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Sample records for subjects general knowledge

  1. Challenges Associated with the Content of the Art History Component in the General Knowledge in Art Subject: Implications for Art History Education in West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adom, Dickson; Kquofi, Steve; Agyem, Joe Adu

    2016-01-01

    The content of the Art History component in the General Knowledge in Art subject studied by various Senior High Schools in West Africa is largely of foreign art histories at the expense of the histories of African indigenous arts which are shallowly presented in the teaching syllabus to be taught students. This makes the students appreciate more…

  2. General engineering knowledge

    CERN Document Server

    Mcgeorge, H D

    2012-01-01

    This book covers the general engineering knowledge required by candidates for the Department of Transport's Certificates of Competency in Marine Engineering, Class One and Class Two. The text is updated throughout in this third edition, and new chapters have been added on production of fresh water and on noise and vibration. Reference is also provided to up-to-date papers and official publications on specialized topics. These updates ensure that this little volume will continue to be a useful pre-examination and revision text. - Marine Engineers Review, January 1992

  3. Sliding Subject Positions: Knowledge and Teacher Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Tony; Rowley, Harriet; Smith, Kim

    2016-01-01

    In England, adjustments to policy in teacher education have had implications for how subject knowledge is understood and for how job descriptions are defined. That is, the interface between teacher educator and subject knowledge representation has been changing. This paper reports on a wider study that considers the experience of university…

  4. Subject knowledge for teaching and continuing professional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This short discussion article outlines a range of theoretical issues underpinning the formation of subject knowledge for teaching. It suggests a number of practical needs that secondary school teachers of English may be seeking to address in the way of subject knowledge development and how this may relate to the ...

  5. Learning, knowledge building, and subject matter knowledge in school science

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aalst, Jan Cornelis Wouterus

    Following a theoretical analysis of constructivist approaches to collaborative learning, a curriculum development model, the Learning to Knowledge Building Model, is proposed. Two empirical studies of student work with Computer Supported Intentional Learning Environment (CSILE) are then presented; these lend support to the model and explicate in detail the nature and extent of the knowledge developed by elementary school students. The first study is a content analysis of a database developed by a combined Grade 5/6 class as part of a unit on heat and matter, conducted after the children completed their work; the analysis assumes the point of view of a subject matter specialist in the field of the students' inquiry. The second study was conducted while the students' investigation was in progress, and takes the point of view of curriculum coverage; it involved a teacher who used a different model of database use, as well as different subject matter. The proposed LKB model is based on a distinction Bereiter and Scardamalia (1996a) have made between learning and knowledge building (i.e., progressive collaborative problem solving); its aim is to support the design and planning of curriculum units and classroom practices in which knowledge building is central. An important feature of the model is the attention given to ensuring that students learn to evaluate their knowledge and to ask the questions that can advance shared knowledge. Among the findings of the first study are: (a) students who wrote more notes that explicated their commonsense knowledge early in the unit, by means of mixed framework notes, tended to write more notes of high scientific merit later; (b) some of the students in this category tried out their ideas in diverse problem contexts; and (c) they tended to dominate the discussions they started. The second study provides additional insight into the role of the teacher, and the potential role of subject matter specialists, in knowledge building; it

  6. Scientific and General Subject Classifications in the Digital World

    CERN Document Server

    De Robbio, Antonella; Marini, A

    2001-01-01

    In the present work we discuss opportunities, problems, tools and techniques encountered when interconnecting discipline-specific subject classifications, primarily organized as search devices in bibliographic databases, with general classifications originally devised for book shelving in public libraries. We first state the fundamental distinction between topical (or subject) classifications and object classifications. Then we trace the structural limitations that have constrained subject classifications since their library origins, and the devices that were used to overcome the gap with genuine knowledge representation. After recalling some general notions on structure, dynamics and interferences of subject classifications and of the objects they refer to, we sketch a synthetic overview on discipline-specific classifications in Mathematics, Computing and Physics, on one hand, and on general classifications on the other. In this setting we present The Scientific Classifications Page, which collects groups of...

  7. How Does That Work? Developing Pedagogical Content Knowledge from Subject Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Judith

    2013-01-01

    The development of subject knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge has been the focus of much educational research and debate in recent years. Of particular interest is the process by which preservice science teachers develop pedagogical content knowledge from their subject knowledge. In the study presented here, a process of writing narrative…

  8. Subjective knowledge and fear appeal effectiveness: implications for message design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Robin L; Roskos-Ewoldsen, David; Carpentier, Francesca Dillman

    2008-01-01

    This research investigates the role of perceived health knowledge on the effectiveness of fear-based persuasive appeals. Undergraduates (N = 263) read a strong fear, weak fear, or efficacy-only message encouraging breast or testicular self-examination. As expected, results indicated that men high in subjective knowledge were less reactant and more persuaded by the efficacy-only message whereas those low in subjective knowledge did not evidence this pattern. Contrary to expectation, women high in subjective knowledge had comparable reactions to each of the 3 messages. Implications for fear appeal theory and message design are discussed.

  9. GP teachers' subject matter knowledge in the context of a tutorial: the preparation and delivery compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantillon, Peter; de Grave, Willem

    2012-05-01

    Clinical teachers use several different types of knowledge in the act of teaching. These include content knowledge (subject matter), knowledge of how to teach (pedagogy) and knowledge of learners (context). Most attention in faculty development has been on how to teach rather than what is taught. The quality of a teacher's subject matter knowledge is likely to be a critical determinant of how well a subject is presented, communicated and learned. We therefore set out to examine teachers' subject matter knowledge in the context of a general practice tutorial on grade 1 hypertension. This study is part of a larger study that employed a mixed method approach (concept mapping, phenomenological interviews and video-stimulated recall) to examine differences between clinical educators in subject matter knowledge, pedagogical knowledge and knowledge of the learning environment in the context of general practice education. This paper presents the concept map data findings from the larger study as well as the parts of the phenomenological interviews that relate to subject matter knowledge and beliefs. We found that there were marked differences in the quality and elaborative structure of GP teachers' knowledge in the concept maps completed prior to the tutorials. These differences were also predictive of differences in the content presented to learners in tutorials. Teachers' beliefs about subject matter were also likely to have affected what they chose to teach about and how they presented it. Subject matter knowledge varies considerably between GP teachers in the context of a common and relatively simple tutorial. Differences in the quality of subject matter knowledge matter because they have a profound effect on what is learned and how it is learned. Faculty development for clinical educators needs to pay heed to the quality of subject matter knowledge in addition to its more common pedagogical focus.

  10. Florida Master Teacher Program: Testing Teacher Subject Matter Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavely, Carolyn; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The efforts of the Florida Institute for Instructional Research and Practice in designing, developing, and analyzing the subject area knowledge tests of the Florida Master Teacher Program are described. A total of 13 subject area examinations was developed in 1984-85, and 5 additional tests were developed the following year. For each subject area…

  11. Knowledge Society, General Framework for Knowledge Based Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Dragos CRISTEA; Daniela MATEI

    2011-01-01

    This paper tries to present the existent relation between knowledge society and knowledge based economy. We will identify the main pillars of knowledge society and present their importance for the development of knowledge societies. Further, we will present two perspectives over knowledge societies, respectively science and learning perspectives, that directly affects knowledge based economies. At the end, we will conclude by identifying some important questions ...

  12. KNOWLEDGE SOCIETY, GENERAL FRAMEWORK FOR KNOWLEDGE BASED ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragos CRISTEA

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper tries to present the existent relation between knowledge society and knowledge based economy. We will identify the main pillars of knowledge society and present their importance for the development of knowledge societies. Further, we will present two perspectives over knowledge societies, respectively science and learning perspectives, that directly affects knowledge based economies. At the end, we will conclude by identifying some important questions that must be answered regarding this new social paradigm.

  13. Anxiety, Locus of Control, Subjective Well Being and Knowledge of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study determines a few differences between accident free drivers and drivers with a history of accidents. 30 public transport bus drivers with a record of road accidents were compared with 30 public transport drivers free of accidents on their knowledge of road rules an regulations, subjective well being, state and ...

  14. students' perception of teacher's knowledge of subject matter and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ALEXANDER E. TIMOTHY

    The study used the ex post facto design to find out the influence of student's perception of teacher's knowledge of the subject matter on the Senior Secondary Three (SS 3) students' performance in reading comprehension. Questionnaires reading comprehension test were used in eliciting data. The data were subsequently ...

  15. e-IQ and IQ knowledge mining for generalized LDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jeffrey; van Bergem, Rutger; Sweet, Charles; Vietsch, Eveline; Szu, Harold

    2015-05-01

    How can the human brain uncover patterns, associations and features in real-time, real-world data? There must be a general strategy used to transform raw signals into useful features, but representing this generalization in the context of our information extraction tool set is lacking. In contrast to Big Data (BD), Large Data Analysis (LDA) has become a reachable multi-disciplinary goal in recent years due in part to high performance computers and algorithm development, as well as the availability of large data sets. However, the experience of Machine Learning (ML) and information communities has not been generalized into an intuitive framework that is useful to researchers across disciplines. The data exploration phase of data mining is a prime example of this unspoken, ad-hoc nature of ML - the Computer Scientist works with a Subject Matter Expert (SME) to understand the data, and then build tools (i.e. classifiers, etc.) which can benefit the SME and the rest of the researchers in that field. We ask, why is there not a tool to represent information in a meaningful way to the researcher asking the question? Meaning is subjective and contextual across disciplines, so to ensure robustness, we draw examples from several disciplines and propose a generalized LDA framework for independent data understanding of heterogeneous sources which contribute to Knowledge Discovery in Databases (KDD). Then, we explore the concept of adaptive Information resolution through a 6W unsupervised learning methodology feedback system. In this paper, we will describe the general process of man-machine interaction in terms of an asymmetric directed graph theory (digging for embedded knowledge), and model the inverse machine-man feedback (digging for tacit knowledge) as an ANN unsupervised learning methodology. Finally, we propose a collective learning framework which utilizes a 6W semantic topology to organize heterogeneous knowledge and diffuse information to entities within a society in

  16. Knowledge Growth: Applied Models of General and Individual Knowledge Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silkina, Galina Iu.; Bakanova, Svetlana A.

    2016-01-01

    The article considers the mathematical models of the growth and accumulation of scientific and applied knowledge since it is seen as the main potential and key competence of modern companies. The problem is examined on two levels--the growth and evolution of objective knowledge and knowledge evolution of a particular individual. Both processes are…

  17. General Practitioners’ Knowledge and Concern about Electromagnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg-Beckhoff, Gabriele; Breckenkamp, Jürgen; Veldt Larsen, Pia; Kowall, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Our aim is to explore general practitioners’ (GPs’) knowledge about EMF, and to assess whether different knowledge structures are related to the GPs’ concern about EMF. Random samples were drawn from lists of GPs in Germany in 2008. Knowledge about EMF was assessed by seven items. A latent class analysis was conducted to identify latent structures in GPs’ knowledge. Further, the GPs’ concern about EMF health risk was measured using a score comprising six items. The association between GPs’ concern about EMF and their knowledge was analysed using multiple linear regression. In total 435 (response rate 23.3%) GPs participated in the study. Four groups were identified by the latent class analysis: 43.1% of the GPs gave mainly correct answers; 23.7% of the GPs answered low frequency EMF questions correctly; 19.2% answered only the questions relating EMF with health risks, and 14.0% answered mostly “don’t know”. There was no association between GPs’ latent knowledge classes or between the number of correct answers given by the GPs and their EMF concern, whereas the number of incorrect answers was associated with EMF concern. Greater EMF concern in subjects with more incorrect answers suggests paying particular attention to misconceptions regarding EMF in risk communication. PMID:25514150

  18. General Practitioners’ Knowledge and Concern about Electromagnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Berg-Beckhoff

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Our aim is to explore general practitioners’ (GPs’ knowledge about EMF, and to assess whether different knowledge structures are related to the GPs’ concern about EMF. Random samples were drawn from lists of GPs in Germany in 2008. Knowledge about EMF was assessed by seven items. A latent class analysis was conducted to identify latent structures in GPs’ knowledge. Further, the GPs’ concern about EMF health risk was measured using a score comprising six items. The association between GPs’ concern about EMF and their knowledge was analysed using multiple linear regression. In total 435 (response rate 23.3% GPs participated in the study. Four groups were identified by the latent class analysis: 43.1% of the GPs gave mainly correct answers; 23.7% of the GPs answered low frequency EMF questions correctly; 19.2% answered only the questions relating EMF with health risks, and 14.0% answered mostly “don’t know”. There was no association between GPs’ latent knowledge classes or between the number of correct answers given by the GPs and their EMF concern, whereas the number of incorrect answers was associated with EMF concern. Greater EMF concern in subjects with more incorrect answers suggests paying particular attention to misconceptions regarding EMF in risk communication.

  19. General practitioners' knowledge and concern about electromagnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg-Beckhoff, Gabriele; Breckenkamp, Jürgen; Larsen, Pia Veldt; Kowall, Bernd

    2014-12-01

    Our aim is to explore general practitioners' (GPs') knowledge about EMF, and to assess whether different knowledge structures are related to the GPs' concern about EMF. Random samples were drawn from lists of GPs in Germany in 2008. Knowledge about EMF was assessed by seven items. A latent class analysis was conducted to identify latent structures in GPs' knowledge. Further, the GPs' concern about EMF health risk was measured using a score comprising six items. The association between GPs' concern about EMF and their knowledge was analysed using multiple linear regression. In total 435 (response rate 23.3%) GPs participated in the study. Four groups were identified by the latent class analysis: 43.1% of the GPs gave mainly correct answers; 23.7% of the GPs answered low frequency EMF questions correctly; 19.2% answered only the questions relating EMF with health risks, and 14.0% answered mostly "don't know". There was no association between GPs' latent knowledge classes or between the number of correct answers given by the GPs and their EMF concern, whereas the number of incorrect answers was associated with EMF concern. Greater EMF concern in subjects with more incorrect answers suggests paying particular attention to misconceptions regarding EMF in risk communication.

  20. Performatising the knower: On semiotic analysis of subject and knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artuković Kristina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers epistemological implications of the concept of performative, starting from the elaborate conception provided by Judith Butler’s theories. The primary postulate of this work is that various interpretations of the performative, with their semiotic shifting from the notions of truth-evaluability and the descriptive nature of meaning, form a line of aban­doning traditional epistemological distinction between subject and object. Through other semiotic concepts which will be presented and analysed, this line reveals the key epistemological issues in the light of semiology, while Judith Butler’s concept of performativity is viewed as a possible outcome of this course of semiology of knowledge, resulting in final transcending of the category of subject.

  1. KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND ASSESSMENT OF GENERAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JONATHAN

    2016-07-01

    Jul 1, 2016 ... College of General Studies. The Federal Military Government, on October 22nd, 1977, directed. Nigerian Universities to introduce a programme on national awareness and that the programme be made compulsory for all students in Nigerian Universities. An enabling decree was promulgated in the same ...

  2. Preschoolers Acquire General Knowledge by Sharing in Pretense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Shelbie L.; Friedman, Ori

    2012-01-01

    Children acquire general knowledge about many kinds of things, but there are few known means by which this knowledge is acquired. In this article, it is proposed that children acquire generic knowledge by sharing in pretend play. In Experiment 1, twenty-two 3- to 4-year-olds watched pretense in which a puppet represented a "nerp" (an unfamiliar…

  3. General Knowledge: A Basic Translation Problem Solving Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Collombat, Isabelle

    2006-01-01

    International audience; Many theorists deplore the fact that since the 70's, in North America, education has been focused on specialized disciplinarian knowledge, sometimes leading to overspecialization, to the detriment of general knowledge. As far as translation is concerned, overspecialization may lead teachers and learners to focus unduly on language skills and techniques, thus undervaluating the importance of general knowledge, rather than lexis only,, as necessary to understand conlexts...

  4. General Practitioners? Knowledge and Concern about Electromagnetic Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriele Berg-Beckhoff; Jürgen Breckenkamp; Pia Veldt Larsen; Bernd Kowall

    2014-01-01

    Our aim is to explore general practitioners’ (GPs’) knowledge about EMF, and to assess whether different knowledge structures are related to the GPs’ concern about EMF. Random samples were drawn from lists of GPs in Germany in 2008. Knowledge about EMF was assessed by seven items. A latent class analysis was conducted to identify latent structures in GPs’ knowledge. Further, the GPs’ concern about EMF health risk was measured using a score comprising six items. The association between GPs’ co...

  5. GR-2 Hybrid Knowledge-Based System Using General Rules

    OpenAIRE

    Zhe , Ma.; Harrison, R F; Kennedy, R. Lee.

    1995-01-01

    GR-2 is a hybrid knowledge-based system consisting of a Multilayer Perceptron and a rule based system for hybrid knowledge representations and reasoning.\\ud Knowledge embedded in the trained Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) is extracted in the form of general (production) rules-- a natural format of abstract knowledge representation. The rule extraction method integrates Black-box and Open-box techniques on the MLP, obtaining feature salient and statistical properties of the training pattern set.\\...

  6. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation knowledge and attitude among general dentists in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkandari, Sarah A; Alyahya, Lolwa; Abdulwahab, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Dentists as health care providers should maintain a competence in resuscitation. This cannot be overemphasized by the fact that the population in our country is living longer with an increasing proportion of medically compromised persons in the general population. This preliminary study aimed to assess the knowledge and attitude of general dentists towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). A cross-sectional study was carried out among 250 licensed general dental practitioners working in ministry of health. Data were obtained through electronic self-administered questionnaire consisting of demographic data of general dentists, and their experience, attitude and knowledge about CPR based on the 2010 American Heart Association guidelines update for CPR. Totally 208 general dentists took part in the present study giving a response rate of 83.2%. Only 36% of the participants demonstrated high knowledge on CPR, while 64% demonstrated low knowledge. Participants' age, gender, nationality, years of experience, career hierarchy, and formal CPR training were associated significantly with CPR knowledge. Almost all the participants (99%) felt that dentists needed to be competent in basic resuscitation skills and showed a positive attitude towards attending continuing dental educational programs on CPR. This study showed that majority of general dental practitioners in Kuwait had inadequate knowledge on CPR. It was also found that CPR training significantly influenced the CPR knowledge of the participants. Therefore, training courses on CPR should be regularly provided to general dentists in the country.

  7. Primary health eye care knowledge among general practitioners ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-05-10

    May 10, 2010 ... Original Research: Primary health eye care knowledge among general practitioners. 52. Vol 53 No 1. S Afr Fam Pract ... Conclusion: GPs appear to lack sufficient knowledge to manage primary health eye care problems, presumably due to a ... hours after welding, with no visible foreign body on the cornea.

  8. Primary health eye care knowledge among general practitioners ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: The main purpose of this study was to determine whether general practitioners (GPs) in the Cape Town metropole have sufficient knowledge to diagnose and treat primary care ophthalmic conditions correctly, and to assess their own perceptions of their levels of knowledge. Secondary objectives included identifying ...

  9. Evaluation of general dentists’ knowledge regarding management of dental trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasim Seyfi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Traumatic dental injuries (TDIs are of the most common dental problems in children and adolescents, which usually occur in the anterior segment and have a significant role in patient’s physical and psychological health. Immediate intervention for damaged teeth can elevate the success rate of treatment in TDI. Thus, general dentists’ knowledge and their effective intervention in TDI are important factors in prognosis of traumatized teeth. The objective of this study was to assess the general dentists’ knowledge and awareness regarding the diagnosis and management of traumatic dental injuries. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the questionnaire data were collected from 130 general dentists, including the demographic data and general dentists’ knowledge about TDIs. The data were analyzed using the Student t-test and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA, Spearman’s and Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results: The mean score of general dentists’ knowledge was 8.5 ± 1.5 (total score:10 and it was the same between both males and females (P=0.083. Dentists’ work place does not have any influence in their knowledge (P=0.133. Also, there was no statically significant relationship between the age, job experience and dentists’ knowledge (P=0.805. The relationship between the frequency of TDI managed cases and dentists’ knowledge was not significant (P=0.507. Conclusion: Considering that the overall knowledge of general dentists regarding the management of TDI was sufficient, it could be a good opportunity in treating these injuries. As TDI is a developing science, it is important to motivate general dentists being up to date regarding this matter.

  10. Subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Vega Encabo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I claim that subjectivity is a way of being that is constituted through a set of practices in which the self is subject to the dangers of fictionalizing and plotting her life and self-image. I examine some ways of becoming subject through narratives and through theatrical performance before others. Through these practices, a real and active subjectivity is revealed, capable of self-knowledge and self-transformation. 

  11. Knowledge and management of snake bite by general practitioners ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The aim of the study was to determine the knowledge of general practitioners in the rural areas of the Free State and Northern Cape regarding snake bites and their treatment. Methods: Telephonic interviews using structured questionnaires were conducted with a random sample of 50 general practitioners from ...

  12. Evaluation of General Nutrition Knowledge in Australian Military Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullen, Charina J; Iredale, Laura; Prvan, Tania; O'Connor, Helen T

    2016-02-01

    Sound nutrition knowledge and a balanced diet are essential for operational readiness and optimal health of military personnel. Few studies have examined nutrition knowledge in this population. To assess the level of general nutrition knowledge across military occupations (ie, officers [OFFRs], physical training instructors [PTIs], cooks [CKs], and soldiers [SOLs]) compared with a civilian, community (C) sample. Cross-sectional study. Convenience sample of Australian military (M) and C participants. General nutrition knowledge measured using the validated General Nutrition Knowledge Questionnaire (GNKQ). Knowledge scores and the influence of demographic characteristics (eg, age, sex, level of education, and living arrangement) within and between M and C groups were evaluated. Analysis of variance, general linear models, independent-samples median test, t tests, χ(2) test, and Spearman's correlation. A sample of 1,295 participants were recruited with 622 (48%) from C. The M sample (n=673) consisted of SOLs 62.1%, OFFRs 9.1%, PTIs 12.8%, and CKs 16.0%. Mean age was higher for C than M (35.5±14 y vs 29.7±9.2 y; Pmilitary personnel, nutrition education programs particularly targeted at SOLs and CKs seem warranted. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Emotions and a Prior Knowledge Representation in Artificial General Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Gavrilov, Andrey

    2008-01-01

    In this paper a prior knowledge representation for Artificial General Intelligence is proposed based on fuzzy rules using linguistic variables. These linguistic variables may be produced by neural network. Rules may be used for generation of basic emotions – positive and negative, which influence on planning and execution of behavior. The representation of Three Laws of Robotics as such prior knowledge is suggested as highest level of motivation in AGI.

  14. Stochastic abstract policies: generalizing knowledge to improve reinforcement learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Marcelo L; Freire, Valdinei; Costa, Anna H R

    2015-01-01

    Reinforcement learning (RL) enables an agent to learn behavior by acquiring experience through trial-and-error interactions with a dynamic environment. However, knowledge is usually built from scratch and learning to behave may take a long time. Here, we improve the learning performance by leveraging prior knowledge; that is, the learner shows proper behavior from the beginning of a target task, using the knowledge from a set of known, previously solved, source tasks. In this paper, we argue that building stochastic abstract policies that generalize over past experiences is an effective way to provide such improvement and this generalization outperforms the current practice of using a library of policies. We achieve that contributing with a new algorithm, AbsProb-PI-multiple and a framework for transferring knowledge represented as a stochastic abstract policy in new RL tasks. Stochastic abstract policies offer an effective way to encode knowledge because the abstraction they provide not only generalizes solutions but also facilitates extracting the similarities among tasks. We perform experiments in a robotic navigation environment and analyze the agent's behavior throughout the learning process and also assess the transfer ratio for different amounts of source tasks. We compare our method with the transfer of a library of policies, and experiments show that the use of a generalized policy produces better results by more effectively guiding the agent when learning a target task.

  15. Objective and Subjective Knowledge and HIV Testing among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Su-I

    2004-01-01

    Little research has been conducted on the knowledge domain specifically related to HIV testing among college students. Students (age 18-24) were recruited from a major university in the southeastern United States to participate in a Web-based survey during spring 2003 (N=440). About 21% of the students reported previous voluntary HIV tests.…

  16. Additional Degree Required? Advanced Subject Knowledge and Academic Librarianship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Since the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) first published its terminal degree statement in 1975, the topic of librarians and advanced subject degrees has been controversial, and research on the topic has remained limited. Based on data gathered from two major online job sites as well as library and information science programs…

  17. Subject knowledge and library support: insights from an experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Research Libraries Consortium (RLC) project involving three South African university libraries was established in 2006 with the aim of improving academic library support. Part of this project focused on subject librarians through the Library Academy and an internship in research libraries in the. United States.

  18. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of general practitioners in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The aim of the study was to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practice of general practicioners (GP's) in the Free State regarding the management of children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Methods: Four hundred and nineteen GP's were identified in the Free State. Each GP was ...

  19. Intelligence, General Knowledge and Personality as Predictors of Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batey, Mark; Furnham, Adrian; Safiullina, Xeniya

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to examine the contribution of fluid intelligence, general knowledge and Big Five personality traits in predicting four indices of creativity: Divergent Thinking (DT) fluency, Rated DT, Creative Achievement and Self-Rated creativity and a combined Total Creativity variable. When creativity was assessed by DT test, the consistent…

  20. Sport concussion knowledge in the UK general public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Mareen; Edwards, Martin Gareth

    2012-05-01

    This is the first study to assess sport concussion knowledge and the effect of sport concussion self-report on knowledge in the UK general public. In the online survey, participants (n = 227) stated personal sport concussion history, injury indicators, and rated 26 injury statements for truthfulness using definite (true, false) or non-definite (probably true, probably false) response options. As anticipated, knowledge was limited. Few statement ratings were definite, and misconceptions prevailed. The injury's seriousness was systematically underestimated, suggesting that knowledge may not be sufficient for injury self-diagnosis and self-recovery measures. Sport concussion self-report was associated with more definite than non-definite statement ratings. However, response accuracy did not differ. This suggested that personal injury experience may yield a false sense of security. The use of accessible, easy-to-use tools needs to be promoted to improve sport practice safety.

  1. Ethics commentary: subjects of knowledge and control in field primatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, N M; Fuentes, A; White, F J

    2010-09-01

    Our primate kin are routinely displaced from their habitats, hunted for meat, captured for trade, housed in zoos, made to perform for our entertainment, and used as subjects in biomedical testing. They are also the subjects of research inquiries by field primatologists. In this article, we place primate field studies on a continuum of human and alloprimate relationships as a heuristic device to explore the unifying ethical implications of such inter-relationships, as well as address specific ethical challenges arising from common research protocols "in the field" (e.g. risks associated with habituation, disease transmission, invasive collection of biological samples, etc.). Additionally, we question the widespread deployment of conservation- and/or local economic development-based justifications for field-based primatological pursuits. Informed by decades of combined fieldwork experience in Indonesia and the Democratic Republic of Congo, we demonstrate the process by which the adherence to a particular ethical calculus can lead to unregulated and ethically problematic research agendas. In conclusion, we offer several suggestions to consider in the establishment of a formalized code of ethics for field primatology. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Eastern Movement Disciplines (EMDs) and Mindfulness: A New Path to Subjective Knowledge in Western Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chunlei; Tito, Johanna M.; Kentel, Jeanne A.

    2009-01-01

    Linda Bain (1995) argues that subjective knowledge is of central importance to her life, both personally and professionally, and that a purely objective approach to physical education should be complemented with subjective knowledge, the key to which is "mindfulness." Following her lead, we argue that the traditional model of physical education…

  3. Pre-Service Physical Education Teachers' Perceptions of Subject Knowledge: Augmenting Learning to Teach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Frank; Waring, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores pre-service teachers' perceptions of subject knowledge as they learn to teach during a one-year postgraduate certificate in education (PGCE) programme in England. The article examines the impact of pre-service teachers' previous experiences and individual subject knowledge profiles on their development during their PGCE course.…

  4. Subject Knowledge Development by Science Student Teachers: The Role of University Tutors and School-Based Subject Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youens, Bernadette; McCarthy, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Following the introduction of a National Curriculum for Science, all secondary science teachers in England need to be prepared to teach all aspects of a broad and balanced science curriculum. This is the second paper in which we explore science student teachers' subject knowledge development during a one-year postgraduate teacher preparation…

  5. Generalization of Pain-Related Fear Based on Conceptual Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulders, Ann; Vandael, Kristof; Vlaeyen, Johan W S

    2017-05-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that pain-related fear is key to the transition from acute to chronic pain. Previous research has shown that perceptual similarity with a pain-associated movement fosters the generalization of fear to novel movements. Perceptual generalization of pain-related fear is adaptive as it enables individuals to extrapolate the threat value of one movement to another without the necessity to learn anew. However, excessive spreading of fear to safe movements may become maladaptive and may lead to sustained anxiety, dysfunctional avoidance behaviors, and severe disability. A hallmark of human cognition is the ability to extract conceptual knowledge from a learning episode as well. Although this conceptual pathway may be important to understand fear generalization in chronic pain, research on this topic is lacking. We investigated acquisition and generalization of concept-based pain-related fear. During acquisition, unique exemplars of one action category (CS+; e.g., opening boxes) were followed by pain, whereas exemplars of another action category (CS-; e.g., closing boxes) were not. Subsequently, spreading of pain-related fear to novel exemplars of both action categories was tested. Participants learned to expect the pain to occur and reported more pain-related fear to the exemplars of the CS+ category compared with those of the CS- category. During generalization, fear and expectancy generalized to novel exemplars of the CS+ category, but not to the CS- category. This pattern was not corroborated in the eyeblink startle measures. This is the first study that demonstrates that pain-related fear can be acquired and generalized based on conceptual knowledge. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. The production of the psychiatric subject: power, knowledge and Michel Foucault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Marc

    2005-01-01

    The issue of power has become increasingly important within psychiatry, psychotherapy and mental health nursing generally. This paper will suggest that the work of Michel Foucault, the French philosopher and historian, has much to contribute to the discussion about the nature, existence and exercise of power within contemporary mental health care. As well as examining his original and challenging account of power, Foucault's emphasis on the intimate relationship between power and knowledge will be explored within the context of psychiatry and mental health nursing. This is to say that the paper will investigate Foucault's account of how power and knowledge are central to the process by which human beings are 'made subjects' and therefore how 'psychiatric identities' are produced. In doing so, it will be suggested that Foucault's work can not only make a valuable contribution to contemporary discussions about power and knowledge, but can also provide a significant critique and reconceptualization of the theoretical foundations and associated diagnostic and therapeutic practices of psychiatry and mental health nursing.

  7. An empirical research on relationships between subjective judgement, technology acceptance tendency and knowledge transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chien-Yun; Chen, Hsiao-Ming; Chen, Wan-Fei; Wu, Chia-Huei; Li, Guodong; Wang, Jiangtao

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among employees' usage intention pertaining to mobile information devices, focusing on subjective judgement, technology acceptance tendency, information sharing behavior and information transfer. A research model was established to verify several hypotheses. The research model based on integrated concepts of knowledge management and technology acceptance modeling. Participants were employees of enterprises in Taiwan, selected by combining snowball and convenience sampling. Data obtained from 779 e-surveys. Multiple-regression analysis was employed for hypothesis verification. The results indicate that perceived ease-of-use of mobile devices was affected by computer self-efficacy and computer playfulness directly; meanwhile, perceived ease-of-use directly affects perceived usefulness. In addition, perceived ease-of-use and perceived usefulness can predict information-sharing behavior in a positive manner, and impact knowledge transfer as well. Based on the research findings, it suggested that enterprises should utilize mobile information devices to create more contact with customers and enrich their service network. In addition, it is recommended that managers use mobile devices to transmit key information to their staff and that they use these devices for problem-solving and decision-making. Further, the staff’s skills pertaining to the operation of mobile information devices and to fully implement their features are reinforced in order to inspire the users' knowledge transfer. Enhancing the playfulness of the interface is also important. In general, it is useful to promote knowledge transfer behavior within an organization by motivating members to share information and ideas via mobile information devices. In addition, a well-designed interface can facilitate employees' use of these devices. PMID:28886088

  8. An empirical research on relationships between subjective judgement, technology acceptance tendency and knowledge transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yu-Hsi; Tsai, Sang-Bing; Dai, Chien-Yun; Chen, Hsiao-Ming; Chen, Wan-Fei; Wu, Chia-Huei; Li, Guodong; Wang, Jiangtao

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among employees' usage intention pertaining to mobile information devices, focusing on subjective judgement, technology acceptance tendency, information sharing behavior and information transfer. A research model was established to verify several hypotheses. The research model based on integrated concepts of knowledge management and technology acceptance modeling. Participants were employees of enterprises in Taiwan, selected by combining snowball and convenience sampling. Data obtained from 779 e-surveys. Multiple-regression analysis was employed for hypothesis verification. The results indicate that perceived ease-of-use of mobile devices was affected by computer self-efficacy and computer playfulness directly; meanwhile, perceived ease-of-use directly affects perceived usefulness. In addition, perceived ease-of-use and perceived usefulness can predict information-sharing behavior in a positive manner, and impact knowledge transfer as well. Based on the research findings, it suggested that enterprises should utilize mobile information devices to create more contact with customers and enrich their service network. In addition, it is recommended that managers use mobile devices to transmit key information to their staff and that they use these devices for problem-solving and decision-making. Further, the staff's skills pertaining to the operation of mobile information devices and to fully implement their features are reinforced in order to inspire the users' knowledge transfer. Enhancing the playfulness of the interface is also important. In general, it is useful to promote knowledge transfer behavior within an organization by motivating members to share information and ideas via mobile information devices. In addition, a well-designed interface can facilitate employees' use of these devices.

  9. General practitioners’ hypertension knowledge and training needs: a survey in Xuhui district, Shanghai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Qian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypertension prevalence is high in China, while patients’ levels of hypertension awareness, treatment and control are low. General practitioners’ knowledge and training relating to hypertension prevention may be an important related factor. We aimed to investigate general practitioners’ knowledge of hypertension prevention and potential training needs. Methods A questionnaire survey was conducted among all general practitioners at five community health service centers selected by convenience sampling. A total of 160 questionnaires were distributed and 147 were returned (response rate 91.9% The questionnaire included general information; 12 subjective questions on health promotion, education and training needs; and 19 objective questions in 5 domains (epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, referral and community management measuring knowledge of hypertension prevention and treatment. Results The major difficulties in health education practice for general practitioners were poor patient compliance (77.6% and lack of medical consultation time (49.0%. The average accuracy rate of hypertension prevention knowledge was 49.2%, ranging from 10.5% to 94.7%. The factors associated with accuracy rate were physician’s education level (medical university vs. professional school, β = 13.3, P = 0.003, and type of center (training base vs. community healthcare center, β = 12.3, P  Conclusions The knowledge level of hypertension prevention is low among general practitioners in urban settings. Physicians working in community clinics where they participate in a series of teaching, assessing and evaluating systems for hypertension prevention perform better than those in general healthcare centers who lack specific training. Continuing hypertension education is urgently needed to ensure that physicians in general practice are aware of and adhere to the national hypertension prevention guidelines.

  10. Association between risk perception, subjective knowledge, and depression in community-dwelling elderly people in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Hissei; Okumiya, Kiyohito; Fukutomi, Eriko; Wada, Taizo; Ishimoto, Yasuko; Kimura, Yumi; Chen, Wen-Ling; Tanaka, Mire; Sakamoto, Ryota; Fujisawa, Michiko; Matsubayashi, Kozo

    2015-05-30

    Risk perception is one of the core factors in theories of health behavior promotion. However, the association between knowledge, risk perception, and depressed mood in depression is unknown. The aim of this study was to clarify the relationships between subjective knowledge, risk perception, and objective scores of depression in community-dwelling elderly people in Japan. A total of 747 elderly participants (mean age: 76.1, female: 59.8%) who completed the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15) along with items assessing subjective knowledge and risk perception were included in the analysis. We assessed the correlation between subjective knowledge and risk perception, and then compare GDS-15 scores by level of subjective knowledge and risk perception. Subjective knowledge was weakly associated with risk perception and related to lower GDS-15 scores in a dose-response pattern, which did not change after adjusting for age, gender, basic activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental ADL, years of education and history of depression. There was no significant association between risk perception and GDS-15 scores. The relationship between knowledge, risk perception, and depressed mood in younger generations is unclear, but warrants examination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. African Journals Online: General Science (broad subject range)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 86 of 86 ... MEJSis a peer reviewed half yearly, international, interdisciplinary and free access electronic journal. The scope of the journal includes various aspects of natural and computational sciences in general and geology, chemistry, physics, biology and mathematical sciences in particular. It focuses on both ...

  12. A Comparison Study of the Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Single Subject Mathematics Credential Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierra, Vicki Ann

    2011-01-01

    This descriptive study compares the entry-level pedagogical content knowledge of single subject mathematics credential candidates based on career status and undergraduate majors. Career changers from science, technology, engineering or math (STEM) fields are compared to first career candidates to see if they bring different skills and knowledge to…

  13. Developing Multimedia Enhanced Content to Upgrade Subject Content Knowledge of Secondary School Teachers in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtebe, Joel S.; Kibga, Elia Y.; Mwambela, Alfred A.; Kissaka, Mussa M.

    2015-01-01

    The failure rates and lack of interest amongst students in science and mathematics in secondary schools in Tanzania is a serious problem. The Ministry of Education and Vocational Training (MoEVT) implemented a project to enhance and upgrade the pedagogical knowledge and subject content knowledge of teachers in selected difficult topics in science…

  14. Relationship between mathematics teacher subject matter knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge and professional development needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajudin, Nor'ain Mohd; Chinnappan, Mohan; Saad, Noor Shah

    2017-05-01

    Two key variables emerged from the literature review is that Specific Matter Knowledge [SMK] and Pedagogical Content Knowledge [PCK] can influence the mathematics teachers' Professional Development [PD] needs. However, the key variables of SMK and PCK that were being investigated were not defined clearly. Empirical evidence that support relationship between SMK and PD and PCK and PD were not verified. In addition, how does PCK mediate SMK and PD is not clear and somewhat lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was to examine the relationship between primary mathematics teacher's SMK, PCK and PD needs. Results of path analysis with SmartPLS indicated that the direct effect of SMK on PD was mediated via PCK. This data provide support for the claim that PD programs for future teachers of primary mathematics should be driven by a more nuanced understanding of the link between SMK and PCK.

  15. Nutrition Knowledge, Attitudes, and Confidence of Australian General Practice Registrars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caryl A. Nowson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition knowledge, attitudes, and confidence were assessed in General Practice Registrars (GPRs throughout Australia. Of approximately 6,000 GPRs invited to complete a nutrition survey, 93 respondents (2% completed the online survey, with 89 (20 males, 69 females providing demographic and educational information. Fifty-one percent had graduated from medical school within the last two years. From a list of 11 dietary strategies to reduce cardiovascular risk, respondents selected weight loss (84%, reducing saturated fats (90%, a maximum of two alcoholic drinks/day (82%, and increasing vegetables (83% as “highly appropriate” strategies, with only 51% indicating that salt reduction was “highly appropriate.” Two-thirds of registrars felt “moderately” (51% or “very” confident (16% providing nutrition advice. Most of them (84% recalled receiving information during training, but only 34% recalled having to demonstrate nutritional knowledge. The results indicate that this group of Australian GPRs understood most of the key dietary recommendations for reducing cardiovascular risk but lacked consensus regarding the recommendation to reduce salt intake and expressed mixed levels of confidence in providing nutritional advice. Appropriate nutrition education before and after graduation is recommended for GPRs to ensure the development of skills and confidence to support patients to make healthy dietary choices and help prevent chronic diseases.

  16. Subjective and objective knowledge and decisional role preferences in cerebrovascular patients compared to controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riechel C

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Christina Riechel,1,* Anna Christina Alegiani,1,* Sascha Köpke,2 Jürgen Kasper,3,4 Michael Rosenkranz,1,5 Götz Thomalla,1 Christoph Heesen1,4 1Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany; 2Nursing Research Unit, Institute of Social Medicine and Epidemiology, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany; 3Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway; 4Institute of Neuroimmunology and Multiple Sclerosis, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany; 5Department of Neurology, Albertinen-Krankenhaus, Hamburg, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Risk knowledge and active role preferences are important for patient involvement in treatment decision-making and adherence. Although knowledge about stroke warning signs and risk factors has received considerable attention, objective knowledge on secondary prevention and further self-esteem subjective knowledge have rarely been studied. The aim of our study was to investigate knowledge and treatment decisional role preferences in cerebrovascular patients compared to controls. Methods: We performed a survey on subjective and objective stroke risk knowledge and autonomy preferences in cerebrovascular patients from our stroke outpatient clinic (n=262 and from pedestrians on the street taken as controls during a “World Stroke Day” (n=274. The questionnaire includes measures for knowledge and decisional role preferences from previously published questionnaires and newly developed measures, for example, subjective knowledge, revealed on a visual analog scale. Results: The overall stroke knowledge was low to moderate, with no differences between patients and controls. Knowledge about secondary prevention was particularly low. Only 10%–15% of participants correctly estimated the stroke absolute risk reduction potential of aspirin. The medical data

  17. Subject knowledge in the health sciences library: an online survey of Canadian academic health sciences librarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Erin M

    2005-10-01

    This study investigated whether Canadian academic health sciences librarians found knowledge of the health sciences to be important and, if so, how they acquired and maintained this knowledge. Data were gathered using a Web-based questionnaire made available to Canadian academic health sciences librarians. Respondents recognized the need for subject knowledge: 93.3% of respondents indicated that subject knowledge was "very important" or "somewhat important" to doing their job. However, few respondents felt that holding a degree in the health sciences was necessary. Respondents reported devoting on average more than 6 hours per week to continuing education through various means. Reading or browsing health sciences journals, visiting Websites, studying independently, and participating in professional associations were identified by the largest number of participants as the best ways to become and stay informed. Although more research needs to be done with a larger sample, subject knowledge continues to be important to Canadian academic health sciences librarians. Continuing education, rather than formal degree studies, is the method of choice for obtaining and maintaining this knowledge.

  18. Attitudes Toward Alzheimer's Care-Seeking Among Korean Americans: Effects of Knowledge, Stigma, and Subjective Norm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, Banghwa Lee; Hong, Michin; Lee, Sang E

    2017-03-10

    Early detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD) ensures that affected individuals and their caregivers can make appropriate plans for health care needs, yet many ethnic minorities delay seeking care for AD until the disease has progressed. This study examined attitudes toward care-seeking for AD among Korean Americans (KAs) and identified factors affecting their attitudes. A cross-sectional survey was used to collect data from 234 KA adults. We conducted hierarchical regression analyses to examine the effects of sociocultural background (age, gender, education, cultural orientation), AD knowledge and exposure to AD, and beliefs about AD (stigma of pity, shame, and public avoidance) and AD care (subjective norm) on KAs' attitudes toward seeking AD care from primary care physicians (PCPs) and AD specialists. We also tested whether knowledge of AD moderated the impact of beliefs about AD and AD care on KAs' attitudes toward seeking AD care. For both PCPs and AD specialists, the subjective norm had the strongest effect on KAs' attitudes toward care seeking (β = 0.557 for PCPs, β = 0.360 for specialists). Effects of stigma beliefs disappeared in the presence of the subjective norm. AD knowledge moderated the impact of the subjective norm on the attitudes toward both PCPs (β = -1.653) and specialists (β = -1.742). The significance of the subjective norm in KAs' attitudes toward AD care-seeking underscores the importance of public education, and our study suggests that increasing AD knowledge could facilitate a change in public attitudes toward seeking AD care.

  19. Relationship between general nutrition knowledge and dietary quality in elite athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spronk, Inge; Heaney, Susan E.; Prvan, Tania; O'Connor, Helen T.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the association between general nutrition knowledge and dietary quality in a convenience sample of athletes (≥ state level) recruited from four Australian State Sport Institutes. General nutrition knowledge was measured by the validated General Nutrition Knowledge

  20. Generalization from episodic memories across time: a route for semantic knowledge acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweegers, Carly C G; Talamini, Lucia M

    2014-10-01

    The storage of input regularities, at all levels of processing complexity, is a fundamental property of the nervous system. At high levels of complexity, this may involve the extraction of associative regularities between higher order entities such as objects, concepts and environments across events that are separated in space and time. We propose that such a mechanism provides an important route towards the formation of higher order semantic knowledge. The present study assessed whether subjects were able to extract complex regularities from multiple associative memories and whether they could generalize this regularity knowledge to new items. We used a memory task in which subjects were required to learn face-location associations, but in which certain facial features were predictive of locations. We assessed generalization, as well as memory for arbitrary stimulus components, over a 4-h post-encoding consolidation period containing wakefulness or sleep. We also assessed the stability of regularity knowledge across a period of several weeks thereafter. We found that subjects were able to detect the regularity structure and use it in a generalization task. Interestingly, the performance on this task increased across the 4hr post-learning period. However, no differential effects of cerebral sleep and wake states during this interval were observed. Furthermore, it was found that regularity extraction hampered the storage of arbitrary facial features, resulting in an impoverished memory trace. Finally, across a period of several weeks, memory for the regularity structure appeared very robust whereas memory for arbitrary associations showed steep forgetting. The current findings improve our understanding of how regularities across memories impact memory (trans)formation.

  1. University Students' Subjective Knowledge of Green Computing and Pro-Environmental Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Tunku Badariah Tunku; Nordin, Mohamad Sahari

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional survey examined the structure of university students' subjective knowledge of green computing--hypothesized to be a multidimensional construct with three important dimensions--and its association with pro-environmental behavior (PEB). Using a previously validated green computing questionnaire, data were collected from 842…

  2. Pre-Service Geography Teachers' Confidence in Geographical Subject Matter Knowledge and Teaching Geographical Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte, Wendy; Reitano, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This research tracked the confidence of 16 undergraduate and postgraduate pre-service geography teachers as they completed a single semester, senior phase geography curriculum course. The study focused specifically on the pre-service teachers' confidence in geographical subject matter knowledge and their confidence in teaching geographical skills.…

  3. Subject Knowledge Enhancement (SKE) Courses for Creating New Chemistry and Physics Teachers: Do They Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynan, Richard; Mallaburn, Andrea; Jones, Robert Bryn; Clays, Ken

    2014-01-01

    During extended subject knowledge enhancement (SKE) courses, graduates without chemistry or physics bachelor degrees prepared to enter a Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) programme to become chemistry or physics teachers. Data were gathered from the exit survey returned by Liverpool John Moores University SKE students about to start…

  4. Subject Knowledge Enhancement Courses for Creating New Chemistry and Physics Teachers: The Students' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynan, Richard; Jones, Robert Bryn; Mallaburn, Andrea; Clays, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Subject knowledge enhancement (SKE) courses are one option open in England to graduates with a science background whose first degree content is judged to be insufficient to train to become chemistry or physics teachers. Previous articles in "School Science Review" have discussed the structure of one type of extended SKE course offered at…

  5. Insights from a Subject Knowledge Enhancement Course for Preparing New Chemistry and Physics Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Michael; Mallaburn, Andrea; Tynan, Richard; Clays, Ken; Jones, Robert Bryn

    2013-01-01

    A recent Government response to shortages of new physics and chemistry teachers is the extended subject knowledge enhancement (SKE) course. Graduates without a physics or chemistry bachelor degree are prepared by an SKE course to enter a Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) programme to become science teachers with a physics or chemistry…

  6. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Devitalizing Agents: A Survey of General Dental Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walimbe, Hrishikesh; Kontham, Ujjwal; Bijle, Mohammed Nadeem Ahmed; Wani, Vaibhav; Nankar, Meenakshi; Muchandi, Sneha

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to analyze knowledge, attitude and practice of general dental practitioners regarding the use of devitalizing agents in their respective practice. A total of 100 practicing general dentists were randomly chosen as per the list of practitioners available to local state association. The questionnaire was designed to cover general information of the participating dentist and concerning different aspects of devitalizing agents. The collected data was subjected to statistical analysis using SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Sciences) version 17.0 (IBM Statistics, Chicago, Illinois, USA). Descriptive statistics was drawn with respective percentages to have a comparative overview. The response rate was 97%, of which the effective and complete replies received were 77% (75). 56% respondents used paraformaldehyde containing pastes. Majority of general practitioners (61%) did not observe any post-operative complication following the use of devitalising agent. 33% (25) of the respondents were not aware of the complications of devitalizing agents. Thus, it can be concluded that general dental practitioners in Pune and Nashik district of Maharashtra, India do use pulp devitalizing agents in spite of possessing knowledge related to the complications.

  7. ROLE OF INTERNET - RESOURCES IN FORMING OF ECOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE AT THE STUDY OF NATURAL SCIENCES SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga M. Naumenko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of internet resources application for forming of pupils ecological knowledge at the study of natural sciences subjects is considered. It is noticed, that distribution of ecological knowledge and development of ecological education became the near-term tasks of school education, taking into account a global ecological crisis. It is therefore important to use in school preparation all possibilities that allow to promote the level of ecological knowledge of students and to influence the same on forming of modern views in relation to environmental preservation. Considerable attention is given to advices for the teachers of natural sciences subjects in relation to methodology of the internet resources use at preparation and realization of practical and laboratory works and other forms of educational-searching activity of students.

  8. General Public Knowledge, Source of Knowledge and Practice towards Antibiotics in the State of Penang, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Sa'di Al-Haddad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aims to investigate the general publicknowledge, source of knowledge, and practice towardsantibiotics in the state of Penang Malaysia.Methods: A cross sectional study design using conveniencesampling technique was adopted in this study from May 2010until August 2010. A pre-validated questionnaire wasdeveloped and distributed to 700 participants in the state ofPenang, Malaysia. All data was analysed using SPSS version 16.A p-value of less than 0.05 was considered significant.Results: 85.6% of our respondents could correctly identifythat antibiotics are used for bacterial infections whereasalmost 58% believed that antibiotics are used for viralinfections. Physicians and pharmacists were the main sourcesof knowledge about antibiotics. While around 30% of ourrespondents rely on the internet, family members and friendsas their sources of information about antibiotics. Malpracticeregarding antibiotics use was found in a high proportion of ourrespondents where many use antibiotics without prescription,prescribe the leftover antibiotics to their friends and familymembers while others modify the antibiotics dose withoutreferring to healthcare professional and others stop theantibiotics course once they feel that their symptoms improve.Conclusion: Malpractice regarding antibiotics was found in agreat proportion of our respondents which might be due to theirrational prescription of antibiotics by healthcareprofessionals as well as due to the misleading sources ofknowledge about antibiotics. There is a need for a nationalawareness program to the public and healthcare professionalsabout antibiotics and about the approaches to improve thecurrent practice.

  9. Neural mechanisms supporting the extraction of general knowledge across episodic memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweegers, Carly C G; Takashima, Atsuko; Fernández, Guillén; Talamini, Lucia M

    2014-02-15

    General knowledge acquisition entails the extraction of statistical regularities from the environment. At high levels of complexity, this may involve the extraction, and consolidation, of associative regularities across event memories. The underlying neural mechanisms would likely involve a hippocampo-neocortical dialog, as proposed previously for system-level consolidation. To test these hypotheses, we assessed possible differences in consolidation between associative memories containing cross-episodic regularities and unique associative memories. Subjects learned face-location associations, half of which responded to complex regularities regarding the combination of facial features and locations, whereas the other half did not. Importantly, regularities could only be extracted over hippocampus-encoded, associative aspects of the items. Memory was assessed both immediately after encoding and 48 h later, under fMRI acquisition. Our results suggest that processes related to system-level reorganization occur preferentially for regular associations across episodes. Moreover, the build-up of general knowledge regarding regular associations appears to involve the coordinated activity of the hippocampus and mediofrontal regions. The putative cross-talk between these two regions might support a mechanism for regularity extraction. These findings suggest that the consolidation of cross-episodic regularities may be a key mechanism underlying general knowledge acquisition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. General Practitioners' Knowledge and Concern about Electromagnetic Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg-Beckhoff, Gabriele; Breckenkamp, Jürgen; Larsen, Pia Veldt

    2014-01-01

    analysis was conducted to identify latent structures in GPs' knowledge. Further, the GPs' concern about EMF health risk was measured using a score comprising six items. The association between GPs' concern about EMF and their knowledge was analysed using multiple linear regression. In total 435 (response...

  11. Cardiovascular risk factors in subjects with psoriasis: a cross-sectional general population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Peter; Thyssen, Jacob P; Zachariae, Claus; Hansen, Peter R; Linneberg, Allan; Skov, Lone

    2013-06-01

    Epidemiological data have established an association between cardiovascular disease and psoriasis. Only one general population study has so far compared prevalences of cardiovascular risk factors among subjects with psoriasis and control subjects. We aimed to determine the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in subjects with and without psoriasis in the general population. During 2006-2008, a cross-sectional study was performed in the general population in Copenhagen, Denmark. A total of 3471 subjects participated in a general health examination that included assessment of current smoking status, weight, height, waist and hip circumferences, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, resting heart rate, and plasma lipids, hemoglobin A1c, fasting glucose, and insulin levels. Physician-diagnosed psoriasis was reported by 238 (7.1%) of 3374 participants. There were no differences between subjects with and without psoriasis with regard to traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Our results contrast with the hitherto-reported increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome in subjects with psoriasis in the general U.S. population. However, our results agree with those of other previous studies in which the association between mild psoriasis and cardiovascular risk factors is often non-significant. Further controlled research is needed to describe the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in subjects with mainly mild to moderate psoriasis in the general population. © 2012 The International Society of Dermatology.

  12. An evaluation study on a university general education subject in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Yu, Lu

    2017-02-01

    This study evaluated a university general education subject on leadership and intrapersonal development ("Tomorrow's Leaders", TL) offered at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) based on an online survey using the Student Feedback Questionnaire (SFQ). At the end of the first semester of the 2013/2014 academic year, 725 Year-1 students completed the online questionnaire. Results showed that the students generally had positive ratings on both the subject attributes and the qualities of teachers. The majority of the participants perceived the subject as beneficial to their holistic development and leadership competencies. Students from the Faculty of Health and Social Sciences (FHSS) and the Faculty of Applied Science and Textiles (FAST) had more favorable evaluation of the subject than students from the Faculty of Construction and Environment (FCE). Students' perceived benefit of the subject was significantly predicted by the subject attributes and teacher attributes. Implications of the findings are discussed.

  13. Is Teacher Knowledge Associated with Performance? On the Relationship between Teachers' General Pedagogical Knowledge and Instructional Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Johannes; Pflanzl, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have identified general pedagogical knowledge (GPK) as a relevant category of teacher knowledge. However, hardly any study has examined the relationship between GPK of teachers and the instructional quality delivered to their students. This article therefore investigates the relationship between teachers' GPK assessed via a…

  14. Multi-Subject fMRI Generalization with| Independent Component Representation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Rasmus Elsborg

    2003-01-01

    Generalizability in a multi-subject fMRI study is investigated. The analysis is based on principal and independent component representations. Subsequent supervised learning and classification is carried out by canonical variates analysis and clustering methods. The generalization error is estimated....... It is shown that independent component representation leads to improvement in the classification rate, and that canonical variates analysis is needed for making generalization cross multiple subjects....

  15. Exploring the Relationship between Secondary Science Teachers' Subject Matter Knowledge and Knowledge of Student Conceptions While Teaching Evolution by Natural Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Margaret M.; Petrosino, Anthony J.; Delgado, Cesar

    2017-01-01

    The fundamental scientific concept of evolution occurring by natural selection is home to many deeply held alternative conceptions and considered difficult to teach. Science teachers' subject matter knowledge (SMK) and the pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) component of knowledge of students' conceptions (KOSC) can be valuable resources for…

  16. Is Practical Subject Matter Knowledge Still Important? Examining the Siedentopian Perspective on the Role of Content Knowledge in Physical Education Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Frank; Waring, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background: The role that content knowledge, an important component of practical subject matter knowledge, plays for pre-service teachers (PSTs) in physical education teacher education (PETE) remains contested and unclear. Whilst some researchers emphasise the facilitative nature of such knowledge, others criticise that too much focus on content…

  17. Materiality, Language and the Production of Knowledge: Art, Subjectivity and Indigenous Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelle Barrett

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Since all theories of knowing deal with the being of subjects, objects, instruments and environments, they can be viewed as onto-epistemological.  This chapter examines key ideas that emerge from the work of Julia Kristeva – 'the speaking subject', 'materiality of language' and 'heterogeneity' – to demonstrate how ontology and epistemology are inextricably entwined in knowledge production. Kristeva also affirms both the agency of matter and  the dimension of human/subjective agency implicated in cultural production. This is contrasted with Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari’s account creative practice. The article also draws on the artistic work of researcher-practitioner Brian Martin, and his account of the relationship between Indigenous Australian art and culture to demonstrate that in an Indigenous world view, the real, the immaterial, the imaginary and the representational occur concurrently.

  18. Knowledge, attitude and assessment of general study courses by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Because these courses are not in the 'core' area of the students study, some tend to see GS courses as unimportant and therefore perform poorly in them. We set out to look at the knowledge, attitudes and assessment of GS courses by students of Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi campus whose courses of study are ...

  19. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of general practitioners in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The questionnaire explored four themes: demographic data; attitudes to caring for children with ADHD; management of these children and knowledge and practice regarding the use of stimulants. Results: Three hundred and eighty four GP's were eligible to complete the questionnaire, of which 147 (38.2%) were returned, ...

  20. Developing Pedagogical Content Knowledge for Teaching a New Topic: More Than Teaching Experience and Subject Matter Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kennedy Kam Ho; Yung, Benny Hin Wai

    2017-03-01

    Teaching experience has been identified as an important factor in pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) development. However, little is known about how experienced teachers may draw on their previous experience to facilitate their PCK development. This study examined how two experienced high school biology teachers approached the teaching of a newly introduced topic in the curriculum, polymerase chain reaction and their PCK development from the pre-lesson planning phase through the interactive phase to the post-lesson reflection phase. Multiple data sources included classroom observations, field notes, semi-structured interviews and classroom artefacts. It was found that the teachers' previous experience informed their planning for teaching the new topic, but in qualitatively different ways. This, in turn, had a bearing on their new PCK development. Subject matter knowledge (SMK) can not only facilitate but may also hinder this development. Our findings identify two types of experienced teachers: those who can capitalise on their previous teaching experiences and SMK to develop new PCK and those who do not. The critical difference is whether in the lesson planning stage, the teacher shows the disposition to draw on a generalised mental framework that enables the teacher to capitalise on his existing SMK to develop new PCK. Helping teachers to acquire this disposition should be a focus for teacher training in light of continuous curriculum changes.

  1. Average bit error probability of binary coherent signaling over generalized fading channels subject to additive generalized gaussian noise

    KAUST Repository

    Soury, Hamza

    2012-06-01

    This letter considers the average bit error probability of binary coherent signaling over flat fading channels subject to additive generalized Gaussian noise. More specifically, a generic closed form expression in terms of the Fox\\'s H function is offered for the extended generalized-K fading case. Simplifications for some special fading distributions such as generalized-K fading and Nakagami-m fading and special additive noise distributions such as Gaussian and Laplacian noise are then presented. Finally, the mathematical formalism is illustrated by some numerical examples verified by computer based simulations for a variety of fading and additive noise parameters. © 2012 IEEE.

  2. Exact Symbol Error Probability of Square M-QAM Signaling over Generalized Fading Channels subject to Additive Generalized Gaussian Noise

    KAUST Repository

    Soury, Hamza

    2013-07-01

    This paper considers the average symbol error probability of square Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM) coherent signaling over flat fading channels subject to additive generalized Gaussian noise. More specifically, a generic closedform expression in terms of the Fox H function and the bivariate Fox H function is offered for the extended generalized-K fading case. Simplifications for some special fading distributions such as generalized-K fading, Nakagami-m fading, and Rayleigh fading and special additive noise distributions such as Gaussian and Laplacian noise are then presented. Finally, the mathematical formalism is illustrated by some numerical examples verified by computer based simulations for a variety of fading and additive noise parameters.

  3. Related General-Vocabulary Knowledge Transfers to Learning Technical Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balch, William R.

    2015-01-01

    In a classroom experiment during the first week of an introductory psychology course, randomly assigned students received a pretest and then a brief training on the definitions of general-vocabulary words either related (e.g., "facilitation") or unrelated (e.g., "rendition") to 16 technical terms (e.g., "social…

  4. Subject matter knowledge, classroom management, and instructional practices in middle school science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Okhee

    This study examined the interrelationships among three major components of classroom teaching: subject matter content knowledge, classroom management, and instructional practices. The study involved two middle school science classes of different achievement levels taught by the same female teacher. The teacher held an undergraduate degree with a major in social studies and a minor in mathematics and science from an elementary teacher education program. The findings indicated that the teacher's limited knowledge of science content and her strict classroom order resulted in heavy dependence on the textbook and students' individual activities (e.g., seatwork) and avoidance of whole-class activities (e.g., discussion) similarly in both classes. Implications for educational practices and further research are discussed.

  5. Economic Subjectivities in Higher Education: Self, Policy and Practice in the Knowledge Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue Saltmarsh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This article considers higher education in the context of global knowledge economy policies as a site for the production of economic subjectivities. Drawing insights from poststructuralist theory and feminist economics, it explores how the incorporation of economic discourse and market metaphors into education policy and practice functions as a disciplinary technique of governmentality. The article argues that while economic discourse displaces, disciplines and disrupts educational discourse, there is a need for greater acknowledgement of the productive potential of the intersection of education and economy as a means through which agency is in part accomplished. Implications for university learning and labour are considered, with a view to contributing to dialogues about new ways of undisciplining economic subjectivities, through which new ways of doing and being might enact alternative educational economies.

  6. Stroke awareness in two Estonian cities: better knowledge in subjects with advanced age and higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vibo, Riina; Kõrv, Liisa; Väli, Merle; Tomson, Kadi; Piirsoo, Erika; Schneider, Siim; Kõrv, Janika

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess stroke awareness of the Estonian population. Investigators were asked to fill in an original, closed-ended multiple-choice questionnaire about the definition, risk factors, symptoms and behavior at the onset of stroke by randomly selected subjects in public places of the two biggest cities in Estonia (Tallinn and Tartu). The study included 355 persons. Most of the respondents knew that stroke is an acute disease and that one should call the ambulance at the onset of a stroke. Speech disorder and paresis were the best known symptoms, while hypertension was the best known risk factor. There were no differences between the sexes, but advanced age and higher level of education were related to higher awareness. The overall knowledge was better compared to many other studies. Future awareness campaigns should be addressed to younger subjects with lower education. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Knowledge and practices of general practitioners regarding psychiatric problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Chaudhary

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mental health problems account for 12% of global disease burden and non-psychiatrist medical practitioners deal with a large proportion of this burden. This study was planned to assess the knowledge, attitude and treatment practices of non-psychiatrist medical practitioners regarding mental health problems. Materials and Methods: One hundred Allopathic and 25 each of Homeopathic and Ayurvedic medical practitioners were interviewed and assessed using a semi-structured performa. Results: Majority (95% of them were aware regarding etiology, increasing incidence and treatment facilities available for mental health problems. Treatment modalities include counseling and medication but 69.9% of them had not received any formal training in administering them. Conclusions: 98.5% practitioners providing mental health services at the primary level feel the need to be properly trained and oriented in the management of these patients to improve quality of healthcare.

  8. Limits of Generalizing in Education Research: Why Criteria for Research Generalization Should Include Population Heterogeneity and Uses of Knowledge Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercikan, Kadriye; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2014-01-01

    Context: Generalization is a critical concept in all research designed to generate knowledge that applies to all elements of a unit (population) while studying only a subset of these elements (sample). Commonly applied criteria for generalizing focus on experimental design or representativeness of samples of the population of units. The criteria…

  9. Is Subjective Knowledge the Key to Fostering Sustainable Behavior? Mixed Evidence from an Education Intervention in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Redman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Educational interventions are a promising way to shift individual behaviors towards Sustainability. Yet, as this research confirms, the standard fare of education, declarative knowledge, does not work. This study statistically analyzes the impact of an intervention designed and implemented in Mexico using the Educating for Sustainability (EfS framework which focuses on imparting procedural and subjective knowledge about waste through innovative pedagogy. Using data from three different rounds of surveys we were able to confirm (1 the importance of subjective and procedural knowledge for Sustainable behavior in a new context; (2 the effectiveness of the EfS framework and (3 the importance of changing subjective knowledge for changing behavior. While the impact was significant in the short term, one year later most if not all of those gains had evaporated. Interventions targeted at subjective knowledge will work, but more research is needed on how to make behavior change for Sustainability durable.

  10. Magazines as wilderness information sources: assessing users' general wilderness knowledge and specific leave no trace knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    John J. Confer; Andrew J. Mowen; Alan K. Graefe; James D. Absher

    2000-01-01

    The Leave No Trace (LNT) educational program has the potential to provide wilderness users with useful minimum impact information. For LNT to be effective, managers need to understand who is most/least aware of minimum impact practices and how to expose users to LNT messages. This study examined LNT knowledge among various user groups at an Eastern wilderness area and...

  11. General public knowledge, source of knowledge and practice towards antibiotics in the state of penang, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Sa′di Al-Haddad

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Malpractice regarding antibiotics was found in a great proportion of our respondents which might be due to the irrational prescription of antibiotics by healthcare professionals as well as due to the misleading sources of knowledge about antibiotics. There is a need for a national awareness program to the public and healthcare professionals about antibiotics and about the approaches to improve the current practice.

  12. Evaluation of dyspnoea in a sample of elderly subjects recruited from general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, F; Mehlsen, J; Raymond, I

    2007-01-01

    . Of 129 subjects with dyspnoea, 68 (53%) had signs of lung disease, 27 (21%) had heart disease, a total of 43 (33%) were obese, 20 (16%) were obese without other causes of dyspnoea and five (4%) had general physical deconditioning. Twelve per cent had none of the above-mentioned potential causes...

  13. Does Variation in the Extent of Generalized Trust, Individual Education and Extensiveness of Social Security Policies Matter for Maximization of Subjective Well-Being?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeeva, Rania F.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I examine whether generalized trust and education, as well as social security policies of welfare state institutions matter for cross-national differences in subjective well-being (SWB), because knowledge on this issue is still lacking. For this purpose I integrated the insights of two sociological theories: Social Function…

  14. Generalizations of the subject-independent feature set for music-induced emotion recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan-Pin; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Duann, Jeng-Ren; Lin, Chin-Teng; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG)-based emotion recognition has been an intensely growing field. Yet, how to achieve acceptable accuracy on a practical system with as fewer electrodes as possible is less concerned. This study evaluates a set of subject-independent features, based on differential power asymmetry of symmetric electrode pairs [1], with emphasis on its applicability to subject variability in music-induced emotion classification problem. Results of this study have evidently validated the feasibility of using subject-independent EEG features to classify four emotional states with acceptable accuracy in second-scale temporal resolution. These features could be generalized across subjects to detect emotion induced by music excerpts not limited to the music database that was used to derive the emotion-specific features.

  15. Metabolic correlates of general cognitive function in nondemented elderly subjects: an FDG PET study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sang Soo; Kwak, Young Bin; Lee, Eun Ju; Ryu, Chang Hyung; Chey, Jean Yung; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    While many studies examined the neural correlates of individual cognitive functions, few made efforts to identify the neural networks associated with general cognitive function. General cognitive function decline in the elderly population is not infrequent. This study examined the brain areas associated with general cognitive function in the elderly subjects. Community-dwelling 116 elderly subjects without dementing illnesses (age, 71{+-}5 y; 13 males and 103 females) participated. General cognitive ability was assessed with the Dementia Rating Scale (K-DRS), which is composed of five subtests of attention, initiation and perseveration, construction, conceptualization, and memory. The EVLT (Elderly Verbal Learning Test), a nine-word list learning test, was used for general memory assessment. Brain FDG PET scans were acquired in all subjects. Brain regions where metabolic levels are correlated with the total scores of K-DRS and EVLT were examined using SPM99. There was a significant positive correlation (P < 0.01 uncorrected, k=100) between the total score of K-DRS and glucose metabolism in the bilateral posterior cingulate gyri, bilateral inferior frontal gyri, left caudate, left inferior parietal lobule, right precuneus, bilateral unci, right parahippocampal gyrus, and right anterior cingulate gyrus. A significant positive correlation between the total score of EVLT and glucose metabolism was shown in the right precuneus, right posterior cingulate gyrus, left insula, bilateral inferior parietal lobules, left anterior cingulate gyrus, left caudate, right inferior frontal gyrus (P < 0.01 uncorrected, k=100). Our data showed the brain regions that are associated with general cognitive function in the elderly. Those regions may serve as the neural substrated of cognitive dysfunction associated with neurodegenerative and cerebrovascular diseases in elderly subjects.

  16. Recent developments in single-subject methodology: methods for analyzing generalization, maintenance, and multicomponent treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, B A; Hartmann, D P

    1988-01-01

    At the outset of this chapter we asked whether or not single-subject methodology has outlived its usefulness to behavior therapy. We did so because serious doubts have been expressed about the ability of single-subject methodology to address the salient issues of the day. This chapter allays many of these doubts. This chapter reveals that single-subject researchers are far from helpless when investigating generalization and maintenance and identifying the active (and inactive) components in their compound treatments. In fact, a number of powerful strategies are at their disposal--strategies that are not strangers to the armamentarium of single-case researchers. These strategies are in essence nothing more than extensions of the reversal, multiple baseline, and simultaneous and alternating-treatments designs. In the case of the assessment of generalization, these extensions involve little more than the inclusion of continuous measures (or regular probes) of untrained responses throughout the investigation. In the case of the assessment of maintenance, they involve the replacement of a comparison of two or more acquisition procedures with a comparison of two or more maintenance procedures. And in the case of the identification of active (and inactive) components of compound treatments, they involve the aggregation of the findings from a series of single-subject investigations. When the requirements of single-subject designs and their extensions cannot be met, investigators still have available a set of traditional group designs (e.g., factorial and additive designs) for attacking these same issues. Assessment of generalization, maintenance, and the components of compound treatments are not the only salient issues facing behavior therapy today. Another is the widening gap between the researcher and the practitioner (e.g., Barlow, 1980; Wilson, 1981). It is thought by some that single-subject methodology may be the means of bridging this gap; that through single-subject

  17. Shared Knowledge among Graphic Designers, Instructional Designers and Subject Matter Experts in Designing Multimedia-Based Instructional Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Rafiza Abdul

    2013-01-01

    The research identified and explored the shared knowledge among the instructional multimedia design and development experts comprising of subject matter expert, graphic designer and instructional designer. The knowledge shared by the team was categorized into three groups of multimedia design principles encompasses of basic principles, authoring…

  18. The Impact of Self-Perceived Subject Matter Knowledge on Pedagogical Decisions in EFL Grammar Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Hugo Santiago

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in language teacher cognition research highlight the need to explore subject matter knowledge in relation to classroom practice. This study examines the impact of two foreign language teachers' knowledge about grammar upon their pedagogical decisions. The primary database consisted of classroom observations and post-lesson…

  19. Citation analysis with medical subject Headings (MeSH) using the Web of Knowledge: A new routine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leydesdorff, L.; Opthof, T.

    2013-01-01

    Citation analysis of documents retrieved from the Medline database (at the Web of Knowledge) has been possible only on a case-by-case basis. A technique is presented here for citation analysis in batch mode using both Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) at the Web of Knowledge and the Science Citation

  20. Food allergy knowledge, attitudes and beliefs: focus groups of parents, physicians and the general public

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gupta, Ruchi S; Kim, Jennifer S; Barnathan, Julia A; Amsden, Laura B; Tummala, Lakshmi S; Holl, Jane L

    2008-01-01

    .... Focus groups were held as a preliminary step in the development of validated survey instruments to assess food allergy knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of parents, physicians, and the general public...

  1. Neural mechanisms supporting the extraction of general knowledge across episodic memories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sweegers, C.C.; Takashima, A.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Talamini, L.M.

    2014-01-01

    General knowledge acquisition entails the extraction of statistical regularities from the environment. At high levels of complexity, this may involve the extraction, and consolidation, of associative regularities across event memories. The underlying neural mechanisms would likely involve a

  2. The Subject and the Setting: Re-Imagining Opportunities for Primary Teachers' Subject Knowledge Development on School-Based Teacher Education Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Rupert

    2017-01-01

    The landscape of teacher education is undergoing significant change in many countries and this is often associated with a move towards greater school involvement in the preparation of teachers. One aspect of teaching expertise that is particularly challenging for primary student-teachers is the development of subject knowledge across a wide range…

  3. Food allergy knowledge, attitudes and beliefs: Focus groups of parents, physicians and the general public

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnathan Julia A

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Food allergy prevalence is increasing in US children. Presently, the primary means of preventing potentially fatal reactions are avoidance of allergens, prompt recognition of food allergy reactions, and knowledge about food allergy reaction treatments. Focus groups were held as a preliminary step in the development of validated survey instruments to assess food allergy knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of parents, physicians, and the general public. Methods Eight focus groups were conducted between January and July of 2006 in the Chicago area with parents of children with food allergy (3 groups, physicians (3 groups, and the general public (2 groups. A constant comparative method was used to identify the emerging themes which were then grouped into key domains of food allergy knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs. Results Parents of children with food allergy had solid fundamental knowledge but had concerns about primary care physicians' knowledge of food allergy, diagnostic approaches, and treatment practices. The considerable impact of children's food allergies on familial quality of life was articulated. Physicians had good basic knowledge of food allergy but differed in their approach to diagnosis and advice about starting solids and breastfeeding. The general public had wide variation in knowledge about food allergy with many misconceptions of key concepts related to prevalence, definition, and triggers of food allergy. Conclusion Appreciable food allergy knowledge gaps exist, especially among physicians and the general public. The quality of life for children with food allergy and their families is significantly affected.

  4. A Reliable and Valid Asthma General Knowledge Questionnaire Useful in the Training of Asthma Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Rae M.; Abdulwadud, Omar A.; Jones, Michael P.; Abramson, Michael; Walters, Haydn

    2000-01-01

    Using the responses of 115 adults attending an asthma educator training course, the Asthma General Knowledge Questionnaire for Adults (AGKQA) was found to be an acceptably valid and reliable measure for assessing knowledge related to the management of asthma by adults. (Author/MKA)

  5. AN EXAMINATION OF AUSTRALIAN GENERAL PRACTITIONERS' KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES AND PRACTICES IN RELATION TO SLEEP DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    Hassed, C; Antoniades, J; KM Jones; Rajaratnam, S.; L Kiropolous; Naughton, M; PITERMAN L

    2012-01-01

    Background: Sleep disorders represent an under-recognised public health problem and are reported to be underdiagnosed in general practices.Aims: To examine general practitioners’ (GPs) attitude, knowledge and practice behaviour and identify barriers to detection,diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders encountered in the Australian primary care setting.Method: Using mixed methods, quantitative data from the Dartmouth Sleep Knowledge Questionnaire (DSKQ) were analysedusing MS Excel 2007. Qua...

  6. Knowledge and Attitude of 851 Nursing Personnel toward Depression in General Hospitals of Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Seon-Cheol; Lee, Hwa-Young; Lee, Dong-Woo; Hahn, Sang-Woo; Park, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yeo-Ju; Choi, Jae Sung; Lee, Ho-Sung; Lee, Soyoung Irene; Na, Kyoung-Sae; Jung, Sung Won; Shim, Se-Hoon; Choi, Joonho; Paik, Jong-Woo; Kwon, Young-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Our study aimed to examine the knowledge and attitude of nursing personnel toward depression in general hospitals of Korea. A total of 851 nursing personnel enrolled at four university-affiliated general hospitals completed self-report questionnaires. Chi-square tests were used to compare the knowledge and attitude of registered or assistant nurses toward depression. In addition, binary logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for the following confounders: age-group and workplace. Reg...

  7. Leadership in Diversity Organizations, and Immigrants' Organizational Commitment and Subjective General Health

    OpenAIRE

    Huynh, Victoria Tran

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine leadership styles in managing cultural diversity from the LIDO-model at workplaces in Norway, and investigate the relationships between perceived leadership styles with immigrants’ organizational commitment and subjective general health through online survey. The leadership styles from the LIDO-model are diversity leadership, assimilation leadership, separation leadership, and laissez-faire leadership. The relationships were measured by t...

  8. Knowledge and Practice of Pulp Therapy in Deciduous Teeth among General Dental Practitioners in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togoo, RA; Nasim, VS; Zakirulla, M; Yaseen, SM

    2012-01-01

    Background: It has been observed that the general dentists and pedodontists differ in their treatment recommendations for pulp therapy in deciduous teeth. Aim: To determine the knowledge and practice of pulp therapy in deciduous teeth by general dental practitioners (GDP) in two cities of southern Saudi Arabia. Subjects and Methods: Fifty GDP selected at random from government and private dental clinics were questioned about pulp therapy in deciduous teeth in Abha and Najran cities using a 10-item questionnaire. The data were analyzed using IBM SPSS software version 11.0 and descriptive statistics were obtained. Results: All 50 participants responded to the survey. Pulpotomy was suggested as the first line of treatment for pulp-exposed primary tooth by 32 respondents with 44 using Buckley's formocresol and 32 applying it on the pulp for 5 minutes. 43 respondents squeeze dried the cotton pellet before application on the pulp. In pulpectomy procedure 44 respondents preferred zinc oxide eugenol as obturation material with 22 using handheld reamers and 15 using slow-speed lentilospirals for obturation. 12 respondents used obturation techniques which had no scientific relevance. In order of preference Glass ionomer cement (GIC), silver amalgam, and stainless steel crowns were the materials of choice for final restoration of endodontically treated deciduous teeth. All 50 answered in the affirmative when asked if they would like to have additional information about pulp therapy in deciduous teeth. Conclusion: The study concluded that general dentists were regularly performing pulp therapy in decidous teeth and therefore need to be frequently updated about these procedures. PMID:23440030

  9. Subjective memory complaints in general practice predicts future dementia: a 4-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldorff, Frans Boch; Vogel, Asmus Mejling; Siersma, Volkert Dirk

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Many older patients in general practice have subjective memory complaints (SMC); however, not all share this information with their general practitioner (GP). The association between SMC and future cognitive decline or dementia is not clear, especially in a general practice population......-nursing home residents aged 65 years and older consulted their GP in October and November 2002, and, when asked, 177 (24%) reported memory problems, and 50 (6.6%) received a hospital-based dementia diagnosis within the 4-years follow-up. SMC had an adjusted Hazard Ratio (HR) of 2.27 for subsequent dementia...... independent predictor for subsequent hospital-based dementia diagnosis. Thus, the GP could consider inquiring for memory complaints to identify vulnerable older patients....

  10. Single-subject research designs in pediatric rehabilitation: a valuable step towards knowledge translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeiser-Logan, Lynne; Slaughter, Rebecca; Hickman, Robbin

    2017-06-01

    Knowledge translation may be particularly challenging in pediatric rehabilitation, where study findings are often ambiguous owing to low statistical power or inconsistent responses to intervention. Disconnection between research protocols and clinical practicality, as well as variability of responsiveness in heterogeneous pediatric populations, may further impede integration of research findings into everyday practice. Use of single-subject research designs (SSRDs) may bridge the gap between research and practice, with robust design options that better identify and preserve patterns of responsiveness to specific interventions and offer protocols that are more readily implemented in practice settings than can be done in traditional randomized controlled trials. This review defines SSRD, provides examples of research questions that can be answered using SSRD, details the experimental designs that can be used and the level of evidence of each design, and describes statistical analysis approaches and clinical application. This analysis will aid researchers, reviewers, clinicians, and others in better understanding SSRD methodology and its application in everyday practice. © 2017 Mac Keith Press.

  11. Knowledge, opinions, and practices about oral cancer among general medical practitioners in Lagos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olalekan Micah Gbotolorun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the knowledge and practices of general medical practitioners (GMPs in Lagos on screening for oral cancer (OC. Materials and Methods: A 43-item self-administered questionnaires was filled by each GMPs recruited into the study. Analysis was done using the SPSS version 17.5. Descriptive analyses were used and results were presented in percentages, graphs, and tables. Results: One-hundred and twenty GMPs participated in the study, 58.7% were males and 41.3% females; their ages ranged 22-61 years (36.1 ΁ 7.97. While most participants answered correctly that smoked tobacco (96.1%, increasing age >45 years (97%, oral sex (99%, and patient with a previous OC (93.7% were risk factors for OC; there was misinformation on the nonrisk factors as only 5.5%, 7.9%, and 18.9%, respectively, answered correctly that family history of cancer, dental infections, and poor oral hygiene were not identifiable risk factors associated with OC. Furthermore, although majority of subjects (81.1% identified the floor and the tongue as the most common sites of OC and leukoplakia (75.6% as a common precursor of OC; only 29.1% identified correctly that OC had one of the worst morbidity and mortality rates of the most common cancers due to late presentation. Only 0.8% of GMPs had a consistent high score in the indexes. Conclusion: The knowledge and practices of GMPs in the Lagos environment on OC needs a lot of improvement for them to become significant in the screening for the disease entity.

  12. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Devitalizing Agents: A Survey of General Dental Practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    Walimbe, Hrishikesh; Kontham, Ujjwal; Bijle, Mohammed Nadeem Ahmed; Wani, Vaibhav; Nankar, Meenakshi; Muchandi, Sneha

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to analyze knowledge, attitude and practice of general dental practitioners regarding the use of devitalizing agents in their respective practice. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 practicing general dentists were randomly chosen as per the list of practitioners available to local state association. The questionnaire was designed to cover general information of the participating dentist and concerning different aspects of devitalizing agents. The collected dat...

  13. Knowledge of and attitudes toward electroconvulsive therapy among medical students, psychology students, and the general public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aki, Ozlem Erden; Ak, Sertac; Sonmez, Yunus Emre; Demir, Basaran

    2013-03-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is safe and effective for the treatment of various psychiatric disorders. Despite being a well-known treatment method among health care professionals, lay people generally have a negative opinion of ECT. The present study aimed to examine knowledge of and attitudes toward ECT among medical students, psychology students, and the general public. Psychology students were included because they are among the important groups in mental health care in Turkey. A Likert-type questionnaire was administered to fifth-year medical students (n = 28), master of science and doctor of philosophy clinical psychology students (n = 35), and a sample of the general public (n = 26). The questionnaire included questions about the general principles of and indications for ECT, and sources of knowledge of and attitudes toward ECT. The medical students were the most knowledgeable about ECT, as expected. The medical students also had a more positive attitude toward ECT than the other 2 groups. More psychology students had negative attitudes on some aspects than general public sample, despite being more knowledgeable. Medical school theoretical and practical training in ECT played an important role in increasing the level of knowledge of and decreasing the prevalence of negative attitudes toward ECT among the medical students; similar training for psychology students is required to achieve similar results.

  14. Predictive validity of a written knowledge test of skills for an OSCE in postgraduate training for general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, A.W.M.; Jansen, J.J.; Zuithoff, P.; Dusman, H.; Tan, L.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the validity of a written knowledge test of skills for performance on an OSCE in postgraduate training for general practice. METHODS: A randomly-selected sample of 47 trainees in general practice took a knowledge test of skills, a general knowledge test and an OSCE. The OSCE

  15. Knowledges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berling, Trine Villumsen

    2012-01-01

    Scientific knowledge in international relations has generally focused on an epistemological distinction between rationalism and reflectivism over the last 25 years. This chapter argues that this distinction has created a double distinction between theory/reality and theory/practice, which works...... as a ghost distinction structuring IR research. While reflectivist studies have emphasised the impossibility of detached, objective knowledge production through a dissolution of the theory/reality distinction, the theory/practice distinction has been left largely untouched by both rationalism...... on the interrelationship between theory and practice in specific domains, while at the same time foregrounding the own position of the researcher. The transformation of European security in the 1990s is taken as an example of how an IR analysis changes focus when seeing knowledge as Bourdieu....

  16. Evaluation of dyspnoea in a sample of elderly subjects recruited from general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, F; Mehlsen, J; Raymond, I

    2007-01-01

    . Of 129 subjects with dyspnoea, 68 (53%) had signs of lung disease, 27 (21%) had heart disease, a total of 43 (33%) were obese, 20 (16%) were obese without other causes of dyspnoea and five (4%) had general physical deconditioning. Twelve per cent had none of the above-mentioned potential causes...... in most cases, the most frequent being lung disease followed by heart disease and obesity. These data shed light on the diagnostic yield that can be expected from a relatively simple diagnostic approach, including the most frequent recommended initial screening tests. As expected, the incremental nature...

  17. Are age and gender associated to tobacco use and knowledge among general practitioners?: Results of a survey in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigid Unim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess knowledge and opinions of Italian general practitioners about the effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions and physicians' attitudes in addressing tobacco-related issues. METHODS: The survey was carried out through a questionnaire administered to general practitioners (GPs attending a medical refresher course. 133 Italian GPs participated in the study with a mean age of 51.4 years (SD = 6.2. RESULTS: The GPs had good knowledge about the predictors of smoking onset, pharmacotherapies for tobacco cessation and the clinical guidelines recommendations. Wrong answers were encountered for the prevalence of smokers in Italy, the Fagerstrom Test for nicotine dependence and minimal advice. Females were more subjected to higher knowledge about tobacco, and at lower risk to be a smoker/ex smoker. Furthermore, physicians > 50 years old living in northern Italy had higher knowledge score. CONCLUSIONS: Physician education on tobacco counseling is associated to increased comfort and practice in advising patients who smoke. Tobacco cessation training might increase the success rate of helping patients to quit smoking.

  18. Profound loss of general knowledge in retrograde amnesia: Evidence from an amnesic artist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma eGregory

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies of retrograde amnesia have focused on autobiographical memory, with fewer studies examining how non-autobiographical memory is affected. Those that have done so have focused primarily on memory for famous people and public events—relatively limited aspects of memory that are tied to learning during specific times of life and do not deeply tap into the rich and extensive knowledge structures that are developed over a lifetime. To assess whether retrograde amnesia can also cause impairments to other forms of general world knowledge, we explored losses across a broad range of knowledge domains in a newly-identified amnesic. LSJ is a professional artist, amateur musician and history buff with extensive bilateral medial temporal and left anterior temporal damage. We examined LSJ's knowledge across a range of everyday domains (e.g., sports and domains for which she had premorbid expertise (e.g., famous paintings. Across all domains tested, LSJ showed losses of knowledge at a level of breadth and depth never before documented in retrograde amnesia. These results show that retrograde amnesia can involve broad and deep deficits across a range of general world knowledge domains. Thus, losses that have already been well-documented (famous people and public events may severely underestimate the nature of human knowledge impairment that can occur in retrograde amnesia.

  19. The impact of teacher subject knowledge on student achievement: Evidence from within-teacher within-student variation

    OpenAIRE

    Metzler, Johannes; Woessmann, Ludger

    2010-01-01

    Teachers differ greatly in how much they teach their students, but little is known about which teacher attributes account for this. We estimate the causal effect of teacher subject knowledge on student achievement using within-teacher within-student variation, exploiting a unique Peruvian 6th-grade dataset that tested both students and their teachers in two subjects. We circumvent omitted-variable and selection biases using student and teacher fixed effects and observing teachers teaching bot...

  20. Simplifying a complex subject: some thoughts on teaching the general circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotjahn, Richard

    1998-01-01

    This issue is devoted to the many accomplishments of Dr Richard Pfeffer. His research is the focus of other articles in this issue. He has also been an instructor who both challenged and positively impressed students in his classes over several decades; for example, his general circulation class helped inspire a book on the subject by this author. So, his teaching is worthy of discussion and this unconventional article is intended to illustrate some aspects of his teaching style. This article has two main parts. First, the classroom environment 20 years ago (when the author was a student in Dr Pfeffer's classes) is sketched; it was different from today. Second, his homework and exam problems were lengthy, challenging, and integrated multiple concepts. Included are four problems; they are intended to be illustrative and to provide homework ideas for current instructors of general circulation subjects. For example, in a problem that estimates the energy release in an extratropical cyclone, a complementary calculation reveals whether baroclinic instability or latent release is the dominant growth mechanism.

  1. [Co-production of knowledge about custody criteria with subjects affected by their parents' custody dispute: a participatory study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenborn, Karl-Franz

    2004-03-01

    This article explores methods within a longitudinal study for allowing subjects more direct participation in research as co-producers of scientific knowledge concerning custody decision-making after divorce. The purpose of the longitudinal study was to evaluate the scientific custody criteria that were applied to children after their parents' divorce. The results of the study, published after the first survey, showed the relevance of children's personal preferences and residence wishes for custody regulations. This was formulated as a general rule for custody decision-making. In the second survey, a copy of our scientific publication written after the first survey, including summaries and a questionnaire was sent to the children involved. They were asked to judge the presentation of the custody problem, the custody recommendations and the presentation of their case history in our publication. Most of the participants (60%) voted for the application of the custody criterion "personal relationship preferences and residence wishes", but they also pointed out the difficulties for the child to articulate those wishes. Together with other studies, the participatory study contributed to a paradigm shift: from an understanding of the custody problem as a structural question concerning the suitability of maternal, paternal or joint custody to a conceptualisation of the custody problem as a decision-making process that demands the participation of the child and professional support if need be. Finally, the value of participatory research methods in divorce research and longitudinal social studies of children and childhood are discussed.

  2. Asymptomatic hyperuricemia is a strong risk factor for resistant hypertension in elderly subjects from general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Alberto; Lenti, Salvatore; Schiavon, Laura; Monte, Alvise Del; Townsend, Danyelle M; Ramazzina, Emilio; Rubello, Domenico; Casiglia, Edoardo

    2017-02-01

    In clinical practice, patient characteristics predicting resistant hypertension (RH) include higher blood pressure levels, left ventricular hypertrophy, older age, obesity, chronic kidney disease and diabetes. On the contrary little is known about the role of serum uric acid (SUA) as a risk factor for RH in subjects from general population. 580 elderly subjects aged ≥65 years were enrolled in the Risk Of Vascular complications Impact of Genetics in Old people (ROVIGO) study. RH was defined as the failure to maintain blood pressure values below 140mmHg (systolic) and 90mmHg (diastolic) despite therapeutic interventions that include appropriate lifestyle measures plus adherence to treatment with full doses of at least three antihypertensive drugs, including a diuretic. RH was confirmed using 24-h ambulatory blood pressure measurement. Hyperuricemic was defined as the subjects having SUA ≥6.8mg/dl or taking uricosuric drugs. Gender-specific odds ratio (OR) for RH was calculated by logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of RH was 5.7% in the cohort and was higher in women (8.3%) than in men (3.0%, phypertension in women (odds ratio 3.11, 95% confidence intervals 1.06-9.1, p=0.03) but not in men. In elderly women from the general population, an SUA value of ≥6.8mg/dl triples the risk of RH. SUA assessment should be recommended to better define the pattern of risk associated with RH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Generalization of Category Knowledge and Dimensional Categorization in Humans (Homo sapiens) and Nonhuman Primates (Macaca mulatta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. David; Zakrzewski, Alexandria C.; Johnston, Jennifer J. R.; Roeder, Jessica L.; Boomer, Joseph; Ashby, F. Gregory; Church, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    A theoretical framework within neuroscience distinguishes humans’ implicit and explicit systems for category learning. We used a perceptual-categorization paradigm to ask whether nonhumans share elements of these systems. Participants learned categories that foster implicit or explicit categorization in humans, because they had a multidimensional, information-integration (II) solution or a unidimensional, rule-based (RB) solution. Then humans and macaques generalized their category knowledge to new, untested regions of the stimulus space. II generalization was impaired, suggesting that II category learning is conditioned and constrained by stimulus generalization to its original, trained stimulus contexts. RB generalization was nearly seamless, suggesting that RB category knowledge in humans and monkeys has properties that grant it some independence from the original, trained stimulus contexts. These findings raise the question of 1) how closely macaques’ dimensional categorization verges on humans’ explicit/declarative categorization, and 2) how far macaques’ dimensional categorization has advanced beyond that in other vertebrate species. PMID:26167774

  4. Polychlorinated biphenyl serum levels in subjects with hepatocellular carcinoma as compared with the general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Zani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs have been recognized as human carcinogens and cause liver cancer in animal experimental studies. However, no study investigated their association with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC so far.  This study aimed to evaluate the serum PCB concentration in HCC patients and in healthy subjects of the general population living in Brescia, North Italy, a highly industrialized area with heavy PCB environmental pollution due to the presence of a PCB producing factory. Methods. Lipid-adjusted PCB concentrations, computed as the sum of 24 congeners, were measured in the serum of 101 HCC patients and in 101 healthy subjects of the same age and gender.Results. Hepatitis B and C virus infection and history of heavy alcohol intake were found, alone and combined, in 87% of HCC patients. No difference was found in PCB serum concentration of HCC patients with and without, and according to, the major risk factors for liver disease. No significant difference was observed in serum total PCB concentration between HCC patients (median: 1081; range: 287.0-3182.0 ng/g lipid and healthy subjects (median: 1199.3; range: 225.7-22825 ng/g lipid. PCB congeners 118, 138, 153, 156, 180 and 194 were the only ones found over the detection limit in at least 30% of HCC patients. The serum level of PCB 118, but not that of other congeners, was higher in HCC patients than in healthy subjects.Conclusion. These findings  do not support the hypothesis that PCBs play an important role in HCC development, although a contribution by some specific congeners cannot be ruled out. 

  5. Ramadan and diabetes - knowledge, attitude and practices of general practitioners; a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmedani, Muhammad Yakoob; Hashmi, Bella Z; Ulhaque, Muhammad Saif

    2016-01-01

    Fasting during Ramadan is obligatory for all Muslims across the world. Through literature review, it has been found out that there are various articles published for the awareness of patients and general population regarding safe fasting during Ramadan. But very few studies highlight the Ramadan specific knowledge of general practitioners engaged in providing care to people with diabetes. This study aims to describe the practice, knowledge and attitude of general practitioners regarding treatment and dietary modifications for people with diabetes during Ramadan across Pakistan. A cross-sectional descriptive study was undertaken among a sample of 274 general practitioners. Data was collected by means of a questionnaire that consisted of 25 questions that were structured according to three categories i-e. Ramadan specific knowledge, diet and physical activity and treatment modification related knowledge and practices of GPs. Out of the total population of GPs surveyed, 70% responded correctly to the questions while 30% responded incorrectly. 1/4(th) of GPs incorrectly responded to questions regarding basic concepts of diabetes and Ramadan. 1/3(rd) of GPs responded incorrectly regarding questions on diet. Almost 40% of the GPs responded incorrectly to the questions regarding drug dosage adjustment in people with diabetes during Ramadan. However, more than 80% responded in agreement regarding alteration in medication timings. Almost one third of the studied populations of general practitioners across Pakistan lack the knowledge of basic principles that are important to be employed in the management of diabetes during Ramadan. Hence there is need to promote educational programmes and CMEs to improve the knowledge of our GPs that should be reflected by their sound clinical practices in the field of diabetes.

  6. General practitioners' knowledge, attitudes and views of providing preconception care: a qualitative investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Ojukwu, O; Patel, D.; Stephenson, J; Howden, B; Shawe, J

    2016-01-01

    Background: Preconception health and care aims to reduce parental risk factors before pregnancy through health promotion and intervention. Little is known about the preconception interventions that general practitioners (GPs) provide. The aim of this study was to examine GPs’ knowledge, attitudes, and views towards preconception health and care in the general practice setting. Methods: As part of a large mixed-methods study to explore preconception care in England, we surveyed 1,173 women...

  7. What Subject Matter Knowledge Do Second-Level Teachers Need to Know to Teach Trigonometry? An Exploration and Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Richard; Fitzmaurice, Olivia; O'Donoghue, John

    2017-01-01

    This study reports on the level of trigonometry Subject Matter Knowledge (SMK) of third and final-year pre-service second-level mathematics teachers () at an Irish third-level institution. The aim of the study was to determine if this sample of prospective teachers has an appropriate level of SMK to teach second-level trigonometric concepts. The…

  8. The Knowledge Base of Subject Matter Experts in Teaching: A Case Study of a Professional Scientist as a Beginning Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diezmann, Carmel M.; Watters, James J.

    2015-01-01

    One method of addressing the shortage of science and mathematics teachers is to train scientists and other science-related professionals to become teachers. Advocates argue that as discipline experts these career changers can relate the subject matter knowledge to various contexts and applications in teaching. In this paper, through interviews and…

  9. [Knowledge of the general population about hypertension and diabetes mellitus in South Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katchunga, P B; Malanda, B; Mweze, M C; Dupont, B; M'Buyamba-Kabangu, J R; Kashongwe, Z; Kabinda, J M; Buysschaert, M

    2012-04-01

    In the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), a country in a post-conflict period, high priority cannot be given to non-communicable diseases other than to emergencies. This certainly involves inadequacy in raising awareness for prevention of these diseases. To evaluate the level of knowledge of the Congolese general population on hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Responses to a questionnaire from 3% of the general population aged 15 and older in the city of Bukavu and two rural areas: Hombo and Walungu (South Kivu, eastern DRC), recruited after stratification by ward in the city of Bukavu and a group of prone villages were expected. The questions focused on identification, testing, causes, complications and treatment of hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Of the 7770 respondents, screening for hypertension and diabetes mellitus affected only 14.9% and 7.3% of subjects respectively. Knowledge of these two conditions was generally low in the general population, although better in the subgroups of patients and those with higher socioeconomic level (Pknowledge (Pknowledge about hypertension and diabetes mellitus and their testing in South Kivu is low. It is imperative that the Congolese government includes non-communicable diseases in its priorities of the millennium. Similarly, the WHO should actively contribute to screening for them in low-income countries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Teaching and learning the geological knowledge as a part of the science education general field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Pérez, Constancio

    2010-05-01

    Since the early 50s of last century the Teaching of Science has undergone a process of continuous development, (Gutiérrez, 1987; Aliberas, Gutierrez and Izquierdo, 1989) to become a scientific discipline largely accepted as such by many different universities worldwide. Besides, the proliferation of publications, magazines, conferences, symposia, meetings, and so on, proves this assertion. In these publications and meetings the Teaching of Science (or Science Education in more general terms) is addressed as a new field of research, teaching and educational innovation focused on the processes of teaching and learning of the experimental sciences (all of them: Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Geology). The study of this discipline is undertaken from different pedagogical, epistemological, psychological and sociological approaches. From this general perspective we can say that over the last two decades each of the sciences has developed specific characteristics so that, today, we could speak about specific didactics for each one of them. In the case of Geology (or Geoscience) Teaching there have been significant contributions from the following fields of research: the students' prior ideas (constructivist approach), the history of geology (as a subject-specific field) and from epistemology (Pedrinaci, E. 2000). The body of geoscience knowledge has an internal logic (as happens with the other science subjects) that allows us to organize the contents to teach, selecting, arranging and establishing proper relations between them. Still geology has a central, transverse, inter-and transdisciplinary character for its relationship with the other sciences. This character makes it appear as one of the disciplines with a huge potential to combine different methodologies of teaching and learning and different learning models already tested in the research field of Physics, Chemistry or Biology Education. Moreover, the most recent term coined for it "geosciences or earth and

  11. [Drinking/smoking habits and knowledge regarding heavy drinking/ smoking as a risk factor of stroke among Japanese general population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Akiko; Miyamatsu, Naomi; Okamura, Tomonori; Nakayama, Hirohumi; Morinaga, Miho; Toyota, Akihiro; Suzuki, Kazuo; Hata, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Takenori

    2010-10-01

    We examined the knowledge regarding heavy drinking and smoking as risk factors of stroke according to drinking/smoking habits among randomly selected Japanese general population. The Japan Stroke Association and co-researchers have performed a large-scale educational intervention to improve knowledge concerning stroke from 2006 to 2008. Prior to above-mentioned intervention, we conducted mail-surveillance on knowledge about stroke in 11,306 randomly selected residents aged 40 to 74. We assessed the relationship between drinking/smoking habits and knowledge regarding heavy drinking and smoking as risk factors by using the chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis adjusting for age, sex, area, employment, living situation, history of stroke and other stroke related diseases, history of liver disease, family history of stroke and drinking (non-drinker / ex-drinker / occasional drinker / habitual drinker) / smoking habits (non-smoker / ex-smoker / current smoker). Total 5,540 subjects (49.0%) participated in this study. Ex-smokers and current smokers had better knowledge regarding smoking as a risk factor of stroke than non-smokers (odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals: 1.89, 1.55-2.31, 1.76, 1.45-2.12, respectively). There was no difference between habitual drinkers and non-drinkers in their knowledge, whereas current smokers had greater knowledge regarding smoking than nonsmokers. Accordingly, it is suggested that it will be necessary for habitual drinkers to be enlightened regarding heavy drinking as a risk factor of stroke and for current smokers to be provided with information regarding not only these risks but also the specific strategies for invoking behavioral changes.

  12. Scaling the Fractal Plain: Towards a General View of Knowledge Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, David; Evans, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to explore coherence across key disciplines of knowledge management (KM) for a general model as a way to address performance dissatisfaction in the field. Design/methodology/approach: Research employed an evidence-based meta-analysis (287 aspects of literature), triangulated through an exploratory survey (91…

  13. Validation of a Test Measuring Young Learners' General L2 English Vocabulary Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvén, Liss Kerstin; Sundqvist, Pia

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to present the validation of a test designed to assess young learners' general L2 English vocabulary knowledge, the Young Learner Vocabulary Assessment Test (YLVAT). YLVAT consists of 37 items selected from the K1-2 frequency levels of the Productive and Vocabulary Levels Tests. In the study, Swedish learners (N = 52, age 12) took…

  14. Knowledge About Chronic Orofacial Pain Among General Dentists of Kermanshah, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Fatemeh; Sharifi, Roohollah; Shahrezaee, Hamid R; Mozaffari, Hamid R

    2017-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of chronic orofacial pain are one of the most challenging issues in dentistry. The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge of general dentists regarding orofacial pain in Kermanshah, Iran. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2016 including general dentists of Kermanshah city. A researcher-designed questionnaire was administered to collect demographic data as well as measuring knowledge of the dentists in four sections including etiology, clinical presentations, physical examination, and treatment of chronic orofacial pain. The questionnaire had acceptable validity (content validity > 0.9) and reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient= 0.857 for test re-test; Cronbach's alpha= 0.72 for internal consistency). The data were analyzed by the SPSS software (ver. 18.0) using Spearman's correlation coefficient (P orofacial pain especially in the treatment field. Therefore, it is recommended to implement educational programs to improve their knowledge.

  15. An empirical research on relationships between subjective judgement, technology acceptance tendency and knowledge transfer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yu-Hsi Yuan; Sang-Bing Tsai; Chien-Yun Dai; Hsiao-Ming Chen; Wan-Fei Chen; Chia-Huei Wu; Guodong Li; Jiangtao Wang

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among employees' usage intention pertaining to mobile information devices, focusing on subjective judgement, technology acceptance tendency...

  16. General practitioners' knowledge, practices, and obstacles in the diagnosis and management of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Krishna P; Montgomery, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    To identify general practitioners' (GPs) knowledge, practices, and obstacles with regard to the diagnosis and management of dementia. Standardized questionnaires covering knowledge, practices, and obstacles were distributed among a purposive sample of GPs in Kathmandu, Nepal. Three hundred and eighty GPs responded (response rate = 89%). Knowledge of practitioners' with regard to the diagnosis and management of dementia was unsatisfactory (management barriers are presented with regard to GP, patient, and carer factors. Specifically, the results address the following issues: communicating the diagnosis, negative views of dementia, difficulty diagnosing early-stage dementia, acceptability of specialists, responsibility for extra issues, knowledge of dementia and aging, less awareness of declining abilities, diminished resources to handle care, lack of specific guidelines, and poor awareness of epidemiology. Demographic changes mean that dementia will represent a significant problem in the future. The following paper outlines the problems and solutions that the Nepalese medical community needs to adopt to deal effectively with diagnosis, care, and management of dementia.

  17. A general symplectic method for the response analysis of infinitely periodic structures subjected to random excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available A general symplectic method for the random response analysis of infinitely periodic structures subjected to stationary/non-stationary random excitations is developed using symplectic mathematics in conjunction with variable separation and the pseudo-excitation method (PEM. Starting from the equation of motion for a single loaded substructure, symplectic analysis is firstly used to eliminate the dependent degrees of the freedom through condensation. A Fourier expansion of the condensed equation of motion is then applied to separate the variables of time and wave number, thus enabling the necessary recurrence scheme to be developed. The random response is finally determined by implementing PEM. The proposed method is justified by comparison with results available in the literature and is then applied to a more complicated time-dependent coupled system.

  18. Knowledge About Chronic Orofacial Pain Among General Dentists of Kermanshah, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Fatemeh; Sharifi, Roohollah; Shahrezaee, Hamid R.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objective: Diagnosis and treatment of chronic orofacial pain are one of the most challenging issues in dentistry. The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge of general dentists regarding orofacial pain in Kermanshah, Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2016 including general dentists of Kermanshah city. A researcher-designed questionnaire was administered to collect demographic data as well as measuring knowledge of the dentists in four sections including etiology, clinical presentations, physical examination, and treatment of chronic orofacial pain. The questionnaire had acceptable validity (content validity > 0.9) and reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient= 0.857 for test re-test; Cronbach’s alpha= 0.72 for internal consistency). The data were analyzed by the SPSS software (ver. 18.0) using Spearman’s correlation coefficient (P dentists with mean (SD) age of 40.55 (8.03) years and mean (SD) practice history of 13.28 (8.43) years. Mean (SD) knowledge score was 10.54 (2.36) (maximum possible score= 15). 48.2% of dentists had good knowledge in overall. 48.2% about etiology, 45.2% about clinical presentations, 36.1% about physical examination, and 7.8% about treatment had good knowledge. Knowledge had direct and significant relationship with age (r = 0.179; P = 0.022) and practice history (r = 0.18; P = 0.021). Conclusion: The results showed that the studied dentists did not have enough knowledge about chronic orofacial pain especially in the treatment field. Therefore, it is recommended to implement educational programs to improve their knowledge. PMID:28553411

  19. Generalized Accelerated Failure Time Frailty Model for Systems Subject to Imperfect Preventive Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huilin Yin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Imperfect preventive maintenance (PM activities are very common in industrial systems. For condition-based maintenance (CBM, it is necessary to model the failure likelihood of systems subject to imperfect PM activities. In this paper, the models in the field of survival analysis are introduced into CBM. Namely, the generalized accelerated failure time (AFT frailty model is investigated to model the failure likelihood of industrial systems. Further, on the basis of the traditional maximum likelihood (ML estimation and expectation maximization (EM algorithm, the hybrid ML-EM algorithm is investigated for the estimation of parameters. The hybrid iterative estimation procedure is analyzed in detail. In the evaluation experiment, the generated data of a typical degradation model are verified to be appropriate for the real industrial processes with imperfect PM activities. The estimates of the model parameters are calculated using the training data. Then, the performance of the model is analyzed through the prediction of remaining useful life (RUL using the testing data. Finally, comparison between the results of the proposed model and the existing model verifies the effectiveness of the generalized AFT frailty model.

  20. General pediatric attending physicians' and residents' knowledge of inpatient hospital finances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Thomas A; Xiao, Rui; Fieldston, Evan

    2013-06-01

    There is evidence suggesting that physicians have a limited foundation of knowledge on health care finances and limited awareness of hospital costs and charges. The objective was to analyze general pediatric attending physicians' and residents' knowledge of costs, charges, and reimbursements for care rendered in the inpatient setting. An online survey was administered to all general pediatric attending physicians who work on the inpatient service and the entire pediatric residency program at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) in spring of 2011. Participants' estimates of costs, charges, and reimbursements for several common tests, medications, and services were obtained and analyzed. A total of 38 attending physicians and 100 residents participated in the study (84% and 76% response rates, respectively). The majority of both attending physicians (71%) and residents (75%) characterized their understanding as "Minimally knowledgeable" or "Completely unaware". Only 15% of attending physicians' estimates and 11% of residents' estimates were within ±25% of true values across all surveyed costs, charges, and reimbursements. Percent error did not vary by level of experience or self-reported knowledge for attending physicians and residents. Attending physicians and residents demonstrated limited knowledge of costs, charges, and reimbursements as shown by a low accuracy of estimates and a high percent error, compared with the actual values. To meet expectations for competency in systems-based practice and to be effective stewards of medical resources, it appears that pediatricians need further financial education.

  1. Relationship between general nutrition knowledge and diet quality in Australian military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullen, Charina J; Farrugia, Jamie-Lee; Prvan, Tania; O'Connor, Helen T

    2016-04-01

    A balanced diet informed by sound nutrition knowledge is key for operational readiness and the health of military personnel. Unfortunately, research suggests that military personnel have inadequate dietary intakes. This study assessed general nutrition knowledge, diet quality and their association in Australian military personnel. A convenience sample of male military personnel (n 211) including Army soldiers and officers completed a validated general nutrition knowledge questionnaire (GNKQ) and FFQ. The GNKQ assessed knowledge of dietary guidelines (Section A), sources of nutrients (Section B), choosing everyday foods (Section C) and diet-disease relationships (Section D). The Australian Recommended Food Score (ARFS) was used to assess diet quality from FFQ data. Statistical analyses included the χ 2 test, Spearman's correlation test, t test, median test, ANCOVA and ordinal logistic regression. The mean total GNKQ score was 52·7 %. Participants performed best on Section A (58·5 %) followed by Sections B (57·3 %) and C (57·0 %) and worst on Section D (31·0 %). Overall, officers scored significantly higher than soldiers (58·7 v. 51·9 %, P=0·001). Age was weakly but positively correlated with GNKQ total scores (r 0·307; Ppersonnel health and operational readiness, initiatives to improve nutrition knowledge and diet quality are recommended in this population, especially in soldiers.

  2. The effect of a focused instructional session on knowledge of surgical staplers in general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, Ryan J; Karmali, Shahzeer; Reso, Artan; Paolucci, Elizabeth; Sherman, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    Surgical stapling devices have been used for a variety of purposes in both laparoscopic and open surgery. Nevertheless, trainees rarely receive any focused instruction on their application and use. This study attempts to determine the baseline knowledge of surgical stapling devices possessed by surgical residents. Furthermore, we attempt to evaluate the effectiveness of a short didactic session in improving the trainee's knowledge of the use and function of surgical staplers. A 20-question multiple-choice test was created to evaluate a general surgery resident's knowledge on the design and use of circular, linear, and laparoscopic surgical staplers. The test was administered before and after attending a 40-minute instructional session on surgical stapling devices. The tests were then scored by a data analyst. A total of 26 residents of 39 in the residency program (26/39, 67%) participated. The pretest mean was 10.62/20 (53%), whereas the posttest mean was 15.38/20 (77%). These results were significantly different on paired samples t-test analysis (t((25)) = -10.3; p 0.05). There is a deficiency of knowledge of surgical staplers in general surgery residents, more so in junior residents. Didactic instruction is effective in raising the level of knowledge of surgical staplers in all residents, up to a similar level. Surgical educators should consider implementing programs like these for staplers and other types of surgical equipment.

  3. Knowledge of General Dentists of Kermanshah about Root Canal Therapy in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roohollah Sharifi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study was conducted to analyze the knowledge of general dentists of Kermanshah about root canal therapy in 2012. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, a two-part questionnaire was designed and given to 93 general dentists in Kermanshah to complete. The first part of the questionnaire comprised of personal and professional information of the participant dentists and the second part of the questionnaire determined the awareness of the dentists about root canal therapy. Data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 20 using Pearson correlation coefficient, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and independent t-test. Results: A total of 84 dentists with the mean age of 39.3±7.1 completed the questionnaires. The mean for 12 correct responses was 63.3%. The highest number of correct responses (86.2% belonged to using proper intra-canal medication (calcium hydroxide and the lowest number of correct responses (41.4% was associated with the number of root canals in maxillary first molar (four canals. There was a reverse correlation between awareness and work experience (P=0.002, r=-0.337. Also, participation in retraining courses did not have significant impact on the knowledge of the dentists (P =0.82. Conclusion: General dentists have average knowledge about root canal therapy. Higher quality regular training is recommended to promote the knowledge of the dentists about endodontic therapies.

  4. Female genital mutilation: an evaluation of the knowledge of French general and specialized travel medicine practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantet, Claire; Aupiais, Camille; Bourdon, Mathilde; Sorge, Frédéric; Pagès, Adèle; Levy, Dora; Lafon-Desmurs, Barthélémy; Faye, Albert

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the knowledge of female genital mutilation (FGM) among 60 general and 52 specialized travel medicine practitioners. Less than 50% of these practitioners had adequate knowledge of FGM. Only 42.9% declared having encountered FGM. FGM is likely underestimated in health facilities. Medical education and supporting information should be developed to better address and prevent FGM. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Subjective perceptions of ESP (English for Specific Purposes university teachers’ professional beginnings: Quantitative research into pedagogical content knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jašková Jana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present methodology and results of a quantitative phase within a research into English for Specific Purposes university teachers and their subjectively perceived changes in pedagogical content knowledge from a retrospective view of their professional beginnings. The introduction describes the investigated issues and explains key concepts. The first chapter refers to the theoretical background of teacher professional development. Since the quantitative research phase is a part of a mixed research design, the second chapter deals with the whole research including the research objective and questions. The third chapter is devoted to the quantitative research phase during which an anonymous electronic questionnaire was sent to the whole population of Czech university teachers of English for Specific Purposes and processed statistically as well as descriptively. The fourth chapter presents the obtained quantitative data discussed within the individual components of pedagogical content knowledge - conceptions of purposes for teaching subject matter, curricular knowledge, knowledge of instructional strategies, and knowledge of students’ understanding. The conclusion summarises all the information and proposes some recommendations for pedagogical practice.

  6. General Intelligence, Emotional Intelligence and Academic Knowledge as Predictors of Creativity Domains: A Study of Gifted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Feyzullah

    2016-01-01

    Creativity of the individual is dependent on numerous factors, such as knowledge, general intelligence and emotional intelligence. The general purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of general intelligence, emotional intelligence and academic knowledge on the emerging of domain-specific creativity. The study was conducted on 178…

  7. Exploring General and Sports Nutrition and Food Knowledge in Elite Male Australian Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Brooke L; Belski, Regina

    2015-06-01

    Nutrition knowledge is believed to influence nutritional intake, which in turn influences performance in elite athletes. There is currently no published data on the nutrition knowledge of elite Australian Football (AF) players. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the current level of general and sports nutrition knowledge in elite male AF athletes. Forty six elite male AF players (23.5 ± 2.8 years) answered 123 questions relating to five areas of nutrition knowledge: dietary recommendations, sources of nutrients, choosing everyday foods, alcohol and sports nutrition. Demographic details and perceptions of nutrition knowledge were collected for all participants. The mean nutrition knowledge score was 74.4 ± 10.9 (60.5%). The highest score was obtained in sports nutrition section (17.9 ± 3.0, 61.7%). The dietitian was selected as the first source of information by 98% of athletes, with club trainer and teammates as second choice for 45.7% and 23.9% of athletes, respectively. The majority of athletes correctly answered questions regarding recommendations to increase fruit and vegetable intake and decrease fat intake (95.6%, 91.1% and 93.3% correct respectively). While 80% of the athletes were aware fat intake should predominately be made up of unsaturated fat, they were less able to identify food sources of unsaturated fats (35.6% and 24.4% correct for statements regarding monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, respectively). Broad nutrition messages and recommendations appear to be well understood; however, gaps in nutrition knowledge are evident. A better understanding of nutrition knowledge in athletes will allow nutrition education interventions to target areas in need of improvement.

  8. Consolidating Pre-Service Physics Teachers' Subject Matter Knowledge Using Didactical Reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäntylä, T.; Nousiainen, M.

    2014-01-01

    In the Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, there are advanced physics courses designed for the needs of pre-service physics teachers. The starting point is that after introductory and intermediate physics courses, pre-service physics teachers know laws and definitions but the knowledge is quite fragmented and does not form coherent…

  9. Pre-Service Teachers' Subject Knowledge of and Attitudes about Radioactivity and Ionising Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colclough, Nicholas Denys; Lock, Roger; Soares, Allan

    2011-01-01

    This study focussed on secondary school (11-18 years) pre-service teachers' (n = 73) knowledge of and attitudes towards risks associated with alpha, beta, and gamma radiations. A multi-method approach was used with physics, chemistry, biology, and history graduates undertaking the one-year initial teacher training, Post Graduate Certificate in…

  10. Knowledge, Attitude and Performance of Shiraz General Dentists about Infection Control Principles during Preparing Intraoral Radiographies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolaziz Hagh Negahdar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Infection control in dental centers is affected by the persons’ attitude and knowledge about mechanisms of infection transmission. This study was designed to evaluate the knowledge and the attitude of Shiraz dentists about infection control during intraoral radiographies preparation. Materials & Methods: In this cross-sectional, and analytical research, the attitude and the knowledge of 45 male and 25 female, randomly selected dentists, were obtained through completion of a researcher- planed questioner which its validity and reliability had been confirmed. Data were analyzed using Cronbach`s alpha, one-way ANOVA, student’s t-test, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient in SPSS (V.21. Results: The average of the dentists’ age was 40.59±10.72 and their average occupational experience was 13.49±9.75 years. The mean score obtained for knowledge about infection control during intraoral radiographic procedures was less than fifty percent of total obtainable score, and was assessed as weak knowledge. There was no significant difference in the level of knowledge between studied male and female dentists (P>0.05. In addition, no significant relationship was detected between level, age/experience, and the university of education (P>0.05. The attitude of the dentists about infection control during intraoral radiography preparation assessed as moderate to good level. Conclusions: The results showed that the main reason for the present problems is insufficient knowledge of the dentists in related subjects. Therefore, the solution, which is recommended among dentists, is to raise their awareness and to change their attitudes and culture in order to improve their performance.

  11. Selected Cardiovascular Risk Markers in Vegetarians and Subjects of General Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valachovičová, Martina; Príbojová, Jana; Urbánek, Vladimír; Bírošová, Lucia

    2017-12-01

    Besides genetic factors there are environmental effects including nutritional habits which can influence the risk of age-related diseases. The aim of the study was to assess the age dependence of selected cardiovascular risk markers in two groups of subjects with different nutritional pattern. In 470 long-term vegetarians and 478 subjects of general population the following indicators were measured: total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triacylglycerol, glucose, insulin concentrations, LDL-cholesterol, atherogenic index and insulin resistance IR(HOMA) were also calculated in studied subjects. Obtained data were evaluated according to age decades. Vegetarian vs. non-vegetarian concentrations of total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, insulin, and values of atherogenic index and IR(HOMA) were significantly reduced in all age decades. Vegetarian vs. non-vegetarian triacalglycerol concentrations were significantly reduced from 4th–7th decade. Vegetarian average decade values of all lipid parameters were in reference range. In non-vegetarian group, the risk average values of total cholesterol (>5.2 mmol/l) were found from 5th–7th decade, LDL-cholesterol (>3.3 mmol/l) in 7th decade and atherogenic index (>4) in 6th–7th decade. In vegetarians vs. non-vegetarians were noted the average decade values for total cholesterol ranging from 4.01–4.59 vs. 4.48–5.67 mmol/l, for triacylglycerols 1.00–1.33 vs. 1.13–1.74 mmol/l, for LDL-cholesterol 2.03–2.58 vs. 2.43–3.49 mmol/l, for atherogenic index 2.72–3.31 vs. 3.05–4.21 and for IR(HOMA) 0.99–1.15 vs. 1.15–1.84. Our data show significantly reduced mean age decade values of lipid and non-lipid cardiovascular risk markers in all adult vegetarians. Smaller changes of markers between decades compared to non-vegetarians document a protective effect of vegetarian nutrition in prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  12. Knowledge, language and subjectivities in a discourse community: Ideas we can learn from elementary children about science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Lori Ann

    2000-10-01

    In light of continuing poor performance by American students in school science, feminists and sociocultural researchers have demonstrated that we need to look beyond content to address the science needs of all school children. In this study I examined issues of discourse norms, knowledge, language and subjectivities (meaning personal and social observations and characteristics) in elementary science. Over a two-year period, I used an interpretive methodological approach to investigate science experiences in two first-second and second grade classrooms. I first established some of the norms and characteristics of the discourse communities through case studies of new students attempting to gain entry to whole class conversations. I then examined knowledge, a central focus of science education addressed by a variety of theoretical approaches. In these classrooms students co-constructed and built knowledge in their whole class science conversations sometimes following convergent (similar knowledge) and, at other times, divergent (differing knowledge) paths allowing for broader discourse. In both paths, there was gendered construction of knowledge in which same gender students elaborated the reasoning of previous speakers. In conjunction with these analyses, I examined what knowledge sources the students used in their science conversations. Students drew on a variety of informal and formal knowledge sources including personal experiences, other students, abstract logic and thought experiments, all of which were considered valid. In using sources from both in and out of school, students' knowledge bases were broader than traditional scientific content giving greater access and richness to their conversations. The next analysis focused on students' use of narrative and paradigmatic language forms in the whole class science conversations. Traditionally, only paradigmatic language forms have been used in science classrooms. The students in this study used both narrative and

  13. Implicit Knowledge of General Upper Secondary School in a Bridge-building Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Annette; Andreasen, Karen Egedal

    2016-01-01

    educational context of upper secondary school, bridge-building activities are meant to facilitate their decision-making on educational paths, but also to attract more and new groups of pupils. However, the premises of the inherent differences of educational contexts and of pupils’ lacking knowledge of upper...... secondary education can be questioned. In this ethnographic case study of a bridge-building project in a rural area in Denmark, we analyse the implicit knowledge of the general upper secondary school, as it is practiced in a bridge-building project, and how it is experienced by the pupils on the background...... of their prior knowledge. The analysis is theoretically informed by especially the code concepts of Basil Bernstein....

  14. Developmental Dynamics of General and School-Subject-Specific Components of Academic Self-Concept, Academic Interest, and Academic Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogol, Katarzyna; Brunner, Martin; Preckel, Franzis; Goetz, Thomas; Martin, Romain

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the developmental dynamics of general and subject-specific (i.e., mathematics, French, and German) components of students' academic self-concept, anxiety, and interest. To this end, the authors integrated three lines of research: (a) hierarchical and multidimensional approaches to the conceptualization of each construct, (b) longitudinal analyses of bottom-up and top-down developmental processes across hierarchical levels, and (c) developmental processes across subjects. The data stemmed from two longitudinal large-scale samples (N = 3498 and N = 3863) of students attending Grades 7 and 9 in Luxembourgish schools. Nested-factor models were applied to represent each construct at each grade level. The analyses demonstrated that several characteristics were shared across constructs. All constructs were multidimensional in nature with respect to the different subjects, showed a hierarchical organization with a general component at the apex of the hierarchy, and had a strong separation between the subject-specific components at both grade levels. Further, all constructs showed moderate differential stabilities at both the general (0.42 < r < 0.55) and subject-specific levels (0.45 < r < 0.73). Further, little evidence was found for top-down or bottom-up developmental processes. Rather, general and subject-specific components in Grade 9 proved to be primarily a function of the corresponding components in Grade 7. Finally, change in several subject-specific components could be explained by negative effects across subjects. PMID:27014162

  15. Developmental Dynamics of General and School-Subject-Specific Components of Academic Self-Concept, Academic Interest, and Academic Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna eGogol

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the developmental dynamics of general and subject-specific (i.e., mathematics, French, and German components of students’ academic self-concept, anxiety, and interest. To this end, the authors integrated three lines of research: (a hierarchical and multidimensional approaches to the conceptualization of each construct, (b longitudinal analyses of bottom-up and top-down developmental processes across hierarchical levels, and (c ipsative developmental processes across subjects. The data stemmed from two longitudinal large-scale samples (N = 3,498 and N = 3,863 of students attending Grades 7 and 9 in Luxembourgish schools. Nested-factor models were applied to represent each construct at each grade level. The analyses demonstrated that several characteristics were shared across constructs. All constructs were multidimensional in nature with respect to the different subjects, showed a hierarchical organization with a general component at the apex of the hierarchy, and had a strong separation between the subject-specific components at both grade levels. Further, all constructs showed moderate differential stabilities at both the general (.42 < r < .55 and subject-specific levels (.45 < r < .73. Further, little evidence was found for top-down or bottom-up developmental processes. Rather, general and subject-specific components in Grade 9 proved to be primarily a function of the corresponding components in Grade 7. Finally, change in several subject-specific components could be explained by negative, ipsative effects across subjects.

  16. General practitioners' knowledge of hand surgery in Singapore: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Kin Ghee; Puhaindran, Mark Edward; Chong, Alphonsus Khin Sze

    2012-08-01

    Hand surgery is a subspecialty with a dedicated training programme in Singapore. Currently, Singapore is one of two countries in the world that still provides dedicated advanced hand specialty training. As hand surgeons depend on referrals from institutions and general practitioners, appropriate hand surgical referral requires the referring physician to have knowledge and understanding of common hand conditions as well as less common but more urgent surgical conditions, and their available surgical treatments. This study aimed to determine the knowledge of hand surgery and hand surgical conditions among general practitioners. A questionnaire survey was conducted during a continuing medical education symposium on hand surgery in Singapore. Participants responded to 12 questions on hand trauma by keying the answers into a computer database system. The results were then analysed. A total of 35 general practitioners responded to our survey, and they were able to answer 53% of the questions correctly. We found knowledge gaps among the participants regarding hand surgical conditions, and identified areas where increased education during medical school, postgraduate training and continuing medical education may be beneficial. Areas that were found to be weak included recognising injuries that pose a high risk for developing wound infection, complications of topical steroid injection in trigger finger treatment and hand tumours. Improving hand surgery knowledge among general practitioners not only leads to improved primary care, but it can also facilitate prompt recognition of surgical problems and subsequent referral to appropriate hand surgeons for treatment. This may possibly reduce the load of tertiary institutions in treating non-urgent hand conditions.

  17. Endocarditis Prophylaxis in Cardiac Patients: Knowledge among General Dental Practitioners in Tabriz

    OpenAIRE

    Ardeshir Lafzi; Nader Abolfazli; Amir Eskandari

    2008-01-01

    Background and aims. Dental procedures injuring oral tissues may induce bacterial release to blood stream that can cause infective endocarditis in susceptible patients. The aim of this study was to determine the level of knowledge of general dental practitioners (GDPs) in Tabriz, Northwest of Iran, regarding endocarditis prophylaxis in cardiac patients receiving dental treatments.

  18. PET Recycling Behavior of consumers in Lahore, Pakistan, Available knowledge and general attitudes, Impact on recycling

    OpenAIRE

    , Meer; , Usman

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Lahore, Pakistan is one of the most populated and hottest regions of the world. Due to long summers beverages consumption is generally high leading to an increase in consumption of beverage PET bottles. There is a huge amount of municipal waste which is not being recycled and as a result it ends up in land refills. Through a survey I have tried to figure out that how different factors like income level, educational level, recycling facility, knowledge and incentives influence recycli...

  19. Predicting Children's Reading and Mathematics Achievement from Early Quantitative Knowledge and Domain-General Cognitive Abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Felicia W; vanMarle, Kristy; Geary, David C

    2016-01-01

    One hundred children (44 boys) participated in a 3-year longitudinal study of the development of basic quantitative competencies and the relation between these competencies and later mathematics and reading achievement. The children's preliteracy knowledge, intelligence, executive functions, and parental educational background were also assessed. The quantitative tasks assessed a broad range of symbolic and nonsymbolic knowledge and were administered four times across 2 years of preschool. Mathematics achievement was assessed at the end of each of 2 years of preschool, and mathematics and word reading achievement were assessed at the end of kindergarten. Our goals were to determine how domain-general abilities contribute to growth in children's quantitative knowledge and to determine how domain-general and domain-specific abilities contribute to children's preschool mathematics achievement and kindergarten mathematics and reading achievement. We first identified four core quantitative competencies (e.g., knowledge of the cardinal value of number words) that predict later mathematics achievement. The domain-general abilities were then used to predict growth in these competencies across 2 years of preschool, and the combination of domain-general abilities, preliteracy skills, and core quantitative competencies were used to predict mathematics achievement across preschool and mathematics and word reading achievement at the end of kindergarten. Both intelligence and executive functions predicted growth in the four quantitative competencies, especially across the first year of preschool. A combination of domain-general and domain-specific competencies predicted preschoolers' mathematics achievement, with a trend for domain-specific skills to be more strongly related to achievement at the beginning of preschool than at the end of preschool. Preschool preliteracy skills, sensitivity to the relative quantities of collections of objects, and cardinal knowledge predicted

  20. Predicting Children's Reading and Mathematics Achievement from Early Quantitative Knowledge and Domain-General Cognitive Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Felicia W.; vanMarle, Kristy; Geary, David C.

    2016-01-01

    One hundred children (44 boys) participated in a 3-year longitudinal study of the development of basic quantitative competencies and the relation between these competencies and later mathematics and reading achievement. The children's preliteracy knowledge, intelligence, executive functions, and parental educational background were also assessed. The quantitative tasks assessed a broad range of symbolic and nonsymbolic knowledge and were administered four times across 2 years of preschool. Mathematics achievement was assessed at the end of each of 2 years of preschool, and mathematics and word reading achievement were assessed at the end of kindergarten. Our goals were to determine how domain-general abilities contribute to growth in children's quantitative knowledge and to determine how domain-general and domain-specific abilities contribute to children's preschool mathematics achievement and kindergarten mathematics and reading achievement. We first identified four core quantitative competencies (e.g., knowledge of the cardinal value of number words) that predict later mathematics achievement. The domain-general abilities were then used to predict growth in these competencies across 2 years of preschool, and the combination of domain-general abilities, preliteracy skills, and core quantitative competencies were used to predict mathematics achievement across preschool and mathematics and word reading achievement at the end of kindergarten. Both intelligence and executive functions predicted growth in the four quantitative competencies, especially across the first year of preschool. A combination of domain-general and domain-specific competencies predicted preschoolers' mathematics achievement, with a trend for domain-specific skills to be more strongly related to achievement at the beginning of preschool than at the end of preschool. Preschool preliteracy skills, sensitivity to the relative quantities of collections of objects, and cardinal knowledge predicted

  1. Spaces, Times, and Knowledge for a Reflective Subjectivity in the Bellaterra Primary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Bosco

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article we present the results of a narrative inquiry into the construction of subjectivity in primary schools. In this study the researchers' own subjectivities came under the same scrutiny as those who were the focus of the research, and were placed in relation to them. We will discuss the doubts that arose as we carried out our research as well as how our positions as researchers changed over the course of the study. We will also describe our attempts to give voice to teachers and learners through our narratives. This goal led us to produce an account of subjectivity that was relational, process-based, and, sometimes, fragmented. Our interpretation of the representation of childhood/learners and learning in school is based upon how the teachers we have worked with shared a reflective, integral, cooperative, and community view of learning. We will also discuss how learners develop forms of positioning, identification, and differentiation depending on their relationships with others. In this way we have been able to reconstruct the way in which learners' subjectivities are formed by narrating scenes observed in classrooms with different groups of peers, and in other areas of the school where these groups carry out different activities. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0902273

  2. Implications of the intersection between knowledge, ideology and subjectivity in Althusser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Martín Torres

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to reconstruct the idea of “political autonomy” behold by Louis Althusser, trough out the exploring of two basic fields of his theory: the marxist theory of knowledge and the consequences that the interdependence of notions such as “ideology” and “subjectivity” has for the reflection of a materialistic political practice. On his reading of the dialectic materialism, Althusser had emphasized the need of recognize the positive role that ideology plays within the development of social relations. Knowledge acquires relevance since its represents the chance to break the reproduction of conditions such as inequality and submission. Nonetheless, when the room for individual action is questioned the problem arises regarding the conditions for the alleged breakdown

  3. The AWAKEN survey: knowledge of narcolepsy among physicians and the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Russell; Kim, Ann Y

    2014-01-01

    Narcolepsy can be a debilitating sleep disorder resulting from the dysregulation of pathways that control the sleep and wake states of patients. Although overall knowledge of narcolepsy has increased, no previous studies characterize awareness and perceptions of this condition in the general population or among physicians. Our survey evaluated the understanding and perceptions of narcolepsy among individuals from the general population and from a sample of physicians, including sleep specialists. The Awareness and Knowledge of Narcolepsy (AWAKEN) survey included a sample of 1000 US adults, 300 primary care physicians (PCPs), and 100 sleep medicine specialists (36% board certified) and was conducted online by Harris Interactive in May 2012. Descriptive analysis was performed using 2-tailed t tests with a significance of P narcolepsy, it ranked lowest in awareness relative to other chronic diseases requiring long-term treatment. Overall, 62% of sleep specialists and 24% of PCPs considered themselves "very" or "extremely" knowledgeable about narcolepsy; however, only 42% and 9% of sleep specialists and PCPs, respectively, felt "very" or "extremely" comfortable diagnosing the disorder. Only 22% of sleep specialists and 7% of PCPs identified all 5 key narcolepsy symptoms; no participant in the general population could identify all 5 symptoms. Sixty-three percent of sleep specialists and 39% of PCPs recognized both of the most prominent narcolepsy symptoms, which are excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy. Substantial gaps exist in understanding narcolepsy and its symptoms, even among sleep medicine specialists. Our findings suggest a need for educational initiatives for physicians to improve recognition of narcolepsy symptoms.

  4. Direct mail improves knowledge of basic life support guidelines in general practice: a randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secher, Niels; Mikkelsen, Mette Marie; Adelborg, Kasper; Mikkelsen, Ronni; Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Rubak, Jens Mørch; Vedsted, Peter; Løfgren, Bo

    2012-10-14

    Implementation of new guidelines into clinical practice is often incomplete. Direct mail is a simple way of providing information to physicians and may improve implementation of new guidelines on basic life support (BLS). The aim of this study was to describe knowledge of the most recent European Resuscitation Council (ERC) Guidelines for BLS among general practitioners (GPs) and investigate whether direct mail improves theoretical knowledge of these guidelines. All general practice clinics (n=351) in Central Denmark Region were randomised to receive either direct mail (intervention) or no direct mail (control). The direct mail consisted of the official ERC BLS/AED poster and a cover letter outlining changes in compression depth and frequency in the new guidelines. In general practice clinics randomised to intervention, every GP received a direct mail addressed personally to him/her. Two weeks later, a multiple-choice questionnaire on demographics and BLS guidelines were mailed to GPs in both groups. In total, 830 GPs were included in this study (direct mail, n=408; control, n=422). The response rate was 58%. The majority (91%) of GPs receiving direct mail were familiar with BLS Guidelines 2010 compared to 72% in the control group (Pguidelines and thus facilitated the implementation of this knowledge into clinical practice. Resuscitation councils and medical societies may consider using direct mail as a simple strategy to facilitate implementation of changes in clinical guidelines.

  5. Cancer-related false knowledge in relatives of cancer patients and the general public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turhal, N S; Dane, F; Ulus, C; Sari, S; Senturk, N; Bingol, D

    2010-01-01

    Although there are many myths about cancer in Turkey, there is no study evaluating Turkish public's knowledge about cancer. The goals of our research were to: 1) measure the extent of knowledge of cancer among the Turkish public; 2) determine the differences in extent of cancer-related knowledge between participants who have relatives with cancer and those who do not; and 3) determine the sources of knowledge possessed. Data were obtained from a total of 415 participants (244 female, 171 male), all of them sitting at the Marmara University Faculty of Medicine Hospital (MUFMH) outpatient clinic waiting area for non-cancer-related reasons. Each participant completed a 3-part questionnaire. Appropriate statistical tests were used for comparison. The mean age was 41 years. Of 415 participants, 65.3% stated that they had one or more cancer patient in their immediate family; 70.1% of the participants had a high-school education or greater. The questionnaire showed that, depending on the question, anywhere from 1.7% to 88.5% of the general public possesses some false information; furthermore, the difference in accuracy between relatives of cancer patients and non-relatives was marginal. Only 3 specific questions, related to the following ideas, rendered answers that were statistically significantly different between these 2 groups: breast cancer is only seen in females (p knowledge about cancer was unacceptably high in our cohort. Broader efforts should be made to inform the Turkish public about cancer.

  6. Knowledge of Thyroid Disorders during Pregnancy among General Practitioners in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Sahar; Abdi, Hengameh; Ahmadi, Soleiman; Bahadoran, Zahra; Amouzegar, Atieh

    2017-07-01

    Thyroid disorders during pregnancy are important health problems worldwide. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge of general practitioners (GPs) about thyroid disorders during pregnancy. In this cross sectional study, 120 GPs were randomly selected among participants of a continuous medical education (CME) program, entitled "practical endocrinology". To assess the knowledge and educational requirements of GPs regarding thyroid disorders during pregnancy, a validated and localized multiple-choice questionnaire was used. A total of 100 GPs completed the questionnaire. The mean age of the participants was 37.0 years, and 41.4% were men. The mean knowledge score of GPs was 39.9%. On average, the rate of correct response to questions concerning the definition, pathophysiology, diagnosis, complications, and treatment of thyroid disorders was 39.0%, 39.3%, 48.8%, 34.3%, and 44.6%, respectively. There was a significant difference in knowledge among GPs, who had and had not passed the training course on thyroid disorders. In addition, GPs who had passed continuous medical education programs obtained higher knowledge scores regarding diagnosis and treatment (P information on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of thyroid disorders during pregnancy. Considering the key role of GPs in the public healthcare system, design of high-quality educational programs and development of specific educational packages about thyroid disorders and pregnancy are necessary.

  7. Endocarditis Prophylaxis in Cardiac Patients: Knowledge among General Dental Practitioners in Tabriz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardeshir Lafzi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and aims. Dental procedures injuring oral tissues may induce bacterial release to blood stream that can cause infective endocarditis in susceptible patients. The aim of this study was to determine the level of knowledge of general dental practitioners (GDPs in Tabriz, Northwest of Iran, regarding endocarditis prophylaxis in cardiac patients receiving dental treatments.

    Materials and methods. This was a cross-sectional, descriptive, analytical study that included 150 GDPs. All practitioners were given a self-administered questionnaire which consisted of three parts assessing their knowledge of cardiac diseases requiring prophylaxis, dental procedures requiring prophylaxis, and antibiotic regimen for endocarditis prophylaxis. Statistical analysis of data was carried out using independent t-test, one-way ANOVA and chi-square test.

    Results. The level of knowledge among GDPs in three areas of cardiac diseases requiring prophylaxis, dental procedures requiring prophylaxis, and antibiotic regimen for endocarditis prophylaxis were 63.7%, 66.8% and 47.7%, respectively. Their overall level of knowledge regarding endocarditis prophylaxis was 59%. Association of the level of knowledge with age and practice period was statistically significant (P < 0.05. However, the level of knowledge was not significantly associated with gender or university of graduation in either of three areas evaluated (P > 0.05.

    Conclusion. According to our results, the knowledge of endocarditis prophylaxis among GDPs in Tabriz was in a moderate level. Regarding the importance of endocarditis prophylaxis in susceptible patients, it should be more emphasized in the curriculum of dental schools and continuing dental education programs.

  8. Effect of socioeconomic level on knowledge of stroke in the general population: A social inequality gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Moreno, J M; Alonso-González, R; Peral Pacheco, D; Millán-Nuñez, M V; Roa-Montero, A; Constantino-Silva, A B; Aguirre-Sánchez, J J

    2016-01-01

    Socioeconomic status is a factor that influences health-related behaviour in individuals as well as health conditions in entire populations. The objective of the present study was to analyse the sociodemographic factors that may influence knowledge of stroke. Cross-sectional study. A representative sample was selected by double randomisation. Face-to-face interviews were carried out by previously trained medical students using a structured questionnaire with open- and closed-ended questions. Adequate knowledge was previously defined. The Mantel-Haenszel test and adjusted logistic regression analysis were used to assess the association between knowledge of stroke and the study variables. 2411 subjects were interviewed (59.9% women; mean age 49.0 [SD 17.3] years) Seventy-three per cent were residents of urban areas, 24.7% had a university education, and 15.2% had a low level of schooling. Only 2.1% reported earning more than 40 000 euros/year, with 29.9% earning less than 10 000. Nearly 74% reported having an excellent or good state of health. The unemployment rate was 17.0%. Prevalence of "adequate knowledge" was 39.7% (95% CI: 37.7%-41.6%). Trend analysis showed an association between knowledge of stroke and income (z=10.14, P<0.0001); educational level (z=15.95, P<0.0001); state of health (z=7.92, P<0.0001); and employment status (z=8.98, P<0.0001). Educational level, income, employment status, and state of health are independent factors for adequate knowledge of stroke. Public awareness campaigns should present material using simple language and efforts should be directed toward the most disadvantaged social strata in particular. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. FROM ENGLISH AS A GENERAL SCHOOL SUBJECT ONTO ENGLISH AS A MEDIUM FOR LEARNING SPECIFIC SUBJECTS: THE NEED TO SHIFT IN THE TEACHING ORIENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Aniroh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The teaching of ESP so far has been dominated by the belief that linguistic mastery of English is considered sufficient to deliver the contents of the subject matter concerned. This view seems to need a critical overview for verbal communication in general, let alone in ESP, requires both proficiency in the language and the contents. This implies that English teachers in ESP need to be equipped satisfactorily in English as well as the subject matter. An ESP teacher needs to possess a double competency. With this as a framework, the teaching of ESP accordingly will need to shift its focus from English in isolation to English as medium for subject matters exchanges.

  10. Examining the Professional, Technical, and General Knowledge Competencies Needed by Beginning School-Based Agricultural Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stripling, Christopher T.; Barrick, R. Kirby

    2013-01-01

    The philosophy behind the kind of teacher education one receives affects the preparedness of beginning agricultural education teachers. The purpose of this philosophical study was to examine and summarize the professional knowledge, technical knowledge, and general knowledge competencies needed in a comprehensive teacher education program to…

  11. General Motor Vehicle Drivers' Knowledge and Practices Regarding Drink Driving in Yinchuan and Guangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Keqin; King, Mark; Fleiter, Judy; Sheehan, Mary; Ma, Wenjun; Lei, Jing; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2015-01-01

    Drink driving contributes to significant levels of injury and economic loss in China but is not well researched. This study examined knowledge, drink-driving practices, and alcohol misuse problems among general drivers in Yinchuan. The objectives were to gain a better understanding of drink driving in Yinchuan, identify areas that need to be addressed, and compare the results with a similar study in Guangzhou. This was a cross-sectional study with a survey designed to collect information on participants' demographic characteristics and their knowledge and practices in relation to drinking and driving. The survey was composed of questions on knowledge and practices in relation to drink driving and was administered to a convenience sample of 406 drivers. Alcohol misuse problems were assessed by using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). Males accounted for the main proportion of drivers sampled from the general population ("general drivers"). A majority of general drivers in both cities knew that drunk driving had become a criminal offense in 2011; however, knowledge of 2 legal blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limits was quite low. Fewer drivers in Yinchuan (22.6%) than in Guangzhou (27.9) reported having been stopped by police conducting breath alcohol testing at least once in the last 12 months. The mean AUDIT score in Yinchuan (M = 8.2) was higher than that in Guangzhou (M = 7.4), and the proportion of Yinchuan drivers with medium or higher alcohol misuse problems (31.2%) was correspondingly higher than in Guangzhou (23.1%). In Yinchuan, males had a significantly higher AUDIT score than females (t = 3.454, P <.001), similar to Guangzhou. Multiple regression analyses were conducted on potential predictors of the AUDIT score (age, gender, monthly income, education level, years licensed, and age started drinking). There were significant individual contributions of gender (beta = 0.173, P =.09) and age at which drinking started (beta = 0.141, P

  12. AN EXAMINATION OF AUSTRALIAN GENERAL PRACTITIONERS’ KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES AND PRACTICES IN RELATION TO SLEEP DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Hassed

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep disorders represent an under-recognised public health problem and are reported to be underdiagnosed in general practices.Aims: To examine general practitioners’ (GPs attitude, knowledge and practice behaviour and identify barriers to detection,diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders encountered in the Australian primary care setting.Method: Using mixed methods, quantitative data from the Dartmouth Sleep Knowledge Questionnaire (DSKQ were analysedusing MS Excel 2007. Qualitative data were obtained from one focus group and eight interviews. Data were thematicallyanalysed.Results: 15 GPs participated; seven in a focus group and eight in interviews. Scores from DSKQ suggest gaps in GPs’knowledge. Qualitative analysis revealed that patients frequently presented with sleep disorders underpinned by mentalhealth disorders. GPs agreed that prescribing pharmacological interventions was undesirable and behavioural interventionswere preferred. Barriers included limited training for GPs, lack of resources, patient expectations and willingness to engagein lifestyle changes, and consultation time constraints.Discussion: Greater flexibility to investigate sleep related problems within the standard consultation and improved accessto educational activities could assist GPs. Patient factors, such as adherence to management strategies, are paramount tosuccessful management of sleep disorders; however, these obstacles to clinical practice may be difficult to overcome.Conclusion: Providing education for GPs about sleep disorders, greater flexibility within consultations may improve patientcare and patient engagement in management strategies may assist, yet a critical success factor in disease managementincludes patient engagement in management strategies.

  13. Cloning: What Do They Know? A Report on the General Knowledge of a Sample of Midwestern Citizens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascazine, John R.; Titterington, Lynda; Khalaf, Ali K.

    This study, part of a larger research project, explored the knowledge of the general population regarding cloning. It also sought to determine where people gather information on cloning. Such awareness of the general public's knowledge of important scientific topics and sources from which people retrieve information can help scientific and…

  14. Early Career Mathematics Teachers' General Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills: Do Teacher Education, Teaching Experience, and Working Conditions Make a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Johannes; Blömeke, Sigrid; Kaiser, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    We examined several facets of general pedagogical knowledge and skills of early career mathematics teachers, asking how they are associated with characteristics of teacher education, teaching experience, and working conditions. Declarative general pedagogical knowledge (GPK) was assessed via a paper-and-pencil test, while early career teachers'…

  15. Learning to spell from reading: general knowledge about spelling patterns influences memory for specific words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacton, Sébastien; Borchardt, Gaëlle; Treiman, Rebecca; Lété, Bernard; Fayol, Michel

    2014-05-01

    Adults often learn to spell words during the course of reading for meaning, without intending to do so. We used an incidental learning task in order to study this process. Spellings that contained double n, r and t which are common doublets in French, were learned more readily by French university students than spellings that contained less common but still legal doublets. When recalling or recognizing the latter, the students sometimes made transposition errors, doubling a consonant that often doubles in French rather than the consonant that was originally doubled (e.g., tiddunar recalled as tidunnar). The results, found in three experiments using different nonwords and different types of instructions, show that people use general knowledge about the graphotactic patterns of their writing system together with word-specific knowledge to reconstruct spellings that they learn from reading. These processes contribute to failures and successes in memory for spellings, as in other domains.

  16. A Framework for Incorporating General Domain Knowledge into Latent Dirichlet Allocation using First-Order Logic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrzejewski, D; Zhu, X; Craven, M; Recht, B

    2011-01-18

    Topic models have been used successfully for a variety of problems, often in the form of application-specific extensions of the basic Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) model. Because deriving these new models in order to encode domain knowledge can be difficult and time-consuming, we propose the Fold-all model, which allows the user to specify general domain knowledge in First-Order Logic (FOL). However, combining topic modeling with FOL can result in inference problems beyond the capabilities of existing techniques. We have therefore developed a scalable inference technique using stochastic gradient descent which may also be useful to the Markov Logic Network (MLN) research community. Experiments demonstrate the expressive power of Fold-all, as well as the scalability of our proposed inference method.

  17. Treatment of General Tension: Subjective and Physiological Effects of Progressive Relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkovec, T. D.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presence or absence of tension release significantly influenced the number of relaxation cycles necessary to produce reports of deep relaxation, frequency of practice, and successfulness of eliminating daily tension at follow-up. Subject's ability to reduce physiological activity by a procedure contributed to reductions in subjective tension.…

  18. An online questionnaire survey of UK general practitioners' knowledge and management of familial hypercholesterolaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, See; Pang, Jing; Adam, Safwaan; Watts, Gerald F; Soran, Handrean

    2016-11-09

    Early diagnosis and treatment of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia (HeFH) is known to be associated with reduced mortality from premature coronary artery disease, but HeFH remains underdiagnosed. This survey aims to determine knowledge and current management of HeFH in general practice. An online questionnaire was administered to general practitioners' (GPs') in the North West of England to assess their knowledge and management of HeFH. Practising GPs in the North West of England were contacted by email and invited to complete an online questionnaire. Recruitment discontinued when the target of 100 was reached. An assessment of the knowledge and current management of HeFH in GPs. 100 GP responses were analysed. Although only 39% considered themselves to have reasonable knowledge of HeFH, 89% knew that HeFH was a genetic disorder and 74% selected the correct lipid profile for diagnosing the condition. More than half (61%) were aware of current guidelines on HeFH. Gaps in knowledge were evident when only 30% correctly identified the prevalence of HeFH and half were not aware of the pattern of inheritance. Increased cardiovascular risk was underestimated by majority. 33% thought that they had HeFH patients in their practice confirming underdiagnosis of the condition. Statin therapy was recognised by 94% to be the right medication for treating HeFH. The majority (82%) regarded GPs to be the most effective healthcare professional for early recognition of HeFH. GPs have an above-average knowledge of familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) and almost universally consider that they have a key role in the early recognition of undiagnosed HeFH patients in the community. However, there are gaps in awareness that need to be addressed to further enhance the care of FH in the community. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Impact of a simple health education program about antenatal care on knowledge, attitudes, subjective norms and intention of pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetohy, Ebtisam M

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify pregnant women practices and to assess the impact of simple health education program on knowledge attitudes, subjective norms and intentions to antenatal care of pregnant women The randomized post-test only control group design was used among 200 pregnant women attending Maternal and Child Health (MCH) centers. One hundred women represented the intervention group who received a simple health eduction program and another 100 women constituted the control group. The study demonstated that nearly the intervention and control group women were equal in sociodemographic characteristics as there was no statistically significant difference in any item studied. It was found that 92% of the intervention group women had high outcome belief that attending Ante-Natal Care (ANC) leads to early detection of dangerous signs of pregnancy compared to 77% of the control group. Also 88% of the intervention group women perceived the importance of early detection of dangerous signs compared to 75% of the control group. Also 95% of the intervention group women had high normative belief that their physician believe that they must go for check up during pregnancy compared to 87% of the control group. The study also clarified that 85% of the intervention group had high motivation to comply with their physicians compared to 73% of the control group. Only 43% of the control group had regular medical check up. The mean scores of indirect attitude, subjective norms, indirect subjective norms, intention and practice were highest for the intervention and control groups among those having more than 12 years of education. The mean score of indirect attitudes increased with increasing level of knowledge among both the intervention and control groups. The mean score of practice was highest among those having positive indirect attitudes among both the intervention and control group. The mean score of practice was highest among those having high indirect subjective

  20. Diet in subjects with irritable bowel syndrome: A cross-sectional study in the general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligaarden Solveig C

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS often relate symptoms to the intake of certain foods. This study assesses differences in diet in subjects with and without IBS. Methods The cross-sectional, population-based study was conducted in Norway in 2001. Out of 11078 invited subjects, 4621 completed a survey about abdominal complaints and intake of common food items. IBS and IBS subgroups were classified according to Rome II criteria. Results IBS was diagnosed in 388 subjects (8.4% and, of these, 26.5% had constipation-predominant IBS (C-IBS, 44.8% alternating IBS (A-IBS, and 28.6% diarrhoea-predominant IBS (D-IBS. Low intake of dairy products (portions/day (Odds Ratio 0.85 [CI 0.78 to 0.93], p = 0.001 and high intake of water (100 ml/day (1.08 [1.02 to 1.15], p = 0.002, tea (1.05 [1.01 to 1.10], p = 0.019 and carbonated beverages (1.07 [1.01 to 1.14], p = 0.023 were associated with IBS. A lower intake of dairy products and a higher intake of alcohol and carbonated beverages were associated with D-IBS and a higher intake of water and tea was associated with A-IBS. In subjects with IBS the severity of symptoms was associated with a higher intake of vegetables and potatoes in subjects with C-IBS, with a higher intake of vegetables in subjects with A-IBS, and with a higher intake of fruits and berries, carbonated beverages and alcohol in subjects with D-IBS. Conclusions In this study, the diet differed in subjects with and without IBS and between IBS subgroups and was associated with the severity of symptoms.

  1. Wood’s Lamp Examination: Evaluation of Basic Knowledge in General Physicians

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    Pudit Suraprasit

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wood’s lamp examination is a useful diagnostic test in many dermatological disorders. However, there was limited data on knowledge of physicians about this tool. Objective: To evaluate basic knowledge of physicians on Wood’s lamp and its applications. Methods: The study used questionnaires in Thai general physicians who attended the 2013 Dermatology Annual Meeting. The questionnaire composed of a picture of a Wood’s lamp instrument and two open-end questions including 1 What is the name of this device? 2 Which diseases can this device help to make the diagnosis? Results: Eighty-two physicians enrolled in this study. Only 55 physicians (67.1% answered the name of a Wood’s lamp correctly. There were 29 out of 55 physicians (52.7% knew at least one application of Wood’s lamp. About half did not know any applications. Tinea versicolor, followed by melasma, tinea captitis, erythrasma, acne, porphyria, and vitiligo, respectively were the common applications that most physicians answered. Conclusion: This study showed around two-third of physicians know Wood’s lamp, but only half of them were knowledgeable about its’ application in dermatoses. Education regarding Wood’s lamp and application should be emphasized more in physicians to assist in dermatologic diagnoses.

  2. Analysis of knowledge of the general population and health professionals on organ donation after cardiac death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedenko, Ramon Correa; Nisihara, Renato; Yokoi, Douglas Shun; Candido, Vinícius de Mello; Galina, Ismael; Moriguchi, Rafael Massayuki; Ceulemans, Nico; Salvalaggio, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the knowledge and acceptance of the public and professionals working in intensive care units regarding organ donation after cardiac death. The three hospitals with the most brain death notifications in Curitiba were selected, and two groups of respondents were established for application of the same questionnaire: the general public (i.e., visitors of patients in intensive care units) and health professionals working in the same intensive care unit. The questionnaire contained questions concerning demographics, intention to donate organs and knowledge of current legislation regarding brain death and donation after cardiac death. In total, 543 questionnaires were collected, including 442 from family members and 101 from health professionals. There was a predominance of women and Catholics in both groups. More females intended to donate. Health professionals performed better in the knowledge comparison. The intention to donate organs was significantly higher in the health professionals group (p = 0.01). There was no significant difference in the intention to donate in terms of education level or income. There was a greater acceptance of donation after uncontrolled cardiac death among Catholics than among evangelicals (p donate, with greater intentions expressed by females. Education and income did not affect the decision. The type of transplant that used a donation after uncontrolled cardiac death was not well accepted in the study population, indicating the need for more clarification for its use in our setting.

  3. Knowledge Management Systems as an Interdisciplinary Communication and Personalized General-Purpose Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Schmitt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available As drivers of human civilization, Knowledge Management (KM processes have co-evolved in line with General-Purpose-Technologies (GPT, such as writing, printing, and information and communication systems. As evidenced by the recent shift from information scarcity to abundance, GPTs are capable of drastically altering societies due to their game-changing impact on our spheres of work and personal development. This paper looks at the prospect of whether a novel Personal Knowledge Management (PKM concept supported by a prototype system has got what it takes to grow into a transformative General-Purpose-Technology. Following up on a series of papers, the KM scenario of a decentralizing revolution where individuals and self-organized groups yield more power and autonomy is examined according to a GPT's essential characteristics, including a wide scope for improvement and elaboration (in people's private, professional and societal life, applicability across a broad range of uses in a wide variety of products and processes (in multi-disciplinary educational and work contexts, and strong complementarities with existing or potential new technologies (like organizational KM Systems and a proposed World Heritage of Memes Repository. The result portrays the PKM concept as a strong candidate due to its personal, autonomous, bottom-up, collaborative, interdisciplinary, and creativity-supporting approach destined to advance the availability, quantity, and quality of the world extelligence and to allow for a wider sharing and faster diffusion of ideas across current disciplinary and opportunity divides.

  4. [Establishment of knowledge, attitudes and opinions of general population about rational use of medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig Soler, Rita; Perramon Colet, Meritxell; Yahni, Corinne Zara; Garcia Puig, Anna M

    2015-01-01

    Identify the level of knowledge, opinions and attitudes of medicines in general population. Descriptive transversal study realised in a sample of≥18 years old public health users from primary health centres in the city of Barcelona. Sample has been chosen using a two phases sampling, stratified by district, gender and age. Questionnaire administered face-to-face. SPSSv15 used for the analysis. December 2011. 484 surveys has been done (IC 95%, α=5%). 53% were women and 21,3% had university studies. Medicine use: 81% had taken medicines in the last 3 months; average of 2,34. 80% of medicated people know what they take and its indication. 55,6% don't know active ingredient concept. Only 35% recognise the active ingredient showed in the box of the medicine (3 cases shown) and 44,5% not one. 22,7% know the meaning of security concepts contraindication, adverse effect and drug interaction. 20% ignore. This fact grows with age and reduces with high study levels. Global rational use of medicines indicator obtains 5,03 from 10: 3,42 opinion and 6,51 attitude. 70% of people think there is no rational use of medicines in general and 21,3% would promote raising awareness. Low level of knowledge and poor attitude and opinion in rational use of medicines have been shown in this study. It is necessary involve citizens and improve their basic knowledge to promote rational use of medicines. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Knowledge on fibromyalgia among general practitioners, from Chiclayo-Peru, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña Ortiz, Fátima Evelin; Capitán de la Cruz, Victoria Alejandra; León Jiménez, Franco Ernesto

    Knowledge about fibromyalgia in general practitioners in the province of Chiclayo, Peru, 2016. Cross sectional descriptive study. Non-probability sampling, census type. In all, 145 physicians were evaluated through a questionnaire of 14 questions, validated by experts and a pilot. The analysis was performed using STATA v. 13. Accuracy in questions involving diagnosis was 41.1% and in questions about treatment: 65%; 75.1% 'had seen patients with fibromyalgia' previously. The average on locating pain points was 2.2±2.8. Only 2.8% identified 11 or more painful points; 54.5% answered that 'the diagnosis is clinical and exams are for the differential diagnosis'; 46.1% in Ministerio de Salud (MINSA) and 28.3% in Seguro Social de Salud (EsSalud) answered the item about diagnostic criteria (P=.021); 65.7% said that psychotherapy, pregabalin and aerobic exercise were the most effective therapeutic triad, with no differences between MINSA and EsSalud: 61.5% vs. 68.6% (P=.23); 59.3% responded that drugs that had proved to be useful were: Pregabalin, duloxetine and amitriptyline; 66.2% responded that the most effective physical therapy is aerobic exercise. Knowledge of the diagnosis and treatment of fibromyalgia by general doctors in Chiclayo is poor. There are some differences in knowledge depending on the age and type of institution to which each belongs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  6. Selective deficits in episodic feeling of knowing in ageing: a novel use of the general knowledge task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morson, Suzannah M; Moulin, Chris J A; Souchay, Céline

    2015-05-01

    Failure to recall an item from memory can be accompanied by the subjective experience that the item is known but currently unavailable for report. The feeling of knowing (FOK) task allows measurement of the predictive accuracy of this reflective judgement. Young and older adults were asked to provide answers to general knowledge questions both prior to and after learning, thus measuring both semantic and episodic memory for the items. FOK judgements were made at each stage for all unrecalled responses, providing a measure of predictive accuracy for semantic and episodic knowledge. Results demonstrated a selective effect of age on episodic FOK resolution, with older adults found to have impaired episodic FOK accuracy while semantic FOK accuracy remained intact. Although recall and recognition measures of episodic memory are equivalent between the two age groups, older adults may have been unable to access contextual details on which to base their FOK judgements. The results suggest that older adults are not able to accurately predict future recognition of unrecalled episodic information, and consequently may have difficulties in monitoring recently encoded memories. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Mothers' electrophysiological, subjective, and observed emotional responding to infant crying: The role of secure base script knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groh, Ashley M; Roisman, Glenn I; Haydon, Katherine C; Bost, Kelly; McElwain, Nancy; Garcia, Leanna; Hester, Colleen

    2015-11-01

    This study examined the extent to which secure base script knowledge-reflected in the ability to generate narratives in which attachment-relevant events are encountered, a clear need for assistance is communicated, competent help is provided and accepted, and the problem is resolved-is associated with mothers' electrophysiological, subjective, and observed emotional responses to an infant distress vocalization. While listening to an infant crying, mothers (N = 108, M age = 34 years) lower on secure base script knowledge exhibited smaller shifts in relative left (vs. right) frontal EEG activation from rest, reported smaller reductions in feelings of positive emotion from rest, and expressed greater levels of tension. Findings indicate that lower levels of secure base script knowledge are associated with an organization of emotional responding indicative of a less flexible and more emotionally restricted response to infant distress. Discussion focuses on the contribution of mothers' attachment representations to their ability to effectively manage emotional responding to infant distress in a manner expected to support sensitive caregiving.

  8. Subjective and objective sleep and self-harm behaviors in young children: A general population study

    OpenAIRE

    Singareddy, Ravi; Krishnamurthy, Venkatesh B.; Vgontzas, Alexandros N.; FERNANDEZ-MENDOZA, Julio; Calhoun, Susan L.; Shaffer, Michele L.; Bixler, Edward O.

    2013-01-01

    Significant association between sleep disturbances and suicidal ideation and/or attempts is reported in adults and adolescents. However, there is paucity of studies exploring the association between sleep and self-harm behaviors (SHB) in young children and are limited to only subjective sleep measures. We examined the association between SHB and both subjective and objective sleep in a population-based sample of 5–12 yr. old. Parents of every student in 3 local school (K-5) districts (n=7,312...

  9. Pilates versus general exercise effectiveness on pain and functionality in non-specific chronic low back pain subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostagi, Fernanda Queiroz Ribeiro Cerci; Dias, Josilainne Marcelino; Pereira, Ligia Maxwell; Obara, Karen; Mazuquin, Bruno Fles; Silva, Mariana Felipe; Silva, Monica Angelica Cardoso; de Campos, Renata Rosa; Barreto, Maria Simone Tavares; Nogueira, Jéssyca Fernandes; Lima, Tarcísio Brandão; Carregaro, Rodrigo Luiz; Cardoso, Jefferson Rosa

    2015-10-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common causes of disability, and the Pilates method has been associated with improvements in symptoms. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the Pilates method, when compared to general exercises, on pain and functionality after eight weeks (16 sessions, 2×/week) and a follow-up of three months, in subjects with non-specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP). A randomised controlled trial composed of 22 subjects was proposed. Subjects were allocated into two groups: the Pilates group (PG) (n = 11) and the general exercise group (GEG) (n = 11). The PG protocol was based on the Pilates method and the GEG performed exercises to manage NSCLBP. There were no differences between the groups. When analysed over time, the GEG demonstrated improvements in functionality between baseline and the end of treatment (P = .02; Cohen'sd¯ = 0.34) and baseline and follow-up (P = .04; Cohen'sd¯ = 0.31). There were no differences between the Pilates and general exercises with regard to pain and functionality in NSCLBP subjects but general exercises were better than Pilates for increasing functionality and flexibility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Deformations of the vacuum solutions of general relativity subjected to linear constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, C.

    2013-12-01

    The problem of deforming geometries is particularly important in the context of constructing new exact solutions of Einstein’s equation. This issue often appears when extensions of the general relativity are treated, for instance in brane world scenarios. In this paper we investigate spacetimes in which the energy-momentum tensor obeys a linear constraint. Extensions of the usual vacuum and electrovacuum solutions of general relativity are derived and an exact solution is presented. The classes of geometries obtained include a wide variety of compact objects, among them black holes and wormholes. The general metric derived in this work generalizes several solutions already published in the literature. Perturbations around the exact solution are also considered.

  11. Generalizing across stimuli as well as subjects: A non-mathematical tutorial on mixed-effects models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang, Yu-Hsuan A.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Although it has long been known that analyses that treat stimuli as a fixed effect do not permit generalization from the sample of stimuli to the population of stimuli, surprisingly little attention has been paid to this issue outside of the field of psycholinguistics. The purposes of the article are (a to present a non-technical explanation of why it is critical to provide a statistical basis for generalizing to both the population subjects and the population of stimuli and (b to provide instructions for doing analyses that allows this generalization using four common statistical analysis programs (JMP, R, SAS, and SPSS.

  12. Multimorbidity and its relation to subjective memory complaints in a large general population of older adults.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.R. Verhey; M.P. van Boxtel; K.J. Hajema; M. van den Akker; Dr. Sil Aarts; J.F. Metsemakers; A.M. van Ingen

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multimorbidity has been suggested to be associated with a variety of negative health-related outcomes. The present study was designed to evaluate the association between multimorbidity and subjective memory complaints. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was based on data obtained from a

  13. Subjective and objective sleep and self-harm behaviors in young children: a general population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singareddy, Ravi; Krishnamurthy, Venkatesh B; Vgontzas, Alexandros N; Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Calhoun, Susan L; Shaffer, Michele L; Bixler, Edward O

    2013-10-30

    Significant association between sleep disturbances and suicidal ideation and/or attempts is reported in adults and adolescents. However, there is paucity of studies exploring the association between sleep and self-harm behaviors (SHB) in young children and are limited to only subjective sleep measures. We examined the association between SHB and both subjective and objective sleep in a population-based sample of 5-12 yr old. Parents of every student in 3 local school (K-5) districts (n=7312) was sent a screening questionnaire. Randomly selected children from this sample underwent a comprehensive history, physical examination, a 9-h overnight polysomnogram and completed several questionnaires. Among the final sample (n=693), 27 children had SHB with adjusted prevalence of 3%. There was no difference in age, gender, obesity, or socioeconomic status in subjects with or without SHB. Significantly more children with SHB had subjective sleep difficulty and depression. Difficulty maintaining sleep and frequent nightmares were associated with SHB independent of depression or demographics. Polysomnographic %REM-sleep was significantly higher in the SHB group after adjusting for demographics and depression. These data indicate that parent reported sleep disturbances are independently associated with SHB. It is possible that higher REM-sleep is a non-invasive biomarker for risk of self-harm behaviors in young children. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. General public knowledge, perceptions and practice towards pharmaceutical drug advertisements in the Western region of KSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Haddad, Mahmoud S; Hamam, Fayez; Al-Shakhshir, Sami M

    2014-04-01

    This study aims to examine general public knowledge and behavior toward pharmaceutical advertisements in the Western part of KSA. A cross sectional convenience sampling technique was used in this study. A total of 1445 valid questionnaires were received and analyzed using SPSS version 16 at alpha value of 0.05. Majority of respondents were aware of different types of drugs to be advertised and drug advertisements should seek approval from the health authorities. Television and Internet showed the highest effect on consumers. Almost half of the participants preferred an advertised drug over non-advertised one. Most of the respondents indicated that the quality of frequently advertised drugs is not better than those prescribed by the doctors. Majority of participants had positive beliefs toward advertised drugs concerning their role in education and spreading of awareness among the public. Pharmaceutical advertisements harm the doctor-patient relationship as evidenced by one-third of the investigated sample. Moreover, majority of the participants mentioned that they would consult another doctor or even change the current doctor if he/she refused to prescribe an advertised medication. Results of this study could be used to develop awareness programs for the general public and try to enforce the regulations and policies to protect the general public and patients from the business oriented pharmaceutical companies and drug suppliers.

  15. Contenidos teóricos de las materias generales y especializadas en los planes de estudios de las diplomaturas de ciencias de la salud Theoretic contents of general and specialized subjects in core curricula of health sciences professions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Arias Navalón

    2003-12-01

    .3%, respectively. Most careers have more hours focused on specialized subjects, with results ranging between the absence of general subjects in Optometry and Speech-language pathology careers and 71.4% of general contents in Occupational therapy. The lack of general health and disease knowledge might have important implications for daily practice and research expectatives of these health professions.

  16. The Predominance Of Integrative Tests Over Discrete Point Tests In Evaluating The Medical Students' General English Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    maryam Heydarpour Meymeh

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Multiple choice tests are the most common type of tests used in evaluating the general English knowledge of the students in most medical universities, however the efficacy of these tests are not examined precisely. Wecompare and examine the integrative tests and discrete point tests as measures of the English language knowledge of medical students.Methods: Three tests were given to 60 undergraduate physiotherapy and Audiology students in their second year of study (after passing their general English course. They were divided into 2 groups.The first test for both groups was an integrative test, writing. The second test was a multiple - choice test 0.(prepositions for group one and a multiple - choice test of tensesfor group two. The same items which were mostfi-equently used wrongly in thefirst test were used in the items of the second test. A third test, a TOEFL, was given to the subjects in order to estimate the correlation between this test and tests one and two.Results: The students performed better in the second test, discrete point test rather than the first which was an integrative test. The same grammatical mistakes in the composition were used correctly in the multiple choice tests by the students.Conclusion:Our findings show that student perform better in non-productive rather than productive test. Since being competent English language user is an expected outcome of university language courses it seems warranted to switch to integrative tests as a measure of English language competency.Keywords: INTEGRATIVE TESTS, ENGLISH LANGUAGE FOR MEDICINE, ACADEMIC ENGLISH

  17. Knowledge, attitude and practice related to diabetes mellitus among the general public in Galle district in Southern Sri Lanka: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, H M M; Weerasinghe, N P; Dias, H; Weerarathna, T P

    2017-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) has become a global epidemic with significant disability and premature death. Identification of the level of knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) related to diabetes among the general public is important in strategies for prevention of diabetes mellitus. This study was conducted as a community based cross sectional study in three Medical Officers of Health (MOH) areas in Galle district. Previously healthy literate individuals who have not attended any diabetes education program in the last two years were selected for this study. A total of 277 participants were included in the study. The majority (77%) had either moderate (39%) or above moderate knowledge (38%) on diabetes mellitus. Even though, level of education was significantly and positively associated with knowledge (p = 0.001), the association of gender and age with knowledge was not significant. Unlike knowledge, the attitude towards diabetes was poor in majority (90%) and level of education had no significant effect on attitude. With regards to practices, more than half of study subjects never had their blood sugar checked and, about 65% used to take refined sugar liberally and a large majority (80%) had no regular exercise activity. Even though the majority (77%) had moderate or above moderate knowledge on diabetes, their attitudes towards diabetes was poor (88%). It appears that the higher knowledge on diabetes did not translate into good practices as over 50% of study subjects did not involve with any preventive measures. Therefore, more emphasis should be given to address the issue of poor attitude and practices towards diabetes mellitus among general public in Sri Lanka.

  18. Knowledge, attitude and practice related to diabetes mellitus among the general public in Galle district in Southern Sri Lanka: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. M Herath

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM has become a global epidemic with significant disability and premature death. Identification of the level of knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP related to diabetes among the general public is important in strategies for prevention of diabetes mellitus. Methods This study was conducted as a community based cross sectional study in three Medical Officers of Health (MOH areas in Galle district. Previously healthy literate individuals who have not attended any diabetes education program in the last two years were selected for this study. Results A total of 277 participants were included in the study. The majority (77% had either moderate (39% or above moderate knowledge (38% on diabetes mellitus. Even though, level of education was significantly and positively associated with knowledge (p = 0.001, the association of gender and age with knowledge was not significant. Unlike knowledge, the attitude towards diabetes was poor in majority (90% and level of education had no significant effect on attitude. With regards to practices, more than half of study subjects never had their blood sugar checked and, about 65% used to take refined sugar liberally and a large majority (80% had no regular exercise activity. Conclusions Even though the majority (77% had moderate or above moderate knowledge on diabetes, their attitudes towards diabetes was poor (88%. It appears that the higher knowledge on diabetes did not translate into good practices as over 50% of study subjects did not involve with any preventive measures. Therefore, more emphasis should be given to address the issue of poor attitude and practices towards diabetes mellitus among general public in Sri Lanka.

  19. Knowledge About Recommended Treatment and Management of Major Depressive Disorder, Panic Disorder, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder Among Family Physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Katerndahl, David; Ferrer, Robert L

    2004-01-01

    Background: Concerns have been raised about whether primary care physicians appropriately manage mental disorders. We assessed family physicians' knowledge of appropriate management of major depressive disorder (MDD), panic disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD).

  20. Subjective sleep, burden, depression, and general health among caregivers of veterans poststroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittman, Maude; Hinojosa, Melanie Sberna; Findley, Kim

    2009-02-01

    The purposes of this article are to explore and describe subjective sleep experiences of informal caregivers of stroke survivors and to explore the relationships between subjective sleep experiences, caregiver burden, depression, and health to provide a broader portrait of the role that sleep plays in the stroke caregiving experience. A total of 276 caregivers and veterans participated in the study. Results indicate a greater risk of depression (Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale) among caregivers who sleep less, have difficulty achieving daytime enthusiasm, use sleep medications, and have poor sleep quality. Caregivers who sleep less have difficulty achieving daytime enthusiasm and are at greater risk of poor health. Greater caregiver burden was associated with less sleep and use of sleep medications. This descriptive analysis demonstrates the important relationship between sleep, depression, health, and burden and can lead to interventions to diagnose and treat sleep difficulties in caregivers.

  1. Image size invariant visual cryptography for general access structures subject to display quality constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kai-Hui; Chiu, Pei-Ling

    2013-10-01

    Conventional visual cryptography (VC) suffers from a pixel-expansion problem, or an uncontrollable display quality problem for recovered images, and lacks a general approach to construct visual secret sharing schemes for general access structures. We propose a general and systematic approach to address these issues without sophisticated codebook design. This approach can be used for binary secret images in non-computer-aided decryption environments. To avoid pixel expansion, we design a set of column vectors to encrypt secret pixels rather than using the conventional VC-based approach. We begin by formulating a mathematic model for the VC construction problem to find the column vectors for the optimal VC construction, after which we develop a simulated-annealing-based algorithm to solve the problem. The experimental results show that the display quality of the recovered image is superior to that of previous papers.

  2. A Meta-Analysis of Seaweed Impacts on Seagrasses: Generalities and Knowledge Gaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, M. S.; Wernberg, T.; Engelen, A. H.

    2012-01-01

    are replaced with unstable sediments, turbid waters, hypoxia, and poor habitat conditions for fishes and invertebrates. Understanding the situations under which seaweeds impact seagrasses on local patch scales can help proactive management and prevent losses at greater scales. Here, we provide a quantitative...... seagrass species were more susceptible than larger species. Findings (a) and (c) were rather intuitive. It was more surprising that 'rooted' seaweeds had comparatively small impacts, particularly given that this category included the infamous invasive Caulerpa species. This result may reflect that seaweed...... identified major knowledge gaps that need to be addressed before general predictive models on seaweed-seagrass interactions can be build, in order to effectively protect seagrass habitats from detrimental competition from seaweeds....

  3. Knowledge of paediatric dentistry by recently-qualified general dentists: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, J

    2007-09-01

    To determine an overview of opinions and knowledge of paediatric dentistry amongst a group of recently-qualified dentists working within the Scottish Hospital Dental Service. A prospective questionnaire-based survey undertaken at Dundee Dental Hospital and School, NHS Tayside, Scotland. The survey evaluated dentists' opinion of managing the child patient and the location of dental treatment as well as knowledge of trauma, minor oral surgery, developmental disorders, mixed dentition problems and joint paediatric/orthodontic scenarios. Data were available for 15 dentists (M: 7; F: 8), median age 25.00 (inter-quartile range 25.40, 27.20) years. Of the respondents, 73.3% enjoyed treating children, although concerns regarding the management of both dental trauma and paediatric minor oral surgery cases were noted by 93.3% and 100% of dentists respectively. Concerning the location of treatment for the child patient, 66.7% believed that this should be 'shared-care' between the general dental practitioners (GDP) and Community Dental Service (CDS), whilst 20.0% and 13.3% observed that this should be undertaken within the CDS and GDP respectively. None of the dentists felt that treatment should be undertaken either privately or within the hospital services. Overall, dentists were best able to answer questions relating to mixed dentition and paediatric/orthodontic problems and least able to do so for minor oral surgical conditions. This pilot study offers baseline data regarding both opinions and also knowledge of paediatric dentistry amongst a group of recently-qualified dentists. Further educational opportunities in this discipline at the postgraduate level may be beneficial.

  4. First Comes the Theory, Then the Practice? On the Acquisition of General Pedagogical Knowledge during Initial Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Teacher education systems worldwide are confronted with the essential question of how to foster both future teachers' theoretical and practical knowledge and to adequately enable future teachers to connect their theoretical and practical knowledge for teaching. This article investigates how future teachers acquire general pedagogical knowledge…

  5. Knowledge, illness perceptions and stated clinical practice behaviour in management of gout: a mixed methods study in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaetgens, B.; Pustjens, T.; Scheepers, L.E.; Janssens, H.J.E.M.; Linden, S. van der; Boonen, A.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to explore knowledge, illness perceptions and stated practice behaviour in relation to gout in primary care. This is a mixed methods study among 32 general practitioners (GPs). The quantitative assessment included the Gout Knowledge Questionnaire (GKQ; range

  6. Usability of teleshopping systems by young and older adults : General performance, task analysis and subjective evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Raad, KJE; Dekker, MR; Sikken, J.A.; den Brinker, P.B.L.M.; Beek, PJ; Brand, AN; Maarse, FJ; Mulder, LJM

    1999-01-01

    Older people generally experience more difficulty learning to work with new information technologies than younger people. This may be partly due to age-related impairments of memory and information processing. To determine which aspects of user interfaces pose too high demands on order users, an

  7. Knowledge on the subject of human physiology among Polish high school students--a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwinczewska, Helena; Rozwadowska, Joanna; Traczyk, Anna; Majda, Szymon; Wysocki, Michał; Grabowski, Kamil; Kopeć, Sylwia; Głowacki, Roman; Węgrzyn, Katarzyna; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Walocha, Jerzy A

    2014-01-01

    responsible decisions regarding their health. Our results suggest that more emphasis should be put on properly teaching human physiology in high school, especially to those students who do not plan a career in medicine-related fields. This study brings to light the disturbing fact that about a year after a student finishes his basic physiology course his knowledge of the subject returns to a pre high school level.

  8. Knowledge transfer for the management of dementia: a cluster-randomised trial of blended learning in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butzlaff Martin E

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The implementation of new medical knowledge into general practice is a complex process. Blended learning may offer an effective and efficient educational intervention to reduce the knowledge-to-practice gap. The aim of this study was to compare knowledge acquisition about dementia management between a blended learning approach using online modules in addition to quality circles (QCs and QCs alone. Methods In this cluster-randomised trial with QCs as clusters and general practitioners (GPs as participants, 389 GPs from 26 QCs in the western part of Germany were invited to participate. Data on the GPs' knowledge were obtained at three points in time by means of a questionnaire survey. Primary outcome was the knowledge gain before and after the interventions. A subgroup analysis of the users of the online modules was performed. Results 166 GPs were available for analysis and filled out a knowledge test at least two times. A significant increase of knowledge was found in both groups that indicated positive learning effects of both approaches. However, there was no significant difference between the groups. A subgroup analysis of the GPs who self-reported that they had actually used the online modules showed that they had a significant increase in their knowledge scores. Conclusion A blended learning approach was not superior to a QCs approach for improving knowledge about dementia management. However, a subgroup of GPs who were motivated to actually use the online modules had a gain in knowledge. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN36550981.

  9. Knowledge transfer for the management of dementia: a cluster-randomised trial of blended learning in general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The implementation of new medical knowledge into general practice is a complex process. Blended learning may offer an effective and efficient educational intervention to reduce the knowledge-to-practice gap. The aim of this study was to compare knowledge acquisition about dementia management between a blended learning approach using online modules in addition to quality circles (QCs) and QCs alone. Methods In this cluster-randomised trial with QCs as clusters and general practitioners (GPs) as participants, 389 GPs from 26 QCs in the western part of Germany were invited to participate. Data on the GPs' knowledge were obtained at three points in time by means of a questionnaire survey. Primary outcome was the knowledge gain before and after the interventions. A subgroup analysis of the users of the online modules was performed. Results 166 GPs were available for analysis and filled out a knowledge test at least two times. A significant increase of knowledge was found in both groups that indicated positive learning effects of both approaches. However, there was no significant difference between the groups. A subgroup analysis of the GPs who self-reported that they had actually used the online modules showed that they had a significant increase in their knowledge scores. Conclusion A blended learning approach was not superior to a QCs approach for improving knowledge about dementia management. However, a subgroup of GPs who were motivated to actually use the online modules had a gain in knowledge. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN36550981. PMID:20047652

  10. Knowledge transfer for the management of dementia: a cluster randomised trial of blended learning in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmar, Horst C; Mayer, Herbert; Ostermann, Thomas; Butzlaff, Martin E; Sandars, John E; Wilm, Stefan; Rieger, Monika A

    2010-01-04

    The implementation of new medical knowledge into general practice is a complex process. Blended learning may offer an effective and efficient educational intervention to reduce the knowledge-to-practice gap. The aim of this study was to compare knowledge acquisition about dementia management between a blended learning approach using online modules in addition to quality circles (QCs) and QCs alone. In this cluster-randomised trial with QCs as clusters and general practitioners (GPs) as participants, 389 GPs from 26 QCs in the western part of Germany were invited to participate. Data on the GPs' knowledge were obtained at three points in time by means of a questionnaire survey. Primary outcome was the knowledge gain before and after the interventions. A subgroup analysis of the users of the online modules was performed. 166 GPs were available for analysis and filled out a knowledge test at least two times. A significant increase of knowledge was found in both groups that indicated positive learning effects of both approaches. However, there was no significant difference between the groups. A subgroup analysis of the GPs who self-reported that they had actually used the online modules showed that they had a significant increase in their knowledge scores. A blended learning approach was not superior to a QCs approach for improving knowledge about dementia management. However, a subgroup of GPs who were motivated to actually use the online modules had a gain in knowledge. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN36550981.

  11. A Meta-Analysis of Seaweed Impacts on Seagrasses: Generalities and Knowledge Gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Mads S.; Wernberg, Thomas; Engelen, Aschwin H.; Tuya, Fernando; Vanderklift, Mat A.; Holmer, Marianne; McGlathery, Karen J.; Arenas, Francisco; Kotta, Jonne; Silliman, Brian R.

    2012-01-01

    Seagrasses are important habitat-formers and ecosystem engineers that are under threat from bloom-forming seaweeds. These seaweeds have been suggested to outcompete the seagrasses, particularly when facilitated by eutrophication, causing regime shifts where green meadows and clear waters are replaced with unstable sediments, turbid waters, hypoxia, and poor habitat conditions for fishes and invertebrates. Understanding the situations under which seaweeds impact seagrasses on local patch scales can help proactive management and prevent losses at greater scales. Here, we provide a quantitative review of available published manipulative experiments (all conducted at the patch-scale), to test which attributes of seaweeds and seagrasses (e.g., their abundances, sizes, morphology, taxonomy, attachment type, or origin) influence impacts. Weighted and unweighted meta-analyses (Hedges d metric) of 59 experiments showed generally high variability in attribute-impact relationships. Our main significant findings were that (a) abundant seaweeds had stronger negative impacts on seagrasses than sparse seaweeds, (b) unattached and epiphytic seaweeds had stronger impacts than ‘rooted’ seaweeds, and (c) small seagrass species were more susceptible than larger species. Findings (a) and (c) were rather intuitive. It was more surprising that ‘rooted’ seaweeds had comparatively small impacts, particularly given that this category included the infamous invasive Caulerpa species. This result may reflect that seaweed biomass and/or shading and metabolic by-products like anoxia and sulphides could be lower for rooted seaweeds. In conclusion, our results represent simple and robust first-order generalities about seaweed impacts on seagrasses. This review also documented a limited number of primary studies. We therefore identified major knowledge gaps that need to be addressed before general predictive models on seaweed-seagrass interactions can be build, in order to effectively

  12. A meta-analysis of seaweed impacts on seagrasses: generalities and knowledge gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Mads S; Wernberg, Thomas; Engelen, Aschwin H; Tuya, Fernando; Vanderklift, Mat A; Holmer, Marianne; McGlathery, Karen J; Arenas, Francisco; Kotta, Jonne; Silliman, Brian R

    2012-01-01

    Seagrasses are important habitat-formers and ecosystem engineers that are under threat from bloom-forming seaweeds. These seaweeds have been suggested to outcompete the seagrasses, particularly when facilitated by eutrophication, causing regime shifts where green meadows and clear waters are replaced with unstable sediments, turbid waters, hypoxia, and poor habitat conditions for fishes and invertebrates. Understanding the situations under which seaweeds impact seagrasses on local patch scales can help proactive management and prevent losses at greater scales. Here, we provide a quantitative review of available published manipulative experiments (all conducted at the patch-scale), to test which attributes of seaweeds and seagrasses (e.g., their abundances, sizes, morphology, taxonomy, attachment type, or origin) influence impacts. Weighted and unweighted meta-analyses (Hedges d metric) of 59 experiments showed generally high variability in attribute-impact relationships. Our main significant findings were that (a) abundant seaweeds had stronger negative impacts on seagrasses than sparse seaweeds, (b) unattached and epiphytic seaweeds had stronger impacts than 'rooted' seaweeds, and (c) small seagrass species were more susceptible than larger species. Findings (a) and (c) were rather intuitive. It was more surprising that 'rooted' seaweeds had comparatively small impacts, particularly given that this category included the infamous invasive Caulerpa species. This result may reflect that seaweed biomass and/or shading and metabolic by-products like anoxia and sulphides could be lower for rooted seaweeds. In conclusion, our results represent simple and robust first-order generalities about seaweed impacts on seagrasses. This review also documented a limited number of primary studies. We therefore identified major knowledge gaps that need to be addressed before general predictive models on seaweed-seagrass interactions can be build, in order to effectively protect

  13. A meta-analysis of seaweed impacts on seagrasses: generalities and knowledge gaps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mads S Thomsen

    Full Text Available Seagrasses are important habitat-formers and ecosystem engineers that are under threat from bloom-forming seaweeds. These seaweeds have been suggested to outcompete the seagrasses, particularly when facilitated by eutrophication, causing regime shifts where green meadows and clear waters are replaced with unstable sediments, turbid waters, hypoxia, and poor habitat conditions for fishes and invertebrates. Understanding the situations under which seaweeds impact seagrasses on local patch scales can help proactive management and prevent losses at greater scales. Here, we provide a quantitative review of available published manipulative experiments (all conducted at the patch-scale, to test which attributes of seaweeds and seagrasses (e.g., their abundances, sizes, morphology, taxonomy, attachment type, or origin influence impacts. Weighted and unweighted meta-analyses (Hedges d metric of 59 experiments showed generally high variability in attribute-impact relationships. Our main significant findings were that (a abundant seaweeds had stronger negative impacts on seagrasses than sparse seaweeds, (b unattached and epiphytic seaweeds had stronger impacts than 'rooted' seaweeds, and (c small seagrass species were more susceptible than larger species. Findings (a and (c were rather intuitive. It was more surprising that 'rooted' seaweeds had comparatively small impacts, particularly given that this category included the infamous invasive Caulerpa species. This result may reflect that seaweed biomass and/or shading and metabolic by-products like anoxia and sulphides could be lower for rooted seaweeds. In conclusion, our results represent simple and robust first-order generalities about seaweed impacts on seagrasses. This review also documented a limited number of primary studies. We therefore identified major knowledge gaps that need to be addressed before general predictive models on seaweed-seagrass interactions can be build, in order to effectively

  14. Comorbid subjective health complaints in patients with sciatica: a prospective study including comparison with the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grøvle, Lars; Haugen, Anne J; Ihlebaek, Camilla M; Keller, Anne; Natvig, Bård; Brox, Jens I; Grotle, Margreth

    2011-06-01

    Chronic nonspecific low back pain is accompanied by high rates of comorbid mental and physical conditions. The aims of this study were to investigate if patients with specific back pain, that is, sciatica caused by lumbar herniation, report higher rates of subjective health complaints (SHCs) than the general population and if there is an association between change in sciatica symptoms and change in SHCs over a 12-month period. A multicenter cohort study of 466 sciatica patients was conducted with follow-up at 3 months and 1 year. Comorbid SHCs were measured by 27 items of the SHC inventory. Odds ratios (ORs) for each SHC were calculated with comparison to a general population sample (n=928) by logistic regression. The SHC number was calculated by summing all complaints present. At baseline, the ORs for reporting SHCs for the sciatica patients were significantly elevated in 15 of the 27 items with a mean (S.D.) SHC number of 7.5 (4.4), compared to 5.2 (4.4) in the general population (Psciatica, the SHC number was reduced to normal levels. Among those with persisting or worsening sciatica, the number increased to a level almost double that of the general population. Compared to the general population, the prevalence of subjective health complaints in sciatica is increased. During follow-up, the number of health complaints increased in patients with persisting or worsening sciatica. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Case Study of Beginning Science Teachers' Subject Matter (SMK) and Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) of Teaching Chemical Reaction in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usak, Muhammet; Ozden, Mustafa; Eilks, Ingo

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a case study focusing on the subject matter knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge, and beliefs about science teaching of student teachers in Turkey at the start of their university education. The topic of interest was that of teaching chemical reactions in secondary chemistry education. A written test was developed which…

  16. The Stochastic Resonance Behaviors of a Generalized Harmonic Oscillator Subject to Multiplicative and Periodically Modulated Noises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchuan Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The stochastic resonance (SR characteristics of a generalized Langevin linear system driven by a multiplicative noise and a periodically modulated noise are studied (the two noises are correlated. In this paper, we consider a generalized Langevin equation (GLE driven by an internal noise with long-memory and long-range dependence, such as fractional Gaussian noise (fGn and Mittag-Leffler noise (M-Ln. Such a model is appropriate to characterize the chemical and biological solutions as well as to some nanotechnological devices. An exact analytic expression of the output amplitude is obtained. Based on it, some characteristic features of stochastic resonance phenomenon are revealed. On the other hand, by the use of the exact expression, we obtain the phase diagram for the resonant behaviors of the output amplitude versus noise intensity under different values of system parameters. These useful results presented in this paper can give the theoretical basis for practical use and control of the SR phenomenon of this mathematical model in future works.

  17. Modern astronomical knowledge as component of general education for sustainable development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurgaliev, I.

    {It is shown that 1) astronomical knowledge was a foundation of emerging modern physics and natural sciences based on mathematics, 2) mathematical basis of the natural sciences serves as an orientation of progress in the true objective of social sciences. The last example for this chain of impacts is the discovery of the fundamental demographic equation (N=aN^2-bN) full of the astronomical analogy [9]. Modern age endorses new imperatives on education. Reckless exploitation of the natural resources will cause irreversible exhaustion of the agro- and bio-potential of the planet during lifetime of a few generations. The adequate respond to the challenge lies in modern technologies and educating responsible (socially oriented) professionals. That is why the importance of teaching modern technologies along with providing the students with the understanding of global long term consequences of the human industrial activities is growing. The course ``Theoretical Foundations of Modern Technologies" at the Moscow State Agricultural University (Timiryazev Academy) taught by the author is discussed. New experimental project ``Space Technologies, Ecology and Safe Energetics in School of the Future" is presented as a project of a new age in the process of implementing at the Moscow city secondary schools by the colleagues and by the author. The new cosmological models in the frame of the Newtonian and general relativistic treatments developed by the author are considered in this report as an example of immediate implementation of new astro-knowledge into the education for modern agrarian students. The centrifugal forces acting between particles rotating randomly around each other are shown to be able to reverse gravitational collapse.

  18. The Nature Index: A General Framework for Synthesizing Knowledge on the State of Biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certain, Grégoire; Skarpaas, Olav; Bjerke, Jarle-Werner; Framstad, Erik; Lindholm, Markus; Nilsen, Jan-Erik; Norderhaug, Ann; Oug, Eivind; Pedersen, Hans-Christian; Schartau, Ann-Kristin; van der Meeren, Gro I.; Aslaksen, Iulie; Engen, Steinar; Garnåsjordet, Per-Arild; Kvaløy, Pål; Lillegård, Magnar; Yoccoz, Nigel G.; Nybø, Signe

    2011-01-01

    The magnitude and urgency of the biodiversity crisis is widely recognized within scientific and political organizations. However, a lack of integrated measures for biodiversity has greatly constrained the national and international response to the biodiversity crisis. Thus, integrated biodiversity indexes will greatly facilitate information transfer from science toward other areas of human society. The Nature Index framework samples scientific information on biodiversity from a variety of sources, synthesizes this information, and then transmits it in a simplified form to environmental managers, policymakers, and the public. The Nature Index optimizes information use by incorporating expert judgment, monitoring-based estimates, and model-based estimates. The index relies on a network of scientific experts, each of whom is responsible for one or more biodiversity indicators. The resulting set of indicators is supposed to represent the best available knowledge on the state of biodiversity and ecosystems in any given area. The value of each indicator is scaled relative to a reference state, i.e., a predicted value assessed by each expert for a hypothetical undisturbed or sustainably managed ecosystem. Scaled indicator values can be aggregated or disaggregated over different axes representing spatiotemporal dimensions or thematic groups. A range of scaling models can be applied to allow for different ways of interpreting the reference states, e.g., optimal situations or minimum sustainable levels. Statistical testing for differences in space or time can be implemented using Monte-Carlo simulations. This study presents the Nature Index framework and details its implementation in Norway. The results suggest that the framework is a functional, efficient, and pragmatic approach for gathering and synthesizing scientific knowledge on the state of biodiversity in any marine or terrestrial ecosystem and has general applicability worldwide. PMID:21526118

  19. The Nature Index: a general framework for synthesizing knowledge on the state of biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certain, Grégoire; Skarpaas, Olav; Bjerke, Jarle-Werner; Framstad, Erik; Lindholm, Markus; Nilsen, Jan-Erik; Norderhaug, Ann; Oug, Eivind; Pedersen, Hans-Christian; Schartau, Ann-Kristin; van der Meeren, Gro I; Aslaksen, Iulie; Engen, Steinar; Garnåsjordet, Per-Arild; Kvaløy, Pål; Lillegård, Magnar; Yoccoz, Nigel G; Nybø, Signe

    2011-04-22

    The magnitude and urgency of the biodiversity crisis is widely recognized within scientific and political organizations. However, a lack of integrated measures for biodiversity has greatly constrained the national and international response to the biodiversity crisis. Thus, integrated biodiversity indexes will greatly facilitate information transfer from science toward other areas of human society. The Nature Index framework samples scientific information on biodiversity from a variety of sources, synthesizes this information, and then transmits it in a simplified form to environmental managers, policymakers, and the public. The Nature Index optimizes information use by incorporating expert judgment, monitoring-based estimates, and model-based estimates. The index relies on a network of scientific experts, each of whom is responsible for one or more biodiversity indicators. The resulting set of indicators is supposed to represent the best available knowledge on the state of biodiversity and ecosystems in any given area. The value of each indicator is scaled relative to a reference state, i.e., a predicted value assessed by each expert for a hypothetical undisturbed or sustainably managed ecosystem. Scaled indicator values can be aggregated or disaggregated over different axes representing spatiotemporal dimensions or thematic groups. A range of scaling models can be applied to allow for different ways of interpreting the reference states, e.g., optimal situations or minimum sustainable levels. Statistical testing for differences in space or time can be implemented using Monte-Carlo simulations. This study presents the Nature Index framework and details its implementation in Norway. The results suggest that the framework is a functional, efficient, and pragmatic approach for gathering and synthesizing scientific knowledge on the state of biodiversity in any marine or terrestrial ecosystem and has general applicability worldwide.

  20. Knowledge and practices regarding mercury hygiene and amalgam waste disposal: A survey among general dental practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Bhardwaj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Amalgam, the most commonly used restorative material, is composed of nearly 50% mercury and 69% silver. It cannot be disposed along with biomedical waste (BMW because mercury-contaminated waste cannot be incinerated or autoclaved. Objectives: To assess the knowledge and observance of proper mercury hygiene and amalgam waste management among general dental practitioners (GDPs. Materials and Methods: A confidential questionnaire containing 14 questions regarding handling and disposal of amalgam was randomly distributed to 175 GDPs in Chandigarh, Panchkula, and Mohali. A response rate of 78% was obtained, and results were statistically analyzed. Results: Out of total dentists surveyed, 71% were found to be using amalgam as restorative material, 63% were doing <5 amalgam restorations per week. Only 6.5% of dentists placed rubber dam during removal and replacement of amalgam restorations. Fifty-five percent of dentists used high-volume evacuation. Filter was used only by 6% dentists. For 98%, dentists' evacuation drained into regular drain. Eighty-six percent of dentists never used amalgamator. Only 31% of dentists stored leftover amalgam scrap in radiographic fixer. Fifty-one percent of dentists disposed the bottle of leftover amalgam scrap along with BMW. One hundred percent of dentists disposed amalgam-contaminated gloves and cotton along with BMW. Only 17% of GDPs periodically monitored mercury vapors in their dental operatories. Conclusion: There exists a significant lack of knowledge regarding mercury hygiene and amalgam waste disposal among GDPs. Guidelines on mercury management need to be strongly implemented to prevent contamination of environment by mercury.

  1. Children's Comprehension of Object Relative Sentences: It's Extant Language Knowledge That Matters, Not Domain-General Working Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusli, Yazmin Ahmad; Montgomery, James W

    2017-10-17

    The aim of this study was to determine whether extant language (lexical) knowledge or domain-general working memory is the better predictor of comprehension of object relative sentences for children with typical development. We hypothesized that extant language knowledge, not domain-general working memory, is the better predictor. Fifty-three children (ages 9-11 years) completed a word-level verbal working-memory task, indexing extant language (lexical) knowledge; an analog nonverbal working-memory task, representing domain-general working memory; and a hybrid sentence comprehension task incorporating elements of both agent selection and cross-modal picture-priming paradigms. Images of the agent and patient were displayed at the syntactic gap in the object relative sentences, and the children were asked to select the agent of the sentence. Results of general linear modeling revealed that extant language knowledge accounted for a unique 21.3% of variance in the children's object relative sentence comprehension over and above age (8.3%). Domain-general working memory accounted for a nonsignificant 1.6% of variance. We interpret the results to suggest that extant language knowledge and not domain-general working memory is a critically important contributor to children's object relative sentence comprehension. Results support a connectionist view of the association between working memory and object relative sentence comprehension. https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.5404573.

  2. Knowledge of results and learning to tell the time in an adult male with an intellectual disability: a single-subject research design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applegate, Samantha L; Rice, Martin S; Stein, Franklin; Maitra, Kinsuk K

    2008-01-01

    The present study investigated whether knowledge of results, in the form of visual and audible feedback, would increase the accuracy of time-telling in an individual with an intellectual disability. A 19-year-old male with mild intellectual disability participated in this A1-B1-A2-B2 single-subject study design. The task involved correctly identifying the time given on a computer. Data, based on the Wilcoxon signed-rank test, showed that the participant demonstrated a greater number of correct responses during the intervention phases. Incorporating knowledge of results into a learning strategy for this individual with intellectual disability resulted in an increased ability to accurately identify the correct time on an analogue clock. There is a need to replicate the study design to increase the external validity and generalization of results. The strategies described in the present study may also be useful for occupational therapists who teach individuals with intellectual disability to gain skills in their everyday activities of daily living (ADLs). (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. A study of knowledge, attitude and practices regarding hair dye use among general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrinal Gupta

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hair dye usage is extremely common all over the world. Hair dyes have been reported to cause a wide range of adverse effects, therefore, the consumer’s knowledge about hair dyeing and related side effects are important. Aim: To assess the knowledge, attitude and practices of general population towards the use of hair dyes. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and fifty consecutive persons using hair dyes were enrolled for this questionnaire-based cross-sectional, descriptive study. Results: These 250 patients comprised 141 men (56.4% and 109 women (43.6% (M: F 1.29:1, aged between 16 and 74 (mean 47.13 years. The majority, 212 patients (84.8% were aged between 20–60 years and 66.4% (n=166 belonged to an urban background. When asked about the reason for using hair color, the principle reason was “to look younger” (59.6%, n=149. Most of the respondents were using synthetic hair dye preparations (55.2%, n=138 and when asked about the brand of hair dye being used, 25.2% (n=63 did not know about the brand they were using. When asked about their perception regarding safety of HD, 61% (n=152 respondents agreed that hair dyes are not safe and on being asked about the carcinogenic potential of HD, only 24% (n=60 respondents agreed. When enquired about the safest variety of HD, majority of respondents (52.4%, n=131 believed that plant based hair colors are the safest. When asked about the safety of HD during pregnancy and lactation, 68% (n=168 of the respondents were unaware regarding this aspect. 14.4% of the respondents reported suffering from some adverse effects due to hair dye use but only 11.11% (n=4 of those stopped using hair dyes. Conclusions: There is lack of awareness about the hair dyes and their adverse effects in the general population. There is an urgent need to increase awareness among consumers regarding the adverse effects of hair dyes and the available safer alternatives. Limitations: Small number of respondents and

  4. Degradation data analysis based on a generalized Wiener process subject to measurement error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junxing; Wang, Zhihua; Zhang, Yongbo; Fu, Huimin; Liu, Chengrui; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2017-09-01

    Wiener processes have received considerable attention in degradation modeling over the last two decades. In this paper, we propose a generalized Wiener process degradation model that takes unit-to-unit variation, time-correlated structure and measurement error into considerations simultaneously. The constructed methodology subsumes a series of models studied in the literature as limiting cases. A simple method is given to determine the transformed time scale forms of the Wiener process degradation model. Then model parameters can be estimated based on a maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method. The cumulative distribution function (CDF) and the probability distribution function (PDF) of the Wiener process with measurement errors are given based on the concept of the first hitting time (FHT). The percentiles of performance degradation (PD) and failure time distribution (FTD) are also obtained. Finally, a comprehensive simulation study is accomplished to demonstrate the necessity of incorporating measurement errors in the degradation model and the efficiency of the proposed model. Two illustrative real applications involving the degradation of carbon-film resistors and the wear of sliding metal are given. The comparative results show that the constructed approach can derive a reasonable result and an enhanced inference precision.

  5. Educational role of art history as a school subject area in programmes of formal education in Slovenia: the aspect of vzgoja, according to general European guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjana Dolšina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Programmes of formal education establish a systematic transfer of knowledge as well as universal values from one generation to another. By that, they ensure the survival of social structures, prevent radical disruptions in their continuity, and serve as basis for general development of a society. Their content and didactic arrangements include interweaving of two basic aspects: the cognitive one and the one related to vzgoja (i.e. upbringing, moral/value education etc.. The latter aims to achieve the ideals of a tolerant, just and lifelong learning society, but seems to be facing increasing challenges, mainly emerging from neoliberal capitalist mentality. Art history as a school subject area in elementary and secondary education may provide an insight beneath the surface of historical events. Thus, it helps develop a critical view towards them and consequently towards the present real-life situations, which contributes to ascending the taxonomic scale of conative educational goals.

  6. Secondary Teachers' Knowledge of Elementary Number Theory Proofs: The Case of General-Cover Proofs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabach, Michal; Levenson, Esther; Barkai, Ruthi; Tsamir, Pessia; Tirosh, Dina; Dreyfus, Tommy

    2011-01-01

    In light of recent reform recommendations, teachers are expected to turn proofs and proving into an ongoing component of their classroom practice. Two questions emerging from this requirement are: Is the mathematical knowledge of high school teachers sufficient to prove various kinds of statements? Does teachers' knowledge allow them to determine…

  7. Teenage mothers' knowledge of sex education in a general hospital of the Umtata district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CX Williams

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available There has been growing concern about the increase in teenage pregnancies in relation to the teenagers’ knowledge of human sexuality and the impact sex education has on these teenagers in both the urban and rural areas. The aim of the study was to assess the knowledge of sex education and the health beliefs of teenagers with regard to teenage pregnancy.

  8. Teenage mothers' knowledge of sex education in a general hospital of the Umtata district

    OpenAIRE

    CX Williams

    1999-01-01

    There has been growing concern about the increase in teenage pregnancies in relation to the teenagers’ knowledge of human sexuality and the impact sex education has on these teenagers in both the urban and rural areas. The aim of the study was to assess the knowledge of sex education and the health beliefs of teenagers with regard to teenage pregnancy.

  9. Building Word Knowledge: Opportunities for Direct Vocabulary Instruction in General Education for Students with Reading Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanzek, Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    Direct vocabulary instruction is 1 critical component of reading instruction. Although most students in the elementary grades need to continue building their vocabulary knowledge, students with reading difficulties are at the greatest risk of falling further behind each year in vocabulary and concept knowledge without effective instruction. This…

  10. Knowledge, attitudes and practices on HIV/AIDS and prevalence of HIV in the general population of Sucre, Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terán Calderón, Carolina; Gorena Urizar, Dorian; González Blázquez, Cristina; Alejos Ferreras, Belén; Ramírez Rubio, Oriana; Bolumar Montrull, Francisco; Ortiz Rivera, Marta; del Amo Valero, Julia

    2015-01-01

    To analyse knowledge, attitudes and sexual practices on HIV/AIDS, and estimate HIV prevalence among residents of Sucre (Bolivia). Population-based survey of residents aged 15-49 randomly selected during 2008/2009. Blood samples were collected on Whatman-filter paper and tested with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Knowledge on HIV/AIDS, sexual risk practices and discriminatory attitudes against people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) were modelled with multiple logistic regression. Of 1499 subjects, 59% were women. All subjects were HIV-negative. Inadequate knowledge of HIV/AIDS transmission and prevention was observed in 67% and risk factors varied by gender (interaction p-value<0.05). Discriminatory attitudes were displayed by 85% subjects; associated factors were: rural residence, low educational level and low income. Unsafe sex was reported by 10%; risk factors varied by residence area (interaction p-value<0.05). In urban areas, risk factors were male sex, younger age and being in common-law union. Prevalence of HIV infection is very low and unsafe sex is relatively uncommon. Inadequate knowledge on HIV/AIDS and discriminatory attitudes towards PLWHA are extremely high and are associated to gender, ethnic and economic inequalities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. A new method to study knowledge, attitude and practice regarding HIV/AIDS in Iranian general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Malekafzali

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There is no study to evaluate knowledge, attitude and sexual practices regarding HIV/AIDS in Iranian general population. Therefore, we chose barber shops as a safe cultural environment since all people, regardless of their social class and age, are customers of barber shops. This method or similar ways of data gathering in general population can be applied according to social and cultural conditions in each country.

  12. A Study of Subject Overlap between the Main Categories of Knowledge Management within the Web of Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Hazeri

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although a relatively new discipline, Knowledge Management (KM is an area with a wide range of theoretical concepts and practical implications. The applicability of KM in different environments, and the vast value and benefits of its application, have led to great developments within the discipline over the last few years. The interdisciplinary nature of KM has also provided the opportunity for contributions by people from different disciplines, which in turn has lead to the rapid advancement of KM boundaries. This paper aims to examine the subject structure of the KM discipline through keyword analysis of documents in the Web of Science, using a hierarchical clustering approach and an inclusion index. Within the Web of Science categories, according to the findings, the three categories of "Management", "Computer Science Information Systems" and "Information Science Library Science" claim the highest number of documents in this area. Of 5570 author keywords, , 96 keywords are identified as "highly used" keywords. Three hierarchical clusters (dendrograms are formed from co-occurrence analysis of highly used keywords in the three categories. A comparison of these denrograms indicates that six clusters, including a total of 16 keywords, are common in the three categories. Looking at clusters of the three categories revealed that two categories - Management and Information Science Library Science - have 14 common/shared clusters, and therefore the highest degree of similarities. However, the category of Computer Science Information Systems, with 28 unique clusters, differs most markedly from the other two categories. To investigate the rate of common keywords from one category to another, the inclusion index is calculated. Results of this exercise indicate that the category of Information Science Library Science has the highest number of common keywords.

  13. Knowledge and Practices About the Subject Emergency Contraception of the Pharmacists and Their Helpers in the Pharmacies in Manisa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayten Taspinar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: The study was carried out as descriptive to determine the knowledge and practices about the subject emergency contraception of the pharmacists and their helpers in the pharmacies in central Manisa. METHOD: The universe of the research was formed by the 113 pharmacies registered to Manisa chamber of pharmacists in the year 2008 and all the pharmacies were included in the study. 47 pharmacists and 88 helpers agreed to join the study. The research which was planned to be descriptive March-to-June 2008. A questionnaire was produced by researchers and filled in during face-to face interviews with the pharmacists and their helpers. RESULTS: The pharmacists and their helpers stated that combined pills (46.8% and 44.5% and condoms (41.5% and 42.7% the most requested family planning methods their pharmacy. It was determined that 48.9% of the pharmacists, 33% of the pharmacist’s helpers gave information to customers about their use of family planning methods, 38.3% of the pharmacists, 23.9 % of the pharmacist’s helpers gave information what to do in case of failure to use/ where to apply to. 91.5% of the pharmacists, 95.5% of the pharmacist’s helpers stated that they had emergency contraception (EC purpose pills in their pharmacies. It was determined that 61.7% of the pharmacists, 28.4% of the pharmacist’s helpers had the knowledge about EC, 61.7% of the pharmacists, 52.3% of the pharmacist’s helpers could consider the EC methods true, 68.1% of the pharmacists, 70.5% of the pharmacist’s helpers gave the correct answers to the question of when the EC – purpose pills would be used. 68.1% of the pharmacists, 45.5% of the pharmacist’s helpers stated that EC methods might have adverse effects, 14.9% of the pharmacists, 25% of the pharmacist’s helpers stated that EC methods were protect agains to STD or not information about it, 12.8% of the pharmacists, 9.1% of the pharmacist’s helpers stated that these pills might be effective after the

  14. Knowledge and practices of chronic hepatitis B virus testing by general practitioners in Victoria, Australia, 2014-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gemert, Caroline; Howell, Jess; Wang, Julie; Stoove, Mark; Cowie, Benjamin; Allard, Nicole; Enright, Chris; Dunn, Elisabeth; Towell, Vanessa; Hellard, Margaret

    2017-09-01

    More than one-third of people living with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) in Australia have not been diagnosed. The aim of this study was to assess general practitioners' (GPs') knowledge and practices regarding chronic HBV diagnosis, and identify opportunities to improve testing rates. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with GPs working in Victoria, Australia. Statistically significant adjusted odds ratios for high knowledge, and ordering two or more HBV tests per week were calculated. Of 1000 GPs who were invited to participate, 232 completed the survey. Chronic HBV knowledge, use of interpreters, and awareness of HBV testing guidelines were low. Chronic HBV knowledge and testing were associated with age and graduation from a medical school outside Australia. Testing was also associated with gender. This study identified gaps in GPs' knowledge about chronic hepatitis. Several barriers to improving testing rates among at-risk populations were identified. We recommend revision of the guidelines for prevention in general practice, and educational activities to improve knowledge of at-risk populations for chronic HBV in Australia.

  15. Leg general muscle moment and power patterns in able-bodied subjects during recumbent cycle ergometry with ankle immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szecsi, J; Straube, A; Fornusek, C

    2014-11-01

    Rehabilitation of persons with pareses commonly uses recumbent pedalling and a rigid pedal boot that fixes the ankle joint from moving. This study was performed to provide general muscle moments (GMM) and joint power data from able-bodied subjects performing recumbent cycling at two workloads. Twenty-six able-bodied subjects pedalled a stationary recumbent tricycle at 60 rpm during passive cycling and at two workloads (low 15 W and high 40 W per leg) while leg kinematics and pedal forces were recorded. GMM and power were calculated using inverse dynamic equations. During the high workload, the hip and knee muscles produced extensor/flexor moments throughout the extensions/flexions phases of the joints. For low workload, a prolonged (crank angle 0-258°) hip extension moment and a shortened range (350-150°) of knee extension moment were observed compared to the corresponding extension phases of each joint. The knee and hip joints generated approximately equal power. At the high workload the hip and knee extensors generated increased power in the propulsion phase. For the first time, this study provides GMM and power patterns for able-bodied subjects performing recumbent cycling with an immobilized ankle. The patterns showed greater similarities to upright cycling with a free ankle, than previously supposed. Copyright © 2014 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Pain medicine as a cross-sectional subject in German medical schools. An opportunity for general pain management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopf, A; Dusch, M; Alt-Epping, B; Petzke, F; Treede, R-D

    2014-08-01

    Unrelieved pain is a substantial public health concern owing in part to deficits in clinical expertise among physicians. In most medical faculties worldwide, teaching on pain and pain management is either nonexistent or limited to a small number of students attending voluntary courses. In light of the fact that pain is the most frequent reason to seek medical advice, the lack of formal training of pain medicine is considered the leading reason for inadequate pain management. Therefore, the patients' unmet needs for adequate diagnosis and therapy call for action. Pain assessment and effective pain management should be a priority in the health care system. The limited number of pain specialists available in hospitals and primary care and CME (continuous medical education) activities focusing on pain are not sufficient to solve the problem. Every practicing physician should, therefore, have basic knowledge of the most prominent painful conditions and management strategies. To achieve this goal, pain medicine should become an integral part of the undergraduate curriculum for medical students. In Germany, pain medicine became a mandatory subject in undergraduate medical studies in 2012. The introduction of pain medicine into the undergraduate curriculum in Germany is a major challenge regarding the development and implementation processes. This article describes current instruments and implementation strategies for pain medicine as a new cross-sectional subject in Germany.

  17. Recall of general and medical vocabulary and text structure knowledge: An experimental study of English for Medical Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarein-Dolab S

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: A 3-unit course is dedicated to general language in medical universities and the vocabulary and text structure of the courses have usually no relation to medical language. We examine whether teaching general language will be as effective as medical language as assessed through recall of general and medical vocabulary and text structure knowledge. Methods: an experimental study was designed, in that, the third year students who had participated in the 3-unit general language classes in the first year of their General Practitioner (GP program were selected and sat for a 60 MCQ tests. The 60 MCQ tests consisted of 30 questions of general language, 25 vocabulary and 5 comprehension questions and also 30 questions of medical language, 25 technical and semi-technical vocabulary and 5 comprehension questions. In all, 145 medical students attended the exam which took 40 minutes to accomplish. Results: The results of the study indicated that memory retention was significantly lower in general language than medical language. The technical and semi-technical vocabulary items were significantly better recalled and the medical text was significantly better understood by the participants. Conclusion: A 3-unit course in general language may be a futile effort since the students will not be exposed to the same vocabulary and text structure knowledge in later years of their GP program. It is recommended that the focus of all the university English courses be on the medical language. Key words: Medical Vocabulary, English For Specific Purposes, ESP

  18. Culture confirmation of gonococcal infection by recall of subjects found to be positive by nucleic acid amplification tests in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jens Kjølseth

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate a routine notification of general practitioners to recall nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT)-positive subjects for culture of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to confirm gonococcal infection in the community.......To evaluate a routine notification of general practitioners to recall nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT)-positive subjects for culture of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to confirm gonococcal infection in the community....

  19. Generating HRD Related "General Knowledge" from Mode 2 "Design Science" Research: A Cumulative Study of Manager and Managerial Leader Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Robert G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper illustrates how Mode 2 "design science" research can generate HRD related "general knowledge" in support of evidence-based practice. It describes a "derived-etic" study that compares and contrasts the findings of six previous "emic" studies previously carried out within six different public and…

  20. How to Study the Influence of Intensity of Treatment on Generalized Skill and Knowledge Acquisition in Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Paul J.; Woynaroski, Tiffany

    2015-01-01

    Seven empirical studies from this special issue and an overview chapter are reviewed to illustrate several points about studying the possible effects of treatment intensity manipulations on generalized skill or knowledge acquisition in students with disabilities. First, we make a case in favor of studying intensity as separate from complexity and…

  1. Peer Review-Based Scripted Collaboration to Support Domain-Specific and Domain-General Knowledge Acquisition in Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetriadis, Stavros; Egerter, Tina; Hanisch, Frank; Fischer, Frank

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of using peer review in the context of scripted collaboration to foster both domain-specific and domain-general knowledge acquisition in the computer science domain. Using a one-factor design with a script and a control condition, students worked in small groups on a series of computer science problems…

  2. A Review of Chemical Bonding Studies: Needs, Aims, Methods of Exploring Students' Conceptions, General Knowledge Claims and Students' Alternative Conceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Suat; Calik, Muammer; Ayas, Alipasa; Coll, Richard K.

    2006-01-01

    The present paper presents a detailed thematic review of chemical bonding studies. To achieve this, a matrix is developed to summarize and present the findings by focusing on insights derived from the related studies. The matrix incorporates the following themes: needs, aims, methods of exploring students' conceptions, general knowledge claims,…

  3. Political Competences and Political Participation: On The Role of “Objective” Political Knowledge, Political Reasoning, and Subjective Political Competence in Early Adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Reichert

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the relation of objective political competences and the subjective assessment of one’s own political competence. The theoretical frame states that at least in early adulthood, only the subjective competence but not political knowledge is an autonomous and important determinant for (socio-political participation, mediating the influence of objective political competences (or political knowledge, respectively. To test the role of subjective political competence and the (remaining effect of political knowledge in early adulthood, empirical evidence using a sample of university students is presented. Cross-sectional analyses show that political knowledge has at least, if anything, an impact on voting, while fully mediated by subjective political competence relating non-electoral legal political activities. In contrast, the more profound competence of political reasoning has clear and stable positive effects on the intention to engage in non-electoral legal political actions – here subjective competence seems to be less important. Eventually, after a short excursus on school participation the findings are summarised and discussed by relating them back to framework and hypothesis. A concluding section proposes two opposing developmental-psychological considerations about the findings, raising further questions and giving an outlook into future research.

  4. Knowledge, perceptions and media use of the Dutch general public and healthcare workers regarding Ebola, 2014.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schol, Lianne G C; Mollers, Madelief; Swaan, Corien M; Beaujean, Desirée J M A; Wong, Albert; Timen, Aura

    2018-01-01

    The Ebola outbreak in West-Africa triggered risk communication activities to promote adequate preventive behaviour in the Netherlands. Our study investigated the level of knowledge, perceptions, and media use regarding Ebola.

  5. The death of public knowledge ? how free markets destroy the general intellect

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    The Death of Public Knowledge argues for the value and importance of shared, publicly accessible knowledge, and suggests that the erosion of its most visible forms, including public service broadcasting, education, and the network of public libraries, has worrying outcomes for democracy.With contributions from both activists and academics, this collection of short, sharp essays focuses on different aspects of public knowledge, from libraries and education to news media and public policy. Together, the contributors record the stresses and strains placed upon public knowledge by funding cuts and austerity, the new digital economy, quantification and target-setting, neoliberal politics, and inequality. These pressures, the authors contend, not only hinder democracies, but also undermine markets, economies, and social institutions and spaces everywhere. Covering areas of international public concern, these polemical, accessible texts include reflections on the fate of schools and education, the takeover of publi...

  6. General characteristics of the institute of bringing senior officials of the subjects of the Russian Federation to justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chepus A.V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical and practical aspects of the problem of bringing senior officials of the RF subjects to criminal liability are analyzed. Legal immunity as the most important feature of their legal status is considered. General characteristic of the liability of such senior officials in the context of the institute of state and law enforcement is provided. The current Russian legislation and judicial practice in this area are analyzed. Special attention is paid to the history of the issue of bringing senior officials to justice, on the example of the Federation Council member status. Basing on the other authors’ researches, the author proposes his own view on the issues of senior officials’ immunity. It’s suggested that in modern legal science the problems of the liability of senior officials of the RF regions aren’t given due attention. There’s no clear understanding of what should be the grounds of such liability, its procedures and application, the legal nature of its sanctions. The author substantiates the position that it’s not necessary to include the regional leaders or heads of executive authorities of the RF subjects in the list of persons having immunity from criminal or administrative prosecution. The arguments are the federal practice – the ministers of the RF Government don’t possess the immunity, and the recent practice – dismissal as a result of loss of confidence. The need to control the activities of the senior officials of the RF subjects and other persons holding the highest positions in the authorities of the RF subjects is substantiated.

  7. The Influence of Subject Knowledge and Second Language Proficiency on the Reading Comprehension of Scientific and Technical Discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tim; Berry, Vivien

    2000-01-01

    Examined the effect of background knowledge and second language proficiency in relation to two sets of specific reading materials. One came from an IELTS reading module related to science and technology; the other was from a highly-specific popular science text. Results showed that both language proficiency and background knowledge predicted…

  8. Webster's word power essential students' companion general knowledge of the English language

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkpatrick, Betty

    2014-01-01

    Helps the student with facts and resource on English grammar, specialist subjects from art to physics, with sections on world facts, Latin and Greek words; Chemical elements; Greek alphabet; the scientific classification of animal; help on essay writing and composition.

  9. Knowledge and Attitude among General Dental Practitioners towards Minimally Invasive Dentistry in Riyadh and AlKharj.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Altaf Hussain; Sheddi, Faisal Mohammed; Alharqan, Mesfer Saad; Khawja, Shabnam Gulzar; Vohra, Fahim; Akram, Zohaib; Faden, Asmaa Ahmed; Khalil, Hesham Saleh

    2016-07-01

    Minimally Invasive Dentistry (MID) emphasizes conservative caries management strategies resulting in less destruction of tooth structure, a deviation of the traditional GV Black's restorative principles. However, there seems to be either deficiency in knowledge or little intention by general dental practitioners to adopt these principles. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitude among general dental practitioners towards minimally invasive dentistry in Riyadh and AlKharj cities of Saudi Arabia. Self-administered structured questionnaires were handed to general dental practitioners (GDPs) in the cities of Riyadh and AlKharj in Saudi Arabia. Several questions, including Likert-type scale response categories (1-5), were used. The questions assessed the respondents' levels of agreement regarding diagnostic, preventive and restorative techniques such as use of caries risk assessment, use of high fluoride tooth paste, Atraumatic Restorative Treatment and tunnel preparations. Out of 200 respondents, 161 GDPs with overall response rate of 80.5% completed the questionnaires. The GDPs showed significantly different approach with regards to the use of sharp explorer for caries detection (p = 0.014). Almost 60% of the participants had received no special education regarding minimally invasive procedures. Moreover, GDPs who had received MID training showed significantly better knowledge and attitude in adopting minimally invasive techniques for both diagnosis and treatment of dental caries. Although GDPs possess knowledge about the benefits of MID; however, study showed deficiencies in their attitudes towards caries detection methods and application of minimally invasive dentistry procedures.

  10. The effect of productive classroom talk and metacommunication on young children's oral communicative competence and subject matter knowledge: An intervention study in early childhood education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, C.; de Mey, J.R.P.B.; van Kruistum, C.J.; van Oers, B.

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of productive classroom talk and metacommunication on the development of young children's oral communicative competence and subject matter knowledge. This study can be characterized as a quasi-experimental study with a

  11. Gender, Previous Knowledge, Personality Traits and Subject-Specific Motivation as Predictors of Students' Math Grade in Upper-Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peklaj, Cirila; Podlesek, Anja; Pecjak, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the relationships between gender, previous knowledge, different personality traits, subject-specific motivational dimensions and students' math grade in secondary school. A total of 386 first-year students (142 boys and 244 girls) from secondary schools in Slovenia (mean age was 15.7 years) participated in the…

  12. So Much to Learn, so Little Time...: Pre-Service Physical Education Teachers' Interpretations and Development of Subject Knowledge as They Learn to Teach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Frank Andreas; Waring, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the development of pre-service teachers during a one-year programme of initial teacher training and education (ITTE) of secondary physical education (PE) in England. It concentrates in particular on the interpretation and development of different dimensions of subject knowledge during different phases of their ITTE programme.…

  13. Knowledge management for systems biology a general and visually driven framework applied to translational medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falciani Francesco

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To enhance our understanding of complex biological systems like diseases we need to put all of the available data into context and use this to detect relations, pattern and rules which allow predictive hypotheses to be defined. Life science has become a data rich science with information about the behaviour of millions of entities like genes, chemical compounds, diseases, cell types and organs, which are organised in many different databases and/or spread throughout the literature. Existing knowledge such as genotype - phenotype relations or signal transduction pathways must be semantically integrated and dynamically organised into structured networks that are connected with clinical and experimental data. Different approaches to this challenge exist but so far none has proven entirely satisfactory. Results To address this challenge we previously developed a generic knowledge management framework, BioXM™, which allows the dynamic, graphic generation of domain specific knowledge representation models based on specific objects and their relations supporting annotations and ontologies. Here we demonstrate the utility of BioXM for knowledge management in systems biology as part of the EU FP6 BioBridge project on translational approaches to chronic diseases. From clinical and experimental data, text-mining results and public databases we generate a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD knowledge base and demonstrate its use by mining specific molecular networks together with integrated clinical and experimental data. Conclusions We generate the first semantically integrated COPD specific public knowledge base and find that for the integration of clinical and experimental data with pre-existing knowledge the configuration based set-up enabled by BioXM reduced implementation time and effort for the knowledge base compared to similar systems implemented as classical software development projects. The knowledgebase enables the

  14. Effect of extension of postgraduate training in general practice on the acquisition of knowledge of trainees.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, A.W.M.; Dusman, H.; Tan, L.; Jansen, K.J.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postgraduate training in general practice aims to develop clinical competence. However, little is known about its effect on trainees' development of competence. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to investigate whether 3 years of postgraduate training in general practice leads to a higher level of

  15. Asking for 'rules of thumb': a way to discover tacit knowledge in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Malin; Borgquist, L; Foldevi, M; Mölstad, S

    2002-12-01

    Research in decision-making has identified heuristics (rules of thumb) as shortcuts to simplify search and choice. To find out if GPs recognize the use of rules of thumb and if they could describe what they looked like. An explorative and descriptive study was set up using focus group interviews. The interview guide contained the questions: Do you recognize the use of rules of thumb? Are you able to give some examples? What are the benefits and dangers in using rules of thumb? Where do they come from? The interviews were transcribed and analysed using the templates in the interview guide, and the examples of rules were classified by editing analysis. Four groups with 23 GPs were interviewed. GPs recognized using rules of thumb, producing examples covering different aspects of the consultation. The rules for somatic problems were formulated as axiomatic simplified medical knowledge and taken for granted, while rules for psychosocial problems were formulated as expressions of individual experience and were followed by an explanation. The rules seemed unaffected by the sparse objections given. A GP's clinical experience was judged a prerequisite for applying the rules. The origin of many rules was via word-of-mouth from a colleague. The GPs acknowledged the benefits of using the rules, thereby simplifying work. GPs recognize the use of rules of thumb as an immediate and semiconscious kind of knowledge that could be called tacit knowledge. Using rules of thumb might explain why practice remains unchanged although educational activities result in more elaborate knowledge.

  16. General Population Knowledge about Extreme Heat: A Cross-Sectional Survey in Lisbon and Madrid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gil Cuesta, J.; Loenhout, J.A.F. van; Colaco, M.D.; Guha-Sapir, D.

    2017-01-01

    Extreme heat is associated with an increased mortality and morbidity. National heat plans have been implemented to minimize the effect of extreme heat. The population's awareness and knowledge of national heat plans and extreme heat is essential to improve the community's behavior and adaptation. A

  17. Validation of a General and Sport Nutrition Knowledge Questionnaire in Adolescents and Young Adults: GeSNK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Calella

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Good knowledge of nutrition is widely thought to be an important aspect to maintaining a balanced and healthy diet. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a new reliable tool to measure the general and the sport nutrition knowledge (GeSNK in people who used to practice sports at different levels. The development of (GeSNK was carried out in six phases as follows: (1 item development and selection by a panel of experts; (2 pilot study in order to assess item difficulty and item discrimination; (3 measurement of the internal consistency; (4 reliability assessment with a 2-week test-retest analysis; (5 concurrent validity was tested by administering the questionnaire along with other two similar tools; (6 construct validity by administering the questionnaire to three groups of young adults with different general nutrition and sport nutrition knowledge. The final questionnaire, consisted of 62 items of the original 183 questions. It is a consistent, valid, and suitable instrument that can be applied over time, making it a promising tool to look at the relationship between nutrition knowledge, demographic characteristics, and dietary behavior in adolescents and young adults.

  18. General knowledge about climate change, factors influencing risk perception and willingness to insure

    OpenAIRE

    Menny, Claas; Osberghaus, Daniel; Pohl, Max; Werner, Ute

    2011-01-01

    In two empirical surveys in Germany the link between the information respondents have about climate change and their risk perception of the phenomenon was analysed. We found that a better understanding of the effects of climate change might lead to a decrease of the perceived hazard. In contrast, a high self-declared knowledge about climate change might correspond with higher risk perception. Further factors affecting the risk perception of climate change are gender, experience of extreme wea...

  19. Women's knowledge of taking oral contraceptive pills correctly and of emergency contraception: effect of providing information leaflets in general practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, L F; Whitfield, M J

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND. About one third of all pregnancies are unplanned and 20% of all pregnancies end in abortion. More than 170,000 legal abortions are performed in the United Kingdom annually. Nearly all general practitioners provide contraceptive advice; the most commonly used form of reversible contraception is the oral contraceptive pill. AIM. The aim of this study was to determine factors associated with women's knowledge of taking the contraceptive pill correctly and of emergency contraception, ...

  20. Knowledge, attitude, and practice of general practitioners in Dammam, Saudi Arabia towards Vitamin D supplementation to infants

    OpenAIRE

    Babli, Afrah I.; Kasim M AlDawood; Ammar H. Khamis

    2015-01-01

    Background: With the report of high prevalence rate of Vitamin D deficiency in the literature since the 1980s, the condition can be considered an epidemic in Saudi Arabia. However, no specific steps have been taken by the Ministry of Health to tackle the problem. Moreover, little is known about general practitioners′ (GPs) knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) of Vitamin D supplementation for infants. Objectives: To measure the KAP of GPs, of Vitamin D supplementation for infants in Dammam,...

  1. General level of knowledge about Brief Solution Focused Therapy (BSFT) in Polish addiction treatment centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczegielniak, Anna; Bracik, Joanna; Mróz, Sylwia; Urbański, Marcin; Cichobłaziński, Leszek; Krysta, Krzysztof; Pyrkosz, Katarzyna; Chudy, Norbert; Krupka-Matuszczyk, Irena

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the level of knowledge about Brief Solution Focused Therapy (BSFT) among therapists and patients during treatment and identification of existing barriers to the introduction of the method. 64 therapists were examined in total; 37 women (57%) and 27 males (43%). The study involved also 191 patients, 160 men (83.77%) and 31 women (16.23%). All the surveys were anonymous and were collected in health centers within the province of Silesia. More than 2/3 of therapists have heard of the method, but do not know the specifics of it. The most important sources of knowledge are other therapists, literature, and mass media. According to the respondents the most important barriers to alcohol addiction treatment include cultural barriers, such as embarrassment or fear of stigmatization. Younger Patients and those treated for a shorter period, state that they know the name of the current method of treatment to a lesser extent than other subgroups. About 10% of people have not heard about the BSFT method of treatment. The level of knowledge about the BSFT method suggests the need to promote this model among both therapists and patients. An introduction of BSFT can improve the treatment of alcohol addiction.

  2. Knowledge, attitude, and practices concerning presence of molds in foods among members of the general public in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matumba, Limbikani; Monjerezi, Maurice; Kankwamba, Henry; Njoroge, Samuel M C; Ndilowe, Peter; Kabuli, Hilda; Kambewa, Daimon; Njapau, Henry

    2016-02-01

    This study assessed knowledge, attitude, and practices (KAP) of the public in Malawi on issues related to molds in foodstuffs. A survey involving structured questionnaire was conducted with 805 respondents from seven districts of Malawi. Descriptive statistics, t tests, and analyses of variance were calculated. A majority of respondents recognized that molds were dangerous to human health (88%); however, about 50% of respondents were not informed that mold toxins are thermally stable and that they are not destroyable by normal cooking processes. About 33% of the respondents asserted that they buy moldy maize, while approximately 20% of respondents reported that they consume moldy fruits having discarded moldy fraction. There were significant differences in knowledge scores among different demographic groups. Females had significantly (p molds in foods. Additionally, the respondent's location had a significant effect. However, respondent's education had subtle effect on knowledge score and the overall population's knowledge score was generally low (3.55 ± 1.32 score out of 9). Results of the study underline the need to raise public's knowledge about health risks associated with spoilage molds in food and prevention and management options.

  3. Entrepreneurs As a Subject of Modern Russian Economy Development: General Characteristics and «Resource Type» Regions Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levin Sergey, N.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, special urgency has the question about the ability of entrepreneurs to act as a subject of the Russian economy development. Analysis of the specificity of targets and resource potential of the modern Russian entrepreneurs is fulfilled in the context of the general features of entrepreneurship development in the countries with "emerging markets". Distinction between "politicized" entrepreneurs, as prevailing type of entrepreneurs in these countries, and "classic" entrepreneurs is shown. Two basic strategies of their behavior in the form of "rent-seeking" and "institutional" entrepreneurship are highlighted. Incentives and constraints of "institutional" entrepreneurship strategies selection made by "politicized" entrepreneurs are considered in the context of assessing the potential of the Russian entrepreneurs as a subject of economic development as well as emerging positive externalities. Analysis is regionalized to consider the specificity of the behavior of entrepreneurs in the economy of the "resource type" regions. Models of "enclave dual economy" and "integrated regional economy" are discrete structural alternatives for "resource type" regions development. "Sectoral" frontiers of net positive externalities that emerge from institutional entrepreneurs’ activity related to the implementation of productive configurations institutions are considered as well as a choice between the "rent-seeking" and "institutional" entrepreneurship. Kemerovo region and Krasnoyarsk region are the basic regions to analyze incentives and constraints of entrepreneurs in the economy of the "resource type" regions. The authors use sociological tools in the form of semi-structured interviews. Initial evaluation of the eight entrepreneurs’ strategies of Kemerovo region and Krasnoyarsk region shows that the most of them used elements of the institutional entrepreneurs’ strategy and focused on the diversification of the regional economy. At the same time

  4. A General Theory of Target Identification: An Analytical Approach to Cognition, Perception, and Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-01

    emotions , hints, hunches, attempts which led to failure, etc., which reflect the subjective aspect of scientific reasearch is carefully shunned and... Zeman [3] and Prior [41 define operators Mz as "possibility" and Lz as "necessity" where Mz N LN. These can also be incorporated within the presen theory...modal logic (see Zeman [3] and Prior [4]). One defines operators LZ = T + n (for necessity truth) and MZ = T - n (for possible truth). It is easy to

  5. Filaggrin null mutations increase the risk and persistence of hand eczema in subjects with atopic dermatitis: results from a general population study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Carlsen, B C; Menné, Torkil

    2010-01-01

    Hand eczema is prevalent in the general population. It remains unclear whether or not filaggrin gene (FLG) null mutations increase the overall risk of hand eczema or only increase the risk of hand eczema in subjects with atopic dermatitis....

  6. Slang knowledge as an indicator of a general social deviancy subcultural factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haertzen, C A; Ross, F E; Hooks, N T

    1979-06-01

    Evidence for a general social deviancy subcultural factor was found using the Kulik, Sarbin, and Stein (1971) slang test on drugs, gangs, law enforcement, and general words. The slang scores of 68 confirmed opiate addicts exceeded those of normals and young delinquents reported by Kulik, et al. (1971), including delinquents who were recidivists. Addicts knew more drug and alcohol slang than slang in the three other categories. It was recommended that more attempts should be made to subdivide measures of social deviancy by means of slang as there is some evidence of possible further differentiation of subcultural types by means of slang.

  7. Evaluation of General Dentists' and Dental Specialists' Knowledge about Oral Cancer in South Khorasan-Iran 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Narjes; Raeesi, Vajehallah; Khazaei, Tahereh; Ramezanzadeh, Khaironnesa; Ebrahimipour, Sediqe

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers and one of the top ten causes of death in the whole world. Most oral cancers are diagnosed at late stages. Since dentists play a critical role in early detection of oral cancer, they should be knowledgeable and skillful in oral cancer diagnosis. The aim of this study was to survey dentist knowledge about oral cancer in Southern Khorasan Province. This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted with dentists who participated in an in-service educational program at the Faculty of Dentistry of Birjand University of Medical Sciences in spring 2014. A questionnaire including demographic information with 11 questions regarding oral cancer was prepared. The participants were required to be complete the questionnaires within a specific time span. The data were analyzed using SPSS 15 software by t-test and one-way ANOVA at 0.05 confidence level. A total of 73 dentists out of 80 answered the questionnaires - 36 (49.3%) were females and 37 (50.7%) were males. Total mean score of knowledge was 7.91 ± 1 of 11. Mean scores of knowledge of male and female participants were 7.70 ± 1.83 and 8.13 ± 1.94 respectively. Mean knowledge score of general dentists was 7.41 ± 1.79 and of dental specialists was 9.44 ± 1.0 In spite of higher knowledge score of women compared to men and general dentists compared to dental specialists, these differences were not statistically significant (p=0.09). Tukey testing showed a significant difference between groups with 1-4 years of experience (8.74) and over twenty years of experience (6.50) ( p=0.001). Considering the good knowledge level of young dentists and the specialists and the importance of early diagnosis of oral cancer, it seems necessary to pay more attention to academic education for dentistry students, as well as holding retraining courses for experienced dentists, so that their knowledge not be reduced over time.

  8. Bridging Water Issue Knowledge Gaps between the General Public and Opinion Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Kevan W.; Lamm, Alexa J.; Carter, Hannah S.

    2015-01-01

    Global conflicts have rapidly made water the most contentious issue in the world today. Considering water drives health, industry, recreation, and the agricultural food system it is no surprise that it has become such a hot topic. As a result, the general public has an increased interest in water-focused policy; policy that can have a large impact…

  9. Retinoblastoma in Mexico: part I. A review of general knowledge of the disease, diagnosis, and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van C. Lansingh

    2015-09-01

    Advances in Rb therapy are generally limited to developed countries. The implications in Mexico, of the findings from this review will be discussed in Part 2, which will be a comprehensive situational analysis of the state of Rb programming in Mexico, including a review of current demographic data available from hospitals that have Rb programs or treat Rb.

  10. Children's Preschool Script Reconstruction: Reliance on General Knowledge as Memory Fades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myles-Worsley, Mariana; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examines children's memory for preschool routines as a function of current grade level and successive modifications in the school-day script. First, children in preschool through third grade were tested, then children in kindergarten through third grade. Results showed a process of generalization for preschool scripts over time. (Author/BB)

  11. Treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea patients in community dental care: knowledge and attitudes among general dental practitioners and specialist dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorjoki-Ranta, T-R; Lobbezoo, F; Vehkalahti, M; Tuomilehto, H; Ahlberg, J

    2016-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is an increasing problem worldwide. Yet, a large number of patients may remain undiagnosed. Dentists could suspect OSA, but little is known about their knowledge and attitudes towards the topic. An email questionnaire was sent to dentists working in Helsinki Health Centre, Helsinki, Finland (n = 226). It consisted of demographic data, items on dentists' overall knowledge of OSA and factors associated with it, and their possibilities and willingness to take part in the recognition and treatment of OSA patients. Altogether, 70·9% (n = 134) of dentists eligible for the study completed the questionnaire. Of them, 79·1% (n = 106) were general practitioners and 20·9% (n = 28) dentists with specialty training. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) (99·3%) and weight control (99·3%) were both generally acknowledged as effective methods to treat OSA. Regarding the efficacy of other treatment modalities, significant differences were found between general practitioners' and specialists' opinions. For example, mandibular advancement devices (MAD) were less often reported by general practitioners (69·8%) than specialists (89·3%) (P Dentists could play an important role in suspecting OSA, but they may need more education to cope with that. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Knowledge, illness perceptions and stated clinical practice behaviour in management of gout: a mixed methods study in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaetgens, Bart; Pustjens, Tobias; Scheepers, Lieke E J M; Janssens, Hein J E M; van der Linden, Sjef; Boonen, Annelies

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the present study is to explore knowledge, illness perceptions and stated practice behaviour in relation to gout in primary care. This is a mixed methods study among 32 general practitioners (GPs). The quantitative assessment included the Gout Knowledge Questionnaire (GKQ; range 0-10; better) and Brief Illness Perceptions Questionnaire (BIPQ; nine items, range 0-10; stronger). Structured individual interviews obtained further qualitative insight into knowledge and perceptions, in the context of daily practice. Among 32 GPs, 18 (56.3 %) were male, mean age 44.4 years (SD 9.6) and mean working experience 17.1 years (SD 9.7). Median score [interquartile ranges (IQR)] on the GKQ was 7.8 [6.7-8.9] and 9.0 [8.0-10.0], when presented as open or multiple-choice questions, respectively. The BIPQ (median; [IQR]) revealed that gout was seen as a chronic disease (8.0; [7.0-9.0]), affecting life and emotions moderately (6.5; [5.0-7.0]), having many severe symptoms (8.0; [7.0-9.0]) and in which treatment could be very helpful (8.0; [7.0-9.0]). Further interviews revealed large variation in specific aspects of knowledge and about gaps concerning indications for uric acid-lowering therapy (UALT), duration of UALT, target serum uric acid (sUA) level or duration of prophylactic treatment. Finally, patients' adherence was not checked systematically. Specific knowledge gaps and discrepancies between perceptions and stated practice behaviour were identified, which might hamper effective management of this well-treatable disease. Improving evidence on the rationale and effectiveness of treatment targets and adherence interventions, tailoring guidelines to general practice and intensification of implementation of guidelines in primary health care seem to be needed.

  13. Women's knowledge of taking oral contraceptive pills correctly and of emergency contraception: effect of providing information leaflets in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L F; Whitfield, M J

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND. About one third of all pregnancies are unplanned and 20% of all pregnancies end in abortion. More than 170,000 legal abortions are performed in the United Kingdom annually. Nearly all general practitioners provide contraceptive advice; the most commonly used form of reversible contraception is the oral contraceptive pill. AIM. The aim of this study was to determine factors associated with women's knowledge of taking the contraceptive pill correctly and of emergency contraception, and to investigate if their knowledge could be improved in general practice by providing women with Family Planning Association information leaflets. METHOD. An uncontrolled intervention study was performed in one rural and one urban English general practice, using a self-completion questionnaire that was initially administered to women attending their general practitioner for oral contraception over six months from 1 October 1992. The questionnaire asked for: sociodemographic information; knowledge of how late women can be taking an oral contraceptive pill and still be protected against unplanned pregnancy; for how many days after being late with a pill they need to use other precautions; sources and methods of emergency contraception; and for how long the methods are effective after the primary contraceptive failure. After completing the questionnaire women were given two leaflets: one about how to take their prescribed contraceptive pill correctly and one about emergency contraception. Three to 12 months later the same questionnaire was administered in the same manner. RESULTS. Of 449 women completing the first questionnaire, 233 (52%) completed the second questionnaire. Initially 71% of 406 women taking an oestrogen/progestogen combined pill knew about the '12-hour rule' and 17% knew about the 'seven-day rule'; giving women information about the pill they were taking increased the extent of knowledge about these rules among 212 respondents to 82% (P emergency contraception

  14. Knowledge and Attitude among General Dental Practitioners towards Minimally Invasive Dentistry in Riyadh and AlKharj

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheddi, Faisal Mohammed; Alharqan, Mesfer Saad; Khawja, Shabnam Gulzar; Vohra, Fahim; Akram, Zohaib; Faden, Asmaa Ahmed; Khalil, Hesham Saleh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Minimally Invasive Dentistry (MID) emphasizes conservative caries management strategies resulting in less destruction of tooth structure, a deviation of the traditional GV Black’s restorative principles. However, there seems to be either deficiency in knowledge or little intention by general dental practitioners to adopt these principles. Aim The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitude among general dental practitioners towards minimally invasive dentistry in Riyadh and AlKharj cities of Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods Self-administered structured questionnaires were handed to general dental practitioners (GDPs) in the cities of Riyadh and AlKharj in Saudi Arabia. Several questions, including Likert-type scale response categories (1–5), were used. The questions assessed the respondents’ levels of agreement regarding diagnostic, preventive and restorative techniques such as use of caries risk assessment, use of high fluoride tooth paste, Atraumatic Restorative Treatment and tunnel preparations. Results Out of 200 respondents, 161 GDPs with overall response rate of 80.5% completed the questionnaires. The GDPs showed significantly different approach with regards to the use of sharp explorer for caries detection (p = 0.014). Almost 60% of the participants had received no special education regarding minimally invasive procedures. Moreover, GDPs who had received MID training showed significantly better knowledge and attitude in adopting minimally invasive techniques for both diagnosis and treatment of dental caries. Conclusion Although GDPs possess knowledge about the benefits of MID; however, study showed deficiencies in their attitudes towards caries detection methods and application of minimally invasive dentistry procedures. PMID:27630962

  15. Investigating the knowledge and preparedness of proximal residents to a general-emergency event at the Koeberg Nuclear Power Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto P. Francioli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ward 23 in the City of Cape Town South Africa is situated within 16 km of Koeberg Nuclear Power Station (KNPS. Massive investments were made to provide the 13 800 residents of Ward 23 with information on emergency preparedness and evacuation procedures in case of a general-emergency event at KNPS. However, it is not known whether these efforts to inform and prepare the proximal residents for a general emergency have been effective or not. The objective of this study was to investigate the level of knowledge of and preparedness for an emergency exhibited by residents of Ward 23. Data was collected through the distribution of semi-structured questionnaires to 204 residents at the study site to ascertain their views on the provision and accessibility of emergency information and to find out whether they utilised this information to prepare themselves. The results revealed that the majority of interviewed residents had very poor knowledge concerning emergency procedures, and few had made any effort to prepare themselves. The majority of better-informed and prepared residents tended to reside closer to KNPS. The poor levels of knowledge and preparedness are attributed to residents’ lack of awareness concerning the availability of information, misconceptions regarding a nuclear hazard and a general emergency event or a lack of incentive to inform themselves due to a perceived high sense of security and the improbability of such an event occurring. To improve resident knowledge and preparedness, efforts should be made to advertise the availability and importance of such emergency information and enhance incentives for residents to inform themselves.

  16. Is Subjective Knowledge the Key to Fostering Sustainable Behavior? Mixed Evidence from an Education Intervention in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Aaron; Redman, Erin

    2017-01-01

    Educational interventions are a promising way to shift individual behaviors towards Sustainability. Yet, as this research confirms, the standard fare of education, declarative knowledge, does not work. This study statistically analyzes the impact of an intervention designed and implemented in Mexico using the Educating for Sustainability (EfS)…

  17. Issues in the Assessment of Bilingually Educated Students: Expressing Subject Knowledge through L1 and L2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gablasova, Dana

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses issues related to oral assessment of school knowledge of L2-educated students. In particular, it examines benefits and disadvantages of students being tested in their L1 (their dominant language) and in their L2 (their language of instruction). The study draws on the data from 37 high school students studying in a content…

  18. An Analysis of Social Studies Teachers' Perception Levels Regarding Web Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesiltas, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    Web pedagogical content knowledge generally takes pedagogical knowledge, content knowledge, and Web knowledge as basis. It is a structure emerging through the interaction of these three components. Content knowledge refers to knowledge of subjects to be taught. Pedagogical knowledge involves knowledge of process, implementation, learning methods,…

  19. General knowledge about diabetes in the elderly diabetic population in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Turk

    2012-08-01

    Results: A total of 225 individuals returned the questionnaire, which represents 75 % response rate. The average score was 8.0 ± 2.4. Not a single subject responded correctly to all 14 questions. The average score achieved by men and women was 8.8 ± 1.9 and 7.6 ± 2.5, respectively. There was no significant difference between the elderly living in urban and rural areas, and the level of education is the most important predictor for better results.

  20. Age-related differences in breast carcinoma knowledge, beliefs, and perceived risk among women visiting an academic general medicine practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, N C; Lee, A M; McDermott, M M

    1997-08-01

    This study assessed whether age-related differences in breast carcinoma knowledge and perceived risk exist among women in a primary care setting and whether these women's beliefs about the best age to begin screening mammography reflect those of their physicians. Consecutive women ages 30-70 years who visited an academic general medicine practice were asked to complete a questionnaire assessing breast carcinoma knowledge, beliefs, and perceived risk. Women's risk estimates were compared with individual risk probabilities derived from the Gail model. Women's beliefs about when to begin screening mammography were compared with the beliefs of the attending physicians in the practice. Questionnaire results were compared across age groups. Six hundred seventy-four women completed the survey. Overall, knowledge scores were negatively correlated with age (correlation coefficient = -0.30, P = 0.001). The level of knowledge about the benefits of mammography was high across all age groups. In contrast, knowledge that breast carcinoma incidence increases with age was poor. Only 28% of all women recognized that breast carcinoma is more common among women age 65 years than among women age 40 years. Among all women, 26% underestimated their risk of developing breast carcinoma in the next 10 years, 32% correctly estimated their risk, and 42% overestimated their risk. Fifty-five percent thought that mammography should begin when a woman is age 30-35 years. In contrast, all surveyed physicians recommended that a woman start undergoing mammography at age 40 years or older. In this primary care setting, older women had poorer breast carcinoma knowledge than younger women but were equally likely to appreciate the benefits of mammography. Most women were unaware that age is a risk factor for breast carcinoma. Improved education of females by their physicians may resolve some of the observed discrepancies regarding the optimal age to begin screening mammography.

  1. Leveraging Students’ Prior Knowledge in Attaining Deep Structural Understanding of Domain General Models

    OpenAIRE

    Swanson, Hillary Lucille

    2015-01-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards charge U.S. teachers with the task of including patterns, as a crosscutting concept, in their science curricula. This study explores the learning processes and outcomes of a pattern-based curriculum that engages middle school students in the construction of models of particular patterns. These patterns are general behaviors or processes that can be found in a range of phenomena; examples of such patterns include threshold, equilibration, and oscillation. ...

  2. Public Knowledge and Behaviours Regarding Antibiotics Use: A Survey among the General Public

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Y Abujheisha

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antimicrobial resistance is associated with increased number of illness, mortality, and health care costs. The incorrect use, excessive prescription and prolonged administration of antibiotics are some factors which allow the growth of resistant bacteria leading to the emergence and spread of bacterial resistance to antibiotics. Several studies about antibiotic use have shown that behaviour towards antibiotics differs among countries, depending on culture, habits, education, and health care organization. The aim of this pilot study was to inspect the attitudes and knowledge regarding antibiotics among the public in Saudi Arabia. Methods: A cross-sectional survey using a validated questionnaire was carried out from January to February 2017 within the public, including hospital attendees and patients come for a consultation at the Prince Sattam university hospital. A total of 670 participants were included in this study. They have been chosen using a suitable sampling method. Persons incorporated in this survey who were above 18 years old and familiar with the term “antibiotics”. Results: The majority of respondents get informed about the use of antibiotics from Pharmacists (79.94%, and Physicians (76.14% and 50.3% (n=331 of the respondents reported using antibiotics six months before the survey. Regarding the source of antibiotics, (42.55% of the respondents usually gets the antibiotics after a consultation with the doctor, while 53.8% declared that their antibiotics were acquired from a retail pharmacy and a few of them (3.65% get the antibiotics from family and friends. The justification of participants for having antibiotics was mostly due to fever (41.34% or respiratory infections (22.19%. About 33.5% stated that they did not complete the treatment course and the reason was they felt better. Almost 57% indicated that they had ever kept an antibiotic at home for emergency need while 28.57% use leftover antibiotics in case they

  3. A Comparative Analysis of General Culture Courses within the Scope of Knowledge Categories in Undergraduate Teacher Education Programs "Turkey and the USA"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayirsever, Fahriye; Kalayci, Nurdan

    2017-01-01

    In this study, general culture and general education courses within the scope of knowledge categories in undergraduate teacher education programs in Turkey and the USA are comparatively analyzed. The study is a comparative education study and uses a descriptive model. In the study, the general culture - general education courses taught in the…

  4. In a Strange and Uncharted Land: ESP Teachers' Strategies for Dealing with Unpredicted Problems in Subject Knowledge during Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, HuiDan; Badger, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    The literature on English for Specific Purposes (ESP) has largely ignored one of its most distinctive features: many ESP teachers have to teach subject-specific texts from areas outside their primary areas of expertise. This paper addresses this issue by investigating the teaching practices and cognitions of three teachers of maritime English in a…

  5. Reformation of VET and Demands on Teachers' Subject Knowledge--Swedish Vocational Teachers' Recurrent Participation in a National CPD Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köpsén, S.; Andersson, P.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates continuing professional development (CPD) of vocational teachers, with a focus on recurrent participation. Vocational teachers need to be competent as teachers and in relation to their vocational teaching subject. Reformation of Swedish vocational education in order to strengthen the working-life connection imposes demands…

  6. Chief Examiners as Prophet and Priest: Relations between Examination Boards and School Subjects, and Possible Implications for Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttick, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from an ethnographic study of three secondary school geography departments in England is drawn on to describe aspects of the relationships between examination boards and school subjects. This paper focuses on one department, in "Town Comprehensive", and the argument is illustrated through a discussion of observed lessons with a…

  7. Children's Comprehension of Object Relative Sentences: It's Extant Language Knowledge That Matters, Not Domain-General Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusli, Yazmin Ahmad; Montgomery, James W.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether extant language (lexical) knowledge or domain-general working memory is the better predictor of comprehension of object relative sentences for children with typical development. We hypothesized that extant language knowledge, not domain-general working memory, is the better predictor. Method:…

  8. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of General Practitioners toward Complementary and Alternative Medicine: a Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barikani, Ameneh; Beheshti, Akram; Javadi, Maryam; Yasi, Marzieh

    2015-08-01

    Orientation of public and physicians to the complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is one of the most prominent symbols of structural changes in the health service system. The aim of his study was a determination of knowledge, attitude, and practice of general practitioners in complementary and alternative medicine. This cross- sectional study was conducted in Qazvin, Iran in 2013. A self-administered questionnaire was used for collecting data including four information parts: population information, physicians' attitude and knowledge, methods of getting information and their function. A total of 228 physicians in Qazvin comprised the population of study according to the deputy of treatment's report of Qazvin University of Medical Sciences. A total of 150 physicians were selected randomly, and SPSS Statistical program was used to enter questionnaires' data. Results were analyzed as descriptive statistics and statistical analysis. Sixty percent of all responders were male. About sixty (59.4) percent of participating practitioners had worked less than 10 years.96.4 percent had a positive attitude towards complementary and alternative medicine. Knowledge of practitioners about traditional medicine in 11 percent was good, 36.3% and 52.7% had average and little information, respectively. 17.9% of practitioners offered their patients complementary and alternative medicine for treatment. Although there was little knowledge among practitioners about traditional medicine and complementary approaches, a significant percentage of them had attitude higher than the lower limit.

  9. Integrated approach to e-learning enhanced both subjective and objective knowledge of aEEG in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Woei Bing; Tagamolila, Vina; Toh, Ying Pin Anne; Cheng, Zai Ru

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Various meta-analyses have shown that e-learning is as effective as traditional methods of continuing professional education. However, there are some disadvantages to e-learning, such as possible technical problems, the need for greater self-discipline, cost involved in developing programmes and limited direct interaction. Currently, most strategies for teaching amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG) in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) worldwide depend on traditional teaching methods. METHODS We implemented a programme that utilised an integrated approach to e-learning. The programme consisted of three sessions of supervised protected time e-learning in an NICU. The objective and subjective effectiveness of the approach was assessed through surveys administered to participants before and after the programme. RESULTS A total of 37 NICU staff (32 nurses and 5 doctors) participated in the study. 93.1% of the participants appreciated the need to acquire knowledge of aEEG. We also saw a statistically significant improvement in the subjective knowledge score (p = 0.041) of the participants. The passing rates for identifying abnormal aEEG tracings (defined as ≥ 3 correct answers out of 5) also showed a statistically significant improvement (from 13.6% to 81.8%, p e-learning can help improve subjective and objective knowledge of aEEG. PMID:25820847

  10. Integrated approach to e-learning enhanced both subjective and objective knowledge of aEEG in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, W B; Tagamolila, V; Toh, Y P; Cheng, Z R

    2015-03-01

    Various meta-analyses have shown that e-learning is as effective as traditional methods of continuing professional education. However, there are some disadvantages to e-learning, such as possible technical problems, the need for greater self-discipline, cost involved in developing programmes and limited direct interaction. Currently, most strategies for teaching amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG) in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) worldwide depend on traditional teaching methods. We implemented a programme that utilised an integrated approach to e-learning. The programme consisted of three sessions of supervised protected time e-learning in an NICU. The objective and subjective effectiveness of the approach was assessed through surveys administered to participants before and after the programme. A total of 37 NICU staff (32 nurses and 5 doctors) participated in the study. 93.1% of the participants appreciated the need to acquire knowledge of aEEG. We also saw a statistically significant improvement in the subjective knowledge score (p = 0.041) of the participants. The passing rates for identifying abnormal aEEG tracings (defined as ≥ 3 correct answers out of 5) also showed a statistically significant improvement (from 13.6% to 81.8%, p approach to e-learning can help improve subjective and objective knowledge of aEEG.

  11. New graduate nurses as knowledge brokers in general practice in New Zealand: a constructivist grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoare, Karen J; Mills, Jane; Francis, Karen

    2013-07-01

    Practice nursing in New Zealand is not well described in the literature. One survey illustrated that most of the New Zealand practice nurses sampled did not know of the country's two premier evidence-based health websites. A recent review compared general practice in the UK, New Zealand and Australia and found that whereas there had been significant developments in empowering the practice nurse workforce to run nurse-led clinics in the UK, New Zealand and Australia lagged behind. The aim of this reported constructivist grounded theory study was to investigate practice nurses' use of information. Conducted in Auckland, New Zealand, data were collected through ethnographic techniques in one general practice between September 2009 and January 2010 to enhance theoretical sensitivity to the area of information use. Subsequently, six experienced practice nurses (one twice after moving jobs) and five new graduate nurses from five different general practices were interviewed, using open-ended questions, between January 2010 and August 2011. Concurrent data collection and analysis occurred throughout the study period. The use of memos, the constant comparative method, data categorisation and finally, data abstraction resulted in the final theory of reciprocal role modelling. Experienced practice nurses role modelled clinical skills to new graduate nurses. Unexpectedly, new graduate nurses were unconscious experts at sourcing information and role modelled this skill to experienced practice nurses. Once this attribute was acknowledged by the experienced practice nurse, mutual learning occurred that enabled both groups of nurses to become better practitioners. Graduate nurses of the millennial generation were identified as a resource for experienced practice nurses who belong to the baby boomer generation and generation X. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Application of the Infinite Relational Model combined with the Bayesian Model of Generalization for Effective Cross-Cultural Knowledge Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Fumiko Kano; Mørup, Morten

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates how the Infinite Relational Model (IRM) [Kemp 2006], a novel unsupervised machine learning method, is effectively applied to loosely-structured datasets consisting of concepts and features for the purpose of mapping Culturally Specific Concepts (CSCs) in a multi......, three strategies are tested in our experiments: 1) applying the IRM directly to two CSC-feature matrices, respectively representing the educational domain knowledge in Japan and Denmark for first categorizing them into categorical classes that are to be subsequently compared and aligned; 2) applying...... the IRM directly to a matrix where the two CSC-feature matrices respectively representing the Danish- and Japanese educational domain knowledge are merged; and 3) applying the Bayesian Model of Generalization (BMG) [Tenenbaum 2001] to directly compute similarity relations between CSCs in the two cultures...

  13. Application of the Infinite Relational Model combined with the Bayesian Model of Generalization for Effective Cross-Cultural Knowledge Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kano Glückstad, Fumiko; Mørup, Morten

    This paper investigates how the Infinite Relational Model (IRM) [Kemp 2006], a novel unsupervised machine learning method, is effectively applied to loosely-structured datasets consisting of concepts and features for the purpose of mapping Culturally Specific Concepts (CSCs) in a multi......, three strategies are tested in our experiments: 1) applying the IRM directly to two CSC-feature matrices, respectively representing the educational domain knowledge in Japan and Denmark for first categorizing them into categorical classes that are to be subsequently compared and aligned; 2) applying...... the IRM directly to a matrix where the two CSC-feature matrices respectively representing the Danish- and Japanese educational domain knowledge are merged; and 3) applying the Bayesian Model of Generalization (BMG) [Tenenbaum 2001] to directly compute similarity relations between CSCs in the two cultures...

  14. Effects of HD-tDCS on memory and metamemory for general knowledge questions that vary by difficulty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Elizabeth F; Ahmed, Rifat; Garcia, Sandry M

    The ability to monitor one's own memory is an important feature of normal memory and is an aspect of 'metamemory'. Lesion studies have shown dissociations between memory and metamemory, but only single dissociations have been shown using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). One potential reason that only single dissociations have been shown is that tDCS effects may be moderated by task difficulty. We used high definition (HD) tDCS to test for dissociable roles of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and anterior temporal lobe (ATL) in semantic long-term memory and metamemory tasks. We also tested whether general knowledge question difficulty moderated the effects of HD-tDCS. Across 3 sessions, participants received active HD-tDCS over the left DLPFC or left ATL, or sham HD-tDCS during general knowledge recall and recognition tests, and a 'feeling-of-knowing' metamemory task. General knowledge questions were blocked by difficulty. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to examine the effects of HD-tDCS on memory and metamemory tasks by memory question difficulty. HD-tDCS over the ATL led to improved recall compared to DLPFC and sham HD-tDCS, and this occurred only for medium difficulty questions. In contrast, for non-recalled questions, HD-tDCS over the DLPFC led to improved recognition accuracy and improved feeling-of-knowing accuracy compared to ATL and sham HD-tDCS, and this was not moderated by memory question difficulty. HD-tDCS can be used to dissociate the roles of the ATL and DLPFC in different memory and 'metamemory' tasks. The effects of HD-tDCS on task may be moderated by task difficulty, depending on the nature of the task and site of stimulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of the Chicago Food Allergy Research Surveys: assessing knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of parents, physicians, and the general public

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pongracic Jacqueline A

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parents of children with food allergy, primary care physicians, and members of the general public play a critical role in the health and well-being of food-allergic children, though little is known about their knowledge and perceptions of food allergy. The purpose of this paper is to detail the development of the Chicago Food Allergy Research Surveys to assess food allergy knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs among these three populations. Methods From 2006–2008, parents of food-allergic children, pediatricians, family physicians, and adult members of the general public were recruited to assist in survey development. Preliminary analysis included literature review, creation of initial content domains, expert panel review, and focus groups. Survey validation included creation of initial survey items, expert panel ratings, cognitive interviews, reliability testing, item reduction, and final validation. National administration of the surveys is ongoing. Results Nine experts were assembled to oversee survey development. Six focus groups were held: 2/survey population, 4–9 participants/group; transcripts were reviewed via constant comparative methods to identify emerging themes and inform item creation. At least 220 participants per population were recruited to assess the relevance, reliability, and utility of each survey item as follows: cognitive interviews, 10 participants; reliability testing ≥ 10; item reduction ≥ 50; and final validation, 150 respondents. Conclusion The Chicago Food Allergy Research surveys offer validated tools to assess food allergy knowledge and perceptions among three distinct populations: a 42 item parent tool, a 50 item physician tool, and a 35 item general public tool. No such tools were previously available.

  16. Developmental Change in the Influence of Domain-General Abilities and Domain-Specific Knowledge on Mathematics Achievement: An Eight-Year Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, David C; Nicholas, Alan; Li, Yaoran; Sun, Jianguo

    2017-07-01

    The contributions of domain-general abilities and domain-specific knowledge to subsequent mathematics achievement were longitudinally assessed (n = 167) through 8th grade. First grade intelligence and working memory and prior grade reading achievement indexed domain-general effects and domain-specific effects were indexed by prior grade mathematics achievement and mathematical cognition measures of prior grade number knowledge, addition skills, and fraction knowledge. Use of functional data analysis enabled grade-by-grade estimation of overall domain-general and domain-specific effects on subsequent mathematics achievement, the relative importance of individual domain-general and domain-specific variables on this achievement, and linear and non-linear across-grade estimates of these effects. The overall importance of domain-general abilities for subsequent achievement was stable across grades, with working memory emerging as the most important domain-general ability in later grades. The importance of prior mathematical competencies on subsequent mathematics achievement increased across grades, with number knowledge and arithmetic skills critical in all grades and fraction knowledge in later grades. Overall, domain-general abilities were more important than domain-specific knowledge for mathematics learning in early grades but general abilities and domain-specific knowledge were equally important in later grades.

  17. The knowledge most worth having: Otis W. Caldwell (1869 1947) and the rise of the general science course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffron, John M.

    1995-07-01

    In 1860 Herbert Spencer asked the famous rhetorical question ‘What Knowledge is of Most Worth?’ The unequivocal answer was science. Giving greater attention to science and scientific knowledge would not only produce additional scientists; more important, argued Spencer, it would make better parents, better church-goers, better citizens and workers, better artists and better consumers of art. It would lead to a ‘command of fundamental processes’, ‘worthy home membership’, ‘worthy use of leisure’, ‘ethical character’ — the goals of a general education spelled out by Spencerians within the National Educational Association in 1918. Here is our puzzle, then: how are we to interpret a definition of science, one widely accepted both in Spencer's time and in our own, that comes so close descriptively to a commonsensical view of what constitutes non-science? The answer to this question lies in part in the historical relationship between science and general education, a relationship established in the opening decades of this century, when the authority of science and scientific objectivity was in the minds of most educators unimpeachable. The high school general science course, developed in its early stages by the botanist and educator, Otis W. Caldwell, was a potent symbol of this new relationship. Organized around broad, topical issues and claiming to teach the mundane truths of life, general science was more than a loose collection of facts from the various earth, biological, and physical sciences. Its many advocates viewed the new unified science course as pedagogically independent of the specialties yet central to education in general. In 1949, two years after Caldwell's death, 72 percent of the total science enrollments in the United States were in general science and biology, its closest cognate. This paper examines the rise of the general science course and its implications for the reform of secondary school science education. It concludes that

  18. Knowledge, attitude, and practice of general practitioners in Dammam, Saudi Arabia towards Vitamin D supplementation to infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babli, Afrah I; AlDawood, Kasim M; Khamis, Ammar H

    2015-01-01

    With the report of high prevalence rate of Vitamin D deficiency in the literature since the 1980s, the condition can be considered an epidemic in Saudi Arabia. However, no specific steps have been taken by the Ministry of Health to tackle the problem. Moreover, little is known about general practitioners' (GPs) knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) of Vitamin D supplementation for infants. To measure the KAP of GPs, of Vitamin D supplementation for infants in Dammam, Saudi Arabia. This was a cross-sectional study of GPs practicing in primary healthcare centers in the Dammam area of Saudi Arabia. All the 110 GPs working in primary health centers (PHCs) in Dammam were invited to participate in the study. Data was collected with the help of a self-administered questionnaire. Data was analyzed using SPSS 20.0. Statistical analysis included descriptive analysis of all the variables, expressed as the mean (standard deviation [SD]) or the median if not normally distributed. Ninety-three GPs working in the Dammam area participated in the study. Thirty percent had excellent knowledge of Vitamin D. Ninety two percent had a positive attitude toward Vitamin D supplementation and sixty percent regularly prescribed Vitamin D supplementation for infants. The majority of GPs had a positive attitude toward Vitamin D supplementation for infants. However, their knowledge and practice need improvement.

  19. Knowledge, attitude, and practice of general practitioners in Dammam, Saudi Arabia towards Vitamin D supplementation to infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afrah I Babli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the report of high prevalence rate of Vitamin D deficiency in the literature since the 1980s, the condition can be considered an epidemic in Saudi Arabia. However, no specific steps have been taken by the Ministry of Health to tackle the problem. Moreover, little is known about general practitioners′ (GPs knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP of Vitamin D supplementation for infants. Objectives: To measure the KAP of GPs, of Vitamin D supplementation for infants in Dammam, Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of GPs practicing in primary healthcare centers in the Dammam area of Saudi Arabia. All the 110 GPs working in primary health centers (PHCs in Dammam were invited to participate in the study. Data was collected with the help of a self-administered questionnaire. Data was analyzed using SPSS 20.0. Statistical analysis included descriptive analysis of all the variables, expressed as the mean (standard deviation [SD] or the median if not normally distributed. Results: Ninety-three GPs working in the Dammam area participated in the study. Thirty percent had excellent knowledge of Vitamin D. Ninety two percent had a positive attitude toward Vitamin D supplementation and sixty percent regularly prescribed Vitamin D supplementation for infants. Conclusion: The majority of GPs had a positive attitude toward Vitamin D supplementation for infants. However, their knowledge and practice need improvement.

  20. Knowledge, attitude and practice of General Practitioners towards adverse drug reaction reporting in South of Iran, Shiraz (Pharmacoepidemiology report).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peymani, Payam; Tabrizi, Reza; Afifi, Saba; Namazi, Soha; Heydari, Seyed Taghi; Shirazi, Mohammad Khabaz; Nouraei, Hasti; Sadeghi, Elham; Lankarani, Kamran B; Maharlouei, Najmeh

    2016-03-16

    An adverse drug reaction (ADRs) is linked with the use of medications and unpredictable negative consequences. The Iranian Pharmacovigilance center (IPC) has reported that the rate of ADR is very low. Thus, this study was performed to find the reasons for this under-reporting, and investigate the level of knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of General Practitioners (GPs) about spontaneous reporting system in Shiraz. The present cross-sectional study was conducted on 350 general practitioners (GPs) working in Shiraz, Iran from Oct 2014 to March 2015. A semi-structured questionnaire was used which included demographic features, and evaluated KAPs of GPs regarding ADRs, Pharmacovigilance, and yellow card reporting. Statistical analysis was done by descriptive and analytical statistics (frequency, Mean±SD, Student t-test, Chi-square) using SPSS version 16. Of 350 (95.1%) GPs, 333 completed the questionnaire. The respondents aged from 26 to76 years, of whom 176 (52.9%) were males with mean age 39.6±8.8 SD years. In regard to work place, 85 (25.5%) had their own office, and 112 (33.7%), 101 (30.9%), and 35 (10.5%) worked in private hospitals, in governmental hospitals, and in more than one place, respectively. Work experience mean was 13.3±8.2SD years and median was 12 years (range 1-50 years). Although, less than half of the participants (n = 151; 45.3%) described ADR correctly, 215 (64.6%) respondents claimed that they were not familiar with physician's responsibility regarding ADR reporting. Overall, few of the participants were aware of the steps in either ADR reporting or using Yellow Card System. On the whole, 100 (30%) respondents achieved acceptable knowledge score, while the median score was 9 out of 14 and minimum and maximum being 5 and 14, respectively. The physicians in Shiraz have poor knowledge of the pharmacovigilance system; however self-education leads to a better knowledge and positive attitude regarding ADRs reporting system. National

  1. Oral cancer--current knowledge, practices and implications for training among an Irish general medical practitioner cohort.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Riordain, Richeal

    2009-11-01

    This study investigated the current knowledge and practices of general medical practitioners (GMPs) in Ireland regarding the examination of the oral cavity and the detection of oral malignancy and the training they had received at both undergraduate and postgraduate level and since commencing in practice. A questionnaire survey of GMPs in Ireland was conducted. One hundred and fifty four (65.3%) of the practitioners reported regularly examining the oral mucosa of their patients. Almost half of these (n=68) further qualified this response by stating that they only examined the oral mucosa if the patient reported pain in this area or if the patient specifically requested an oral examination for some reason. Eighty one (34.3%) practitioners surveyed felt confident in their ability to detect oral malignancies with the remaining two thirds unsure of whether they would be able to detect oral cancer. There was a significant association between the undergraduate and postgraduate teaching on examination of the oral cavity and whether practitioners felt confident in their ability to detect oral cancer [chi(2)(1)=4.811, p<0.05]. A statistically significant association was also found between the undergraduate and postgraduate teaching on the diagnosis of oral malignant disease and whether practitioners felt confident in their ability to detect oral cancer [chi(2)(1)=6.194, p<0.05]. In conclusion the level of knowledge of Irish general medical practitioners needs to be addressed with appropriate initiatives both at undergraduate level and via CME.

  2. General

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Page S20: NMR compound 4i. Page S22: NMR compound 4j. General: Chemicals were purchased from Fluka, Merck and Aldrich Chemical Companies. All the products were characterized by comparison of their IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopic data and their melting points with reported values. General procedure ...

  3. Female genital cosmetic surgery: a cross-sectional survey exploring knowledge, attitude and practice of general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonis, M; Manocha, R; Ong, J J

    2016-09-26

    To explore general practitioner's (GP) knowledge, attitudes and practice regarding female genital cosmetic surgery (FGCS) in Australia. Cross-sectional survey. Australia. GPs who attended a women's health seminar and GPs who subscribed to a non-governmental, national health professional organisation database that provides education to primary care professionals. A national online survey of GPs was conducted for the 10-week period, starting 1 week prior and 2 months after a Women's Health seminar was held in Perth on 8 August 2015. 31 questions prompted GPs' knowledge, attitudes and practice in managing patients asking about FGCS. The survey was fully completed by 443 GPs; 54% had seen patients requesting FGCS. Overall, 75% (95% CI 71% to 79%) of GPs rated their knowledge of FGCS as inadequate and 97% (95% CI 94% to 99%) had been asked by women of all ages about genital normality. Of those who had seen patients requesting FGCS, nearly half (44%, 95% CI 38% to 51%) reported they had insufficient knowledge of risks of FGCS procedures and 35% (95% CI 29% to 41%) reported seeing females younger than 18 years of age requesting FGCS. Just over half (56%, 95% CI 51% to 60%) of the GPs felt that women should be counselled before making a referral for FGCS. More than half the GPs suspected psychological disturbances in their patients requesting FGCS such as depression, anxiety, relationship difficulties and body dysmorphic disorder. GPs see women of all ages presenting with genital anatomy concerns and in those who request FGCS, GPs often suspected a range of mental health difficulties. GPs require greater education to support their patients who request FGCS. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  4. Citation Analysis using the Medline Database at the Web of Knowledge: Searching "Times Cited" with Medical Subject Headings (MeSH)

    CERN Document Server

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2012-01-01

    Citation analysis of documents retrieved from the Medline database (at the Web of Knowledge) has been possible only on a case-by-case basis. A technique is here developed for citation analysis in batch mode using both Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) at the Web of Knowledge and the Science Citation Index at the Web of Science. This freeware routine is applied to the case of "Brugada Syndrome," a specific disease and field of research (since 1992). The journals containing these publications are attributed to Web-of-Science Categories other than "Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems"), perhaps because of the possibility of genetic testing for this syndrome in the clinic. With this routine, all the instruments available for citation analysis can be used on the basis of MeSH terms.

  5. Second Flexner Century: The Democratization of Medical Knowledge: Repurposing a General Pathology Course Into Multigrade-Level "Gateway" Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Ronald S; Waer, Amy L; Weinstein, John B; Briehl, Margaret M; Holcomb, Michael J; Erps, Kristine A; Holtrust, Angelette L; Tomkins, Julie M; Barker, Gail P; Krupinski, Elizabeth A

    2017-01-01

    Starting in 1910, the "Flexner Revolution" in medical education catalyzed the transformation of the US medical education enterprise from a proprietary medical school dominated system into a university-based medical school system. In the 21st century, what we refer to as the "Second Flexner Century" shifts focus from the education of medical students to the education of the general population in the "4 health literacies." Compared with the remarkable success of the first Flexner Revolution, retrofitting medical science education into the US general population today, starting with K-12 students, is a more daunting task. The stakes are high. The emergence of the patient-centered medical home as a health-care delivery model and the revelation that medical errors are the third leading cause of adult deaths in the United States are drivers of population education reform. In this century, patients will be expected to assume far greater responsibility for their own health care as full members of health-care teams. For us, this process began in the run-up to the "Second Flexner Century" with the creation and testing of a general pathology course, repurposed as a series of "gateway" courses on mechanisms of diseases, suitable for introduction at multiple insertion points in the US education continuum. In this article, we describe nomenclature for these gateway courses and a "top-down" strategy for creating pathology coursework for nonmedical students. Finally, we list opportunities for academic pathology departments to engage in a national "Democratization of Medical Knowledge" initiative.

  6. A generalized constitutive elasticity law for GLPD micromorphic materials, with application to the problem of a spherical shell subjected to axisymmetric loading conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koffi Enakoutsa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we propose to replace the GLPD hypo-elasticity law by a more rigorous generalized Hooke's law based on classical material symmetry characterization assumptions. This law introduces in addition to the two well-known Lame's moduli, five constitutive constants. An analytical solution is derived for the problem of a spherical shell subjected to axisymmetric loading conditions to illustrate the potential of the proposed generalized Hooke's law.

  7. A generalized constitutive elasticity law for GLPD micromorphic materials, with application to the problem of a spherical shell subjected to axisymmetric loading conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Enakoutsa, Koffi

    2014-01-01

    In this work we propose to replace the GLPD hypo-elasticity law by a more rigorous generalized Hooke's law based on classical material symmetry characterization assumptions. This law introduces in addition to the two well-known Lame's moduli, five constitutive constants. An analytical solution is derived for the problem of a spherical shell subjected to axisymmetric loading conditions to illustrate the potential of the proposed generalized Hooke's law.

  8. Improving Knowledge of General Dental Practitioners on Antibiotic Prescribing by Raising Awareness of the Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Zahabiyoun

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Cases of antimicrobial resistance are increasing, partly due to inappropriate prescribing practices by dentists. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prescrib- ing practices and knowledge of dentists with regards to antibiotics. Moreover, this study aimed to determine whether the prescriptions comply with the recommended guidelines and whether clinical audit can alter the prescribing practices of dentists leading to better use of antibiotics in the dental service.Materials and Methods: A clinical audit (before/after non-controlled trial was carried out in two dental clinics in the northeast of England. Retrospective data were collected from 30 antibiotic prescriptions, analysed and compared with the recommended guide- lines. Data collected included age and gender of patients, type of prescribed antibiotics and their dosage, frequency and duration, clinical condition and reason for prescribing. The principles of appropriate prescribing based on guidance by the Faculty of General Dental Practice in the United Kingdom (UK, FGDP, were discussed with the dental clini- cians. Following this, prospective data were collected and similarly managed. Pre and post audit data were then compared. Changes were tested for significance using McNemar's test and P value<0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results: After intervention, data revealed that antibiotic prescribing practices of dentists improved, as there was an increase in the percentage of prescriptions that were in accor- dance with the FGDP (UK guidelines.Conclusion: In view of the limited data collected, this study concludes that there are inap- propriate antibiotic prescribing practices amongst general dental practitioners and that clinical audit can address this situation, leading to a more rational use of antibiotics in dental practice.

  9. Approach, attitudes, and knowledge of general practitioners in relation to Helicobacter pylori is inadequate. There is much room for improvement!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Contreras, A D; Rascón, O; Amieva-Balmori, M; Ríos-Gálvez, S; Maza, Y J; Meixueiro-Daza, A; Roesch-Dietlen, F; Remes-Troche, J M

    Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is one of the most common infections in humans. Due to its worldwide prevalence, a series of guidelines and recommendations has been developed for the appropriate screening, diagnosis, and management of patients with Hp infection. To evaluate the approach, attitudes, and knowledge of a group of Mexican general practitioners in relation to Hp. A cross-sectional study was conducted that evaluated the knowledge of Hp diagnosis and treatment through the application of a questionnaire. From the total of 430 questionnaires delivered, information was obtained from 411 (95% response rate). The most frequent indications for eradication treatment were peptic ulcer (48.4%), gastroesophageal reflux disease (41.8%), and dyspepsia (39.2%). Thirty-one percent of the physicians surveyed used more than one test to look for Hp, and serology was the most commonly employed method. The most widely used antibiotic regimen was clarithromycin plus amoxicillin (63.8%), followed by metronidazole plus tetracycline (16%). Ninety-two percent of the physicians confirmed eradication through endoscopy for the histologic analysis and only 23% utilized the breath test. Our results show the lack of knowledge about the established diagnostic and treatment recommendations for Hp infection. The implementation of workshops, courses, and conferences, or the formulation of practical guidelines should be directed at primary care physicians to strengthen the practice of medicine based on scientific evidence. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  10. Awareness, knowledge and attitudes to non-melanoma skin cancer and actinic keratosis among the general public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Allan C; Kopp, Laura J

    2005-02-01

    The incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) has dramatically increased worldwide. In areas of high incidence this will place a significant burden on the health system. Objectives To establish the awareness, knowledge and attitudes of the general public to NMSC and provide an overview on their level of understanding and knowledge of preventative measures. Two thousand and one hundred Caucasian and Hispanic individuals, aged 40-75 years, from the UK, Italy, Germany, Spain, France, the USA and Australia were randomly selected to participate in this market research survey. In a structured telephone interview lasting approximately 10 min, respondents answered questions on NMSC, specifically actinic keratosis (AK) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Overall, 6% of respondents had been diagnosed with NMSC, of which the incidence was highest in Australia and the USA. The frequency of skin cancer detection examinations was also greater within these populations. Countries with a high incidence of NSMC had greater awareness of the condition, with more awareness of BCC than AK. The majority of respondents believed there was a correlation between skin cancer and sun exposure, however, a minority of respondents associated skin cancer with 'moderate' tanning. Overall, 86% of respondents claimed that they always took precautions against ultraviolet exposure when in the sun, but only 26% applied sunscreen most or all of the time when they were exposed to the sun for more than 1 h. In most of the countries, outside workers reported lower sunscreen use than other respondents. Nonmelanoma skin cancer awareness and prevention behaviors varied significantly among the countries studied. Improved population-specific documentation of skin cancer knowledge and prevention behaviors will facilitate the development and assessment of public health campaigns.

  11. General practitioners' knowledge, attitude and prescribing of antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections in Selangor, Malaysia: findings and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Kamil, Tengku Karmila Tengku; Md Yusof, Faridah Aryani; Alrasheedy, Alian A; Yusoff, Zuraidah Mohd; Saleem, Fahad; Al-Tamimi, Saleh Karamah; Wong, Zhi Yen; Aljadhey, Hisham; Godman, Brian

    2015-04-01

    Antibiotics are widely prescribed especially for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs). Their irrational use can increase costs and resistance. Assess knowledge, attitude and prescribing of antibiotics for URTIs in Selangor, Malaysia, using a cross-sectional survey among general practitioners (GPs) working in private clinics in 2011. One hundred and thirty-nine physicians completed the questionnaire (response rate = 34.8%). 49.6% (n = 69) agreed antibiotics are helpful in treating URTIs, with most GPs agreeing antibiotics may reduce URTI duration and complications. The majority of GPs reported they felt patients expected antibiotics, with 36.7% (n = 51) agreeing patients would change doctors if they did not prescribe antibiotics and 21.6% (n = 30) agreeing when requested they prescribe antibiotics even if they believe them to be unnecessary. When assessed against six criteria, most GPs had a moderate level of knowledge of prescribing for URTIs. However, antibiotic prescriptions could be appreciably reduced. Further programs are needed to educate GPs and patients about antibiotics building on current initiatives.

  12. Generalized hidden-mapping ridge regression, knowledge-leveraged inductive transfer learning for neural networks, fuzzy systems and kernel methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhaohong; Choi, Kup-Sze; Jiang, Yizhang; Wang, Shitong

    2014-12-01

    Inductive transfer learning has attracted increasing attention for the training of effective model in the target domain by leveraging the information in the source domain. However, most transfer learning methods are developed for a specific model, such as the commonly used support vector machine, which makes the methods applicable only to the adopted models. In this regard, the generalized hidden-mapping ridge regression (GHRR) method is introduced in order to train various types of classical intelligence models, including neural networks, fuzzy logical systems and kernel methods. Furthermore, the knowledge-leverage based transfer learning mechanism is integrated with GHRR to realize the inductive transfer learning method called transfer GHRR (TGHRR). Since the information from the induced knowledge is much clearer and more concise than that from the data in the source domain, it is more convenient to control and balance the similarity and difference of data distributions between the source and target domains. The proposed GHRR and TGHRR algorithms have been evaluated experimentally by performing regression and classification on synthetic and real world datasets. The results demonstrate that the performance of TGHRR is competitive with or even superior to existing state-of-the-art inductive transfer learning algorithms.

  13. Filozofia jako przedmiot scalający wiedzę szkolną [Philosophy as a school subject integrating student knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanda Kamińska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The authoress of the article formulates and defends the thesis that contemporary modeling of teaching philosophy can be analyzed in a paradigm of integrating knowledge of pupils. In the first part of this article she describes the complexity of a problem of modeling the philosophical knowledge of a pupil. It is caused by a solid tradition which divides science and philosophy. In Kamińska’s opinion this tradition forms opinions among academics and practitioners, which determine the place of philosophy in relation to other school subjects. Authoress argues, that the ‘integrative knowledge’ model is able to execute the expectations of the employers according to social and intellectual abilities of their potential employees. To achieve this, she mentions the research on the expectations of the employers towards the professional competences of the graduates. Skills and abilities relating to the cul- tural and social roles need philosophical competences like analytical and effective thinking, model operating, logical and moral skills of graduates. The main theoretical basis of the presented model are Bertalanffy’s metho- dology, Paul Hirst’s and Joseph Schwab’s pedagogical conceptions which relate to contents of didactic structure used in school practice and substantial structures of relevant scientific knowledge. Furthermore, it is also based on Henryk Struve’s conceptions of stages of development of philosophical skills. The second part of this article is dedicated to practical aspects. Authoress shows in examples the possibility of implementation of this model to school practice.

  14. [A survey on general knowledge and influencing factors of dental aesthetics among three universities students in Fuzhou city].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hao; Cheng, Shao-Long; Zhou, Jia-Yi; Cheng, Hui

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the general knowledge of dental aesthetics among three universities students in Fuzhou city and the factors influencing their satisfaction with general dental appearance and the color of anterior teeth. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted on 506 university students in Fuzhou city to identify their general knowledge of dental aesthetics. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the factors influencing the study populations' satisfaction with dental appearance and the color of anterior teeth with SPSS 13.0 software package. The 506 respondents consisted of 220 males (43.5%) and 286 females (56.5%), with a mean age of 22.65 years (SD=1.95). 53.6% of these participants were not satisfied with their dental appearance, 57.2% were not satisfied with the color of their anterior teeth. The majority of the participants (66%) chose tooth bleaching as the most desired treatment to improve their dental appearance. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that respondents' dissatisfaction with dental appearance was significantly associated with gender (OR=1.94, 95% CI: 1.03-3.68), the opinion that their teeth were irregular (OR=2.70, 95% CI: 1.61-4.54) and unhappiness with anterior teeth color (OR=4.27; 95% CI: 2.47-7.33). The results also indicated that respondents' dissatisfaction with the color of anterior teeth was significantly associated with the professional learning experience of dentistry (OR=0.26, 95% CI: 1.61-4.54) and gender (OR=1.76, 95% CI: 1.05-2.96). Most of the respondents in this study are not satisfied with their dental appearance is the color of anterior teeth. Tooth bleaching is the treatment most desired by the participants. Tooth color is one of the most important factors determining whether respondents are satisfied with their dental appearance. Females pay a greater attention to dental aesthetics than males. Over one year professional learning experience of dentistry is the protective factor of respondents

  15. 26 CFR 1.367(a)-1T - Transfers to foreign corporations subject to section 367(a): In general (temporary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... directly, indirectly, or constructively. Indirect or constructive transfers that are described in section... of an inter-dealer quotation system. An inter-dealer quotation system is any system of general... section 1504(d). Section 367(A) applies to the constructive reorganization and transfer of property from a...

  16. Developmental Change in the Influence of Domain-General Abilities and Domain-Specific Knowledge on Mathematics Achievement: An Eight-Year Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, David C.; Nicholas, Alan; Li, Yaoran; Sun, Jianguo

    2017-01-01

    The contributions of domain-general abilities and domain-specific knowledge to subsequent mathematics achievement were longitudinally assessed (n = 167) through 8th grade. First grade intelligence and working memory and prior grade reading achievement indexed domain-general effects, and domain-specific effects were indexed by prior grade…

  17. Pre-service teachers' perceived value of general pedagogical knowledge for practice: Relations with epistemic beliefs and source beliefs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Merk

    Full Text Available Pre-service teachers tend to devalue general pedagogical knowledge (GPK as a valid source for deriving successful teaching practices. The present study investigated beliefs about knowledge sources and epistemic beliefs as predictors for students' perceived value of GPK. Three pre-registered hypotheses were tested. We expected beliefs that GPK originates from scientific sources to entail a devaluation of GPK (Hypothesis 1. Concerning epistemic beliefs, we expected absolute beliefs to positively, and multiplistic beliefs to negatively predict pre-service teachers' perceived practical value of GPK (Hypothesis 2. Finally, we expected relationships between epistemic beliefs and pre-service teachers' perceived practical value of GPK to be confounded by epistemic trustworthiness, perceived topic-specific consistency and topic-specific familiarity (Hypothesis 3. In a study using a split plot design, 365 pre-service teachers were presented with four texts on different educational research topics. For each topic, three text versions were constructed. Even though they were invariant in content, these versions varied in a way that the results were allegedly generated by a practitioner, an expert or by means of a scientific study. Unexpectedly, results showed that research findings allegedly generated by means of a scientific study were associated with a higher perceived value of (topic-specific GPK for practice (Hypothesis 1. As expected, the perceived value of GPK for practice was predicted by topic-specific multiplism and domain-specific absolutism (Hypothesis 2. These predictive effects were confounded by expertise evaluations of the source and the consistency of prior beliefs with the presented research results (Hypothesis 3. In summary, our results suggest that source beliefs might not be responsible for the devaluation of GPK, but that beliefs on the nature and structure of GPK (i.e., epistemic beliefs might play an even more important role in this

  18. Pre-service teachers’ perceived value of general pedagogical knowledge for practice: Relations with epistemic beliefs and source beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosman, Tom; Rueß, Julia; Syring, Marcus; Schneider, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Pre-service teachers tend to devalue general pedagogical knowledge (GPK) as a valid source for deriving successful teaching practices. The present study investigated beliefs about knowledge sources and epistemic beliefs as predictors for students’ perceived value of GPK. Three pre-registered hypotheses were tested. We expected beliefs that GPK originates from scientific sources to entail a devaluation of GPK (Hypothesis 1). Concerning epistemic beliefs, we expected absolute beliefs to positively, and multiplistic beliefs to negatively predict pre-service teachers’ perceived practical value of GPK (Hypothesis 2). Finally, we expected relationships between epistemic beliefs and pre-service teachers’ perceived practical value of GPK to be confounded by epistemic trustworthiness, perceived topic-specific consistency and topic-specific familiarity (Hypothesis 3). In a study using a split plot design, 365 pre-service teachers were presented with four texts on different educational research topics. For each topic, three text versions were constructed. Even though they were invariant in content, these versions varied in a way that the results were allegedly generated by a practitioner, an expert or by means of a scientific study. Unexpectedly, results showed that research findings allegedly generated by means of a scientific study were associated with a higher perceived value of (topic-specific) GPK for practice (Hypothesis 1). As expected, the perceived value of GPK for practice was predicted by topic-specific multiplism and domain-specific absolutism (Hypothesis 2). These predictive effects were confounded by expertise evaluations of the source and the consistency of prior beliefs with the presented research results (Hypothesis 3). In summary, our results suggest that source beliefs might not be responsible for the devaluation of GPK, but that beliefs on the nature and structure of GPK (i.e., epistemic beliefs) might play an even more important role in this respect

  19. Pre-service teachers' perceived value of general pedagogical knowledge for practice: Relations with epistemic beliefs and source beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merk, Samuel; Rosman, Tom; Rueß, Julia; Syring, Marcus; Schneider, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Pre-service teachers tend to devalue general pedagogical knowledge (GPK) as a valid source for deriving successful teaching practices. The present study investigated beliefs about knowledge sources and epistemic beliefs as predictors for students' perceived value of GPK. Three pre-registered hypotheses were tested. We expected beliefs that GPK originates from scientific sources to entail a devaluation of GPK (Hypothesis 1). Concerning epistemic beliefs, we expected absolute beliefs to positively, and multiplistic beliefs to negatively predict pre-service teachers' perceived practical value of GPK (Hypothesis 2). Finally, we expected relationships between epistemic beliefs and pre-service teachers' perceived practical value of GPK to be confounded by epistemic trustworthiness, perceived topic-specific consistency and topic-specific familiarity (Hypothesis 3). In a study using a split plot design, 365 pre-service teachers were presented with four texts on different educational research topics. For each topic, three text versions were constructed. Even though they were invariant in content, these versions varied in a way that the results were allegedly generated by a practitioner, an expert or by means of a scientific study. Unexpectedly, results showed that research findings allegedly generated by means of a scientific study were associated with a higher perceived value of (topic-specific) GPK for practice (Hypothesis 1). As expected, the perceived value of GPK for practice was predicted by topic-specific multiplism and domain-specific absolutism (Hypothesis 2). These predictive effects were confounded by expertise evaluations of the source and the consistency of prior beliefs with the presented research results (Hypothesis 3). In summary, our results suggest that source beliefs might not be responsible for the devaluation of GPK, but that beliefs on the nature and structure of GPK (i.e., epistemic beliefs) might play an even more important role in this respect

  20. What do general practitioners know about ADHD? Attitudes and knowledge among first-contact gatekeepers: systematic narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatlow-Golden, Mimi; Prihodova, Lucia; Gavin, Blanaid; Cullen, Walter; McNicholas, Fiona

    2016-09-07

    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a common childhood disorder with international prevalence estimates of 5 % in childhood, yet significant evidence exists that far fewer children receive ADHD services. In many countries, ADHD is assessed and diagnosed in specialist mental health or neuro-developmental paediatric clinics, to which referral by General (Family) Practitioners (GPs) is required. In such 'gatekeeper' settings, where GPs act as a filter to diagnosis and treatment, GPs may either not recognise potential ADHD cases, or may be reluctant to refer. This study systematically reviews the literature regarding GPs' views of ADHD in such settings. A search of nine major databases was conducted, with wide search parameters; 3776 records were initially retrieved. Studies were included if they were from settings where GPs are typically gatekeepers to ADHD services; if they addressed GPs' ADHD attitudes and knowledge; if methods were clearly described; and if results for GPs were reported separately from those of other health professionals. Few studies specifically addressed GP attitudes to ADHD. Only 11 papers (10 studies), spanning 2000-2010, met inclusion criteria, predominantly from the UK, Europe and Australia. As studies varied methodologically, findings are reported as a thematic narrative, under the following themes: Recognition rate; ADHD controversy (medicalisation, stigma, labelling); Causes of ADHD; GPs and ADHD diagnosis; GPs and ADHD treatment; GP ADHD training and sources of information; and Age, sex differences in knowledge and attitudes. Across times and settings, GPs practising in first-contact gatekeeper settings had mixed and often unhelpful attitudes regarding the validity of ADHD as a construct, the role of medication and how parenting contributed to presentation. A paucity of training was identified, alongside a reluctance of GPs to become involved in shared care practice. If access to services is to be improved for possible

  1. Integrating pedagogical content knowledge and pedagogical/psychological knowledge in mathematics

    OpenAIRE

    Harr, Nora; Eichler, Andreas; Renkl, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In teacher education at universities, general pedagogical and psychological principles are often treated separately from subject matter knowledge and therefore run the risk of not being applied in the teaching subject. In an experimental study (N = 60 mathematics student teachers) we investigated the effects of providing aspects of general pedagogical/psychological knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge in an integrated or separated way. In both conditions (‘integrated’ vs. ‘separate’), ...

  2. Teacher Autonomy and Subject Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeon, Frankie

    2004-01-01

    The National Primary Strategy (DfES, 2004) is encouraging schools to design "broad and rich curricula" which make the most of links between different areas, building on literacy and numeracy and developing speaking and listening skills. Primary teachers' confidence with, and understanding of, science will be crucial to the effectiveness…

  3. Conceptualising GP teachers' knowledge: a pedagogical content knowledge perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantillon, Peter; de Grave, Willem

    2012-05-01

    Most teacher development initiatives focus on enhancing knowledge of teaching (pedagogy), whilst largely ignoring other important features of teacher knowledge such as subject matter knowledge and awareness of the learning context. Furthermore, teachers' ability to learn from faculty development interventions is limited by their existing (often implicit) pedagogical knowledge and beliefs. Pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) represents a model of teacher knowledge incorporating what they know about subject matter, pedagogy and context. PCK can be used to explore teachers' prior knowledge and to structure faculty development programmes so that they take account of a broader range of teachers' knowledge. We set out to examine the application of a PCK model in a general practice education setting. This study is part of a larger study that employed a mixed method approach (concept mapping, phenomenological interviews and video-stimulated recall) to explore features of GP teachers' subject matter knowledge, pedagogical knowledge and knowledge of the learning environment in the context of a general practice tutorial. This paper presents data on GP teachers' pedagogical and context knowledge. There was considerable overlap between different GP teachers' knowledge and beliefs about learners and the clinical learning environment (i.e. knowledge of context). The teachers' beliefs about learners were largely based on assumptions derived from their own student experiences. There were stark differences, however, between teachers in terms of pedagogical knowledge, particularly in terms of their teaching orientations (i.e. transmission or facilitation orientation) and this was manifest in their teaching behaviours. PCK represents a useful model for conceptualising clinical teacher prior knowledge in three domains, namely subject matter, learning context and pedagogy. It can and should be used as a simple guiding framework by faculty developers to inform the design and delivery of

  4. Processos interacionais e a construção de conhecimento e subjetividade de crianças Children's interactional processes and the production of knowledge and subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veriana de Fátima Rodrigues Colaço

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo propõe uma discussão teórica acerca dos processos interacionais infantis concebidos como mediadores para a construção de conhecimento e subjetividade. Tem como pressuposto a compreensão da atividade discursiva como processo que integra ação e linguagem e que se define como atividade mediada semioticamente, constituindo-se espaço de construção de conhecimento compartilhado. Os referenciais que embasam esta discussão estão pautados na teoria histórico-cultural de Vygotsky e na teoria da linguagem de Bakhtin, focalizando 3 categorias conceituais específicas: mediação semiótica, zona de desenvolvimento proximal e dialogia. O foco central da discussão volta-se para a temática da linguagem e dos processos de desenvolvimento cognitivo e subjetividade. A linguagem é abordada como inter-ação, dentro do enfoque da teoria da enunciação, e o desenvolvimento cognitivo e a construção da subjetividade compreendidos como resultantes dos intercâmbios da criança no seu contexto histórico-cultural, ou seja, linguagem, desenvolvimento e subjetivação como construções sociais.This paper discusses children's interactional processes in terms of their mediation in the production of knowledge and subjectivity. Discoursive activity is conceived as a semiotically mediated process which integrates action and language, constituting a space of construction of shared knowledge. This discussion is based on Vygotsky sociohistorical theory and Bakhtin's theory of language, particularly on three specific concepts: semiotic mediation, zone of proximal development and dialogism. The argument focuses on themes of language and the processes of cognitive development and subjectivity. Language is understood on terms of the nature of interaction as presented in the theory of enunciation. Cognitive development and subjectivity production are viewed as a result of children's interchanges within their historical and cultural environment, that is

  5. Work ethics and general work attitudes in adolescents are related to quality of life, sense of coherence and subjective health – a Swedish questionnaire study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkansson Anders

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Working life is an important arena in most people's lives, and the working line concept is important for the development of welfare in a society. For young people, the period before permanent establishment in working life has become longer during the last two decades. Knowledge about attitudes towards work can help us to understand young people's transition to the labour market. Adolescents are the future workforce, so it seems especially important to notice their attitudes towards work, including attitudes towards the welfare system. The aim of this study was to describe and analyse upper secondary school students' work attitudes, and to explore factors related to these attitudes. Methods The sample consisted of 606 upper secondary school students. They all received a questionnaire including questions about quality of life (QOL, sense of coherence (SOC, subjective health and attitudes towards work. The response rate was 91%. A factor analysis established two dimensions of work attitudes. Multivariate analyses were carried out by means of logistic regression models. Results Work ethics (WE and general work attitudes (GWA were found to be two separate dimensions of attitudes towards work. Concerning WE the picture was similar regardless of gender or study programme. Males in theoretical programmes appeared to have more unfavourable GWA than others. Multivariate analyses revealed that good QOL, high SOC and good health were significantly related to positive WE, and high SOC was positively related to GWA. Being female was positively connected to WE and GWA, while studying on a practical programme was positively related to GWA only. Among those who received good parental support, GWA seemed more favourable. Conclusion Assuming that attitudes towards work are important to the working line concept, this study points out positive factors of importance for the future welfare of the society. Individual factors such as female gender

  6. Knowledge Quartet’s Unit of Contingency in the Light of Mathematics Content Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semiha Kula

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to introduce the Contingency unit of Knowledge Quartet, which is a framework used in assessing mathematics student teachers’ subject matter knowledge and pedagogical knowledge, address its significance and demonstrate examples from its reflections on classroom setting. The study initially covers the type of knowledge that teachers should possess and Knowledge Quartet, which enables examining and assessing subject matter knowledge and pedagogical knowledge together. Next, general information was given regarding knowledge units of this model and it was explained including contingency components. Finally, the importance of Contingency was mentioned and some examples in classroom setting were discussed. It is thought that through this study, awareness of mathematics student teachers can be made ensured with regards to situations that teachers may encounter and that are almost impossible to plan in advance.Key Words:    Contingency, knowledge quartet, mathematics student teacher, subject matter knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge

  7. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of the general public toward sun exposure and protection: A national survey in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlGhamdi, Khalid M; AlAklabi, Aeed S; AlQahtani, Abdulla Z

    2016-11-01

    Background: Many international studies have been conducted to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) of the public toward sun exposure and sun-protection measures. However, there are scarce data on these factors from the Middle East. Objectives: This study aimed to explore the KAP of the public toward sun exposure and sun-protection measures among Saudis. Methods: A cross-sectional survey using a specially designed questionnaire was conducted on a stratified random sample of the general population in the five geographical regions of Saudi Arabia (central, eastern, northern, southern, and western). Data were collected between October 2010 and March 2011. Multiple logistic regressions were applied to relate the use of sunscreen and skin cancer awareness with various socio-demographic variables. Results: The questionnaire was distributed to 2900 Saudis. A total of 2622 questionnaires were completed, returned, and included in the data analysis, corresponding to a response rate of 90.4%. The mean (SD) age of respondents was 27.8 ± 9.7 years. Fifty percent (1301/1601) of the respondents were males. Fifty-five percent (1406/2544) were aware of the association between sun exposure and skin cancer. Female, young and student respondents were more likely to be aware of the connection between sun exposure and skin cancer (p < 0.001). Likewise, respondents from the middle social class and those with higher education levels were more likely to be informed (p < 0.02). The prevalence of regular sunscreen use among study participants was only 23.7%, and female and employed respondents were more likely to use sunscreen (p < 0.001). Protective clothes were the most commonly used sun protection measure as reported by more than 90% of our participants. Conclusion: This study has shown that sun awareness and protection are generally inadequate in the Saudi population and suggests the need for health education programs.

  8. Train, teach; taught? How the content of specific science subject matter knowledge sessions impacts on trainee teachers’ classroom practice and children’s learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Kind

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The impact science sessions for trainee science teachers have on 11-14 year olds’ learning of science was assessed using questionnaires and a “Video-Interview (trainee –Interview (pupils” (V-I-I technique devised for this study. V-I-I involved: video-recording trainee-taught lessons; and two interviews – with a pupil group to probe learning occurring in the lesson and with the trainee.Eighty UK-based trainees taking a one-year postgraduate teacher education course completed the questionnaire probing perceptions about university- and school-based training sessions designed to develop science subject matter knowledge (SMK and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK. Six trainees participated in V-I-I.Most trainees saw all sessions as SMK-based, regardless of teacher educators’ intended purposes. Lesson videos revealed ”describing” activities, task completion and good behaviour as main focii. Explanation of key science ideas and use of materials and /ideas from training sessions were largely absent. Trainee interviews revealed contrasts: most perceived a lesson as “successful” when children completed tasks quietly. Other trainees realised their understanding impacted on pupils’ learning science concepts. Pupil interviews showed positive attitudes towards science and learning difficult ideas, but little specific learning of topics taught.

  9. Elementary General Education Teachers' Knowledge of and Experience Teaching Students with Disabilities in Science and Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Diane

    In Grades 3 to 5 at a suburban southeastern elementary school, the percentage of students with disabilities (SWDs) who do not meet state standards in science and social studies is greater than that of their nondisabled peers. To address this disparity, district administrators required that proficiency ratings increase for SWDs without providing general education (GE) teachers with training. A qualitative bounded case study was used to understand how GE teachers constructed their knowledge of and met SWDs instructional needs and to understand GE teachers' needs as they worked toward meeting the district goals. Piaget's constructivist learning theory served as the conceptual framework for this study. A purposeful sample of 6 GE teachers, 2 each from Grades 3-5 whose classrooms included SWDs, volunteered to participate in open-ended interviews. Qualitative data were analyzed using provisional coding and pattern coding. A primary finding was that the participants identified teacher collaboration and professional development necessary to accommodate SWDs in the GE setting. This finding led to a recommendation that school leaders provide ongoing professional development for GE teachers as well as ongoing opportunities for collaboration between GE and special education teachers. These endeavors may contribute to positive social change by providing GE teachers instructional strategies and accommodations for meeting the learning needs of SWDs to increase the number and percentage of SWDs who meet the state standards and district goals in science and social studies.

  10. The SCRIPT project: a knowledge translation approach to improve prescription practice in a general intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamani, Arvind; Suen, Stella; Phillips, Danielle; Thomson, Michele

    2011-12-01

    Medication errors can be dangerous and are an intensive care unit quality indicator. Few studies have assessed interventions aimed at improving prescription practice. Anecdotal reports in our ICU indicated a high incidence of prescription errors, including illegible handwriting, and lack of prescriber identity and antibiotic indications. Knowledge translation (KT) is an emerging tool that uses collaborative stakeholder participation and focuses on education and inclusiveness rather than punitive audits. To evaluate interventions aimed at improving prescription practice. A KT quality assurance project with three phases: (1) measuring baseline performance; (2) education; and (3) measuring post-education performance. Doctors and nurses working in the 19-bed general ICU of a tertiary referral hospital. Education protocols were developed by senior doctors, nurses and the pharmacist. "Walking the process" with all doctors and nurses identified local barriers and issues. Ten weeks were allocated for the baseline and post-education audits, and 8 weeks for education. The project was then delayed for a few months to prevent the Hawthorne effect. Incidence of prescription errors in the post-education phase. There was a highly significant improvement in many error rates - illegible prescriptions reduced from 39.4% to 13.4% (P prescription errors.

  11. Improving cardiovascular prevention in general practice: Results of a comprehensive personalized strategy in subjects at high risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanzini, Fausto; Marzona, Irene; Baviera, Marta; Barlera, Simona; Milani, Valentina; Caimi, Vittorio; Longoni, Paolo; Tombesi, Massimo; Silletta, Maria G; Tognoni, Gianni; Roncaglioni, Maria Carla

    2016-06-01

    Although high cardiovascular risk patients should be the main target of preventive strategies, modifiable risk factors are often inadequately controlled. To assess feasibility and results of a comprehensive personalized method for cardiovascular prevention in high risk patients followed by their general practitioner. Between 2004 and 2007, 12,513 patients (mean age 64.0 ± 9.5 years; 61.5% males) with multiple cardiovascular risk factors or history of atherosclerotic disease were identified and followed for five years. If control of major modifiable cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, diabetes, obesity, smoking, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity) was sub-optimal, at baseline and yearly thereafter general practitioners planned with patients, with the help of a brief checklist, preventive interventions to improve the global risk profile. Main outcome was the control of the seven major modifiable cardiovascular risk factors during follow-up. Secondary outcome was the incidence of cardiovascular deaths and hospitalization for cardiovascular reasons according to the improvement in global cardiovascular risk profile during the first year. Control of all major modifiable risk factors except physical inactivity improved gradually and significantly (p practice. The improvement in the global cardiovascular risk profile was associated with a better prognosis. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  12. Knowledge and Awareness among Parents and General Dental Practitioners regarding Rehabilitation with Full Coverage Restoration in Children: A Multi-centric Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moda, Aman; Saroj, Gyanendra; Sharma, Swati; Gupta, Basant

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and awareness among parents and general dental practitioners regarding rehabilitation with full coverage restoration in children following pulp therapy. A multiple choice questionnaire was given to 1,000 parents and 400 general practitioners in this multicentric trial. The questionnaire assessed their beliefs, knowledge regarding care of primary teeth, assessment of treating children, and knowledge regarding importance of primary teeth. All the questionnaires were then compiled and statistically analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software. 53% parents did not know the importance of primary teeth and 73% parents also thought that no treatment is possible for pulpally involved primary teeth. 20% parents believed that root canal treatment can be possible for children and only 10% knew about full coverage restorations. 40% of the general dentists felt that the best treatment in the case of primary necrotic teeth is extraction and only 13% knew about stainless steel crowns. 62% of general dental practitioners pointed out patients' noninterest in providing crowns whereas 68% parents reported non-information by dentists. Both parents and general dental practitioners have incomplete and inadequate knowledge regarding full coverage restorations, and we need to improve the knowledge and dental awareness of the parents and the general dental practitioners. How to cite this article: Moda A, Saroj G, Sharma S, Gupta B. Knowledge and Awareness among Parents and General Dental Practitioners regarding Rehabilitation with Full Coverage Restoration in Children: A Multi-centric Trial. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):177-180.

  13. Knowledge and Awareness among Parents and General Dental Practitioners regarding Rehabilitation with Full Coverage Restoration in Children: A Multi-centric Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroj, Gyanendra; Sharma, Swati; Gupta, Basant

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and awareness among parents and general dental practitioners regarding rehabilitation with full coverage restoration in children following pulp therapy. Materials and methods: A multiple choice questionnaire was given to 1,000 parents and 400 general practitioners in this multicentric trial. The questionnaire assessed their beliefs, knowledge regarding care of primary teeth, assessment of treating children, and knowledge regarding importance of primary teeth. All the questionnaires were then compiled and statistically analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software. Results and discussion: 53% parents did not know the importance of primary teeth and 73% parents also thought that no treatment is possible for pulpally involved primary teeth. 20% parents believed that root canal treatment can be possible for children and only 10% knew about full coverage restorations. 40% of the general dentists felt that the best treatment in the case of primary necrotic teeth is extraction and only 13% knew about stainless steel crowns. 62% of general dental practitioners pointed out patients’ noninterest in providing crowns whereas 68% parents reported non-information by dentists. Conclusion: Both parents and general dental practitioners have incomplete and inadequate knowledge regarding full coverage restorations, and we need to improve the knowledge and dental awareness of the parents and the general dental practitioners. How to cite this article: Moda A, Saroj G, Sharma S, Gupta B. Knowledge and Awareness among Parents and General Dental Practitioners regarding Rehabilitation with Full Coverage Restoration in Children: A Multi-centric Trial. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):177-180. PMID:27365944

  14. Sex differences in general knowledge: meta-analysis and new data on the contribution of school-related moderators among high-school students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich S Tran

    Full Text Available Research from various countries consistently reported an advantage of boys over girls in general knowledge and was also suggestive of some overall trends regarding specific domains of general knowledge that were speculated to stem from biologically differentiated interests. However, results were heterogeneous and, as of yet, had not been evaluated meta-analytically. Moreover, previous research drew on overly homogeneous high-school or undergraduate samples whose representativeness appears problematic; mostly, likely moderators, such as school type, student age or parental education, were also not directly investigated or controlled for. We provide a meta-analytical aggregation of available results regarding sex differences in general knowledge and present new data, investigating the psychometric properties of the General Knowledge Test (GKT, on which previous research primarily relied, and explored sex differences in a large and heterogeneous Austrian high-school student sample (N = 1088. The aggregated sex effect in general knowledge was of medium size in previous research, but differences in specific domains were heterogeneous across countries and only modest at best. Large sex differences in our data could be explained to a large part by school-related moderators (school type, school, student age, parental education and selection processes. Boys had a remaining advantage over girls that was only small in size and that was consistent with the magnitude of sex differences in general intelligence. Analysis of the GKT yielded no evidence of biologically differentiated interests, but of a specific interest in the humanities among girls. In conclusion, previous research likely overestimated sex differences in general knowledge.

  15. General Immune Status and Oral Microbiology in Patients with Different Forms of Periodontitis and Healthy Control Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jana; Jentsch, Holger; Stingu, Catalina-Suzana; Sack, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Objective Immunological processes in the etiopathogenesis of periodontitis, especially the aggressive form, are not well understood. This study examined clinical as well as systemic immunological and local microbiological features in healthy controls and patients with different forms of periodontitis. Materials and Methods 14 healthy subjects, 15 patients diagnosed with aggressive periodontitis, and 11 patients with chronic periodontitis were recruited. Periodontal examination was performed and peripheral blood was collected from each patient. Lymphocyte populations as well as the release of cytokines by T-helper cells were determined by flow cytometry and enzyme linked immunosorbent spot assay. Subgingival plaque samples were taken from each individual and immediately cultivated for microbiological examination. Results When stimulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with lipopolysaccharide, a higher IL-1β release was found in patients with moderate chronic periodontitis compared to the other groups (pperiodontitis showed the highest percentage of memory B-cells without class switch (p = 0.01). The subgingival plaque differed quantitatively as well as qualitatively with a higher number of Gram-negative anaerobic species in periodontitis patients. Prevotella denticola was found more often in patients with aggressive periodontitis (pperiodontitis, seems to be associated with an activation of the systemic immune response. Conclusion Differences between aggressive periodontitis and moderate chronic periodontitis are evident, which raises the question of an inadequate balance between systemic immune response and bacterial infection in aggressive periodontitis. PMID:25299619

  16. General Perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-09-25

    Sep 25, 2013 ... general pedagogical knowledge (e.g. classroom control, using group work), pedagogical content knowledge, curriculum knowledge, knowledge of learners and their characteristics, knowledge of educational contexts (e.g. schools and the wider community), and knowledge of educational ends purposes ...

  17. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice Survey among Nurses in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital toward Tuberculosis-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Collaboration Program

    OpenAIRE

    Helen Oktavia Sutiono; Arto Yuwono Soeroto; Bony Wiem Lestari

    2016-01-01

    Background: One of the barriers on implementation of Tuberculosis-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (TB-HIV) collaboration is lack of health care workers’ knowledge to this program. This study aimed to measure level of knowledge, attitude, and practice among inpatient nurses in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital toward TB-HIV collaboration program and to measure their correlation. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study with total sampling method which started on May–October 2013 at Internal...

  18. Among Paulas, Martas, Pedros, Anas... in order to understand the complex subjects/knowledge relations in the context of historical learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Eloisa Caimi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We comprehend the learning room as a space where teachers and students knowledge cross it other, permeated by the idiosyncrasies from the society that surrounds the school. This study aims know the pedagogical practice of two teachers in the history teaching for the formers years of the fundamental school, to comprehend as the work that they develop interfere in the student’s historical knowledge construction. The study of case method of survey had the contribution of the teachers of two municipal schools from Londrina. The data, collected through the observation inside the learning room and semi structured interviews with the teachers, were analyzed from the theoretical assumptions announced by Isabel Barca, Hilary Cooper and Keity Barton. We concluded that there are similarities and differences on the teacher’s practice and the students behavior in both classrooms. From a general view, the work with the history is based, nearly exclusively, in the didactical book reading and in the demand to the students retain the information from it. There’s a silence in front of the questions raised by the students about the content and the mechanisms that permit the students to comprehend that the past can have many interpretations are inexistent.

  19. Knowledge of HIV/AIDS and attitudes towards people living with HIV among the general staff of a public university in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Yvonne; Huang, Mary

    2009-12-01

    Stigma and discrimination towards people living with HIV have been widely documented, and have extended their impact into the workplace. Stigmatising attitudes towards people living with HIV (PLHIV) in the workplace significantly hinder HIV prevention efforts and indirectly affect national development. This cross-sectional study was designed to determine the level of knowledge about HIV and AIDS and assess attitudes towards PLHIV among the general staff of Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), as well as to identify factors that are associated with it. Self-administered questionnaires were posted to a total of 344 general staff from six randomly selected faculties, and they were a given a week to return the questionnaires. The response rate was 38%. Data were analysed using Pearson's correlation, independent t-test and multiple linear regression. The respondents showed a considerably high level of knowledge about HIV/AIDS (mean knowledge score of 15.57+/-1.93 out of 18 points) although there were some misconceptions (N=129). Likert scale responses to 20 attitude statements revealed that respondents generally had moderately positive attitudes toward PLHIV (average score of 69.65+/-10.08 out of 100 points). Attitudes were inconsistent when it involved direct contact and interaction with PLHIV. Factors significantly associated with level of knowledge and attitudes included age, education and income. There was no difference in mean score for knowledge and attitudes by gender. Further efforts are necessary to improve attitudes of the general staff towards PLHIV, particularly in areas of direct contact with PLHIV.

  20. Change in women's knowledge of general and personal preconception health risks following targeted brief counseling in publicly funded primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Anne L; Logue, Kristi M; Thorne, Castalia; Badal, Hannah J

    2013-01-01

    To explore knowledge of general and personal preconception health risks among women in publicly funded clinics and whether brief counseling can improve knowledge. Interventional cohort study. Five publicly funded primary care clinics. Two cohorts of low-income, nonpregnant African-American and Hispanic women of reproductive age (300 in each cohort). Targeted brief counseling based upon risks identified via preconception health risk assessment. Correct responses on test of women's knowledge of general and personal preconception health risks pre-encounter vs. 3 to 6 months post-encounter. McNemar's test to compare proportion of women in each cohort who correctly answer questions of preconception health knowledge pre-encounter vs. 3 to 6 months post-encounter. Women in the intervention cohort experienced a significant increase in knowledge related to preconception health from baseline to 3 to 6 months post-encounter, including recognition of the importance of folic acid supplementation, seeking medical care for chronic conditions, and review of medication in the preconception period that was not observed for the comparison cohort. Among women with chronic medical conditions, those in the intervention cohort significantly increased their knowledge that the condition could lead to problems in pregnancy (+43%) relative to the lesser improvement in knowledge observed for those in the comparison cohort (+4%) (p preconception health risks improved following screening and brief counseling in publicly funded primary care clinics.

  1. Value of General Medical Knowledge Examinations in Performance Assessment of Practicing Physicians With Potential Competence and Performance Deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenghofer, Elizabeth F; Henzel, Thomas R; Miller, Stephen H; Norcross, William; Boal, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Problems with a physician's performance may arise at any point during their career. As such, there is a need for effective, valid tools and processes to accurately assess and identify deficiencies in competence or performance. Although scores on multiple-choice questions have been shown to be predictive of some aspects of physician performance in practicing physicians, their relationship to overall clinical competence is somewhat uncertain particularly after the first 10 years of practice. As such, the purpose of this study was to examine how a general medical knowledge multiple-choice question examination is associated with a comprehensive assessment of competence and performance in experienced practicing physicians with potential competence and performance deficiencies. The study included 233 physicians, of varying specialties, assessed by the University of California, San Diego Physician Assessment and Clinical Education Program (PACE), between 2008 and 2012, who completed the Post-Licensure Assessment System Mechanisms of Disease (MoD) examination. Logistic regression determined if the examination score significantly predicted passing assessment outcome after correcting for gender, international medical graduate status, certification status, and age. Most physicians (89.7%) received an overall passing assessment outcome on the PACE assessment. The mean MoD score was 66.9% correct, with a median of 68.0%. Logistic regression (P = .038) was significant in indicating that physicians with higher MoD examination scores had an increased likelihood of achieving a passing assessment outcome (odds ratio = 1.057). Physician MoD scores are significant predictors of overall physician competence and performance as evaluated by PACE assessment.

  2. Relationship between sport knowledge, sport performance and academic ability: empirical evidence from GCSE Physical Education. General Certificate of Secondary Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, T

    1999-04-01

    The literature concerning links between sport knowledge, sport performance and academic ability is reviewed and related to empirical evidence obtained from a GCSE examination in Physical Education, together with GCSE Mathematics and GCSE English grades. For most sports examined, there was a small but significant positive correlation between sport performance and GCSE Mathematics and English grades, confirming the findings of most previous research. Using a multilevel multivariate model, average sport performance, academic ability and sex were important explanatory variables for sport knowledge, yet only academic ability was an important explanatory variable for the concept of physical education knowledge. Ability in game sports, rather than athletics, were related to sport knowledge. Males scored higher for sport knowledge than females, after taking into account sport performance and academic ability. The effects of sport performance and academic ability on sport knowledge were stable across schools, but there was some evidence that the effect of sex varied across schools. These findings support theories of a role for sport knowledge in sport performance; that such a role should be greater in game sports; that academic ability is important for gaining such knowledge; and they highlight differences in sport knowledge between the sexes.

  3. Lithuanian general practitioners' knowledge of confidentiality laws in adolescent sexual and reproductive healthcare: a cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeff; Jaruseviciene, Lina; Liljestrand, Jerker

    2008-01-01

    In Lithuania, the legislation addressing confidentiality in adolescent healthcare is contradictory and vague. Previous studies have also revealed that medico-legal knowledge among physicians is poor, and attitudes play a correspondingly greater role than legal knowledge in ensuring the confidenti...

  4. Improving the Mathematical Content Knowledge of General and Special Educators: Evaluating a Professional Development Module that Focuses on Number Sense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Valerie N.; Cain, Chris R.

    2013-01-01

    Student performance in mathematics has been linked to the mathematical knowledge of the teacher. Based on this finding, a 5-day professional development module was created to improve teachers' mathematical knowledge and their understanding of number sense. We found no difference prior to the professional development in mathematical content…

  5. The Influence of Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) for Teaching Macroevolution on Student Outcomes in a General Education Biology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Emily Marie

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) for teaching macroevolution on non-science majors' knowledge of macroevolution and evolution acceptance. The nature and sources of an experienced faculty member's PCK and instruction as enacted PCK (Park & Oliver, 2008) were examined to consider the influence of these…

  6. Treatment options for subjective tinnitus: Self reports from a sample of general practitioners and ENT physicians within Europe and the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Tinnitus affects about 10-15% of the general population and risks for developing tinnitus are rising through increased exposure to leisure noise through listening to personal music players at high volume. The disorder has a considerable heterogeneity and so no single mechanism is likely to explain the presence of tinnitus in all those affected. As such there is no standardized management pathway nor singly effective treatment for the condition. Choice of clinical intervention is a multi-factorial decision based on many factors, including assessment of patient needs and the healthcare context. The present research surveyed clinicians working in six Westernized countries with the aims: a) to establish the range of referral pathways, b) to evaluate the typical treatment options for categories of subjective tinnitus defined as acute or chronic, and c) to seek clinical opinion about levels of satisfaction with current standards of practice. Methods A structured online questionnaire was conducted with 712 physicians who reported seeing at least one tinnitus patients in the previous three months. They were 370 general practitioners (GPs) and 365 ear-nose-throat specialists (ENTs) from the US, Germany, UK, France, Italy and Spain. Results Our international comparison of health systems for tinnitus revealed that although the characteristics of tinnitus appeared broadly similar across countries, the patient's experience of clinical services differed widely. GPs and ENTs were always involved in referral and management to some degree, but multi-disciplinary teams engaged either neurology (Germany, Italy and Spain) or audiology (UK and US) professionals. For acute subjective tinnitus, pharmacological prescriptions were common, while audiological and psychological approaches were more typical for chronic subjective tinnitus; with several specific treatment options being highly country specific. All therapy options were associated with low levels of satisfaction

  7. Knowledge and curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šaranović-Božanović Nadežda

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper raises the questions as follows: What is knowledge in general? What is it that a student should know? What does it mean that somebody knows something? Those questions point to a volume of dilemmas related to the epistemological issue of the nature of knowledge. Regardless of some authors' views that knowledge has not been defined yet, in the present paper knowledge is a subject matter of analysis from the aspect of various theoretical conceptions. The fact is that curricula development as well as the conception of student cognitive development depends on how knowledge is defined. Also, a question is raised on how beliefs about human thinking affect curricula development and accomplishment. It is all the more important if the basic function of education is considered to be knowledge acquisition and development of intellectual abilities. Regarding different approaches to curriculum development, the paper points to some epistemological postulates that affected educational practice. It is true that a model of talking and numerical approach dominate educational practice. It would be quite appropriate to modify curricula in accordance with contemporary theoretical-empirical research results. There is a general agreement that the process of knowledge acquisition in teaching should become the subject of special analysis in order that its regularities can be understood.

  8. The Conception of the General Content of the Composition, Structure and Working of the Informative Components of the Economic Knowledge Base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor St. LEAHU

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting of the content aspect, on the systematic-informational positions, the general conceptional variant of the composition, structure and transformative relations of elements of the informative compartment of knowledge base (K.Bs. of automatized banks of economic intelligent data (A.Bn.E.Ig.D. arent to clear

  9. Knowledge, attitudes and practices on HIV/AIDS and prevalence of HIV in the general population of Sucre, Bolivia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Terán Calderón

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: Prevalence of HIV infection is very low and unsafe sex is relatively uncommon. Inadequate knowledge on HIV/AIDS and discriminatory attitudes towards PLWHA are extremely high and are associated to gender, ethnic and economic inequalities.

  10. Body English: The Dilemma of the Physical in the Objectification of Subjective Knowledge Structures: The Role of the Body in Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, S. D.

    1990-01-01

    Presents evidence to show that the body plays a continuing and fundamental part in the process of thinking and the development of the knowledge used to think. Topics discussed include knowledge structures and representations; artificial intelligence; feeling; learning processes; models of knowledge; information retrieval; and implications for…

  11. The Role of Teachers' Pedagogical and Subject-Matter Knowledge in Planning and Enacting Science-Inquiry Instruction, and in Assessing Students' Science-Inquiry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birlean, Camelia

    This study explored the relation between pedagogical knowledge and subject-matter knowledge, in the context of inquiry-driven science instruction, and their relation to instructors' performance in the instructional process. This multiple case study focused on three distinct categories of teachers--Novice in Inquiry and in Science, Novice in Inquiry and Expert in Science, and Expert in Inquiry and in Science--and examined the commonalities and differences among them by exploring the cognitive processes these teachers used when planning and enacting an inquiry instructional situation, as well as when assessing students' learning resulting from this specific instructional event. Inquiry instruction varied across cases from largely structured to largely open. The Novice-Novice's science instruction, predominantly traditional in the approach, differed greatly from that of the Expert-Expert and of the Novice-Expert. The latter two emphasized--to various extents structured, guided, and open--inquiry strategy as part of their ongoing instruction. The open inquiry was an approach embraced solely by the Expert-Expert teacher throughout the Advanced Science Research instruction, emphasizing the creative aspect of problem generation. Edward teacher also distinguished himself from the other two participants in his view of planning and terminology used to describe it, both of which emphasized the dynamic and flexible feature of this instructional process. The Expert-Expert identified occasional planning, planning of specific skills and content critical to students' learning process during their independent inquiry. The observed teaching performance of the three participants partly reflected their planning; the alignment was least frequent for the Novice-Novice. The assessment of inquiry-based projects varied greatly across participants. Each teacher participant evaluated a set of three inquiry-based science projects that differed in their quality, and this variation increased

  12. Comparison of CCL28, interleukin-8, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in subjects with gingivitis, chronic periodontitis and generalized aggressive periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertugrul, A S; Sahin, H; Dikilitas, A; Alpaslan, N; Bozoglan, A

    2013-02-01

    Cytokines produced by various cells are strong local mediators of inflammation. Mucosa-associated epithelial chemokine (CCL28), interleukin-8 (IL-8), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) are major cytokines that play important roles in the periodontal inflammatory process. In this study we aimed to compare the levels of CCL28, IL-8, IL-1β and TNF-α in the gingival crevicular fluid of both periodontally healthy subjects and in subjects diagnosed with gingivitis, chronic periodontitis and generalized aggressive periodontitis. A total of 84 subjects participated in the study: 21 subjects had gingivitis, 21 subjects had chronic periodontitis, 21 subjects had generalized aggressive periodontitis and 21 were periodontally healthy. The levels of CCL28, IL-8, IL-1β and TNF-α were analyzed using enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA). The total levels of CCL28 and IL-8 in the gingival crevicular fluid of the generalized aggressive periodontitis group (324.74 ± 42.62 pg/30 s, 487.62 ± 49.21 pg/30 s) were significantly higher than those of the chronic periodontitis group (268.81 ± 28.64 pg/30 s, 423.65 ± 35.24 pg/30 s), the gingivitis group (146.35 ± 17.46 pg/30 s, 310.24 ± 48.20 pg/30 s) and the periodontally healthy group (92.46 ± 22.04 pg/30 s, 148.41 ± 24.64 pg/30 s). Similarly, the total levels of IL-1β and TNF-α in the generalized aggressive periodontitis group (110.23 ± 9.20 pg/30 s, 1284.46 ± 86.32 pg/30 s) were significantly higher than those in the chronic periodontitis group (423.65 ± 35.24 pg/30 s, 82.64 ± 9.12 pg/30 s), the gingivitis group (52.10 ± 7.15 pg/30 s, 824.24 ± 44.68 pg/30 s) and the periodontally healthy group (36.44 ± 8.86 pg/30 s, 628.26 ± 34.61 pg/30 s). CCL28, IL-8, IL-1β and TNF-α may play key roles in the host response to inflammation in periodontal diseases. As the severity of periodontal diseases increases, destruction of periodontal tissues also increases. Inflammation is one among

  13. Health related quality of life in rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, end stage renal disease and geriatric subjects. Experience from a General Hospital in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambriz Murillo, Yesenia; Menor Almagro, Raul; Campos-González, Israel David; Cardiel, Mario H

    2015-01-01

    Chronic diseases have a great impact in the morbidity and mortality and in the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients around the world. The impact of rheumatic diseases has not been fully recognized. We conducted a comparative study to evaluate the HRQoL in different chronic diseases. The aim of the present study was to assess the HRQoL and identify specific areas affected in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA), diabetes mellitus, end-stage renal disease, geriatric subjects and a control group. We conducted a cross-sectional study, in a General Hospital in Morelia, Mexico. All patients met classification criteria for RA, OA, diabetes mellitus, end-stage renal disease; the geriatric subjects group was≥65 years, and the control group≥30 years. Demographic characteristics were recorded, different instruments were applied: SF-36, visual analogue scale for pain, patient's and physician's global assessments, Beck Depression Inventory and specific instruments (DAS-28, HAQ-Di, WOMAC, Diabetes Quality of Life [DQOL] and Kidney Disease Questionnaire of Life [KDQOL]). Biochemical measures: erythrocyte sedimentation rate, blood count, glucose, HbA1C, serum creatinine and urea. We evaluated 290 subjects (control group: 100; geriatric subjects: 30 and 160 for the rest of groups). Differences were detected in baseline characteristics (P<.0001). The SF-36 scores were different between control group and others groups (P=0.007). The worst HRQoL was in end-stage renal disease group (±SD: 48.06±18.84 x/SD). The general health was the principal affected area in RA. The pain was higher in rheumatic diseases: OA (5.2±2.4) and RA (5.1±3). HAQ was higher in OA compared to RA (1.12±0.76 vs 0.82±0.82, respectively; P=.001). Forty five percent of all subjects had depression. The HRQoL in RA patients is poor and comparable to other chronic diseases (end-stage renal disease and diabetes mellitus). Rheumatic diseases should be considered high impact

  14. Memory and comprehension for health information among older adults: distinguishing the effects of domain-general and domain-specific knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jessie; Payne, Brennan; Gao, Xuefei; Conner-Garcia, Thembi; Graumlich, James F; Murray, Michael D; Morrow, Daniel G; Stine-Morrow, Elizabeth A L

    2015-01-01

    While there is evidence that knowledge influences understanding of health information, less is known about the processing mechanisms underlying this effect and its impact on memory. We used the moving window paradigm to examine how older adults varying in domain-general crystallised ability (verbal ability) and health knowledge allocate attention to understand health and domain-general texts. Participants (n = 107, age: 60-88 years) read and recalled single sentences about hypertension and about non-health topics. Mixed-effects modelling of word-by-word reading times suggested that domain-general crystallised ability increased conceptual integration regardless of text domain, while health knowledge selectively increased resource allocation to conceptual integration at clause boundaries in health texts. These patterns of attentional allocation were related to subsequent recall performance. Although older adults with lower levels of crystallised ability were less likely to engage in integrative processing, when they did, this strategy had a compensatory effect in improving recall. These findings suggest that semantic integration during reading is an important comprehension process that supports the construction of the memory representation and is engendered by knowledge. Implications of the findings for theories of text processing and memory as well as for designing patient education materials are discussed.

  15. Sofrimento escolar como impedimento da construção de conhecimento/subjetividade School suffering as an obstacle to knowledge/subjectivity building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nize Maria Campos Pellanda

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A partir de reflexões sobre as conseqüências da modernidade em termos de uma profunda fragmentação das dimensões da realidade como gênese de sofrimento dos alunos através de práticas pedagógicas contrárias às necessidades dos seres humanos, elaboramos a questão central de pesquisa: As práticas formalistas e fragmentadoras das dimensões do fazer, do ser e do conhecer podem redundar em dor e sofrimento comprometendo o desenvolvimento integral dos alunos? Descrevemos os pressupostos teóricos oriundos do paradigma da complexidade e como eles sustentam o arcabouço lógico-teórico da investigação. Os referenciais teóricos mais importantes foram buscados na Teoria da Biologia da Cognição, desenvolvida por H. Maturana e F. Varela, cujo eixo central é a questão da inseparabilidade entre construção do conhecimento e construção de sujeito.Reflections on the consequences of modernity, seen as a deep fragmentation of reality dimensions that makes students suffer because of pedagogical practices contrary to human needs, led us to main question of this research: can the formalist and fragmentizing practices of the dimensions of making, being and knowing cause pain and suffering that jeopardize the full development of students? We describe the theoretical assumptions derived from the complexity paradigm and how they support the logical-theoretical structure of investigation. The most import theoretical frameworks were drawn from the theory of the Biology of Cognition developed by H. Maturana and F. Verela, whose main thrust is the issue of the inseparability knowledge building and subject building.

  16. Análisis del programa de la asignatura "Introducción a la medicina general integral" Analysis of the syllabus of "Introduction to comprehensive general medicine" subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix J. Sansó Soberats

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo constituye un profundo análisis del programa de la asignatura "Introducción a la medicina general integral" que se imparte en el primer año del pregrado en la carrera de medicina en Cuba. En él se presentan juicios críticos en relación con la fundamentación del programa, sus objetivos, la relación objetivo-contenido, el ordenamiento y distribución de los contenidos, los medios de enseñanza que se proponen, el sistema evaluativo y las orientaciones metodológicas que se ofrecen a los tutores y profesores. Se concluye que este es un programa que por los objetivos que se propone y por su estrategia docente responde al perfil de salida del médico general básico. No obstante, necesita ser perfeccionado y se requiere una actualización en sus contenidos, acordes con el desarrollo que ha alcanzado la medicina familiar en el país y con la experiencia acumulada con la impartición de esta asignaturaThe present paper goes deep into the syllabus of "Introduction to general comprehensive medicine" subject that is taught in the first year of the medical career. Critical judgements in connection with the foundation of the syllabus, its objectives, the objective-content relation, the arrangement and distribution of the contents, the proposed teaching tools, the evaluative system and the methodological guidance given to tutors and professors are presented here. It is concluded that according to its objectives and to its teaching strategy, this syllabus answers to the profile of the basic general physician. However, it requires an improvement and updating of its contents, according to the development achieved by family medicine in the country and to the experience accumulated on teaching this subject.

  17. Neuroanatomy Education: The Impact on Perceptions, Attitudes, and Knowledge of an Intensive Course on General Practice Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arantes, Mavilde; Barbosa, Joselina Maria; Ferreira, Maria Amélia

    2017-01-01

    General practitioners are responsible for the management of an increasing number of patients with neurological illness, and thus a solid education in neurosciences is a necessary component of their training. This study examines the effects of an intensive clinical neuroanatomy course on twenty general practice residents' perceptions, attitudes,…

  18. Characterizing Teaching Assistants' Knowledge and Beliefs Following Professional Development Activities within an Inquiry-Based General Chemistry Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Lindsay B.; Maeng, Jennifer L.; Whitworth, Brooke A.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to explore changes in undergraduate and graduate teaching assistants' (TAs') content knowledge and beliefs about teaching within the context of an inquiry-based laboratory course. TAs received professional development (PD), which was informed by the TA training literature base and was designed for TAs…

  19. Treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea patients in community dental care : knowledge and attitudes among general dental practitioners and specialist dentists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vuorjoki-Ranta, T.R.; Lobbezoo, F.; Vehkalahti, M.; Tuomilehto, H.; Ahlberg, J.

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is an increasing problem worldwide. Yet, a large number of patients may remain undiagnosed. Dentists could suspect OSA, but little is known about their knowledge and attitudes towards the topic. An email questionnaire was sent to dentists working in Helsinki Health

  20. Treatment options for subjective tinnitus: Self reports from a sample of general practitioners and ENT physicians within Europe and the USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall Deborah A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tinnitus affects about 10-15% of the general population and risks for developing tinnitus are rising through increased exposure to leisure noise through listening to personal music players at high volume. The disorder has a considerable heterogeneity and so no single mechanism is likely to explain the presence of tinnitus in all those affected. As such there is no standardized management pathway nor singly effective treatment for the condition. Choice of clinical intervention is a multi-factorial decision based on many factors, including assessment of patient needs and the healthcare context. The present research surveyed clinicians working in six Westernized countries with the aims: a to establish the range of referral pathways, b to evaluate the typical treatment options for categories of subjective tinnitus defined as acute or chronic, and c to seek clinical opinion about levels of satisfaction with current standards of practice. Methods A structured online questionnaire was conducted with 712 physicians who reported seeing at least one tinnitus patients in the previous three months. They were 370 general practitioners (GPs and 365 ear-nose-throat specialists (ENTs from the US, Germany, UK, France, Italy and Spain. Results Our international comparison of health systems for tinnitus revealed that although the characteristics of tinnitus appeared broadly similar across countries, the patient's experience of clinical services differed widely. GPs and ENTs were always involved in referral and management to some degree, but multi-disciplinary teams engaged either neurology (Germany, Italy and Spain or audiology (UK and US professionals. For acute subjective tinnitus, pharmacological prescriptions were common, while audiological and psychological approaches were more typical for chronic subjective tinnitus; with several specific treatment options being highly country specific. All therapy options were associated with low levels

  1. Conocimiento objetivo y subjetivo sobre el VIH/SIDA como predictor del uso de condón en adolescentes Objective and subjective knowledge on HIV/AIDS as predictors of condom use in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Villaseñor-Sierra

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Evaluar la asociación de conocimientos objetivo y subjetivo sobre VIH/SIDA con el uso del condón. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se analizó la base de datos de una encuesta aleatoria, anónima y autoaplicada en 1 410 adolescentes de cuatro estratos socioeconómicos de Guadalajara, Jalisco, México, entre 1995 y 1996. El conocimiento objetivo se evaluó mediante 24 preguntas sobre VIH/SIDA y el "subjetivo" con la pregunta: "¿qué tanto crees conocer sobre el SIDA?" Las variables predictoras del uso del condón se identificaron mediante regresión logística y cálculo de la razón de momios con IC 95%. RESULTADOS: El nivel de conocimiento objetivo fue regular y tuvo diferencias por estratos (pOBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between objective and subjective knowledge on HIV/AIDS and condom use. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Analysis of a database from an anonymous, self-applied, randomized survey conducted between 1995 and 1996. Study subjects were 1 410 adolescents of four socioeconomic strata from Guadalajara, Mexico. Objective knowledge was assessed with 24 questions regarding HIV/AIDS, and subjective knowledge with the question "how much do you think you know about HIV/AIDS?" The variables associated with condom use were identified using logistic regression analysis and by calculating odds ratios with a 95% confidence interval. RESULTS: The degree of objective knowledge was "average", differentiated by socioeconomic strata (p< 0.001, and was higher in adolescents from medium and high socioeconomic strata (p< 0.008. Regarding subjective knowledge, adolescents from the low, medium, and high socioeconomic strata claimed to know "a little", and the ones from the lowest stratum claimed to know "very little". Condom use was higher in males (35.4%, and in adolescents from high socioeconomic strata (p< 0.005, than in females (15.3% (p< 0.001. Although there was a correlation between objective and subjective knowledge (r = 0.37, p< 0.001, a higher

  2. Body Mass Index and Mortality in the General Population and in Subjects with Chronic Disease in Korea: A Nationwide Cohort Study (2002-2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Hoon Kim

    Full Text Available The association between body mass index (BMI and mortality is not conclusive, especially in East Asian populations. Furthermore, the association has been neither supported by recent data, nor assessed after controlling for weight changes.We evaluated the relationship between BMI and all-cause or cause-specific mortality, using prospective cohort data by the National Health Insurance Service in Korea, which consisted of more than one million subjects. A total of 153,484 Korean adults over 30 years of age without pre-existing cardiovascular disease or cancer at baseline were followed-up until 2010 (mean follow-up period = 7.91 ± 0.59 years. Study subjects repeatedly measured body weight 3.99 times, on average.During follow-up, 3,937 total deaths occurred; 557 deaths from cardiovascular disease, and 1,224 from cancer. In multiple-adjusted analyses, U-shaped associations were found between BMI and mortality from any cause, cardiovascular disease, and cancer after adjustment for age, sex, smoking status, alcohol consumption, physical activity, socioeconomic status, and weight change. Subjects with a BMI < 23 kg/m2 and ≥ 30 kg/m2 had higher risks of all-cause and cause-specific mortality compared with the reference group (BMI 23-24.9 kg/m2. The lowest risk of all-cause mortality was observed in subjects with a BMI of 25-26.4 kg/m2 (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.86; 95% CI 0.77 to 0.97. In subgroup analyses, including the elderly and those with chronic diseases (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease, subjects with a BMI of 25-29.9 kg/m2 (moderate obesity had a lower risk of mortality compared with the reference. However, this association has been attenuated in younger individuals, in those with higher socioeconomic status, and those without chronic diseases.Moderate obesity was associated more strongly with a lower risk of mortality than with normal, underweight, and overweight groups in the general population of South Korea

  3. Knowledge and attitudes towards evidence-based medicine of mentors in general practice can be influenced by using medical students as academic detailers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrdoljak, Davorka; Petric, Dragomir; Diminić Lisica, Ines; Kranjčević, Ksenija; Došen Janković, Sanja; Delija, Ita; Puljak, Livia

    2015-01-01

    Regular use of evidence-based medicine (EBM) among general practitioners (GP) is insufficient. To analyse whether knowledge and attitudes about EBM can be improved among mentors in general practice by involving sixth-year medical students as academic detailers. An interventional non-randomized before-and-after study included 98 GPs (49 in the intervention group of mentors and 49 controls) and 174 medical students attending family medicine clinical rotations. A telephone survey on knowledge and attitudes towards EBM was conducted among participating physicians before, and six months after the rotation. During the rotation, each mentor chose two cases from real life, and the students' task was to form an answerable clinical question, find the evidence-based answer and to write a brief report. The mentor reviewed the report and discussed it with the student. Students' EBM detailing intervention led to significant improvement in knowledge and attitudes about EBM in the intervention group of mentors in general practice compared to control GPs (relative increase in knowledge was 20 ± 46.9% vs 6 ± 12.1%, respectively; P = 0.042). Among participants with Ph.D. or specialization in family medicine, the observed effects of the intervention were similar as in the total sample, and statistically significant, but not in the group of participants with neither scientific degree nor specialization in family medicine. Knowledge and attitudes of GP mentors towards EBM can be improved by involving medical students as academic detailers. Further studies should explore the effectiveness of this method among GPs that are not mentors, and who do not have a specialization or research degree.

  4. Systematic review of the current status of programs and general knowledge of diagnosis and management of retinoblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A. Ramírez-Ortiz

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: There is an immediate need in Mexico to expand primary care providers’ knowledge of Rb and to expand and upgrade current Rb programs to meet the needs of the population adequately. Diagnosis and care of Rb patients in Mexico can also be improved by the establishment of a national Rb registry and a national early detection program, and by increased use of the national treatment protocol.

  5. An Inquiry on the Effect of Knowledge Management and Strategic Leadership on Dynamic Capability, Entrepreneurship Strategy and Organizational Performance in the General Public Hospitals.

    OpenAIRE

    Najmi Kamariah, M.S. Idrus, M. Asdar, Indrianty Sudirman

    2013-01-01

    Organizational dynamic capability and entrepreneurship strategy are two aspects that have contribution in affecting organizational performances particularly by means of knowledge management and strategic leadership. There is a need to identify this presumption, thus current research in this paper were employed in the General Public Hospitals in Makassar in the Provinces of South Sulawesi (Indonesia). Previous research has uncovered important factors of organizational performance such as knowl...

  6. EEG-Based Quantification of Cortical Current Density and Dynamic Causal Connectivity Generalized across Subjects Performing BCI-Monitored Cognitive Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristos Courellis

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantification of dynamic causal interactions among brain regions constitutes an important component of conducting research and developing applications in experimental and translational neuroscience. Furthermore, cortical networks with dynamic causal connectivity in brain-computer interface (BCI applications offer a more comprehensive view of brain states implicated in behavior than do individual brain regions. However, models of cortical network dynamics are difficult to generalize across subjects because current electroencephalography (EEG signal analysis techniques are limited in their ability to reliably localize sources across subjects. We propose an algorithmic and computational framework for identifying cortical networks across subjects in which dynamic causal connectivity is modeled among user-selected cortical regions of interest (ROIs. We demonstrate the strength of the proposed framework using a “reach/saccade to spatial target” cognitive task performed by 10 right-handed individuals. Modeling of causal cortical interactions was accomplished through measurement of cortical activity using (EEG, application of independent component clustering to identify cortical ROIs as network nodes, estimation of cortical current density using cortically constrained low resolution electromagnetic brain tomography (cLORETA, multivariate autoregressive (MVAR modeling of representative cortical activity signals from each ROI, and quantification of the dynamic causal interaction among the identified ROIs using the Short-time direct Directed Transfer function (SdDTF. The resulting cortical network and the computed causal dynamics among its nodes exhibited physiologically plausible behavior, consistent with past results reported in the literature. This physiological plausibility of the results strengthens the framework's applicability in reliably capturing complex brain functionality, which is required by applications, such as diagnostics and BCI.

  7. Development of the Complex General Linear Model in the Fourier Domain: Application to fMRI Multiple Input-Output Evoked Responses for Single Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel E. Rio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A linear time-invariant model based on statistical time series analysis in the Fourier domain for single subjects is further developed and applied to functional MRI (fMRI blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD multivariate data. This methodology was originally developed to analyze multiple stimulus input evoked response BOLD data. However, to analyze clinical data generated using a repeated measures experimental design, the model has been extended to handle multivariate time series data and demonstrated on control and alcoholic subjects taken from data previously analyzed in the temporal domain. Analysis of BOLD data is typically carried out in the time domain where the data has a high temporal correlation. These analyses generally employ parametric models of the hemodynamic response function (HRF where prewhitening of the data is attempted using autoregressive (AR models for the noise. However, this data can be analyzed in the Fourier domain. Here, assumptions made on the noise structure are less restrictive, and hypothesis tests can be constructed based on voxel-specific nonparametric estimates of the hemodynamic transfer function (HRF in the Fourier domain. This is especially important for experimental designs involving multiple states (either stimulus or drug induced that may alter the form of the response function.

  8. Impact of an educational meeting on knowledge and awareness of general practitioners on upper respiratory tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celal Ayaz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate knowledge ofprimary care physicians regarding the use of antibioticsfor the upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs and thespecific outcomes of a health educational meeting in twocities using a self -administered questionnaire.Materials and methods: A standard questionnaire wasfilled by the participants before and after the meeting. Thequestionnaire had seven questions about definition, epidemiology,diagnosis and treatment of URTIs. The knowledgeand approaches of practitioners concern about diagnosisand antibiotic use in URTIs were evaluated. Theproportion of overall satisfied answers before and afterthe meeting was compared.Results: Totally 110 primary care physicians joined intothe study. Before the educational meeting, more than30% of participants stated that the at least 50% of thecausative agents of the URTIs are bacteria. Eighty-eightpercent declared that anaerobes or Neisseria are not theplausible causative agents in URTIs. Only 14% of them indicatedthat procaine penicillin is the primary agent for thetreatment of Streptococcus pyogenes. On the other hand,95% of survey participants considered that penicillin isthe first choice for URTI with Beta-hemolytic Streptococcus.After the educational meeting, most of participants’knowledge showed a significant improvement in knowledge.There were a significantly more correct answers toall questions after the educational meeting compared tobefore the meeting. (27.7% of doctors before vs.92.7%after, p<0.001.Conclusion: As a conclusion, attending the educationalmeetings helps primary care physicians’ to increase theirknowledge and it provides to gain a standard approach intheir professional life.

  9. CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT READING COMPREHENSION IN THE SUBJECT ENGLISH FOR ACADEMIC PURPOSES / CONSIDERACIONES SOBRE LA COMPRENSIÓN LECTORA EN LA ASIGNATURA INGLÉS CON FINES GENERALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Feliciana Mayo Castro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Reading comprehension is one of the general abilities of English language in the teaching-learning process. This skill constitutes a cultural and a work device, and it is the basis that helps to acquire of a great amount of knowledge. This methodological suggestion facilitates the development of reading comprehension due to that it is a system of exercises which are organized in a hierarchical way that leads the students to better decode the message expressed in a text. Reading comprehension ability makes easier to decode a message not only in English language but in Spanish language as well. LA COMPRENSIÓN LECTORA EN LA ASIGNATURA INGLÉS CON FINES GENERALES AUTORAS: DIRECCIÓN PARA CORRESPONDENCIA: Departamento de Idiomas. Universidad de Las Tunas, Cuba. E-mail graciela@ult.edu.cu Fecha de recepción: 21\t-\t08\t-\t2013 Fecha de aceptación:\t30\t-\t11\t-\t2013 RESUMEN La comprensión lectora es una de las habilidades generales en el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje del idioma inglés, esta constituye un instrumento de trabajo y de cultura y es la base que facilita el aprendizaje de un gran cúmulo de conocimientos. La presente alternativa metodológica facilita el desarrollo de la habilidad de comprensión lectora pues parte de un sistema de ejercicios jerárquicamente organizados, lo que conllevan al estudiante a una decodificación más acertada del mensaje expresado en los textos. El desarrollo de esta habilidad les permite la decodificación de información tanto en la lengua inglesa como en la lengua materna.

  10. Pediatric information seeking behaviour, information needs, and information preferences of health care professionals in general emergency departments: Results from the Translating Emergency Knowledge for Kids (TREKK) Needs Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Shannon D; Albrecht, Lauren; Given, Lisa M; Hartling, Lisa; Johnson, David W; Jabbour, Mona; Klassen, Terry P

    2017-01-09

    The majority of children requiring emergency care are treated in general emergency departments (EDs) with variable levels of pediatric care expertise. The goal of the Translating Emergency Knowledge for Kids (TREKK) initiative is to implement the latest research in pediatric emergency medicine in general EDs to reduce clinical variation. To determine national pediatric information needs, seeking behaviours, and preferences of health care professionals working in general EDs. An electronic cross-sectional survey was conducted with health care professionals in 32 Canadian general EDs. Data were collected in the EDs using the iPad and in-person data collectors. Total of 1,471 surveys were completed (57.1% response rate). Health care professionals sought information on children's health care by talking to colleagues (n=1,208, 82.1%), visiting specific medical/health websites (n=994, 67.7%), and professional development opportunities (n=941, 64.4%). Preferred child health resources included protocols and accepted treatments for common conditions (n=969, 68%), clinical pathways and practice guidelines (n=951, 66%), and evidence-based information on new diagnoses and treatments (n=866, 61%). Additional pediatric clinical information is needed about multisystem trauma (n=693, 49%), severe head injury (n=615, 43%), and meningitis (n=559, 39%). Health care professionals preferred to receive child health information through professional development opportunities (n=1,131, 80%) and printed summaries (n=885, 63%). By understanding health care professionals' information seeking behaviour, information needs, and information preferences, knowledge synthesis and knowledge translation initiatives can be targeted to improve pediatric emergency care. The findings from this study will inform the following two phases of the TREKK initiative to bridge the research-practice gap in Canadian general EDs.

  11. Stroke awareness in the general population: knowledge of stroke risk factors and warning signs in older adults

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    Shelley Emer

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is a leading cause of death and functional impairment. While older people are particularly vulnerable to stroke, research suggests that they have the poorest awareness of stroke warning signs and risk factors. This study examined knowledge of stroke warning signs and risk factors among community-dwelling older adults. Methods Randomly selected community-dwelling older people (aged 65+ in Ireland (n = 2,033; 68% response rate. Participants completed home interviews. Questions assessed knowledge of stroke warning signs and risk factors, and personal risk factors for stroke. Results Of the overall sample, 6% had previously experienced a stroke or transient ischaemic attack. When asked to identify stroke risk factors from a provided list, less than half of the overall sample identified established risk factors (e.g., smoking, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertension being the only exception (identified by 74%. Similarly, less than half identified established warning signs (e.g., weakness, headache, with slurred speech (54% as the exception. Overall, there were considerable gaps in awareness with poorest levels evident in those with primary level education only and in those living in Northern Ireland (compared with Republic of Ireland. Conclusion Knowledge deficits in this study suggest that most of the common early symptoms or signs of stroke were recognized as such by less than half of the older adults surveyed. As such, many older adults may not recognise early symptoms of stroke in themselves or others. Thus, they may lose vital time in presenting for medical attention. Lack of public awareness about stroke warning signs and risk factors must be addressed as one important contribution to reducing mortality and morbidity from stroke.

  12. Stroke awareness in the general population: knowledge of stroke risk factors and warning signs in older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Anne; O'Hanlon, Ann; McGee, Hannah; Donnellan, Claire; Shelley, Emer; Horgan, Frances; O'Neill, Desmond

    2009-01-01

    Background Stroke is a leading cause of death and functional impairment. While older people are particularly vulnerable to stroke, research suggests that they have the poorest awareness of stroke warning signs and risk factors. This study examined knowledge of stroke warning signs and risk factors among community-dwelling older adults. Methods Randomly selected community-dwelling older people (aged 65+) in Ireland (n = 2,033; 68% response rate). Participants completed home interviews. Questions assessed knowledge of stroke warning signs and risk factors, and personal risk factors for stroke. Results Of the overall sample, 6% had previously experienced a stroke or transient ischaemic attack. When asked to identify stroke risk factors from a provided list, less than half of the overall sample identified established risk factors (e.g., smoking, hypercholesterolaemia), hypertension being the only exception (identified by 74%). Similarly, less than half identified established warning signs (e.g., weakness, headache), with slurred speech (54%) as the exception. Overall, there were considerable gaps in awareness with poorest levels evident in those with primary level education only and in those living in Northern Ireland (compared with Republic of Ireland). Conclusion Knowledge deficits in this study suggest that most of the common early symptoms or signs of stroke were recognized as such by less than half of the older adults surveyed. As such, many older adults may not recognise early symptoms of stroke in themselves or others. Thus, they may lose vital time in presenting for medical attention. Lack of public awareness about stroke warning signs and risk factors must be addressed as one important contribution to reducing mortality and morbidity from stroke. PMID:19656359

  13. Stroke awareness in the general population: knowledge of stroke risk factors and warning signs in older adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hickey, Anne

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke is a leading cause of death and functional impairment. While older people are particularly vulnerable to stroke, research suggests that they have the poorest awareness of stroke warning signs and risk factors. This study examined knowledge of stroke warning signs and risk factors among community-dwelling older adults. METHODS: Randomly selected community-dwelling older people (aged 65+) in Ireland (n = 2,033; 68% response rate). Participants completed home interviews. Questions assessed knowledge of stroke warning signs and risk factors, and personal risk factors for stroke. RESULTS: Of the overall sample, 6% had previously experienced a stroke or transient ischaemic attack. When asked to identify stroke risk factors from a provided list, less than half of the overall sample identified established risk factors (e.g., smoking, hypercholesterolaemia), hypertension being the only exception (identified by 74%). Similarly, less than half identified established warning signs (e.g., weakness, headache), with slurred speech (54%) as the exception. Overall, there were considerable gaps in awareness with poorest levels evident in those with primary level education only and in those living in Northern Ireland (compared with Republic of Ireland). CONCLUSION: Knowledge deficits in this study suggest that most of the common early symptoms or signs of stroke were recognized as such by less than half of the older adults surveyed. As such, many older adults may not recognise early symptoms of stroke in themselves or others. Thus, they may lose vital time in presenting for medical attention. Lack of public awareness about stroke warning signs and risk factors must be addressed as one important contribution to reducing mortality and morbidity from stroke.

  14. The Knowledge of the Role of Papillomavirus-Related Head and Neck Pathologies among General Practitioners, Otolaryngologists and Trainees. A Survey-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackowska, Joanna; Bartochowska, Anna; Karlik, Michał; Wichtowski, Mateusz; Tokarski, Maciej; Wierzbicka, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the survey was to introduce knowledge of HPV's role in head and neck pathologies to general physicians (GPs), otorhinolaryngologists (ENTs) and newly graduated doctors, as well as to promote HPV-related diseases prevention. Cross-sectional study. Self-designed questionnaire was sent to 2100 doctors. A total of 404 doctors, including 144 ENTs, 192 GPs and 68 trainees, responded. The majority of ENTs (86.8%) had contact with recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) and oropharyngeal cancers (OPCs) patients; in contrast, the majority of GPs (55.7%) did not (p = 0.00). The knowledge of HPV aetiology of cervical cancer versus OPCs and RRP was statistically higher. 7% of ENTs, 20% of GPs and 10% of trainees had not heard about HPV in oropharyngeal diseases. Women had greater knowledge than men. Both in the group of GPs and ENTs, 100% of respondents had heard about the impact of vaccination on the reduction of cervical cancer incidence. Only 39.11% of respondents had heard about the possibility of using vaccination against HPV in RRP-ENT doctors significantly more often than GPs and trainees (p = 0.00). Only 28.96% of physicians had heard about the potential value of HPV vaccination in preventing OPCs, including 44.44% of ENT doctors, 23.44% of GPs and 11.76% of trainees (p = 0.00). The doctors from district hospitals showed lower level of knowledge compared with clinicians (p = 0.04). The different levels of knowledge and awareness of HPV issues highlight the need for targeted awareness strategies in Poland with implementation of HPV testing and vaccination. The information should be accessible especially to those with lower education levels: ENTs from small, provincial wards, GPs from cities of < 200,000 inhabitants and older physicians. The incorporation of HPV issues into the studies curriculum would be fruitful in terms of improving the knowledge of trainees.

  15. Child and adolescent psychiatry: which knowledge and skills do primary care physicians need to have? A survey in general practitioners and paediatricians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempp, Thomas; Heinzel-Gutenbrunner, Monika; Bachmann, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Primary care physicians (PCPs) play a key role in the initial assessment and management of children and adolescents with mental health problems. However, it is unclear whether current medical education curricula sufficiently equip PCPs for this task. The aim of this study was to investigate, which child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP)-related skills and knowledge PCPs say they require in their daily practice. A questionnaire was generated, employing a modified two-step Delphi approach. Besides socio-demographic items, the questionnaire contained 17 CAP-related knowledge items and 13 CAP-related skills items, which had to be rated by importance in daily practice. The questionnaire was distributed to 348 office-based paediatricians and 500 general practitioners (GPs) in Germany. The overall return rate was 51.3% (435/848). Regarding CAP-related knowledge, both paediatricians and GPs rated somatoform disorders and obesity as highly important for daily practice. Moreover, paediatricians also deemed regulatory disorders during infancy (e.g. crying, sleep disorders) as important, while GPs assessed knowledge on paediatric depression as relevant. For paediatricians and GPs, the most relevant CAP-related skills were communicating with children and adolescents and their parents. Additionally, paediatricians rated differentiating between non-pathologic and clinically relevant behaviour problems very relevant, while GPs considered basic psychotherapeutic skills essential. The CAP-related knowledge and skills perceived relevant for doctors in primary care differ from the majority of current medical school CAP curricula, which cover mainly typical, epitomic CAP disorders and are predominantly knowledge-oriented. Therefore, medical education in CAP should be amended to reflect the needs of PCPs to improve healthcare for children and adolescents with mental health problems.

  16. Spinal fMRI during proprioceptive and tactile tasks in healthy subjects: activity detected using cross-correlation, general linear model and independent component analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valsasina, P.; Agosta, F.; Filippi, M. [Scientific Institute Ospedale San Raffaele, Neuroimaging Research Unit, Milan (Italy); Caputo, D. [Scientific Institute Fondazione Don Gnocchi, Department of Neurology, Milan (Italy); Stroman, P.W. [Queen' s University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Centre for Neuroscience Studies, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Functional MRI (fMRI) of the spinal cord is able to provide maps of neuronal activity. Spinal fMRI data have been analyzed in previous studies by calculating the cross-correlation (CC) between the stimulus and the time course of every voxel and, more recently, by using the general linear model (GLM). The aim of this study was to compare three different approaches (CC analysis, GLM and independent component analysis (ICA)) for analyzing fMRI scans of the cervical spinal cord. We analyzed spinal fMRI data from healthy subjects during a proprioceptive and a tactile stimulation by using two model-based approaches, i.e., CC analysis between the stimulus shape and the time course of every voxel, and the GLM. Moreover, we applied independent component analysis, a model-free approach which decomposes the data in a set of source signals. All methods were able to detect cervical cord areas of activity corresponding to the expected regions of neuronal activations. Model-based approaches (CC and GLM) revealed similar patterns of activity. ICA could identify a component correlated to fMRI stimulation, although with a lower statistical threshold than model-based approaches, and many components, consistent across subjects, which are likely to be secondary to noise present in the data. Model-based approaches seem to be more robust for estimating task-related activity, whereas ICA seems to be useful for eliminating noise components from the data. Combined use of ICA and GLM might improve the reliability of spinal fMRI results. (orig.)

  17. Knowledge spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Doignon, Jean-Paul

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge spaces offer a rigorous mathematical foundation for various practical systems of knowledge assessment. An example is offered by the ALEKS system (Assessment and LEarning in Knowledge Spaces), a software for the assessment of mathematical knowledge. From a mathematical standpoint, knowledge spaces generalize partially ordered sets. They are investigated both from a combinatorial and a stochastic viewpoint. The results are applied to real and simulated data. The book gives a systematic presentation of research and extends the results to new situations. It is of interest to mathematically oriented readers in education, computer science and combinatorics at research and graduate levels. The text contains numerous examples and exercises and an extensive bibliography.

  18. Assessing the Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices on Antibiotics Among the General Public Attending the Outpatient Pharmacy Units of Hospitals in Bhutan: A Cross-Sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshokey, Tshokey; Adhikari, Deepika; Tshering, Thupten; Wangmo, Sangay; Wangdi, Kinley

    2017-10-01

    We assessed the level of knowledge, attitudes, and practices on antibiotics through a questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey among the general public in Bhutan. Of the 692 participants, 52.6% (364) were females with a mean age of 34.2 years. More than half of the respondents showed unsatisfactory knowledge varying significantly from 23.1% to 69.6%. Cotrimoxazole (septran) was the least known while amoxicillin was the most known antibiotics assessed. Two-thirds of the responsents (267) knew that inappropriate use of antibiotics could lead to antimicrobial resistance and 89% (319) were aware of the need to complete the antibiotic courses. In bivariate analysis, satisfactory knowledge was associated with the education level of graduate and higher as compared with no education. This study revealed unsatisfactory knowledge and attitude but satisfactory practices on antibiotics use among participants. Efforts are needed to improve public awareness on antibiotics. Enforcement of regulations on sale of antibiotics over the counter needs a revamp.

  19. Non-Bayesian noun generalization in 3- to 5-year-old children: Probing the role of prior knowledge in the suspicious coincidence effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Gavin W.; Samuelson, Larissa K.; Smith, Jodi R.; Spencer, John P.

    2014-01-01

    It is unclear how children learn labels for multiple overlapping categories such as “Labrador,” “dog,” and “animal.” Xu and Tenenbaum (2007a) suggested that learners infer correct meanings with the help of Bayesian inference. They instantiated these claims in a Bayesian model, which they tested with preschoolers and adults. Here, we report data testing a developmental prediction of the Bayesian model—that more knowledge should lead to narrower category inferences when presented with multiple subordinate examples. Two experiments did not support this prediction. Children with more category knowledge showed broader generalization when presented with multiple subordinate examples, compared to less knowledgeable children and adults. This implies a U-shaped developmental trend. The Bayesian model was not able to account for these data, even with inputs that reflected the similarity judgments of children. We discuss implications for the Bayesian model including a combined Bayesian/morphological knowledge account that could explain the demonstrated U-shaped trend. PMID:24961497

  20. Examination of level of knowledge in Italian general practitioners attending an education session on diagnosis and management of the early stage of Alzheimer's disease: pass or fail?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veneziani, Federica; Panza, Francesco; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Capozzo, Rosa; Barulli, Maria Rosaria; Leo, Antonio; Lozupone, Madia; Fontana, Andrea; Arcuti, Simona; Copetti, Massimiliano; Cardinali, Valentina; Grasso, Alessandra; Tursi, Marianna; Iurillo, Annalisa; Imbimbo, Bruno Pietro; Seripa, Davide; Logroscino, Giancarlo

    2016-07-01

    We detected the general level of knowledge about the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and subsequent care in general practitioners (GPs) from Southern Italy. We explored also the GP perception about their knowledge and training on diagnosis and management of AD. On a sample of 131 GPs, we administered two questionnaires: the GP-Knowledge, evaluating GPs' expertise about AD epidemiology, differential diagnosis, and available treatments, and the GP-QUestionnaire on Awareness of Dementia (GP-QUAD), assessing the GPs' attitudes, awareness, and practice regarding early diagnosis of dementia. Specific screening tests or protocols to diagnose and manage dementia were not used by 53% of our GPs. The training on the recognition of early AD signs and symptoms was considered inadequate by 55% of the participants. Females were more likely to consider their training insufficient (58%) compared to males (53%). Female GPs were less likely to prescribe antipsychotic drugs to control neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) and suggest specialist advice in late stage of cognitive impairment. Multiple Correspondence Analysis (MCA) performed only on GP-QUAD suggested two dimensions explaining 26.1% ("GP attitude") and 20.1% ("GP knowledge") of the inertia for a total of 46.2%, In our survey on GP clinical practice, several problems in properly recognizing early AD symptoms and subsequently screening patients to be referred to secondary/tertiary care centers for diagnosis confirmation have emerged. In the future, specific training programs and educational projects for GPs should be implemented also in Italy to improve detection rates and management of dementia in primary care.

  1. A low-rank multivariate general linear model for multi-subject fMRI data and a non-convex optimization algorithm for brain response comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingting; Pham, Minh; Sun, Jianhui; Yan, Guofen; Li, Huazhang; Sun, Yinge; Gonzalez, Marlen Z; Coan, James A

    2017-12-26

    The focus of this paper is on evaluating brain responses to different stimuli and identifying brain regions with different responses using multi-subject, stimulus-evoked functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. To jointly model many brain voxels' responses to designed stimuli, we present a new low-rank multivariate general linear model (LRMGLM) for stimulus-evoked fMRI data. The new model not only is flexible to characterize variation in hemodynamic response functions (HRFs) across different regions and stimulus types, but also enables information "borrowing" across voxels and uses much fewer parameters than typical nonparametric models for HRFs. To estimate the proposed LRMGLM, we introduce a new penalized optimization function, which leads to temporally and spatially smooth HRF estimates. We develop an efficient optimization algorithm to minimize the optimization function and identify the voxels with different responses to stimuli. We show that the proposed method can outperform several existing voxel-wise methods by achieving both high sensitivity and specificity. We apply the proposed method to the fMRI data collected in an emotion study, and identify anterior dACC to have different responses to a designed threat and control stimuli. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Standard errors and confidence intervals in within-subjects designs: generalizing Loftus and Masson (1994) and avoiding the biases of alternative accounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Volker H; Loftus, Geoffrey R

    2012-06-01

    Repeated measures designs are common in experimental psychology. Because of the correlational structure in these designs, the calculation and interpretation of confidence intervals is nontrivial. One solution was provided by Loftus and Masson (Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 1:476-490, 1994). This solution, although widely adopted, has the limitation of implying same-size confidence intervals for all factor levels, and therefore does not allow for the assessment of variance homogeneity assumptions (i.e., the circularity assumption, which is crucial for the repeated measures ANOVA). This limitation and the method's perceived complexity have sometimes led scientists to use a simplified variant, based on a per-subject normalization of the data (Bakeman & McArthur, Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, & Computers 28:584-589, 1996; Cousineau, Tutorials in Quantitative Methods for Psychology 1:42-45, 2005; Morey, Tutorials in Quantitative Methods for Psychology 4:61-64, 2008; Morrison & Weaver, Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, & Computers 27:52-56, 1995). We show that this normalization method leads to biased results and is uninformative with regard to circularity. Instead, we provide a simple, intuitive generalization of the Loftus and Masson method that allows for assessment of the circularity assumption.

  3. Knowledge and attitude of women on the available PMTCT services at the antenatal clinic of the Coast Province General Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin, Adam; Mutugi, Marion; Wanzala, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Several high profile events of the last decade have served as catalysts for the now widely available prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV services. However, Kenya continues to face challenges in assuring that all women in need of PMTCT services receive the full package. Methods A cross sectional survey was undertaken. Systematic sampling method was used for sample selection. Data was collected using pretested structured questionnaires. Data was analyzed in SPSS and Epi Info using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results Approximately 75% of participants were seeking PMTCT services in CPGH for the first time, 71% knew of their HIV status. About 95% of participants were satisfied with privacy during testing. Clients who had never delivered in CPGH had a significantly (p<0.001) higher odds compared to those who had previously delivered in CPGH and had their first PMTCT visit. participants who had never lost a pregnancy in CPGH and were in the hospital for the first time were 3 times likely to seek PMTCT services compared to those who had lost a pregnancy in CPGH. There was a significant association between family planning use before pregnancy and first PMTCT. Conclusion Participants seeking PMTCT services had poor HIV knowledge; but reported positive experiences and good provider – client relationship. However for a successful PMTCT program in CPGH attention needs to be paid in the patient experiences as they seek other reproductive services. PMID:25360188

  4. [Knowledge, attitude and opinion of patients regarding the new German legislation on advance care planning : Results of a survey in a department of general internal medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmeadawy, S; Fitzner, C; Elsner, F; Dietrich, C G

    2017-02-01

    In September 2009 a new legislation for advance care planning was introduced in Germany with the important characteristics of bindingness and unlimited validity for individual directives. Knowledge regarding this act and the attitude towards its characteristics among patients is unclear. Analysis of knowledge, attitude and opinion of patients in a general internal medical department regarding advance care planning in general and the recent German legislation. A total of 200 consecutive patients in an internal medicine ward were interviewed with the help of a questionnaire regarding their attitude to and knowledge on advance care planning in general and the current legislation. Approximately 40 % of the patients had issued some form of directive (either advance care directive or health care proxy) and only 7.5 % were advised by their physicians to make an advance directive. Patients with no directive were not willing to deal with dying and death, were not well-informed about directives or assumed that relatives or physicians would make an appropriate decision. Characteristics of the new legislation were controversially assessed; only 21 % of the patients wished to have a literal implementation of their directive. Regarding the content of an advance directive, more than 80 % of the patients voted for pain control in the palliative setting. The proportion of patients with a directive regarding advance care planning is only slowly increasing. Many patients are not well-informed, do not want to deal with dying or would like to delegate decisions to relatives and physicians. The present characteristics of the German legislation are controversially assessed and often do not represent the wishes of the patients.

  5. Mental health literacy: a cross-cultural approach to knowledge and beliefs about depression, schizophrenia and generalized anxiety disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altweck, Laura; Marshall, Tara C.; Ferenczi, Nelli; Lefringhausen, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Many families worldwide have at least one member with a behavioral or mental disorder, and yet the majority of the public fails to correctly recognize symptoms of mental illness. Previous research has found that Mental Health Literacy (MHL)—the knowledge and positive beliefs about mental disorders—tends to be higher in European and North American cultures, compared to Asian and African cultures. Nonetheless quantitative research examining the variables that explain this cultural difference remains limited. The purpose of our study was fourfold: (a) to validate measures of MHL cross-culturally, (b) to examine the MHL model quantitatively, (c) to investigate cultural differences in the MHL model, and (d) to examine collectivism as a predictor of MHL. We validated measures of MHL in European American and Indian samples. The results lend strong quantitative support to the MHL model. Recognition of symptoms of mental illness was a central variable: greater recognition predicted greater endorsement of social causes of mental illness and endorsement of professional help-seeking as well as lesser endorsement of lay help-seeking. The MHL model also showed an overwhelming cultural difference; namely, lay help-seeking beliefs played a central role in the Indian sample, and a negligible role in the European American sample. Further, collectivism was positively associated with causal beliefs of mental illness in the European American sample, and with lay help-seeking beliefs in the Indian sample. These findings demonstrate the importance of understanding cultural differences in beliefs about mental illness, particularly in relation to help-seeking beliefs. PMID:26441699

  6. Mental health literacy: a cross-cultural approach to knowledge and beliefs about depression, schizophrenia and generalized anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eAltweck

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Many families worldwide have at least one member with a behavioral or mental disorder, and yet the majority of the public fails to correctly recognize symptoms of mental illness. Previous research has found that Mental Health Literacy (MHL – the knowledge and positive beliefs about mental disorders – tends to be higher in Asian and African cultures, compared to European and North American cultures. Nonetheless quantitative research examining the variables that explain this cultural difference remains limited. The purpose of our study was fourfold: a to validate measures of MHL cross-culturally, b to examine the MHL model quantitatively, c to investigate cultural differences in the MHL model, and d to examine collectivism as a predictor of MHL. We validated measures of MHL in European American and Indian samples. The results lend strong quantitative support to the MHL model. Recognition of symptoms of mental illness was a central variable: greater recognition predicted greater endorsement of social causes of mental illness and endorsement of professional help-seeking as well as lesser endorsement of lay help-seeking. The MHL model also showed an overwhelming cultural difference; namely, lay help-seeking beliefs played a central role in the Indian sample, and a negligible role in the European American sample. Further, collectivism was positively associated with causal beliefs of mental illness in the European American sample, and with lay help-seeking beliefs in the Indian sample. These findings demonstrate the importance of understanding cultural differences in beliefs about mental illness, particularly in relation to help-seeking beliefs.

  7. The concept of the lifeworld as a tool in analysing healthcare work: exploring professionals’ resistance to governance through subjectivity, norms and experiential knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, P.

    2011-01-01

    Health-care work is increasingly practiced within governance frameworks. These ‘softer’ forms of new public management typically seek to shape working practices and cultures around key organising principles such as risk, knowledge and performance. Yet the implementation of these control mechanisms

  8. Development of Arithmetical Thinking: Evaluation of Subject Matter Knowledge of Pre-Service Teachers in Order to Design the Appropriate Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guberman, Raisa

    2016-01-01

    One of the key courses in the mathematics teacher education program in Israel is arithmetic, which engages in contents which these pre-service mathematics teachers (PMTs) will later teach at school. Teaching arithmetic involves knowledge about the essence of the concept of "number" and the development thereof, calculation methods and…

  9. Generalized results of individualized exposure doses reconstruction for the subjects of Ukrainian State Register of persons, affected due to Chernobyl accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhtarov, I A; Kovgan, L M; Masiuk, S V; Ivanova, O M; Chepurny, M I; Boyko, Z N; Gerasymenko, V B; Tereshchenko, S A; Kravchenko, I G; Kortushin, G I; Marcenjyk, O D; Gubina, I G

    2015-12-01

    Since 2007, the department of dosimetry of NRCRM has been working for to supply the Ukrainian State Register (SRU) of persons affected due to Chernobyl accident by exposure doses estimations. As of now, the individualization of doses has been performed for nine raions located in Kyiv, Zhytomyr, Rivne and Chernihiv oblasts. The structure of raion-specific models used for the reconstruction of individualized doses was described in detail in the previous 19-th issue of this journal (2014). The choice conditions for persons from the SRU using which for each raion there was formed a contingent of persons for whom the dose could be reconstructed. During the period of 2007-2015, the individualized dose was reconstructed for 244226 persons in 9 raions, representing ~ 58% of all registered in the SRU inhabitants of the raions. The calculation results were transferred to the SRU in formats adapted to the common database structure of the SRU. For each person who satisfied the conditions of selection there were estimated: (1) possible absorbed internal exposure dose of the thyroid by radioiodine in 1986 (assuming that the person in 1986 lived in the same village and was enlisted in the SRU); (2) annual doses of external, internal and total exposure of the whole body for a period of observation in the SRU; (3) total exposure dose of whole body accumulated during the period of observation in the SRU; (4) the total cumulative dose of feasible exposure during the period since 1986 till the decision to be registered in the SRU. There are presented the generalized results of the SRU subjects distribution for different raions in dependence on intervals of doses accumulated at different periods after the accident. The raion matrix tables show the dynamics of accumulation of doses by the SRU subjects both for their stay on the account and for the period of their possible residence registration in the settlement since 1986. The directions for further research to be implemented for

  10. [Subjective social status and health-related quality of life among adults in Germany. Results from the German General Social Survey (ALLBUS 2010)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoebel, J; Kuntz, B; Müters, S; Lampert, T

    2013-10-01

    The impact of subjective perception of social status on health has been analysed in international health research for several years. However, in Germany the empirical analysis of the relation between subjective social status (SSS) and health is still in the very early stages. This study investigates if health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in German adults is associated with SSS over and above conventional measures of social status. The results are based on the German General Social Survey (ALLBUS 2010), a representative cross-sectional survey of the adult resident population in Germany (n=2 827). HRQoL was assessed with 4 items referring to self-rated health (SRH) and impairment of well-being due to bodily pain, depressiveness, and loneliness. SSS was measured with a 10-point scale where participants rated their status in society. The impact of SSS on HRQoL was analysed separately for men and women using logistic regression models adjusted for age, school education, net equivalent household income, and occupational position. Poorer SRH, bodily pain, depressiveness, and loneliness occurred significantly more often in men and women with low SSS compared to those with higher SSS. After adjusting for age, education, income, and occupation, the effects of SSS on SRH and depressiveness remained significant in men and women (SRH: men: OR=4.76; 95% CI=2.52-8.99; women: OR=2.95; 95% CI=1.74-4.99; depressiveness: men: OR=2.86; 95% CI=1.60-5.10; women: OR=2.75; 95% CI=1.65-4.56). The effects of SSS on bodily pain and loneliness were observed only in women after adjustment for objective status indicators (OR=1.75; 95% CI=1.07-2.86 and OR=3.03; 95% CI=1.43-6.42, respectively). These findings indicate that self-perception of social disadvantage affects HRQoL in German adults independently and partly gender-specifically. Hence, complementary to objective status indicators the SSS offers additional potential for describing and explaining health inequalities. © Georg Thieme

  11. The Effect of Cultural Background Knowledge on Learning English Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Ibrahim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the effect of cultural background knowledge on learning English Language. It also aims to investigate if there are significant differences between subjects' performance in reading comprehension according to sex and general ability in English (GAE. The study aims at answering the following questions: 1 . To what extent is the effect of cultural background knowledge on subjects' performance in reading comprehension? 2 . What is the difference in performance in reading comprehension between male and female subjects who have cultural background knowledge and those who do not have any knowledge? 3. What is the differenc e between subjects' performance in reading comprehension texts which are loaded with American culture and their general ability in English. ? The population of th is study consisted of all first - year students majoring in English at Hebron University in th e first semester of the academic year 2011/2012. They were 600. The sample of the study consisted of 60 subjects, males and females divided into four groups, two experimental and two controlled. The researcher followed the experimental method. Means, stand ard deviations and Pearson Product Moment Correlation were calculated by using SPSS program. The study revealed the following results: 1. There are statistically significant differences in performance in reading comprehension between subjects who have cu ltural background knowledge and those who do not have any knowledge . 2 . There are no statistically significant differences in performance in reading comprehension between male and female subjects who have cultural background knowledge and those who do not have any knowledge. 3. Subjects' GAE revealed that there are significant differences in performance in reading comprehension between subjects who have cultural background knowledge and those who do not have any knowledge. In the light of the results of th e study, the researcher recommends the

  12. Integrated learning: ways of fostering the applicability of teachers’ pedagogical and psychological knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Harr, Nora; Eichler, Andreas; Renkl, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In teacher education, general pedagogical and psychological knowledge is often taught separately from the teaching subject itself, potentially leading to inert knowledge. In an experimental study with 69 mathematics student teachers, we tested the benefits of fostering the integration of pedagogical content knowledge and general pedagogical and psychological knowledge with respect to knowledge application. Integration was fostered either by integrating the contents or by prompting the learner...

  13. Cited References and Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) as Two Different Knowledge Representations : Clustering and Mappings at the Paper Level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leydesdorff, L.; Comins, J.A.; Sorensen, A.A.; Bornmann, L.; Hellsten, I.

    2016-01-01

    For the biomedical sciences, the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) make available a rich feature which cannot currently be merged properly with widely used citing/cited data. Here, we provide methods and routines that make MeSH terms amenable to broader usage in the study of science indicators: using

  14. Analysis of the level of knowledge and interest in the subject of e-business among students of the Higher State Vocational School in Tarnów

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pokrzyk

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article refers to the commonly used concept of e-business. Describes the following terms: e-commers, B2B and B2C. The main purpose of writing was to show the relevance of business enterprise on the web. To confirm this we used the results of a survey conducted among the students of PWSZ in Tarnów. The survey provided information about the student's knowledge of internet business. The results of the survey confirmed the validity of the preparation and organization of a conference under the title of "eBusiness Camp" and also we encountered topics on which students would like to expand their knowledge.

  15. Lack of knowledge about mother-to-child HIV transmission prevention in pregnant women at Tijuana General Hospital, Baja California, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becka, Chandra M; Chacón-Cruz, Enrique; Araneta, Maria Rosario; Viani, Rolando M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify determinants of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) knowledge regarding mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) among pregnant women at Tijuana General Hospital, Baja California, Mexico. Between March and November 2003, patients from the prenatal care (n = 1294) and labor and delivery (L&D) units (n = 495) participated in a cross-sectional study to measure HIV knowledge. Less than one-third (30%) knew that HIV could be transmitted to a child during delivery, and 36% knew that HIV could be transmitted by breast-feeding. Only 27% knew that an MTCT could be prevented. Prenatal patients were more likely to know that MTCT was preventable (prenatal: 31% versus L&D 25%; P = .02). Logistic regression indicated that prenatal patients (odds ratio = 1.49, confidence interval 1.07-2.07) were more likely to know that HIV could be transmitted through breast-feeding. Overall, both groups had poor knowledge regarding MTCT of HIV. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. The HPV vaccine: knowledge and attitudes among public health nurses and general practitioners in Northern Norway after introduction of the vaccine in the school-based vaccination programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Karin; Aasland, Olaf Gjerløw; Klouman, Elise

    2017-09-21

    To investigate knowledge of and attitudes to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, HPV vaccination, cervical cancer, related sources of information and factors associated with willingness to vaccinate one's own daughter among primary health care (PHC) personnel. Cross-sectional study. PHC. All public health nurses (PHNs) and general practitioners (GPs) in Northern Norway were invited to answer a structured electronic questionnaire; 31% participated (N = 220). Self-reported and actual knowledge, information sources, attitudes and willingness to vaccinate their (tentative) daughter. 47% of respondents knew that HPV infection is a necessary cause of cervical cancer. PHNs had higher self-reported and actual knowledge about HPV vaccination and cervical cancer than GPs. PHNs used the Norwegian Institute of Public Health's numerous information sources on HPV, while GPs had a low user rate. 88% of PHNs and 50% of GPs acquired information from the pharmaceutical industry. 93% PHNs and 68% of GPs would vaccinate their 12-year-old daughter. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, willingness to vaccinate one's daughter was positively associated with younger age, being PHN (OR = 5.26, 95%CI 1.74-15.94), little concern about vaccine side effects (OR = 3.61, 95%CI 1.10-11.81) and disagreement among experts (OR = 7.31, 95%CI 2.73-19.60). Increased knowledge about HPV infection and vaccination is needed, particularly among GPs. Those least concerned about side effects and disagreements among experts were most likely to vaccinate their daughter. These findings are of interest for public health authorities responsible for the Norwegian vaccination and cervix cancer screening programmes, and providers of training of PHC personnel. Key points One year after introduction of HPV vaccination among 12-year-old schoolgirls in Norway, a cross-sectional study in Northern Norway among general practitioners (GPs) and public health nurses (PHNs) showed that

  17. Effectiveness of health education intervention in improving knowledge, attitude, and practices regarding Tuberculosis among HIV patients in General Hospital Minna, Nigeria - A randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisallah, Chindo Ibrahim; Rampal, Lekhraj; Lye, Munn-Sann; Mohd Sidik, Sherina; Ibrahim, Normala; Iliyasu, Zubairu; Onyilo, Michael Ochigbo

    2018-01-01

    The risk of development of active TB in HIV-infected individuals is 20-37 times higher than those that are HIV negative. Poor knowledge of TB amongst people living with HIV has been associated with high transmission. To determine the effectiveness of a new health education intervention module in improving knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) regarding tuberculosis among HIV patients in General Hospital Minna, Nigeria. A randomized control trial was carried out from July 2015 to June 2017. A random number generating program was used to allocate 226 respondents into 2 groups. The intervention group received health education regarding tuberculosis using the developed module. The control group received the normal services provided for HIV patients. Data were collected from December 2015 to September 2016 at baseline, immediate post intervention, three, six and nine months. The outcome measures were knowledge, attitude, and practice. There was no significant difference with respect to socio-demographic characteristics, KAP of the respondents in the intervention and control group at baseline. However, there was significant improvement in knowledge in the intervention group compared to the control group, group main effect (F = (1,218) = 665.889, p = 0.001, partial ἠ2 = 0.753, d = 5.4); time (F = (3.605, 218) = 52.046, p = 0.001, partial ἠ2 = 0.193, d = 1.52) and interaction between group with time (F = (3.605, 218) = 34.028, p = 0.001, partial ἠ2 = 0.135, d = 1.23). Likewise, there was significant improvement in attitude, group main effect (p = 0.001, d = 1.26) and time (p = 0.001, p, d = 0.65). Similarly, there was improvement in practice, group main effect, time, and interaction of group with time (p < 0.05). The health education intervention program was effective in improving KAP regarding tuberculosis among HIV patients.

  18. Transfer of spatial knowledge from a virtual environment to reality: Impact of route complexity and subject's strategy on the exploration mode

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard N'Kaoua; Jérôme Rodrigues; Hélène Sauzéon; Grégory Wallet

    2009-01-01

    The use of virtual reality as tool in the area of spatial cognition raises the question of the quality of learning transfer from a virtual to a real environment. It is first necessary to determine with healthy subjects, the cognitive aids that improve the quality of transfer and the conditions required, especially since virtual reality can be used as effective tool in cognitive rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the exploratio...

  19. General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Khriplovich, I. B

    2005-01-01

    This book offers an alternative to other textbooks on the subject, providing a more specific discussion of numerous general relativistic effects for readers who have knowledge of classical mechanics and electrodynamics, including special relativity. Coverage includes gravitational lensing, signal retardation in the gravitational field of the Sun, the Reissner-Nordström solution, selected spin effects, the resonance transformation of an electromagnetic wave into a gravitational one, and the entropy and temperature of black holes. The book includes numerous problems at various levels of difficulty, making it ideal also for independent study by a broad readership of advanced students and researchers. I.B. Khriplovich is Chief Researcher, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk, and Chair of Theoretical Physics at Novosibirsk University. Dr. Khriplovich is a Corresponding Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences. He has been awarded the Dirac Medal ``For the advancement of theoretical physics'' by Univ...

  20. Survey on Awareness and Knowledge about the Effect of Diabetes Mellitus on Systemic and Oral Health in Patients Visiting General Medicine Outpatient Department in Dental Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantala Arunkumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This survey was conducted on known diabetic patients to appraise the awareness and knowledge about the effect of diabetes mellitus (DM on systemic and oral health and to evaluate the source of the information. Aim: The aim of this study was to gather baseline information on awareness and knowledge of diabetic patients regarding their systemic and oral health with the view of enhancing their oral health education. Which will help in updating their knowledge regarding strong association of DM on oral diseases, also about importance of maintaining glycemic levels and good oral health. Methodology: This experimental study was conducted on known diabetic patients visiting general medicine outpatient department for fitness to undergo dental treatments. Patients were evaluated by using a self developed questionnaire by interview method. The questions were about awareness regarding effect of DM on systemic and oral health, sources of information patients have received and elicit the symptoms of DM in those diabetics and educate them regarding importance of glycemic control and maintenance of oral health. Results: All the participants had Type 2 DM. The knowledge about DM disease was poor and most of them attended camps related to DM and their systemic consequences, but none of them attended DM associated oral health camps. Many patients(47.5% were educated about the effect of DM on systemic organs and their prevention, by their treating physician, but none of the physicians informed about effect of DM on oral tissues (0%. Surprisingly, only some dentists (24% told regarding oral complications of DM, large number of patients gathered information by other sources mainly from relatives and friends, who are diabetics (61.9%. So awareness of diabetic patients of their increased risk for oral diseases is low compared to their awareness of systemic diseases. Conclusion: It is of paramount importance for dental specialist to raise the attentiveness

  1. Cited references and Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) as two different knowledge representations: clustering and mappings at the paper level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leydesdorff, Loet; Comins, Jordan A; Sorensen, Aaron A; Bornmann, Lutz; Hellsten, Iina

    2016-01-01

    For the biomedical sciences, the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) make available a rich feature which cannot currently be merged properly with widely used citing/cited data. Here, we provide methods and routines that make MeSH terms amenable to broader usage in the study of science indicators: using Web-of-Science (WoS) data, one can generate the matrix of citing versus cited documents; using PubMed/MEDLINE data, a matrix of the citing documents versus MeSH terms can be generated analogously. The two matrices can also be reorganized into a 2-mode matrix of MeSH terms versus cited references. Using the abbreviated journal names in the references, one can, for example, address the question whether MeSH terms can be used as an alternative to WoS Subject Categories for the purpose of normalizing citation data. We explore the applicability of the routines in the case of a research program about the amyloid cascade hypothesis in Alzheimer's disease. One conclusion is that referenced journals provide archival structures, whereas MeSH terms indicate mainly variation (including novelty) at the research front. Furthermore, we explore the option of using the citing/cited matrix for main-path analysis as a by-product of the software.

  2. Knowledge management: another management fad?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard J. Ponzi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge management is a subject of a growth body of literature. While capturing the interest of practitioners and scholars in the mid-1990s, knowledge management remains a broadly defined concept with faddish characteristics. Based on annual counts of article retrieved from Science Citation Index, Social Science Citation Index, and ABI Inform referring to three previous recognized management fad, this paper introduces empirical evidence that proposes that a typical management movement generally reveals itself as a fad in approximately five years. In applying this approach and assumption to the case of knowledge management, the findings suggest that knowledge management is at least living longer than typical fads and perhaps is in the process of establishing itself as a new aspect of management. To further the understanding of knowledge management's development, its interdisciplinary activity and breadth are reported and briefly discussed.

  3. Organising Documentation in Knowledge Evolution and Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina De Castro

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of a subject evolves in time due to many factors, such as better understanding, study of additional issues within the same subject, study of related work from other themes, etc. This can be achieved by individual work, direct cooperation with other people and, in general, knowledge sharing. In this context, and in the broader context of knowledge communication, the appropriate organisation of documentation plays a fundamental role, but is often very difficult to achieve. A layered architecture is here proposed for the development of a structured repository of documentation, here called knowledge-bibliography KB. The process of knowledge acquisition, evolution and communication is firstly considered, then the distributed nature of nowadays knowledge and the ways it is shared and transferred are taken into account. On the basis of the above considerations, a possible clustering of documentation collected by many people is defined. An LDAP-based architecture for the implementation of this structure is also discussed.

  4. Subject Sensitive Invariantism: In Memoriam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauw, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Subject sensitive invariantism is the view that whether a subject knows depends on what is at stake for that subject: the truth-value of a knowledge-attribution is sensitive to the subject's practical interests. I argue that subject sensitive invariantism cannot accept a very plausible principle for

  5. The effectiveness of clinical problem-based learning model of medico-jurisprudence education on general law knowledge for Obstetrics/Gynecological interns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hui-Chin; Wang, Ning-Yen; Ko, Wen-Ru; Yu, You-Tsz; Lin, Long-Yau; Tsai, Hui-Fang

    2017-06-01

    The effective education method of medico-jurisprudence for medical students is unclear. The study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of problem-based learning (PBL) model teaching medico-jurisprudence in clinical setting on General Law Knowledge (GLK) for medical students. Senior medical students attending either campus-based law curriculum or Obstetrics/Gynecology (Ob/Gyn) clinical setting morning meeting from February to July in 2015 were enrolled. A validated questionnaire comprising 45 questions were completed before and after the law education. The interns attending clinical setting small group improvisation medico-jurisprudence problem-based learning education had significantly better GLK scores than the GLK of students attending campus-based medical law education course after the period studied. PBL teaching model of medico-jurisprudence is an ideal alternative pedagogy model in medical law education curriculum. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Does the Sun revolve around the Earth? A comparison between the general public and online survey respondents in basic scientific knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Emily A; Farid, Hany

    2016-02-01

    We conducted an online survey using a set of factual science questions that are commonly administered to assess fact-based scientific literacy. We report that the online population performed substantially better on this standard assessment than the traditional survey population. For example, it has been widely reported that 1 in 4 Americans does not know that the Earth revolves around the Sun, whereas among the online population, this ratio is reduced to 1 in 25. While new online platforms provide researchers with unprecedented ease of access to a large sample population for studying trends in public knowledge and attitudes, generalizing from online population samples to the US population at large poses a considerable challenge. We discuss the potential reasons for this discrepancy and the implications for conducting research online. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Behavioral, autonomic, and subjective reactions to low- and moderate-level simulated sonic booms : a report of two experiments and a general evaluation of sonic boom startle effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-09-01

    Two separate studies are reported. The first attempted to determine a sonic boom exposure level below which startle reactions would not occur. Subjects were exposed indoors to six simulated sonic booms having various outside overpressures. In the sec...

  8. Impact on knowledge and behaviour of the general population of two different methods of solid waste management: An explorative cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Cimmuto, Angela; Mannocci, Alice; Ribatti, Domenico; Boccia, Antonio; La Torre, Giuseppe

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of the present study were to evaluate knowledge among general population about the risks factors of waste management, to estimate the feeling of anxiety concerning the waste, and to compare knowledge of two different methods for collecting municipal solid waste (MSW): a street separate collection system and a door-to-door separate collection system. A cross-sectional study was performed, administering an anonymous questionnaire to 180 inhabitants in Aprilia, Latium, Italy. The study sample consisted of 183 citizens: 64 in the intervention group and 119 in the control group. The intervention was represented by a campaign of door-to-door collection. The correct implementation of separate collection of waste was 87.5% in the intervention group and 63% in the control group (pdifference concerning the quality of information was found (pinformation pack (80.7%, p=0.024). The information campaign seemed to increase people's awareness about the problem, improving the management of waste and household waste. The door-to-door collection was appreciated and preferred by both groups. The adoption of a door-to-door scheme seems to be a winning option mostly because it is supported by an information and education system for the citizens. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. GPs' knowledge, use, and confidence in national physical activity and health guidelines and tools: a questionnaire-based survey of general practice in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Robin; Chapman, Tim; Brannan, Mike Gt; Varney, Justin

    2017-10-01

    Physical activity (PA) brief advice in health care is effective at getting individuals active. It has been suggested that one in four people would be more active if advised by a GP or nurse, but as many as 72% of GPs do not discuss the benefits of physical activity with patients. To assess the knowledge, use, and confidence in national PA and Chief Medical Officer (CMO) health guidelines and tools among GPs in England. Online questionnaire-based survey of self-selecting GPs in England that took place over a 10-day period in March 2016. The questionnaire consisted of six multiple-choice questions and was available on the Doctors.net.uk (DNUK) homepage. Quotas were used to ensure good regional representation. The final analysis included 1013 responses. Only 20% of responders were broadly or very familiar with the national PA guidelines. In all, 70% of GPs were aware of the General Practice Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPPAQ), but 26% were not familiar with any PA assessment tools, and 55% reported that they had not undertaken any training with respect to encouraging PA. The majority of GPs in England (80%) are unfamiliar with the national PA guidelines. Awareness of the recommended tool for assessment, GPPAQ, is higher than use by GPs. This may be because it is used by other clinical staff, for example, as part of the NHS Health Check programme. Although brief advice in isolation by GPs on PA will only be a part of the behaviour change journey, it is an important prompt, especially if repeated as part of routine practice. This study highlights the need for significant improvement in knowledge, skills, and confidence to maximise the potential for PA advice in GP consultations. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  10. A cross-sectional study of the knowledge, attitude, and practice of general practitioners regarding dog bite management in nothern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: There are many myths and false beliefs associated with wound management. These include application of oils, herbs, and red chilies on wound inflicted by rabid animals, and not washing the wound properly. General practitioners (GPs constitute a key source of medical care in study area and are approached for anti-rabies treatment by victims of animal bites. Aim: The aim of the present study is to assess the knowledge and practices among the general practitioners (GPs regarding dog bite management. Settings and Design : Community-based cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: The present study was carried out in the private and public clinics of Ambala city from January 2012 to April 2012 using a pre-tested self-administered questionnaire. The study population composed of 100 GPs comprising 45 MBBS or above degree holders (Group 1 and 55 other GPs like BAMS, RMPs, etc (Group 2. Statistical Analysis Used: Interpretation of data was done using percentages and proportions. χ2 -Test was used to test the statistical difference in the knowledge between the two groups. Results: Out of the total, 68% and 29% respondents in Group 1 and Group 2, respectively, correctly told that wound must be washed with soap and water for minimum period of 15 min. A total 71% and 11% respondents in Group 1 and Group 2, respectively, could correctly answer about the target groups for pre-exposure prophylaxis. A total 62% GPs did not know the high-risk groups to whom pre-exposure prophylaxis has to be given. Conclusions: There was an apparent lack of awareness among the GPs regarding appropriate animal wound management and vaccine administration. Reorientation programs and continued medical education for GPs are required to highlight the WHO guidelines regarding treatment of animal bite.

  11. The changing role of the subject specialist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Cotta-Schønberg

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available As we all know, libraries are these years rapidly undergoing change on unparalleled scale. Evidently, this applies to librarians, too, and not the least to that important category of library staff, the subject specialist. As recruiting and education of library workers differ from country to country it is difficult to give a detailed, generally valid description of the subject librarian in libraries, but I believe that you can describe an ideal model of subject librarianship as follows: Within each of the major subject disciplines covered by the library, the library should have a subject specialist preferably with a master degree or at least a bachelor degree in the particular subject discipline. The role of the subject specialist is to perform four basic functions where extensive subject knowledge is considered to be necessary: selecting and classifying books, assisting users with advanced subject inquiries, giving subject-specific courses in information retrieval, and maintaining liaison with relevant academic departments and centres. Personally, I know this system very well since I got employment in the Royal Library in Copenhagen as a subject specialist in psychology in the very month I finished my degree in psychology from the University of Copenhagen, back in 1973. The subject librarian system at the Royal Library in Copenhagen was patterned on the ideal model, as I just described it, and it was closely paralleled in the other academic libraries in Denmark, also the new university libraries which were founded in the seventies.

  12. Exploring patients' awareness and Healthcare professionals' knowledge and attitude to pertussis and influenza vaccination during the antenatal periods in Cavan Monaghan General Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwudi, Ugezu; Essajee, Murtaza

    2017-12-19

    Infection with Pertussis or with Influenza during the antenatal period usually results in complications leading to severe morbidity and mortality. Influenza virus outbreak usually occurs almost every year during the winter periods with profound burden on the entire healthcare system. Both disease conditions are preventable with adequate health education and vaccination. Healthcare professionals have a role to play in the communication and provision of this all important health programme. We aimed to assess patients' awareness of pertussis and influenza vaccination as well as healthcare professionals' knowledge and attitude to pertussis and influenza vaccination during the antenatal periods in Cavan Monaghan General Hospital. We performed a prospective cohort study in the antenatal clinics among patients, Non- consultant hospital doctors (NCHDs) and midwives in the maternity unit. Our setting was a regional hospital in the North East of the Republic of Ireland with approximately 2000 deliveries per annum. These were randomly recruited from those attending routine antenatal clinic during the study period and healthcare professional working in the maternity unit. Of the 113 antenatal women who completed the questionnaire,. more than 75% have heard of both vaccinations in pregnancy. Interestingly, 51.3% of women heard of the vaccination from their General practitioner (GP) while 1.8% heard of it from their hospital doctor. Despite this awareness, 57.6% and 31.9% of women knew that influenza and pertussis vaccine respectively is safe in pregnancy. The uptake of both vaccines is quite low with 31% for pertussis and 42.5% for influenza vaccine respectively. Despite more than 95% of healthcare professionals being aware of the health service executive (HSE) guidelines on immunisation, more than 75% of healthcare professionals did not receive the influenza vaccinations themselves and had no plans to receive it. More so, only 18% of healthcare professionals always discuss

  13. A look at risk factors of proteinuria in subjects without impaired renal filtration function in a general population in Owerri, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyabolu, Ernest Ndukaife; Chukwuonye, Innocent Ijezie; Anyabolu, Arthur Ebelenna; Enwere, Okezie

    2016-01-01

    Proteinuria is a common marker of kidney damage. This study aimed at determining predictors of proteinuria in subjects without impaired renal filtration function in Owerri, Nigeria. This was a cross-sectional study involving 136 subjects, consecutively drawn from Federal Medical Centre (FMC), Owerri, Nigeria. Relevant investigations were performed, including 24-hour urine protein (24HUP). Correlation and multivariate linear regression analysis were used to determine the association and strength of variables to predict proteinuria. Proteinuria was defined as 24HUP ≥0.300g and impaired renal filtration function as creatinine clearance (ClCr) proteinuria in this study. The risk factors of proteinuria in subjects without impaired renal filtration function in Owerri, Nigeria, included 24HUV, SUPCR, 24HUPCR, 24HUPOR, 24HUCOR and SUPOR. Further research should explore the relationship between urine creatinine and urine osmolality, and how this relationship may affect progression of kidney damage, with or without impaired renal filtration function.

  14. Knowledge, Beliefs and Attitudes of Patients and the General Public towards the Interactions of Physicians with the Pharmaceutical and the Device Industry: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadlallah, Racha; Nas, Hala; Naamani, Dana; El-Jardali, Fadi; Hammoura, Ihsan; Al-Khaled, Lina; Brax, Hneine; Kahale, Lara; Akl, Elie A

    2016-01-01

    To systematically review the evidence on the knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes of patients and the general public towards the interactions of physicians with the pharmaceutical and the device industry. We included quantitative and qualitative studies addressing any type of interactions between physicians and the industry. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE in August 2015. Two reviewers independently completed data selection, data extraction and assessment of methodological features. We summarized the findings narratively stratified by type of interaction, outcome and country. Of the 11,902 identified citations, 20 studies met the eligibility criteria. Many studies failed to meet safeguards for protecting from bias. In studies focusing on physicians and the pharmaceutical industry, the percentages of participants reporting awareness was higher for office-use gifts relative to personal gifts. Also, participants were more accepting of educational and office-use gifts compared to personal gifts. The findings were heterogeneous for the perceived effects of physician-industry interactions on prescribing behavior, quality and cost of care. Generally, participants supported physicians' disclosure of interactions through easy-to-read printed documents and verbally. In studies focusing on surgeons and device manufacturers, the majority of patients felt their care would improve or not be affected if surgeons interacted with the device industry. Also, they felt surgeons would make the best choices for their health, regardless of financial relationship with the industry. Participants generally supported regulation of surgeon-industry interactions, preferably through professional rather than governmental bodies. The awareness of participants was low for physicians' receipt of personal gifts. Participants also reported greater acceptability and fewer perceived influence for office-use gifts compared to personal gifts. Overall, there appears to be lower awareness, less concern and

  15. Knowledge, Beliefs and Attitudes of Patients and the General Public towards the Interactions of Physicians with the Pharmaceutical and the Device Industry: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Racha Fadlallah

    Full Text Available To systematically review the evidence on the knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes of patients and the general public towards the interactions of physicians with the pharmaceutical and the device industry.We included quantitative and qualitative studies addressing any type of interactions between physicians and the industry. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE in August 2015. Two reviewers independently completed data selection, data extraction and assessment of methodological features. We summarized the findings narratively stratified by type of interaction, outcome and country.Of the 11,902 identified citations, 20 studies met the eligibility criteria. Many studies failed to meet safeguards for protecting from bias. In studies focusing on physicians and the pharmaceutical industry, the percentages of participants reporting awareness was higher for office-use gifts relative to personal gifts. Also, participants were more accepting of educational and office-use gifts compared to personal gifts. The findings were heterogeneous for the perceived effects of physician-industry interactions on prescribing behavior, quality and cost of care. Generally, participants supported physicians' disclosure of interactions through easy-to-read printed documents and verbally. In studies focusing on surgeons and device manufacturers, the majority of patients felt their care would improve or not be affected if surgeons interacted with the device industry. Also, they felt surgeons would make the best choices for their health, regardless of financial relationship with the industry. Participants generally supported regulation of surgeon-industry interactions, preferably through professional rather than governmental bodies.The awareness of participants was low for physicians' receipt of personal gifts. Participants also reported greater acceptability and fewer perceived influence for office-use gifts compared to personal gifts. Overall, there appears to be lower awareness

  16. Object Knowledge Modulates Colour Appearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Witzel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the memory colour effect for colour diagnostic artificial objects. Since knowledge about these objects and their colours has been learned in everyday life, these stimuli allow the investigation of the influence of acquired object knowledge on colour appearance. These investigations are relevant for questions about how object and colour information in high-level vision interact as well as for research about the influence of learning and experience on perception in general. In order to identify suitable artificial objects, we developed a reaction time paradigm that measures (subjective colour diagnosticity. In the main experiment, participants adjusted sixteen such objects to their typical colour as well as to grey. If the achromatic object appears in its typical colour, then participants should adjust it to the opponent colour in order to subjectively perceive it as grey. We found that knowledge about the typical colour influences the colour appearance of artificial objects. This effect was particularly strong along the daylight axis.

  17. Object knowledge modulates colour appearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzel, Christoph; Valkova, Hanna; Hansen, Thorsten; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the memory colour effect for colour diagnostic artificial objects. Since knowledge about these objects and their colours has been learned in everyday life, these stimuli allow the investigation of the influence of acquired object knowledge on colour appearance. These investigations are relevant for questions about how object and colour information in high-level vision interact as well as for research about the influence of learning and experience on perception in general. In order to identify suitable artificial objects, we developed a reaction time paradigm that measures (subjective) colour diagnosticity. In the main experiment, participants adjusted sixteen such objects to their typical colour as well as to grey. If the achromatic object appears in its typical colour, then participants should adjust it to the opponent colour in order to subjectively perceive it as grey. We found that knowledge about the typical colour influences the colour appearance of artificial objects. This effect was particularly strong along the daylight axis. PMID:23145224

  18. Effect of fish oil supplementation on quality of life in a general population of older Dutch subjects: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rest, O. van de; Geleijnse, J.M.; Kok, F.J.; Staveren, W.A. van; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Beekman, A.T.; Groot, L.C. de

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation on quality of life (QOL). DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. SETTING: Independently living individuals from the general older Dutch population. PARTICIPANTS:

  19. Effect of fish oil supplementation on quality of life in a general population of older Dutch subjects: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rest, van de O.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Kok, F.; Staveren, van W.A.; Olderikkert, M.G.M.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Groot, de L.C.P.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation on quality of life (QOL). DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. SETTING: Independently living individuals from the general older Dutch population. PARTICIPANTS:

  20. Letramentos em rede: textos, máquinas, sujeitos e saberes em translação Networked literacies: texts, machines, subjects and knowledges in translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo El Khouri Buzato

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho apresenta uma proposta de (redescrição do fenômeno do(s (novos letramento(s fundamentada teórico-metodologicamente na Teoria Ator-Rede e ilustra o percurso que levou a tal proposta com uma vinheta descritiva de parte dos resultados de um estudo de cunho etnográfico que envolveu dois estudantes universitários do sudeste do Brasil por um período de dois anos. Os dados incluídos no estudo foram gerados por várias estratégias, tais como o monitoramento dos computadores pessoais dos informantes por meio de um software especializado, notas de campo, diários pessoais, observação simples e participante, além de entrevistas semiestruturadas. Objetiva convidar a comunidade de pesquisa em novos letramentos no Brasil a avaliar a utilidade de conceberem-se letramentos e subjetividades como atores-redes, assim como os limites de tal manobra teórico-metodológica. Revisa brevemente estudos sobre (novos letramento(s que utilizaram conceitos da Teoria Ator-Rede e conclui que a mesma ainda não foi explorada em todo o seu potencial nesse campo de pesquisa.The study proposes a (redescription of the phenomenon of (new literacy(ies on the theoretical-methodological basis of Actor-Network Theory and illustrates the process that led to such a proposal with a descriptive vignette based on some results of a two-year ethnography-oriented study that involved two university students from southeastern Brazil. The data included in the study were generated through various strategies such as monitoring the informants' personal computers, field notes, personal journals, participant and non-participant observation as well as semi-structured interviews. It is intended that the article works as an invitation for the literacy research community in Brazil to assess the usefulness of conceiving literacies and subjectivities as actor-networks, as well as the limits of such a theoretical-methodological move. Previous studies on (new literacy(ies that used

  1. Reducing drug related deaths: a pre-implementation assessment of knowledge,barriers and enablers for naloxone distribution through general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The Scottish Naloxone Programme aims to reduce Scotland’s high number of drug-related deaths (DRDs) caused by opiate overdose. It is currently implemented through specialist drug services but General Practitioners (GPs) are likely to have contact with drug using patients and their families and are therefore in an ideal position to direct them to naloxone schemes, or provide it themselves. This research gathered baseline data on GP’s knowledge of and willingness to be involved in DRD prevention, including naloxone administration, prior to the implementation of primary care based delivery. Methods Mixed methods were used comprising a quantitative, postal survey and qualitative telephone interviews. A questionnaire was sent to 500 GPs across Scotland. An initial mailing was followed by a reminder. A shortened questionnaire containing seven key questions was posted as a final reminder. Telephone interviews were conducted with 17 GPs covering a range of demographic characteristics and drug user experience. Results A response rate of 55% (240/439) was achieved. There was some awareness of the naloxone programme but little involvement (3.3%), 9% currently provided routine overdose prevention, there was little involvement in displaying overdose prevention information (naloxone prescribing with half of respondents willing to provide this to drug users or friends/family. However half were uncertain GP based naloxone provision was essential to reduce DRDs. Factors enabling naloxone distribution were: evidence of effectiveness, appropriate training, and adding to the local formulary. Interviewees had limited awareness of what naloxone distribution in primary care may involve and considered naloxone supply as a specialist service rather than a core GP role. Wider attitudinal barriers to involvement with this group were expressed. Conclusions There was poor awareness of the Scottish National Naloxone Programme in participants. Results indicated GPs did not

  2. Photoprotection and vitamin D status: A study on awareness, knowledge and attitude towards sun protection in general population from Kuwait, and its relation with vitamin D levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawaf Al-Mutairi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The primary cause of skin cancers is exposure to ultraviolet (UV radiation. And, for decades sun protection has been promoted in various public health education campaigns. Recently, however, vitamin D deficiency has been related to increased risk of skin cancers. And, skin being the primary site for the synthesis of active form of vitamin D, excessive sun protection could lead to vitamin D-deficient states. But, the results have so far been conflicting. Aims: To study the level of awareness, knowledge and attitude of representative groups from the general population from Kuwait towards sun protection. And, also study the correlation of the level of sun protective measures used and vitamin D levels in these groups. Methods: The study constituted of two main parts. First part comprised a questionnaire-based survey of representative group of people aged 18 and above to assess their knowledge, awareness and attitude towards sun protection. The second part consisted of measuring serum vitamin D levels in 150 volunteers amongst the responders of the questionnaire, who had been regularly using sunscreens for at least 2 years and compare to the levels seen in 150 age and sex-matched responders of similar skin phototypes, who had never used sunscreens. Results: Out of the total of 1044 responders, 80% of them had adequate knowledge of the beneficial and harmful effects of sun exposure, and had been using sunscreens regularly, and adopting other sun protective measures in their daily life. The levels of vitamin D were found to be deficient in both sunscreen users and those who had never used sunscreens. The difference between the two groups was statistically insignificant (60.67% vs 54.67%; P value>0.001. Conclusion: Population at large seems to be adequately informed about the beneficial and deleterious effects of sun exposure. Vitamin D levels are deficient in majority of our people, and there is a need to do larger surveys covering all

  3. Comparison in the Knowledge and Awareness of Hypertension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fifty nine non-clinical hospital workers of the Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching hospital, Sagamu were compared with 52 factory workers in the same locality in order to determine their knowledge and awareness of the subject of Hypertension. In general the level of knowledge and awareness was poor in both study ...

  4. The place of confusional arousals in sleep and mental disorders - Findings in a general population sample of 13,057 subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohayon, MM; Priest, RG; Zulley, J; Smirne, S

    Confusional arousals, or sleep drunkenness, occur upon awakening and remain un studied in the general population. We selected a representative sample from the United Kingdom. Germany, and Italy (N = 13,0.57) and conducted telephone interviews. Confusional arousals were reported by 2.9% of the

  5. Knowledge and attitude of pediatric dentists, general dentists, postgraduates of pediatric dentistry, and dentists of other specialties toward the endodontic treatment of primary teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Devendra Patil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pediatric dentists (PDs play an important role in treating primary teeth and oral health care needs for children. Pulp therapy is widely used in the treatment of primary teeth. The choice of endodontic treatment modality changes among general dentist (GD and PD. Aim and Objectives: The aim of this study is to determine the attitudes of PDs, GDs, postgraduates (PGs of pediatric dentistry and dentists of other specialties toward endodontic treatment of primary teeth. Materials and Methods: A structured 20-item questionnaire was formulated in English and distributed to PD, GD's, PGs of pediatric dentistry, and dentist of other specialties. The filled questionnaire survey was statistically analyzed using simple descriptive analysis and inferential analysis was performed using Chi-square t- test. Results: Out of the 237 survey respondents, 27.43% were BDS (GD's, 16.88% were MDS (PD, 12.66% were PG's (pediatric dentistry, and 43.04% were MDS (other than PD. About 91.6% of the total respondents preferred endodontic procedures in primary teeth. Conclusion: The study concluded that the GD's, PD's, and dentist of other specialty differ in their treatment recommendations for primary teeth. The GDs and dentist of other specialty were regularly performing pulp therapy in primary teeth and should frequently update their knowledge about endodontic procedures in primary teeth.

  6. General Lack of Correlations between Age and Signs of the Metabolic Syndrome in Subjects with Non-diabetic Fasting Glucose Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, Harry G; Mrvichin, Nate; Clouatre, Dallas; Bagchi, Debasis; Preuss, Jeffrey M; Perricone, Nicholas V; Swaroop, Anand; Kaats, Gilbert R

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance and advancing age are well-recognized risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Recent reports indicate that fasting glucose levels in non-diabetic patients correlate appropriately with the development of certain elements in metabolic syndrome, which suggest a cause-effect relationship with insulin resistance. The present investigation assessed whether a significant association exists between chronological age and various elements of metabolic syndrome in this same group of subjects possessing non-diabetic fasting glucose levels. Baseline data were taken from 288 subjects (age 17-87 years) with fasting glucose levels ≤ 125 mg/dl. Correlations between chronological age and different metabolic parameters were assessed to determine any statistically significant relationships and compare these with previously demonstrated metabolic parameters. With the exception of systolic blood pressure, the following correlations between age and components of metabolic syndrome were not significant or even significant in the opposite direction compared to those found in the same population using fasting glucose as the independent variable: body weight, body fat, diastolic blood pressure, white blood cell count (WBC)/neutrophil count, and circulating levels of insulin, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). Although systolic blood pressure still increased, it was to a lesser extent than might be expected. In the present investigation, a cross-sectional analysis was carried out over a wide age range of subjects. It is noteworthy that fasting glucose levels and the other major elements of metabolic syndrome did not change significantly with advancing age. These results demonstrate that decreasing insulin resistance and fasting glucose levels may be an important way to overcome the adverse effects and perturbations of advancing age

  7. Integrated learning: Ways of fostering the applicability of teachers’ pedagogical and psychological knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora eHarr

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In teacher education, general pedagogical and psychological knowledge is often taught separately from the teaching subject itself, potentially leading to inert knowledge. In an experimental study with 69 mathematics student teachers, we tested the benefits of fostering the integration of pedagogical content knowledge and general pedagogical and psychological knowledge with respect to knowledge application. Integration was fostered either by integrating the contents or by prompting the learners to integrate separately-taught knowledge. Fostering integration, as compared to a separate presentation without integration help, led to more applicable pedagogical and psychological knowledge and greater simultaneous application of pedagogical and psychological knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge. The advantages of fostering knowledge integration were not moderated by the student teachers’ prior knowledge or working memory capacity. A disadvantage of integrating different knowledge types referred to increased learning times.

  8. A Generic Simulation Approach for the Fast and Accurate Estimation of the Outage Probability of Single Hop and Multihop FSO Links Subject to Generalized Pointing Errors

    KAUST Repository

    Ben Issaid, Chaouki

    2017-07-28

    When assessing the performance of the free space optical (FSO) communication systems, the outage probability encountered is generally very small, and thereby the use of nave Monte Carlo simulations becomes prohibitively expensive. To estimate these rare event probabilities, we propose in this work an importance sampling approach which is based on the exponential twisting technique to offer fast and accurate results. In fact, we consider a variety of turbulence regimes, and we investigate the outage probability of FSO communication systems, under a generalized pointing error model based on the Beckmann distribution, for both single and multihop scenarios. Selected numerical simulations are presented to show the accuracy and the efficiency of our approach compared to naive Monte Carlo.

  9. PRAGMATIC KNOWLEDGE OR NOBLE KNOWLEDGE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian MANOLESCU

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Disputes about the opportunity to introduce competence-based education are increasingly present in terms of educational policies and strategies. Obviously, in the last decade and a half, several countries have introduced competence based education. Although specific knowledge acquisition should be an essential component of student learning, assessing such knowledge in adult life depends largely on the individual purchase of more general concepts and skills. The article discusses pragmatic knowledge and noble knowledge. This is a collective dilemma, to the extent that the education system lives in the tension between the two logics. The two positions or divergent attitudes can coexist as long ast hey do not become extremist. Educational dilemma is especially now a priority.

  10. Transition in public knowledge of risk factors of cardiovascular disease in an Iranian general population: A latent transition analysis (LTA) on a longitudinal large community-based educational prevention program

    OpenAIRE

    Rafiee Alhossaini, Mahsa; Hassanzadeh, Akbar; Feizi, Awat; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the second leading cause of death, after accidents, in Iran. This study was performed to assess the change in levels of knowledge about 8 risk factors of CVD and its associated determinants the Iranian general population. METHODS The current repeated cross-sectional study included 3014 people in 2004, 3012 in 2005, and 4719 in 2007, aged older than 19 years. Knowledge about 8 risk factors (high blood pressure, nutrition, physical inactivity, smokin...

  11. A generalized modal shock spectra method for spacecraft loads analysis. [internal loads in a spacecraft structure subjected to a dynamic launch environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubert, M.; Salama, M.

    1979-01-01

    Unlike an earlier shock spectra approach, generalization permits an accurate elastic interaction between the spacecraft and launch vehicle to obtain accurate bounds on the spacecraft response and structural loads. In addition, the modal response from a previous launch vehicle transient analysis with or without a dummy spacecraft - is exploited to define a modal impulse as a simple idealization of the actual forcing function. The idealized modal forcing function is then used to derive explicit expressions for an estimate of the bound on the spacecraft structural response and forces. Greater accuracy is achieved with the present method over the earlier shock spectra, while saving much computational effort over the transient analysis.

  12. Exploring Knowledge Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul; Mahoney, Joseph T

    Knowledge governance is characterized as a distinctive research subject, the understanding of which cuts across diverse fields in management. In particular, it represents an intersection of knowledge management, strategic management, and theories of the firm. Knowledge governance considers how...... deployment of governance mechanisms influences knowledge processes: sharing, retaining, and creating knowledge. We survey the papers in this volume of the special issue, and discuss the remaining research challenges....

  13. Public awareness of early symptoms of stroke and information sources about stroke among the general Japanese population: the Acquisition of Stroke Knowledge Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamatsu, Naomi; Okamura, Tomonori; Nakayama, Hirofumi; Toyoda, Kazunori; Suzuki, Kazuo; Toyota, Akihiro; Hata, Takashi; Hozawa, Atsushi; Nishikawa, Tomofumi; Morimoto, Akiko; Ogita, Mihoko; Morino, Ayumi; Yamaguchi, Takenori

    2013-01-01

    It is important that the general population be aware of the early symptoms, since it has been shown that early arrival to hospitals leads better prognosis of stroke patients. However, the general population is not well informed about the early symptoms of stroke. This study was conducted to clarify which stroke symptoms are less well known and which information sources are related to awareness of stroke symptoms. A multiple-choice, mail-in survey involving 5,540 randomly selected residents, aged 40-74 years, of 3 cities in Japan was conducted. Their knowledge about stroke symptoms and their information sources were surveyed; information sources were classified as mass media (television/newspaper/radio) and personal communication sources (posters/leaflets/internet/health professionals/family and/or friends). 'Awareness' was defined as selecting all 5 of the correct stroke symptoms from among 10 listed symptoms with decoy choices. The estimated fraction of the possible impact due to each source on the whole population was also calculated by odds ratios (ORs) and the proportion of respondents who selected each source (Pe). The combined effects of mass media and personal communication sources on awareness were also assessed. Of the 5,540 residents, only 23% selected all 5 correct symptoms. Visual disturbance was the least known of the 5 symptoms (35%). All sources were positively related to awareness, with ORs (Pe) of: television, 1.58 (72.5%); newspaper, 1.79 (48.0%); radio, 1.74 (13.3%); posters, 1.73 (7.6%); leaflets, 1.50 (24.7%); Internet, 1.66 (5.6%); health professionals, 1.33 (34.8%), and family/friends, 1.21 (44.6%). The estimated fraction of the possible impact due to each source was higher for mass media (television, 0.31 and newspaper, 0.28) than personal communication sources (Internet, 0.04 and leaflets, 0.12). Mass media only and mass media/personal communication sources were significantly associated (ORs: 1.66, 2.75, respectively). As a single method of

  14. Integrating pedagogical content knowledge and pedagogical/psychological knowledge in mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harr, Nora; Eichler, Andreas; Renkl, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In teacher education at universities, general pedagogical and psychological principles are often treated separately from subject matter knowledge and therefore run the risk of not being applied in the teaching subject. In an experimental study (N = 60 mathematics student teachers) we investigated the effects of providing aspects of general pedagogical/psychological knowledge (PPK) and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) in an integrated or separated way. In both conditions ("integrated" vs. "separated"), participants individually worked on computer-based learning environments addressing the same topic: use and handling of multiple external representations, a central issue in mathematics. We experimentally varied whether PPK aspects and PCK aspects were treated integrated or apart from one another. As expected, the integrated condition led to greater application of pedagogical/psychological aspects and an increase in applying both knowledge types simultaneously compared to the separated condition. Overall, our findings indicate beneficial effects of an integrated design in teacher education.

  15. Integrating pedagogical content knowledge and pedagogical/psychological knowledge in mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harr, Nora; Eichler, Andreas; Renkl, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In teacher education at universities, general pedagogical and psychological principles are often treated separately from subject matter knowledge and therefore run the risk of not being applied in the teaching subject. In an experimental study (N = 60 mathematics student teachers) we investigated the effects of providing aspects of general pedagogical/psychological knowledge (PPK) and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) in an integrated or separated way. In both conditions (“integrated” vs. “separated”), participants individually worked on computer-based learning environments addressing the same topic: use and handling of multiple external representations, a central issue in mathematics. We experimentally varied whether PPK aspects and PCK aspects were treated integrated or apart from one another. As expected, the integrated condition led to greater application of pedagogical/psychological aspects and an increase in applying both knowledge types simultaneously compared to the separated condition. Overall, our findings indicate beneficial effects of an integrated design in teacher education. PMID:25191300

  16. User's guide to Sears List of subject headings

    CERN Document Server

    Satija, Mohinder P

    2008-01-01

    This book is a companion to the 19th edition of the Sears List and a complete course in the theory and practice of the List for practitioners, teachers, and learners. The object of this small, practical introduction is to be simple, clear, and illustrative, assuming the reader has little prior knowledge either of the Sears List or of subject headings work in general.

  17. Stop the Knowledge Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Faria, Pedro; Sofka, Wolfgang; Shehu, Edlira

    Recent research has given special attention to international knowledge spillovers. Yet, multinational companies (MNCs) subsidiaries are generally treated as passive actors by most studies. We challenge this assumption by investigating the drivers of knowledge protection intensity of MNC...

  18. Subjective safety in traffic.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    The term ‘subjective safety in traffic’ refers to people feeling unsafe in traffic or, more generally, to anxiety regarding being unsafe in traffic for oneself and/or others. Subjective safety in traffic can lead to road users limiting their mobility and social activities, which is one of the

  19. Zwischen Gesetz und Fall. Mutmassungen uber Typologien als Padagogische Wissensform (Between General Law and the Individual Case. Conjectures Concerning Typologies as a Form of Pedagogical Knowledge).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Walter

    2003-01-01

    Considers the mediation between scientific knowledge and practical action as a crucial feature of professional teaching. Investigates the assumption that typologies represent a form of knowledge which can bridge the gap between theory and practice. Differentiates between two forms of typological thinking and discusses reservations concerning…

  20. Comparing a disease-specific and a generic health-related quality of life instrument in subjects with asthma from the general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rochat Thierry

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few epidemiologic studies have assessed health-related quality of life (HRQL of asthma patients from a general population and it is unclear which instrument is best suitable for this purpose. We investigated the validity of the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ and the SF-36 completed by individuals with asthma from the population-based SAPALDIA (Swiss study on air pollution and lung diseases in adults cohort. Methods The study included 258 participants with a physician-diagnosed asthma who had completed the AQLQ and SF-36. We assessed floor and ceiling effects, internal consistency reliability and cross-sectional validity with a priori hypotheses that correlations between the specific HRQL domains (e.g. "symptoms" or "physical functioning" and the corresponding external validation measures (respiratory symptoms, need for doctor visits, limitation in activities due to asthma and lung function would capture similar aspects and be correlated moderately (≥ 0.3 to strongly (≥ 0.5, whereas non-corresponding domains be correlated weakly with each other ( Results The AQLQ showed pronounced ceiling effects with all median domain scores above 6 (scores varied from 1–7. For the SF-36, ceiling effects were present in 5 out of 8 domains. Cronbach's alpha was >0.7 for all AQLQ and SF-36 domains. Correlations between the AQLQ domains "respiratory symptoms", "activity limitation" and "environmental exposure", and the validation measures ranged from 0.29–0.57. Correlations between the "emotional function" domain and the validation measures were also in this range (0.31–0.55 and not as low as we hypothesized. For the SF-36, correlations between "physical functioning" and "role physical", and the validation measures ranged from 0.25–0.56, whereas "role emotional" and "mental health" correlated with these measures from 0.01–0.23. Conclusion The AQLQ and the SF-36 showed fairly good internal consistency. Both instruments

  1. Knowledge brokering:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    In the recent years a number of studies have explored different inter-organizational search strategies in relation to knowledge brokering and innovation performance. So far there has been very limited research that involves a crossing of both organizational and technological boundaries that also......-organizational search strategy that spans technological boundaries and involves the formation and search among weak ties. The findings show how knowledge brokering is influenced by the make-up of the technology involved, the technological distance between the two parties and why weak ties are less likely to collaborate...... on such an opportunity, than a strong tie would be. Furthermore, a number of organizational enablers for this open inter-organizational search and knowledge brokering strategy are identified. The main arguments point to the role of a general technological competence and the R&D department being the networking department....

  2. General practitioners' beliefs about people with schizophrenia and whether they should be subject to discriminatory treatment when in medical hospital: The mediating role of dangerousness perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magliano, Lorenza; Punzo, Rosanna; Strino, Antonella; Acone, Roberta; Affuso, Gaetana; Read, John

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the relationships between General Practitioners' (GPs) beliefs about People With Schizophrenia (PWS) and GPs' recommendations regarding restrictions for such people when in medical (nonpsychiatric) hospital, and whether these relationships were mediated by dangerousness perception. There were 322 randomly selected Italian GPs who completed a questionnaire measuring beliefs about PWS. Structural Equation Model (SEM) was used to explore the effects of these beliefs on the GPs' views about the need for restrictive rules in hospital. Thirty-1 percent of GPs firmly believed that, in medical wards, PWS should be supervised and 18% that they should be separated from other patients. SEM revealed that belief in such differential treatment was positively related to a belief that PWS need medication for the rest of their lives, and to perceptions of others' need for social distance, and of dangerousness. Dangerousness was, in turn, positively related to the belief that PWS need medication for their lives, and to a perception of the need for social distance, but negatively related to perceived capacity to report health problems. Analyses of indirect effects showed that the relationships of belief in discriminatory treatment with belief in medication for life and with perceived social distance were mediated by perceived dangerousness. GPs' attitudes about PWS appear closely with their beliefs on discriminatory behaviors in hospital, and the mediating role of dangerousness perceptions. Providing GPs with education about schizophrenia treatments and prognosis, and countering stereotypes about dangerousness, could be helpful to reduce GPs' beliefs in the need for discriminatory treatment of PWS. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Relationships of National Teacher Examination Communication Skills and General Knowledge Scores with High School and College Grades, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Characteristics, and Self-Reported Skill Ratings and Academic Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurr, K. Terry; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Relationships among National Teacher Examinations (NTE) Communication Skills and General Knowledge test scores, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator characteristics, self-reported academic problems, and 14 skill self-ratings were examined for 161 college teaching majors. After several other variables were controlled, personality variables accounted for a…

  4. Expanding subjectivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda; Soldz, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A major theme in recent psychoanalytic thinking concerns the use of therapist subjectivity, especially “countertransference,” in understanding patients. This thinking converges with and expands developments in qualitative research regarding the use of researcher subjectivity as a tool to understa...

  5. Factor structure and internal consistency of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12 and the Subjective Vitality Scale (VS, and the relationship between them: a study from France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismaïl Amany

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objectives of this study were to test the factor structure and internal consistency of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12 and the Subjective Vitality Scale (VS in elderly French people, and to test the relationship between these two questionnaires. Methods Using a standard 'forward-backward' translation procedure, the English language versions of the two instruments (i.e. the 12-item General Health Questionnaire and the Subjective Vitality Scale were translated into French. A sample of adults aged 58–72 years then completed both questionnaires. Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The factor structures of the two instruments were extracted by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA. Finally, the relationship between the two instruments was assessed by correlation analysis. Results In all, 217 elderly adults participated in the study. The mean age of the respondents was 61.7 (SD = 6.2 years. The mean GHQ-12 score was 17.4 (SD = 8.0, and analysis showed satisfactory internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha coefficient = 0.78. The mean VS score was 22.4 (SD = 7.4 and its internal consistency was found to be good (Cronbach's alpha coefficient = 0.83. While CFA showed that the VS was uni-dimensional, analysis for the GHQ-12 demonstrated a good fit not only to the two-factor model (positive vs. negative items but also to a three-factor model. As expected, there was a strong and significant negative correlation between the GHQ-12 and the VS (r = -0.71, P Conclusion The results showed that the French versions of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12 and the Subjective Vitality Scale (VS are reliable measures of psychological distress and vitality. They also confirm a significant negative correlation between these two instruments, lending support to their convergent validity in an elderly French population. The findings indicate that both measures have good structural

  6. Sobre conhecimento geral e específico: destaque substantivos e adjetivos para uma epistemologia da Enfermagem Sobre el conocimiento general y específico: destaques substantivos y adjetivos para una epistemología de la Enfermería General and specific knowledge: substantive and adjective detachs to an epistemology of nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma de Carvalho

    2007-06-01

    científico. En el análisis de los aspectos mas destacados, algunos conceptos epistemológicos sirven para conferir problemas del saber profesional y de la ciencia en su relación con la práctica de la enseñanza y de la asistencia en enfermería. La problemática del conocimiento general y específico se relaciona con dificultades conceptuales del propio conocimiento en si mismo, pero también con la experiencia de la formación de la conciencia crítica y del perfil profesional frente a los retos de la práctica total de la enfermería enseñanza, investigación y asistencia extensiva a las repercusiones para la formación del perfil profesional en el área de la enfermería.This paper focuses on the general and specific knowledge concerning Nursing - teaching and practice in the art of caring, with implications to the relevant aspects of reality investigation and the search for answer to scientific construction. Objective: To clarify the definitions concerned to Nursing: theory, knowledge itself and research. Methodology discursive with philosophical approach to propositions and arguments on theoretical and practical aspects of human knowledge, the consciousness (subjectivity and reality (object of study, considering the thought and the scientific knowledge. In the analysis of those aspects, some epistemological concepts allow the discussion of questions on professional knowledge and science, related to the practice of teaching and assistance in nursing. The problem of the specific and general knowledge is related not only to the conceptual difficulties and the acquisition of knowledge itself, but also to the experience of acquiring the professional abilities and a critical consciousness facing the challenges of the complete practice of nursing teaching, research and assistance, with consequences to the creation of a professional profile in the Nursing area.

  7. Are general and strategic measures of organizational context and leadership associated with knowledge and attitudes toward evidence-based practices in public behavioral health settings? A cross-sectional observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Byron J; Mandell, David S; Hadley, Trevor R; Rubin, Ronnie M; Evans, Arthur C; Hurford, Matthew O; Beidas, Rinad S

    2017-05-12

    Examining the role of modifiable barriers and facilitators is a necessary step toward developing effective implementation strategies. This study examines whether both general (organizational culture, organizational climate, and transformational leadership) and strategic (implementation climate and implementation leadership) organizational-level factors predict therapist-level determinants of implementation (knowledge of and attitudes toward evidence-based practices). Within the context of a system-wide effort to increase the use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) and recovery-oriented care, we conducted an observational, cross-sectional study of 19 child-serving agencies in the City of Philadelphia, including 23 sites, 130 therapists, 36 supervisors, and 22 executive administrators. Organizational variables included characteristics such as EBP initiative participation, program size, and proportion of independent contractor therapists; general factors such as organizational culture and climate (Organizational Social Context Measurement System) and transformational leadership (Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire); and strategic factors such as implementation climate (Implementation Climate Scale) and implementation leadership (Implementation Leadership Scale). Therapist-level variables included demographics, attitudes toward EBPs (Evidence-Based Practice Attitudes Scale), and knowledge of EBPs (Knowledge of Evidence-Based Services Questionnaire). We used linear mixed-effects regression models to estimate the associations between the predictor (organizational characteristics, general and strategic factors) and dependent (knowledge of and attitudes toward EBPs) variables. Several variables were associated with therapists' knowledge of EBPs. Clinicians in organizations with more proficient cultures or higher levels of transformational leadership (idealized influence) had greater knowledge of EBPs; conversely, clinicians in organizations with more resistant cultures

  8. Transition in public knowledge of risk factors of cardiovascular disease in an Iranian general population: A latent transition analysis (LTA) on a longitudinal large community-based educational prevention program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiee Alhossaini, Mahsa; Hassanzadeh, Akbar; Feizi, Awat; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the second leading cause of death, after accidents, in Iran. This study was performed to assess the change in levels of knowledge about 8 risk factors of CVD and its associated determinants the Iranian general population. METHODS The current repeated cross-sectional study included 3014 people in 2004, 3012 in 2005, and 4719 in 2007, aged older than 19 years. Knowledge about 8 risk factors (high blood pressure, nutrition, physical inactivity, smoking, diabetes, heredity, stress, and obesity) as the major causes of CVD was evaluated using latent transition analysis (LTA). RESULTS The most widely known CVD risk factors were nutrition and physical inactivity followed by stress. In addition, old age, low level of education, male gender and low socioeconomic status (SES) level were the significant determinants of low knowledge levels of CVD risk factors. Besides, individuals’ knowledge of CVD risk factors increased across the time. CONCLUSION Public knowledge of CVD risk factors has increased; however significant gaps continue to exist, particularly among the elderly, less-educated people, people in low socioeconomic status level and men. Future intensified educational efforts by policymakers are necessary for improving knowledge of CVD, particularly among high-risk groups. PMID:28149314

  9. Comparison of nurses and general caregivers' knowledge, attitude, and practice on medication administration process and their distress level in long-term care facilities across Penang, Kuala Lumpur, and Selangor of Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangiisuran, Balamurugan; Tye, Sok Cin; Leow, May Yen; Awang, Rahmat

    2018-02-01

    Comparing nurses and general caregivers' knowledge, attitude, and practices (KAP) on medication administration process in long-term care (LTC) setting and an assessment of their stress, anxiety, and depression (SAD) level. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among nurses and general caregivers working in LTC using a validated questionnaire. Consisting of demographic characteristics (Section 1); 40 questions on KAP (Section 2); and assessment of Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-21) (Section 3). 155 formally paid staffs in 26 LTC facilities were recruited. Nurses scored significantly higher in the knowledge section compared to caregivers (12.4 ± 1.7 vs. 4.5 ± 3.8; P attitude (41.5 ± 4.8 vs. 30.8 ± 7.3; P practice (65.2 ± 8.5 vs. 40.3 ± 10.9; P knowledge on aspects pertaining to posology, appropriate methods of drug administration, and side effects of common drugs used by the elderly. Compared to nurses, the general caregivers also reported poorer medication administration practices; including not checking labels and expiry dates prior to administration, and not providing basic information about medication therapy to the residents. However, both nurses and general caregivers reported positive attitudes in their role as caregivers. They take pride and satisfaction in their occupation providing support to the elderly. General caregivers demonstrated lesser knowledge, poorer attitude, and practices towards medication administration processes, in addition to higher SAD score in LTC facilities.

  10. An Examination of General and Special Education Teachers' Knowledge and Perceptions of Differentiated Reading Instruction in a Co-Teaching Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jelyne Martin

    2016-01-01

    This mixed methods study focused on an analysis of the special education and general education teachers' perceptions of differentiated instruction and differentiated training. The researcher examined special education and general education teachers' use of differentiated instruction curriculum through classroom observations. The participants…

  11. Nesnel ve Öznel Bilginin Tüketicilerin Satın Alma Davranışlarına Etkisine Yönelik Bir Araştırma(An Investigation of The Effect of Objective and Subjective Knowledge on Consumers’ Buying Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalender Özcan ATILGAN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the growing body of marketing literature on the impact of consumer knowledge on intention to buy, distinction between subjective and objective knowledge has clearly been made. The difference between subjective and objective knowledge may be due to both the definition and measurement process. The goal of this research is to examine the impact of both subjective and objective knowledge related to attitude to and intention to buy light milk and dairy products. Data were gathered via face-to-face survey from 330 consumers living in Erdemli district of Mersin, Turkey. A Hybrid Path Analysis was performed to test the hypothesis. The results of Structural Equations Modelling clearly indicate that subjective knowledge and health consciousness are positively associated with attitude towards light milk and dairy products and objective knowledge is negatively associated with attitude towards light milk and dairy products. Also, attitude towards light milk and dairy products is positively associated with intention to buy these products. Implications and suggestions are developed based on the structural model for future researches.

  12. Education integrated into structured general practice care for Type 2 diabetic patients results in sustained improvement of disease knowledge and self-care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Arend, IJM; Stolk, RP; Rutten, GEHM; Schrijvers, GJP

    Aims The objective of this study was to study the effectiveness of structured care with and without integrated education with regard to patients' knowledge, self-care behaviour and disease perception. Methods Four diabetes care programmes implemented in a daily primary care setting were compared,

  13. SUBJECT INDEX

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subject Index. Variation of surface electric field during geomagnetic disturbed period at Maitri, Antarctica. 1721. Geomorphology. A simple depression-filling method for raster and irregular elevation datasets. 1653. Decision Support System integrated with Geographic. Information System to target restoration actions in water-.

  14. Evaluation of Health 200 - Wellness Lifestyles: Can a University General Education Course in Wellness Lifestyles Enhance Students' Behaviors, Attitudes and Knowledge Regarding Their Health?

    OpenAIRE

    Skolaut Zeakes, Beverly Jean Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine whether a required wellness course affected a change in the behaviors of college students. A post-course evaluation, which examined the relation between attitude, knowledge, and behavior, was conducted six months following the completion of the course. A secondary purpose of the research was to solicit information from participating students concerning which portions of the course they felt benefited them and those that did not. This w...

  15. "Wo Es War": Psychoanalysis, Marxism, and Subjectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Subjectivity, for Descartes, emerged when he doubted the veracity of his knowledge. Instead of truth, he counted this knowledge to be inherited myth. Cartesian subjectivity has been helpful for forming a critical education predicated on doubting ideology and hegemony. But Marx indicates a very different kind of knowledge in his analysis of…

  16. The Subjectivity of Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Morten

    What is a 'we' – a collective – and how can we use such communal self-knowledge to help people? This book is about collectivity, participation, and subjectivity – and about the social theories that may help us understand these matters. It also seeks to learn from the innovative practices and ideas...... practices. Through this dialogue, it develops an original trans-disciplinary critical theory and practice of collective subjectivity for which the ongoing construction and overcoming of common sense, or ideology, is central. It also points to ways of relating discourse with agency, and fertilizing insights...... from interactionism and ideology theories in a cultural-historical framework....

  17. SUBJECT INDEX

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Generalized density-functional theory: Conquering the N-representability problem with exact functionals for the electron pair density and the second-order re- duced density matrix. 507. Chemical reactivity of hypervalent silicon com- pounds: The local hard and soft acids and bases prin- ciple viewpoint. 525. A philicity based ...

  18. A Study of General Education Astronomy Students' Understandings of Cosmology. Part V. The Effects of a New Suite of Cosmology "Lecture-Tutorials" on Students' Conceptual Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Colin S.; Prather, Edward E.; Duncan, Douglas K.

    2012-01-01

    This is the final paper in a five-paper series describing our national study of the teaching and learning of cosmology in general education astronomy college-level courses. A significant portion of this work was dedicated to the development of five new "Lecture-Tutorials" that focus on addressing the conceptual and reasoning difficulties that our…

  19. [Design and validation of a questionnaire to assess the level of general knowledge on eating disorders in students of Health Sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Socarrás, Violeida; Aguilar Martínez, Alicia; Vaqué Crusellas, Cristina; Milá Villarroel, Raimon; González Rivas, Fabián

    2016-01-01

    To design and validate a questionnaire to assess the level of knowledge regarding eating disorders in college students. Observational, prospective, and longitudinal study, with the design of the questionnaire based on a conceptual review and validation by a cognitive pre-test and pilot test-retest, with analysis of the psychometric properties in each application. University Foundation of Bages, Barcelona. Marco community care. A total of 140 students from Health Sciences; 53 women and 87 men with a mean age of 21.87 years; 28 participated in the pre-test and 112 in the test-retests, 110 students completed the study. Validity and stability study using Cronbach α and Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient statistics; relationship skills with sex and type of study, non-parametric statistical Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests; for demographic variables, absolute or percentage frequencies, as well as mean, central tendency and standard deviation as measures of dispersion were calculated. The statistical significance level was 95% confidence. The questionnaire was obtained that had 10 questions divided into four dimensions (classification, demographics characteristics of patients, risk factors and clinical manifestations of eating disorders). The scale showed good internal consistency in its final version (Cronbach α=0.724) and adequate stability (Pearson correlation 0.749). The designed tool can be accurately used to assess Health Sciences students' knowledge of eating disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Double-blind randomised controlled trial of the independent and synergistic effect of Spirulina maxima with exercise (ISESE) on general fitness, lipid profile and redox status in overweight and obese subjects: study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Lepe, Marco Antonio; López-Díaz, José Alberto; de la Rosa, Laura Alejandra; Hernández-Torres, Rosa Patricia; Wall-Medrano, Abraham; Juarez-Oropeza, Marco Antonio; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Urquidez-Romero, Rene; Ramos-Jiménez, Arnulfo

    2017-01-01

    Introduction In order to reduce cardiovascular disease risk factors, a healthy diet must include dietary antioxidants from different sources (eg, Spirulina maxima) and regular practice of exercise should be promoted. There is some evidence from animal studies that S. maxima and exercise decrease cardiovascular disease risks factors. However, very few studies have proved the independent or synergistic effect of S. maxima plus exercise in humans. This study attempts to address the independent and synergistic effects in overweight and obese subjects participating in a systematic physical exercise programme at moderate intensity on general fitness, plasma lipid profile and antioxidant capacity. Methods and analysis Using a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, counterbalanced crossover study design, 80 healthy overweight and obese subjects will be evaluated during a 12-week isoenergetic diet accompanied by 4.5 g/day S. maxima intake and/or a physical systematic exercise programme at moderate intensity. Body composition, oxygen uptake, heart rate, capillary blood lactate, plasma concentrations of triacylglycerols, total, low-density and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, antioxidant status, lipid oxidation, protein carbonyls, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and paraoxonase will be assessed. Ethics and dissemination This study and all the procedures have been approved by the Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez Bioethics Committee. Findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals, national and international conferences. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02837666. PMID:28645949

  1. How Knowledge Powers Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemov, Doug

    2017-01-01

    Recent research shows that reading comprehension relies heavily on prior knowledge. Far more than generic "reading skills" like drawing inferences, making predictions, and knowing the function of subheads, how well students learn from a nonfiction text depends on their background knowledge of the text's subject matter. And in a cyclical…

  2. Knowledge on musculoskeletal diseases by the Spanish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro, Pablo; Alfaro, Noelia; Méndez, José Ignacio; Garcia-Vicuña, Rosario; Jover, Juan Ángel; Sevilla, Jordi; Gabriele, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    To explore knowledge on musculoskeletal-diseases (MSDs) by the Spanish population. This was a cross-sectional study of the general population (> 18 years) using a telephone survey of 1,009 subjects stratified by habitat size, age, sex, and geographic area. A structured questionnaire was used to collect information on the subjects, their general knowledge of MSDs (GK), their specific knowledge of particular MSDs (SK), and their knowledge of their social impact (KSI). Synthetic indicators of the level of knowledge were used to analyze, using univariate and multivariate models, variables associated to the level of knowledge. The KSI level ranges from medium-high (mean: 0.62 ± 0.16 out of 1), suggesting that most subjects recognize MSDs as disabling conditions which affect the ability to work and have a high personal and social cost. The GK level is intermediate (mean: 0.50 ± 0.17); 60% of subjects know something about MSDs, but 54% state that their information is poor/very poor. The SK level is low (mean: 0.18 ± 0.10), and there are some MSDs that are little known (lupus, spondylitis). Being male or retired or having a MSD is associated to a greater knowledge of MSDs. The Spanish population has a medium level of knowledge of the frequency and extent to which MSDs affect performance of activities by those who suffer them. They identify them adequately and have a GK of their symptoms, but have little information about them. The level of knowledge varies depending on social and demographic factors and on whether or not the subject has direct or indirect experience of what a MSD means. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Generale preventie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1949-01-01

    In part I of this study a survey has veen given of what Dutch authors have written since 1870, when capital punishment was abolished, on subjects concerning the general preventive effect of punishment. This historical survey ends where, during the years 1940-1945, under the stress of the occupation

  4. General practitioners' knowledge and practice of complementary/alternative medicine and its relationship with life-styles: a population-based survey in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Frè Monica

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The growing popularity of CAM among the public is coupled with an ongoing debate on its effectiveness, safety, and its implications on the reimbursement system. This issue is critically important for GPs, who have a "gatekeeping" role with respect to health care expenditure. GPs must be aware of medications' uses, limitations and possible adverse effects. Our objective was to explore GPs' knowledge of CAM and patterns of recommendation and practice, as well as the relationship between such patterns and GPs' life-styles. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in Tuscany, a region of central Italy. One hundred percent female GPs (498 and a 60% random sample of male GPs (1310 practising in the region were contacted through a self-administered postal questionnaire followed by a postal reminder and telephone interview. Results Overall response rate was 82.1%. Most respondents (58% recommended CAM but a far smaller fraction (13% practised it; yet 36% of CAM practitioners had no certificated training. Being female, younger age, practising in larger communities, having had some training in CAM as well as following a vegetarian or macrobiotic diet and doing physical activity were independent predictors of CAM recommendation and practice. However, 42% of GPs did not recommend CAM to patients mostly because of the insufficient evidence of its effectiveness. Conclusion CAM knowledge among GPs is not as widespread as the public demand seems to require, and the scarce evidence of CAM effectiveness hinders its professional use among a considerable number of GPs. Sound research on CAM effectiveness is needed to guide physicians' behaviour, to safeguard patients' safety, and to assist policy-makers in planning regulations for CAM usage.

  5. The effects of community-wide dissemination of information on perceptions of palliative care, knowledge about opioids, and sense of security among cancer patients, their families, and the general public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Miki; Hirai, Kei; Takebayashi, Toru; Morita, Tatsuya; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Takeuchi, Ayano; Yamagishi, Akemi; Kinoshita, Hiroya; Shirahige, Yutaka; Eguchi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Prejudices against palliative care are a potential barrier to quality end-of-life care. There have been few large-scale community-wide interventions to distribute appropriate information about palliative care, and no studies have investigated their impact on cancer patients, their families, and the general public. Thus, we conducted a 3-year community intervention and evaluated the effects of distributing such information at the community level, and explored associations among levels of exposure, perceptions, knowledge, and the sense of security achieved. Over a period of 3 years, we provided flyers, booklets, posters, and public lectures about palliative care in four regions of Japan, and carried out pre- and post-intervention surveys with repeated cross-sectional samplings of cancer patients (pre 859, post 857), bereaved family members (1110, 1137), and the general public (3984, 1435). The levels of exposure to the provided information were measured by a multiple-choice questionnaire after intervention. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to estimate multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for perceptions of palliative care, knowledge about opioids, and sense of security among the exposure groups. Overall perceptions of palliative care, opioids, and receiving care at home improved significantly among the general public and families, but not among the patients at the community level. However, multiple regression revealed that patients of extensive exposure category had significantly more positive perceptions of palliative care to those of non-exposure category (p = 0.02). The sense of security regarding cancer care of all patients, family members, and the general public improved. Among others, the respondents who reported extensive exposure in the general public and family members scored significantly higher sense of security. Our findings indicate that providing palliative care information via small media and lectures in the community is

  6. Students' Knowledge of AIDS and Their Attitudes toward Gay Men and Lesbian Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieger, Ingrid; Ponterotto, Joseph G.

    1988-01-01

    Assessed students' (N=198) knowledge of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) specific facts, their attitudes toward people with AIDS, and their general attitudes toward homosexual men and lesbian women. Found most subjects accurately informed on the subject of AIDS. Most held neither negative views toward homosexuality nor punitive views…

  7. Photogrammetry and remote sensing education subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaridou, Maria A.; Karagianni, Aikaterini Ch.

    2017-09-01

    The rapid technologic advances in the scientific areas of photogrammetry and remote sensing require continuous readjustments at the educational programs and their implementation. The teaching teamwork should deal with the challenge to offer the volume of the knowledge without preventing the understanding of principles and methods and also to introduce "new" knowledge (advances, trends) followed by evaluation and presentation of relevant applications. This is of particular importance for a Civil Engineering Faculty as this in Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, as the framework of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing is closely connected with applications in the four educational Divisions of the Faculty. This paper refers to the above and includes subjects of organizing the courses in photogrammetry and remote sensing in the Civil Engineering Faculty of Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. A scheme of the general curriculum as well the teaching aims and methods are also presented.

  8. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 24: A general approach to measuring the value of aerospace information products and services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinberg, Herbert R.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the various approaches to measuring the value of information, first defining the meanings of information, economics of information, and value. It concludes that no general model of measuring the value of information is possible and that the usual approaches, such as cost/benefit equations, have very limited applications. It also concludes that in specific contexts with given goals for newly developed products and services or newly acquired information there is a basis for its objective valuation. The axioms and inputs for such a model are described and directions for further verification and analysis are proposed.

  9. Knowledge Management at CNAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callosada, C. de la

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge management at CNAT (Almaraz & Trillo NPPs) representsa significant part of our safety-oriented management system. The purpose is to generate for the stations useful knowledge, which should be then preserved and made easily accessible for everyone in the organization. The aim is to promote knowledge usage for ensuring safe plant operation and facilitating the required generational change-over. In fact, knowledge management is considered one of the main policies at CNAT, with everyone in the organization being expected to collaborate in it. Similarly, some general behavioral expectations at CNAT are directly or indirectly related to knowledge management (i.e. qualification, teamwork, learning and continuous improvement). (Author)

  10. Integrated learning: ways of fostering the applicability of teachers' pedagogical and psychological knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harr, Nora; Eichler, Andreas; Renkl, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In teacher education, general pedagogical and psychological knowledge (PPK) is often taught separately from the teaching subject itself, potentially leading to inert knowledge. In an experimental study with 69 mathematics student teachers, we tested the benefits of fostering the integration of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) and general PPK with respect to knowledge application. Integration was fostered either by integrating the contents or by prompting the learners to integrate separately taught knowledge. Fostering integration, as compared to a separate presentation without integration help, led to more applicable PPK and greater simultaneous application of PPK and PCK. The advantages of fostering knowledge integration were not moderated by the student teachers' prior knowledge or working memory capacity. A disadvantage of integrating different knowledge types referred to increased learning times.

  11. Integrated learning: ways of fostering the applicability of teachers’ pedagogical and psychological knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harr, Nora; Eichler, Andreas; Renkl, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In teacher education, general pedagogical and psychological knowledge (PPK) is often taught separately from the teaching subject itself, potentially leading to inert knowledge. In an experimental study with 69 mathematics student teachers, we tested the benefits of fostering the integration of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) and general PPK with respect to knowledge application. Integration was fostered either by integrating the contents or by prompting the learners to integrate separately taught knowledge. Fostering integration, as compared to a separate presentation without integration help, led to more applicable PPK and greater simultaneous application of PPK and PCK. The advantages of fostering knowledge integration were not moderated by the student teachers’ prior knowledge or working memory capacity. A disadvantage of integrating different knowledge types referred to increased learning times. PMID:26082740

  12. Morbidity pattern of hydatid disease (cystic echinococcosis) and lack of its knowledge in patients attending Mamata General Hospital, Khammam, Andhra Pradesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemachander, S Suguna; Prasad, C Rajendra; Jessica, M

    2008-01-01

    There is hearsay that prevalence of hydatid disease in Khammam and Nalgonda districts of Andhra Pradesh is high. We report here a preliminary study conducted to determine the magnitude of the problem of hydatid disease and the morbidity associated with it in patients attending MGH, KMM, A.P. (rural hospital). Eleven cases were identified during the period from November 2005 to May 2006 (seven months). Pain in abdomen, mass per abdomen, loss of appetite, pregnancy complicated by cystic echinococcosis (CE), and jaundice were the main clinical symptoms and signs. Ultrasonography, detection and removal of the cysts on the operation table, microscopic examination of the aspirated hydatid fluid were confirmatory. Ziehl-Neelsen stain of the aspirated fluid revealed acid-fast scolices. Interrogation of the patients and their family members (50) revealed that there was a total lack of knowledge of dog-tapeworm-caused infection in humans. They knew 'rabies' as the only disease man gets from dogs, and tapeworms are from pork and beef.

  13. Knowledge management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tayfun Gülle

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The book includes detailed information concerning knowledge and knowledge management with current resources in seven chapters uder the titles of “organizational effects of knowlegde management, knowledge management systems, new knowledge discovery: data mining, computer as an information sharing platform, technologies as knowledge management: artificial intelligence and knowledge based systems, future of knowlegde management”. Concepts of knowledge and knowledge management becomes phenomenon for all disciplinaries so global companies, other companies, state sector, epistemologists, experts of innovation and governance, information professionals etc may find informative to it. The book also includes three prefaces which are well-informed and so all of them is summarized in the text.

  14. Knowledge management for libraries

    CERN Document Server

    Forrestal, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Libraries are creating dynamic knowledge bases to capture both tacit and explicit knowledge and subject expertise for use within and beyond their organizations. In this book, readers will learn to move policies and procedures manuals online using a wiki, get the most out of Microsoft SharePoint with custom portals and Web Parts, and build an FAQ knowledge base from reference management applications such as LibAnswers. Knowledge Management for Libraries guides readers through the process of planning, developing, and launching th

  15. Level and conditioning of knowledge about breast cancer displayed by women in perimenopausal age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogusz, Renata; Humeniuk, Ewa; Walecka, Irena; Bojar, Iwona

    2016-06-02

    Women aged 50-69 are the most likely to develop breast cancer. Knowledge about breast tumours as well as regular examination are two of the key factors which reduce the risk of the disease, and increase both the success of treatment and chances of survival. The aim of the paper was to assess knowledge about risk factors, symptoms, screening, early diagnosis and breast cancer treatment among women in perimenopausal age. 400 women aged 45-60, residing in the Lublin region of eastern Poland participated in the research. The primary research tool was a questionnaire with 35 questions checking knowledge about symptoms, screening and early diagnosis, as well as breast cancer treatment. Particulars were also part of the questionnaire. Over 50% of women obtained average results with regard to general knowledge, 40% obtained high results and 6% low results. Subjective assessment of the women's knowledge was statistically significantly (pbreast cancer early diagnosis and therapy. Over a half of the women in perimenopausal age had average general knowledge, while only 40% - high. Over half of the women in perimenopausal age had average general knowledge, while only 40% - high. Subjective assessment of knowledge differed statistically significantly from the objective assessment. Women with higher education and living in rural areas displayed a higher level of general knowledge about breast cancer. The study did not identified any relationship between level of knowledge about breast cancer and age, financial situation or health of women in perimenopausal age.

  16. Knowledge management, innovativeness, and organizational performance: Evidence from Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavković Marko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of knowledge management and its contribution to organizational performance and innovativeness has been the subject of many studies and is increasingly gaining recognition worldwide. Our study analyses the impact of knowledge management on perceived organizational performance and innovativeness in the context of the Serbian economy. The results of the empirical research on leading Serbian firms demonstrates the direct and positive effect of knowledge management. The regression results show that knowledge management generally has a positive effect on organizational performance. Also, the results show that knowledge management is positively related to the different dimensions of organizational innovation (process innovation and administrative innovation. The mediating effects of process innovation and administrative innovation on the relationship between knowledge management and organizational performance are only partially supported.

  17. Knowledge as the Source of Opportunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erikson, Truls; Korsgaard, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we show how Davidson's theory of knowledge can be used to elaborate the objective, intersubjective and subjective components of knowledge. Departing from Hayek's core insights about the dispersion of knowledge in society, we reiterate that opportunities involve subjective knowledge...... such as judgment and imagination, intersubjective knowledge of the social and institutional context, as well as knowledge about objective realities “out there”....

  18. Knowledge Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    The first of the four papers in this symposium, "Knowledge Management and Knowledge Dissemination" (Wim J. Nijhof), presents two case studies exploring the strategies companies use in sharing and disseminating knowledge and expertise among employees. "A Theory of Knowledge Management" (Richard J. Torraco), develops a conceptual…

  19. An internet based approach to improve general practitioners' knowledge and practices: the development and pilot testing of the "ABC's of vitamin D" program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonevski, B; Magin, P; Horton, G; Bryant, J; Randell, M; Kimlin, M G

    2015-06-01

    Online continuing medical education (CME) offers a number of advantages for physicians including flexibility with regards to location and timing of use. In order to effect physician practices and improve patient outcomes, it is important that the development of online CME is theory and evidence-based. This paper aims to describe the development of an online CME program for practising general practitioners (GPs) on vitamin D and sun health called "The ABC's of Vitamin D for GPs" using elements of design principles for physician-education web sites as a framework. The paper will also report the program's usability and acceptability pilot test results. The ABC's of Vitamin D program was developed following nine principles: needs assessment; evidence-based content development; multimodal program and modularisation; clinical cases; tailoring and interactivity; audit and feedback; credibility of the web site host; patient education materials; ease of use and navigation. Among the 20 GPs invited, acceptability and useability was tested with 12 GPs (60%) who agreed to participate and were interviewed following use of the program. The study was conducted between 2011 and 2013. An online CME program consisting of eight modules was constructed. Of the 12 participating GPs, most (n=11) reported that the program was clear and easy to understand, logical, easy to navigate, and took a reasonable amount of time (estimated between 1 and 3h) to complete. Eleven of 12 participants said they would use the program as an accredited CME activity and all participants indicated that the program was 'very or somewhat' likely to lead to changes in the advice patients are given. This study found that a theory and evidence based approach for the development of an online CME program for GPs was acceptable to users. Further research is needed to examine whether the online CME program is effective at changing GP practices and improving patient outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All

  20. Knowledge Sharing is Knowledge Creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge sharing and knowledge transfer are important to knowledge communication. However when groups of knowledge workers engage in knowledge communication activities, it easily turns into mere mechanical information processing despite other ambitions. This article relates literature of knowledge...... communication and knowledge creation to an intervention study in a large Danish food production company. For some time a specific group of employees uttered a wish for knowledge sharing, but it never really happened. The group was observed and submitted to metaphor analysis as well as analysis of co......-creation strategies. Confronted with the results, the group completely altered their approach to knowledge sharing and let it become knowledge co-creation. The conclusions are, that knowledge is and can only be a diverse and differentiated concept, and that groups are able to embrace this complexity. Thus rather than...

  1. Understanding Knowledge through the Example of C. S. Peirce’s Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enn Kasak

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the era of Charles Sanders Peirce, cosmology was similar to philosophy that was still aspiring to be scientific. Peirce, having worked as an astrophysicist, supported cosmology’s strive towards science. In cosmology, one often relies on knowledge different from everyday knowledge: such knowledge is very general and is situated on the boundaries of what is known; it is very difficult to ascertain it empirically. After Karl Popper, a realist may distinguish between subjective and objective knowledge but this distinction does not suffice for cosmology. A pragmaticist following Peirce could distinguish knowledge about real ideas, which could be termed i-knowledge. This could mean being made party to or being grasped by real ideas functioning outside ourselves. Expressing all i-knowledge as propositional knowledge is difficult. However, non-propositional i-knowledge can sometimes be expressed as principles or paradoxically.

  2. Governing Individual Knowledge Sharing Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minbaeva, Dana; Pedersen, Torben

    2010-01-01

    The emerging Knowledge Governance Approach asserts the need to build microfoundations grounded in individual action. Toward this goal, using the Theory of Planned Behavior, we aim to explain individual knowledge sharing behavior as being determined by the intention to share knowledge and its...... antecedents: attitude toward knowledge sharing, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control. In addition, we consider managerial interventions (governance mechanisms) that managers can employ to influence the identified antecedents and thereby govern individual knowledge sharing behavior. We test...... a positive effect on subjective norms and perceived behavioral control, respectively....

  3. Knowledge Sharing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdt Christensen, Peter

    The concept of knowledge management has, indeed, become a buzzword that every single organization is expected to practice and live by. Knowledge management is about managing the organization's knowledge for the common good of the organization -but practicing knowledge management is not as simple...... as that. This article focuses on knowledge sharing as the process seeking to reduce the resources spent on reinventing the wheel.The article introduces the concept of time sensitiveness; i.e. that knowledge is either urgently needed, or not that urgently needed. Furthermore, knowledge sharing...... is considered as either a push or pull system. Four strategies for sharing knowledge - help, post-it, manuals and meeting, and advice are introduced. Each strategy requires different channels for sharing knowledge. An empirical analysis in a production facility highlights how the strategies can be practiced....

  4. Stroke Knowledge in Spanish-speaking populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Maximiliano A; Ameriso, Sebastián F; Willey, Joshua Z

    2015-01-01

    Background Spanish is the second most spoken language in the world. Spanish-speaking populations (SSP) have heterogeneous cultural backgrounds, racial and ethnical origins, economic status, and access to health care systems. There are no published reviews about stroke knowledge in SSP. We reviewed the existing literature addressing stroke knowledge among SSP and propose future directions for research. Summary We identified 18 suitable studies by searching PubMed, Lilacs, Scopus, Embase, Cochrane and Scielo databases, and looking at reference lists of eligible articles. We also included 2 conference abstracts. Data related to stroke knowledge from studies of Spanish-speakers was analyzed. Key messages Little is known about stroke knowledge in SSP, especially in Latin America. Information is poor even among subjects at risk, stroke patients, stroke survivors, and health care providers. “Ictus”, the word used for stroke in Spanish, is largely unrecognized among subjects at risk. Furthermore, access to medical care and presence of neurologists are suboptimal in many regions. There are several potential issues to solve regarding stroke knowledge and stroke care in SSP. Programs to educate the general population and non-neurologists medical providers in stroke and telemedicine may be suitable options to improve the present situation. PMID:25871697

  5. Knowledge Acquisition, Knowledge Programming, and Knowledge Refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes-Roth, Frederick; And Others

    This report describes the principal findings and recommendations of a 2-year Rand research project on machine-aided knowledge acquisition and discusses the transfer of expertise from humans to machines, as well as the functions of planning, debugging, knowledge refinement, and autonomous machine learning. The relative advantages of humans and…

  6. Interactive knowledge acquisition tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudziak, Martin J.; Feinstein, Jerald L.

    1987-01-01

    The problems of designing practical tools to aid the knowledge engineer and general applications used in performing knowledge acquisition tasks are discussed. A particular approach was developed for the class of knowledge acquisition problem characterized by situations where acquisition and transformation of domain expertise are often bottlenecks in systems development. An explanation is given on how the tool and underlying software engineering principles can be extended to provide a flexible set of tools that allow the application specialist to build highly customized knowledge-based applications.

  7. Human subject research for engineers a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    de Winter, Joost C F

    2017-01-01

    This Brief introduces engineers to the main principles in ethics, research design, statistics, and publishing of human subject research. In recent years, engineering has become strongly connected to disciplines such as biology, medicine, and psychology. Often, engineers (and engineering students) are expected to perform human subject research. Typical human subject research topics conducted by engineers include human-computer interaction (e.g., evaluating the usability of software), exoskeletons, virtual reality, teleoperation, modelling of human behaviour and decision making (often within the framework of ‘big data’ research), product evaluation, biometrics, behavioural tracking (e.g., of work and travel patterns, or mobile phone use), transport and planning (e.g., an analysis of flows or safety issues), etc. Thus, it can be said that knowledge on how to do human subject research is indispensable for a substantial portion of engineers. Engineers are generally well trained in calculus and mechanics, but m...

  8. Knowledge management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul; Mahnke, Volker

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge management has emerged as a very successful organization practice and has beenextensively treated in a large body of academic work. Surprisingly, however, organizationaleconomics (i.e., transaction cost economics, agency theory, team theory and property rightstheory) has played no role...... in the development of knowledge management. We argue thatorganizational economics insights can further the theory and practice of knowledge managementin several ways. Specifically, we apply notions of contracting, team production,complementaries, hold-up, etc. to knowledge management issues (i.e., creating...... and integrationknowledge, rewarding knowledge workers, etc.) , and derive refutable implications that are novelto the knowledge management field from our discussion....

  9. The Episteme of Knowledge Civilisation

    OpenAIRE

    Wierzbicki, Andrzej P.; Nakamori, Yoshiteru

    2007-01-01

    The paper starts with a discussion of the concept of knowledge society, economy or civilization, while stressing possible different interpretations of several issues: the reasons of emergence of knowledge societies, the issue of perceiving knowledge as capacity of action versus perceiving it as intellectual heritage of humanity, the issue of public versus private ownership of knowledge as the source of the basic socio-economic conflict of the knowledge civilization era. In general, these diff...

  10. Objective drivers of subjective well-being in geriatric inpatients: mobility function and level of education are general predictors of self-evaluated health, feeling of loneliness, and severity of depression symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bień, Barbara; Bień-Barkowska, Katarzyna

    2016-12-01

    Identification of optimal predictors for different indicators of subjective well-being (SWB) in geriatric inpatients: (1) self-evaluated health status (SEH), (2) feeling of loneliness (FoL), and (3) severity of depression symptoms (SoDS). Investigation of the relationship between response categories of the SWB indicators and their predictors. The data were collected retrospectively from hospital records. All 555 geriatric inpatients underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment, including the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test. The Bayesian information criterion was applied in ordinal logistic regression models to identify optimal predictors of SEH, FoL, and SoDS among different objective factors. After controlling for high-stress situations in the recent past, motor slowness measured with the TUG test, and a level of education were jointly selected as the best predictors of all three SWB indicators. The speed of performing the TUG test improved SEH (OR = 2.08) and decreased both FoL (OR = 0.41) and SoDS (OR = 0.41). A higher level of education improved SEH (OR = 1.05) and alleviated both FoL (OR = 0.96) and SoDS (OR = 0.92). Additionally, a higher level of SEH was positively correlated with a lower BMI, improved instrumental activities of daily living (I-ADL), and higher hemoglobin level. FoL was reinforced by the level of comorbidity, and SoDS was increased by impaired basic ADL. Although SWB in geriatric inpatients can be explained by objective comorbidities and disabilities, the good motor function (i.e., a TUG test outcome of less than about 20 s) and a higher level of education were the general predictors that exert an independent beneficial impact on all three SWB indicators.

  11. Health knowledge among the millennial generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Tom; Shaffer, Michele L; Christy, Stetter; Widome, Mark D; Repke, John; Weitekamp, Michael R; Eslinger, Paul J; Bargainnier, Sandra S; Paul, Ian M

    2013-04-28

    The Millennial Generation, also known as Generation Y, is the demographic cohort following Generation X, and is generally regarded to be composed of those individuals born between 1980 and 2000. They are the first to grow up in an environment where health-related information is widely available by internet, TV and other electronic media, yet we know very little about the scope of their health knowledge. This study was undertaken to quantify two domains of clinically relevant health knowledge: factual content and ability to solve health related questions (application) in nine clinically related medical areas. Study subjects correctly answered, on average, 75% of health application questions but only 54% of health content questions. Since students were better able to correctly answer questions dealing with applications compared to those on factual content contemporary US high school students may not use traditional hierarchical learning models in acquisition of their health knowledge.

  12. Health Knowledge Among the Millennial Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Tom; Shaffer, Michele L.; Christy, Stetter; Widome, Mark D.; Repke, John; Weitekamp, Michael R.; Eslinger, Paul J.; Bargainnier, Sandra S.; Paul, Ian M.

    2013-01-01

    The Millennial Generation, also known as Generation Y, is the demographic cohort following Generation X, and is generally regarded to be composed of those individuals born between 1980 and 2000. They are the first to grow up in an environment where health-related information is widely available by internet, TV and other electronic media, yet we know very little about the scope of their health knowledge. This study was undertaken to quantify two domains of clinically relevant health knowledge: factual content and ability to solve health related questions (application) in nine clinically related medical areas. Study subjects correctly answered, on average, 75% of health application questions but only 54% of health content questions. Since students were better able to correctly answer questions dealing with applications compared to those on factual content contemporary US high school students may not use traditional hierarchical learning models in acquisition of their health knowledge. PMID:25170479

  13. Dancers' Perceived and Actual Knowledge of Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Dana H; Lynch, Meaghan; Cushman, Daniel; Hu, Jason; Garner, Jocelyn

    2017-06-15

    Dancers are highly susceptible to musculoskeletal injuries and frequently require interaction with medical professionals. While many dancers have a finely tuned awareness of their bodies, their knowledge of the fundamentals of human anatomy is not uniform. There is a paucity of literature on the benefits of human anatomy education in dancers, though it seems intuitive that there should be a relationship. The purpose of this study was to assess dancers' perceived and actual knowledge of basic musculoskeletal anatomy and its relationship to function. Adult dancers at the undergraduate, pre-professional, and professional levels were surveyed through an anonymous online questionnaire. Questions included demographic information, dance techniques studied, anatomy training, and injury history. Subjects rated their perceived knowledge of anatomy and were tested with 15 multiple-choice questions on basic musculoskeletal anatomy. Four hundred seventy-five surveys were completed. Ordinal regression showed a correlation of perceived to actual knowledge of anatomy (p < 0.001). Factors that correlated with increases in both perceived and actual knowledge of anatomy included having taken an anatomy course of any type (p < 0.001) and increased age (p ≤ 0.001). Years of dance training and professional dancer status both significantly correlated with increased knowledge of anatomy (p < 0.001) but not perceived knowledge. Chi-square analysis showed that dancers with training in either modern or jazz dance had a significantly higher perceived, but not actual, knowledge when compared to those without training in those styles of dance (p < 0.001 and p = 0.011, respectively). In conclusion, dancers generally scored well on questions pertaining to basic musculoskeletal anatomy, and their perception correlated with their actual knowledge of anatomy. Factors that contribute to dancers' knowledge of anatomy include age, years of experience, professional dancer status, and anatomy training.

  14. Knowledge management and history

    OpenAIRE

    Ermine, Jean-Louis; Pauget, Bertrand; Beretti, Annie; Tortorici, Gilbert

    2004-01-01

    International audience; Capitalisation of the history of a technology, a technique or a concept within an industrial company is relevant to historians. However it largely exceeds the historical problems from a Knowledge Management point of view. In this context, it can be the subject of specific approaches especially Knowledge Engineering. However, it faces two types of difficulties: - The techniques in History have few modelling tools, and are even rather reticent with the use of such tools....

  15. Model-free adaptive sliding mode controller design for generalized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L M WANG

    2017-08-16

    Aug 16, 2017 ... Abstract. A novel model-free adaptive sliding mode strategy is proposed for a generalized projective synchronization (GPS) between two entirely unknown fractional-order chaotic systems subject to the external disturbances. To solve the difficulties from the little knowledge about the master–slave system ...

  16. Researching Risk: Narrative, Biography, Subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Henwood

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article contributes to the development of methodological practices promoting greater epistemic reflexivity in risk research and in social science generally. Knowledge of the specific practices researchers will find useful cannot exist separately from any particular empirical project. Accordingly, we report on, and provide a reflective account of, the "nuclear risk" project that was part of the Social Contexts and Responses to Risk (SCARR network in the UK (2003-2008. A key focus is exploring the value of narrative methods—especially narrative elicitation methods—for understanding people's perceptions of, and ways of living with, risk. We credit our deployment of a narrative method with producing a rich form of data on risk-biography intersections, which have carried great significance in our analytical work on the way biographical experiences, dynamically unfolding through space and time, can be interrupted by risk events. Arguments from the literature on reflexive modernity are deployed to make the case for: researching risk in everyday life as a problematic in and of itself; placing concepts of risk-biography, risk-reflexivity and risk-subjectivity at centre stage; and finding ways to inquire into the social and psychic complexities involved in the dynamic construction and reconstruction of risk phenomena. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1001201

  17. Accessible Knowledge - Knowledge on Accessibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Inge Mette

    2015-01-01

    Although serious efforts are made internationally and nationally, it is a slow process to make our physical environment accessible. In the actual design process, architects play a major role. But what kinds of knowledge, including research-based knowledge, do practicing architects make use of when...... designing accessible environments? The answer to the question is crucially important since it affects how knowledge is distributed and how accessibility can be ensured. In order to get first-hand knowledge about the design process and the sources from which they gain knowledge, 11 qualitative interviews...... were conducted with architects with experience of designing for accessibility. The analysis draws on two theoretical distinctions. The first is research-based knowledge versus knowledge used by architects. The second is context-independent knowledge versus context-dependent knowledge. The practitioners...

  18. Generalized polygons

    CERN Document Server

    Maldeghem, Hendrik

    1998-01-01

    This book is intended to be an introduction to the fascinating theory ofgeneralized polygons for both the graduate student and the specialized researcher in the field. It gathers together a lot of basic properties (some of which are usually referred to in research papers as belonging to folklore) and very recent and sometimes deep results. I have chosen a fairly strict geometrical approach, which requires some knowledge of basic projective geometry. Yet, it enables one to prove some typically group-theoretical results such as the determination of the automorphism groups of certain Moufang polygons. As such, some basic group-theoretical knowledge is required of the reader. The notion of a generalized polygon is a relatively recent one. But it is one of the most important concepts in incidence geometry. Generalized polygons are the building bricks of Tits buildings. They are the prototypes and precursors of more general geometries such as partial geometries, partial quadrangles, semi-partial ge­ ometries, near...

  19. How general is general information construct?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Zarevski

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a small number of constructs in the field of differential psychology that have raised so much debate between psychologists and professionals in related disciplines as is the case of general (verbal information construct. It seemed reasonable to test the validity of this construct measured with general information test in comparison with other measures of knowledge (cultural knowledge, vocabulary, knowledge of the most recent events, foreign language knowledge, and a standard verbal type g test. A sample of 376 candidates for state services was tested in a selection situation. Three analyses were conducted to determine the position of general information test in the space of other verbal competency measures. The first analysis questioned latent structure of the space of four tests having the same format and asking about the knowledge of international terms, general culture, knowledge of most recent events, and general information. The second analysis included the g-factor intelligence test so to see how the above described structure changes when this new test is introduced. The third analysis introduced an English language test. In all of the three component analyses only one eigenvalue was larger than 1 and it explained between 52 and 64% of variance. In all analyses general information test had the highest projection on the only significant latent dimension of these cognitive spaces. In other words, it can be concluded that the construct of general information is in the center of this hyperconus. That is why we consider measurement of general information knowledge, as well as the construct itself, to be an important question in psychological diagnostics. Thus, it is important to go further with the investigation of this construct because it does not seem that it is named general information by accident.

  20. Subject Orientation of Teaching and Academic Subjects in the Context of Different Didactic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Osmolovskaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the research findings concerning the didactic characteristics and means of subject-oriented teaching. The research question includes the content of the general secondary education regarded as the design object. The process of selecting and structuring materials is reviewed from the theoretical standpoint, and the attempt is made to identify the ways of selecting materials for students’ learning from the social experience reflected in culture. The author introduces the concept of subject-orientation as a tool providing pedagogic adaptation of social experience in the process of teaching content development. Subject-oriented teaching is defined in the context of traditional knowledge, as well as the competence and student-oriented didac- tic approaches; the forms and means of its realization being indicated providing the new ways for introducing and understanding the educational subject. The research results can be used by the specialists in didactic, curricula developers, authors of textbooks in various subjects