deprivation, these results indicate that rTMS applied concurrently with WM task performance affected neural circuitry involved in WM to prevent its full impact.

  18. Measurements of potential differences in human subjects induced by motion in a superconducting magnetic field.

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    Frinak, S; Knight, R A; Liboff, A R

    1992-01-01

    We have attempted to measure the electromotive forces (emfs) induced in human beings moving at a constant speed in a highly dense magnetic field. Experiments were initially conducted on a set of models, and then directly on human subjects. The models consisted of single circular loops of Tygon tubing (I.D., 0.635 cm; O.D., 0.9525 cm) filled with normal saline solution, with circumferences of 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 cm. The models were connected to an amplifier via silver/silver-chloride electrodes. Each saline loop was mounted on a movable platform, with the plane of the loop perpendicular to the platform's axis; the platform was enabled to move at known constant speeds into and out of the bore of a 1.89-T magnet. The human subjects were then substituted for the saline loops, with the long axis parallel to the direction of motion, and with standard EKG electrodes placed at 180 degrees successively on the ankle, calf, lower thigh, upper thigh, chest, and head. In all cases, for human subjects and models, the peak induced voltage was directly proportional to the speed of movement and the square of the circumference of the bounded cross-sectional areas. Thus, for the saline loops, the correlation coefficient between induced voltage and circumference was .998, and for human subjects, .947. Under the loose assumption that for equal circumferences the bounded areas in human subjects were equal to those in the circular loops, the induced emfs in human subjects were consistently about 13% greater than those in the loops. At a mean speed of 1.18 m/s, the chest had a peak induced voltage of 260 mV, while the voltage at the ankle had a peak of 19.8 mV. The experimental data were used to estimate the corresponding induced-current density at the pericardium, 17 mA/m2. We conclude for a human subject moving at constant speed along the body's long axis into a magnetic field that Faraday's law is closely followed for various cross-sections of the body. Further, in those cases in

  19. Spontaneously Fluctuating Motor Cortex Excitability in Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood: A Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study.

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    Stern, William M; Desikan, Mahalekshmi; Hoad, Damon; Jaffer, Fatima; Strigaro, Gionata; Sander, Josemir W; Rothwell, John C; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2016-01-01

    Alternating hemiplegia of childhood is a very rare and serious neurodevelopmental syndrome; its genetic basis has recently been established. Its characteristic features include typically-unprovoked episodes of hemiplegia and other transient or more persistent neurological abnormalities. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation to assess the effect of the condition on motor cortex neurophysiology both during and between attacks of hemiplegia. Nine people with alternating hemiplegia of childhood were recruited; eight were successfully tested using transcranial magnetic stimulation to study motor cortex excitability, using single and paired pulse paradigms. For comparison, data from ten people with epilepsy but not alternating hemiplegia, and ten healthy controls, were used. One person with alternating hemiplegia tested during the onset of a hemiplegic attack showed progressively diminishing motor cortex excitability until no response could be evoked; a second person tested during a prolonged bilateral hemiplegic attack showed unusually low excitability. Three people tested between attacks showed asymptomatic variation in cortical excitability, not seen in controls. Paired pulse paradigms, which probe intracortical inhibitory and excitatory circuits, gave results similar to controls. We report symptomatic and asymptomatic fluctuations in motor cortex excitability in people with alternating hemiplegia of childhood, not seen in controls. We propose that such fluctuations underlie hemiplegic attacks, and speculate that the asymptomatic fluctuation we detected may be useful as a biomarker for disease activity.

  20. Emotion regulation before and after transcranial magnetic stimulation in obsessive compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, S J; van der Werf, Y D; Mataix-Cols, D; Trujillo, J P; van Oppen, P; Veltman, D J; van den Heuvel, O A

    2015-10-01

    Impaired emotion regulation may underlie exaggerated emotional reactivity in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), yet instructed emotion regulation has never been studied in the disorder. This study aimed to assess the neural correlates of emotion processing and regulation in 43 medication-free OCD patients and 38 matched healthy controls, and additionally test if these can be modulated by stimulatory (patients) and inhibitory (controls) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC). Participants performed an emotion regulation task during functional magnetic resonance imaging before and after a single session of randomly assigned real or sham rTMS. Effect of group and rTMS were assessed on self-reported distress ratings and brain activity in frontal-limbic regions of interest. Patients had higher distress ratings than controls during emotion provocation, but similar rates of distress reduction after voluntary emotion regulation. OCD patients compared with controls showed altered amygdala responsiveness during symptom provocation and diminished left dlPFC activity and frontal-amygdala connectivity during emotion regulation. Real v. sham dlPFC stimulation differentially modulated frontal-amygdala connectivity during emotion regulation in OCD patients. We propose that the increased emotional reactivity in OCD may be due to a deficit in emotion regulation caused by a failure of cognitive control exerted by the dorsal frontal cortex. Modulatory rTMS over the left dlPFC may influence automatic emotion regulation capabilities by influencing frontal-limbic connectivity.

  1. Spontaneously Fluctuating Motor Cortex Excitability in Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood: A Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, William M.; Desikan, Mahalekshmi; Hoad, Damon; Jaffer, Fatima; Strigaro, Gionata; Sander, Josemir W.; Rothwell, John C.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Alternating hemiplegia of childhood is a very rare and serious neurodevelopmental syndrome; its genetic basis has recently been established. Its characteristic features include typically-unprovoked episodes of hemiplegia and other transient or more persistent neurological abnormalities. Methods We used transcranial magnetic stimulation to assess the effect of the condition on motor cortex neurophysiology both during and between attacks of hemiplegia. Nine people with alternating hemiplegia of childhood were recruited; eight were successfully tested using transcranial magnetic stimulation to study motor cortex excitability, using single and paired pulse paradigms. For comparison, data from ten people with epilepsy but not alternating hemiplegia, and ten healthy controls, were used. Results One person with alternating hemiplegia tested during the onset of a hemiplegic attack showed progressively diminishing motor cortex excitability until no response could be evoked; a second person tested during a prolonged bilateral hemiplegic attack showed unusually low excitability. Three people tested between attacks showed asymptomatic variation in cortical excitability, not seen in controls. Paired pulse paradigms, which probe intracortical inhibitory and excitatory circuits, gave results similar to controls. Conclusions We report symptomatic and asymptomatic fluctuations in motor cortex excitability in people with alternating hemiplegia of childhood, not seen in controls. We propose that such fluctuations underlie hemiplegic attacks, and speculate that the asymptomatic fluctuation we detected may be useful as a biomarker for disease activity. PMID:26999520

  2. Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation in preoperative planning for the treatment of motor area cavernous angiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paiva WS

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Wellingson Silva Paiva,1 Erich Talamoni Fonoff,1 Marco Antonio Marcolin,2 Edson Bor-Seng-Shu,1 Eberval Gadelha Figueiredo,1 Manoel Jacobsen Teixeira11Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil; 2Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Laboratory, Institute of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Since the introduction of microscopic techniques, radical surgery for cavernous angiomas has become a recommended treatment option. However, the treatment of motor area cavernous angioma represents a great challenge for the surgical team. Here, we describe an approach guided by frameless neuronavigation and preoperative functional mapping with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, for surgical planning. We used TMS to map the motor cortex and its relationship with the angioma. We achieved complete resection of the lesions in the surgeries, while avoiding areas of motor response identified during the preoperative mapping. We verified the complete control of seizures (Engel class 1A in the patients with previous refractory epilepsy. Postsurgery, one patient was seizure-free without medication, and two patients required only one medication for seizure control. Thus, navigated TMS appears to be a useful tool, in preoperative planning for cavernous angiomas of the motor area.Keywords: neurosurgical procedures, brain mapping, neuronavigation

  3. Spontaneously Fluctuating Motor Cortex Excitability in Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood: A Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William M Stern

    Full Text Available Alternating hemiplegia of childhood is a very rare and serious neurodevelopmental syndrome; its genetic basis has recently been established. Its characteristic features include typically-unprovoked episodes of hemiplegia and other transient or more persistent neurological abnormalities.We used transcranial magnetic stimulation to assess the effect of the condition on motor cortex neurophysiology both during and between attacks of hemiplegia. Nine people with alternating hemiplegia of childhood were recruited; eight were successfully tested using transcranial magnetic stimulation to study motor cortex excitability, using single and paired pulse paradigms. For comparison, data from ten people with epilepsy but not alternating hemiplegia, and ten healthy controls, were used.One person with alternating hemiplegia tested during the onset of a hemiplegic attack showed progressively diminishing motor cortex excitability until no response could be evoked; a second person tested during a prolonged bilateral hemiplegic attack showed unusually low excitability. Three people tested between attacks showed asymptomatic variation in cortical excitability, not seen in controls. Paired pulse paradigms, which probe intracortical inhibitory and excitatory circuits, gave results similar to controls.We report symptomatic and asymptomatic fluctuations in motor cortex excitability in people with alternating hemiplegia of childhood, not seen in controls. We propose that such fluctuations underlie hemiplegic attacks, and speculate that the asymptomatic fluctuation we detected may be useful as a biomarker for disease activity.

  4. Neural correlates of transmeatal cochlear laser (TCL) stimulation in healthy human subjects.

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    Siedentopf, Christian M; Ischebeck, Anja; Haala, Ilka A; Mottaghy, Felix M; Schikora, Detlef; Verius, Michael; Koppelstaetter, Florian; Buchberger, Waltraud; Schlager, Andreas; Felber, Stephan R; Golaszewski, Stefan M

    2007-01-16

    Transmeatal cochlear laser (TCL) treatment has recently been proposed as a therapeutic procedure for cochlear dysfunction such as chronic cochlear tinnitus or sensorineural hearing loss. The aim of this study was to investigate whether TLC has any influence on the central nervous system using functional MRI with healthy young adults. The laser stimulation device was placed on the tympanic membrane of both ears. A laser stimulation run and a placebo run were performed in random order. The participants were unable to differentiate between verum and placebo stimulation. In the comparison of verum to placebo runs, we observed significant activations within the left superior frontal gyrus, the right middle and medial frontal gyrus, the right superior parietal lobule, the left superior occipital gyrus, the precuneus and cuneus bilaterally, the right anterior and the left and right middle and posterior cingulate gyrus and the left thalamus. This network of brain areas corresponds well to results from previous PET studies of patients with tinnitus. Though TCL seems to have a clinically measurable effect on the central nervous system the neurophysiological mechanism leading to the observed activated neuronal network remains unknown.

  5. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over dorsolateral prefrontal cortex modulates value-based learning during sequential decision-making.

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    Wittkuhn, Lennart; Eppinger, Ben; Bartsch, Lea M; Thurm, Franka; Korb, Franziska M; Li, Shu-Chen

    2017-12-02

    Adaptive behavior in daily life often requires the ability to acquire and represent sequential contingencies between actions and the associated outcomes. Although accumulating evidence implicates the role of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) in complex value-based learning and decision-making, direct evidence for involvements of this region in integrating information across sequential decision states is still scarce. Using a 3-stage deterministic Markov decision task, here we applied offline, inhibitory low-frequency 1-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the left dlPFC in young male adults (n = 31, mean age = 23.8 years, SD = 2.5 years) in a within-subject cross-over design to study the roles of this region in influencing value-based sequential decision-making. In two separate sessions, each participant received 1-Hz rTMS stimulation either over the left dlPFC or over the vertex. The results showed that transiently inhibiting the left dlPFC impaired choice accuracy, particularly in situations in which the acquisition of sequential transitions between decision states and temporally lagged action-outcome contingencies played a greater role. Estimating parameters of a diffusion model from behavioral choices, we found that the diffusion drift rate, which reflects the efficiency of information integration, was attenuated by the stimulation. Moreover, the effects of rTMS interacted with session: individuals who could not efficiently integrate information across sequential states in the first session due to disrupted dlPFC function also could not catch up in performance during the second session with those individuals who could learn sequential transitions with intact dlPFC function in the first session. Taken together, our findings suggest that the left dlPFC is crucially involved in the acquisition of complex sequential relations and in the potential of such learning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Gain of electromagnetic radiation traveling in a semiconductor subjected to magnetic and ultrasonic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksanyan, A.G.; Boyakhchyan, G.P.; Mirzabekyan, E.G.

    1979-08-01

    A calculation is made of the gain experienced by an electromagnetic wave in a semiconductor subjected to magnetic field and ultrasonic fields. It is shown that the gain can be 1--500 for a wide range of the parameters. Analytic expressions are obtained for the frequency depencence of the real part of the high-frequency conductivity when the pump power, ultrasonic wavelength, and temperature of the semiconductor are varied.

  7. Objective QbTest and subjective evaluation of stimulant treatment in adult attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijlenga, D; Jasperse, M; Gehlhaar, S K; Sandra Kooij, J J

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the QbTest as an objective measure versus self-reported ADHD Rating Scale (ADHD-RS) before and during stimulant treatment in adults with ADHD. We used the subjective ADHD Rating Scale (ADHD-RS), and the objective computerized QbTest, which is a 20-minute unconditional identical pairs test that measures attention, impulsivity, and also hyperactivity using a motion-tracking system. Patients were assessed before (baseline) and during medical treatment with stimulants (follow-up) in an observational study design. Data of n=145 patients at baseline and n=82 patients at follow-up were analyzed. There were significant symptom reductions on all symptom domains, but correlations between the tests were weak. Improvement on the QbTest was independent of the patient's age, gender, educational level, ADHD subtype, co-morbid disorders, and use of other medications. Patients with worst QbTest results at baseline showed most improvement at follow-up. The QbTest was more sensitive to medication effects than the ADHD-RS. QbTest objectified clinical significant medication effect in 54% of patients who subjectively did not report any clinical effects. Symptoms dimensions of objective and subjective tests refer to different psychological constructs. The QbTest is a valuable addition to existing subjective measures to assess medication effects in ADHD patients who have difficulties reporting treatment effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Myelination process in preterm subjects with periventricular leucomalacia assessed by magnetization transfer ratio

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    Xydis, Vassilios; Astrakas, Loukas; Gassias, Dimitrios; Argyropoulou, Maria [University of Ioannina, Department of Radiology, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece); Drougia, Aikaterini; Andronikou, Styliani [University of Ioannina, Neonatology Clinic, Child Health Department, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece)

    2006-09-15

    Magnetization transfer imaging assesses the myelination status of the brain. To study the progress of myelination in children with periventricular leucomalacia (PVL) by measuring the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and to compare the MTR values with normal values. Brain MTR in 28 PVL subjects (16 males, 12 females, gestational age 30.7{+-}2.5 weeks, corrected age 3.1{+-}2.9 years) was measured using a 3D gradient echo sequence (TR/TE 32/8 ms, flip angle 60 , 4 mm/2 mm overlapping sections) without and with magnetization transfer prepulse and compared with normal values for preterm subjects. MTR of white-matter structures followed a monoexponential function model (y=A-B*exp(-x/C)) while the thalamus and caudate nucleus had a poor goodness of fit. MTR of the splenium of the corpus callosum reached a final value lower than normal (0.67 versus 0.70) at a younger age [t(99%) at 10.32 versus 18.90 months; P<0.05]. MTR of the normal-appearing occipital white matter and of the genu of the corpus callosum reached a normal final MTR but at a younger age than normal preterm infants [t(99%) at 8.51 versus 14.50 months and 12.51 versus 20.85 months, respectively]. In PVL subjects, myelination of the splenium is characterized by early arrest and deficient maturation. Accelerated myelination in unaffected white matter might suggest a compensatory process of reorganization. (orig.)

  9. Effect of sacral magnetic stimulation on the anorectal manometric activity: a new modality for examining sacro-rectoanal interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Masayuki; Okuyama, Naoki; Hirayama, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Kumiko; Satoh, Kanako

    2007-08-01

    We examined the interaction between the sacral neural system and the anorectal activity using a technique comprising repetitive magnetic stimulation. Thirteen control children without any bowel dysmotility (age range; 3 month old to 15 year old), 20 patients with chronic constipation (1 month old to 14 year old), and nine pre-operative patients with Hirschsprung's disease (1 month old to 6 year old) were examined. Magnetic stimulation was applied at the S3 level using the MagPro (Medtronic) device while simultaneously performing manometric recordings of the anorectal activity. In the 13 controls and the 20 patients with chronic constipation, the rectoanal reflex was demonstrated by balloon rectal dilatation. The sphincter response to magnetic stimulation was biphasic in the controls, consisting of an initial rise followed by a decrease in the sphincter pressure, while it varied among the patients with chronic constipation including a biphasic response in 16 patients, no response in three patients, and only a transient rise in pressure in one patient. In nine pre-operative patients with Hirschsprung's disease, no rectoanal reflex was observed, however, the sphincter pressure increased due to magnetic stimulation in six patients, while three patients exhibited no recordable responses. These results suggest that the repetitive magnetic stimulation technique is a valuable modality for investigating the neural interaction between the sacral nervous system and the anorectum.

  10. Excitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to left dorsal premotor cortex enhances motor consolidation of new skills

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    Boyd Lara A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following practice of skilled movements, changes continue to take place in the brain that both strengthen and modify memory for motor learning. These changes represent motor memory consolidation a process whereby new memories are transformed from a fragile to a more permanent, robust and stable state. In the present study, the neural correlates of motor memory consolidation were probed using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS to the dorsal premotor cortex (PMd. Participants engaged in four days of continuous tracking practice that immediately followed either excitatory 5 HZ, inhibitory 1 HZ or control, sham rTMS. A delayed retention test assessed motor learning of repeated and random sequences of continuous movement; no rTMS was applied at retention. Results We discovered that 5 HZ excitatory rTMS to PMd stimulated motor memory consolidation as evidenced by off-line learning, whereas only memory stabilization was noted following 1 Hz inhibitory or sham stimulation. Conclusion Our data support the hypothesis that PMd is important for continuous motor learning, specifically via off-line consolidation of learned motor behaviors.

  11. NMDA Receptor-Dependent Metaplasticity by High-Frequency Magnetic Stimulation

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    Tursonjan Tokay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency magnetic stimulation (HFMS can elicit N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP at Schaffer collateral-CA1 pyramidal cell synapses. Here, we investigated the priming effect of HFMS on the subsequent magnitude of electrically induced LTP in the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices using field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP recordings. In control slices, electrical high-frequency conditioning stimulation (CS could reliably induce LTP. In contrast, the same CS protocol resulted in long-term depression when HFMS was delivered to the slice 30 min prior to the electrical stimulation. HFMS-priming was diminished when applied in the presence of the metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonists (RS-α-methylserine-O-phosphate (MSOP and (RS-α-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG. Moreover, when HFMS was delivered in the presence of the NMDA receptor-antagonist D-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (50 µM, CS-induced electrical LTP was again as high as under control conditions in slices without priming. These results demonstrate that HFMS significantly reduced the propensity of subsequent electrical LTP and show that both metabotropic glutamate and NMDA receptor activation were involved in this form of HFMS-induced metaplasticity.

  12. Reorganization of Motor Representations in Patients with Brain Lesions: A Navigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulubas, Lucia; Sollmann, Nico; Tanigawa, Noriko; Zimmer, Claus; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2018-03-01

    This is an explorative study applying presurgical navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) to investigate the spatial distributions of motor sites to reveal tumor-induced brain plasticity in patients with brain tumors. We analyzed nTMS-based motor maps derived from presurgical mapping of 100 patients with motor eloquently located brain tumors (tumors in the frontal lobe, the precentral gyrus [PrG], the postcentral gyrus [PoG], the remaining parietal lobe, or the temporal lobe). Based on these motor maps, we systematically investigated changes in motor evoked potential (MEP) counts among 4 gyri (PrG, PoG, medial frontal gyrus, and superior frontal gyrus) between subgroups of patients according to the tumor location in order to depict the tumor's influence on reorganization. When comparing patients with different tumor locations, high MEP counts were elicited less frequently by stimulating the PrG in patients with tumors directly affecting the PrG (p motor representations within the primary motor cortex. In contrast, patients with PoG and parietal tumors primarily showed high MEP counts when stimulating the PoG (p motor function from the PrG to adjacent regions but rather leads to a reorganization within anatomical constraints, such as of the PoG. Thus, presurgical nTMS-based motor mapping sensitively depicted the tumor-induced plasticity of the motor cortex.

  13. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) coupled with electroencephalography (EEG): Biomarker of the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimiskidis, V K

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, a number of novel brain-stimulation techniques have been developed (such as TMS-EEG, TMS-fMRI and TMS-NIRS), yet they remain underutilized in the field of epilepsy. Accumulating evidence suggests that transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) combined with electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) is a highly relevant technique for exploration of the pathophysiology of human epilepsies as well as a promising biomarker with diagnostic and prognostic potential. In genetic generalized epilepsies, TMS-EEG has provided pathophysiological insight by revealing quasi-stable, covert states of excitability, a subclass of which is associated with the generation of TMS-induced epileptiform discharges (EDs). In focal epilepsy, TMS-induced EDs were successfully employed to identify the epileptogenic zone. In addition, TMS trains applied during focal EDs can terminate them, and appear to restore the effective connectivity of the brain network significantly altered by EDs. This abortive effect of TMS on EDs may possibly serve as a biomarker of response to invasive neuromodulatory techniques. TMS-EEG-based stimulation paradigms can provide insight into the mechanisms underlying human epilepsies and, thus, warrant further study as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. [Evaluation of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation effectiveness in treatment of psychiatric and neurologic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastuszak, Żanna; Stępień, Anna; Piusińska-Macoch, Renata; Brodacki, Bogdan; Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz

    2016-06-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a treatment option with proved effectiveness especially in drug resist depression. It is used in functional brain mapping before neurosurgery operations and diagnostic of corticospinal tract transmission. Many studies are performed to evaluate rTMS using in treatment of obsessive - compulsive disorder, schizophrenia, autism, strokes, tinnitus, Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, cranial traumas. Moreover rTMS was used in treatment of multiple sclerosis, migraine, dystonia. Electromagnetical field generated by rTMS penetrate skin of the scalp and infiltrate brain tissues to a depth of 2 cm, cause neurons depolarization and generating motor, cognitive and affective effects. Depending on the stimulation frequency rTMS can stimuli or inhibit brain cortex. rTMS mechanism of action remains elusive. Probably it is connected with enhancement of neurotransmitters, modulation of signals transductions pathways in Central Nervous System, gene transcription and release of neuroprotective substances. Studies with use of animals revealed that rTMS stimulation can generate brain changes similar to those seen after electric shock therapy without provoking seizures. The aim of presenting study was to analyze actual researches evaluating rTMS use in treatment of psychiatric and neurological diseases. © 2016 MEDPRESS.

  15. Is there potential for repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) as a treatment of OCD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Rashid; Robbins, Trevor W

    2017-09-01

    Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a common and highly debilitating psychiatric disorder. Amongst OCD sufferers are a significant number (40-60%) of so-called non-responders who do not fully respond to commonly available treatments, which include medications (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors-SSRIs) and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). Modern 'neuromodulatory' techniques such as Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS), repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) potentially offer alternative forms of treatment for OCD patients who either do not respond to, or are unable or unwilling to take SSRIs and undergo CBT. Although shown to be effective in treatment resistant OCD, DBS requires invasive neurosurgical procedures with associated risks. On the other hand, rTMS and tDCS are non-invasive forms of treatment, which are largely risk free, but the evidence of their efficacy so far is somewhat limited, with only small number of published studies. In this brief survey we will address the potential of rTMS as a therapeutic tool for OCD and review the published literature on the cortical targets for rTMS used so far. We will also discuss some of the newer variants of rTMS techniques only a few of which have been employed so far, and speculate whether there might be a place for rTMS as a standard treatment in OCD, along side CBT, SSRIs and DBS.

  16. Theta-burst repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation suppresses specific excitatory circuits in the human motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lazzaro, V; Pilato, F; Saturno, E; Oliviero, A; Dileone, M; Mazzone, P; Insola, A; Tonali, P A; Ranieri, F; Huang, Y Z; Rothwell, J C

    2005-06-15

    In four conscious patients who had electrodes implanted in the cervical epidural space for the control of pain, we recorded corticospinal volleys evoked by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the motor cortex before and after a 20 s period of continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS). It has previously been reported that this form of repetitive TMS reduces the amplitude of motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), with the maximum effect occurring at 5-10 min after the end of stimulation. The present results show that cTBS preferentially decreases the amplitude of the corticospinal I1 wave, with approximately the same time course. This is consistent with a cortical origin of the effect on the MEP. However, other protocols that lead to MEP suppression, such as short-interval intracortical inhibition, are characterized by reduced excitability of late I waves (particularly I3), suggesting that cTBS suppresses MEPs through different mechanisms, such as long-term depression in excitatory synaptic connections.

  17. Surgical leg rotation: cortical neuroplasticity assessed through brain mapping using transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Maria Grazia; Rota, Viviana; Manfrini, Marco; Perucca, Laura; Caronni, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Rotationplasty (Borggreve-Van Nes operation) is a rare limb salvage procedure, most often applied to children presenting with sarcoma of the distal femur. In type A1 operation, the distal thigh is removed and the proximal tibia is axially rotated by 180°, remodeled, grafted onto the femoral stump, and then prosthetized. The neurovascular bundle is spared. The rotated ankle then works as a knee. The foot plantar and dorsal flexors act as knee extensors and flexors, respectively. Functional results may be excellent. Cortical neuroplasticity was studied in three men (30–31 years) who were operated on the left lower limb at ages between 7 and 11 years and were fully autonomous with a custom-made prosthesis, as well as in three age–sex matched controls. The scalp stimulation coordinates, matching the patients’ brain MRI spots, were digitized through a ‘neuronavigation’ optoelectronic system, in order to guide the transcranial magnetic stimulation coil, thus ensuring spatial precision during the procedure. Through transcranial magnetic stimulation driven by neuronavigation, the cortical representations of the contralateral soleus and vastus medialis muscles were studied in terms of amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and centering and width of the cortical areas from which the potentials could be evoked. Map centering on either hemisphere did not differ substantially across muscles and participants. In the operated patients, MEP amplitudes, the area from which MEPs could be evoked, and their product (volume) were larger for the muscles of the unaffected side compared with both the rotated soleus muscle (average effect size 0.75) and the muscles of healthy controls (average effect size 0.89). In controls, right–left differences showed an effect size of 0.38. In no case did the comparisons reach statistical significance (P>0.25). Nevertheless, the results seem consistent with cortical plasticity reflecting strengthening of the unaffected leg and a

  18. Maximal Voluntary Activation of the Elbow Flexors Is under Predicted by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Compared to Motor Point Stimulation Prior to and Following Muscle Fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadigan, Edward W J; Collins, Brandon W; Philpott, Devin T G; Kippenhuck, Garreth; Brenton, Mitchell; Button, Duane C

    2017-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic (TMS) and motor point stimulation have been used to determine voluntary activation (VA). However, very few studies have directly compared the two stimulation techniques for assessing VA of the elbow flexors. The purpose of this study was to compare TMS and motor point stimulation for assessing VA in non-fatigued and fatigued elbow flexors. Participants performed a fatigue protocol that included twelve, 15 s isometric elbow flexor contractions. Participants completed a set of isometric elbow flexion contractions at 100, 75, 50, and 25% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) prior to and following fatigue contractions 3, 6, 9, and 12 and 5 and 10 min post-fatigue. Force and EMG of the bicep and triceps brachii were measured for each contraction. Force responses to TMS and motor point stimulation and EMG responses to TMS (motor evoked potentials, MEPs) and Erb's point stimulation (maximal M-waves, Mmax) were also recorded. VA was estimated using the equation: VA% = (1-SITforce/PTforce) × 100. The resting twitch was measured directly for motor point stimulation and estimated for both motor point stimulation and TMS by extrapolation of the linear regression between the superimposed twitch force and voluntary force. MVC force, potentiated twitch force and VA significantly (p motor point stimulation in non-fatigued and fatigued elbow flexors. Motor point stimulation compared to TMS superimposed twitch forces were significantly (p motor point stimulation as opposed to TMS led to a higher estimation of VA in non-fatigued and fatigued elbow flexors. The decreased linear relationship between TMS superimposed twitch force and voluntary force led to an underestimation of the estimated resting twitch force and thus, a reduced VA.

  19. The effect of music on corticospinal excitability is related to the perceived emotion: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannelli, Fabio; Banfi, Chiara; Borgheresi, Alessandra; Fiori, Elisa; Innocenti, Iglis; Rossi, Simone; Zaccara, Gaetano; Viggiano, Maria Pia; Cincotta, Massimo

    2013-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and neuroimaging studies suggest a functional link between the emotion-related brain areas and the motor system. It is not well understood, however, whether the motor cortex activity is modulated by specific emotions experienced during music listening. In 23 healthy volunteers, we recorded the motor evoked potentials (MEP) following TMS to investigate the corticospinal excitability while subjects listened to music pieces evoking different emotions (happiness, sadness, fear, and displeasure), an emotionally neutral piece, and a control stimulus (musical scale). Quality and intensity of emotions were previously rated in an additional group of 30 healthy subjects. Fear-related music significantly increased the MEP size compared to the neutral piece and the control stimulus. This effect was not seen with music inducing other emotional experiences and was not related to changes in autonomic variables (respiration rate, heart rate). Current data indicate that also in a musical context, the excitability of the corticomotoneuronal system is related to the emotion expressed by the listened piece. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for tinnitus treatment: no enhancement by the dopamine and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor bupropion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinjung, Tobias; Steffens, Thomas; Landgrebe, Michael; Vielsmeier, Veronika; Frank, Elmar; Burger, Julia; Strutz, Juergen; Hajak, Göran; Langguth, Berthold

    2011-04-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the temporal cortex has shown beneficial effects in patients with chronic tinnitus. Recent preclinical data in healthy controls suggest that the effects of low-frequency rTMS can be enhanced by dopaminergic drugs. We investigated whether application of the dopamine reuptake inhibitor bupropion increases the clinical effects of low-frequency rTMS over the auditory cortex in tinnitus patients. Eighteen subjects with chronic tinnitus received 10 sessions of 1 Hz rTMS (2000 pulses/day, 110% motor threshold) applied to the left temporal cortex. In addition, these subjects received one dosage of 150 mg bupropion (Wellbutrin XL/Elontril) 4 hours before each TMS session. Treatment outcome was assessed with a tinnitus questionnaire over a 3-month period. Treatment effects were compared with a control group of 100 tinnitus patients matched for age, tinnitus duration, and tinnitus questionnaire baseline scores, who received the same rTMS treatment without prior bupropion application. For the whole sample, there was a significant effect of rTMS treatment over time. There were no significant differences between the bupropion and the control group. Our data suggest that 150 mg bupropion administration does not enhance the effect of rTMS in the treatment of tinnitus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Efficacy of bilateral repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for negative symptoms of schizophrenia : results of a multicenter double-blind randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dlabac-de Lange, J. J.; Bais, L.; van Es, F. D.; Visser, B. G. J.; Reinink, E.; Bakker, B.; van den Heuvel, E. R.; Aleman, A.; Knegtering, H.

    Background. Few studies have investigated the efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) treatment for negative symptoms of schizophrenia, reporting inconsistent results. We aimed to investigate whether 10 Hz stimulation of the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during 3

  2. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induces oscillatory power changes in chronic tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eSchecklmann

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic tinnitus is associated with neuroplastic changes in auditory and non-auditory cortical areas. About ten years ago, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS of auditory and prefrontal cortex was introduced as potential treatment for tinnitus. The resulting changes in tinnitus loudness are interpreted in the context of rTMS induced activity changes (neuroplasticity. Here, we investigate the effect of single rTMS sessions on oscillatory power to probe the capacity of rTMS to interfere with tinnitus-specific cortical plasticity. We measured 20 patients with bilateral chronic tinnitus and 20 healthy controls comparable for age, sex, handedness, and hearing level with a 63-channel EEG system. Educational level, intelligence, depressivity and hyperacusis were controlled for by analysis of covariance. Different rTMS protocols were tested: Left and right temporal and left and right prefrontal cortices were each stimulated with 200 pulses at 1Hz and with an intensity of 60% stimulator output. Stimulation of central parietal cortex with 6-fold reduced intensity (inverted passive-cooled coil served as sham condition. Before and after each rTMS protocol five minutes of resting state EEG were recorded. The order of rTMS protocols was randomized over two sessions with one week interval in between.Analyses on electrode level showed that people with and without tinnitus differed in their response to left temporal and right frontal stimulation. In tinnitus patients left temporal rTMS decreased frontal theta and delta and increased beta2 power, whereas right frontal rTMS decreased right temporal beta3 and gamma power. No changes or increases were observed in the control group. Only non-systematic changes in tinnitus loudness were induced by single sessions of rTMS.This is the first study to show tinnitus-related alterations of neuroplasticity that were specific to stimulation site and oscillatory frequency. The observed effects can be interpreted

  3. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induces oscillatory power changes in chronic tinnitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schecklmann, Martin; Lehner, Astrid; Gollmitzer, Judith; Schmidt, Eldrid; Schlee, Winfried; Langguth, Berthold

    2015-01-01

    Chronic tinnitus is associated with neuroplastic changes in auditory and non-auditory cortical areas. About 10 years ago, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of auditory and prefrontal cortex was introduced as potential treatment for tinnitus. The resulting changes in tinnitus loudness are interpreted in the context of rTMS induced activity changes (neuroplasticity). Here, we investigate the effect of single rTMS sessions on oscillatory power to probe the capacity of rTMS to interfere with tinnitus-specific cortical plasticity. We measured 20 patients with bilateral chronic tinnitus and 20 healthy controls comparable for age, sex, handedness, and hearing level with a 63-channel electroencephalography (EEG) system. Educational level, intelligence, depressivity and hyperacusis were controlled for by analysis of covariance. Different rTMS protocols were tested: Left and right temporal and left and right prefrontal cortices were each stimulated with 200 pulses at 1 Hz and with an intensity of 60% stimulator output. Stimulation of central parietal cortex with 6-fold reduced intensity (inverted passive-cooled coil) served as sham condition. Before and after each rTMS protocol 5 min of resting state EEG were recorded. The order of rTMS protocols was randomized over two sessions with 1 week interval in between. Analyses on electrode level showed that people with and without tinnitus differed in their response to left temporal and right frontal stimulation. In tinnitus patients left temporal rTMS decreased frontal theta and delta and increased beta2 power, whereas right frontal rTMS decreased right temporal beta3 and gamma power. No changes or increases were observed in the control group. Only non-systematic changes in tinnitus loudness were induced by single sessions of rTMS. This is the first study to show tinnitus-related alterations of neuroplasticity that were specific to stimulation site and oscillatory frequency. The observed effects can be

  4. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Educes Frequency-Specific Causal Relationships in the Motor Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Felipe S; Franklin, Crystal; Narayana, Shalini; Szabó, C Ákos; Fox, Peter T

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has the potential to treat brain disorders by modulating the activity of disease-specific brain networks, yet the rTMS frequencies used are delivered in a binary fashion - excitatory (>1 Hz) and inhibitory (≤1 Hz). To assess the effective connectivity of the motor network at different rTMS stimulation rates during positron-emission tomography (PET) and confirm that not all excitatory rTMS frequencies act on the motor network in the same manner. We delivered image-guided, supra-threshold rTMS at 3 Hz, 5 Hz, 10 Hz, 15 Hz and rest (in separate randomized sessions) to the primary motor cortex (M1) of the lightly anesthetized baboon during PET imaging. Each rTMS/PET session was analyzed using normalized cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements. Path analysis - using structural equation modeling (SEM) - was employed to determine the effective connectivity of the motor network at all rTMS frequencies. Once determined, the final model of the motor network was used to assess any differences in effective connectivity at each rTMS frequency. The exploratory SEM produced a very well fitting final network model (χ(2) = 18.04, df = 21, RMSEA = 0.000, p = 0.647, TLI = 1.12) using seven nodes of the motor network. 5 Hz rTMS produced the strongest path coefficients in four of the seven connections, suggesting that this frequency is the optimal rTMS frequency for stimulation the motor network (as a whole); however, the premotor cerebellum connection was optimally stimulated at 10 Hz rTMS and the supplementary motor area caudate connection was optimally driven at 15 Hz rTMS. We have demonstrated that 1) 5 Hz rTMS revealed the strongest path coefficients (i.e. causal influence) on the nodes of the motor network, 2) stimulation at "excitatory" rTMS frequencies did not produce increased CBF in all nodes of the motor network, 3) specific rTMS frequencies may be used to target specific none

  5. Enhanced motor function and its neurophysiological correlates after navigated low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the contralesional motor cortex in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Shahid; Vernet, Marine; Najib, Umer; Perez, Jennifer; Alonso-Alonso, Miguel; Knobel, Mark; Yoo, Woo-Kyoung; Edwards, Dylan; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2016-08-11

    The net effect of altered interhemispheric interactions between homologous motor cortical areas after unilateral stroke has been previously reported to contribute to residual hemiparesis. Using this framework, we hypothesized that navigated 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the contralesional hemisphere would induce a stronger physiological and behavioural response in patients with residual motor deficit than in healthy subjects, because an imbalance in interhemispheric excitability may underlie motor dysfunction. Navigated rTMS was conducted in 8 chronic stroke patients (67.50±13.77 years) and in 8 comparable normal subjects (57.38±9.61 years). We evaluated motor function (Finger tapping, Nine Hole Peg test, Strength Index and Reaction Time) as well as the excitatory and inhibitory function (resting motor threshold, motor evoked potential amplitude, intra-cortical inhibition and facilitation, and silent period) of the stimulated and non-stimulated motor cortex before and after navigated rTMS. rTMS induced an increase in excitability in the ipsilesional (non-stimulated) motor cortex and led to improved performance in the finger tapping task and pinch force task. These physiological and behavioral effects were more prominent (or robust) in the group of stroke patients than in the control group. Navigated low-frequency rTMS involving precise and consistent targeting of the contralesional hemisphere in stroke patients enhanced the cortical excitability of the ipsilesional hemisphere and the motor response of the hemiparetic hand.

  6. Can Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Really Relieve Medication-Resistant Auditory Verbal Hallucinations? Negative Results from a Large Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slotema, Christina W.; Blom, Jan Dirk; de Weijer, Antoin D.; Diederen, Kelly M.; Goekoop, Rutger; Looijestijn, Jasper; Daalman, Kirstin; Rijkaart, Anne-Marije; Kahn, Rene S.; Hoek, Hans W.; Sommer, Iris E. C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Several studies have applied low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) directed at the left temporoparietal area (TP) for the treatment of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH), but findings on efficacy are inconsistent. Furthermore, recent functional magnetic

  7. Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) dose-dependently stimulates glucagon secretion in healthy human subjects at euglycaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, J J; Gallwitz, B; Siepmann, N

    2003-01-01

    secretion under normoglycaemic conditions. METHODS: Ten healthy subjects (9 men, 1 woman; age 33+/-11; BMI 26.8+/-2.2 kg/m(2)) received three different doses of intravenous GIP (7, 20, and 60 pmol/kg body weight) and placebo. Venous blood samples were drawn over 30 min for glucagon and GIP concentrations...

  8. Substrate utilization and thermogenic responses to beta-adrenergic stimulation in obese subjects with NIDDM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaak, E E; Saris, W H; Wolffenbuttel, B H

    OBJECTIVE: This study intended to investigate disturbances in beta-adrenergically-mediated substrate utilization and thermogenesis in obese subjects with mild non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). DESIGN: Following a baseline period of 30 min, the beta-agonist isoproterenol (ISO) was

  9. Muscular Strength Gains and Sensory Perception Changes: A Comparison of Electrical and Combined Electrical/Magnetic Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-10

    Electrotherapy 2d ed. Norwalk, CT: Appleton & Lange; 1991:385-399. 18. Cadwell J. Principles of magnetoelectric stimulation. In: Chokroverty S, ed. Magnetic...press). 23. Cummings J. Electrical stimulation of healthy muscle and tissue repair. In: Nelson RM, Currier DP, eds. Clinical Electrotherapy , 2d ed...flow, and and influencing changes. In: Nelson RM, Currier DP, eds. Clinical Electrotherapy , 2d ed. Norwalk, CT: Appleton & Lange;1991:171-199 27

  10. A Computational Model for Real-Time Calculation of Electric Field due to Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Paffi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to propose an approach for an accurate and fast (real-time computation of the electric field induced inside the whole brain volume during a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS procedure. The numerical solution implements the admittance method for a discretized realistic brain model derived from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI. Results are in a good agreement with those obtained using commercial codes and require much less computational time. An integration of the developed code with neuronavigation tools will permit real-time evaluation of the stimulated brain regions during the TMS delivery, thus improving the efficacy of clinical applications.

  11. A comparison of 15 Hz sine on-line and off-line magnetic stimulation affecting the voltage-gated sodium channel currents of prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Dong, Lei; Gao, Yang; Dou, Jun-Rong; Li, Ze-yan

    2016-10-01

    Combined with the use of patch-clamp techniques, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has proven to be a noninvasive neuromodulation tool that can inhibit or facilitate excitability of neurons after extensive research. The studies generally focused on the method: the neurons are first stimulated in an external standard magnetic exposure device, and then moved to the patch-clamp to record electrophysiological characteristics (off-line magnetic exposure). Despite its universality, real-time observation of the effects of magnetic stimulation on the neurons is more effective (on-line magnetic stimulation). In this study, we selected a standard exposure device for magnetic fields acting on mouse prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons, and described a new method that a patch-clamp setup was modified to allow on-line magnetic stimulation. By comparing the off-line exposure and on-line stimulation of the same magnetic field intensity and frequency affecting the voltage-gated sodium channel currents, we succeeded in proving the feasibility of the new on-line stimulation device. We also demonstrated that the sodium channel currents of prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons increased significantly under the 15 Hz sine 1 mT, and 2 mT off-line magnetic field exposure and under the 1 mT and 2 mT on-line magnetic stimulation, and the rate of acceleration was most significant on 2 mT on-line magnetic stimulation. This study described the development of a new on-line magnetic stimulator and successfully demonstrated its practicability for scientific stimulation of neurons.

  12. Study of brain functional network based on sample entropy of EEG under magnetic stimulation at PC6 acupoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lei; Wang, Yao; Yu, Hongli; Yin, Ning; Li, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Acupuncture is based on the theory of traditional Chinese medicine. Its therapeutic effectiveness has been proved by clinical practice. However, its mechanism of action is still unclear. Magnetic stimulation at acupuncture point provides a new means for studying the theory of acupuncture. Based on the Graph Theory, the construction and analysis method of complex network can help to investigate the topology of brain functional network and understand the working mechanism of brain. In this study, magnetic stimulation was used to stimulate Neiguan (PC6) acupoint and the EEG (Electroencephalograph) signal was recorded. Using non-linear method (Sample Entropy) and complex network theory, brain functional network based on EEG signal under magnetic stimulation at PC6 acupoint was constructed and analyzed. In addition, the features of complex network were comparatively analyzed between the quiescent and stimulated states. Our experimental results show the topology of the network is changed, the connection of the network is enhanced, the efficiency of information transmission is improved and the small-world property is strengthened through stimulating the PC6 acupoint.

  13. Cortical Plasticity Induction by Pairing Subthalamic Nucleus Deep-Brain Stimulation and Primary Motor Cortical Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udupa, Kaviraja; Bahl, Nina; Ni, Zhen; Gunraj, Carolyn; Mazzella, Filomena; Moro, Elena; Hodaie, Mojgan; Lozano, Andres M; Lang, Anthony E; Chen, Robert

    2016-01-13

    Noninvasive brain stimulation studies have shown abnormal motor cortical plasticity in Parkinson's disease (PD). These studies used peripheral nerve stimulation paired with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to primary motor cortex (M1) at specific intervals to induce plasticity. Induction of cortical plasticity through stimulation of the basal ganglia (BG)-M1 connections has not been studied. In the present study, we used a novel technique of plasticity induction by repeated pairing of deep-brain stimulation (DBS) of the BG with M1 stimulation using TMS. We hypothesize that repeated pairing of subthalamic nucleus (STN)-DBS and M1-TMS at specific time intervals will lead to plasticity in the M1. Ten PD human patients with STN-DBS were studied in the on-medication state with DBS set to 3 Hz. The interstimulus intervals (ISIs) between STN-DBS and TMS that produced cortical facilitation were determined individually for each patient. Three plasticity induction conditions with repeated pairings (180 times) at specific ISIs (∼ 3 and ∼ 23 ms) that produced cortical facilitation and a control ISI of 167 ms were tested in random order. Repeated pairing of STN-DBS and M1-TMS at short (∼ 3 ms) and medium (∼ 23 ms) latencies increased M1 excitability that lasted for at least 45 min, whereas the control condition (fixed ISI of 167 ms) had no effect. There were no specific changes in motor thresholds, intracortical circuits, or recruitment curves. Our results indicate that paired-associative cortical plasticity can be induced by repeated STN and M1 stimulation at specific intervals. These results show that STN-DBS can modulate cortical plasticity. We introduced a new experimental paradigm to test the hypothesis that pairing subthalamic nucleus deep-brain stimulation (STN-DBS) with motor cortical transcranial magnetic stimulation (M1-TMS) at specific times can induce cortical plasticity in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We found that repeated pairing of STN

  14. Magnetic Nanocomposite Scaffold-Induced Stimulation of Migration and Odontogenesis of Human Dental Pulp Cells through Integrin Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hyung-Mun; Lee, Eui-Suk; Kim, Mi-joo; Kim, Jung-Ju; Lee, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Hae-Hyoung; Park, Kyung-Ran; Yi, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Hae-Won; Kim, Eun-cheol

    2015-01-01

    Magnetism is an intriguing physical cue that can alter the behaviors of a broad range of cells. Nanocomposite scaffolds that exhibit magnetic properties are thus considered useful 3D matrix for culture of cells and their fate control in repair and regeneration processes. Here we produced magnetic nanocomposite scaffolds made of magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) and polycaprolactone (PCL), and the effects of the scaffolds on the adhesion, growth, migration and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) were investigated. Furthermore, the associated signaling pathways were examined in order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms in the cellular events. The magnetic scaffolds incorporated with MNPs at varying concentrations (up to 10%wt) supported cellular adhesion and multiplication over 2 weeks, showing good viability. The cellular constructs in the nanocomposite scaffolds played significant roles in the stimulation of adhesion, migration and odontogenesis of HDPCs. Cells were shown to adhere to substantially higher number when affected by the magnetic scaffolds. Cell migration tested by in vitro wound closure model was significantly enhanced by the magnetic scaffolds. Furthermore, odontogenic differentiation of HDPCs, as assessed by the alkaline phosphatase activity, mRNA expressions of odontogenic markers (DMP-1, DSPP,osteocalcin, and ostepontin), and alizarin red staining, was significantly stimulated by the magnetic scaffolds. Signal transduction was analyzed by RT-PCR, Western blotting, and confocal microscopy. The magnetic scaffolds upregulated the integrin subunits (α1, α2, β1 and β3) and activated downstream pathways, such as FAK, paxillin, p38, ERK MAPK, and NF-κB. The current study reports for the first time the significant impact of magnetic scaffolds in stimulating HDPC behaviors, including cell migration and odontogenesis, implying the potential usefulness of the magnetic scaffolds for dentin-pulp tissue engineering.

  15. Magnetic Nanocomposite Scaffold-Induced Stimulation of Migration and Odontogenesis of Human Dental Pulp Cells through Integrin Signaling Pathways.

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    Hyung-Mun Yun

    Full Text Available Magnetism is an intriguing physical cue that can alter the behaviors of a broad range of cells. Nanocomposite scaffolds that exhibit magnetic properties are thus considered useful 3D matrix for culture of cells and their fate control in repair and regeneration processes. Here we produced magnetic nanocomposite scaffolds made of magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs and polycaprolactone (PCL, and the effects of the scaffolds on the adhesion, growth, migration and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs were investigated. Furthermore, the associated signaling pathways were examined in order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms in the cellular events. The magnetic scaffolds incorporated with MNPs at varying concentrations (up to 10%wt supported cellular adhesion and multiplication over 2 weeks, showing good viability. The cellular constructs in the nanocomposite scaffolds played significant roles in the stimulation of adhesion, migration and odontogenesis of HDPCs. Cells were shown to adhere to substantially higher number when affected by the magnetic scaffolds. Cell migration tested by in vitro wound closure model was significantly enhanced by the magnetic scaffolds. Furthermore, odontogenic differentiation of HDPCs, as assessed by the alkaline phosphatase activity, mRNA expressions of odontogenic markers (DMP-1, DSPP,osteocalcin, and ostepontin, and alizarin red staining, was significantly stimulated by the magnetic scaffolds. Signal transduction was analyzed by RT-PCR, Western blotting, and confocal microscopy. The magnetic scaffolds upregulated the integrin subunits (α1, α2, β1 and β3 and activated downstream pathways, such as FAK, paxillin, p38, ERK MAPK, and NF-κB. The current study reports for the first time the significant impact of magnetic scaffolds in stimulating HDPC behaviors, including cell migration and odontogenesis, implying the potential usefulness of the magnetic scaffolds for dentin-pulp tissue engineering.

  16. Detailed 3D models of the induced electric field of transcranial magnetic stimulation coils

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    Salinas, F S; Lancaster, J L; Fox, P T [Research Imaging Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)

    2007-05-21

    Previous models neglected contributions from current elements spanning the full geometric extent of wires in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) coils. A detailed account of TMS coil wiring geometry is shown to provide significant improvements in the accuracy of electric field (E-field) models. Modeling E-field dependence based on the TMS coil's wire width, height, shape and number of turns clearly improved the fit of calculated-to-measured E-fields near the coil body. Detailed E-field models were accurate up to the surface of the coil body (within 0.5% of measured) where simple models were often inadequate (up to 32% different from measured)

  17. Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation possibilities in difficult diagnostic cases upper motor neuron lesions – case report

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    I. S. Bakulin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a neurodegenerative disease characterized with lesions of both upper and lower motor neurons. In accordance with modern diagnostics criteria, only clinical symptoms are used for revealing lesions of the upper motor neuron with the ALS, which often causes serious difficulties. Absence of the pyramidal syndrome does not allow diagnosing ALS, and the diagnosis of progressive muscular atrophy should be set in these cases. We describe a case of an isolated generalized lesion of the lower motor neuron with the signs of cortical motor neurons lesion revealed in the course of navigational transcranial magnetic stimulation. Possible reasons for difficulties in detecting pyramidal syndrome are discussed together with the necessity of working out the criteria of instrumental diagnostics of lesions of the upper motor neuron in ALS.

  18. A case of cerebral reversible vasoconstriction syndrome triggered by repetition transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Mamiko; Yamate, Koji; Hayashi, Hiromi; Miura, Toyoaki; Kobayashi, Yasutaka

    2017-08-31

    A 75-year-old man was admitted for combined low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and intensive occupational therapy. Five days after the initiation of rTMS, he developed hypotension and temporary exacerbation of the right hemiplegia with thunderclap headache. MRA showed segmental stenosis of the left middle cerebral artery, which findings were improved at 9 days after the onset of the headache. He was diagnosed as having the reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS). The rTMS was recognized as safe rehabilitation treatment. However, it is necessary to recognize that RCVS can become one of the precipitants. This is the first report of RCVS triggered by rTMS.

  19. Potential Impact of Geomagnetic Field in Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Diseases.

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    Chae, Kwon-Seok; Kim, Yong-Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Throughout the long history of various therapeutic trials of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), some TMS protocols have been reported to be clearly effective in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Despite promising results from repetitive TMS (rTMS) using low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) for neurodegenerative diseases, the low reproducibility has hampered the clinical applications of rTMS. Here, based on the notion of radical pair mechanism explaining magnetoreception in living organisms, we propose a new perspective that rTMS with controlled geomagnetic field (rTMS-GMF) can be an efficient and reproducible therapeutic approach for neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, combined consideration of imprinted GMF and/or EMFs in patients' earlier life may augment the potential efficacy of the rTMS-GMF. The investigation of this approach is intriguing and may have a high impact on the technical suitability and clinical application of the rTMS-GMF in the near future.

  20. Potential Impact of Geomagnetic Field in Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Diseases

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    Kwon-Seok Chae

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the long history of various therapeutic trials of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, some TMS protocols have been reported to be clearly effective in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Despite promising results from repetitive TMS (rTMS using low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs for neurodegenerative diseases, the low reproducibility has hampered the clinical applications of rTMS. Here, based on the notion of radical pair mechanism explaining magnetoreception in living organisms, we propose a new perspective that rTMS with controlled geomagnetic field (rTMS-GMF can be an efficient and reproducible therapeutic approach for neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, combined consideration of imprinted GMF and/or EMFs in patients’ earlier life may augment the potential efficacy of the rTMS-GMF. The investigation of this approach is intriguing and may have a high impact on the technical suitability and clinical application of the rTMS-GMF in the near future.

  1. Interhemispheric inhibition induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation over primary sensory cortex

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    Yasuyuki Iwata

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated whether the long-interval interhemispheric inhibition (LIHI is induced by the transcranial magnetic stimulation over the primary sensory area (S1-TMS without activation of the conditioning side of the primary motor area (M1 contributing to the contralateral motor evoked potential (MEP, whether the S1-TMS-induced LIHI is dependent on the status of the S1 modulated by the tactile input, and whether the pathways mediating the LIHI are different from those mediating the M1-TMS-induced LIHI. In order to give the TMS over the S1 without eliciting the MEP, the intensity of the S1-TMS was adjusted to be the sub-motor-threshold level and the trials with the MEP response elicited by the S1-TMS were discarded online. The LIHI was induced by the S1-TMS given 40 ms before the test TMS in the participants with the attenuation of the tactile perception of the digit stimulation (TPDS induced by the S1-TMS, indicating that the LIHI is induced by the S1-TMS without activation of the conditioning side of the M1 contributing to the contralateral MEP in the participants in which the pathways mediating the TPDS is sensitive to the S1-TMS. The S1-TMS-induced LIHI was positively correlated with the attenuation of the TPDS induced by the S1-TMS, indicating that the S1-TMS-induced LIHI is dependent on the effect of the S1-TMS on the pathways mediating the TPDS at the S1. In another experiment, the effect of the digit stimulation given before the conditioning TMS on the S1- or M1-TMS-induced LIHI was examined. The digit stimulation produces tactile input to the S1 causing change in the status of the S1. The S1-TMS-induced LIHI was enhanced when the S1-TMS was given in the period in which the tactile afferent volley produced by the digit stimulation just arrived at the S1, while the LIHI induced by above-motor-threshold TMS over the contralateral M1 was not enhanced by the tactile input. Thus, the S1-TMS-induced LIHI is dependent on the

  2. Interhemispheric Inhibition Induced by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Over Primary Sensory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Yasuyuki; Jono, Yasutomo; Mizusawa, Hiroki; Kinoshita, Atsushi; Hiraoka, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated whether the long-interval interhemispheric inhibition (LIHI) is induced by the transcranial magnetic stimulation over the primary sensory area (S1-TMS) without activation of the conditioning side of the primary motor area (M1) contributing to the contralateral motor evoked potential (MEP), whether the S1-TMS-induced LIHI is dependent on the status of the S1 modulated by the tactile input, and whether the pathways mediating the LIHI are different from those mediating the M1-TMS-induced LIHI. In order to give the TMS over the S1 without eliciting the MEP, the intensity of the S1-TMS was adjusted to be the sub-motor-threshold level and the trials with the MEP response elicited by the S1-TMS were discarded online. The LIHI was induced by the S1-TMS given 40 ms before the test TMS in the participants with the attenuation of the tactile perception of the digit stimulation (TPDS) induced by the S1-TMS, indicating that the LIHI is induced by the S1-TMS without activation of the conditioning side of the M1 contributing to the contralateral MEP in the participants in which the pathways mediating the TPDS is sensitive to the S1-TMS. The S1-TMS-induced LIHI was positively correlated with the attenuation of the TPDS induced by the S1-TMS, indicating that the S1-TMS-induced LIHI is dependent on the effect of the S1-TMS on the pathways mediating the TPDS at the S1. In another experiment, the effect of the digit stimulation given before the conditioning TMS on the S1- or M1-TMS-induced LIHI was examined. The digit stimulation produces tactile input to the S1 causing change in the status of the S1. The S1-TMS-induced LIHI was enhanced when the S1-TMS was given in the period in which the tactile afferent volley produced by the digit stimulation just arrived at the S1, while the LIHI induced by above-motor-threshold TMS over the contralateral M1 was not enhanced by the tactile input. Thus, the S1-TMS-induced LIHI is dependent on the status of the S1

  3. High frequency somatosensory stimulation increases sensori-motor inhibition and leads to perceptual improvement in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchi, Lorenzo; Erro, Roberto; Antelmi, Elena; Berardelli, Alfredo; Tinazzi, Michele; Liguori, Rocco; Bhatia, Kailash; Rothwell, John

    2017-06-01

    High frequency repetitive somatosensory stimulation (HF-RSS), which is a patterned electric stimulation applied to the skin through surface electrodes, improves two-point discrimination, somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold (STDT) and motor performance in humans. However, the mechanisms which underlie these changes are still unknown. In particular, we hypothesize that refinement of inhibition might be responsible for the improvement in spatial and temporal perception. Fifteen healthy subjects underwent 45min of HF-RSS. Before and after the intervention several measures of inhibition in the primary somatosensory area (S1), such as paired-pulse somatosensory evoked potentials (pp-SEP), high-frequency oscillations (HFO), and STDT were tested, as well as tactile spatial acuity and short intracortical inhibition (SICI). HF-RSS increased inhibition in S1 tested by pp-SEP and HFO; these changes were correlated with improvement in STDT. HF-RSS also enhanced bumps detection, while there was no change in grating orientation test. Finally there was an increase in SICI, suggesting widespread changes in cortical sensorimotor interactions. These findings suggest that HF-RSS can improve spatial and temporal tactile abilities by increasing the effectiveness of inhibitory interactions in the somatosensory system. Moreover, HF-RSS induces changes in cortical sensorimotor interaction. HF-RSS is a repetitive electric stimulation technique able to modify the effectiveness of inhibitory circuitry in the somatosensory system and primary motor cortex. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. All rights reserved.

  4. Transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment of major depression during pregnancy: a review

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    Renata de Melo Felipe

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Pregnancy is characterized by a high prevalence of mental disorders. Depression is the most common of these disorders and it is a risk factor for negative maternal and child development outcomes. Psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy are conventional and well-established therapeutic options, but some clients fail to respond and the safety of using some pharmacological agents during pregnancy is unclear. Some neuromodulation techniques, such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS, have been studied in depressed pregnant women. Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of rTMS for major depression in pregnant women. Methods: The LILACS and PubMed databases were reviewed using the search terms depression, pregnancy and magnetic stimulation. Texts including primary data, published in Portuguese, Spanish, or English, between 1995 and 2014, that evaluated depressed pregnant women and used rTMS as the intervention were selected. Papers lacking sufficient data were excluded. Twenty-two texts were initially identified; after applying the inclusion criteria, 12 were selected and analyzed. Results: The studies reviewed reported satisfactory responses to rTMS in acute depressive episodes, as measured using depressive symptom scales. Remission of symptoms was achieved in many cases. The procedure was well tolerated and there were no reports of damage/complications to unborn children. Conclusion: The data available at this time support the efficacy and tolerability of rTMS for depression in pregnant women. Controlled studies should corroborate this conclusion. This review only included studies in three languages and the resulting sample size was not large enough to conduct a meta-analysis.

  5. Voltage-sensitive dye imaging of transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced intracortical dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, Vladislav; Eysel, Ulf T; Jancke, Dirk

    2014-09-16

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is widely used in clinical interventions and basic neuroscience. Additionally, it has become a powerful tool to drive plastic changes in neuronal networks. However, highly resolved recordings of the immediate TMS effects have remained scarce, because existing recording techniques are limited in spatial or temporal resolution or are interfered with by the strong TMS-induced electric field. To circumvent these constraints, we performed optical imaging with voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) in an animal experimental setting using anaesthetized cats. The dye signals reflect gradual changes in the cells' membrane potential across several square millimeters of cortical tissue, thus enabling direct visualization of TMS-induced neuronal population dynamics. After application of a single TMS pulse across visual cortex, brief focal activation was immediately followed by synchronous suppression of a large pool of neurons. With consecutive magnetic pulses (10 Hz), widespread activity within this "basin of suppression" increased stepwise to suprathreshold levels and spontaneous activity was enhanced. Visual stimulation after repetitive TMS revealed long-term potentiation of evoked activity. Furthermore, loss of the "deceleration-acceleration" notch during the rising phase of the response, as a signature of fast intracortical inhibition detectable with VSD imaging, indicated weakened inhibition as an important driving force of increasing cortical excitability. In summary, our data show that high-frequency TMS changes the balance between excitation and inhibition in favor of an excitatory cortical state. VSD imaging may thus be a promising technique to trace TMS-induced changes in excitability and resulting plastic processes across cortical maps with high spatial and temporal resolutions.

  6. Brain Stimulation Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Magnetic Seizure Therapy Deep Brain Stimulation Additional Resources Brain Stimulation Therapies Overview Brain stimulation therapies can play ... for a shorter recovery time than ECT Deep Brain Stimulation Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first developed ...

  7. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to Address Mild Cognitive Impairment in the Elderly: A Randomized Controlled Study

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    Hellen Livia Drumond Marra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique with potential to improve memory. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI, which still lacks a specific therapy, is a clinical syndrome associated with increased risk of dementia. This study aims to assess the effects of high-frequency repetitive TMS (HF rTMS on everyday memory of the elderly with MCI. We conducted a double-blinded randomized sham-controlled trial using rTMS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. Thirty-four elderly outpatients meeting Petersen’s MCI criteria were randomly assigned to receive 10 sessions of either active TMS or sham, 10 Hz rTMS at 110% of motor threshold, 2,000 pulses per session. Neuropsychological assessment at baseline, after the last session (10th and at one-month follow-up, was applied. ANOVA on the primary efficacy measure, the Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test, revealed a significant group-by-time interaction p=0.05, favoring the active group. The improvement was kept after one month. Other neuropsychological tests were heterogeneous. rTMS at 10 Hz enhanced everyday memory in elderly with MCI after 10 sessions. These findings suggest that rTMS might be effective as a therapy for MCI and probably a tool to delay deterioration.

  8. Daily left prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for medication-resistant burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezaki, Y; Badran, B W; Gonzales, T S; George, M S

    2015-08-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a persistent and chronic burning sensation in the mouth in the absence of any abnormal organic findings. The pathophysiology of BMS is unclear and its treatment is not fully established. Although antidepressant medication is commonly used for treatment, there are some medication-resistant patients, and a new treatment for medication-resistant BMS is needed. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technology approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of depression. Recent studies have found beneficial effects of TMS for the treatment of pain. A case of BMS treated successfully with daily left prefrontal rTMS over a 2-week period is reported here. Based on this patient's clinical course and a recent pain study, the mechanism by which TMS may act to decrease the burning pain is discussed. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and connectivity mapping: tools for studying the neural bases of brain disorders.

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    Michelle Hampson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available There has been an increasing emphasis on characterizing pathophysiology underlying psychiatric and neurological disorders in terms of altered neural connectivity and network dynamics. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS provides a unique opportunity for investigating connectivity in the human brain. TMS allows researchers and clinicians to directly stimulate cortical regions accessible to electromagnetic coils positioned on the scalp. The induced activation can then propagate through long-range connections to other brain areas. Thus, by identifying distal regions activated during TMS, researchers can infer connectivity patterns in the healthy human brain and can examine how those patterns may be disrupted in patients with different brain disorders. Conversely, connectivity maps derived using neuroimaging methods can identify components of a dysfunctional network. Nodes in this dysfunctional network accessible as targets for TMS by virtue of their proximity to the scalp may then permit TMS-induced alterations of components of the network not directly accessible to TMS via propagated effects. Thus TMS can provide a portal for accessing and altering neural dynamics in networks that are widely distributed anatomically. Finally, when long-term modulation of network dynamics is induced by trains of repetitive TMS, changes in functional connectivity patterns can be studied in parallel with changes in patient symptoms. These correlational data can elucidate neural mechanisms underlying illness and recovery. In this review, we focus on the application of these approaches to the study of psychiatric and neurological illnesses.

  10. Exploring Cortical Plasticity and Oscillatory Brain Dynamics via Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Resting-State Electroencephalogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Nor Azila

    2016-07-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive, non-pharmacological technique that is able to modulate cortical activity beyond the stimulation period. The residual aftereffects are akin to the plasticity mechanism of the brain and suggest the potential use of TMS for therapy. For years, TMS has been shown to transiently improve symptoms of neuropsychiatric disorders, but the underlying neural correlates remain elusive. Recently, there is evidence that altered connectivity of brain network dynamics is the mechanism underlying symptoms of various neuropsychiatric illnesses. By combining TMS and electroencephalography (EEG), the functional connectivity patterns among brain regions, and the causal link between function or behaviour and a specific brain region can be determined. Nonetheless, the brain network connectivity are highly complex and involve the dynamics interplay among multitude of brain regions. In this review article, we present previous TMS-EEG co-registration studies, which explore the functional connectivity patterns of human cerebral cortex. We argue the possibilities of neural correlates of long-term potentiation/depression (LTP-/LTD)-like mechanisms of synaptic plasticity that drive the TMS aftereffects as shown by the dissociation between EEG and motor evoked potentials (MEP) cortical output. Here, we also explore alternative explanations that drive the EEG oscillatory modulations post TMS. The precise knowledge of the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying TMS will help characterise disturbances in oscillatory patterns, and the altered functional connectivity in neuropsychiatric illnesses.

  11. Field modeling for transcranial magnetic stimulation: A useful tool to understand the physiological effects of TMS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielscher, Axel; Antunes, Andre; Saturnino, Guilherme B

    2015-01-01

    Electric field calculations based on numerical methods and increasingly realistic head models are more and more used in research on Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). However, they are still far from being established as standard tools for the planning and analysis in practical applications of TMS. Here, we start by delineating three main challenges that need to be addressed to unravel their full potential. This comprises (i) identifying and dealing with the model uncertainties, (ii) establishing a clear link between the induced fields and the physiological stimulation effects, and (iii) improving the usability of the tools for field calculation to the level that they can be easily used by non-experts. We then introduce a new version of our pipeline for field calculations (www.simnibs.org) that substantially simplifies setting up and running TMS and tDCS simulations based on Finite-Element Methods (FEM). We conclude with a brief outlook on how the new version of SimNIBS can help to target the above identified challenges.

  12. Effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on masseter motor-neuron pool excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huang; Liu, Wei Cai; Song, Yu Han

    2017-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been widely used to modulate the excitability of the cortical control of limbs muscles, but rarely in the cortical control of human masseter muscles. This study aims to investigate the effects of rTMS on masseter motor-neuron pool excitability in humans. A total of 20 healthy participants were selected and received a total of three rTMS sessions involving stimulation of the right masseter-motor complex: one session of 10-Hz rTMS, one session of 1-Hz rTMS and one session of sham rTMS at an intensity of 80% of the active motor threshold (AMT). The masseter AMT, motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), cortical-silent period (CSP), and short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) were measured before and after each rTMS session. The masseter SICI was significantly decreased following 10-Hz rTMS, with no significant changes in AMT, MEPs or CSP. No significant differences in masseter AMT, MEPs, CSP or SICI were observed in either the 1-Hz, or sham rTMS groups. The present findings demonstrate that high-frequency rTMS increases masseter motor-neuron pool excitability. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Modification of electrical pain threshold by voluntary breathing-controlled electrical stimulation (BreEStim in healthy subjects.

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    Shengai Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pain has a distinct sensory and affective (i.e., unpleasantness component. BreEStim, during which electrical stimulation is delivered during voluntary breathing, has been shown to selectively reduce the affective component of post-amputation phantom pain. The objective was to examine whether BreEStim increases pain threshold such that subjects could have improved tolerance of sensation of painful stimuli. METHODS: Eleven pain-free healthy subjects (7 males, 4 females participated in the study. All subjects received BreEStim (100 stimuli and conventional electrical stimulation (EStim, 100 stimuli to two acupuncture points (Neiguan and Weiguan of the dominant hand in a random order. The two different treatments were provided at least three days apart. Painful, but tolerable electrical stimuli were delivered randomly during EStim, but were triggered by effortful inhalation during BreEStim. Measurements of tactile sensation threshold, electrical sensation and electrical pain thresholds, thermal (cold sensation, warm sensation, cold pain and heat pain thresholds were recorded from the thenar eminence of both hands. These measurements were taken pre-intervention and 10-min post-intervention. RESULTS: There was no difference in the pre-intervention baseline measurement of all thresholds between BreEStim and EStim. The electrical pain threshold significantly increased after BreEStim (27.5±6.7% for the dominant hand and 28.5±10.8% for the non-dominant hand, respectively. The electrical pain threshold significantly decreased after EStim (9.1±2.8% for the dominant hand and 10.2±4.6% for the non-dominant hand, respectively (F[1, 10] = 30.992, p = .00024. There was no statistically significant change in other thresholds after BreEStim and EStim. The intensity of electrical stimuli was progressively increased, but no difference was found between BreEStim and EStim. CONCLUSION: Voluntary breathing controlled electrical stimulation

  14. Presurgical mapping with functional MRI. Comparative study with transcranial magnetic stimulation and intraoperative mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminogo, Makio; Morikawa, Minoru; Ishimaru, Hideki; Ochi, Makoto; Onizuka, Masanori; Shirakawa, Yasushi; Takahashi, Haruki; Shibata, Shobu [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-05-01

    The thumb movement was evoked by transcranical magnetic stimulation (TCS) for the mapping of the motor cortex. After the placement of the marker determined by TCS on the scalp, fMRI under motor tasks consisting of repetitive grasping was performed. For motor cortex activation, an axial oblique plane to maximize gray matter sampling in the rolandic cortex was employed in order to compare these different mapping techniques more precisely. Sixteen patients with brain tumors were included in this study. In nine patients, fMRI disclosed activation in one restricted gyrus or in the localized area around one restricted sulcus. Of these nine patients, preoperative TCS mapping corresponded closely with fMRI in six, while in the remaining three, the TCS marker fell between 1 and 2 cm apart from the fMRI-activated area. However, in these three patients, intraoperative electrocortical stimulation corresponded with the preoperative mapping with fMRI. In six patients, contiguous two gyri were activated by motor tasks. The TCS marker was disclosed on one of the two activated gyri. Of these six patients, the position of the TCS marker and fMRI-activated site corresponded with each other in four cases. They were found on the same gyrus but there was 1.0-2.0 cm distance between them in two cases. Intraoperative somatosensory evoked potential was monitored in two of these six cases. They corresponded well with the mapping by fMRI and TCS together. In only one patient, no significant activation area was obtained by fMRI because of excessive head motion during motor tasks. The TCS maker in this patients was identical with intraoperative electro-cortical stimulation mapping. (K.H.)

  15. Fast multigrid-based computation of the induced electric field for transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa

    2012-12-07

    In transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), the distribution of the induced electric field, and the affected brain areas, depends on the position of the stimulation coil and the individual geometry of the head and brain. The distribution of the induced electric field in realistic anatomies can be modelled using computational methods. However, existing computational methods for accurately determining the induced electric field in realistic anatomical models have suffered from long computation times, typically in the range of tens of minutes or longer. This paper presents a matrix-free implementation of the finite-element method with a geometric multigrid method that can potentially reduce the computation time to several seconds or less even when using an ordinary computer. The performance of the method is studied by computing the induced electric field in two anatomically realistic models. An idealized two-loop coil is used as the stimulating coil. Multiple computational grid resolutions ranging from 2 to 0.25 mm are used. The results show that, for macroscopic modelling of the electric field in an anatomically realistic model, computational grid resolutions of 1 mm or 2 mm appear to provide good numerical accuracy compared to higher resolutions. The multigrid iteration typically converges in less than ten iterations independent of the grid resolution. Even without parallelization, each iteration takes about 1.0 s or 0.1 s for the 1 and 2 mm resolutions, respectively. This suggests that calculating the electric field with sufficient accuracy in real time is feasible.

  16. Comparing the magnetic resonant coupling radiofrequency stimulation to the traditional approaches: Ex-vivo tissue voltage measurement and electromagnetic simulation analysis

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    Sai Ho Yeung

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the design concept of magnetic resonant coupling has been adapted to electromagnetic therapy applications such as non-invasive radiofrequency (RF stimulation. This technique can significantly increase the electric field radiated from the magnetic coil at the stimulation target, and hence enhancing the current flowing through the nerve, thus enabling stimulation. In this paper, the developed magnetic resonant coupling (MRC stimulation, magnetic stimulation (MS and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS are compared. The differences between the MRC RF stimulation and other techniques are presented in terms of the operating mechanism, ex-vivo tissue voltage measurement and electromagnetic simulation analysis. The ev-vivo tissue voltage measurement experiment is performed on the compared devices based on measuring the voltage induced by electromagnetic induction at the tissue. The focusing effect, E field and voltage induced across the tissue, and the attenuation due to the increase of separation between the coil and the target are analyzed. The electromagnetic stimulation will also be performed to obtain the electric field and magnetic field distribution around the biological medium. The electric field intensity is proportional to the induced current and the magnetic field is corresponding to the electromagnetic induction across the biological medium. The comparison between the MRC RF stimulator and the MS and TENS devices revealed that the MRC RF stimulator has several advantages over the others for the applications of inducing current in the biological medium for stimulation purposes.

  17. Enhanced balance associated with coordination training with stochastic resonance stimulation in subjects with functional ankle instability: an experimental trial

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    Brown Cathleen N

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ankle sprains are common injuries that often lead to functional ankle instability (FAI, which is a pathology defined by sensations of instability at the ankle and recurrent ankle sprain injury. Poor postural stability has been associated with FAI, and sports medicine clinicians rehabilitate balance deficits to prevent ankle sprains. Subsensory electrical noise known as stochastic resonance (SR stimulation has been used in conjunction with coordination training to improve dynamic postural instabilities associated with FAI. However, unlike static postural deficits, dynamic impairments have not been indicative of ankle sprain injury. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of coordination training with or without SR stimulation on static postural stability. Improving postural instabilities associated with FAI has implications for increasing ankle joint stability and decreasing recurrent ankle sprains. Methods This study was conducted in a research laboratory. Thirty subjects with FAI were randomly assigned to either a: 1 conventional coordination training group (CCT; 2 SR stimulation coordination training group (SCT; or 3 control group. Training groups performed coordination exercises for six weeks. The SCT group received SR stimulation during training, while the CCT group only performed coordination training. Single leg postural stability was measured after the completion of balance training. Static postural stability was quantified on a force plate using anterior/posterior (A/P and medial/lateral (M/L center-of-pressure velocity (COPvel, M/L COP standard deviation (COPsd, M/L COP maximum excursion (COPmax, and COP area (COParea. Results Treatment effects comparing posttest to pretest COP measures were highest for the SCT group. At posttest, the SCT group had reduced A/P COPvel (2.3 ± 0.4 cm/s vs. 2.7 ± 0.6 cm/s, M/L COPvel (2.6 ± 0.5 cm/s vs. 2.9 ± 0.5 cm/s, M/L COPsd (0.63 ± 0.12 cm vs. 0.73 ± 0

  18. Stimulation from Cochlear Implant Electrodes Assists with Recovery from Asymmetric Perceptual Tilt: Evidence from the Subjective Visual Vertical Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua J. Gnanasegaram

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular end organ impairment is highly prevalent in children who have sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL rehabilitated with cochlear implants (CIs. As a result, spatial perception is likely to be impacted in this population. Of particular interest is the perception of visual vertical because it reflects a perceptual tilt in the roll axis and is sensitive to an imbalance in otolith function. The objectives of the present study were thus to identify abnormalities in perception of the vertical plane in children with SNHL and determine whether such abnormalities could be resolved with stimulation from the CI. Participants included 53 children (15.2±4.0 years of age with SNHL and vestibular loss, confirmed with vestibular evoked myogenic potential testing. Testing protocol was validated in a sample of 9 young adults with normal hearing (28.8±7.7 years. Perception of visual vertical was assessed using the static Subjective Visual Vertical (SVV test performed with and without stimulation in the participants with cochleovestibular loss. Trains of electrical pulses were delivered by an electrode in the left and/or right ear. Asymmetric spatial orientation deficits were found in nearly half of the participants with CIs (24/53 [45%]. The abnormal perception in this cohort was exacerbated by visual tilts in the direction of their deficit. Electric pulse trains delivered using the CI shifted this abnormal perception towards centre (i.e., normal [p = 0.007]. Importantly, this benefit was realized regardless of which ear was stimulated. These results suggest a role for CI stimulation beyond the auditory system, in particular, for improving vestibular/balance function.

  19. Self-organization of topological defects for a triangular-lattice magnetic dots array subject to a perpendicular magnetic field

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    R.S. Khymyn

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The regular array of magnetic particles (magnetic dots of the form of a two-dimensional triangular lattice in the presence of external magnetic field demonstrates complicated magnetic structures. The magnetic symmetry of the ground state for such a system is lower than that for the underlying lattice. Long range dipole-dipole interaction leads to a specific antiferromagnetic order in small fields, whereas a set of linear topological defects appears with the growth of the magnetic field. Self-organization of such defects determines the magnetization process for a system within a wide range of external magnetic fields.

  20. Functional cortical reorganization after low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation plus intensive occupational therapy for upper limb hemiparesis: evaluation by functional magnetic resonance imaging in poststroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Naoki; Kakuda, Wataru; Senoo, Atsushi; Kondo, Takahiro; Mitani, Sugao; Shimizu, Masato; Abo, Masahiro

    2013-08-01

    Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the nonlesional hemisphere combined with occupational therapy significantly improves motor function of the affected upper limb in poststroke hemiparetic patients, but the recovery mechanism remains unclear. To investigate the recovery mechanism using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Forty-seven poststroke hemiparetic patients were hospitalized to receive 12 sessions of 40-min low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the nonlesional hemisphere and daily occupational therapy for 15 days. Motor function was evaluated with the Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Wolf Motor Function Test. The functional magnetic resonance imaging with motor tasks was performed at admission and discharge. The laterality index of activated voxel number in Brodmann areas 4 and 6 on functional magnetic resonance imaging was calculated (laterality index range of -1 to +1). Patients were divided into two groups based on functional magnetic resonance imaging findings before the intervention: group 1: patients who showed bilateral activation (n = 27); group 2: patients with unilateral activation (n = 20). Treatment resulted in improvement in Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Wolf Motor Function Test in the two groups (P functional magnetic resonance imaging indicated that our proposed treatment can induce functional cortical reorganization, leading to motor functional recovery of the affected upper limb. Especially, it seems that neural activation in the lesional hemisphere plays an important role in such recovery in poststroke hemiparetic patients. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

  1. Electroporation of cells using EM induction of ac fields by a magnetic stimulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C; Robinson, M P [Department of Electronics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Evans, J A [Academic Unit of Medical Physics, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Smye, S W [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Leeds Teaching Hospitals, St. James' s University Hospital, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); O' Toole, P [Department of Biology, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-21

    This paper describes a method of effectively electroporating mammalian cell membranes with pulsed alternating-current (ac) electric fields at field strengths of 30-160 kV m{sup -1}. Although many in vivo electroporation protocols entail applying square wave or monotonically decreasing pulses via needles or electrode plates, relatively few have explored the use of pulsed ac fields. Following our previous study, which established the effectiveness of ac fields for electroporating cell membranes, a primary/secondary coil system was constructed to produce sufficiently strong electric fields by electromagnetic induction. The primary coil was formed from the applicator of an established transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) system, while the secondary coil was a purpose-built device of a design which could eventually be implanted into tissue. The effects of field strength, pulse interval and cumulative exposure time were investigated using microscopy and flow cytometry. Results from experiments on concentrated cell suspensions showed an optimized electroporation efficiency of around 50%, demonstrating that electroporation can be practicably achieved by inducing such pulsed ac fields. This finding confirms the possibility of a wide range of in vivo applications based on magnetically coupled ac electroporation.

  2. The influence of sulcus width on simulated electric fields induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, A M; Rampersad, S M; Lucka, F; Lanfer, B; Lew, S; Aydin, Ü; Wolters, C H; Stegeman, D F; Oostendorp, T F

    2013-01-01

    Volume conduction models can help in acquiring knowledge about the distribution of the electric field induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). One aspect of a detailed model is an accurate description of the cortical surface geometry. Since its estimation is difficult, it is important to know how accurate the geometry has to be represented. Previous studies only looked at the differences caused by neglecting the complete boundary between the CSF and GM (Thielscher et al. 2011; Bijsterbosch et al. 2012), or by resizing the whole brain (Wagner et al. 2008). However, due to the high conductive properties of the CSF, it can be expected that alterations in sulcus width can already have a significant effect on the distribution of the electric field. To answer this question, the sulcus width of a highly realistic head model, based on T1-, T2- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRI), was altered systematically. This study shows that alterations in the sulcus width do not cause large differences in the majority of the electric field values. However, considerable overestimation of sulcus width produces an overestimation of the calculated field strength, also at locations distant from the target location. PMID:23787706

  3. The influence of sulcus width on simulated electric fields induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, A M; Rampersad, S M; Lucka, F; Lanfer, B; Lew, S; Aydin, U; Wolters, C H; Stegeman, D F; Oostendorp, T F

    2013-07-21

    Volume conduction models can help in acquiring knowledge about the distribution of the electric field induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation. One aspect of a detailed model is an accurate description of the cortical surface geometry. Since its estimation is difficult, it is important to know how accurate the geometry has to be represented. Previous studies only looked at the differences caused by neglecting the complete boundary between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and grey matter (Thielscher et al 2011 NeuroImage 54 234-43, Bijsterbosch et al 2012 Med. Biol. Eng. Comput. 50 671-81), or by resizing the whole brain (Wagner et al 2008 Exp. Brain Res. 186 539-50). However, due to the high conductive properties of the CSF, it can be expected that alterations in sulcus width can already have a significant effect on the distribution of the electric field. To answer this question, the sulcus width of a highly realistic head model, based on T1-, T2- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images, was altered systematically. This study shows that alterations in the sulcus width do not cause large differences in the majority of the electric field values. However, considerable overestimation of sulcus width produces an overestimation of the calculated field strength, also at locations distant from the target location.

  4. A Retrospective Chart Review of 10 Hz Versus 20 Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristie L. DeBlasio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We performed a retrospective chart review to examine the progress of patients with depression who received different frequencies of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS delivered to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. rTMS is a safe and effective alternative treatment for patients with various psychological and medical conditions. During treatment, a coil delivering a time-varying magnetic pulse placed over the scalp penetrates the skull, resulting in clinical improvement. There were 47 patients and three distinct treatment groups found: 10 Hz, 20 Hz, and a separate group who received both frequencies (10/20 Hz. The primary outcome indicator was the difference in Beck Depression Inventory–II (BDI-II scores. Secondary outcomes included categorical indicators of remission, response, and partial response rates as assessed with the BDI-II. In all 3 groups, the majority of patients had depression that remitted, with the highest rate occurring in the 20 Hz group. There were similar response rates in the 10 Hz and 20 Hz groups. There were no patients in the 10/20 Hz group whose depression responded and the highest partial response and nonresponse rates occurred in this group. Although within-group differences were significant from baseline to end of treatment, there were no between-group differences.

  5. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in developmental stuttering: Relations with previous neurophysiological research and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busan, P; Battaglini, P P; Sommer, M

    2017-06-01

    Developmental stuttering (DS) is a disruption of the rhythm of speech, and affected people may be unable to execute fluent voluntary speech. There are still questions about the exact causes of DS. Evidence suggests there are differences in the structure and functioning of motor systems used for preparing, executing, and controlling motor acts, especially when they are speech related. Much research has been obtained using neuroimaging methods, ranging from functional magnetic resonance to diffusion tensor imaging and electroencephalography/magnetoencephalography. Studies using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in DS have been uncommon until recently. This is surprising considering the relationship between the functionality of the motor system and DS, and the wide use of TMS in motor-related disturbances such as Parkinson's Disease, Tourette's Syndrome, and dystonia. Consequently, TMS could shed further light on motor aspects of DS. The present work aims to investigate the use of TMS for understanding DS neural mechanisms by reviewing TMS papers in the DS field. Until now, TMS has contributed to the understanding of the excitatory/inhibitory ratio of DS motor functioning, also helping to better understand and critically review evidence about stuttering mechanisms obtained from different techniques, which allowed the investigation of cortico-basal-thalamo-cortical and white matter/connection dysfunctions. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Does a single session of theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation of inferior temporal cortex affect tinnitus perception?

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    Moser Tobias

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cortical excitability changes as well as imbalances in excitatory and inhibitory circuits play a distinct pathophysiological role in chronic tinnitus. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS over the temporoparietal cortex was recently introduced to modulate tinnitus perception. In the current study, the effect of theta-burst stimulation (TBS, a novel rTMS paradigm was investigated in chronic tinnitus. Twenty patients with chronic tinnitus completed the study. Tinnitus severity and loudness were monitored using a tinnitus questionnaire (TQ and a visual analogue scale (VAS before each session. Patients received 600 pulses of continuous TBS (cTBS, intermittent TBS (iTBS and intermediate TBS (imTBS over left inferior temporal cortex with an intensity of 80% of the individual active or resting motor threshold. Changes in subjective tinnitus perception were measured with a numerical rating scale (NRS. Results TBS applied to inferior temporal cortex appeared to be safe. Although half of the patients reported a slight attenuation of tinnitus perception, group analysis resulted in no significant difference when comparing the three specific types of TBS. Converting the NRS into the VAS allowed us to compare the time-course of aftereffects. Only cTBS resulted in a significant short-lasting improvement of the symptoms. In addition there was no significant difference when comparing the responder and non-responder groups regarding their anamnestic and audiological data. The TQ score correlated significantly with the VAS, lower loudness indicating less tinnitus distress. Conclusion TBS does not offer a promising outcome for patients with tinnitus in the presented study.

  7. Repeated sessions of functional repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation increases motor cortex excitability and motor control in survivors of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massie, Crystal L; Tracy, Brian L; Paxton, Roger J; Malcolm, Matthew P

    2013-01-01

    To determine the impact of a single-session of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and an rTMS intervention on neurophysiology and motor control in survivors of stroke. Twelve stroke survivors were randomized into functional-rTMS or passive-rTMS conditions. Measures of short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF), and force steadiness (coefficient of variation, CV) at 10 and 20% of maximum voluntary contraction were assessed at baseline and after a single-session of rTMS (post single-session), and again following an intervention of 8 rTMS sessions (2 sessions per day; post-intervention). Functional-rTMS required subjects to exceed a muscle activation threshold assessed by surface electromyography to trigger each rTMS train; the passive-rTMS group received rTMS while relaxed. ICF scores significantly increased following the single-session of functional-rTMS compared to the decrease following passive-rTMS. The increase in APB SICI and ICF scores following the intervention was significantly greater for the functional-rTMS group compared to the decreases following passive-rTMS. The groups were significantly different in the CV of force (20%) following the single-session of rTMS, and in the 10 and 20% tasks following the intervention. The functional-rTMS group increased steadiness overtime, whereas the passive group demonstrated a return to baseline following the intervention session. No differences were observed in first dorsal interosseus (FDI) measures (SICI and ICF) between groups. The functional-rTMS protocol enhanced cortical excitability following a single-session and after repeated sessions and improved steadiness, whereas the passive stimulation protocol tended to decrease excitation and no improvements in steadiness were observed.

  8. The researcher as experimental subject: using self-experimentation to access experiences, understand social phenomena, and stimulate reflexivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Kevin; Reddy, Geetha; Choi, Ellen; Gillespie, Alex

    2015-06-01

    The current article argues that researcher-as-subject self-experimentation can provide valuable insight and systematic knowledge to social psychologists. This approach, the modus operandi of experimental psychology when the field was in its infancy, has been largely eclipsed by an almost exclusive focus on participant-as-subject other-experimentation. Drawing from the non-experimental first-person traditions of autoethnography, participant observation, and phenomenology, we argue that participating as both observer and subject within one's own social psychological experiment affords researchers at least three potential benefits: (1) access to "social qualia," that is, the subjective experience of social phenomena; (2) improved mental models of social phenomena, potentially stimulating new research questions; and (3) an enhanced ability to be reflexive about the given experiment. To support our position, we provide first-person self-reflections from researchers who have self-experimented with transformed social interactions involving Milgram's cyranoid method. We close by offering guidelines on how one might approach self-experimentation, and discuss a variety of first-person perspective ethnographic technologies that can be incorporated into the practice.

  9. Acylation stimulating protein, complement C3 and lipid metabolism in ketosis-prone diabetic subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liu

    Full Text Available Ketosis-prone diabetes (KPDM is new-onset diabetic ketoacidosis without precipitating factors in non-type 1 diabetic patients; after management, some are withdrawn from exogenous insulin, although determining factors remain unclear.Twenty KPDM patients and twelve type 1 diabetic patients (T1DM, evaluated at baseline, 12 and 24 months with/without insulin maintenance underwent a standardized mixed-meal tolerance test (MMTT for 2 h.At baseline, triglyceride and C3 were higher during MMTT in KPDM vs. T1DM (p<0.0001 with no differences in non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA while Acylation Stimulating Protein (ASP tended to be higher. Within 12 months, 11 KPDM were withdrawn from insulin treatment (KPDM-ins, while 9 were maintained (KPDM+ins. NEFA was lower in KPDM-ins vs. KPDM+ins at baseline (p = 0.0006, 12 months (p<0.0001 and 24 months (p<0.0001 during MMTT. NEFA in KPDM-ins decreased over 30-120 minutes (p<0.05, but not in KPDM+ins. Overall, C3 was higher in KPDM-ins vs KPDM+ins at 12 months (p = 0.0081 and 24 months (p = 0.0019, while ASP was lower at baseline (p = 0.0024 and 12 months (p = 0.0281, with a decrease in ASP/C3 ratio.Notwithstanding greater adiposity in KPDM-ins, greater NEFA decreases and lower ASP levels during MMTT suggest better insulin and ASP sensitivity in these patients.

  10. Slip behaviour of carbonate-bearing faults subjected to fluid pressure stimulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collettini, Cristiano; Scuderi, Marco; Marone, Chris

    2017-04-01

    Earthquakes caused by fluid injection within reservoir have become an important topic of political and social discussion as new drilling and improved technologies enable the extraction of oil and gas from previously unproductive formations. During reservoir stimulation, the coupled interactions of frictional and fluid flow properties together with the stress state control both the onset of fault slip and fault slip behaviour. However, currently, there are no studies under controlled, laboratory conditions for which the effect of fluid pressure on fault slip behaviour can be deduced. To cover this gap, we have developed laboratory experiments where we monitor fault slip evolution at constant shear stress but with increasing fluid pressure, i.e. reducing the effective normal stress. Experiments have been conducted in the double direct shear configuration within a pressure vessel on carbonate fault gouge, characterized by a slightly velocity strengthening friction that is indicative of stable aseismic creep. In our experiments fault slip history can be divided in three main stages: 1) for high effective normal stress the fault is locked and undergoes compaction; 2) when the shear and effective normal stress reach the failure condition, accelerated creep is associated to fault dilation; 3) further pressurization leads to an exponential acceleration during fault compaction and slip localization. Our results indicate that fault weakening induced by fluid pressurization overcomes the velocity strengthening behaviour of calcite gouge, resulting in fast acceleration and earthquake slip. As applied to tectonic faults our results suggest that a larger number of crustal faults, including those slightly velocity strengthening, can experience earthquake slip due to fluid pressurization.

  11. Physical and Cognitive Stimulation Using an Exergame in Subjects with Normal Aging, Mild and Moderate Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Sadoun, Grégory; Sacco, Guillaume; Manera, Valeria; Bourgeois, Jérémy; König, Alexandra; Foulon, Pierre; Fosty, Baptiste; Bremond, François; d'Arripe-Longueville, Fabienne; Robert, Philippe

    2016-06-30

    The use of Serious exerGames (SeG) as enriched environments (EE), which promotes cognitive simulation with physical activity in a positive emotional context, has been proposed to represent a powerful method to slow down the decline due to neurodegenerative diseases (ND), such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, so far, no SeG targeting EE has been tested in ND subjects. This study aimed at evaluating the usability and short-term training effects of X-Torp, an action SeG designed for elderly ND subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD. X-Torp is a SeG played using the Microsoft® Kinect™. 10 ND subjects and 8 healthy elderly controls (HEC) were enrolled in a 1-month program with three training sessions per week. Usability was evaluated through game time, game performance, the aerobic intensity level reached, perceived emotions, and perceived usability. All participants successfully completed the training program. ND subjects played less and had a lower game performance compared to HEC. During the sessions, ND subjects maintained a light intensity of aerobic activity, while HEC maintained a moderate intensity. Both groups experienced only positive emotions, and reported a 'moderate' to 'high' perceived competence, a 'moderate' game difficulty, and a 'high' interest in the game. Usability results suggest that X-Torp represents a usable EE for healthy subjects and persons with MCI and AD. However, in order to reach moderate or high intensity of aerobic activity, X-Torp control modes should be adapted to become more physically stimulating.

  12. Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Targeted to Premotor Cortex Followed by Primary Motor Cortex Modulates Excitability Differently Than Premotor Cortex or Primary Motor Cortex Stimulation Alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mo; Deng, Huiqiong; Schmidt, Rebekah L; Kimberley, Teresa J

    2015-12-01

    The excitability of primary motor cortex (M1) can be modulated by applying low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over M1 or premotor cortex (PMC). A comparison of inhibitory effect between the two locations has been reported with inconsistent results. This study compared the response secondary to rTMS applied over M1, PMC, and a combined PMC + M1 stimulation approach which first targets stimulation over PMC then M1. Ten healthy participants were recruited for a randomized, cross-over design with a one-week washout between visits. Each visit consisted of a pretest, an rTMS intervention, and a post-test. Outcome measures included short interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), intracortical facilitation (ICF), and cortical silent period (CSP). Participants received one of the three interventions in random order at each visit including: 1-Hz rTMS at 90% of resting motor threshold to: M1 (1200 pulses), PMC (1200 pulses), and PMC + M1 (600 pulses each, 1200 total). PMC + M1 stimulation resulted in significantly greater inhibition than the other locations for ICF (P = 0.005) and CSP (P stimulation may modulate brain excitability differently from PMC or M1 alone. CSP was the assessment measure most sensitive to changes in inhibition and was able to distinguish between different inhibitory protocols. This work presents a novel procedure that may have positive implications for therapeutic interventions. © 2015 International Neuromodulation Society.

  13. An Investigation of the Late Excitatory Potentials in the Hand following Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Early Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Balla

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent neuroimaging studies in humans support the clinical observations that the motor cortex is affected early in the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Patients and Methods: We measured the silent period (SP induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation in AD patients in the very early stage of the disease, and we explored whether and in which way the pharmacologic manipulation of the cholinergic system could modify it. Results: An increase in the duration of the SP was observed in AD patients in the early stage in comparison to controls. After 2 months of treatment with donepezil, the duration did not differ significantly from that of normal subjects. The results of our study show a fragmentation and an enlargement of the SP in the presence of multiple late excitatory potentials (LEPs in early untreated AD patients. These LEPs were also modulated by donepezil. Conclusions: The results suggest an early functional impairment of cholinergic neurotransmission in AD. The disturbance in acetylcholine output in early AD leads to a decrease in excitability of the motor system.

  14. Actigraphy in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder Undergoing Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: An Open Label Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Masaki; Kikuchi, Senichiro; Nisijima, Koichi; Suda, Shiro

    2017-03-01

    The effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on physical activity and sleep patterns in individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) remain unclear. We examined the effects of rTMS treatment on the rest-activity cycle and sleep disturbances in MDD. In this open-label pilot study, 14 patients with medication-resistant MDD underwent 10 rTMS sessions over the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. In addition to Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores, waist actigraphy was used to evaluate alterations in the rest-activity cycle over the course of rTMS treatments. Actigraphic data were evaluated at baseline and in the first (rTMS sessions 1-3), second (rTMS sessions 4-7), and third (rTMS sessions 8-10) sections. Although Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores were significantly improved by rTMS, sleep variables assessed by actigraphy did not show significant changes. However, post hoc tests indicated a significant increase in mean steps per day between the baseline and first section time points (P = 0.014; t13 = -2.316). Our data indicated that a daytime physical activity response to rTMS occurred in early sessions, whereas subjective symptom improvements were consistent across all sessions. Future double-blind placebo-controlled studies assessing the effects of rTMS on the rest-activity cycle and sleep disturbances in MDD are warranted.

  15. The number of full-sine cycles per pulse influences the efficacy of multicycle transcranial magnetic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pechmann, Astrid; Delvendahl, Igor; Bergmann, Til O

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the efficacy of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to excite corticospinal neurons depends on pulse waveform. OBJECTIVE/HYPOTHESES: In this study, we examined whether the effectiveness of polyphasic TMS can be increased by using a pulse profile that consists...

  16. Low-frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation over left dorsal premotor cortex improves the dynamic control of visuospatially cued actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ward, Nick S; Bestmann, Sven; Hartwigsen, Gesa

    2010-01-01

    Left rostral dorsal premotor cortex (rPMd) and supramarginal gyrus (SMG) have been implicated in the dynamic control of actions. In 12 right-handed healthy individuals, we applied 30 min of low-frequency (1 Hz) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over left rPMd to investigate the ...

  17. Effects of bilateral repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on treatment resistant auditory-verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vercammen, Ans; Knegtering, Henderikus; Bruggeman, Richard; Westenbroek, Hanneke. M.; Jenner, Jack A.; Slooff, Cees J.; Wunderink, Lex; Aleman, Andre

    2009-01-01

    Background: Neuroimaging findings implicate bilateral superior temporal regions in the genesis of auditory-verbal hallucinations (AVH). This study aimed to investigate whether 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the bilateral temporo-parietal region would lead to increased

  18. Short-term adaptations in spinal cord circuits evoked by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation: possible underlying mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Monica A.; Lungholt, Bjarke K.S.; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2005-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been shown to induce adaptations in cortical neuronal circuitries. In the present study we investigated whether rTMS, through its effect on corticospinal pathways, also produces adaptations at the spinal level, and what the neuronal mechanis...

  19. MAGNETIC FIELD INFLUENCE ON NGF-STIMULATED NEURITE OUTGROWTH IN PC-12 CELLS: EFFECT OF PAINT FUMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    MAGNETIC FIELD INFLUENCE ON NGF-STIMULATED NEURITE OUTGROWTH IN PC-12 CELLS: EFFECT OF PAINT FUMES. C. F. Blackman1, D. E. House2*, S. G. Benane3*, A. Ubeda4, M.A. TrilIo4. 1 National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, EPA,Research Triangle Park, North Caro...

  20. Cortical Inhibition in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: New Insights from the Electroencephalographic Response to Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckmann, Sarah; Hauk, Daniela; Roessner, Veit; Resch, Franz; Freitag, Christine M.; Kammer, Thomas; Ziemann, Ulf; Rothenberger, Aribert; Weisbrod, Matthias; Bender, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is one of the most frequent neuropsychiatric disorders in childhood. Transcranial magnetic stimulation studies based on muscle responses (motor-evoked potentials) suggested that reduced motor inhibition contributes to hyperactivity, a core symptom of the disease. Here we employed the N100 component of the…

  1. A Preliminary Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study of Cortical Inhibition and Excitability in High-Functioning Autism and Asperger Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enticott, Peter G.; Rinehart, Nicole J.; Tonge, Bruce J.; Bradshaw, John L.; Fitzgerald, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Controversy surrounds the distinction between high-functioning autism (HFA) and Asperger disorder, but motor abnormalities are associated features of both conditions. This study examined motor cortical inhibition and excitability in HFA and Asperger disorder using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Method: Participants were diagnosed by…

  2. Transcranial magnetic stimulation reveals two functionally distinct stages of motor cortex involvement during perception of emotional body language

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgomaneri, Sara; Gazzola, V.; Avenanti, Alessio

    Studies indicate that perceiving emotional body language recruits fronto-parietal regions involved in action execution. However, the nature of such motor activation is unclear. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) we provide correlational and causative evidence of two distinct stages of

  3. Transcranial magnetic stimulation reveals two functionally distinct stages of motor cortex involvement during perception of emotional body language

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgomaneri, S.; Gazzola, V.; Avenanti, A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies indicate that perceiving emotional body language recruits fronto-parietal regions involved in action execution. However, the nature of such motor activation is unclear. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) we provide correlational and causative evidence of two distinct stages of

  4. A 3 month, follow-up, randomized, placebo-controlles study of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in depression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koerselman, F; Laman, D.M; van Duijn, H; van Duijn, M.A.J.; Willems, M.AM

    2004-01-01

    Background/Objective: There is evidence for an antidepressant effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), but little is known about posttreatment course. Therefore, we conducted a placebo-controlled, double-blind study in depressed patients in order to investigate the effect of

  5. Transcranial magnetic stimulation with a half-sine wave pulse elicits direction-specific effects in human motor cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Nikolai H; Delvendahl, Igor; Pechmann, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) commonly uses so-called monophasic pulses where the initial rapidly changing current flow is followed by a critically dampened return current. It has been shown that a monophasic TMS pulse preferentially excites different cortical circuits in the human motor...

  6. Sleep disturbances in obsessive-compulsive disorder: Association with non-response to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donse, L.; Sack, A.T.; Fitzgerald, P.B.; Arns, M.W.

    2017-01-01

    Background Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a promising augmentation strategy for treatment-refractory OCD. However, a substantial group still fails to respond. Sleep disorders, e.g. circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD), are highly prevalent in OCD and might mediate

  7. The Contribution of Primary Motor Cortex Is Essential for Probabilistic Implicit Sequence Learning: Evidence from Theta Burst Magnetic Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Leonora; Teo, James T.; Obeso, Ignacio; Rothwell, John C.; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2010-01-01

    Theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (TBS) is considered to produce plastic changes in human motor cortex. Here, we examined the inhibitory and excitatory effects of TBS on implicit sequence learning using a probabilistic serial reaction time paradigm. We investigated the involvement of several cortical regions associated with implicit…

  8. The Stimulation Effect of Auricular Magnetic Press Pellets on Older Female Adults with Sleep Disturbance Undergoing Polysomnographic Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chyi Lo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Objectives. To examine the stimulation effect of auricular magnetic press pellet therapy on older female adults with sleep disturbance as determined by polysomnography (PSG. Design. Randomized, single-blind, experimental-controlled, parallel-group. Setting. Community. Participants. Twenty-seven older female adults with sleep disturbance according to the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI >5 for at least 3 months were recruited. Participants were screened by both the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, as well as polysomnography prior to randomization. Interventions. All eligible participants were randomly allocated into the experimental or control group. Both groups were taped with magnetic press pellet on auricular points for 3 weeks. The experimental group was treated by applying pressure on the magnetic press pellets 3 times per day while no stimulation was applied on the control group. Measurements and Results. Both groups were measured by PSG and PSQI at the beginning of the study and 3 weeks after the study. Both groups showed improvements on PSQI scores compared to the baseline. One-way analysis of covariance adjusted for baseline scores showed that significant improvements of PSG-derived sleep parameters, such as sleep efficiency, were found in the experimental group. However, no significant differences between groups were observed in the proportion of sleep stages with the exception of Stage 2. Conclusions. Auricular therapy using magnetic pellets and stimulation by pressing was more effective in improving the sleep quality compared to auricular therapy without any stimulation.

  9. Dopamine release in human striatum induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over dorsolateral prefrontal cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sang Soo; Yoon, Eun Jin; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Animal study suggests that prefrontal cortex plays an important Animal studies suggest that prefrontal cortex plays an important role in the modulation of dopamine (DA) release in subcortical areas. However, little is known about the relationship between DA release and prefrontal activation in human. We investigated whether repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) influences DA release in human striatum with SPECT measurements of striatal binding of [123I)iodobenzamide (IBZM), a DA D2 receptor radioligand that is sensitive to endogenous DA. Five healthy male volunteers (age, 25{+-}2 yr) were studied with brain [123I]IBZM SPECT under three conditions (resting, Sham stimulation, and active rTMS over left DLPFC), while receiving a bolus plus constant infusion of [123I]IBZM DLPFC was defined as a 6 cm anterior and 1cm lateral from the primary motor cortex. rTMS session consisted of three blocks, in each block, 15 trains of 2 see duration were delivered with 10 Hz stimulation frequency, 100% motor threshold, and between-train intervals of 10 sec. Striatal V3', calculated as (striatal - occipital) / occipital activity ratio, was measured under equilibrium condition, at baseline and after sham and active rTMS. Sham stimulation did not affect striatal V3'. rTMS over DLPFC induced reduction of V3' in the ipsilateral and contralateral striatum by 9.7% {+-} 1.3% and 10.6% {+-} 3.2%, respectively, compared with sham procedures (P < 0.01 and P < 0.01, respectively), indicating striatal DA release elicited by rTMS over DLPFC. V3' reduction in the ipsilateral caudate nucleus was greater than that in the contralateral caudate nucleus (9.9% {+-} 4.5% vs. 6.6% {+-} 3.1%, P < 0.05). These data demonstrate DA release in human striatum induced by rTMS over DLPFC, supporting that cortico-striatal fibers originating in prefrontal cortex are involved in local DA release.

  10. Bilateral transfer phenomenon: A functional magnetic resonance imaging pilot study of healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uggetti, Carla; Ausenda, Carlo D; Squarza, Silvia; Cadioli, Marcello; Grimoldi, Ludovico; Cerri, Cesare; Cariati, Maurizio

    2016-08-01

    The bilateral transfer of a motor skill is a physiological phenomenon: the development of a motor skill with one hand can trigger the development of the same ability of the other hand. The purpose of this study was to verify whether bilateral transfer is associated with a specific brain activation pattern using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The motor task was implemented as the execution of the Nine Hole Peg Test. Fifteen healthy subjects (10 right-handers and five left-handers) underwent two identical fMRI runs performing the motor task with the non-dominant hand. Between the first and the second run, each subject was intensively trained for five minutes to perform the same motor task with the dominant hand. Comparing the two functional scans across the pool of subjects, a change of the motor activation pattern was observed. In particular, we observed, in the second run, a change in the activation pattern both in the cerebellum and in the cerebral cortex. We found activations in cortical areas involved in somatosensory integration, areas involved in procedural memory. Our study shows, in a small group of healthy subjects, the modification of the fMRI activation pathway of a motor task performed by the non-dominant hand after intensive exercise performing the same task with the dominant hand. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation on the cognitive event-related potential p300: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rêgo, Samuel R M; Marcolin, Marco A; May, Geoffrey; Gjini, Klevest

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review regarding the effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on the cognitive event-related potential P300. A search was performed of the PubMed database, using the keywords "transcranial magnetic stimulation" and "P300." Eight articles were selected and, after analysis of references, one additional article was added to the list. We found the comparison among studies to be difficult, as the information regarding the effects of TMS on P300 is both scarce and heterogeneous with respect to the parameters used in TMS stimulation and the elicitation of P300. However, 7 of 9 studies found positive results. New studies need to be carried out in order to understand the contribution of these variables and others to the alteration in the latency and amplitude of the P300 wave.

  12. Adjunctive treatment with transcranial magnetic stimulation in treatment resistant depression: a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang LIU

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS to the left prefrontal cortex is a promising antidepressant treatment but the appropriate duration of treatment andits effect on cognitive symptoms in treatment resistant patients is uncertain.Hypotheis: Patients with treatment resistant depression on standard antidepressant medication who receive four weeks of adjunctive treatment with high-frequency rTMS to the left prefrontal cortex will have better clinical outcomes and better cognitive functioning than those who receive sham rTMS treatments.Methods: Thirty patients with treatment resistant depression (defined as failure to respond to two or more antidepressants of different classes administered for at least 6 weeks at or above two-thirds of the recommended maximum dose receiving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors wererandomly assigned to receive adjundive treatment with either real rTMS (n=15 or sham rTMS (n=15 5 times a week for 4 conseculive weeks. Blinded pre-post evaluations were conducted using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD, the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS, the severity of illness measure from the Clinical Global Impression Rating scale(CGI-S, the Wechsler Adult Intelligence ScaIe (WAIS, the Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS, and the Wisconsjn Card Sorting Test(WC5T.Results:14 subjects from each group completed the study. There was no significant difference in the HAMD total scores between the two groups after 2 weeks of treatment but after 4 weeks of treatment the mean percentage drop in the HAMD total score was significantly greater in the real rTMS group (49%, SD=19% than in the sham rTMS group(29%, SD=25%, with a mean difference of 20% [95%CI=3%-37%;t26=2.42; P=0.023]. At 4 weeks the mean (SD reduction in the MADRS total score was also greater in the real rTMS group [47%(23% vs 16%(40

  13. Estimulação transcraniana não invasiva em indivíduos com paralisia cerebral: uma revisão integrativa da literatura = Noninvasive brain stimulation in subjects with cerebral palsy: a integrative literature review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gomes, Aline Freitas; Martins, Juliana Saibt

    2016-01-01

    ... eletrônicas Scielo, Medline/PubMed, PEDro e Lilacs. Os descritores e operadores boleanos utilizados foram congenital hemiplegia OR cerebral palsy AND transcranial magnetic stimulation OR transcranial direct current stimulation. Foram...

  14. Application of magnetic motor stimulation for measuring conduction time across the lower part of the brachial plexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafezi Rahmatollah

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The objective of this study was to calculate central motor conduction time (CMCT of median and ulnar nerves in normal volunteers. Conduction time across the lower part of the brachial plexus was measured by using magnetic stimulation over the motor cortex and brachial plexus and recording the evoked response in hand muscles. Design This descriptive study was done on 112 upper limbs of healthy volunteers. Forty-six limbs belonging to men and sixty-six belonging to women were studied by magnetic stimulation of both motor cortex and brachial plexus and recording the evoked response in thenar and hypothenar muscles. Stimulation of the motor cortex gives rise to absolute latency of each nerve whereas stimulation of the brachial plexus results in peripheral conduction time. The difference between these two values was considered the central motor conduction time (CMCT. Results In summary the result are as follows; Cortex-thenar latency = 21.4 ms (SD = 1.7, CMCT-thenar = 9.6 ms (SD = 1.9, Cortex-hypothenar latency = 21.3 ms (SD = 1.8, CMCT-hypothenar = 9.4 ms (SD = 1.8. Conclusion These findings showed that there is no meaningful difference between two genders. CMCT calculated by this method is a little longer than that obtained by electrical stimulation that is due to the more distally placed second stimulation. We recommend magnetic stimulation as the method of choice to calculate CMCT and its use for lower brachial plexus conduction time. This method could serve as a diagnostic tool for diagnosis of lower plexus entrapment and injuries especially in early stages.

  15. Effects of 10 Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of the Left Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex in Disorders of Consciousness

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    Xiaoyu Xia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWhile repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS has been applied in treatment of patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC, a standardized stimulation protocol has not been proposed, and its therapeutic effects are inconsistently documented.ObjectivesTo assess the efficacy of rTMS in improving consciousness in patients with persistent minimally conscious state (MCS or unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS, previously known as vegetative state (VS.MethodA prospective single-blinded study, with selected subjects, was carried out. In total, 16 patients (5 MCS and 11 VS/UWS with chronic DOC were included. All patients received active 10 Hz rTMS at the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, at one session per day, for 20 consecutive days. A single daily session of stimulation consisted of 1,000 pulses (10 s of 10 Hz trains; repeated 10 times with an inter-train interval of 60 s; and 11 min and 40 s for total session. The main outcome measures were changes in the total score on the JFK Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (CRS-R scale. Additional measures were the impressions of caregivers after the conclusion of the interventions, which were assessed using the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I scale.ResultsThe CRS-R scores were increased in all 5 MCS patients and 4 of 11 VS/UWS patients, while a significant enhancement of CRS-R scores was observed compared to the baseline in all participants (p = 0.007. However, the improvement was more notable in MCS patients (p = 0.042 than their VS/UWS counterparts (p = 0.066. Based on the CGI-I scores, two patients improved considerably, two improved, six minimally improved, six experienced no change, and none deteriorated. Good concordance was seen between the CGI-I result and the increases in CRS-R scores.ConclusionTreatment of 10 Hz multisession rTMS applied to the left DLPFC is promising for the rehabilitation of DOC patients, especially those in MCS

  16. Acoustic evaluation of short-term effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on motor aspects of speech in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasova, I; Mekyska, J; Kostalova, M; Marecek, R; Smekal, Z; Rektorova, I

    2013-04-01

    Hypokinetic dysarthria in Parkinson's disease (PD) can be characterized by monotony of pitch and loudness, reduced stress, variable rate, imprecise consonants, and a breathy and harsh voice. Using acoustic analysis, we studied the effects of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) applied over the primary orofacial sensorimotor area (SM1) and the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) on motor aspects of voiced speech in PD. Twelve non-depressed and non-demented men with PD (mean age 64.58 ± 8.04 years, mean PD duration 10.75 ± 7.48 years) and 21 healthy age-matched men (a control group, mean age 64 ± 8.55 years) participated in the speech study. The PD patients underwent two sessions of 10 Hz rTMS over the dominant hemisphere with 2,250 stimuli/day in a random order: (1) over the SM1; (2) over the left DLPFC in the "on" motor state. Speech examination comprised the perceptual rating of global speech performance and an acoustic analysis based upon a standardized speech task. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare acoustic speech variables between controls and PD patients. The Wilcoxon test was used to compare data prior to and after each stimulation in the PD group. rTMS applied over the left SM1 was associated with a significant increase in harmonic-to-noise ratio and net speech rate in the sentence tasks. With respect to the vowel task results, increased median values and range of Teager-Kaiser energy operator, increased vowel space area, and significant jitter decrease were observed after the left SM1 stimulation. rTMS over the left DLPFC did not induce any significant effects. The positive results of acoustic analysis were not reflected in a subjective rating of speech performance quality as assessed by a speech therapist. Our pilot results indicate that one session of rTMS applied over the SM1 may lead to measurable improvement in voice quality and intensity and an increase in speech rate and tongue movements

  17. Effects of 10 Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of the Left Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex in Disorders of Consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiaoyu; Bai, Yang; Zhou, Yangzhong; Yang, Yi; Xu, Ruxiang; Gao, Xiaorong; Li, Xiaoli; He, Jianghong

    2017-01-01

    While repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been applied in treatment of patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC), a standardized stimulation protocol has not been proposed, and its therapeutic effects are inconsistently documented. To assess the efficacy of rTMS in improving consciousness in patients with persistent minimally conscious state (MCS) or unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS), previously known as vegetative state (VS). A prospective single-blinded study, with selected subjects, was carried out. In total, 16 patients (5 MCS and 11 VS/UWS) with chronic DOC were included. All patients received active 10 Hz rTMS at the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), at one session per day, for 20 consecutive days. A single daily session of stimulation consisted of 1,000 pulses (10 s of 10 Hz trains; repeated 10 times with an inter-train interval of 60 s; and 11 min and 40 s for total session). The main outcome measures were changes in the total score on the JFK Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (CRS-R) scale. Additional measures were the impressions of caregivers after the conclusion of the interventions, which were assessed using the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I) scale. The CRS-R scores were increased in all 5 MCS patients and 4 of 11 VS/UWS patients, while a significant enhancement of CRS-R scores was observed compared to the baseline in all participants (p = 0.007). However, the improvement was more notable in MCS patients (p = 0.042) than their VS/UWS counterparts (p = 0.066). Based on the CGI-I scores, two patients improved considerably, two improved, six minimally improved, six experienced no change, and none deteriorated. Good concordance was seen between the CGI-I result and the increases in CRS-R scores. Treatment of 10 Hz multisession rTMS applied to the left DLPFC is promising for the rehabilitation of DOC patients, especially those in MCS. Further validation with a cohort of a larger

  18. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in cervical dystonia: effect of site and repetition in a randomized pilot trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Pirio Richardson

    Full Text Available Dystonia is characterized by abnormal posturing due to sustained muscle contraction, which leads to pain and significant disability. New therapeutic targets are needed in this disorder. The objective of this randomized, sham-controlled, blinded exploratory study is to identify a specific motor system target for non-invasive neuromodulation and to evaluate this target in terms of safety and tolerability in the cervical dystonia (CD population. Eight CD subjects were given 15-minute sessions of low-frequency (0.2 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS over the primary motor cortex (MC, dorsal premotor cortex (dPM, supplementary motor area (SMA, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC and a sham condition with each session separated by at least two days. The Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS score was rated in a blinded fashion immediately pre- and post-intervention. Secondary outcomes included physiology and tolerability ratings. The mean change in TWSTRS severity score by site was 0.25 ± 1.7 (ACC, -2.9 ± 3.4 (dPM, -3.0 ± 4.8 (MC, -0.5 ± 1.1 (SHAM, and -1.5 ± 3.2 (SMA with negative numbers indicating improvement in symptom control. TWSTRS scores decreased from Session 1 (15.1 ± 5.1 to Session 5 (11.0 ± 7.6. The treatment was tolerable and safe. Physiology data were acquired on 6 of 8 subjects and showed no change over time. These results suggest rTMS can modulate CD symptoms. Both dPM and MC are areas to be targeted in further rTMS studies. The improvement in TWSTRS scores over time with multiple rTMS sessions deserves further evaluation.

  19. Differential effects of motor cortical excitability and plasticity in young and old individuals: a Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid eBashir

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with changes in the motor system that, over time, can lead to functional impairments and contribute negatively to the ability to recover after brain damage. Unfortunately, there are still many questions surrounding the physiological mechanisms underlying these impairments. We examined cortico-spinal excitability and plasticity in a young cohort (age range: 19-31 and an elderly cohort (age range: 47-73 of healthy right-handed individuals using navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS. Subjects were evaluated with a combination of physiological (motor evoked potentials (MEPs, motor threshold (MT, intracortical inhibition (ICI, intracortical facilitation (ICF, and silent period (SP and behavioral (reaction time (RT, pinch force, 9 hole peg task (HPT measures at baseline and following one session of low-frequency (1 Hz navigated repetitive TMS (rTMS to the right (non-dominant hemisphere.In the young cohort, the inhibitory effect of 1 Hz rTMS was significantly in the right hemisphere and a significant facilitatory effect was noted in the unstimulated hemisphere. Conversely, in the elderly cohort, we report only a trend toward a facilitatory effect in the unstimulated hemisphere, suggesting reduced cortical plasticity and interhemispheric commuinication. To this effect, we show that significant differences in hemispheric cortico-spinal excitability were present in the elderly cohort at baseline, with significantly reduced cortico-spinal excitability in the right hemisphere as compared to the left hemisphere. A correlation analysis revealed no significant relationship between cortical thickness of the selected region of interest and MEPs in either young or old subjects prior to and following rTMS. When combined with our preliminary results, further research into this topic could lead to the development of neurophysiological markers pertinent to the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of neurological

  20. Transcranial magnetic stimulation for posttraumatic stress disorder: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisson Paulino Trevizol

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is a promising non-pharmacological intervention for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. However, randomized controlled trials (RCTs and meta-analyses have reported mixed results. Objective To review articles that assess the efficacy of TMS in PTSD treatment. Methods A systematic review using MEDLINE and other databases to identify studies from the first RCT available up to September 2015. The primary outcome was based on PTSD scores (continuous variable. The main outcome was Hedges' g. We used a random-effects model using the statistical packages for meta-analysis available in Stata 13 for Mac OSX. Heterogeneity was evaluated with I2 (> 35% for heterogeneity and the χ2 test (p < 0.10 for heterogeneity. Publication bias was evaluated using a funnel plot. Meta-regression was performed using the random-effects model. Results Five RCTs (n = 118 were included. Active TMS was significantly superior to sham TMS for PTSD symptoms (Hedges' g = 0.74; 95% confidence interval = 0.06-1.42. Heterogeneity was significant in our analysis (I2 = 71.4% and p = 0.01 for the χ2 test. The funnel plot shows that studies were evenly distributed, with just one study located marginally at the edge of the funnel and one study located out of the funnel. We found that exclusion of either study did not have a significant impact on the results. Meta-regression found no particular influence of any variable on the results. Conclusion Active TMS was superior to sham stimulation for amelioration of PTSD symptoms. Further RCTs with larger sample sizes are fundamental to clarify the precise impact of TMS in PTSD.

  1. 5 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the ipsilesional sensory cortex enhances motor learning after stroke

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    Sonia M Brodie

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sensory feedback is critical for motor learning, and thus to neurorehabilitation after stroke. Whether enhancing sensory feedback by applying excitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS over the ipsilesional primary sensory cortex (IL-S1 might enhance motor learning in chronic stroke has yet to be investigated. The present study investigated the effects of 5 Hz rTMS over IL-S1 paired with skilled motor practice on motor learning, hemiparetic cutaneous somatosensation, and motor function. Individuals with unilateral chronic stroke were pseudo-randomly divided into either Active or Sham 5 Hz rTMS groups (n=11/group. Following stimulation, both groups practiced a Serial Tracking Task (STT with the hemiparetic arm; this was repeated for 5 days. Performance on the STT was quantified by response time, peak velocity, and cumulative distance tracked at baseline, during the 5 days of practice, and at a no-rTMS retention test. Cutaneous somatosensation was measured using two-point discrimination. Standardized sensorimotor tests were performed to assess whether the effects might generalize to impact hemiparetic arm function. The active 5Hz rTMS + training group demonstrated significantly greater improvements in STT performance [response time (F1,286.04=13.016, p< 0.0005, peak velocity (F1,285.95=4.111, p=0.044, and cumulative distance (F1,285.92=4.076, p=0.044] and cutaneous somatosensation (F1,21.15=8.793, p=0.007 across all sessions compared to the sham rTMS + training group. Measures of upper extremity motor function were not significantly different for either group. Our preliminary results suggest that, when paired with motor practice, 5Hz rTMS over IL-S1 enhances motor learning related change in individuals with chronic stroke, potentially as a consequence of improved cutaneous somatosensation, however no improvement in general upper extremity function was observed.

  2. Electric field depth–focality tradeoff in transcranial magnetic stimulation: simulation comparison of 50 coil designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2012-01-01

    Background Various transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) coil designs are available or have been proposed. However, key coil characteristics such as electric field focality and attenuation in depth have not been adequately compared. Knowledge of the coil focality and depth characteristics can help TMS researchers and clinicians with coil selection and interpretation of TMS studies. Objective To quantify the electric field focality and depth of penetration of various TMS coils. Methods The electric field distributions induced by 50 TMS coils were simulated in a spherical human head model using the finite element method. For each coil design, we quantified the electric field penetration by the half-value depth, d1/2, and focality by the tangential spread, S1/2, defined as the half-value volume (V1/2) divided by the half-value depth, S1/2 = V1/2/d1/2. Results The 50 TMS coils exhibit a wide range of electric field focality and depth, but all followed a depth–focality tradeoff: coils with larger half-value depth cannot be as focal as more superficial coils. The ranges of achievable d1/2 are similar between coils producing circular and figure-8 electric field patterns, ranging 1.0–3.5 cm and 0.9–3.4 cm, respectively. However, figure-8 field coils are more focal, having S1/2 as low as 5 cm2 compared to 34 cm2 for circular field coils. Conclusions For any coil design, the ability to directly stimulate deeper brain structures is obtained at the expense of inducing wider electrical field spread. Novel coil designs should be benchmarked against comparison coils with consistent metrics such as d1/2 and S1/2. PMID:22483681

  3. Controllable pulse parameter transcranial magnetic stimulator with enhanced circuit topology and pulse shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterchev, Angel V.; DʼOstilio, Kevin; Rothwell, John C.; Murphy, David L.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. This work aims at flexible and practical pulse parameter control in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which is currently very limited in commercial devices. Approach. We present a third generation controllable pulse parameter device (cTMS3) that uses a novel circuit topology with two energy-storage capacitors. It incorporates several implementation and functionality advantages over conventional TMS devices and other devices with advanced pulse shape control. cTMS3 generates lower internal voltage differences and is implemented with transistors with a lower voltage rating than prior cTMS devices. Main results. cTMS3 provides more flexible pulse shaping since the circuit topology allows four coil-voltage levels during a pulse, including approximately zero voltage. The near-zero coil voltage enables snubbing of the ringing at the end of the pulse without the need for a separate active snubber circuit. cTMS3 can generate powerful rapid pulse sequences (\\lt 10 ms inter pulse interval) by increasing the width of each subsequent pulse and utilizing the large capacitor energy storage, allowing the implementation of paradigms such as paired-pulse and quadripulse TMS with a single pulse generation circuit. cTMS3 can also generate theta (50 Hz) burst stimulation with predominantly unidirectional electric field pulses. The cTMS3 device functionality and output strength are illustrated with electrical output measurements as well as a study of the effect of pulse width and polarity on the active motor threshold in ten healthy volunteers. Significance. The cTMS3 features could extend the utility of TMS as a research, diagnostic, and therapeutic tool.

  4. A neuronal network model for simulating the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on local field potential power spectra.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Bey

    Full Text Available Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS holds promise as a non-invasive therapy for the treatment of neurological disorders such as depression, schizophrenia, tinnitus, and epilepsy. Complex interdependencies between stimulus duration, frequency and intensity obscure the exact effects of rTMS stimulation on neural activity in the cortex, making evaluation of and comparison between rTMS studies difficult. To explain the influence of rTMS on neural activity (e.g. in the motor cortex, we use a neuronal network model. The results demonstrate that the model adequately explains experimentally observed short term effects of rTMS on the band power in common frequency bands used in electroencephalography (EEG. We show that the equivalent local field potential (eLFP band power depends on stimulation intensity rather than on stimulation frequency. Additionally, our model resolves contradictions in experiments.

  5. Automatic bearing fault diagnosis of permanent magnet synchronous generators in wind turbines subjected to noise interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun; Lu, Siliang; Zhai, Chao; He, Qingbo

    2018-02-01

    An automatic bearing fault diagnosis method is proposed for permanent magnet synchronous generators (PMSGs), which are widely installed in wind turbines subjected to low rotating speeds, speed fluctuations, and electrical device noise interferences. The mechanical rotating angle curve is first extracted from the phase current of a PMSG by sequentially applying a series of algorithms. The synchronous sampled vibration signal of the fault bearing is then resampled in the angular domain according to the obtained rotating phase information. Considering that the resampled vibration signal is still overwhelmed by heavy background noise, an adaptive stochastic resonance filter is applied to the resampled signal to enhance the fault indicator and facilitate bearing fault identification. Two types of fault bearings with different fault sizes in a PMSG test rig are subjected to experiments to test the effectiveness of the proposed method. The proposed method is fully automated and thus shows potential for convenient, highly efficient and in situ bearing fault diagnosis for wind turbines subjected to harsh environments.

  6. Static field influences on transcranial magnetic stimulation: considerations for TMS in the scanner environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Jeffrey M; Jalinous, Reza; Cantarero, Gabriela L; Desmond, John E

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be combined with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to simultaneously manipulate and monitor human cortical responses. Although tremendous efforts have been directed at characterizing the impact of TMS on image acquisition, the influence of the scanner's static field on the TMS coil has received limited attention. The aim of this study was to characterize the influence of the scanner's static field on TMS. We hypothesized that spatial variations in the static field could account for TMS field variations in the scanner environment. Using an MRI-compatible TMS coil, we estimated TMS field strengths based on TMS-induced voltage changes measured in a search coil. We compared peak field strengths obtained with the TMS coil positioned at different locations (B0 field vs fringe field) and orientations in the static field. We also measured the scanner's static field to derive a field map to account for TMS field variations. TMS field strength scaled depending on coil location and orientation with respect to the static field. Larger TMS field variations were observed in fringe field regions near the gantry as compared to regions inside the bore or further removed from the bore. The scanner's static field also exhibited the greatest spatial variations in fringe field regions near the gantry. The scanner's static field influences TMS fields and spatial variations in the static field correlate with TMS field variations. Coil orientation changes in the B0 field did not result in substantial TMS field variations. TMS field variations can be minimized by delivering TMS in the bore or outside of the 0-70 cm region from the bore entrance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) Therapy in Parkinson Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

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    Wagle Shukla, Aparna; Shuster, Jonathan J; Chung, Jae Woo; Vaillancourt, David E; Patten, Carolynn; Ostrem, Jill; Okun, Michael S

    2016-04-01

    Several studies have reported repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) therapy as an effective treatment for the control of motor symptoms in Parkinson disease. The objective of the study is to quantify the overall efficacy of this treatment. Systematic review and meta-analysis. We reviewed the literature on clinical rTMS trials in Parkinson disease since the technique was introduced in 1980. We used the following databases: MEDLINE, Web of Science, Cochrane, and CINAHL. Patients with Parkinson disease who were participating in prospective clinical trials that included an active arm and a control arm and change in motor scores on Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale as the primary outcome. We pooled data from 21 studies that met these criteria. We then analyzed separately the effects of low- and high-frequency rTMS on clinical motor improvements. The overall pooled mean difference between treatment and control groups in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor score was significant (4.0 points, 95% confidence interval, 1.5, 6.7; P = .005). rTMS therapy was effective when low-frequency stimulation (≤ 1 Hz) was used with a pooled mean difference of 3.3 points (95% confidence interval 1.6, 5.0; P = .005). There was a trend for significance when high-frequency stimulation (≥ 5 Hz) studies were evaluated with a pooled mean difference of 3.9 points (95% confidence interval, -0.7, 8.5; P = .08). rTMS therapy demonstrated benefits at short-term follow-up (immediately after a treatment protocol) with a pooled mean difference of 3.4 points (95% confidence interval, 0.3, 6.6; P = .03) as well as at long-term follow-up (average follow-up 6 weeks) with mean difference of 4.1 points (95% confidence interval, -0.15, 8.4; P = .05). There were insufficient data to statistically analyze the effects of rTMS when we specifically examined bradykinesia, gait, and levodopa-induced dyskinesia using quantitative methods. rTMS therapy in patients with Parkinson

  8. Contralesional Hemisphere Regulation of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation-Induced Kinetic Coupling in the Poststroke Lower Limb

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    Andrew Q. Tan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe neural constraints underlying hemiparetic gait dysfunction are associated with abnormal kinetic outflow and altered muscle synergy structure. Recent evidence from our lab implicates the lesioned hemisphere in mediating the expression of abnormally coupled hip adduction and knee extension synergy, suggesting a role of cortical networks in the regulation of lower limb motor outflow poststroke. The potential contribution of contralesional hemisphere (CON-H in regulating paretic leg kinetics is unknown. The purpose of this study is to characterize the effect of CON-H activation on aberrant across-joint kinetic coupling of the ipsilateral lower-extremity muscles poststroke.MethodsAmplitude-matched adductor longus motor-evoked potentials were elicited using single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS of the lesioned (L-H and CON-Hs during an isometric adductor torque matching task from 11 stroke participants. For 10 control participants, TMS of the contralateral and ipsilateral hemisphere were given during the same task. TMS-induced torques were characterized at the hip and knee joints to determine the differential regulation of abnormal kinetic synergies by each motor cortices. The TMS-induced ratio of knee extension/hip adduction torques was quantified during 40 and 20% of maximum adduction torque.FindingsFor both the 40 and 20% target adduction tasks, we find that contralesional stimulation significantly reduced but did not eliminate the TMS-induced ratio of knee extension/hip adduction torques for the stroke group (p = 0.0468, p = 0.0396. In contrast, the controls did not present a significantly different TMS-evoked torque following stimulation (p = 0.923 of the hemisphere ipsilateral to the test leg.InterpretationThe reduced expression of abnormal across-joint kinetic coupling suggests that the CON-H may contribute an adaptive role in lower limb control poststroke. Future study of neuromodulation paradigms that

  9. Safety of primed repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and modified constraint-induced movement therapy in a randomized controlled trial in pediatric hemiparesis.

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    Gillick, Bernadette T; Krach, Linda E; Feyma, Tim; Rich, Tonya L; Moberg, Kelli; Menk, Jeremiah; Cassidy, Jessica; Kimberley, Teresa; Carey, James R

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the safety of combining a 6-Hz primed low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) intervention in the contralesional hemisphere with a modified constraint-induced movement therapy (mCIMT) program in children with congenital hemiparesis. Phase 1 randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled pretest/posttest trial. University academic facility and pediatric specialty hospital. Subjects (N = 19; age range, 8-17 y) with congenital hemiparesis caused by ischemic stroke or periventricular leukomalacia. No subject withdrew because of adverse events. All subjects included completed the study. Subjects were randomized to 1 of 2 groups: either real rTMS plus mCIMT (n = 10) or sham rTMS plus mCIMT (n = 9). Adverse events, physician assessment, ipsilateral hand function, stereognosis, cognitive function, subject report of symptoms assessment, and subject questionnaire. No major adverse events occurred. Minor adverse events were found in both groups. The most common events were headaches (real: 50%, sham: 89%; P = .14) and cast irritation (real: 30%, sham: 44%; P = .65). No differences between groups in secondary cognitive and unaffected hand motor measures were found. Primed rTMS can be used safely with mCIMT in congenital hemiparesis. We provide new information on the use of rTMS in combination with mCIMT in children. These findings could be useful in research and future clinical applications in advancing function in congenital hemiparesis. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Transcranial magnetic stimulation with a half-sine wave pulse elicits direction-specific effects in human motor cortex

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    Jung Nikolai H

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS commonly uses so-called monophasic pulses where the initial rapidly changing current flow is followed by a critically dampened return current. It has been shown that a monophasic TMS pulse preferentially excites different cortical circuits in the human motor hand area (M1-HAND, if the induced tissue current has a posterior-to-anterior (PA or anterior-to-posterior (AP direction. Here we tested whether similar direction-specific effects could be elicited in M1-HAND using TMS pulses with a half-sine wave configuration. Results In 10 young participants, we applied half-sine pulses to the right M1-HAND which elicited PA or AP currents with respect to the orientation of the central sulcus. Measurements of the motor evoked potential (MEP revealed that PA half-sine stimulation resulted in lower resting motor threshold (RMT than AP stimulation. When stimulus intensity (SI was gradually increased as percentage of maximal stimulator output, the stimulus–response curve (SRC of MEP amplitude showed a leftward shift for PA as opposed to AP half-sine stimulation. Further, MEP latencies were approximately 1 ms shorter for PA relative to AP half-sine stimulation across the entire SI range tested. When adjusting SI to the respective RMT of PA and AP stimulation, the direction-specific differences in MEP latencies persisted, while the gain function of MEP amplitudes was comparable for PA and AP stimulation. Conclusions Using half-sine pulse configuration, single-pulse TMS elicits consistent direction-specific effects in M1-HAND that are similar to TMS with monophasic pulses. The longer MEP latency for AP half-sine stimulation suggests that PA and AP half-sine stimulation preferentially activates different sets of cortical neurons that are involved in the generation of different corticospinal descending volleys.

  11. Intermittent theta burst over M1 may increase peak power of a Wingate anaerobic test and prevent the reduction of voluntary activation measured with transcranial magnetic stimulation

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    Louis-Solal Giboin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the potential of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS to improve performances in patients suffering from motor neuronal afflictions, its effect on motor performance enhancement in healthy subjects during a specific sport task is still unknown. We hypothesised that after an intermittent theta burst (iTBS treatment, performance during the Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT, will increase and supraspinal fatigue following the exercise will be lower in comparison to a control treatment.Ten subjects participated in two randomised experiments consisting of a WAnT 5 minutes after either an iTBS or a control treatment. We determined voluntary activation (VA of the right knee extensors with TMS (VATMS and with peripheral nerve stimulation (VAPNS of the femoral nerve, before and after the WAnT. T-tests were applied to the WAnT results and a 2 way within subject ANOVA was applied to VA results. The iTBS treatment increased the peak power and the maximum pedalling cadence and suppressed the reduction of VATMS following the WAnT compared to the control treatment. No behavioural changes related to fatigue (mean power and fatigue index were observed.These results indicate for the first time that iTBS could be used as a potential intervention to improve anaerobic performance in a sport specific task.

  12. Noninvasive and painless magnetic stimulation of nerves improved brain motor function and mobility in a cerebral palsy case.

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    Flamand, Véronique H; Schneider, Cyril

    2014-10-01

    Motor deficits in cerebral palsy disturb functional independence. This study tested whether noninvasive and painless repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation could improve motor function in a 7-year-old boy with spastic hemiparetic cerebral palsy. Stimulation was applied over different nerves of the lower limbs for 5 sessions. We measured the concurrent aftereffects of this intervention on ankle motor control, gait (walking velocity, stride length, cadence, cycle duration), and function of brain motor pathways. We observed a decrease of ankle plantar flexors resistance to stretch, an increase of active dorsiflexion range of movement, and improvements of corticospinal control of ankle dorsiflexors. Joint mobility changes were still present 15 days after the end of stimulation, when all gait parameters were also improved. Resistance to stretch was still lower than prestimulation values 45 days after the end of stimulation. This case illustrates the sustained effects of repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation on brain plasticity, motor function, and gait. It suggests a potential impact for physical rehabilitation in cerebral palsy. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Different patterns of cortical excitability in major depression and vascular depression: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

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    Concerto, Carmen; Lanza, Giuseppe; Cantone, Mariagiovanna; Pennisi, Manuela; Giordano, Daniela; Spampinato, Concetto; Ricceri, Riccardo; Pennisi, Giovanni; Aguglia, Eugenio; Bella, Rita

    2013-11-09

    Clinical and functional studies consider major depression (MD) and vascular depression (VD) as different neurobiological processes. Hypoexcitability of the left frontal cortex to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is frequently reported in MD, whereas little is known about the effects of TMS in VD. Thus, we aimed to assess and compare motor cortex excitability in patients with VD and MD. Eleven VD patients, 11 recurrent drug-resistant MD patients, and 11 healthy controls underwent clinical, neuropsychological and neuroimaging evaluations in addition to bilateral resting motor threshold, cortical silent period, and paired-pulse TMS curves of intracortical excitability. All patients continued on psychotropic drugs, which were unchanged throughout the study. Scores on one of the tests evaluating frontal lobe abilities (Stroop Color-Word interference test) were worse in patients compared with controls. The resting motor threshold in patients with MD was significantly higher in the left hemisphere compared with the right (p depression with subcortical vascular disease and early-onset recurrent drug resistant MD. The data provide a TMS model of the different processes underlying VD and MD. Additionally, our results support the "Vascular depression hypothesis" at the neurophysiological level, and confirm the inter-hemispheric asymmetry to TMS in patients with MD. We were unable to support previous findings of impaired intracortical inhibitory mechanisms to TMS in patients with MD, although a drug-induced effect on our results cannot be excluded. This study may aid the understanding of the pathogenetic differences underlying the clinical spectrum of depressive disorders.

  14. Vascular Cognitive Impairment through the Looking Glass of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

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    Giuseppe Lanza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, there has been a significant growth in the literature exploiting transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS with the aim at gaining further insights into the electrophysiological and neurochemical basis underlying vascular cognitive impairment (VCI. Overall, TMS points at enhanced brain cortical excitability and synaptic plasticity in VCI, especially in patients with overt dementia, and neurophysiological changes seem to correlate with disease process and progress. These findings have been interpreted as part of a glutamate-mediated compensatory effect in response to vascular lesions. Although a single TMS parameter owns low specificity, a panel of measures can support the VCI diagnosis, predict progression, and possibly identify early markers of “brain at risk” for future dementia, thus making VCI a potentially preventable cause of both vascular and degenerative dementia in late life. Moreover, TMS can be also exploited to select and evaluate the responders to specific drugs, as well as to become an innovative rehabilitative tool in the attempt to restore impaired neural plasticity. The present review provides a perspective of the different TMS techniques by further understanding the cortical electrophysiology and the role of distinctive neurotransmission pathways and networks involved in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of VCI and its subtypes.

  15. Reduction hybrid artifacts of EMG-EOG in electroencephalography evoked by prefrontal transcranial magnetic stimulation

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    Bai, Yang; Wan, Xiaohong; Zeng, Ke; Ni, Yinmei; Qiu, Lirong; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-12-01

    Objective. When prefrontal-transcranial magnetic stimulation (p-TMS) performed, it may evoke hybrid artifact mixed with muscle activity and blink activity in EEG recordings. Reducing this kind of hybrid artifact challenges the traditional preprocessing methods. We aim to explore method for the p-TMS evoked hybrid artifact removal. Approach. We propose a novel method used as independent component analysis (ICA) post processing to reduce the p-TMS evoked hybrid artifact. Ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) was used to decompose signal into multi-components, then the components were separated with artifact reduced by blind source separation (BSS) method. Three standard BSS methods, ICA, independent vector analysis, and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) were tested. Main results. Synthetic results showed that EEMD-CCA outperformed others as ICA post processing step in hybrid artifacts reduction. Its superiority was clearer when signal to noise ratio (SNR) was lower. In application to real experiment, SNR can be significantly increased and the p-TMS evoked potential could be recovered from hybrid artifact contaminated signal. Our proposed method can effectively reduce the p-TMS evoked hybrid artifacts. Significance. Our proposed method may facilitate future prefrontal TMS-EEG researches.

  16. Sensory tricks and brain excitability in cervical dystonia: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

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    Amadio, Stefano; Houdayer, Elise; Bianchi, Francesca; Tesfaghebriel Tekle, Habtom; Urban, Ivan Pietro; Butera, Calogera; Guerriero, Roberta; Cursi, Marco; Leocani, Letizia; Comi, Giancarlo; Del Carro, Ubaldo

    2014-08-01

    Sensory tricks such as touching the face with fingertips often improve cervical dystonia [CD]. This study is to determine whether sensory tricks modulate motor cortex excitability, assessed by paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation [p-pTMS]. Eight patients with rotational CD underwent p-pTMS, at rest and when the sensory trick was applied. To test intracortical inhibition [ICI] and facilitation [ICF], the amplitude ratio between conditioned and unconditioned cortical motor evoked potentials was measured at several interstimulus intervals (ISI 1, 3, 15, and 20 ms) and compared with controls mimicking patients' sensory tricks. At rest, a significant ICF enhancement was found at ISIs 15 through 20 in patients compared with controls, whereas no significant ICI changes were observed. Sensory tricks significantly reduced the abnormal ICF in patients and did not induce any change in controls. In our CD patients, sensory tricks seem to improve dystonia through an inhibitory effect on motor cortex excitability. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  17. A Comprehensive Study of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease

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    Kimura, Hideki; Kurimura, Masayuki; Kurokawa, Katsurou; Nagaoka, Utako; Arawaka, Shigeki; Wada, Manabu; Kawanami, Toru; Kurita, Keiji; Kato, Takeo

    2011-01-01

    The clinical benefits of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for Parkinson's disease (PD) remain controversial. We performed a comprehensive study to examine whether rTMS is a safe and effective treatment for PD. Twelve PD patients received rTMS once a week. The crossover study design consisted of 4-week sham rTMS followed by 4-week real rTMS. The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Modified Hoehn and Yahr Stage, Schwab and England ADL Scale, Actigraph, Mini-Mental State Examination, Hamilton Depression Scale, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-revised, and cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examinations were used to evaluate the rTMS effects. Under both drug-on and drug-off conditions, the real rTMS improved the UPDRS scores significantly, while the sham rTMS did not. There were no significant changes in the results of the neuropsychological tests, CBF and CSF. rTMS seems to be a safe and effective therapeutic option for PD patients, especially in a wearing-off state. PMID:22389830

  18. Characterizing and Modulating Brain Circuitry through Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Combined with Electroencephalography

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    Faranak Farzan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The concurrent combination of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS with electroencephalography (TMS-EEG is a powerful technology for characterizing and modulating brain networks across developmental, behavioral and disease states. Given the global initiatives in mapping the human brain, recognition of the utility of this technique is growing across neuroscience disciplines. Importantly, TMS-EEG offers translational biomarkers that can be applied in health and disease, across the lifespan, and in humans and animals, bridging the gap between animal models and human studies. However, to utilize the full potential of TMS-EEG methodology, standardization of TMS-EEG study protocols is needed. In this article, we review the principles of TMS-EEG methodology, factors impacting TMS-EEG outcome measures, and the techniques for preventing and correcting artifacts in TMS-EEG data. To promote the standardization of this technique, we provide comprehensive guides for designing TMS-EEG studies and conducting TMS-EEG experiments. We conclude by reviewing the application of TMS-EEG in basic, cognitive and clinical neurosciences, and evaluate the potential of this emerging technology in brain research.

  19. Characterizing and Modulating Brain Circuitry through Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Combined with Electroencephalography.

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    Farzan, Faranak; Vernet, Marine; Shafi, Mouhsin M D; Rotenberg, Alexander; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    The concurrent combination of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) is a powerful technology for characterizing and modulating brain networks across developmental, behavioral, and disease states. Given the global initiatives in mapping the human brain, recognition of the utility of this technique is growing across neuroscience disciplines. Importantly, TMS-EEG offers translational biomarkers that can be applied in health and disease, across the lifespan, and in humans and animals, bridging the gap between animal models and human studies. However, to utilize the full potential of TMS-EEG methodology, standardization of TMS-EEG study protocols is needed. In this article, we review the principles of TMS-EEG methodology, factors impacting TMS-EEG outcome measures, and the techniques for preventing and correcting artifacts in TMS-EEG data. To promote the standardization of this technique, we provide comprehensive guides for designing TMS-EEG studies and conducting TMS-EEG experiments. We conclude by reviewing the application of TMS-EEG in basic, cognitive and clinical neurosciences, and evaluate the potential of this emerging technology in brain research.

  20. Accuracy of Intraoperative Computed Tomography during Deep Brain Stimulation Procedures: Comparison with Postoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

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    Bot, Maarten; van den Munckhof, Pepijn; Bakay, Roy; Stebbins, Glenn; Verhagen Metman, Leo

    2017-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of intraoperative computed tomography (iCT) in localizing deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes by comparing this modality with postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Optimal lead placement is a critical factor for the outcome of DBS procedures and preferably confirmed during surgery. iCT offers 3-dimensional verification of both microelectrode and lead location during DBS surgery. However, accurate electrode representation on iCT has not been extensively studied. DBS surgery was performed using the Leksell stereotactic G frame. Stereotactic coordinates of 52 DBS leads were determined on both iCT and postoperative MRI and compared with intended final target coordinates. The resulting absolute differences in X (medial-lateral), Y (anterior-posterior), and Z (dorsal-ventral) coordinates (ΔX, ΔY, and ΔZ) for both modalities were then used to calculate the euclidean distance. Euclidean distances were 2.7 ± 1.1 and 2.5 ± 1.2 mm for MRI and iCT, respectively (p = 0.2). Postoperative MRI and iCT show equivalent DBS lead representation. Intraoperative localization of both microelectrode and DBS lead in stereotactic space enables direct adjustments. Verification of lead placement with postoperative MRI, considered to be the gold standard, is unnecessary. © 2017 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Deep transcranial magnetic stimulation as a treatment for psychiatric disorders: a comprehensive review.

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    Bersani, F S; Minichino, A; Enticott, P G; Mazzarini, L; Khan, N; Antonacci, G; Raccah, R N; Salviati, M; Delle Chiaie, R; Bersani, G; Fitzgerald, P B; Biondi, M

    2013-01-01

    Deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a technique of neuromodulation and neurostimulation based on the principle of electromagnetic induction of an electric field in the brain. The coil (H-coil) used in deep TMS is able to modulate cortical excitability up to a maximum depth of 6 cm and is therefore able not only to modulate the activity of the cerebral cortex but also the activity of deeper neural circuits. Deep TMS is largely used for the treatment of drug-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD) and is being tested to treat a very wide range of neurological, psychiatric and medical conditions. The aim of this review is to illustrate the biophysical principles of deep TMS, to explain the pathophysiological basis for its utilization in each psychiatric disorder (major depression, autism, bipolar depression, auditory hallucinations, negative symptoms of schizophrenia), to summarize the results presented thus far in the international scientific literature regarding the use of deep TMS in psychiatry, its side effects and its effects on cognitive functions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. [Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), inhibition processes and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) - an overview].

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    Hoegl, Thomas; Bender, Stephan; Buchmann, Johannes; Kratz, Oliver; Moll, Gunther H; Heinrich, Hartmut

    2014-11-01

    Motor system excitability can be tested by transcranial magnetic stimulation CFMS). In this article, an overview of recent methodological developments and research findings related to attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is provided. Different TMS parameters that reflect the function of interneurons in the motor cortex may represent neurophysiological markers of inhibition in ADHD, particularly the so-called intracortical inhibition. In children with a high level of hyperactivity and impulsivity, intracortical inhibition was comparably low at rest as shortly before the execution of a movement. TMS-evoked potentials can also be measured in the EEG so that investigating processes of excitability is not restricted to motor areas in future studies. The effects of methylphenidate on motor system excitability may be interpreted in the sense of a 'fine-tuning' with these mainly dopaminergic effects also depending on genetic parameters (DAT1 transporter). A differentiated view on the organization of motor control can be achieved by a combined analysis of TMS parameters and event-related potentials. Applying this bimodal approach, strong evidence for a deviant implementation of motor control in children with ADHD and probably compensatory mechanisms (with involvement of the prefrontal cortex) was obtained. These findings, which contribute to a better understanding of hyperactivity/impulsivity, inhibitory processes and motor control in ADHD as well as the mechanisms of medication, underline the relevance of TMS as a neurophysiological method in ADHD research.

  3. Corticospinal facilitation during observation of graspable objects: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

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    Michele Franca

    Full Text Available In 1979, Gibson first advanced the idea that the sight of graspable objects automatically activates in the observer the repertoire of actions necessary to interact with them, even in the absence of any intention to act ("affordance effect". The neurophysiological substrate of this effect was later identified in a class of bimodal neurons, the so-called "canonical" neurons, located within monkey premotor cortex. In humans, even if different behavioral studies supported the existence of affordance effect, neurophysiological investigations exploring its neural substrates showed contradictory results. Here, by means of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS, we explored the time-course of the "affordance effect" elicited by the observation of everyday-life graspable objects on motor cortex of resting observers. We recorded motor evoked potentials (MEP from three intrinsic hand muscles (two "synergic" for grasping, OP and FDI and one "neutral", ADM. We found that objects' vision determined an increased excitability at 120 milliseconds after their presentation. Moreover, this modulation was proved to be specific to the cortical representations of synergic muscles. From an evolutionary perspective, this timing perfectly fits with a fast recruitment of the motor system aimed at rapidly and accurately choosing the appropriate motor plans in a competitive environment filled with different opportunities.

  4. Long-lasting repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation modulates electroencephalography oscillation in patients with disorders of consciousness.

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    Xia, Xiaoyu; Liu, Yang; Bai, Yang; Liu, Ziyuan; Yang, Yi; Guo, Yongkun; Xu, Ruxiang; Gao, Xiaorong; Li, Xiaoli; He, Jianghong

    2017-10-18

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been applied for the treatment of patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). Timely and accurate assessments of its modulation effects are very useful. This study evaluated rTMS modulation effects on electroencephalography (EEG) oscillation in patients with chronic DOC. Eighteen patients with a diagnosis of DOC lasting more than 3 months were recruited. All patients received one session of 10-Hz rTMS at the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and then 12 of them received consecutive rTMS treatment everyday for 20 consecutive days. Resting-state EEGs were recorded before the experiment (T0) after one session of rTMS (T1) and after the entire treatment (T2). The JFK Coma Recovery Scale-Revised scale scores were also recorded at the time points. Our data showed that application of 10-Hz rTMS to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex decreased low-frequency band power and increased high-frequency band power in DOC patients, especially in minimal conscious state patients. Considering the correlation of the EEG spectrum with the consciousness level of patients with DOC, quantitative EEG might be useful for assessment of the effect of rTMS in DOC patients.

  5. The role of transcranial magnetic stimulation in evaluation of motor cortex excitability in Rett syndrome.

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    Krajnc, Natalija; Zidar, Janez

    2016-07-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a frequent neurodevelopmental disorder confirmed by clinical criteria and supported by the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) mutation. A short central motor conduction time (CMCT) was reported in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies performed in RTT. This was attributed to hyperexcitability of the motor cortex and/or spinal motor neurons, but was not studied further. We performed TMS in RTT to evaluate motor cortex excitability by determining the cortical motor threshold (CMT) and motor cortex inhibition by the cortical silent period (CSP) besides measuring CMCT. Single-pulse TMS was performed in 17 Rett patients, diagnosed by clinical criteria and MECP2 mutation testing, and the same number of healthy controls. The outcome measures were compared between RTT groups with different antiepileptic drugs (AED) and those with and without the MECP2 mutation. CMCT was shorter, but we found elevated CMT and shorter CSP, which suggests decreased excitatory and inhibitory motor cortical function. The outcome was independent of AED and the presence or absence of the MECP2 mutation. Decreased excitatory and inhibitory motor cortical function could explain the short CMCT, with higher stimulus intensities needed to excite pyramidal neurons. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Non-invasive brain stimulation and computational models in post-stroke aphasic patients: single session of transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation. A randomized clinical trial

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    Michele Devido dos Santos

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Patients undergoing the same neuromodulation protocol may present different responses. Computational models may help in understanding such differences. The aims of this study were, firstly, to compare the performance of aphasic patients in naming tasks before and after one session of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS and sham, and analyze the results between these neuromodulation techniques; and secondly, through computational model on the cortex and surrounding tissues, to assess current flow distribution and responses among patients who received tDCS and presented different levels of results from naming tasks. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective, descriptive, qualitative and quantitative, double blind, randomized and placebo-controlled study conducted at Faculdade de Ciências Médicas da Santa Casa de São Paulo. METHODS: Patients with aphasia received one session of tDCS, TMS or sham stimulation. The time taken to name pictures and the response time were evaluated before and after neuromodulation. Selected patients from the first intervention underwent a computational model stimulation procedure that simulated tDCS. RESULTS: The results did not indicate any statistically significant differences from before to after the stimulation.The computational models showed different current flow distributions. CONCLUSIONS: The present study did not show any statistically significant difference between tDCS, TMS and sham stimulation regarding naming tasks. The patients’responses to the computational model showed different patterns of current distribution.

  7. Influence of Distance and Illumination on Detection of Marks in Augmented Reality applied to Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

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    José Soeiro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out while developing an Augmented Reality mobile application that represents 3D virtual models of the brain of a patient over the real image of the patient’s head. The main purpose of the application is to guide doctors during a non-invasive medical procedure called Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation that uses electromagnetic stimulation to treat neurological problems. The tracking of these markers have proven to be one of the more challenging components of such an application and we observe that lighting conditions and distance to the markers are two of the main factors that can influence their accurate recognition

  8. Prevalence of Sinusitis Detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Subjects with Dementia or Alzheimer's Disease.

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    Yasue, Minori; Sugiura, Saiko; Uchida, Yasue; Otake, Hironao; Teranishi, Masaaki; Sakurai, Takashi; Toba, Kenji; Shimokata, Hiroshi; Ando, Fujiko; Otsuka, Rei; Nakashima, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that periodontitis is associated with Alzheimer's disease. However, the association between paranasal sinusitis and Alzheimer's disease has not been studied, although olfactory dysfunction frequently precedes the progress of dementia or Alzheimer's disease. We studied 783 patients (283 men, 500 women; mean age 77.0 ± 7.9 years) who visited the Center for Comprehensive Care and Research on Memory Disorders, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, and 2139 control subjects who participated in a population-based study conducted by the National Institute for Longevity Sciences - Longitudinal Study of Aging (NILS-LSA) in Japan. Sinusitis was evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) according to the Lund-Mackay scoring system. A sinusitis score of ≥ 4 was classified as positive and a score of ≤ 3 was classified as negative. The prevalence of positive sinusitis was 6.3% in patients with a mini-mental state examination (MMSE) score of sinusitis was7.2% in the control group. The prevalence of sinusitis was not significantly different between normal controls and patients with dementia or Alzheimer's disease after adjustments for age and sex. The rate of positive sinusitis was higher in male than in female subjects in both groups. The prevalence of sinusitis in patients with Alzheimer's disease or dementia was not higher than in the general population.

  9. The Effectiveness of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Poststroke Apathy Is Associated with Improved Interhemispheric Functional Connectivity.

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    Mitaki, Shingo; Onoda, Keiichi; Abe, Satoshi; Oguro, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Shuhei

    2016-12-01

    Poststroke apathy is relatively common and has negative effects on the functional recovery of the patient; however, few reports have demonstrated the existence of effective treatments for poststroke apathy. Here, we describe a case of poststroke apathy that was successfully treated with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we detected improved interhemispheric functional connectivity that was correlated with the patient's recovery from poststroke apathy. Our case suggests that rTMS can improve the transfer of information through the corpus callosum, which is crucial for helping patients recover from poststroke apathy. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The combination of neuronavigation with transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment of opercular gliomas of the dominant brain hemisphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamov, T; Spiriev, T; Tzvetanov, P; Petkov, A

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the application of transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with neuronavigation for preoperative mapping of the language area in neurosurgical interventions on the opercular area of the dominant hemisphere. Five patients were operated upon gliomas in the opercular area. For localization of the speech area a transcranial magnetic stimulator MEDTRONIC-MagPro was used. BrainLAB-VectorVision Neuronavigation system was utilized for precise planning of the operative approach. Gross total resection was achieved in all patients. Three-month postoperative follow-up was done. Three of the patients had a transient postoperative motor aphasia which resolved within 1 month. This method is useful for preoperative localization of the speech area, as well as preoperative planning of the operative approach and intra-operative planning of the direction of brain retraction and operative corridor. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of anatomical variability on neural stimulation strength and focality in electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H; Peterchev, Angel V

    2009-01-01

    We present a quantitative comparison of two metrics-neural stimulation strength and focality-in electrocon-vulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) using finite-element method (FEM) simulation in a spherical head model. Five stimulation modalities were modeled, including bilateral ECT, unilateral ECT, focal electrically administered seizure therapy (FEAST), and MST with circular and double-cone coils, with stimulation parameters identical to those applied in clinical practice. We further examine the effect on the stimulation metrics of individual-, sex- and age-related variability in tissue layer thickness and conductivity. Neural stimulation by MST is shown to be more focal and superficial than ECT. This result suggests that it may be advantageous to reduce the current used in ECT. The stimulation strength in MST is also less sensitive to variations in head geometry and tissue conductivity than in ECT. Individualization of pulse amplitude in both ECT and MST could compensate for anatomical variability, which could lead to more consistent clinical outcomes.

  12. Right secondary somatosensory cortex-a promising novel target for the treatment of drug-resistant neuropathic orofacial pain with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm, Pauliina; Lamusuo, Salla; Taiminen, Tero; Pesonen, Ullamari; Lahti, Ari; Virtanen, Arja; Forssell, Heli; Hietala, Jarmo; Hagelberg, Nora; Pertovaara, Antti; Parkkola, Riitta; Jääskeläinen, Satu

    2015-07-01

    High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the motor cortex has analgesic effect; however, the efficacy of other cortical targets and the mode of action remain unclear. We examined the effects of rTMS in neuropathic orofacial pain, and compared 2 cortical targets against placebo. Furthermore, as dopaminergic mechanisms modulate pain responses, we assessed the influence of the functional DRD2 gene polymorphism (957C>T) and the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met polymorphism on the analgesic effect of rTMS. Sixteen patients with chronic drug-resistant neuropathic orofacial pain participated in this randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Navigated high-frequency rTMS was given to the sensorimotor (S1/M1) and the right secondary somatosensory (S2) cortices. All subjects were genotyped for the DRD2 957C>T and COMT Val158Met polymorphisms. Pain, mood, and quality of life were monitored throughout the study. The numerical rating scale pain scores were significantly lower after the S2 stimulation than after the S1/M1 (P = 0.0071) or the sham (P = 0.0187) stimulations. The Brief Pain Inventory scores were also lower 3 to 5 days after the S2 stimulation than those at pretreatment baseline (P = 0.0127 for the intensity of pain and P = 0.0074 for the interference of pain) or after the S1/M1 (P = 0.001 and P = 0.0001) and sham (P = 0.0491 and P = 0.0359) stimulations. No correlations were found between the genetic polymorphisms and the analgesic effect in the present small clinical sample. The right S2 cortex is a promising new target for the treatment of neuropathic orofacial pain with high-frequency rTMS.

  13. Descending motor pathways and cortical physiology after spinal cord injury assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Brigo, Francesco; Orioli, Andrea; Tezzon, Frediano; Schwenker, Kerstin; Christova, Monica; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-09-04

    We performed here a systematic review of the studies using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a research and clinical tool in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by TMS represent a highly accurate diagnostic test that can supplement clinical examination and neuroimaging findings in the assessment of SCI functional level. MEPs allows to monitor the changes in motor function and evaluate the effects of the different therapeutic approaches. Moreover, TMS represents a useful non-invasive approach for studying cortical physiology, and may be helpful in elucidating the pathophysiological mechanisms of brain reorganization after SCI. Measures of motor cortex reactivity, e.g., the short interval intracortical inhibition and the cortical silent period, seem to point to an increased cortical excitability. However, the results of TMS studies are sometimes contradictory or divergent, and should be replicated in a larger sample of subjects. Understanding the functional changes at brain level and defining their effects on clinical outcome is of crucial importance for development of evidence-based rehabilitation therapy. TMS techniques may help in identifying neurophysiological biomarkers that can reliably assess the extent of neural damage, elucidate the mechanisms of neural repair, predict clinical outcome, and identify therapeutic targets. Some researchers have begun to therapeutically use repetitive TMS (rTMS) in patients with SCI. Initial studies revealed that rTMS can induce acute and short duration beneficial effects especially on spasticity and neuropathic pain, but the evidence is to date still very preliminary and well-designed clinical trials are warranted. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Neurocognitive Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) in Adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD)

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher A Wall; Christopher A Wall; Paul eCroarkin; Paul eCroarkin; Shawn eMcClintock; Shawn eMcClintock; Lauren L Murphy; Lorelei A Bandel; Leslie A Sim; Leslie A Sim; Shirlene M Sampson

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: It is estimated that 30% to 40% of adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) do not receive full benefit from current antidepressant therapies. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a novel therapy approved by the US FDA to treat adults with MDD. Research suggests rTMS is not associated with adverse neurocognitive effects in adult populations; however, there is no documentation of its neurocognitive effects in adolescents. This is a secondary post hoc ana...

  15. Hazard zoning around electric substations of petrochemical industries by stimulation of extremely low-frequency magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Monireh; Monazzam, Mohammad Reza; Farhang Matin, Laleh; Khosroabadi, Hossein

    2015-05-01

    Electromagnetic fields in recent years have been discussed as one of the occupational hazards at workplaces. Hence, control and assessment of these physical factors is very important to protect and promote the health of employees. The present study was conducted to determine hazard zones based on assessment of extremely low-frequency magnetic fields at electric substations of a petrochemical complex in southern Iran, using the single-axis HI-3604 device. In measurement of electromagnetic fields by the single-axis HI-3604 device, the sensor screen should be oriented in a way to be perpendicular to the field lines. Therefore, in places where power lines are located in different directions, it is required to keep the device towards three axes of x, y, and z. For further precision, the measurements should be repeated along each of the three axes. In this research, magnetic field was measured, for the first time, in three axes of x, y, and z whose resultant value was considered as the value of magnetic field. Measurements were done based on IEEE std 644-1994. Further, the spatial changes of the magnetic field surrounding electric substations were stimulated using MATLAB software. The obtained results indicated that the maximum magnetic flux density was 49.90 μT recorded from boiler substation, while the minimum magnetic flux density of 0.02 μT was measured at the control room of the complex. As the stimulation results suggest, the spaces around incoming panels, transformers, and cables were recognized as hazardous zones of indoor electric substations. Considering the health effects of chronic exposure to magnetic fields, it would be possible to minimize exposure to these contaminants at workplaces by identification of risky zones and observation of protective considerations.

  16. Repetitive magnetic stimulation induces plasticity of excitatory postsynapses on proximal dendrites of cultured mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Maximilian; Platschek, Steffen; Priesemann, Viola; Becker, Denise; Willems, Laurent M; Ziemann, Ulf; Deller, Thomas; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Jedlicka, Peter; Vlachos, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the human brain can lead to long-lasting changes in cortical excitability. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms which underlie rTMS-induced plasticity remain incompletely understood. Here, we used repetitive magnetic stimulation (rMS) of mouse entorhino-hippocampal slice cultures to study rMS-induced plasticity of excitatory postsynapses. By employing whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of CA1 pyramidal neurons, local electrical stimulations, immunostainings for the glutamate receptor subunit GluA1 and compartmental modeling, we found evidence for a preferential potentiation of excitatory synapses on proximal dendrites of CA1 neurons (2-4 h after stimulation). This rMS-induced synaptic potentiation required the activation of voltage-gated sodium channels, L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptors. In view of these findings we propose a cellular model for the preferential strengthening of excitatory synapses on proximal dendrites following rMS in vitro, which is based on a cooperative effect of synaptic glutamatergic transmission and postsynaptic depolarization.

  17. High frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation treatment for major depression: Dissociated effects on psychopathology and neurocognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar-Perdomo, Santiago; McGirr, Alexander; Van den Eynde, Frederique; Rodrigues Dos Santos, Nicole; Berlim, Marcelo T

    2017-08-01

    This open-label pilot study explored the effects of a course of accelerated high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) on two neurocognitive domains (decision-making and impulse control) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Participants with MDD and a treatment resistant major depressive episode (n=24) underwent twice-daily HF-rTMS targeted at the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (lDLPFC) over two weeks. Psychopathology was assessed by clinician-administered and self-reported measures of depression and anxiety; decision-making was assessed by the Iowa Gambling Task, the Balloon Analog Risk Task and the Game of Dice Task; impulse control was assessed by the Stroop Color-Word Task, the Continuous Performance Task and the Stop-Signal Task. Depression and anxiety scores significantly improved from pre-post HF-rTMS treatment. However, none of the decision-making or impulse control variables of interest changed significantly from pre-post HF-rTMS. Moreover, there was no correlation between changes in psychopathological symptoms and in neurocognition. This is a moderately sized open label trial, and the confounds of ongoing psychotropics and illness chronicity can not be excluded in this treatment resistant sample. There is dissociation between acute symptomatic benefit after a course of accelerated HF-rTMS applied to the lDLPFC in treatment resistant MDD and performance on tests of decision making and impulse control. Though rTMS appears cognitively safe, additional research is warranted to understand this potential dissociation and its putative clinical implications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Seizure suppression by EEG-guided repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotenberg, Alexander; Muller, Paul; Birnbaum, Daniel; Harrington, Michael; Riviello, James J; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Jensen, Frances E

    2008-12-01

    To test the anticonvulsive potential of a range of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) frequencies by novel methods for simultaneous EEG and rTMS in a rat seizure model. Seizures were triggered by intraperitoneal kainic acid (KA; 10mg/kg). Rats (n=21) were divided into three groups in which individual seizures were treated with rTMS trains at one of three frequencies: 0.25, 0.5 or 0.75 Hz. EEG was continuously viewed by an operator who identified each seizure onset. Consecutive seizures in each animal were (1) treated with active rTMS, (2) treated with sham rTMS, or (3) were untreated. EEG was re-analyzed post hoc by visual inspection, and seizure durations were compared within and between treatment groups. KA-induced seizures were abbreviated by 0.75 Hz (P=0.019) and 0.5 Hz (P=0.033) active EEG-guided rTMS. In contrast, neither active 0.25 Hz rTMS nor the control conditions affected seizure duration (P>0.2). We demonstrate that EEG-guided rTMS can suppress seizures in the rat KA epilepsy model, and that the effect is frequency dependent, with 0.75 and 0.5 Hz rTMS being superior to 0.25 Hz rTMS. These data support the use of rat seizure models in translational research aimed at evaluation and development of effective rTMS anticonvulsive protocols. We also offer a proof of principle that real-time analysis of EEG can be used to guide rTMS to suppress individual seizures.

  19. Regional cerebral blood flow changes associated with transcranial magnetic stimulation in refractory depressed patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C. H.; Chung, Y. A.; Chae, J. H.; Oh, J. H.; Kim, S. H.; Sohn, H. S.; Chung, S. K. [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Imaging studies by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) demonstrates biological activities of the brain. The aim of this study was to investigate the patterns of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) after a series of therapeutic rTMS sessions. Nine patients with refractory depression who had not been responsive to appropriate pharmacotherapy over 1 year were randomly assigned to daily 1 Hz right-sided rTMS or 20 Hz l