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Sample records for subjects fasting insulin

  1. Substrate Metabolism and Insulin Sensitivity During Fasting in Obese Human Subjects: Impact of GH Blockade.

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    Pedersen, Morten Høgild; Svart, Mads Vandsted; Lebeck, Janne; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Pedersen, Steen Bønløkke; Møller, Niels; Jessen, Niels; Jørgensen, Jens O L

    2017-04-01

    Insulin resistance and metabolic inflexibility are features of obesity and are amplified by fasting. Growth hormone (GH) secretion increases during fasting and GH causes insulin resistance. To study the metabolic effects of GH blockade during fasting in obese subjects. Nine obese males were studied thrice in a randomized design: (1) after an overnight fast (control), (2) after 72 hour fasting (fasting), and (3) after 72 hour fasting with GH blockade (pegvisomant) [fasting plus GH antagonist (GHA)]. Each study day consisted of a 4-hour basal period followed by a 2-hour hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp combined with indirect calorimetry, assessment of glucose and palmitate turnover, and muscle and fat biopsies. GH levels increased with fasting (P fasting-induced reduction of serum insulin-like growth factor I was enhanced by GHA (P Fasting increased lipolysis and lipid oxidation independent of GHA, but fasting plus GHA caused a more pronounced suppression of lipid intermediates in response to hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp. Fasting-induced insulin resistance was abrogated by GHA (P Fasting plus GHA also caused elevated glycerol levels and reduced levels of counterregulatory hormones. Fasting significantly reduced the expression of antilipolytic signals in adipose tissue independent of GHA. Suppression of GH activity during fasting in obese subjects reverses insulin resistance and amplifies insulin-stimulated suppression of lipid intermediates, indicating that GH is an important regulator of substrate metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and metabolic flexibility also in obese subjects.

  2. Fasting Ghrelin Levels Are Decreased in Obese Subjects and Are Significantly Related With Insulin Resistance and Body Mass Index

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    Dimitrios Papandreou

    2017-10-01

    CONCLUSION: Obese subjects have low fasting ghrelin levels that they are significantly related to insulin resistance and body mass index. More prospective studies are needed to establish the role of ghrelin in the pathogenesis of human obesity.

  3. The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor vildagliptin improves beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity in subjects with impaired fasting glucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utzschneider, Kristina M; Tong, Jenny; Montgomery, Brenda

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of treatment with the dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitor vildagliptin on insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function in subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 22 subjects with IFG (11 female and 11 male, mean +/- SD...... (FSIGT), followed by a 2-h meal tolerance test (MTT), was performed at 2, 8, and 10 weeks. From the FSIGT, the acute insulin response to glucose (AIR(g)) and insulin sensitivity index (S(I)) were determined and used to compute the disposition index (AIR(g) x S(I)) as a measure of beta-cell function...... was not sustained after washout. CONCLUSIONS: The DPP-4 inhibitor vildagliptin improves insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function, leading to improved postprandial glycemia in subjects with IFG, who are known to have beta-cell dysfunction. Thus, vildagliptin may prevent progression to diabetes in high...

  4. Decreased insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity are associated with liver function in subjects with fasting glucose between 100 and 109 mg/dL in Taiwanese population.

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    Hsiao, Jeng-Yueh; Wang, Chiao-Ling; Hsia, Pi-Jung; Hsieh, Ming-Chia; Hsin, Shih-Chieh; Lin, Kun-Der; Shin, Shyi-Jang

    2007-11-01

    In 2003, the American Diabetes Association recommended that the lower limit for the diagnosis of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) should be reduced from 110 to 100 mg/dL in the analysis of the associated risk factors of IFG. It has been proposed that liver dysfunction may contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes. A primary aim was to investigate the relationship between liver enzyme and insulin resistance (IR) in IFG group. The secondary aim was to investigate IR and beta-cell function assessed by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR and HOMA-%B, respectively) in subjects with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) between 100 and 109 mg/dL. We enrolled 284 subjects whose medical history and physical examination required tests to screen for metabolic abnormalities. In addition, we also excluded all factors affecting glucose or insulin metabolism. According to the FPG level, they were divided into the following groups: group A, FPG population, the fasting insulin level, the fasting glucose, HbA1c, HOMA-IR, alanine aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, aspartate aminotransferase, and the diastolic blood pressure all increased significantly as the glycemic status progressed, whereas HOMA-%B levels decreased significantly as the glycemic status progressed. The lipid profile, alkaline phosphatase, and systolic blood pressure did not differ significantly among 3 different glycemic classifications. Study results indicate that, first, there was a significant decrease of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in subjects with fasting glucose from 100 to 109 mg/dL compared with subjects with normal fasting glucose. Second, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase were associated with IR as the glycemic status progressed in the IFG group.

  5. Circadian rhythm of the autonomic nervous system in insulin resistant subjects with normoglycemia, impaired fasting glycemia, impaired glucose tolerance, type 2 diabetes mellitus

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    Serra Pietro

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In type 2 diabetes mellitus both insulin resistance and hyperglycemia are considered responsible for autonomic dysfunction. The relation between the autonomic activity, impaired fasting glycemia and impaired glucose tolerance is, however, unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the circadian autonomic activity expressed as heart rate variability (HRV measured by 24-hours ECG recording in insulin resistant subjects (IR with characteristics as follow: IR subjects with normal oral glucose tolerance test results, IR subjects with impaired fasting glucose, IR subjects with impaired glucose tolerance and subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods Eighty Caucasian insulin resistant subjects (IR and twenty five control subjects were recruited for the study. IR subjects were divided into four groups according to the outcoming results of oral glucose tests (OGTTs: IR subjects with normal glucose regulation (NGR, IR subjects with impaired fasting glycemia (IFG, IR subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT and subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM. Autonomic nervous activity was studied by 24-hours ECG recording. Heart rate variability analysis was performed in time and frequency domains: SDNN, RMS-SD, low frequency (LF and high frequency (HF were calculated. Results The total SDNN showed statistically significant reduction in all four groups with insulin resistant subjects (IR when compared to the control group (p Conclusion The results of our study suggest that insulin resistance might cause global autonomic dysfunction which increases along with worsening glucose metabolic impairment. The analysis of sympathetic and parasympathetic components and the sympathovagal balance demonstrated an association between insulin resistance and sympathetic over-activity, especially during night. The results indicated that the sympathetic over-activity is directly correlated to the grade of insulin resistance

  6. GLP-1 and peptide YY secretory response after fat load is impaired by insulin resistance, impaired fasting glucose and type 2 diabetes in morbidly obese subjects.

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    Fernández-García, José C; Murri, Mora; Coin-Aragüez, Leticia; Alcaide, Juan; El Bekay, Rajaa; Tinahones, Francisco J

    2014-05-01

    Both glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY) are gut hormones involved in energy homoeostasis. Obesity, insulin resistance and hyperglycaemia are significant confounders when GLP-1 and PYY secretion is assessed. Thus, we evaluated GLP-1 and PYY response after fat load in morbidly obese patients with different degrees of insulin resistance and glycemic status. We studied 40 morbidly obese subjects (mean age, 40·6 ± 1·3 years; mean BMI, 53·1 ± 1·2 kg/m(2) ) divided into groups according to their glycemic status: normal fasting glucose (NFG) group, impaired fasting glucose (IFG) group and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) group. NFG patients were additionally subclassified, according to the homoeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMAIR ), into a low insulin-resistance (LIR) group (HOMAIR response to fat load. The implications of this attenuated enteroendocrine response should be elucidated by further studies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Impact of traits of metabolic syndrome on β-cell function and insulin resistance in normal fasting, normal glucose tolerant subjects.

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    Cubeddu, Luigi X; Hoffmann, Irene S

    2012-10-01

    Metabolic syndrome, impaired fasting glucose (IFG), and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) predict risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). To determine if increased risk preceded development of these abnormalities, β-cell function and insulin resistance were assessed in euglycemic subjects with and without traits of metabolic syndrome. A total of 562 apparently healthy Latin-American subjects were screened for metabolic syndrome [National Education Cholesterol Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NECP ATP III)]. Early pancreatic insulin response ΔInsulin(0-30)/ΔGlucose(0-30), Matsuda index, disposition index (DI), and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) ratio were obtained from oral glucose tolerance testing (0-180 min). ΔI(0-30)/ΔG(0-30), Matsuda index, DI, and HOMA-IR deteriorated in direct proportion with number of traits of metabolic syndrome, and with increases in glucose levels within the euglycemic range. DI was the most sensitive index. In subjects with 1, 2, 3, and 4-5 traits, DI was 21.4%, 40%, 57%, and 76% lower, respectively, than in subjects with no traits. As a single trait, abdominal obesity was associated with insulin resistance, whereas, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), alone or combined with high triglycerides, was not associated with insulin resistance or β-cell dysfunction. Combined impairments in β-cell function and insulin sensitivity were responsible for the increases in fasting and 2-h plasma glucose concentrations within the euglycemic range. Impaired β-cell function and increased insulin resistance are present much before development of metabolic syndrome, IFG, or IGT. β-Cell function and insulin sensitivity worsen in direct proportion with number of traits of metabolic syndrome and increases in glucose levels. Compared to abdominal obesity, low HDL-C±high triglycerides may bear a lesser weight in predicting risk of T2DM.

  8. Fasting in Ramadan with an insulin pump.

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    Kesavadev, Jothydev

    2015-05-01

    A good majority of subjects with diabetes on insulin therapies observe fasting during Ramadan. The challenge for the physician and the patient is to manage diabetes without an interruption to fasting by avoiding hypoglycaemia and simultaneously ensuring that blood glucose remain at acceptable safe levels. Insulin Pumps differ from syringes and insulin pens in that it offers a variable basal rate, different type of boluses and associated calculators. The technological advances that pumps offer, help educated subjects pre-programme a reduced basal rate throughout the day. Pumps ensure avoidance of hypoglycaemia and hyperglycaemia and preserve quality of life and enhance confidence in patients during fasting. Due to multiple benefits, insulin pumps are considered the best delivery systems for insulin during the holy month of Ramadan, despite the prerequisites for its optimal output and cost concerns.

  9. A pilot study to examine the feasibility of insulin glargine in subjects with impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance or new-onset type 2 diabetes.

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    Marbury, T C; Schwartz, S; Rosenberg, M A; Jariwala, N; Becker, R H A; Johnston, P S

    2008-05-01

    People with early type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance [IGT] and/or impaired fasting glucose [IFG]) are at risk of hyperglycaemia-related complications, including cardiovascular disease. Insulin, traditionally reserved as late treatment in type 2 diabetes, may also be a useful therapy in this population. We examined the short-term efficacy and tolerability of insulin glargine (glargine) in individuals with early or pre-type 2 diabetes. In this multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, parallel group, 12-day study, subjects with IGT/IFG (n=9), newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (n=9) or normal glucose tolerance (n=3) (confined to a clinical research unit taking a prescribed diet) were randomized to once-daily glargine (n=16) or placebo (saline; n=5) at bedtime. Dose was titrated to achieve target fasting blood glucose (FBG) 80-95 mg/dL. Over the treatment period, mean FBG decreased in glargine-treated subjects (from 100.0+/-18.8 to 85.6+/-18.4 mg/dL), but was unchanged in placebo-treated subjects (from 112.5+/-10.6 to 111.3+/-17.5 mg/dL). Mean eight-point blood glucose value decreased by 9.7 mg/dL in the glargine group, but increased by 8.1 mg/dL in the placebo group. Mean post-exercise blood glucose was similar before and after glargine treatment, but increased after placebo treatment. Five subjects receiving glargine experienced 16 mild symptomatic hypoglycaemia episodes; however, no hypoglycaemia occurred during exercise. Mean body weight decreased in both the glargine (-0.44 kg) and placebo (-0.25 kg) groups, in line with dietary restrictions. The results of this pilot study suggest that glargine can be used by people with IFG, IGT or new-onset type 2 diabetes for management of hyperglycaemia with low risk of hypoglycaemia. However titration of insulin in people on dietary restrictions should be more cautious as they may be more prone to hypoglycaemia. Further studies are warranted to determine the clinical benefits of this

  10. Insulin resistance in obesity can be reliably identified from fasting plasma insulin.

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    ter Horst, K W; Gilijamse, P W; Koopman, K E; de Weijer, B A; Brands, M; Kootte, R S; Romijn, J A; Ackermans, M T; Nieuwdorp, M; Soeters, M R; Serlie, M J

    2015-12-01

    Insulin resistance is the major contributor to cardiometabolic complications of obesity. We aimed to (1) establish cutoff points for insulin resistance from euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps (EHCs), (2) identify insulin-resistant obese subjects and (3) predict insulin resistance from routinely measured variables. We assembled data from non-obese (n=112) and obese (n=100) men who underwent two-step EHCs using [6,6-(2)H2]glucose as tracer (insulin infusion dose 20 and 60 mU m(-2) min(-1), respectively). Reference ranges for hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity were calculated from healthy non-obese men. Based on these reference values, obese men with preserved insulin sensitivity or insulin resistance were identified. Cutoff points for insulin-mediated suppression of endogenous glucose production (EGP) and insulin-stimulated glucose disappearance rate (Rd) were 46.5% and 37.3 μmol kg(-)(1) min(-)(1), respectively. Most obese men (78%) had EGP suppression within the reference range, whereas only 12% of obese men had Rd within the reference range. Obese men with Rd insulin-sensitive obese men in age, body mass index (BMI), body composition, fasting glucose or cholesterol, but did have higher fasting insulin (110±49 vs 63±29 pmol l(-1), Pinsulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (4.5±2.2 vs 2.7±1.4, P=0.004). Insulin-resistant obese men could be identified with good sensitivity (80%) and specificity (75%) from fasting insulin >74 pmol l(-1). Most obese men have hepatic insulin sensitivity within the range of non-obese controls, but below-normal peripheral insulin sensitivity, that is, insulin resistance. Fasting insulin (>74 pmol l(-1) with current insulin immunoassay) may be used for identification of insulin-resistant (or metabolically unhealthy) obese men in research and clinical settings.

  11. Effect of HCV on fasting glucose, fasting insulin and peripheral insulin resistance in first 5 years of infection.

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    Ahmed, Naeema; Rashid, Amir; Naveed, Abdul Khaliq; Bashir, Qudsia

    2016-02-01

    To assess the effects of hepatitis C virus infection in the first 5 years on fasting glucose, fasting insulin and peripheral insulin resistance. The case-control study was conducted at the Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, from December 2011 to November 2012, and comprised subjects recruited from a government hospital in Rawalpindi. The subjects included known cases of hepatitis C virus infection for at least 5 years, and normal healthy controls. Fasting blood samples of all the subjects were collected and analysed for serum fasting insulin and serum fasting glucose levels. Homeostatic model assessment-Insulin resistance was calculated SPSS 11 was used for statistical analysis. Of the 30 subjects, 20(66.6%) were cases, while 10(33.3%) were controls. Serum fasting glucose mean level in cases was 89.55±9.53 compared to 84.40±9.80 in the controls (p=0.188). The mean serum fasting insulin in controls was 7.52±3.23 and 6.79±3.30 in cases (p=0.567). Homeostatic model assessment-Insulin resistance level in controls was 1.60±0.76 and In the cases it was 1.49±0.74 (p=0.695). Peripheral insulin resistance and development of type 2 diabetes as a complication of hepatitis C virus infection was not likely at least within the first five years of infection.

  12. Blood homocysteine and fasting insulin levels are reduced and erythrocyte sedimentation rates increased with a glycophospholipid-vitamin formulation: a retrospective study in older subjects

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    Rita R. Ellithorpe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elevations in Homocyteine (Hcys levels in the blood have been correlated with increased risk for coronary heart disease and stroke, loss of cognition and memory, and other chronic medical conditions. Objective: A retrospective study was initiated to determine if Hcys levels and other blood markers were altered in subjects taking an oral functional food supplement containing a mixture of phosphoglycolipids (NT Factor® and vitamins. Methods: Thirty-five patients (28 females, 7 males, Av. Age=60.7±9.6 years who had used the functional food Advanced Physician’s FormulaTM with NTFactor® in tablet form each day were enrolled in a retrospective study on blood chemistry. This retrospective study followed a prospective study on the use of the same supplement to reduce fatigue in patients with chronic fatigue. Participants were patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (myalgic encephalomyelitis or other fatiguing illnesses. Subjects had blood drawn over a 6-month period, and routine blood testing was performed. In this laboratory study the results were analyzed for differences, and statistical analyses were performed. Results: All participants responded in the study and showed an average reduction of 31.8% in Hcys levels (from 10.85±0.42 to 7.40±0.42 µmol/L; t-test, p<0.001; Wilcoxon, p<0.001. Women responded better than men: women (from 11.06±0.50 to 8.67±0.82 µmol/L, 34.4% reduction, t-test, p< 0.001; Wilcoxon, p<0.001 versus men (from 10.80±0.51 to 7.01±0.47 µmol/L, 21.6% reduction, t-test, p< 0.0862. Differences were also found in fasting insulin levels (from 12.80±3.11 to 5.30±1.77 µIU/mL, 58.6% reduction, t-test, p<0.005 and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR. ESR increased from 10.5±2.21 to 20.19±3.20 mm/hr (92.2% increase, t-test, p<0.0314; Wilcoxon, p<0.0154. Other tests were not significantly different after 6 months of supplement, there were no side effects from the test supplement, and none of the participants had

  13. Differences in insulin clearance between metabolically healthy and unhealthy obese subjects.

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    Marini, Maria A; Frontoni, Simona; Succurro, Elena; Arturi, Franco; Fiorentino, Teresa V; Sciacqua, Angela; Perticone, Francesco; Sesti, Giorgio

    2014-04-01

    Metabolically healthy obese (MHO) are relatively insulin sensitive and have a favorable cardio-metabolic risk profile compared with metabolically abnormal obese (MAO). To evaluate whether MAO individuals have a decreased insulin clearance compared with MHO individuals, 49 MHO, 147 MAO, and 172 non-obese individuals were analyzed in this cross-sectional study. Insulin clearance and insulin sensitivity were assessed through euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. MHO subjects exhibited significant lower triglycerides, total cholesterol, 2-h post-challenge glucose, fasting and 2-h post-challenge insulin, steady-state plasma insulin, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and gamma-glutamyltransferase as compared with MAO individuals. Disposition index was higher in MHO subjects as compared with MAO individuals after adjusting for gender and age (P = 0.04). Insulin clearance was significantly lower in MAO individuals as compared with MHO and non-obese individuals. The difference between the two obese subgroups remained significant after adjusting for gender, age, waist circumference, fat mass, and insulin-stimulated glucose disposal (P = 0.03). The hepatic insulin extraction (C-peptide/insulin) in the fasting state was significantly higher in MHO subjects as compared with MAO individuals (P < 0.0001). In univariate analysis adjusted for gender and age, insulin clearance was correlated with hepatic insulin extraction (P = 0.01). In conclusion, insulin clearance differs among obese subjects with different metabolic phenotypes. Impaired insulin clearance may contribute to sustained fasting and post-meal hyperinsulinemia observed in MAO individuals.

  14. Insulin resistance in obesity can be reliably identified from fasting plasma insulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Horst, K. W.; Gilijamse, P. W.; Koopman, K. E.; de Weijer, B. A.; Brands, M.; Kootte, R. S.; Romijn, J. A.; Ackermans, M. T.; Nieuwdorp, M.; Soeters, M. R.; Serlie, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is the major contributor to cardiometabolic complications of obesity. We aimed to (1) establish cutoff points for insulin resistance from euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps (EHCs), (2) identify insulin-resistant obese subjects and (3) predict insulin resistance from routinely

  15. Homeostatic Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR): A Better Marker for Evaluating Insulin Resistance Than Fasting Insulin in Women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome.

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    Majid, Hafsa; Masood, Qamar; Khan, Aysha Habib

    2017-03-01

    To assess the utility of HOMA-IR in assessing insulin resistance in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and compare it with fasting insulin for assessing insulin resistance (IR). Observational study. Section of Clinical Chemistry, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from January 2009 to September 2012. Medical chart review of all women diagnosed with PCOS was performed. Of the 400 PCOS women reviewed, 91 met the inclusion criteria. Insulin resistance was assessed by calculating HOMA-IR using the formula (fasting glucose x fasting insulin)/405, taking normal value fasting insulin levels ≥12 µIU/ml. A total of 91 premenopausal women diagnosed with PCOS were included. Mean age was 30 ±5.5 years. Mean HOMA-IR of women was 3.1 ±1.7, respectively with IR in 69% (n=63) women, while hyperinsulinemia was present in 60% (n=55) women (fasting Insulin 18.5 ±5.8 µIU/ml). Hyperandrogenism was present in 53.8% (n=49), whereas 38.5% (n=35) women had primary infertility or subfertility, while 65.9% (n=60) had menstrual irregularities; and higher frequencies were observed in women with IR. Eight subjects with IR and endocrine abnormalities were missed by fasting insulin. Insulin resistance is common in PCOS and it is likely a pathogenic factor for development of PCOS. HOMAIR model performed better than hyperinsulinemia alone for diagnosing IR.

  16. Peripheral blood transcriptomic signatures of fasting glucose and insulin concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.H. Chen (Brian); M.-F. Hivert (Marie-France); M.J. Peters (Marjolein); L.C. Pilling (Luke); Hogan, J.D. (John D.); Pham, L.M. (Lisa M.); L.W. Harries (Lorna); C.S. Fox (Caroline); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); A. Dehghan (Abbas); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); A. Hofman (Albert); J. Hong (Jaeyoung); R. Joehanes (Roby); A.D. Johnson (Andrew); P.J. Munson (Peter); D. Rybin (Denis); A. Singleton (Andrew); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); S.-X. Ying (Sai-Xia); D. Melzer (David); D. Levy (Daniel); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); J.C. Florez (Jose); J. Dupuis (Josée); J.B. Meigs (James); Kolaczyk, E.D. (Eric D.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractGenome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified genetic loci associated with glycemic traits. However, characterizing the functional significance of these loci has proven challenging. We sought to gain insights into the regulation of fasting insulin and fasting

  17. Short-term interval training alters brain glucose metabolism in subjects with insulin resistance.

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    Honkala, Sanna M; Johansson, Jarkko; Motiani, Kumail K; Eskelinen, Jari-Joonas; Virtanen, Kirsi A; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Knuuti, Juhani; Nuutila, Pirjo; Kalliokoski, Kari K; Hannukainen, Jarna C

    2017-01-01

    Brain insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (GU) is increased in obese and insulin resistant subjects but normalizes after weight loss along with improved whole-body insulin sensitivity. Our aim was to study whether short-term exercise training (moderate intensity continuous training (MICT) or sprint interval training (SIT)) alters substrates for brain energy metabolism in insulin resistance. Sedentary subjects ( n = 21, BMI 23.7-34.3 kg/m2, age 43-55 y) with insulin resistance were randomized into MICT ( n = 11, intensity≥60% of VO2peak) or SIT ( n = 10, all-out) groups for a two-week training intervention. Brain GU during insulin stimulation and fasting brain free fatty acid uptake (FAU) was measured using PET. At baseline, brain GU was positively associated with the fasting insulin level and negatively with the whole-body insulin sensitivity. The whole-body insulin sensitivity improved with both training modes (20%, p = 0.007), while only SIT led to an increase in aerobic capacity (5%, p = 0.03). SIT also reduced insulin-stimulated brain GU both in global cortical grey matter uptake (12%, p = 0.03) and in specific regions ( p Brain FAU remained unchanged after the training in both groups. These findings show that short-term SIT effectively decreases insulin-stimulated brain GU in sedentary subjects with insulin resistance.

  18. Correlation between measures of insulin resistance in fasting and non-fasting blood

    OpenAIRE

    Hancox Robert J; Landhuis C Erik

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Epidemiological investigation of insulin resistance is difficult. Standard measures of insulin resistance require invasive investigations, which are impractical for large-scale studies. Surrogate measures using fasting blood samples have been developed, but even these are difficult to obtain in population-based studies. Measures of insulin resistance have not been validated in non-fasting blood samples. Our objective was to assess the correlations between fasting and non-f...

  19. Elevated fasting insulin level significantly increases the risk of microalbuminuria.

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    Ryoo, Jae-Hong; Park, Sung Keun; Jung, Ju Young

    2015-01-01

    Microalbuminuria is significantly associated with long-term prognosis in the general population as well as in diabetic patients. It is well known that insulin resistance (IR) can induce microalbuminuria, but an elevated fasting insulin level, which is an early clinical manifestation of IR, as a risk factor for microalbuminuria has not been clarified, so we investigated the association between fasting insulin level and the development of microalbuminuria in a general population. A total of 1,192 non-diabetic Korean men without microalbuminuria in 2005 were followed until 2010. They were categorized into 3 groups according to their fasting insulin levels and monitored for the development of microalbuminuria. The incidence of microalbuminuria was compared among groups, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate the hazard ratios for microalbuminuria according to the fasting insulin levels. During 4,013.0 person-years of follow-up, 51 incident cases of microalbuminuria developed between 2006 and 2010. The incidence of microalbuminuria increased in proportion to the fasting insulin levels (tertile 1: 1.8%, tertile 2: 4.5%, tertile 3: 6.5%, Pfasting insulin levels [tertile 1: reference, tertile 2: 2.44 (1.01-5.89), tertile 3: 3.30 (1.40-7.78), respectively, P for trend 0.013]. Elevated fasting insulin level was associated with the future development of microalbuminuria.

  20. Minimally invasive insulin delivery in subjects with type 1 diabetes using hollow microneedles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Jyoti; Felner, Eric I; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2009-06-01

    Microneedles have previously been used to deliver insulin to animal models, but not in human subjects. This study tested the hypothesis that hollow microneedles can deliver insulin to modulate blood glucose levels in subjects with type 1 diabetes in a minimally invasive manner. This study was carried out in two adults with type 1 diabetes and evaluated bolus delivery of lispro insulin using a hollow microneedle compared to a catheter infusion set (9 mm). The study first determined the minimum insulin delivery depth by administering insulin from microneedles inserted 1, 3.5, and 5 mm into the skin of fasting subjects and then assessed the efficacy of insulin delivery from microneedles inserted 1 mm into the skin to reduce postprandial glucose levels. Blood samples were periodically assayed for plasma free insulin and plasma glucose levels for up to 3.5 h. The first phase of the study indicated that microneedles inserted at the shallowest depth of 1 mm within the skin led to rapid insulin absorption and reduction in glucose levels. Bolus insulin delivery followed by consumption of a standardized meal in the second phase revealed that microneedles were effective in reducing postprandial glucose levels. Subjects reported no pain from microneedle treatments, and there were no adverse events. This study provides the first proof of concept that hollow microneedles can effectively deliver bolus insulin to type 1 diabetes subjects in a minimally invasive manner.

  1. Fasting insulin, insulin resistance and risk of hypertension in the general population: A meta-analysis.

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    Wang, Feng; Han, Lili; Hu, Dayi

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the association of fasting insulin concentrations or insulin resistance with subsequent risk of hypertension have yielded conflicting results. To quantitatively assess the association of fasting insulin concentrations or homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) with incident hypertension in a general population by performing a meta-analysis. We searched the PubMed and Embase databases until August 31, 2016 for prospective observational studies investigating the elevated fasting insulin concentrations or HOMA-IR with subsequent risk of hypertension in the general population. Pooled risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of hypertension was calculated for the highest versus the lowest category of fasting insulin or HOMA-IR. Eleven studies involving 10,230 hypertension cases were identified from 55,059 participants. Meta-analysis showed that the pooled adjusted RR of hypertension was 1.54 (95% CI 1.34-1.76) for fasting insulin concentrations and 1.43 (95% CI 1.27-1.62) for HOMA-IR comparing the highest to the lowest category. Subgroup analysis results showed that the association of fasting insulin concentrations with subsequent risk of hypertension seemed more pronounced in women (RR 2.07; 95% CI 1.19-3.60) than in men (RR 1.48; 95% CI 1.17-1.88). This meta-analysis suggests that elevated fasting insulin concentrations or insulin resistance as estimated by homeostasis model assessment is independently associated with an exacerbated risk of hypertension in the general population. Early intervention of hyperinsulinemia or insulin resistance may help clinicians to identify the high risk of hypertensive population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Peripheral Blood Transcriptomic Signatures of Fasting Glucose and Insulin Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Brian H; Hivert, Marie-France; Peters, Marjolein J; Pilling, Luke C; Hogan, John D; Pham, Lisa M; Harries, Lorna W; Fox, Caroline S; Bandinelli, Stefania; Dehghan, Abbas; Hernandez, Dena G; Hofman, Albert; Hong, Jaeyoung; Joehanes, Roby; Johnson, Andrew D; Munson, Peter J; Rybin, Denis V; Singleton, Andrew B; Uitterlinden, André G; Ying, Saixia; Melzer, David; Levy, Daniel; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Ferrucci, Luigi; Florez, Jose C; Dupuis, Josée; Meigs, James B; Kolaczyk, Eric D

    2016-12-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified genetic loci associated with glycemic traits. However, characterizing the functional significance of these loci has proven challenging. We sought to gain insights into the regulation of fasting insulin and fasting glucose through the use of gene expression microarray data from peripheral blood samples of participants without diabetes in the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) (n = 5,056), the Rotterdam Study (RS) (n = 723), and the InCHIANTI Study (Invecchiare in Chianti) (n = 595). Using a false discovery rate q fasting glucose and 433 transcripts associated with fasting insulin levels after adjusting for age, sex, technical covariates, and complete blood cell counts. Among the findings, circulating IGF2BP2 transcript levels were positively associated with fasting insulin in both the FHS and RS. Using 1000 Genomes-imputed genotype data, we identified 47,587 cis-expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) and 6,695 trans-eQTL associated with the 433 significant insulin-associated transcripts. Of note, we identified a trans-eQTL (rs592423), where the A allele was associated with higher IGF2BP2 levels and with fasting insulin in an independent genetic meta-analysis comprised of 50,823 individuals. We conclude that integration of genomic and transcriptomic data implicate circulating IGF2BP2 mRNA levels associated with glucose and insulin homeostasis. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  3. Differential effects of casein versus whey on fasting plasma levels of insulin, IGF-1 and IGF-1/IGFBP-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoppe, Camilla; Mølgaard, Christian; Dalum, Cathrine

    2009-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Milk increases both fasting insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and thereby growth, in healthy prepubertal boys. It is, however, unknown which components in milk are responsible for milk’s growth-stimulating effect. Subjects/Methods: To get closer to the ident......Background/Objectives: Milk increases both fasting insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and thereby growth, in healthy prepubertal boys. It is, however, unknown which components in milk are responsible for milk’s growth-stimulating effect. Subjects/Methods: To get closer...

  4. Haplotypes in the lipoprotein lipase gene influence fasting insulin and discovery of a new risk haplotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, Mark O; Taylor, Kent D; Guo, Xiuqing; Hokanson, John E; Haffner, Steven M; Cui, Jinrui; Chen, Yii-Der I; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Bergman, Richard N; Rotter, Jerome I

    2007-01-01

    Prior studies of Mexican Americans described association of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene haplotypes with insulin sensitivity/resistance and atherosclerosis. The most common haplotype (haplotype 1) was protective, whereas the fourth most common haplotype (haplotype 4) conferred risk for insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. In this study of Hispanics in the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study Family Study, we sought to replicate LPL haplotype association with insulin sensitivity/resistance. LPL haplotypes based on 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms were analyzed for association with indexes of insulin sensitivity and other metabolic and adiposity measures. This study was conducted in the general community of San Antonio, Texas, and San Luis Valley, Colorado. Participants in this study were 978 members of 86 Hispanic families. LPL haplogenotype, metabolic phenotypes, and adiposity were measured in this study. The haplotype structure was identical with that observed in prior studies. Among 978 phenotyped subjects, haplotype 1 was associated with decreased fasting insulin (P = 0.01), and haplotype 4 was associated with increased fasting insulin (P = 0.02) and increased visceral fat mass (P = 0.002). Insulin sensitivity, derived from iv glucose tolerance testing, tended (P > 0.1) to be higher with haplotype 1 (S(I) = 1.72) and lower with haplotype 4 (S(I)=1.38). Haplotype 2 was associated with increases in fasting insulin, triglycerides (TGs), TG to high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol ratio, and apolipoprotein B (P = 0.01-0.04). This study independently replicates our prior results of LPL haplotypes 1 and 4 as associated with measures of insulin sensitivity and resistance, respectively. Haplotype 4 may confer insulin resistance by increasing visceral fat. Haplotype 2 was identified as a new risk haplotype, suggesting the complex nature of LPL's effect on features of the insulin resistance syndrome.

  5. Safety and efficacy of normalizing fasting glucose with bedtime NPH insulin alone in NIDDM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusi, K; Cunningham, G R; Comstock, J P

    1995-06-01

    To examine the safety and overall clinical effects of normalizing the fasting plasma glucose (FPG) level with bedtime NPH insulin alone in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) that is poorly controlled with maximal doses of sulfonylureas. Twelve obese male NIDDM subjects were treated for 16 weeks with bedtime insulin after a 4-week sulfonylurea washout. The insulin dosage was increased until the FPG level was normalized. The 24-h plasma glucose profiles and lipid and HbA1c levels were measured at the beginning and end of the study, and the incidence and severity of hypoglycemic episodes were closely monitored. In addition, hyperglycemic clamp studies were performed to assess insulin secretion and provide an indirect measurement of insulin sensitivity. FPG (14.6 +/- 0.9 mmol/l at week 0) was normalized ( Bedtime insulin significantly improved total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels (P Weight gain was 2.4 +/- 0.7 kg, and blood pressure was unchanged. During the hyperglycemic clamp, there was an improvement in the first phase (P bedtime in amounts sufficient to achieve a normal FPG level does not cause excessive or severe hypoglycemia and does lead to good glycemic and lipid control in NIDDM. Bedtime insulin therapy also is accompanied by improved insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. We conclude that a single dose of insulin alone at bedtime merits consideration as a therapeutic strategy in patients with poorly controlled NIDDM.

  6. Comparison of insulin degludec with insulin glargine in insulin-naive subjects with Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodbard, H W; Cariou, B; Zinman, B

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare long-term safety and efficacy of the basal insulin analogue degludec with glargine in insulin-naive subjects with Type 2 diabetes.......The aim of this study was to compare long-term safety and efficacy of the basal insulin analogue degludec with glargine in insulin-naive subjects with Type 2 diabetes....

  7. The significance of impaired fasting glucose versus impaired glucose tolerance: importance of insulin secretion and resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale Schianca, Gian Piero; Rossi, Antonello; Sainaghi, Pier Paolo; Maduli, Elisabetta; Bartoli, Ettore

    2003-05-01

    The American Diabetes Association recommended substituting 2hBS (glycemia at the second hour of an oral glucose tolerance test [OGTT]) for fasting blood glucose (FBS) in screening for glucose intolerance. It is debated whether these tests measure the same abnormality and relate to defective insulin secretion or resistance. This study examines the diagnostic effectiveness of FBS versus 2hBS and their relationship with insulin secretion and resistance. Based on history or physical findings suggesting glucose intolerance, we enrolled 398 unselected subjects admitted to a general Internal Medicine ward. After 5 days of a weight-maintaining diet, FBS, 2hBS, and insulin were measured during OGTT. The homeostatic model assessment was used to assess beta-cell function and insulin resistance. Excluding 19 patients with diabetes (5%), we identified 284 subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 22 with isolated impaired fasting glucose (IFG), 59 with isolated impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and 14 with associated IFG/IGT. The sensitivity of FBS in predicting 2hBS was 19%, specificity 93%. Positive and negative predictive values were 39% and 83%, respectively. Insulin resistance was absent in NGT and IFG and markedly elevated in IGT and IFG/IGT, whereas defective insulin release was significant only in isolated IFG. In unselected patients, elevated FBS depends primarily on defective insulin secretion, and impaired 2hBS on insulin resistance. Because these tests measure different alterations, they are useful in combination.

  8. Fasting insulin has a stronger association with an adverse cardiometabolic risk profile than insulin resistance: the RISC study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Rooij, Susanne R; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Kozakova, Michaela

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fasting insulin concentrations are often used as a surrogate measure of insulin resistance. We investigated the relative contributions of fasting insulin and insulin resistance to cardiometabolic risk and preclinical atherosclerosis. DESIGN AND METHODS: The Relationship between Insulin...... of the metabolic syndrome in 1177 participants. Carotid artery intima media thickness (IMT) was measured by ultrasound to assess preclinical atherosclerosis. RESULTS: Fasting insulin was correlated with all elements of the metabolic syndrome. Insulin sensitivity (M/I) was correlated with most elements. The odds...... ratio for the metabolic syndrome of those in the highest quartile of fasting insulin compared with those in the lower quartiles was 5.4 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.8-10.3, adjusted for insulin sensitivity) in men and 5.1 (2.6-9.9) in women. The odds ratio for metabolic syndrome of those with insulin...

  9. Kinetics of circulating endogenous insulin, C-peptide, and proinsulin in fasting nondiabetic man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, J H; Tronier, B; Bülow, J B

    1987-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of insulin, C-peptide, and proinsulin were measured in different vascular beds in order to determine renal, hepatic, and systemic kinetics of the endogenous peptides in the fasting condition. Nineteen nondiabetic subjects were studied, two were normal, nine had minor vascular...

  10. Insulin resistance in subjects with a history of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soonthornpun, Supamai; Setasuban, Worawong; Thamprasit, Atchara

    2009-05-01

    Hyperinsulinaemia has been suggested as an important factor for developing hypokalaemic paralysis in patients with thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP). Since hyperinsulinaemia is a common feature of insulin resistance, there may be a causal relationship between insulin resistance and TPP. To compare insulin sensitivity between subjects with a history of TPP and others with a history of thyrotoxicosis without periodic paralysis. Insulin sensitivity measured by euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp and 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were performed nonselectively in 10 subjects with a history of TPP (TPP group) and 10 age- and sex-matched subjects with a history of simple thyrotoxicosis (control group). All participants had euthyroidism and fasting plasma glucose of TPP group were higher than that of the control group. One of 10 (10%) subjects in the TPP group and 6 of 10 (60%) in the control group had BMI of TPP group was higher than in the control group. The TPP group had lower insulin sensitivity than the control group. The subjects with a history of TPP were more obese and had lower insulin sensitivity than those with a history of simple thyrotoxicosis. Insulin resistance with compensatory hyperinsulinaemia may be a key feature of the pathogenesis of TPP.

  11. Association of fasting glucagon and proinsulin concentrations with insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrannini, E; Muscelli, E; Natali, A

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Hyperproinsulinaemia and relative hyperglucagonaemia are features of type 2 diabetes. We hypothesised that raised fasting glucagon and proinsulin concentrations may be associated with insulin resistance (IR) in non-diabetic individuals. METHODS: We measured IR [by a euglycaemic......-hyperinsulinaemic (240 pmol min(-1) m(-2)) clamp technique] in 1,296 non-diabetic (on a 75 g OGTT) individuals [716 women and 579 men, mean age 44 years, BMI 26 kg/m(2) (range 18-44 kg/m(2))] recruited at 19 centres in 14 European countries. IR was related to fasting proinsulin or pancreatic glucagon concentrations......, controlling for known determinants of insulin sensitivity (i.e. sex, age, BMI and glucose tolerance) as well as factors potentially affecting glucagon and proinsulin (i.e. fasting plasma glucose and C-peptide concentrations), glucagon and proinsulin were still positively associated, and adiponectin...

  12. The effect of feeding frequency on insulin and ghrelin responses in human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Thomas; Chambers, Edward S; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2008-01-01

    Recent work shows that increased meal frequency reduces ghrelin responses in sheep. Human research suggests there is an interaction between insulin and ghrelin. The effect of meal frequency on this interaction is unknown. Therefore, we investigated the effect of feeding frequency on insulin...... and ghrelin responses in human subjects. Five healthy male volunteers were recruited from the general population: age 24 (SEM 2)years, body mass 75.7 (SEM 3.2) kg and BMI 23.8 (SEM 0.8) kg/m(2). Volunteers underwent three 8-h feeding regimens: fasting (FAST); low-frequency(two) meal ingestion (LOFREQ......(MEAL)); high-frequency (twelve) meal ingestion (HIFREQ(MEAL)). Meals were equi-energetic within trials,consisting of 64% carbohydrate, 23% fat and 13% protein. Total energy intake was equal between feeding trials. Total area under the curve for serum insulin and plasma ghrelin responses did not differ between...

  13. Elevation of serum insulin concentration during euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp studies leads to similar activation of insulin receptor kinase in skeletal muscle of subjects with and without NIDDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, H H; Vestergaard, H; Kotzke, G

    1995-01-01

    The role of skeletal muscle insulin receptor kinase in the pathogenesis of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) was investigated. Muscle biopsies from 13 patients with NIDDM and 10 control subjects at fasting serum insulin concentrations and approximately 1,000 pmol/l steady-state serum...... insulin during euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps were immediately frozen. The biopsies were then solubilized, and the receptors were immobilized to anti-insulin receptor antibody-coated microwells. Receptor kinase and binding activities were consecutively measured in these wells. The increase in serum...... insulin concentration (73 +/- 14 to 1,004 +/- 83 and 45 +/- 7 to 1,07 +/- 77 pmol/l in the NIDDM and control groups, respectively) had similar effects on receptor kinase activity in both study groups (12 +/- 1 to 42 +/- 5 and 12 +/- 2 to 47 +/- 5 amol P.fmol binding activity-1. min-1 in the NIDDM...

  14. Insulin Sensitivity Determines Effects of Insulin and Meal Ingestion on Systemic Vascular Resistance in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerdeman, Jorn; Meijer, Rick I; Eringa, Etto C; Hoekstra, Trynke; Smulders, Yvo M; Serné, Erik H

    2016-01-01

    In addition to insulin's metabolic actions, insulin can dilate arterioles which increase blood flow to metabolically active tissues. This effect is blunted in insulin-resistant subjects. Insulin's effect on SVR, determined by resistance arterioles, has, however, rarely been examined directly. We determined the effects of both hyperinsulinemia and a mixed meal on SVR and its relationship with insulin sensitivity. Thirty-seven lean and obese women underwent a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, and 24 obese volunteers underwent a mixed-meal test. SVR was assessed using CPP before and during hyperinsulinemia as well as before and 60 and 120 minutes after a meal. SVR decreased significantly during hyperinsulinemia (-13%; p Insulin decreased SVR more strongly in insulin-sensitive individuals (standardized β: -0.44; p = 0.01). In addition, SVR at 60 minutes after meal ingestion was inversely related to the Matsuda index (β: -0.39; p = 0.04) and the change in postprandial SVR was directly related to postprandial glycemia (β: 0.53; p insulin resistance. This suggests that resistance to insulin-induced vasodilatation contributes to regulation of vascular resistance. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Effect of intermittent fasting and refeeding on insulin action in healthy men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halberg, Nils; Henriksen, Morten; Söderhamn, Nathalie

    2005-01-01

    (mean +/- SE); body mass index: 25.7 +/- 0.4 kg/m(2)] by subjecting them to intermittent fasting every second day for 20 h for 15 days. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic (40 mU.min(-1).m(-2)) clamps were performed before and after the intervention period. Subjects maintained body weight (86.4 +/- 2.3 kg......; coefficient of variation: 0.8 +/- 0.1%). Plasma free fatty acid and beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were 347 +/- 18 and 0.06 +/- 0.02 mM, respectively, after overnight fast but increased (P fasting, confirming that the subjects were fasting. Insulin......-mediated whole body glucose uptake rates increased from 6.3 +/- 0.6 to 7.3 +/- 0.3 mg.kg(-1).min(-1) (P = 0.03), and insulin-induced inhibition of adipose tissue lipolysis was more prominent after than before the intervention (P = 0.05). After the 20-h fasting periods, plasma adiponectin was increased compared...

  16. The Comparison of Two Methods of Exercise (intense interval training and concurrent resistance- endurance training on Fasting Sugar, Insulin and Insulin Resistance in Women with Mellitus Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Bazyar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Exercise is an important component of health and an integral approach to the management of diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of intense interval training and concurrent resistance- endurance training on fasting sugar, insulin and insulin resistance in women with mellitus diabetes.   Methods: Fifty-two overweight female diabetic type 2 patients (aged 45-60 years old with fasting blood glucose≥ 126 mg/dl were selected to participate in the present study. Participants were assigned to intense interval training group (N=17, concurrent resistance- endurance training group (N=17 and control group (N=18. The exercises incorporated 10 weeks of concurrent resistance- endurance training and intense interval training. Fasting blood sugar, serum insulin concentrations levels were measured. Concurrent training group trained eight weeks, three times a week of endurance training at 60% of maximum heart rate (MHR and two resistance training sessions per week with 70% of one repetition maximum (1-RM. Intense interval training group trained for eight weeks, three sessions per week for 4 to 10 repeats Wingate test on the ergometer 30s performed with maximum effort. The control group did no systematic exercise. At the end of experiment 42 subjects were succeed and completed the study period, and 10 subjects were removed due to illness and absence in the exercise sessions. Fasting blood sugar and insulin levels 24 hours before and 48 hours after the last training session was measured.   Results: The findings indicated that in periodic fasting, the blood sugar in intensive training group had a marked decrease (p= 0.000 however, the fasting blood sugar of exercise and power stamina groups reduced significantly (p=0.062. The results showed no significant difference between the groups (171/0 p =0.171. Fasting insulin (p <0.001 and insulin resistance (0001/0 = p=0.001 in periodic intensive training group were

  17. Effects of two different types of fast food on postprandial metabolism in normal and overweight subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramel, A; Gudmundsdottir, F D; Thorsdottir, I

    2012-11-01

    The aim was to investigate the effects of a conventional and an unconventional fast-food meal on postprandial metabolism in normal and in overweight subjects. Twenty-five healthy normal (n = 12) and overweight (n = 13) volunteers (21-39 years) participated in this randomized, dietary cross-over study and received two test meals (matched in energy and energy giving nutrients) after an overnight fast with 1 week between test days. The conventional fast-food meal was a hamburger meal (hamburger, bacon, cola drink, calculated glycemic load = 48.7), the unconventional fast food was a salmonburger meal (fiber-rich sourdough rye bread, salad with vinegar, orange juice, glycemic load = 46.0). Blood samples were taken before and after the meal and analyzed for glucose (before 20, 40, 60 and 80 min) and insulin (before 1, 2 and 3 h). Postprandial increases in glucose and insulin were 44% lower after the unconventional meal (Pfast food can have less effect on blood insulin and glucose postprandially compared with conventional fast food matched in energy and energy giving nutrients. The difference between meals in insulin response is associated with higher BMI. Thus, improvement in food quality might help to control postprandial increases in blood glucose and blood insulin.

  18. The relationship between vitamin D status, physical activity and insulin resistance in overweight and obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavadar, Gülis; Demircioğlu, Demet Tekdöş; Özgönenel, Levent; Emre, Tuluhan Yunus

    2015-05-20

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) incidence has been increasing worldwide along with the rise of obesity and sedantery lifestyle. Decreased physical activity (PA) and obesity have also been associated with the low vitamin D levels. We aimed to determine the association between PA, vitamin D status and insulin resistance in overweight and obese subjects. A total of 294 (186 female, 108 male) overweight or obese subjects were included in this cross-sectional study. 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D), insulin, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and HbA1c levels were measured in blood samples. Body mass index (BMI), HOMA-index and total score of International Physical Activity Questionnaire-long form (IPAQ) were calculated. Insulin resistant subjects were compared with the non-resistant group. The mean age of the participants was 45 ± 12.25 and 41.39 ± 10.32; 25(OH)D levels were 8.91 ± 4.30 and 17.62 ± 10.47 ng/dL; BMIs were 31.29 ± 4.48 and 28.2 ± 3.16 kg/m², IPAQ total scores were 548.71 ± 382.81 and 998 ± 486.21 in the insulin resistant and nonresistant subjects, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in terms of 25(OH)D, FPG, insulin levels, IPAQ total score and BMI between the two groups (p = 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.001).Significantly low 25(OH)D levels, high BMI and low PA in insulin resistant subjects confirm the importance of active lifestyle and the maintenance of normal vitamin D levels in overweight and obese subjects in prevention of T2DM.

  19. The relationship between vitamin D status, physical activity and insulin resistance in overweight and obese subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülis Kavadar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM incidence has been increasing worldwide along with the rise of obesity and sedantery lifestyle. Decreased physical activity (PA and obesity have also been associated with the low vitamin D levels. We aimed to determine the association between PA, vitamin D status and insulin resistance in overweight and obese subjects. A total of 294 (186 female, 108 male overweight or obese subjects were included in this cross-sectional study. 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OHD, insulin, fasting plasma glucose (FPG and HbA1c levels were measured in blood samples. Body mass index (BMI, HOMA-index and total score of International Physical Activity Questionnaire-long form (IPAQ were calculated. Insulin resistant subjects were compared with the non-resistant group. The mean age of the participants was 45±12.25 and 41.39±10.32; 25(OHD levels were 8.91 ± 4.30 and 17.62 ± 10.47 ng/dL; BMIs were 31.29 ± 4.48  and 28.2 ± 3.16 kg/m², IPAQ total scores were 548.71±382.81 and 998±486.21 in the insulin resistant and nonresistant subjects, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in terms of 25(OHD, FPG, insulin levels, IPAQ  total score and BMI between the two groups (p = 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.001.Significantly low 25(OHD levels, high BMI and low PA in insulin resistant subjects confirm the importance of active lifestyle and the maintenance of normal vitamin D levels in overweight and obese subjects in prevention of T2DM.

  20. Fasting plasma chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid concentrations are inversely correlated with insulin sensitivity in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laville Martine

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulating data suggest a novel role for bile acids (BAs in modulating metabolic homeostasis. BA treatment has been shown to improve glucose tolerance and to increase energy expenditure in mice. Here, we investigated the relationship between fasting plasma BAs concentrations and metabolic parameters in humans. Findings Fasting plasma glucose, insulin and lipid profile were measured in 14 healthy volunteers, 20 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D, and 22 non-diabetic abdominally obese subjects. Insulin sensitivity was also assessed by the determination of the glucose infusion rate (GIR during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp in a subgroup of patients (9 healthy and 16 T2D subjects. Energy expenditure was measured by indirect calorimetry. Plasma cholic acid (CA, chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA and deoxycholic acid (DCA concentrations were analyzed by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry. In univariable analysis, a positive association was found between HOMA-IR and plasma CDCA (β = 0.09, p = 0.001, CA (β = 0.03, p = 0.09 and DCA concentrations (β = 0.07, p Conclusions Both plasma CDCA, CA and DCA concentrations were negatively associated with insulin sensitivity in a wide range of subjects.

  1. Circulating ApoJ is closely associated with insulin resistance in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ji A; Kang, Min-Cheol; Ciaraldi, Theodore P; Kim, Sang Soo; Park, Kyong Soo; Choe, Charles; Hwang, Won Min; Lim, Dong Mee; Farr, Olivia; Mantzoros, Christos; Henry, Robert R; Kim, Young-Bum

    2018-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes. ApolipoproteinJ (ApoJ) has been implicated in altered pathophysiologic states including cardiovascular and Alzheimer's disease. However, the function of ApoJ in regulation of glucose homeostasis remains unclear. This study sought to determine whether serum ApoJ levels are associated with insulin resistance in human subjects and if they change after interventions that improve insulin sensitivity. Serum ApoJ levels and insulin resistance status were assessed in nondiabetic (ND) and type 2 diabetic (T2D) subjects. The impacts of rosiglitazone or metformin therapy on serum ApoJ levels and glucose disposal rate (GDR) during a hyperinsulinemic/euglycemic clamp were evaluated in a separate cohort of T2D subjects. Total ApoJ protein or that associated with the HDL and LDL fractions was measured by immunoblotting or ELISA. Fasting serum ApoJ levels were greatly elevated in T2D subjects (ND vs T2D; 100±8.3 vs. 150.6±8.5AU, Pinsulin, HOMA-IR, and BMI. ApoJ levels were significantly and independently associated with HOMA-IR, even after adjustment for age, sex, and BMI. Rosiglitazone treatment in T2D subjects resulted in a reduction in serum ApoJ levels (before vs. after treatment; 100±13.9 vs. 77±15.2AU, P=0.015), whereas metformin had no effect on ApoJ levels. The change in ApoJ levels during treatment was inversely associated with the change in GDR. Interestingly, ApoJ content in the LDL fraction was inversely associated with HOMA-IR. Serum ApoJ levels are closely correlated with the magnitude of insulin resistance regardless of obesity, and decrease along with improvement of insulin resistance in response only to rosiglitazone in type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Zinc-α2-glycoprotein is associated with insulin resistance in humans and is regulated by hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, or liraglutide administration: cross-sectional and interventional studies in normal subjects, insulin-resistant subjects, and subjects with newly diagnosed diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mengliu; Liu, Rui; Li, Shu; Luo, Yu; Zhang, Yali; Zhang, Lili; Liu, Dongfang; Wang, Yaxu; Xiong, Zhengai; Boden, Guenther; Chen, Shirong; Li, Ling; Yang, Gangyi

    2013-05-01

    Zinc-α2-glycoprotein (ZAG) has been proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Previous studies in humans and in rodents have produced conflicting results regarding the link between ZAG and insulin resistance. The objective of this study was to examine the relationships between ZAG and insulin resistance in cross-sectional and interventional studies. Serum ZAG (determined with ELISA) was compared with various parameters related to insulin resistance in subjects with normal glucose tolerance, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and in women with or without polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps were performed in healthy and PCOS women. Real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting were used to assess mRNA and protein expression of ZAG. The effect of a glucagon-like peptide-1 agonist on ZAG was studied in a 12-week liraglutide treatment trial. Circulating ZAG was lower in patients with IGT and newly diagnosed T2DM than in controls. Circulating ZAG correlated positively with HDL cholesterol and adiponectin, and correlated inversely with BMI, waist-to-hip ratio, body fat percentage, triglycerides, fasting blood glucose, fasting insulin, HbA1c, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). On multivariate analysis, ZAG was independently associated with BMI, HOMA-IR, and adiponectin. ZAG mRNA and protein were decreased in adipose tissue of T2DM patients. Moreover, circulating ZAG levels were lower in women with PCOS than in women with high insulin sensitivity. Liraglutide treatment for 12 weeks significantly increased circulating ZAG levels. We conclude that ZAG may be an adipokine associated with insulin resistance.

  3. Trans-ethnic Meta-analysis and Functional Annotation Illuminates the Genetic Architecture of Fasting Glucose and Insulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Ching-Ti; Raghavan, Sridharan; Maruthur, Nisa; Kabagambe, Edmond Kato; Hong, Jaeyoung; Ng, Maggie C. Y.; Hivert, Marie-France; Lu, Yingchang; An, Ping; Bentley, Amy R.; Drolet, Anne M.; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Guo, Xiuqing; Armstrong, Loren L.; Irvin, Marguerite R.; Li, Man; Lipovich, Leonard; Rybin, Denis V.; Taylor, Kent D.; Agyemang, Charles; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Cade, Brian E.; Chen, Wei-Min; Dauriz, Marco; Delaney, Joseph A. C.; Edwards, Todd L.; Evans, Daniel S.; Evans, Michele K.; Lange, Leslie A.; Leong, Aaron; Liu, Jingmin; Liu, Yongmei; Nayak, Uma; Patel, Sanjay R.; Porneala, Bianca C.; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Snijder, Marieke B.; Stallings, Sarah C.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Yanek, Lisa R.; Zhao, Wei; Becker, Diane M.; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Biggs, Mary L.; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Bowden, Donald W.; Chen, Guanjie; Correa, Adolfo; Couper, David J.; Crawford, Dana C.; Cushman, Mary; Eicher, John D.; Fornage, Myriam; Franceschini, Nora; Fu, Yi-Ping; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Gottesman, Omri; Hara, Kazuo; Harris, Tamara B.; Jensen, Richard A.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Jhun, Min A.; Karter, Andrew J.; Keller, Margaux F.; Kho, Abel N.; Kizer, Jorge R.; Krauss, Ronald M.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Li, Xiaohui; Liang, Jingling; Liu, Simin; Lowe, William L.; Mosley, Thomas H.; North, Kari E.; Pacheco, Jennifer A.; Peyser, Patricia A.; Patrick, Alan L.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Selvin, Elizabeth; Sims, Mario; Smith, Jennifer A.; Tajuddin, Salman M.; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Wren, Mary P.; Yao, Jie; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Ziegler, Julie T.; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Boerwinkle, Eric; Ferrucci, Luigi; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Miljkovic, Iva; Pankow, James S.; Rotimi, Charles N.; Sale, Michele M.; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Arnett, Donna K.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Nalls, Michael A.; Province, Michael A.; Kao, W. H. Linda; Siscovick, David S.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Wilson, James G.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Dupuis, Josée; Rich, Stephen S.; Florez, Jose C.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Morris, Andrew P.; Meigs, James B.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the genetic basis of the type 2 diabetes (T2D)-related quantitative traits fasting glucose (FG) and insulin (FI) in African ancestry (AA) individuals has been limited. In non-diabetic subjects of AA (n = 20,209) and European ancestry (EA; n = 57,292), we performed trans-ethnic (AA+EA)

  4. Effect of fasting on laryngopharyngeal reflux disease in male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Abdul-latif; Nassar, Jihad; Dowli, Alexander; Al Zaghal, Zeid; Sabri, Alain

    2012-11-01

    To address the effect of fasting on laryngopharyngeal reflux disease (LPRD). A total of 22 male subjects have been recruited for this study. Subjects with vocal fold pathologies, recent history of upper respiratory tract infection or laryngeal manipulation were excluded. Demographic data included age and history of smoking. All subjects were evaluated while fasting for at least 12 h and non-fasting. By non-fasting we mean that they ate and drank during the day at their discretion with no reservation. The abstention from water and or food intake during the non-fasting period extended from few minutes to 3 h. All subjects were evaluated at the same time during the day. The evaluation consisted of a laryngeal examination and the Reflux Symptom Index (RSI). The Reflux Finding Score (RFS) was used to report on the reflux laryngeal findings. Subjects were considered to have LPRD if either the RSI or the RFS were positive (>9 RSI, >7 RFS). There was a non-significant increase in the total prevalence of LPRD while fasting compared to non-fasting (32 vs. 50 % while fasting, p value 0.361). In the RSI, the most common symptoms while non-fasting and fasting were throat clearing (64 vs. 68 %), postnasal drip (45 vs. 59 %) and globus sensation (36 vs. 50 %). The average score of all the three increased significantly while fasting. For the RFS the most common laryngeal findings in the non-fasting group versus the fasting group were erythema (77 vs. 68 %), thick endolaryngeal mucus (77 vs. 77 %) and posterior commissure hypertrophy (55 vs. 64 %). Fasting results in a nonsignificant increase in laryngopharyngeal reflux disease. The increase can be hypothetically explained on the change in eating habits and the known alterations in gastric secretions during Ramadan. Fasting subjects must be alert to the effect of LPRD on their throat and voice in particular.

  5. Elevated fasting insulin predicts the future incidence of metabolic syndrome: a 5-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Ki-Chul C

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is controversy about the specific pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome (MS but several authors have argued that hyperinsulinemia is a key feature of the cluster. We aimed to assess whether the baseline insulin levels could predict the development of MS in a well characterised cohort of otherwise healthy adults who were followed over a five year period. Methods We identified 2, 350 Koreans subjects who did not have MS in 2003 and who were followed up in 2008. The subjects were divided into 4 groups according to the baseline quartiles of fasting insulin, and the predictors of the incidence of MS were analyzed using multivariate regression analysis. Results Over the follow up period, 8.5% of the cohort developed MS. However, 16.4% of the subjects in the highest quartile of the insulin levels developed MS. In a model that included gender, age, the smoking status, the exercise level, alcohol consumption and the systolic blood pressure, the subjects in the highest quartile of the insulin levels had more than a 5 times greater risk of developing MS compared that of the subjects in the lowest quartile. This predictive importance remained significant even after correcting for all the individual features of MS. Conclusions These data suggest that high baseline fasting insulin levels are independent determinants for the future development of MS.

  6. Elevated fasting insulin predicts the future incidence of metabolic syndrome: a 5-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Ki-Chul C; Seo, Mi-Hae H; Rhee, Eun-Jung J; Wilson, Andrew M

    2011-11-30

    There is controversy about the specific pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome (MS) but several authors have argued that hyperinsulinemia is a key feature of the cluster. We aimed to assess whether the baseline insulin levels could predict the development of MS in a well characterised cohort of otherwise healthy adults who were followed over a five year period. We identified 2, 350 Koreans subjects who did not have MS in 2003 and who were followed up in 2008. The subjects were divided into 4 groups according to the baseline quartiles of fasting insulin, and the predictors of the incidence of MS were analyzed using multivariate regression analysis. Over the follow up period, 8.5% of the cohort developed MS. However, 16.4% of the subjects in the highest quartile of the insulin levels developed MS. In a model that included gender, age, the smoking status, the exercise level, alcohol consumption and the systolic blood pressure, the subjects in the highest quartile of the insulin levels had more than a 5 times greater risk of developing MS compared that of the subjects in the lowest quartile. This predictive importance remained significant even after correcting for all the individual features of MS. These data suggest that high baseline fasting insulin levels are independent determinants for the future development of MS.

  7. Moringa Oleifera Leaf Increases Insulin Secretion after Single Dose Administration: A Preliminary Study in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthanont, Pimjai; Lumlerdkij, Natchagorn; Akarasereenont, Pravit; Vannasaeng, Sathit; Sriwijitkamol, Apiradee

    2016-03-01

    Herbal medicine has long been used as an alternative medicine for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Recently, Moringa oleifera (MO or ma-rum in Thai) leaf has been widely used in T2DM patients. Several studies in diabetes rat model have shown that MO had effect on glucose metabolism. However study in humans is lacking. Examine effects of MO on plasma glucose and insulin secretion. Ten healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study (mean age 29 ± 5 years; BMI 20.6 ± 1.5 kg/m2; FPG 81 ± 5 mg/dl). After an overnight fast and every two weeks, subjects received an oral dose of MO at increasing dosages of 0, 1, 2, and 4 g. Plasma glucose (PG) and insulin were collected at baseline and at 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 4, and 6 hours after each MO dosage administration. Insulin secretion rate was measured using area under the curve (AUC) of insulin and AUC of insulin/glucose ratio. After doses of 0, 1, 2, and 4 g MO, mean plasma insulin increased (2.3 ± 0.9, 2.7 ± 1.0, 3.3 ± 1.4, and 4.1 ± 1.7 μU/ml, respectively) despite there being no differences in mean PG (77 ± 6, 78 ± 5, 79 ± 6, and 79 ± 5 mg/dl, respectively). AUC of insulin was greater after high-dose MO (4 g) than after baseline or low-dose MO capsule (1 g) (24.0 ± 3.5 vs. 14.5 ± 1.8 or 16.1 ± 2.0, respectively; p = 0.03), while there was no difference in AUC of glucose. Accordingly, insulin secretion rate represented by AUC of insulin/glucose ratio after high-dose MO was significantly increased by 74% (P = 0.041), as compared with that of baseline. We concluded that high-dose (4 g) MO leaf powder capsules significantly increased insulin secretion in healthy subjects. These results suggest that MO leaf may be a potential agent in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Further studies of MO in patients with T2DM are needed.

  8. Greater impairment of postprandial triacylglycerol than glucose response in metabolic syndrome subjects with fasting hyperglycaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kim G; Walden, Charlotte M; Murray, Peter; Smith, Adrian M; Minihane, Anne M; Lovegrove, Julie A; Williams, Christine M

    2013-08-01

    Studies have started to question whether a specific component or combinations of metabolic syndrome (MetS) components may be more important in relation to cardiovascular disease risk. Our aim was to examine the impact of the presence of raised fasting glucose as a MetS component on postprandial lipaemia. Men classified with the MetS underwent a sequential test meal investigation, in which blood samples were taken at regular intervals after a test breakfast (t=0 min) and lunch (t=330 min). Lipids, glucose and insulin were measured in the fasting and postprandial samples. MetS subjects with 3 or 4 components were subdivided into those without (n=34) and with (n=23) fasting hyperglycaemia (≥5.6 mmol/l), irrespective of the combination of components. Fasting lipids and insulin were similar in the two groups, with glucose significantly higher in the men with glucose as a MetS component (Ppostprandial triacylglycerol (TAG) response in men with fasting hyperglycaemia. Greater glucose AUC (Pglucose to be an important predictor of the postprandial TAG and glucose response. Our data analysis has revealed a greater impairment of postprandial TAG than glucose response in MetS subjects with raised fasting glucose. The worsening of postprandial lipaemic control may contribute to the greater CVD risk reported in individuals with MetS component combinations which include hyperglycaemia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of a fibre-enriched milk drink on insulin and glucose levels in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilvi Taru K

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The glycaemic response to foods is dependent on the quality and content of carbohydrates. Carbohydrates in the form of dietary fibre have favourable effects on insulin and glucose metabolism and may help to control energy intake. Dairy products have a relatively low carbohydrate content, and most of the carbohydrate is in the form of lactose which causes gastrointestinal symptoms in part of the population. In order to avoid these symptoms, dairy products can be replaced with lactose-free dairy products which are on the market in many parts of the world. However, the effects of lactose-free products on insulin and glucose metabolism have not been studied. Methods In the present study, we investigated the effects of 1 a lactose-free milk drink, 2 a novel fibre-enriched, fat- and lactose-free milk drink and 3 normal fat-free milk on serum glucose and insulin levels and satiety using a randomized block design. Following an overnight fast, 26 healthy volunteers ingested 200 ml of one of these drinks on three non-consecutive days. Insulin and glucose levels and subjective satiety ratings were measured before the ingestion of the milk product and 20, 40, 60, 120 and 180 minutes after ingestion. The responses were calculated as the area under the curve subtracted by the baseline value (AUC minus baseline. Results The insulin response was significantly lower for the fibre-enriched milk drink than it was for the other milk products (AUC, P = 0.007. There were no differences in the response for glucose or in the AUC for the subjective satiety ratings between the studied milk products. Conclusion The present results suggest that this novel milk drink could have positive effects on insulin response.

  10. Does Reducing Basal Insulin During Ramadan Fasting by Children and Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Decrease the Risk of Symptomatic Hypoglycemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeb, Asma; Al Qahtani, Nabras; Attia, Salima; Al Suwaidi, Hana; Nagelkerke, Nico

    2016-09-01

    Ramadan fasting by patients with type 1 diabetes might predispose them to hypoglycemia. There are no data on the optimal way of adjusting basal insulin during fasting. We aim at studying whether reducing basal insulin during Ramadan reduces the frequency of symptomatic hypoglycemia. We enrolled children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes who intended to fast during Ramadan. Logbooks were given to subjects to mark days fasted, symptomatic hypoglycemia, and dose of basal insulin on all days of Ramadan. Logbooks were examined. Glucometers and insulin pumps were downloaded. Seventy-five patients were enrolled. The age was 10.2-18.9 (14.5) years. Sixty-eight patients had results analyzed. Forty-one patients were on pumps, and 27 patients were on multiple daily injections (MDI). Mean HbA1c was 7.9 (1.2) and 8.4 (1.3) for the pump and the MDI, respectively (P = 0.007). Thirty-nine patients had hypoglycemia leading to breaking fast. The mean number of episodes of breaking fast was 3 (1-8). Thirty-five of the 68 patients had reduced basal insulin. The difference in the frequency of hypoglycemia in those who reduced/did not reduce insulin was not statistically significant (P > 0.10). Fifteen patients on MDI and 24 patients on pumps had at least one episode of breaking fast. Six and 18 of the patients on MDI and pumps, respectively, reduced basal insulin (P > 0.10). This is the first study examining the impact of reduction of basal insulin on hypoglycemia in adolescents. Reducing basal insulin during Ramadan fasting does not decrease the risk of symptomatic hypoglycemia. Use of the insulin pump does not appear to be different from MDI in the frequency of occurrence of hypoglycemia.

  11. In vivo differential effects of fasting, re-feeding, insulin and insulin stimulation time course on insulin signaling pathway components in peripheral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agouni, Abdelali; Owen, Carl; Czopek, Alicja; Mody, Nimesh; Delibegovic, Mirela

    2010-10-08

    Components of the insulin receptor signaling pathway are probably some of the best studied ones. Even though methods for studying these components are well established, the in vivo effects of different fasting regimens, and the time course of insulin receptor phosphorylation and that of its downstream components in insulin-sensitive peripheral tissues have not been analyzed in detail. When assessing insulin signaling, it may be beneficial to drive insulin levels as low as possible by performing an overnight fast before injecting a supra-physiological dose of insulin. Recent studies have shown however that 5 or 6 h fast in mice is sufficient to assess physiological responses to insulin and/or glucose in glucose tolerance tests, insulin tolerance tests and euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp studies. Moreover, mice are nocturnal feeders, with ∼70% of their daily caloric intake occurring during the dark cycle, and their metabolic rate is much higher than humans. Therefore, an overnight fast in mice is closer to starvation than just food withdrawal. Thus our aim was to assess insulin signaling components from the insulin receptor to downstream targets IRS1, Akt/PKB, GSK3, Erk1/2 and ribosomal protein S6 in muscle, liver and adipose tissue in 5 h versus 16 h (overnight) fasted mice, and the time course (0-30 min) of these phosphorylation events. We also assessed whether re-feeding under 5 h and 16 h fasting conditions was a more robust stimulus than insulin alone. Our study determines that a short food withdrawal from mice, for a period of 5 h, results in a similar insulin-stimulated response in phosphorylation events as the long overnight fast, presenting a more physiological experimental set up. We also demonstrate that in vivo, insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of its signaling components is different between different peripheral tissues, and depending on the tissue(s) and protein(s) of interest, an appropriate time course should be chosen. Copyright © 2010

  12. Starting bedtime glargine versus NPH insulin in poorly controlled type 2 diabetic patients with various hyperglycemia types (fasting type or postprandial type).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vähätalo, Markku A; Viikari, Jorma; Rönnemaa, Tapani

    2014-04-01

    Our aim was to compare the effects of an intermediate acting human insulin (NPH) and a long-acting insulin analog, insulin glargine, in insulin naïve type 2 diabetes patients, stratified by the type of hyperglycemia (fasting or postprandial type). Based on different action profiles, we hypothesized that patients having different hyperglycemia types would react differently when treated with these insulins. This is a post hoc analysis of the Lanmet study data. The Lanmet study was a randomized, 36-week controlled insulin initiation study in type 2 diabetes patients. 109 subjects with baseline HbA1c >8.0% (64 mmol/mol) completed the study. The patients were divided into two groups according to fasting glucose (mmol/l)/HbA1c (%) ratio. Patients with a ratio ≥1.3 were defined as having fasting type and those with a ratio weight, and final insulin dose. Independently of insulin type, compared to patients with postprandial type hyperglycemia, those with fasting type hyperglycemia had 2.1 kg/m(2) greater initial BMI (p = 0.044), gained 2.0 kg more weight (p = 0.020, adjusted for baseline BMI p = 0.035), and had 36% greater final insulin dose/kg (p = 0.001). With respect to hyperglycemia type, there was no difference between NPH and glargine in their effects on HbA1c. When starting bedtime insulin in type 2 diabetes patients, those with fasting type hyperglycemia are prone to greater weight gain. Hyperglycemia type does not help in identifying patients who would benefit specially from either NPH insulin or insulin glargine.

  13. Cardiopulmonary fitness, adiponectin, chemerin associated fasting insulin level in colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ki-Yong; Lee, Mi Kyung; Kim, Dong-Il; Park, Jihye; Min, Jihee; In Yang, Hyuk; Lee, Junga; Oh, Minsuk; An, Joongbae; Lee, Ji-Won; Chu, Sang Hui; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Kim, Nam-Kyu; Jeon, Justin Y

    2016-07-01

    Since circulating level of insulin is associated with colorectal cancer prognosis, it is important to identify factors contributing to fasting insulin level in colorectal cancer patients. The purpose of the current study is to investigate the association of physical fitness, adiponectin, and chemerin levels with circulating level of insulin in colorectal cancer patients. A total of 123 stage II-III colorectal cancer patients who completed standard cancer treatment were recruited. Anthropometric characteristics, fitness measurements, fasting insulin level, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, lipid profiles, and adiponectin and chemerin levels were analyzed. Cardiopulmonary fitness level inversely associated with fasting insulin levels (the least fit (1st tertile): 8.11 ± 0.64, moderately fit (2nd tertile): 6.02 ± 0.63, and highly fit (3rd tertile): 5.58 ± 0.66 μU/ml, unfit vs. moderately fit, p fasting adiponectin and chemerin levels were associated with fasting insulin levels after adjustment for gender, age, stage, and BMI. In our combined analyses, participants with high adiponectin and low chemerin levels showed significantly lower fasting insulin levels (4.92 ± 0.75 vs. 8.07 ± 0.80 μU/ml, p fasting insulin level. Our results suggest that physical fitness and adiponectin and chemerin levels may contribute to circulating levels of insulin. These results suggest that exercise may influence the prognosis of colorectal cancer patients by influencing physical fitness level, circulating levels of adiponectin and chemerin.

  14. Comparison of a carbohydrate-free diet vs. fasting on plasma glucose, insulin and glucagon in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, Frank Q; Almokayyad, Rami M; Gannon, Mary C

    2015-02-01

    Hyperglycemia improves when patients with type 2 diabetes are placed on a weight-loss diet. Improvement typically occurs soon after diet implementation. This rapid response could result from low fuel supply (calories), lower carbohydrate content of the weight-loss diet, and/or weight loss per se. To differentiate these effects, glucose, insulin, C-peptide and glucagon were determined during the last 24 h of a 3-day period without food (severe calorie restriction) and a calorie-sufficient, carbohydrate-free diet. Seven subjects with untreated type 2 diabetes were studied. A randomized-crossover design with a 4-week washout period between arms was used. Results from both the calorie-sufficient, carbohydrate-free diet and the 3-day fast were compared with the initial standard diet consisting of 55% carbohydrate, 15% protein and 30% fat. The overnight fasting glucose concentration decreased from 196 (standard diet) to 160 (carbohydrate-free diet) to 127 mg/dl (fasting). The 24 h glucose and insulin area responses decreased by 35% and 48% on day 3 of the carbohydrate-free diet, and by 49% and 69% after fasting. Overnight basal insulin and glucagon remained unchanged. Short-term fasting dramatically lowered overnight fasting and 24 h integrated glucose concentrations. Carbohydrate restriction per se could account for 71% of the reduction. Insulin could not entirely explain the glucose responses. In the absence of carbohydrate, the net insulin response was 28% of the standard diet. Glucagon did not contribute to the metabolic adaptations observed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Elevated fasting insulin levels increase the risk of abdominal obesity in Korean men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Keun; Oh, Chang-Mo; Jung, Taegi; Choi, Young-Jun; Chung, Ju Youn; Ryoo, Jae-Hong

    2017-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether an elevated fasting insulin level predicts abdominal obesity. A cohort study was conducted with 13,707 non-obese Korean men. They were categorized into 4 groups according to the quartile of fasting insulin level, and followed up from 2005 to 2010. Incidence rates of obesity were compared among the 4 groups during follow-up, and a Cox proportional hazards model was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) for abdominal obesity according to fasting insulin level. The overall incidence rate of obesity was 16.2%, but the rate increased in proportion to the fasting insulin level (quartiles 1-4: 9.8%, 12.4%, 16.9%, 25.5%, Pfasting insulin level in an unadjusted model. However, after adjustment for covariates, including baseline waist circumference (WC), only in the quartile 4 group was the statistical significance of the association maintained [quartile 2-4; abdominal obesity: 0.89 (0.76-1.02), 1.00 (0.86-1.14) and 1.24 (1.08-1.43), P for trend fasting insulin levels, an overall proportional relationship between fasting insulin level and incident abdominal obesity was not found. Additionally, this association was largely accounted for by baseline WC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Reduced insulin secretion and glucose intolerance are involved in the fasting susceptibility of common vampire bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Mariella B; Queiroz, Joicy F; Dias Gomes, Carolinne I; Collares-Buzato, Carla B; Barbosa, Helena C; Boschero, Antonio C; Gonçalves, Carlos A; Pinheiro, Eliana C

    2013-03-01

    Susceptibility during fasting has been reported for the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus), to the point of untimely deaths after only 2-3 nights of fasting. To investigate the underlying physiology of this critical metabolic condition, we analyzed serum insulin levels, pancreatic islets morphometry and immunocytochemistry (ICC), static insulin secretion in pancreas fragments, and insulin signaling mechanism in male vampire bats. A glucose tolerance test (ipGTT) was also performed. Serum insulin was found to be lower in fed vampires compared to other mammals, and was significantly reduced after 24h fasting. Morphometrical analyses revealed small irregular pancreatic islets with reduced percentage of β-cell mass compared to other bats. Static insulin secretion analysis showed that glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was impaired, as insulin levels did not reach significance under high glucose concentrations, whereas the response to the amino acid leucin was preserved. Results from ipGTT showed a failure on glucose clearance, indicating glucose intolerance due to diminished pancreatic insulin secretion and/or decreased β-cell response to glucose. In conclusion, data presented here indicate lower insulinemia and impaired insulin secretion in D. rotundus, which is consistent with the limited ability to store body energy reserves, previously reported in these animals. Whether these metabolic and hormonal features are associated with their blood diet remains to be determined. The peculiar food sharing through blood regurgitation, reported to this species, might be an adaptive mechanism overcoming this metabolic susceptibility. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantification of beta-cell function during IVGTT in Type II and non-diabetic subjects: assessment of insulin secretion by mathematical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, L L; Vølund, A; Madsbad, Sten

    2001-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We compared four methods to assess their accuracy in measuring insulin secretion during an intravenous glucose tolerance test in patients with Type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus and with varying beta-cell function and matched control subjects. METHODS: Eight control...... subjects and eight Type II diabetic patients underwent an intravenous glucose tolerance test with tolbutamide and an intravenous bolus injection of C-peptide to assess C-peptide kinetics. Insulin secretion rates were determined by the Eaton deconvolution (reference method), the Insulin SECretion method...... (ISEC) based on population kinetic parameters as well as one-compartment and two-compartment versions of the combined model of insulin and C-peptide kinetics. To allow a comparison of the accuracy of the four methods, fasting rates and amounts of insulin secreted during the first phase (0-10 min...

  18. Fasting insulin modifies the relation between age and renal function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oterdoom, Leendert H.; de Vries, Aiko P. J.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; de Jong, Paul E.; Gans, Reinold B.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    Background. The worldwide increase in end-stage renal disease has been alleged to be associated with insulin resistance-related conditions. Insulin resistance and the concomitant compensatory hyperinsulinaemia may accelerate age-related decline in renal function through inducing glomerular

  19. Plasma HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, but not LDL-cholesterol, are associated with insulin secretion in non-diabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natali, Andrea; Baldi, Simona; Bonnet, Fabrice; Petrie, John; Trifirò, Silvia; Tricò, Domenico; Mari, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Experimental data support the notion that lipoproteins might directly affect beta cell function, however clinical data are sparse and inconsistent. We aimed at verifying whether, independently of major confounders, serum lipids are associated with alterations in insulin secretion or clearance non-diabetic subjects. Cross sectional and observational prospective (3.5yrs), multicentre study in which 1016 non-diabetic volunteers aged 30-60yrs. and with a wide range of BMI (20.0-39.9kg/m2) were recruited in a setting of University hospital ambulatory care (RISC study). baseline fasting lipids, fasting and OGTT-induced insulin secretion and clearance (measured by glucose and C-peptide modeling), peripheral insulin sensitivity (by the euglycemic clamp). Lipids and OGTT were repeated in 980 subjects after 3.5years. LDL-cholesterol did not show independent associations with fasting or stimulated insulin secretion or clearance. After accounting for potential confounders, HDL-cholesterol displayed negative and triglycerides positive independent associations with fasting and OGTT insulin secretion; neither with insulin clearance. Low HDL-cholesterol and high triglycerides were associated with an increase in glucose-dependent and a decrease in non-glucose-dependent insulin secretion. Over 3.5years both an HDL-cholesterol decline and a triglycerides rise were associated with an increase in fasting insulin secretion independent of changes in body weight or plasma glucose. LDL-cholesterol does not seem to influence any major determinant of insulin bioavailability while low HDL-cholesterol and high triglycerides might contribute to sustain the abnormalities in insulin secretion that characterize the pre-diabetic state. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Fasting insulin sensitivity indices are not better than routine clinical variables at predicting insulin sensitivity among Black Africans: a clamp study in sub-Saharan Africans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background We aimed to evaluate the predictive utility of common fasting insulin sensitivity indices, and non-laboratory surrogates [BMI, waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR)] in sub-Saharan Africans without diabetes. Methods We measured fasting glucose and insulin, and glucose uptake during 80/mU/m2/min euglycemic clamp in 87 Cameroonians (51 men) aged (SD) 34.6 (11.4) years. We derived insulin sensitivity indices including HOMA-IR, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), fasting insulin resistance index (FIRI) and glucose-to-insulin ratio (GIR). Indices and clinical predictors were compared to clamp using correlation tests, robust linear regressions and agreement of classification by sex-specific thirds. Results The mean insulin sensitivity was M = 10.5 ± 3.2 mg/kg/min. Classification across thirds of insulin sensitivity by clamp matched with non-laboratory surrogates in 30-48% of participants, and with fasting indices in 27-51%, with kappa statistics ranging from −0.10 to 0.26. Fasting indices correlated significantly with clamp (/r/=0.23-0.30), with GIR performing less well than fasting insulin and HOMA-IR (both p insulin sensitivity indices are modest predictors of insulin sensitivity measured by euglycemic clamp, and do not perform better than clinical surrogates in this population. PMID:25106496

  1. Insulin degludec/insulin aspart versus biphasic insulin aspart 30 twice daily in insulin-experienced Japanese subjects with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes: Subgroup analysis of a Pan-Asian, treat-to-target Phase 3 Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneda, Shinji; Hyllested-Winge, Jacob; Gall, Mari-Anne; Kaneko, Shizuka; Hirao, Koichi

    2017-03-01

    The present study was a subgroup analysis of a Pan-Asian Phase 3 open-label randomized treat-to-target trial evaluating insulin degludec/insulin aspart (IDegAsp) and biphasic insulin aspart 30 (BIAsp 30) in Japanese subjects with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on insulin. Eligible subjects (n = 178) were randomized (2: 1) to twice-daily (b.i.d.) IDegAsp or BIAsp 30 with or without metformin for 26 weeks, titrated to a blood glucose target of between 3.9 and <5.0 mmol/L. Changes in HbA1c , the proportion of responders reaching the HbA1c target, and changes in fasting plasma glucose, nine-point self-monitored plasma glucose profiles, and body weight were assessed. At 26 weeks, the decrease in HbA1c was similar in both groups. Fasting plasma glucose was lower with IDegAsp than BIAsp 30 (estimated treatment difference -1.50 mmol/L; 95 % confidence interval [CI] -1.98, -1.01). Overall confirmed hypoglycemia rates were similar; the nocturnal confirmed hypoglycemia rate was lower with IDegAsp than BIAsp 30 (estimated rate ratio 0.44; 95 % CI 0.20, 0.99). No severe hypoglycemic episodes were reported. The results indicate that IDegAsp b.i.d. improves glycemic control and, compared with BIAsp 30, lowers the rate of nocturnal confirmed hypoglycemia. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes published John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd and Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine.

  2. The effect of Ramadan fasting on glycaemic control in insulin dependent diabetic patients: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabbood, Majid H; Ho, Kenneth W; Simons, Mary R

    Ramadan fasting is one of the five pillars of Islam. People with diabetes are exempted from fasting according to Islamic rules. However, many people with diabetes wish to fast. Physicians are asked frequently by their patients about their ability to fast and the possible impact of fasting on their glycaemic control. Studies about the effect of Ramadan on people with insulin-treated diabetes are scarce. This review aims to provide clinicians with the best recommendations for their patients with insulin-treated diabetes who wish to fast. Four databases (Medline, EMBASE, Scopus and PubMed) were searched using the following MeSH terms and keywords: "insulin dependent diabetes mellitus", "type 1 diabetes mellitus", 'Ramadan' "and" "fasting". In addition, a hand search of key journals and reference lists was performed. Sixteen full text articles were selected for review and critical analysis. All of the included studies except one found improvement or no change in glycaemic control parameters during Ramadan fasting. The incidence of major complications were negligible. Minor hypoglycaemic events were reported in some studies but did not adversely affect fasting. Postprandial hyperglycaemia was a major concern in other studies. However, the incidence of severe hyperglycaemia and diabetic ketoacidosis were trivial. Ramadan fasting is feasible for insulin dependent diabetic patient who wish to fast. Clinicians should advise their patients about the importance of adequate glycaemic control before Ramadan and frequent glucose monitoring during fasting. Certain types of Insulin seem to be more beneficial than other. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of risk for metabolic syndrome according to the fasting insulin concentration in Korean men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ju Young; Park, Sung Keun; Choi, Joong-Myung; Hong, Hyun Pyo; Choi, Young-Jun; Ryoo, Jae-Hong

    2017-01-01

    As a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome (MetS) is an important global health problem due to its high worldwide prevalence. The objective of this study is to determine whether the fasting serum insulin concentration influences future incidence of MetS. A total of 14,621 Korean men without MetS participating in a medical health check-up program were followed up from 2005 until 2010. They were divided into 4 groups according to baseline fasting insulin concentrations. The incidence of MetS was compared among the groups, and Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine if MetS was associated with higher fasting insulin concentration. The incidence of MetS increased according to the baseline fasting insulin concentration (first quartile: 8.4%, second quartile: 12.3%, third quartile: 16.3%, fourth quartile: 26.5%, Pfasting insulin concentration. Additionally, increased fasting insulin concentration was an independent risk factor for the future development of MetS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Gender differences in the associations between cortisol and insulin in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, RP; Lamberts, SWJ; deJong, FH; Pols, HAP; Grobbee, DE

    To investigate the role of cortisol in the etiology of insulin resistance in men and women, we examined 218 healthy non-hospitalized elderly, selected from the Rotterdam Study. Free cortisol was assessed by the ratio of fasting serum cortisol over corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), and insulin

  5. The insulin-mediated modulation of visually evoked magnetic fields is reduced in obese subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Guthoff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin is an anorexigenic hormone that contributes to the termination of food intake in the postprandial state. An alteration in insulin action in the brain, named "cerebral insulin resistance", is responsible for overeating and the development of obesity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To analyze the direct effect of insulin on food-related neuronal activity we tested 10 lean and 10 obese subjects. We conducted a magnetencephalography study during a visual working memory task in both the basal state and after applying insulin or placebo spray intranasally to bypass the blood brain barrier. Food and non-food pictures were presented and subjects had to determine whether or not two consecutive pictures belonged to the same category. Intranasal insulin displayed no effect on blood glucose, insulin or C-peptide concentrations in the periphery; however, it led to an increase in the components of evoked fields related to identification and categorization of pictures (at around 170 ms post stimuli in the visual ventral stream in lean subjects when food pictures were presented. In contrast, insulin did not modulate food-related brain activity in obese subjects. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrated that intranasal insulin increases the cerebral processing of food pictures in lean whereas this was absent in obese subjects. This study further substantiates the presence of a "cerebral insulin resistance" in obese subjects and might be relevant in the pathogenesis of obesity.

  6. Chromium supplementation in non-obese non-diabetic subjects is associated with a decline in insulin sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masharani Umesh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of chromium supplements is widespread for the prevention and treatment of diabetes mellitus but there are conflicting reports on efficacy, possibly reflecting discrepant effects across different populations. In the present studies, we test the hypothesis that chromium supplementation raises serum chromium levels and correspondingly improves insulin sensitivity. Methods A double blind placebo-controlled randomized trial was conducted on 31 non-obese, normoglycemic subjects. After baseline studies, the subjects were randomized to placebo or chromium picolinate 500 μg twice a day. The primary endpoint was change in insulin sensitivity as measured by euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. Pre-specified secondary endpoints included fasting lipids, blood pressure, weight, body composition measured by DXA scan. Results After 16 weeks of chromium picolinate therapy there was no significant change in insulin sensitivity between groups (p=0.83. There was, however, a strong association between serum chromium and change in insulin resistance (β = -0.83, p=0.01, where subjects with the highest serum chromium had a worsening of insulin sensitivity. This effect could not be explained by changes in physiological parameters such as body weight, truncal fat and serum lipids with chromium therapy. Conclusions Chromium therapy did not improve insulin sensitivity in non-obese normoglycemic individuals. Further, subjects who have high serum chromium levels paradoxically had a decline in insulin sensitivity. Caution therefore should be exercised in recommending the use of this supplement. Trial registration The study was registered on the NIH registry (clinicaltrials.gov and the identifier is NCT00846248

  7. Fasting Insulin is Better Partitioned according to Family History of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus than Post Glucose Load Insulin of Oral Glucose Tolerance Test in Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Saritha; Chandran, Sindhu Padinjareveedu; Nesheera, K K; Jacob, Jose

    2017-05-01

    Hyperinsulinemia is contributed by insulin resistance, hepatic insulin uptake, insulin secretion and rate of insulin degradation. Family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus has been reported to cause hyperinsulinemia. Correlation of fasting insulin with post glucose load Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) insulin in young adults and their partitioning according to family history of type 2 diabetes. In this observational cross-sectional study, clinical evaluation and biochemical assays of insulin and diabetes related parameters, and secondary clinical influences on type 2 diabetes in volunteers were done for inclusion as participants (n=90) or their exclusion. Cut off levels of quantitative biochemical variables were fixed such that they included the effects of insulin resistance, but excluded other secondary clinical influences. Distribution was analysed by Shapiro-Wilk test; equality of variances by Levene's test; Log10 transformations for conversion of groups to Gaussian distribution and for equality of variances in the groups compared. When the groups compared had Gaussian distribution and there was equality of variance, parametric methods were used. Otherwise, non parametric methods were used. Fasting insulin was correlating significantly with 30, 60 and 120 minute OGTT insulin showing that hyperinsulinemia in the fasting state was related to hyperinsulinemia in the post glucose load states. When fasting and post glucose load OGTT insulin were partitioned into those without and with family history of type 2 diabetes, maximum difference was seen in fasting insulin (pfamily history of type 2 diabetes, demonstrating stratification and heterogeneity in the insulin sample. Of these, fasting insulin was better partitioned and could be used for baseline reference interval calculations.

  8. Consumption of a liquid high-fat meal increases triglycerides but decreases high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in abdominally obese subjects with high postprandial insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Lu, Huixia; Liu, Fukang; Cai, Huizhen; Xia, Hui; Guo, Fei; Xie, Yulan; Huang, Guiling; Miao, Miao; Shu, Guofang; Sun, Guiju

    2017-07-01

    Abdominal obesity is associated with an increased risk of insulin resistance, which may be a potential contributor to dyslipidemia. However, the relationship between postprandial insulin resistance and lipid metabolism in abdominally obese subjects remains unknown. We hypothesized that postprandial dyslipidemia would be exaggerated in abdominally obese subjects with high postprandial insulin resistance. To test this hypothesis, serum glucose, insulin, triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B were measured at baseline and postprandial state at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 hours after a liquid high-fat meal in non-abdominally obese controls (n=44) and abdominally obese subjects with low (AO-LPIR, n=40), middle (n=40), and high postprandial insulin resistance (AO-HPIR, n=40) based on the tertiles ratio of the insulin to glucose areas under the curve (AUC). Their serum adipokines were tested at baseline only. Fasting serum leptin was higher (Pdensity lipoprotein cholesterol AUC was lower (P<.05), in AO-HPIR than those in AO-LPIR and controls. Postprandial AUCs for total cholesterol and apolipoprotein B were similar in abdominally obese subjects with different degrees of postprandial insulin resistance and controls. The present study indicated that the higher degree of postprandial insulin resistance, the more adverse lipid profiles in abdominally obese subjects, which provides insight into opportunity for screening in health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Fasting insulin sensitivity indices are not better than routine clinical variables at predicting insulin sensitivity among Black Africans: a clamp study in sub-Saharan Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobngwi, Eugene; Kengne, Andre-Pascal; Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin B; Choukem, Simeon; Sobngwi-Tambekou, Joelle; Balti, Eric V; Pearce, Mark S; Siaha, Valentin; Mamdjokam, Aissa S; Effoe, Valery; Lontchi-Yimagou, Eric; Donfack, Oliver T; Atogho-Tiedeu, Barbara; Boudou, Philippe; Gautier, Jean-Francois; Mbanya, Jean-Claude

    2014-08-09

    We aimed to evaluate the predictive utility of common fasting insulin sensitivity indices, and non-laboratory surrogates [BMI, waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR)] in sub-Saharan Africans without diabetes. We measured fasting glucose and insulin, and glucose uptake during 80/mU/m2/min euglycemic clamp in 87 Cameroonians (51 men) aged (SD) 34.6 (11.4) years. We derived insulin sensitivity indices including HOMA-IR, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), fasting insulin resistance index (FIRI) and glucose-to-insulin ratio (GIR). Indices and clinical predictors were compared to clamp using correlation tests, robust linear regressions and agreement of classification by sex-specific thirds. The mean insulin sensitivity was M = 10.5 ± 3.2 mg/kg/min. Classification across thirds of insulin sensitivity by clamp matched with non-laboratory surrogates in 30-48% of participants, and with fasting indices in 27-51%, with kappa statistics ranging from -0.10 to 0.26. Fasting indices correlated significantly with clamp (/r/=0.23-0.30), with GIR performing less well than fasting insulin and HOMA-IR (both p fasting indices (/r/=0.38-0.43). Combinations of fasting indices and clinical predictors explained 25-27% of variation in clamp values. Fasting insulin sensitivity indices are modest predictors of insulin sensitivity measured by euglycemic clamp, and do not perform better than clinical surrogates in this population.

  10. Does Ramadan fasting affect expiratory flow rates in healthy subjects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhan, Mirza M F; Siddiqui, Qamar A; Khan, Mohammed N; Sabir, Salman

    2006-11-01

    To assess whether Ramadan fasting affects the expiratory flow rates in healthy subjects, and to know if these effects correlate to a change in other variables. This unmatched case-control longitudinal study includes 46 non-smoking healthy subjects who undertook lung function testing at the Aga Khan University, Pakistan. Expiratory flow rates and body mass were measured in 3 Islamic months, corresponding to November 2001 to January 2002. There was a significant reduction in body mass in Ramadan compared to pre and post Ramadan. No significant changes in expiratory flows were seen during Ramadan as compared to the pre Ramadan period. However, forced expiratory flow rates at 75% of vital capacity (FEF(75)) and between 75% and 85% of vital capacity (FEF(75-85)) showed a significant increase in the post Ramadan period compared to Ramadan. Changes in FEF(75) were negatively correlated to changes in body mass between Ramadan and post Ramadan. This study shows that Ramadan fasting will not affect expiratory flow rates in healthy subjects. Post Ramadan values did show an increase in FEF(75) and FEF(75-85), possibly due to changes in body water and fat content. The reductions in body mass were most probably due to lack of nutrition and not dehydration as the fasts were performed in winter. Collection of reference values or early phase clinical trials measuring expiratory flow rates should not be affected by Ramadan fasting.

  11. Exenatide augments first- and second-phase insulin secretion in response to intravenous glucose in subjects with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fehse, Frauke; Trautmann, Michael; Holst, Jens Juul

    2005-01-01

    CONTEXT: First-phase insulin secretion (within 10 min after a sudden rise in plasma glucose) is reduced in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). The incretin mimetic exenatide has glucoregulatory activities in DM2, including glucose-dependent enhancement of insulin secretion. OBJECTIVE: The objective...... of the study was to determine whether exenatide can restore a more normal pattern of insulin secretion in subjects with DM2. DESIGN: Fasted subjects received iv insulin infusion to reach plasma glucose 4.4-5.6 mmol/liter. Subjects received iv exenatide (DM2) or saline (DM2 and healthy volunteers), followed...... by iv glucose challenge. PATIENTS: Thirteen evaluable DM2 subjects were included in the study: 11 males, two females; age, 56 +/- 7 yr; body mass index, 31.7 +/- 2.4 kg/m2; hemoglobin A1c, 6.6 +/- 0.7% (mean +/- sd) treated with diet/exercise (n = 1), metformin (n = 10), or acarbose (n = 2). Controls...

  12. Comparison of Intermittent Fasting Versus Caloric Restriction in Obese Subjects: A Two Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksungar, F B; Sarıkaya, M; Coskun, A; Serteser, M; Unsal, I

    2017-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) is proven to be effective in increasing life span and it is well known that, nutritional habits, sleeping pattern and meal frequency have profound effects on human health. In Ramadan some Muslims fast during the day-light hours for a month, providing us a unique model of intermittent fasting (IF) in humans. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of IF versus CR on the same non-diabetic obese subjects who were followed for two years according to the growth hormone (GH)/Insulin like growth factor (IGF)-1 axis and insulin resistance. Single-arm Interventional Human Study. 23 female subjects (Body Mass Index (BMI) 29-39, aged between 28-42years). Follow-up is designed as 12 months of CR, after which there was a month of IF and 11 months of CR again, to be totally 24 months. Subjects' daily diets were aligned as low calorie diet during CR and during the IF period, the same subjects fasted for 15 hours in a day for a month and there was no daily calorie restriction. Nutritional pattern was changed as 1 meal in the evening and a late supper before sleeping and no eating and drinking during the day light hours in the IF model. Subjects made brisk walking twice a day during the whole follow-up including both CR and IF periods. BMI, Blood glucose, insulin, TSH, GH, HbA1c, IGF-1, Homa-IR and urinary acetoacetate levels were monitored once in three months and twice in the fasting month. While subjects lost 1250 ± 372g monthly during the CR, in the IF period, weight loss was decreased to 473 ± 146 g. BMI of all subjects decreased gradually and as the BMI decreased, glucose, HbA1c, insulin, Homa-IR and TSH levels were decreased. GH levels were at baseline at the beginning, increased in the first six months and stayed steady during the CR and IF period than began decreasing after the IF period, while IGF-I increased gradually during the CR period and beginning with the 7th day of IF period, it decreased and kept on decreasing till the

  13. Fasting insulin at baseline influences the number of cardiometabolic risk factors and R-R interval at 3years in a healthy population: the RISC Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pataky, Z; Golay, A; Laville, M; Disse, E; Mitrakou, A; Guidone, C; Gabriel, R; Bobbioni-Harsch, E

    2013-09-01

    This was a cross-sectional and longitudinal study of factors contributing to the number of cardiometabolic risk factors, common carotid artery intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT) and R-R interval in clinically healthy subjects without diabetes. Anthropometric and cardiometabolic parameters were measured in the Relationship between Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Disease (RISC) Study cohort at baseline (n=1211) and 3years later (n=974). At baseline, insulin sensitivity was assessed by the euglycaemic clamp technique. The CCA-IMT was echographically measured and the R-R interval was electrocardiographically evaluated at baseline and at the 3-year follow-up. Higher baseline BMI, fasting insulin and tobacco use as well as greater changes in BMI and fasting insulin but lower adiponectin levels, were associated with a greater number of cardiometabolic risk factors at the 3-year follow-up independently of insulin sensitivity (all Pfasting insulin, whereas higher fasting insulinaemia and its 3-year changes were significantly associated with a smaller R-R interval (P=0.005 and P=0.002, respectively). These relationships were independent of baseline age, gender, BMI, adiponectin, insulin sensitivity, tobacco use and physical activity. In clinically healthy subjects, fasting insulinaemia, adiponectin and lifestyle parameters are related to the presence of one or two cardiometabolic risk factors before criteria for the metabolic syndrome are met. These results underline the importance of fasting insulinaemia as an independent cardiometabolic risk factor at an early stage of disease development in a healthy general population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Cassia cinnamon does not change the insulin sensitivity or the liver enzymes in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickenberg, Jennie; Lindstedt, Sandra; Nilsson, Jan; Hlebowicz, Joanna

    2014-09-24

    Published studies have reported conflicting results regarding the effects of cinnamon on glucose, lipids and insulin. To gain further insight into the metabolic effects of Cinnamomum cassia we performed randomized, double-blinded placebo-controlled study using euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp. Twenty-one subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) were included in the study (10 or 11 subjects in each group). The study groups were matched for age, gender and body mass index (BMI). Waist-to-hip ratio, BMI, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, insulin, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein , HbA1c, ASAT, ALAT, bilirubin, ALP, GT and PK were measured before and after the intake of capsules equivalent to 6 g cinnamon twice a day for 12 weeks. The changes in insulin resistance were measured by euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp. The Wilcoxon signed rank sum test, the Mann-Whitney U test and Pearson's chi-squared test were used to analyse the data. Values of p cassia twice a day for 12 weeks did not change the insulin sensitivity or liver enzymes in subjects with IGT.

  15. Insulin resistance, exercise capacity and body composition in subjects with two hypertensive parents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, U B; Dige-Petersen, H; Ibsen, H

    1999-01-01

    correlated to abdominal fat mass but not to insulin sensitivity. CONCLUSION: Subjects with a strong genetic predisposition to essential hypertension had increased diastolic blood pressure compared with subjects with normotensive parents, but they were not insulin resistant. This may be due to the subjects......OBJECTIVE: To study insulin resistance in subjects with strong genetic predisposition to essential hypertension, compared with non-disposed subjects. SUBJECTS: Thirty normotensive subjects aged 18-35 years whose parents both had essential hypertension, and 30 age- and sex matched subjects whose...... parents were both normotensive, were studied. Subjects or parents with diabetes and morbid obesity were excluded. METHODS: The study comprised (1) a frequent sampling oral glucose tolerance test; (2) an isoglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study; (3) an analysis of body composition by dual-energy X...

  16. Postprandial Triglyceride Is Associated with Fasting Triglyceride and HOMA-IR in Korean Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo Hee Lee

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundRecent studies indicate postprandial triglyceride (TG had a better association with cardiovascular events and metabolic syndrome than fasting TG. The authors of the present study investigated the metabolic and clinical relevance of postprandial TG.MethodsIn a cross-sectional retrospective study, the authors of the present study compared fasting and postprandial TG and analyzed the relationship between postprandial TG and various demographic and metabolic parameters in 639 Korean subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2D, group I, n=539 and impaired fasting glucose (IFG, group II, n=100 after ingestion of a standardized liquid meal (total 500 kcal, 17.5 g fat, 68.5 g carbohydrate, and 17.5 g protein.ResultsFasting and postprandial TG were significantly correlated (r=0.973, r=0.937, P<0.001 in group I and II, respectively. Of the variables, total cholesterol, waist circumference and body mass index were significantly correlated with fasting and postprandial TG in both groups. Only postprandial TG showed a significant correlation with glucose metabolic parameters (e.g., postprandial glucose, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR], and fasting C-peptide in subjects with T2D. Multiple regression analysis showed fasting TG and HOMA-IR could be predictable variables for postprandial TG in subjects with T2D.ConclusionPostprandial TG was very strongly correlated with fasting TG. The authors of the present study suggest insulin resistance may be more associated with postprandial TG than fasting TG in Korean T2D patients on a low-fat diet.

  17. Fasting plasma glucose levels and coronary artery calcification in subjects with impaired fasting glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eun, Young-Mi; Kang, Sung-Goo; Song, Sang-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Prediabetes is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). While the association of impaired glucose tolerance with CVD has been shown in many studies, the relationship between impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and CVD remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare the coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores of participants with normal fasting glucose versus those with IFG, according to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels, and to assess whether differences in CAC scores were independent of important confounders. Retrospective study. Health Promotion Center of the University Hospital (Gyeonggi-do, South Korea), during the period 2010-2014. Participants were enrolled from the general population who visited for a medical check-up. CAC was assessed in asymptomatic individuals by multidetector computed tomography. Anthropometric parameters and metabolic profiles were also recorded. Subjects were divided into four fasting glucose groups. Participants with a history of CVD or diabetes mellitus were excluded. Correlation between FPG and CAC scores, CAC score categories, and association between CAC score and FPG categories. Of 1112 participants, 346 (34.2%) had a CAC score > 0. FPG values in the IFG patients were positively but weakly correlated with CAC scores (r=0.099, P=.001). The incidence of CAC differed according to FPG level (P =110 mg/dL had a significantly higher risk of CAC than did subjects with normal fasting glucose (110.

  18. Impact of a lifestyle program on vascular insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome subjects: the RESOLVE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinet, Agnes; Obert, Philippe; Dutheil, Frederic; Diagne, Lamine; Chapier, Robert; Lesourd, Bruno; Courteix, Daniel; Walther, Guillaume

    2015-02-01

    Impaired insulin-dependent vasodilation might contribute to microvascular dysfunction of metabolic syndrome (MetS). The aims of this study were to assess the insulin vasoreactivity in MetS, and to evaluate the effects of a lifestyle program. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, AND OUTCOME MEASURES: Laser Doppler measurements were used to assess cutaneous blood flux (CBF) and flowmotion in response to iontophoresis of insulin and acetylcholine (ACh) in 38 MetS and 18 controls. Anthropometric, plasma insulin, glycemia, and inflammatory markers were measured. MetS subjects (n = 24) underwent a 6-month lifestyle intervention (M6) with a 3-week residential program (D21). The absolute and relative peak insulin and ACh CBF were significantly higher in controls than in MetS subjects. Significant inverse correlations were found between peak insulin CBF and glycemia, insulin and glycated hemoglobin, active plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), C-reactive protein (CRP), and IL-6. With respect to flowmotion, MetS subjects showed lower values in total spectrum CBF and in all its components (except respiratory one). At D21 and M6, peak insulin CBF increased and was no longer different from control values whereas peak ACh CBF did not change. From D21, all the different components and the total CBF spectrum became similar to the control values. The changes in peak insulin CBF and in endothelial component between M6 and baseline were inversely correlated with the change in CRP and PAI-1. The local vasodilatory effects to insulin and its overall flowmotion are impaired in MetS subjects in relation to inflammation. The lifestyle intervention reversed this insulin-induced vascular dysfunction in parallel to decreased inflammation level.

  19. Insulin-stimulated glucose transport in circulating mononuclear cells from nondiabetic and IDDM subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneman, D; Zinman, B; Elliott, M E; Bilan, P J; Klip, A

    1992-02-01

    The objectives of this study were 1) to evaluate glucose transport and its regulation by insulin in easily accessible human cells, 2) to investigate the glucose transporter isoforms involved, and 3) to establish whether a defect in glucose transport is associated with peripheral insulin resistance, which is common in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) patients. We measured 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) uptake in circulating mononuclear cells from 23 nondiabetic adults, 16 adults with IDDM, and 10 children with IDDM. Circulating mononuclear cells were separated from whole blood by Ficoll gradients and incubated with +/- 1 nM insulin. 2-DG uptake was measured after incubation with [3H]2-DG and cell separation through corn oil-phthalate. Cytochalasin B-inhibitable 2-DG uptake (basal and insulin stimulated) was higher in control than in IDDM subjects (P less than 0.001). Insulin significantly increased 2-DG uptake or 3-O-methylglucose uptake in both groups. Basal and insulin-stimulated 2-DG uptake was similar for adults and children with IDDM and did not correlate with age or body mass index in any group or disease duration, insulin dosage, or HbA1c in IDDM. In separated monocytes and lymphocytes, 2-DG uptake increased in response to insulin only in the monocyte population. Insulin dose-response curves indicated maximal stimulation of hexose uptake at 1-2 nM insulin for both control and diabetic subjects and demonstrated a significant decrease in maximal insulin response in the latter. Immunoblotting with specific antibodies revealed that circulating mononuclear cells and separated monocytes express the GLUT1 but not the GLUT4 isoform of the glucose transporter.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Insulin sensitivity, insulin release and glucagon-like peptide-1 levels in persons with impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance in the EUGENE2 study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laakso, M; Zilinskaite, J; Hansen, T

    2008-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We examined the phenotype of individuals with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and/or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) with regard to insulin release and insulin resistance. METHODS: Non-diabetic offspring (n=874; mean age 40+/-10.4 years; BMI 26.6+/-4.9 kg/m(2)) of type 2 diabetic...

  1. Transcriptomic and metabolomic profiling of chicken adipose tissue in response to insulin neutralization and fasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Bo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Domestic broiler chickens rapidly accumulate adipose tissue due to intensive genetic selection for rapid growth and are naturally hyperglycemic and insulin resistant, making them an attractive addition to the suite of rodent models used for studies of obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans. Furthermore, chicken adipose tissue is considered as poorly sensitive to insulin and lipolysis is under glucagon control. Excessive fat accumulation is also an economic and environmental concern for the broiler industry due to the loss of feed efficiency and excessive nitrogen wasting, as well as a negative trait for consumers who are increasingly conscious of dietary fat intake. Understanding the control of avian adipose tissue metabolism would both enhance the utility of chicken as a model organism for human obesity and insulin resistance and highlight new approaches to reduce fat deposition in commercial chickens. Results We combined transcriptomics and metabolomics to characterize the response of chicken adipose tissue to two energy manipulations, fasting and insulin deprivation in the fed state. Sixteen to 17 day-old commercial broiler chickens (ISA915 were fed ad libitum, fasted for five hours, or fed but deprived of insulin by injections of anti-insulin serum. Pair-wise contrasts of expression data identified a total of 2016 genes that were differentially expressed after correction for multiple testing, with the vast majority of differences due to fasting (1780 genes. Gene Ontology and KEGG pathway analyses indicated that a short term fast impacted expression of genes in a broad selection of pathways related to metabolism, signaling and adipogenesis. The effects of insulin neutralization largely overlapped with the response to fasting, but with more modest effects on adipose tissue metabolism. Tissue metabolomics indicated unique effects of insulin on amino acid metabolism. Conclusions Collectively, these data provide a foundation

  2. Transcriptomic and metabolomic profiling of chicken adipose tissue in response to insulin neutralization and fasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Domestic broiler chickens rapidly accumulate adipose tissue due to intensive genetic selection for rapid growth and are naturally hyperglycemic and insulin resistant, making them an attractive addition to the suite of rodent models used for studies of obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans. Furthermore, chicken adipose tissue is considered as poorly sensitive to insulin and lipolysis is under glucagon control. Excessive fat accumulation is also an economic and environmental concern for the broiler industry due to the loss of feed efficiency and excessive nitrogen wasting, as well as a negative trait for consumers who are increasingly conscious of dietary fat intake. Understanding the control of avian adipose tissue metabolism would both enhance the utility of chicken as a model organism for human obesity and insulin resistance and highlight new approaches to reduce fat deposition in commercial chickens. Results We combined transcriptomics and metabolomics to characterize the response of chicken adipose tissue to two energy manipulations, fasting and insulin deprivation in the fed state. Sixteen to 17 day-old commercial broiler chickens (ISA915) were fed ad libitum, fasted for five hours, or fed but deprived of insulin by injections of anti-insulin serum. Pair-wise contrasts of expression data identified a total of 2016 genes that were differentially expressed after correction for multiple testing, with the vast majority of differences due to fasting (1780 genes). Gene Ontology and KEGG pathway analyses indicated that a short term fast impacted expression of genes in a broad selection of pathways related to metabolism, signaling and adipogenesis. The effects of insulin neutralization largely overlapped with the response to fasting, but with more modest effects on adipose tissue metabolism. Tissue metabolomics indicated unique effects of insulin on amino acid metabolism. Conclusions Collectively, these data provide a foundation for further study into the

  3. Endogenous incretin hormone augmentation of acute insulin secretion in normoglycemic relatives of type 2 diabetic subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alford, Frank P; Rantzau, Christian; Henriksen, Jan-Erik

    2014-01-01

    were calculated in 19 REL and 18 CON subjects by cross-correlation linear regression slope analyses of the OGTT (0-30 min) matched insulin/glucose profiles vs the early (0-5 min) and delayed (10-30 min) IVGTT profiles. RESULTS: At 0 year, REL and CON IGIOGTT and IGIIVGTT were similar, but the REL 2...... glucose and a reduced IVGTT insulin/glucose slope, but the RELDGT IHA was similar to normoglycemic REL (RELNGT) and CON. By 10 years, RELDGT OGTT insulin/glucose slopes were reduced (P = .03-.01), but more so for the early (P slopes, compared...... to the normoglycaemic REL and CON subjects. CONCLUSIONS: IHA on acute insulin release is maintained in normoglycemic REL and CON subjects over 10 years. The apparent deterioration in IHA in RELDGT is consistent with a progressive failure of acute β-cell function over 10 years....

  4. Expression of the major insulin regulatable glucose transporter (GLUT4) in skeletal muscle of noninsulin-dependent diabetic patients and healthy subjects before and after insulin infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P H; Lund, S; Vestergaard, H

    1993-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study we have examined the regulatory effect of insulin in vivo on the major insulin regulatable glucose transporter (GLUT4) in vastus lateralis muscle from 12 noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients and 8 healthy control subjects. Insulin-stimulated glucose...... in the NIDDM patients. The GLUT4 protein per DNA of muscle obtained in the basal state correlated positively with the in vivo insulin-stimulated glucose uptake rate in the control group (r = 0.82, P ... protein content in skeletal muscle after 4 h of insulin infusion did not correlate with insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in any of the groups. In conclusion, 4 h of insulin infusion causing supraphysiological serum insulin levels modulates the expression of GLUT4 in skeletal muscle from healthy subjects...

  5. The effect of DPP-4 inhibition with sitagliptin on incretin secretion and on fasting and postprandial glucose turnover in subjects with impaired fasting glucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bock, Gerlies; Man, Chiara Dalla; Micheletto, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Low Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) concentrations have been observed in impaired fasting glucose (IFG). It is uncertain if these abnormalities contribute directly to the pathogenesis of IFG and impaired glucose tolerance. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors raise incretin...... period, the mixed meal was repeated. Results: As expected, subjects with IFG who received placebo did not experience any change in glucose concentrations. Despite raising intact GLP-1 concentrations, treatment with sitagliptin did not alter either fasting or postprandial glucose, insulin or C....... Conclusions: DPP-4 inhibition did not alter fasting or postprandial glucose turnover in people with IFG. Low incretin concentrations are unlikely to be involved in the pathogenesis of IFG....

  6. Chronic administration of ghrelin regulates plasma glucose and normalizes insulin levels following fasting hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goshadrou, Fatemeh; Kazerouni, Faranak; Mehranfard, Nasrin; Sadeghi, Bahman

    2015-12-01

    Ghrelin is an endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor. The majority of the previous studies have shown that the short-term ghrelin treatment induces hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia in healthy humans and rodents. However, the results obtained from long-term treatment with ghrelin are not clear enough. In this study, we assessed acute (1 day) and chronic (21 days) effects of intraperitoneally administered ghrelin (at different doses of 1, 10 and 20 μg/kg) during a 12-h fasting period in rats using glucose oxidase method and direct sandwich ELISA (the Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay) and then compared the effects of exogenous ghrelin on blood glucose and insulin levels on day 21 with those on day 1. The results showed that acute ghrelin administration markedly increased fasting plasma glucose at doses of 1 and 10 μg/kg as well as insulin levels at 1 μg/kg in comparison to control values. Ghrelin (at 1 μg/kg) altered plasma glucose but not insulin levels on the 21st day compared to control values. In addition, the comparison of the influence of ghrelin administration on plasma glucose and insulin levels on day 21 with those on the first day revealed that the chronic administration of ghrelin notably decreased plasma glucose and insulin levels relative to the acute ghrelin treatment. These findings indicate that hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia caused by the exogenous ghrelin during acute treatment are temporary and prolonged treatment with ghrelin regulates plasma glucose and restores insulin to normal levels, suggesting a possible role for ghrelin in improving insulin resistance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dietary fiber and associations with adiposity and fasting insulin among college students with plausible dietary reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd-Williams, Courtney E; Strother, Myra L; Kelly, Louise A; Huang, Terry T K

    2009-09-01

    We examined dietary fiber intake, food sources of dietary fiber, and relation of dietary fiber to body composition and metabolic parameters in college students with plausible dietary reports. Students (18-24 y of age) provided data on anthropometry, fasting blood chemistries, and body composition (bioelectric impedance). Diet and physical activity were assessed with the Diet History Questionnaire and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Plausible dietary reporters were identified (+/-1 SD cutoffs for reported energy intake as a percentage of predicted energy requirement). Multiple regression analyses were conducted with the total (n = 298) and plausible (n = 123) samples, adjusting for age, race, sex, smoking status, physical activity, energy intake, and fat-free mass (where applicable). Food sources of dietary fiber were similar in men and women. In the plausible sample compared with the total sample, dietary fiber was more strongly associated with fat mass (beta = -0.24, P fasting insulin (beta = -0.15, P fasting insulin and fat mass in men and women and inversely related to percentage of body fat, body mass index, and waist circumference in men only (P fasting insulin levels in men and women and consistently associated with adiposity measurements in men.

  8. Relationship of dopamine type 2 receptor binding potential with fasting neuroendocrine hormones and insulin sensitivity in human obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Julia P; Kessler, Robert M; Feurer, Irene D; Volkow, Nora D; Patterson, Bruce W; Ansari, Mohammad S; Li, Rui; Marks-Shulman, Pamela; Abumrad, Naji N

    2012-05-01

    Midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons, which are involved with reward and motivation, are modulated by hormones that regulate food intake (insulin, leptin, and acyl ghrelin [AG]). We hypothesized that these hormones are associated with deficits in DA signaling in obesity. We assessed the relationships between fasting levels of insulin and leptin, and AG, BMI, and insulin sensitivity index (S(I)) with the availability of central DA type 2 receptor (D2R). We measured D2R availability using positron emission tomography and [(18)F]fallypride (radioligand that competes with endogenous DA) in lean (n = 8) and obese (n = 14) females. Fasting hormones were collected prior to scanning and S(I) was determined by modified oral glucose tolerance test. Parametric image analyses revealed associations between each metabolic measure and D2R. The most extensive findings were negative associations of AG with clusters involving the striatum and inferior temporal cortices. Regional regression analyses also found extensive negative relationships between AG and D2R in the caudate, putamen, ventral striatum (VS), amygdala, and temporal lobes. S(I) was negatively associated with D2R in the VS, while insulin was not. In the caudate, BMI and leptin were positively associated with D2R availability. The direction of associations of leptin and AG with D2R availability are consistent with their opposite effects on DA levels (decreasing and increasing, respectively). After adjusting for BMI, AG maintained a significant relationship in the VS. We hypothesize that the increased D2R availability in obese subjects reflects relatively reduced DA levels competing with the radioligand. Our findings provide evidence for an association between the neuroendocrine hormones and DA brain signaling in obese females.

  9. Impact of Serum Triglyceride and High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels on Early-Phase Insulin Secretion in Normoglycemic and Prediabetic Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Shimodaira

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIncreased triglycerides (TGs and decreased high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C levels are established as diabetic risks for nondiabetic subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship among TG, HDL-C, TG/HDL-C ratio, and early-phase insulin secretion in normoglycemic and prediabetic subjects.MethodsWe evaluated 663 Japanese subjects who underwent the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. On the basis of these results, the subjects were divided into four groups: those with normal glucose tolerance (NGT; n=341, isolated impaired fasting glucose (i-IFG; n=211, isolated impaired glucose tolerance (i-IGT; n=71, and combined IFG and IGT (IFG+IGT; n=40. Insulin secretion was estimated by the insulinogenic index (IGI (Δinsulin/Δglucose [30 to 0 minutes] and disposition index (DI (IGI/homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance.ResultsIn prediabetic subjects (i-IFG, i-IGT, and IFG+IGT, linear regression analyses revealed that IGI and DI were positively correlated with HDL-C levels. Moreover, in subjects with i-IGT and (IFG+IGT, but not with i-IFG, the indices of insulin secretion were negatively correlated with the log-transformed TG and TG/HDL-C ratio. In both the subjects with i-IGT, multivariate linear regression analyses revealed that DI was positively correlated with HDL-C and negatively with log-transformed TG and TG/HDL-C ratio. On the other hand, in subjects with NGT, there was no association between insulin secretion and lipid profiles.ConclusionThese results revealed that serum TG and HDL-C levels have different impacts on early-phase insulin secretion on the basis of their glucose tolerance status.

  10. Effect of upper respiratory tract infection on AIR inhaled insulin pharmacokinetics and glucodynamics in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gern, J E; Stone, C K; Nakano, M; Muchmore, D B; de la Peña, A; Park, S; Suri, A; Tibaldi, F; Soon, D; Busse, W W

    2008-02-01

    The suitability of employing AIR Inhaled Insulin (AIR Insulin; AIR is a registered trademark of Alkermes) during acute upper respiratory tract infection (URI) has not been determined. Twenty-one healthy, non-diabetic subjects were enrolled in a single-sequence, two-period, euglycemic clamp study. Subjects received a single 12 U-equivalent dose of AIR Insulin before rhinovirus (RV16) inoculation and during symptomatic infection. Spirometry was used to evaluate pulmonary safety. AIR Insulin exposure (the area under the immunoreactive insulin (IRI) concentration vs time curve from time zero until the IRI concentrations returned to the predose baseline value (AUC(0-t'))) and glucodynamic response (total amount of glucose infused (G(tot))) were comparable before and during RV infection (AUC(0-t') 46,300 vs 52,600 pmol min/l, P=0.21; G(tot) 61,800 vs 68,700 mg, P=0.42, respectively). Variability of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters did not change during URI; either did the number or intensity of adverse events. No significant change in forced expiratory volume or forced vital capacity was observed following AIR Insulin administration or during URI. The AIR Insulin system provides similar pharmacokinetic and glucodynamic responses under conditions of an experimentally induced RV infection and is regarded as suitable for use in diabetic patients during URIs.

  11. Can Fasting Glucose Levels or Post-Breakfast Glucose Fluctuations Predict the Occurrence of Nocturnal Asymptomatic Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetic Patients Receiving Basal-Bolus Insulin Therapy with Long-Acting Insulin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuishi, Sumie; Nishimura, Rimei; Ando, Kiyotaka; Tsujino, Daisuke; Utsunomiya, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether the occurrence of nocturnal asymptomatic hypoglycemia may be predicted based on fasting glucose levels and post-breakfast glucose fluctuations. The study subjects comprised type 1 diabetic patients who underwent CGM assessments and received basal-bolus insulin therapy with long-acting insulin. The subjects were evaluated for I) fasting glucose levels and II) the range of post-breakfast glucose elevation (from fasting glucose levels to postprandial 1- and 2-hour glucose levels). The patients were divided into those with asymptomatic hypoglycemia during nighttime and those without for comparison. Optimal cut-off values were also determined for relevant parameters that could predict nighttime hypoglycemia by using ROC analysis. 64 patients (mean HbA1c 8.7 ± 1.8%) were available for analysis. Nocturnal asymptomatic hypoglycemia occurred in 23 patients (35.9%). Fasting glucose levels (I) were significantly lower in those with hypoglycemia than those without (118 ± 35 mg/dL vs. 179 ± 65 mg/dL; P fasting glucose level 54 mg/dL (0.65/0.61/0.71, P = 0.006), 2-h postprandial elevation > 78 mg/dL (0.65/0.73/0.71, P = 0.005). Nocturnal asymptomatic hypoglycemia was associated with increases in post-breakfast glucose levels in type 1 diabetes. Study findings also suggest that fasting glucose levels and the range of post-breakfast glucose elevation could help predict the occurrence of nocturnal asymptomatic hypoglycemia.

  12. Metformin effects on peripheral sensitivity to insulin in non diabetic obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendri, S; Debussche, X; Puy, H; Vincent, O; Marcelli, J M; Dubreuil, A; Lalau, J D

    1993-01-01

    Using the euglycaemic insulin-clamp technique we examined the effects of one-month metformin treatment on peripheral glucose utilization in non diabetic obese subjects. Two groups of obese subjects were studied in comparison with untreated lean women. Group 1 (n = 6) experienced weight loss (BMI: 32.6 +/- 1.7 vs 34.8 +/- 1.6 kg/m2, p metformin treatment the mean Km decreased by 31% in group 1 (p diabetic obese subjects, metformin seems not to affect peripheral insulin-mediated glucose metabolism unless there is weight loss.

  13. Treatment with the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor vildagliptin improves fasting islet-cell function in subjects with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessio, David A; Denney, Amanda M; Hermiller, Linda M; Prigeon, Ronald L; Martin, Julie M; Tharp, William G; Saylan, Monica Liqueros; He, Yanling; Dunning, Beth E; Foley, James E; Pratley, Richard E

    2009-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are proposed to lower blood glucose in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) by prolonging the activity of the circulating incretins, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Consistent with this mechanism of action, DPP-4 inhibitors improve glucose tolerance after meals by increasing insulin and reducing glucagon levels in the plasma. However, DPP-4 inhibitors also reduce fasting blood glucose, an unexpected effect because circulating levels of active GIP and GLP-1 are low in the postabsorptive state. The objective of the study was to examine the effects of DPP-4 inhibition on fasting islet function. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The study was performed in General Clinical Research Centers at two University Hospitals. Forty-one subjects with T2DM were treated with metformin or diet, having good glycemic control with glycosylated hemoglobin values of 6.2-7.5%. Subjects were treated with vildagliptin (50 mg twice daily) or placebo for 3 months, followed by a 2-wk washout. Major Outcome Measure: We measured insulin secretion in response to iv glucose and arginine before and after treatment and after drug washout. There were small and comparable reductions in glycosylated hemoglobin in both groups over 3 months. Vildagliptin increased fasting GLP-1 levels in subjects taking metformin, but not those managed with diet, and raised active GIP levels slightly. DPP-4 inhibitor treatment improved the acute insulin and C-peptide responses to glucose (50 and 100% respectively; P fasting conditions. This suggests that DPP-4 inhibition has metabolic benefits in addition to enhancing meal-induced GLP-1 and GIP activity.

  14. Effects of Curcuma longa (turmeric) on postprandial plasma glucose and insulin in healthy subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous animal studies have shown that Curcuma (C.) longa lowers plasma glucose. C. longa may thus be a promising ingredient in functional foods aimed at preventing type 2 diabetes. The purpose of the study is to study the effect of C. longa on postprandial plasma glucose, insulin levels and glycemic index (GI) in healthy subjects. Methods Fourteen healthy subjects were assessed in a crossover trial. A standard 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was administered together with capsules containing a placebo or C. longa. Finger-prick capillary and venous blood samples were collected before, and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after the start of the OGTT to measure the glucose and insulin levels, respectively. Results The ingestion of 6 g C. longa had no significant effect on the glucose response. The change in insulin was significantly higher 30 min (P = 0.03) and 60 min (P = 0.041) after the OGTT including C. longa. The insulin AUCs were also significantly higher after the ingestion of C. longa, 15 (P = 0.048), 30 (P = 0.035), 90 (P = 0.03), and 120 (P = 0.02) minutes after the OGTT. Conclusions The ingestion of 6 g C. longa increased postprandial serum insulin levels, but did not seem to affect plasma glucose levels or GI, in healthy subjects. The results indicate that C. longa may have an effect on insulin secretion. Trial registration number NCT01029327 PMID:20937162

  15. Effects of Curcuma longa (turmeric on postprandial plasma glucose and insulin in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingemansson Sandra

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous animal studies have shown that Curcuma (C. longa lowers plasma glucose. C. longa may thus be a promising ingredient in functional foods aimed at preventing type 2 diabetes. The purpose of the study is to study the effect of C. longa on postprandial plasma glucose, insulin levels and glycemic index (GI in healthy subjects. Methods Fourteen healthy subjects were assessed in a crossover trial. A standard 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT was administered together with capsules containing a placebo or C. longa. Finger-prick capillary and venous blood samples were collected before, and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after the start of the OGTT to measure the glucose and insulin levels, respectively. Results The ingestion of 6 g C. longa had no significant effect on the glucose response. The change in insulin was significantly higher 30 min (P = 0.03 and 60 min (P = 0.041 after the OGTT including C. longa. The insulin AUCs were also significantly higher after the ingestion of C. longa, 15 (P = 0.048, 30 (P = 0.035, 90 (P = 0.03, and 120 (P = 0.02 minutes after the OGTT. Conclusions The ingestion of 6 g C. longa increased postprandial serum insulin levels, but did not seem to affect plasma glucose levels or GI, in healthy subjects. The results indicate that C. longa may have an effect on insulin secretion. Trial registration number NCT01029327

  16. Ceylon cinnamon does not affect postprandial plasma glucose or insulin in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickenberg, Jennie; Lindstedt, Sandra; Berntorp, Kerstin; Nilsson, Jan; Hlebowicz, Joanna

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies on healthy subjects have shown that the intake of 6 g Cinnamomum cassia reduces postprandial glucose and that the intake of 3 g C. cassia reduces insulin response, without affecting postprandial glucose concentrations. Coumarin, which may damage the liver, is present in C. cassia, but not in Cinnamomum zeylanicum. The aim of the present study was to study the effect of C. zeylanicum on postprandial concentrations of plasma glucose, insulin, glycaemic index (GI) and insulinaemic index (GII) in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). A total of ten subjects with IGT were assessed in a crossover trial. A standard 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was administered together with placebo or C. zeylanicum capsules. Finger-prick capillary blood samples were taken for glucose measurements and venous blood for insulin measurements, before and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 min after the start of the OGTT. The ingestion of 6 g C. zeylanicum had no significant effect on glucose level, insulin response, GI or GII. Ingestion of C. zeylanicum does not affect postprandial plasma glucose or insulin levels in human subjects. The Federal Institute for Risk Assessment in Europe has suggested the replacement of C. cassia by C. zeylanicum or the use of aqueous extracts of C. cassia to lower coumarin exposure. However, the positive effects seen with C. cassia in subjects with poor glycaemic control would then be lost.

  17. Insulin secretion and incretin hormones after oral glucose in non-obese subjects with impaired glucose tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, E; Olsson, T; Söderberg, S

    2004-01-01

    Subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) are usually overweight and exhibit insulin resistance with a defective compensation of insulin secretion. In this study, we sought to establish the interrelation between insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity after oral glucose in non-obese subjects...... with IGT and we also examined this interrelation in relation to the 2 main incretins, glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP). To that end, 13 women with IGT and 17 women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) with measurements...... of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, GLP-1, and GIP. Insulin secretion (TIS) and insulin sensitivity (OGIS) were assessed using models describing the relationship between glucose, insulin and C-peptide data. These models allowed estimation also of the hepatic extraction of insulin. The age (54.2 +/- 9.7 [mean...

  18. Anthropometric measures and fasting insulin levels in children before and after cure of Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Margaret F; Graf, Jennifer; Gokarn, Nirmal; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2012-06-01

    Children with Cushing syndrome present with growth delay and excess adiposity that tends to be generalized rather than centripetal. There are no prospective studies of this phenotype as it evolves before and after treatment in children. The aims of this study were to evaluate children prior to and one-year after surgical cure compared to controls and to determine fasting insulin levels and their possible association with waist circumference and waist-height ratio, pre- and post-cure of Cushing syndrome. 30 children with Cushing syndrome were evaluated prior to and one-year post-treatment and compared to 14 age and body mass index-matched controls. Only triceps skin fold z- score showed a significant difference between patients with active Cushing syndrome and controls. A positive correlation between fasting insulin levels and waist circumference z- score was found for children with Cushing syndrome; this association persisted one-year following cure. Unlike adults affected with Cushing syndrome, upper arm muscle area of children with Cushing syndrome did not differ from obese children without Cushing syndrome. The persistence of a positive correlation between waist circumference and fasting insulin despite remission of Cushing syndrome suggests that children with a history of Cushing syndrome may have an increased risk for adverse long-term effects of increased abdominal fat mass. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Effects of whole body vibration plus diet on insulin-resistance in middle-aged obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellia, A; Sallì, M; Lombardo, M; D'Adamo, M; Guglielmi, V; Tirabasso, C; Giordani, L; Federici, M; Lauro, D; Foti, C; Sbraccia, P

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the early effects of whole body vibration (WBV) added to hypocaloric diet on insulin-resistance and other parameters associated with glucose regulation in sedentary obese individuals. We randomly assigned 34 patients to WBV plus hypocaloric diet (WBV group) or diet alone (CON group) for 8 weeks. Fasting and post-load glucose, insulin, lipids, C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor-α, leptin, adiponectin were assessed. Insulin sensitivity index (ISI) was derived from oral-glucose-tolerance test. Body composition was evaluated with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Both groups lost approximately 5% of weight, with greater reduction of body fat in WBV than in CON (-7.1±1.2 Kg vs. -5.3±1.0 Kg, p=0.003). Percent variation of ISI was more pronounced in WBV than in CON group (+35±4% vs. + 22±5%, p=0.002), accompanied by slight improvement in post-load glucose (-1.07±0.02 vs. - 0.12±0.01 mmol/l, p=0.031) but without changes in fasting levels. Adiponectin significantly increased in WBV group compared with CON (p=0.021 for comparison) whereas no differences in leptin and inflammatory markers were observed. In middle-aged sedentary obese subjects, WBV added to hypocaloric diet for 8 weeks improved body composition, insulin-resistance, glucose regulation and adiponectin levels to a greater extent compared with diet alone. Efficacy and feasibility of this approach in the long term need to be ascertained. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Adverse effects on insulin secretion of replacing saturated fat with refined carbohydrate but not with monounsaturated fat: A randomized controlled trial in centrally obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lin F; Vethakkan, Shireene R; Nesaretnam, Kalanithi; Sanders, Thomas A B; Teng, Kim-Tiu

    Current dietary guidelines recommend the replacement of saturated fatty acids (SAFAs) with carbohydrates or monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) based on evidence on lipid profile alone, the chronic effects of the mentioned replacements on insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity are however unclear. To assess the chronic effects of the substitution of refined carbohydrate or MUFA for SAFA on insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in centrally obese subjects. Using a crossover design, randomized controlled trial in abdominally overweight men and women, we compared the effects of substitution of 7% energy as carbohydrate or MUFA for SAFA for a period of 6 weeks each. Fasting and postprandial blood samples in response to corresponding SAFA, carbohydrate, or MUFA-enriched meal-challenges were collected after 6 weeks on each diet treatment for the assessment of outcomes. As expected, postprandial nonesterified fatty acid suppression and elevation of C-peptide, insulin and glucose secretion were the greatest with high-carbohydrate (CARB) meal. Interestingly, CARB meal attenuated postprandial insulin secretion corrected for glucose response; however, the insulin sensitivity and disposition index were not affected. SAFA and MUFA had similar effects on all markers except for fasting glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide concentrations, which increased after MUFA but not SAFA when compared with CARB. In conclusion, a 6-week lower-fat/higher-carbohydrate (increased by 7% refined carbohydrate) diet may have greater adverse effect on insulin secretion corrected for glucose compared with isocaloric higher-fat diets. In contrast, exchanging MUFA for SAFA at 7% energy had no appreciable adverse impact on insulin secretion. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Insulin Resistance Predicts Atherogenic Lipoprotein Profile in Nondiabetic Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia De C. Cartolano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Atherogenic diabetes is associated with an increased cardiovascular risk and mortality in diabetic individuals; however, the impact of insulin resistance (IR in lipid metabolism in preclinical stages is generally underreported. For that, we evaluated the capacity of IR to predict an atherogenic lipid subfraction profile. Methods. Complete clinical evaluation and biochemical analysis (lipid, glucose profile, LDL, and HDL subfractions and LDL phenotype and size were performed in 181 patients. The impact of IR as a predictor of atherogenic lipoproteins was tested by logistic regression analysis in raw and adjusted models. Results. HDL-C and Apo AI were significantly lower in individuals with IR. Individuals with IR had a higher percentage of small HDL particles, lower percentage in the larger ones, and reduced frequency of phenotype A (IR = 62%; non-IR = 83%. IR individuals had reduced probability to have large HDL (OR = 0.213; CI = 0.999–0.457 and had twice more chances to show increased small HDL (OR = 2.486; CI = 1.341–7.051. IR was a significant predictor of small LDL (OR = 3.075; CI = 1.341–7.051 and atherogenic phenotype (OR = 3.176; CI = 1.469–6.867. Conclusion. IR, previously DM2 diagnosis, is a strong predictor of quantitative and qualitative features of lipoproteins directly associated with an increased atherogenic risk.

  2. Effect of bromocriptine-QR therapy on glycemic control in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus whose dysglycemia is inadequately controlled on insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamarthi, Bindu; Cincotta, Anthony H

    2017-05-01

    The concurrent use of an insulin sensitizer in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with inadequate glycemic control on basal-bolus insulin may help improve glycemic control while limiting further insulin requirement. Bromocriptine-QR (B-QR), a quick release, sympatholytic, dopamine D2 receptor agonist therapy for T2DM, is a postprandial insulin sensitizer. This study evaluated the effect of B-QR on dysglycemia in T2DM subjects with suboptimal glycemic control on basal-bolus insulin plus metformin. The effect of once-daily morning administration of B-QR on dysglycemia was evaluated in 60 T2DM subjects derived from the Cycloset Safety Trial, with HbA1c >7% on basal-bolus insulin plus metformin at baseline, randomized to B-QR (N = 44) versus placebo (N = 16) and completed 12 weeks of study drug treatment. The analyses also included a subset of subjects on high-dose insulin (total daily insulin dose (TDID) ≥70 units; N = 36: 27 B-QR; 9 placebo). Subjects were well matched at baseline. After 12 weeks of B-QR treatment, mean % HbA1c decreased by -0.73% relative to baseline (p QR therapy resulted in % HbA1c reductions of -0.95 and -1.49 relative to baseline (p QR on HbA1c. The fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and TDID changes within each treatment group were not significant. More subjects achieved HbA1c ≤7 at 12 weeks with B-QR relative to placebo (36.4% B-QR vs 0% placebo, Fisher's exact 2-sided p = 0.003 in the entire cohort and 37% vs 0%, 2-sided p = 0.039 in the high-dose insulin subset). B-QR therapy improves glycemic control in T2DM subjects whose glycemia is poorly controlled on metformin plus basal-bolus insulin, including individuals on high-dose basal-bolus insulin. This glycemic impact occurred without significant change in FPG, suggesting a postprandial glucose lowering mechanism of action. Cycloset Safety Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00377676.

  3. Effects of insulin on renal haemodynamics and sodium handling in normal subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, K; Jensen, T; Skøtt, P

    1991-01-01

    Diabetic patients treated with insulin injected subcutaneously are characterized by peripheral hyperinsulinaemia and an increased mass of total body exchangeable sodium. We hypothesized that this may cause, at least in part, the glomerular hyperfiltration seen in the diabetic state. Six normal...... subjects were studied on 2 days in random order. Day A: Basal state for 40 min, hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp for 1 h (insulin infusion rate 2 mU kg-1 min-1 and 50% glucose infusion) and hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp combined with volume expansion (2 1 isotonic sodium chloride) for 2 h. Day B.......01) was observed compared with basal conditions. GFR and CLi were unchanged during day B. Insulin infusion reduced renal sodium excretion. Absolute proximal tubular reabsorption was unchanged on both days. Insulin infusion without volume expansion caused a decrease of 24% in the fractional distal sodium excretion...

  4. Decoration of intramyocellular lipid droplets with PLIN5 modulates fasting-induced insulin resistance and lipotoxicity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmink, Anne; Bosma, Madeleen; Kuijpers, Helma J H; Hoeks, Joris; Schaart, Gert; van Zandvoort, Marc A M J; Schrauwen, Patrick; Hesselink, Matthijs K C

    2016-05-01

    In contrast to insulin-resistant individuals, insulin-sensitive athletes possess high intramyocellular lipid content (IMCL), good mitochondrial function and high perilipin 5 (PLIN5) levels, suggesting a role for PLIN5 in benign IMCL storage. We hypothesised a role for PLIN5 in modulating fasting-mediated insulin resistance. Twelve men were fasted for 60 h, before and after which muscle biopsies were taken and stained for lipid droplets (LDs), PLIN5 and laminin. Confocal microscopy images were analysed for LD size, number, PLIN5 association and subcellular distribution. Fasting elevated IMCL content 2.8-fold and reduced insulin sensitivity (by 55%). Individuals with the most prominent increase in IMCL showed the least reduction in insulin sensitivity (r = 0.657; p = 0.028) and mitochondrial function (r = 0.896; p = 0.006). During fasting, PLIN5 gene expression or PLIN5 protein content in muscle homogenates was unaffected, microscopy analyses revealed that the fraction of PLIN5 associated with LDs (PLIN5+) increased significantly (+26%) upon fasting, suggesting PLIN5 redistribution. The significant increase in LD number (+23%) and size (+23%) upon fasting was entirely accounted for by PLIN5+ LDs, not by LDs devoid of PLIN5. Also the association between IMCL storage capacity and insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction was only apparent for PLIN5+ LDs. Fasting results in subcellular redistribution of PLIN5 and promotes the capacity to store excess fat in larger and more numerous PLIN5-decorated LDs. This associates with blunting of fasting-induced insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting a role for PLIN5 in the modulation of fasting-mediated lipotoxicity. trialregister.nl NTR 2042.

  5. Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Insulin Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... medicines. You can do it. Back to Top Insulin Safety Tips Never drink insulin. Do not share ...

  6. [Adiponectin, insulin and glucose concentrations in overweight and obese subjects after a complex carbohydrates (fiber) diet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Rodríguez, Dora Cristina; Solano R, Liseti; González Martínez, Julio César

    2009-09-01

    Adiponectin one of the cytokines secreted by the adipose tissue that regulates the energetic metabolism through glucose and insulin interactions, stimulates the oxidation of fatty acids, reduces the plasmatic triglycerides and improves glucose metabolism by increasing insulin sensibility. Serum concentrations of adiponectin, insulin and glucose were assessed in order to establish association to weight loss after a dietary regime based on consumption of complex carbohydrates (fiber) during six weeks. Overweight and obese subjects (n=56) were studied by anthropometry. Adiponectin and insulin were measured by ELISA and glucose by Colorimetry. Data was analyzed by non parametric tests to compare independent or related samples. 12 men and 44 women, aged 20 to 55 years, 17 overweight and 39 obese were assessed. Adiponectin concentration was significantly low at basal determination in all the subjects (4,47 +/- 1,64); being higher in women (4,62 +/- 1,57 vs 3,93 +/- 1,86 microU/mL in men), while glucose and insulin values were at normal range (82,46 +/-26,51 mg/dL and 14,12 +/- 10,15 microU/mL) respectively with no significant differences for sex. Overweight subjects had significantly higher adiponectin concentrations than obese participants, at all measurements. Dietary regime promoted significant increase in adiponectin concentration at second and sixth week, with a negative correlation to body mass index and gender as they lost body weight.

  7. Natural history of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in the progression from normal glucose tolerance to impaired fasting glycemia and impaired glucose tolerance: the Inter99 study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faerch, Kristine; Vaag, Allan; Holst, Jens J

    2008-01-01

    follow-up data from the Inter99 study were used. Individuals with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) at baseline and i-IFG, i-IGT, combined IFG/IGT, or NGT at the 5-year follow-up were examined with an oral glucose tolerance test (n = 3,145). Insulin sensitivity index (ISI), homeostasis model assessment......OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe the natural history of insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in the development of isolated impaired fasting glycemia (i-IFG), isolated impaired glucose tolerance (i-IGT), and combined IFG/IGT. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Baseline and 5-year...

  8. Fasting Triglycerides and Glucose Index as a Diagnostic Test for Insulin Resistance in Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Romero, Fernando; Villalobos-Molina, Rafael; Jiménez-Flores, J Rafael; Simental-Mendia, Luis E; Méndez-Cruz, René; Murguía-Romero, Miguel; Rodríguez-Morán, Martha

    2016-07-01

    Although the Glucose and Triglyceride levels (TyG) index is useful for identification of insulin resistance (IR) in different ethnic groups, it has not been evaluated in young adults. We undertook this study to evaluate the TyG index as a diagnostic test for IR in young adults. A total of 5,538 healthy young adults, 3,795 (68.5%) non-pregnant women and 1,743 (31.5%) men, with an average age of 19.2 ± 1.4 years, were enrolled in a population-based cross-sectional study. To estimate diagnostic characteristics of the TyG index, a randomized subsample of the target population (n = 75) was under euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp test. Using the cutoff values obtained in the clamp study, the diagnostic concordance between TyG index and HOMA-IR was evaluated in the overall population. The TyG index was calculated as the Ln[fasting triglycerides (mg/dL) × fasting glucose (mg/dL)]/2. Normal weight, overweight, and obesity were identified in 3,632 (65.6%), 1,355 (24.5%), and 551 (9.9%) participants. A total of 346 (9.1%) men and 278 (15.9%) women exhibited IR. The best cutoff value of TyG index for diagnosis of IR was 4.55 (sensitivity 0.687, negative predictive value (NPV) 0.844, and negative likelihood ratio (NLR) 0.47) for women and 4.68 (sensitivity 0.673, NPV 0.900, and NLR 0.45) for men. In normal-weight individuals the diagnostic concordance between TyG index and HOMA-IR was 0.934 and 0.915, in the overweight subjects was 0.908 and 0.895 and, in the obese participants 0.916 and 0.950, for men and women, respectively. TyG index may be useful for screening IR in young adults. Copyright © 2016 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Beneficial impact of sleep extension on fasting insulin sensitivity in adults with habitual sleep restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leproult, Rachel; Deliens, Gaétane; Gilson, Médhi; Peigneux, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    A link between sleep loss and increased risk for the development of diabetes is now well recognized. The current study investigates whether sleep extension under real-life conditions is a feasible intervention with a beneficial impact on glucose metabolism in healthy adults who are chronically sleep restricted. Intervention study. Sixteen healthy non-obese volunteers (25 [23, 27.8] years old, 3 men). Two weeks of habitual time in bed followed by 6 weeks during which participants were instructed to increase their time in bed by one hour per day. Continuous actigraphy monitoring and daily sleep logs during the entire study. Glucose and insulin were assayed on a single morning blood sample at the end of habitual time in bed and at the end of sleep extension. Home polysomnography was performed during one weekday of habitual time in bed and after 40 days of sleep extension. Sleep time during weekdays increased (mean actigraphic data: +44 ± 34 minutes, P sleep time correlated with changes in glucose (r = +0.53, P = 0.041) and insulin levels (r = -0.60, P = 0.025), as well as with indices of insulin sensitivity (r = +0.76, P = 0.002). In healthy adults who are chronically sleep restricted, a simple low cost intervention such as sleep extension is feasible and is associated with improvements in fasting insulin sensitivity. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  10. Fasting plasma insulin is associated with metabolic syndrome in farmers but not in nomads among the Mongolian population, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Hideyuki; Wang, Peiyu; Okamura, Tomonori; Wuyun, GaoWa; Wu, HePing; Su, Xiulan; Hayakawa, Takehito; Amamoto, Kenji; Ueshima, Hirotsugu

    2011-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) includes insulin resistance among its criteria for diagnosing metabolic syndrome (MetS); however, previous epidemiologic studies have limited their research to settled populations only. This study aims to clarify the relationship between plasma insulin and metabolic factors on a broader scale by studying data obtained from nomadic and settled Mongolian populations. A cross-sectional epidemiologic study of 200 nomads and 256 farmers was performed in Inner Mongolia, Republic of China. Plasma insulin levels and other metabolic factors, such as blood pressure, serum lipids and obesity, were measured. Participants were classified into 3 categories according to their plasma insulin levels. Cut-off values grouped into tertiles of fasting insulin for all participants were 6.73 nmol/L and 10.33 nmol/L. The mean number of metabolic risk factors, waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose and triglyceride were higher, and the mean HDL cholesterol was lower in the higher fasting insulin tertile among farmers after adjusting for age, gender, smoking, alcohol drinking and total cholesterol. However, no MetS factors were statistically related with fasting insulin tertile levels among nomads. In nomads, hyperinsulinemia may not be an indicator of MetS due to their specific life-style.

  11. Vinegar supplementation lowers glucose and insulin responses and increases satiety after a bread meal in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostman, E; Granfeldt, Y; Persson, L; Björck, I

    2005-09-01

    To investigate the potential of acetic acid supplementation as a means of lowering the glycaemic index (GI) of a bread meal, and to evaluate the possible dose-response effect on postprandial glycaemia, insulinaemia and satiety. In all, 12 healthy volunteers participated and the tests were performed at Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Lund University, Sweden. Three levels of vinegar (18, 23 and 28 mmol acetic acid) were served with a portion of white wheat bread containing 50 g available carbohydrates as breakfast in randomized order after an overnight fast. Bread served without vinegar was used as a reference meal. Blood samples were taken during 120 min for analysis of glucose and insulin. Satiety was measured with a subjective rating scale. A significant dose-response relation was seen at 30 min for blood glucose and serum insulin responses; the higher the acetic acid level, the lower the metabolic responses. Furthermore, the rating of satiety was directly related to the acetic acid level. Compared with the reference meal, the highest level of vinegar significantly lowered the blood glucose response at 30 and 45 min, the insulin response at 15 and 30 min as well as increased the satiety score at 30, 90 and 120 min postprandially. The low and intermediate levels of vinegar also lowered the 30 min glucose and the 15 min insulin responses significantly compared with the reference meal. When GI and II (insulinaemic indices) were calculated using the 90 min incremental area, a significant lowering was found for the highest amount of acetic acid, although the corresponding values calculated at 120 min did not differ from the reference meal. Supplementation of a meal based on white wheat bread with vinegar reduced postprandial responses of blood glucose and insulin, and increased the subjective rating of satiety. There was an inverse dose-response relation between the level of acetic acid and glucose and insulin responses and a linear dose-response relation between

  12. [Effects of compound whole grain-soybean on insulin resistance and serum adipocytokines in impared fasting glucose population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shufen; Zhang, Hong; Chi, Jing; Liu, Yaqi; Zhou, Siyu; Zhai, Chengkai

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of compound whole grain-soybean on insulin resistance and serum adipocytokines levels in impared fasting glucose population. According to inclusion and exclusion criteria, 163 cases of impared fasting glucose (IFG) Chinese Han population from the age of 40 to 75 years old, were screened from 12 community health centers of three main districts of Nanjing city by the multi-stage cluster and simple randomization method from March to September, 2008. The IFG subjects were randomly divided into the intervention group (87 individuals) and control group (76 individuals) by quasi-experimental design. The intervention group was provided with compound whole grain-soybean and health education, while only health education was provided for the control group. Body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), lipid profiles, fasting blood glucose (FBG), fasting insulin (FINS) and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), adipocytokines including leptin, lipocalin 2 (LCN-2) and adiponectin (ADP) levels were measured before and after the half a year intervention period. Chi square test was used to analyze the distribution differences. Two-sample t-test was used to compare the differences of the two groups before and after the half a year intervention period, and paired t-test was used to compare the differences between before and after intervention in the intervention group or control group. Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare the differences of all indexes between after and before dietary intervention. After dietary intervention for half a year on the IFG population, BMI ((24.87 ± 3.69) kg/m(2)), FBG((6.27 ± 0.24) mmol/L), FINS((7.14 ± 1.05) mU/L) , HOMA-IR (1.99 ± 0.31), leptin ((13.07 ± 2.22) µg /L), LCN-2 ((67.42 ± 18.20) µg/L) of intervention group were decreased significantly compared to the levels of BMI ((25.16 ± 4.07) kg/m(2)), FBG((6.40 ± 0.28) mmol/L), FINS ((7.32 ± 1.54) mU/L), HOMA-IR (2.08 ± 0.45), leptin

  13. Effect of fructose consumption on insulin sensitivity in nondiabetic subjects: a systematic review and meta-analysis of diet-intervention trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Horst, Kasper W; Schene, Merle R; Holman, Rebecca; Romijn, Johannes A; Serlie, Mireille J

    2016-12-01

    High fructose consumption has been suggested to contribute to several features of metabolic syndrome including insulin resistance, but to our knowledge, no previous meta-analyses have investigated the effect of fructose on insulin sensitivity in nondiabetic subjects. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled diet-intervention studies in nondiabetic subjects to determine the effect of fructose on insulin sensitivity. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for relevant trials on the basis of predetermined eligibility criteria. Two investigators independently performed the study selection, quality assessment, and data extraction. Results were pooled with the use of the generic inverse-variance method with random effects weighting and were expressed as mean differences (MDs) or standardized mean differences (SMDs) with 95% CIs. Twenty-nine articles that described 46 comparisons in 1005 normal-weight and overweight or obese participants met the eligibility criteria. An energy-matched (isocaloric) exchange of dietary carbohydrates by fructose promoted hepatic insulin resistance (SMD: 0.47; 95% CI: 0.03, 0.91; P = 0.04) but had no effect on fasting plasma insulin concentrations (MD: -0.79 pmol/L; 95% CI: -6.41, 4.84 pmol/L; P = 0.78), the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (MD: 0.13; 95% CI: -0.07, 0.34; P = 0.21), or glucose disposal rates under euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp conditions (SMD: 0.00; 95% CI: 20.41, 0.41; P = 1.00). Hypercaloric fructose (∼25% excess of energy compared with that of the weight-maintenance control diet) raised fasting plasma insulin concentrations (MD: 3.38 pmol/L; 95% CI: 0.03, 6.73 pmol/L; P insulin resistance (SMD: 0.77; 95% CI: 0.28, 1.26; P insulin resistance in nondiabetic adults without affecting peripheral or muscle insulin sensitivity. Larger and longer-term studies are needed to assess whether real-world fructose consumption has adverse effects on insulin

  14. Chronic consumption of an inositol-enriched carob extract improves postprandial glycaemia and insulin sensitivity in healthy subjects: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañuls, Celia; Rovira-Llopis, Susana; Falcón, Rosa; Veses, Silvia; Monzó, Nuria; Víctor, Víctor M; Rocha, Milagros; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Inositols are thought to be mediators of the insulin signalling pathway. We assessed the effects of inositols on glycaemic control in fasting and postprandial states and evaluated lipoprotein profile and LDL particle size in healthy population. A 12-week double-blind clinical trial was performed with forty healthy subjects administered either an inositol-enriched beverage (IEB) -containing 2.23 g of inositols in 250 ml- or a sucrose-sweetened beverage (SB) twice a day. Anthropometric measurements, fasting glucose levels, insulin and HOMA-IR index, lipoprotein profile and postprandial glucose concentrations (measured using the continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS)) were recorded throughout the intervention period. Following the 12-week trial subjects receiving the IEB exhibited a significant decrease in insulin, HOMA-IR and Apo B and an increase in LDL particle size, whereas the SB group showed increases in BMI and fasting glucose concentration. Analysis of postprandial glucose levels at breakfast, lunch and dinner revealed a mean reduction of glucose of ≈14% and a significant reduction in the area under the curve at 24 h after consumption of the IEB. Our results show that chronic IEB supplementation induces a significant improvement in carbohydrated metabolism parameters in healthy subjects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  15. High normal fasting glucose level in obese youth: a marker for insulin resistance and beta cell dysregulation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Malley, G

    2010-06-01

    A high but normal fasting plasma glucose level in adults is a risk factor for future development of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. We investigated whether normal fasting plasma glucose levels (<5.60 mmol\\/l) are associated with decreases in insulin sensitivity and beta cell function, as well as an adverse cardiovascular profile in obese youth.

  16. Liver alanine aminotransferase, insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction in normotriglyceridaemic subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schindhelm, RK; Diamant, M; Bakker, SJL; van Dijk, RAJM; Scheffer, PG; Teerlink, T; Kostense, PJ; Heine, RJ

    Background Plasma levels of liver transaminases, including alanine aminotransferase (ALT), are elevated in most cases of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Elevated ALT levels are associated with insulin resistance, and subjects with NAFLD have features of the metabolic syndrome that confer

  17. Evaluation of insulin sensitivity in hyperprolactinemic subjects by euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzcu, Alpaslan; Yalaki, Serkan; Arikan, Senay; Gokalp, Deniz; Bahcec, Mithat; Tuzcu, Sadiye

    2009-01-01

    The background and aim of the study is to evaluate insulin sensitivity in hyperprolactinemic subjects via euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp technique. Sixteen hyperprolactinemic subjects and 12 healthy subjects were included in the study. HOMA-B and HOMA-IR values of groups were calculated. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp technique was performed in both groups, and the M value of the groups was defined. Mann-Whitney U and chi-square tests were used in statistical analysis. Basal insulin level of hyperprolactinemic patients were higher than the control group (6.85 +/- 4.68; 3.66 +/- 0.88 microU/ml respectively; P < 0.05). Mean HOMA-IR and HOMA-B values of patients were higher than control group (1.49 +/- 1.30; 0.78 +/- 0.27 respectively; P = 0.02 and 136.28 +/- 72.53; 64.77 +/- 23.31, respectively, P < 0.001). M values of the patients were statistically lower than the control group (5.64 +/- 2.36; 7.05 +/- 1.62 kg/mg/min respectively; P < 0.05). (1) Hyperprolactinemic patients were more insulin resistant than control subjects. (2) Insulin resistance in hyperprolactinemic patients is not associated with obesity or anthropometric parameters such as fat content, waist circumference and BMI.

  18. Fasting Lipoprotein Lipase Protein Levels Can Predict a Postmeal Increment of Triglyceride Levels in Fasting Normohypertriglyceridemic Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzaki, Kokoro; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Kazunori; Sakane, Naoki

    2016-09-01

    Although a postprandial increment in triglyceride (TG) levels is considered to be a risk factor for atherogenesis, tests (e.g., fat load) to assess postprandial changes in TG levels cannot be easily applied to clinical practice. Therefore, fasting markers that predict postprandial TG states are needed to be developed. One current candidate is lipoprotein lipase (LPL) protein, a molecule that hydrides TGs. This study investigated whether fasting LPL levels could predict postprandial TG levels. A total of 17 subjects (11 men, 6 women, mean age 52 ± 11 years) with normotriglyceridemia during fasting underwent the meal test. Several fasting parameters, including LPL, were measured for the area under the curve of postprandial TGs (AUC-TG). The subjects' mean fasting TG level was 1.30 mmol/l, and their mean LPL level was 41.6 ng/ml. The subjects' TG levels increased after loading (they peaked after two postprandial hours). Stepwise multiple regression analysis demonstrated that fasting TG levels were a predictor of the AUC-TG. In addition, fasting LPL mass levels were found to be a predictor of the AUC-TG (β = 0.65, P fasting TG levels. Fasting LPL levels may be useful to predict postprandial TG increment in this population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Post-lunch triglyceridaemia associates with HDLc and insulin resistance in fasting normotriglyceridaemic menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Paris, A; Rodriguez-Valle, A; Navarro, M A; Puzo-Foncillas, J; Arbones-Mainar, J M

    2017-12-01

    Post-prandial hypertriglyceridaemia (P-HTG) is associated with cardiovascular disease. This association is of paramount importance during menopause, which is also related to reduced high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDLc) and elevated triglyceride (TG) levels. We aimed to provide a self-assesing tool to screen for P-HTG in menopausal women who were normotriglyceridaemic at fasting and adhered to a Mediterranean-style eating pattern. We performed oral fat loading tests (OFLT) in combination with self-measurements of diurnal capillary TG at fixed time-points (DC-TG) in 29 healthy menopausal women. TG levels >220 mg dL-1 at any given time during the OFLT served as diagnostic criteria for P-HTG. Subsequently, DC-TG profiles were examined to determine the best mealtime (breakfast, lunch or dinner), as well as optimal cut-off points to classify these women as having P-HTG according to the OFLT. Insulin resistance was defined as the upper tertile of the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance. We found that, despite having normal fasting TG levels, P-HTG was highly prevalent (approximately 40%). Moreover, self-assessed 3-h post-lunch TG levels >165 mg dL-1 increased the odds of having hypo-HDL cholesterolaemia by 14.1-fold (P = 0.026) and the odds of having insulin resistance by 31.6-fold (P = 0.007), adjusted for total fat intake in women adhering to a Mediterranean eating pattern having their highest energy intake at lunch. Self-assessed 3-h post-lunch TG can be used to study post-prandial TG metabolism in Southern European menopausal women who are normotriglyceridaemic at fasting. Characterising an individual's post-prandial response may help menopausal women to evaluate their risk of cardiovascular disease. © 2017 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  20. Variability of insulin-stimulated myocardial glucose uptake in healthy elderly subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Klaus F; Hove, Jens D; Freiberg, Jacob

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess regional and global variability of insulin-stimulated myocardial glucose uptake in healthy elderly subjects and to evaluate potentially responsible factors. Twenty men with a mean age of 64 years, no history of cardiovascular disease, and normal blood pressure......, bicycle exercise test, electrocardiogram and echocardiography were studied [ P(coronary artery disease) ... rest and hyperaemic blood flow during dipyridamole infusion were measured with nitrogen-13 ammonia and positron emission tomography in 16 left ventricular myocardial segments. Intra-individual and inter-individual variability of insulin-stimulated myocardial glucose uptake [relative dispersion...

  1. Knockdown of angiopoietin-like 2 mimics the benefits of intermittent fasting on insulin responsiveness and weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Cécile; Pinçon, Anthony; Bélanger, Alexandre Maxime; Luo, Xiaoyan; Gillis, Marc-Antoine; de Montgolfier, Olivia; Thorin-Trescases, Nathalie; Thorin, Éric

    2018-01-01

    Angiopoietin-like 2 (ANGPTL2) is an inflammatory adipokine linking obesity to insulin resistance. Intermittent fasting, on the other hand, is a lifestyle intervention able to prevent obesity and diabetes but difficult to implement and maintain. Our objectives were to characterize a link between ANGPTL2 and intermittent fasting and to investigate whether the knockdown of ANGPTL2 reproduces the benefits of intermittent fasting on weight gain and insulin responsiveness in knockdown and wild-type littermates mice. Intermittent fasting, access to food ad libitum once every other day, was initiated at the age of three months and maintained for four months. Intermittent fasting decreased by 63% (p intermittent fasting improved insulin sensitivity (p intermittent fasting regimen: insulin sensitivity and weight gain were identical, while intermittent fasting had no additional impact on these parameters in knockdown mice. Energy intake was similar between both wild-type fed intermittent fasting and ANGPTL2 knockdown mice fed ad libitum, suggesting that intermittent fasting and knockdown of ANGPTL2 equally lower feeding efficiency. These results suggest that the reduction of ANGPTL2 could be a useful and promising strategy to prevent obesity and insulin resistance, although further investigation of the mechanisms linking ANGPTL2 and intermittent fasting is warranted. Impact statement Intermittent fasting is an efficient diet pattern to prevent weight gain and improve insulin sensitivity. It is, however, a difficult regimen to follow and compliance is expected to be very low. In this work, we demonstrate that knockdown of ANGPTL2 in mice fed ad libitum mimics the beneficial effects of intermittent fasting on weight gain and insulin sensitivity in wild-type mice. ANGPTL2 is a cytokine positively associated with fat mass in humans, which inactivation in mice improves resistance to a high-fat metabolic challenge. This study provides a novel pathway by which IF acts to limit

  2. General Lack of Correlations between Age and Signs of the Metabolic Syndrome in Subjects with Non-diabetic Fasting Glucose Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, Harry G; Mrvichin, Nate; Clouatre, Dallas; Bagchi, Debasis; Preuss, Jeffrey M; Perricone, Nicholas V; Swaroop, Anand; Kaats, Gilbert R

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance and advancing age are well-recognized risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Recent reports indicate that fasting glucose levels in non-diabetic patients correlate appropriately with the development of certain elements in metabolic syndrome, which suggest a cause-effect relationship with insulin resistance. The present investigation assessed whether a significant association exists between chronological age and various elements of metabolic syndrome in this same group of subjects possessing non-diabetic fasting glucose levels. Baseline data were taken from 288 subjects (age 17-87 years) with fasting glucose levels ≤ 125 mg/dl. Correlations between chronological age and different metabolic parameters were assessed to determine any statistically significant relationships and compare these with previously demonstrated metabolic parameters. With the exception of systolic blood pressure, the following correlations between age and components of metabolic syndrome were not significant or even significant in the opposite direction compared to those found in the same population using fasting glucose as the independent variable: body weight, body fat, diastolic blood pressure, white blood cell count (WBC)/neutrophil count, and circulating levels of insulin, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). Although systolic blood pressure still increased, it was to a lesser extent than might be expected. In the present investigation, a cross-sectional analysis was carried out over a wide age range of subjects. It is noteworthy that fasting glucose levels and the other major elements of metabolic syndrome did not change significantly with advancing age. These results demonstrate that decreasing insulin resistance and fasting glucose levels may be an important way to overcome the adverse effects and perturbations of advancing age

  3. Effect of consumption of a carob pod inositol-enriched beverage on insulin sensitivity and inflammation in middle-aged prediabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañuls, Celia; Rovira-Llopis, Susana; López-Doménech, Sandra; Veses, Silvia; Víctor, Víctor M; Rocha, Milagros; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio

    2016-10-12

    This study assessed the effects of an inositol-enriched beverage (IEB) on blood glucose levels and inflammation status in subjects with an impaired fasting glucose (IFG) state according to body mass index (BMI). This was a 12 week, double-blind, randomized, controlled trial employing forty-four IFG subjects (fasting glucose levels 100-125 mg dl(-1)) that were divided into two intervention groups: one receiving a IEB (n = 24) containing mainly pinitol (2.0 g twice a day), and the other a sweetened beverage based on sucrose (SB; n = 20). Anthropometric and biochemical measurements, postprandial and fasting nocturnal glycaemia (continuous glucose monitoring system), and inflammatory parameters (IL-6 and TNF-α) were analyzed at baseline and after intervention according to BMI (non-obese: BMI < 30 kg m(-2) or obese: BMI ≥ 30 kg m(-2)). Non-obese subjects who consumed IEB exhibited a significant decrease in insulin (-14.4%), HOMA-IR index (-15.1%) and percentage of glucose change after postprandial and fasting nocturnal periods (-10.0% and -10.3%, respectively) compared with the SB group (-2.35% and 10.2%, respectively) although they did not show any change in inflammatory cytokine levels. By contrast, obese subjects who consumed IEB showed a smaller variation in glucose levels after nocturnal fasting (-4.34%) and a marked decrease in IL-6 and TNF-α (p < 0.05). These findings support that consumption of IEB in prediabetic subjects produces a response that is dependent on BMI, with a clear improvement of insulin resistance and postprandial and nocturnal glycemia in non-obese subjects and a marked anti-inflammatory response in obese subjects.

  4. Effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM on insulin sensitivity and the systemic inflammatory response in human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Anne Sofie; Larsen, Nadja; Pedersen-Skovsgaard, Theis

    2010-01-01

    According to animal studies, intake of probiotic bacteria may improve glucose homeostasis. We hypothesised that probiotic bacteria improve insulin sensitivity by attenuating systemic inflammation. Therefore, the effects of oral supplementation with the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus...... course with either L. acidophilus NCFM or placebo. L. acidophilus was detected in stool samples by denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis and real-time PCR. Separated by the 4-week intervention period, two hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamps were performed to estimate insulin sensitivity. Furthermore......, the systemic inflammatory response was evaluated by subjecting the participants to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide injection (0·3 ng/kg) before and after the treatment course. L. acidophilus NCFM was detected in 75 % of the faecal samples after treatment with the probiotic bacterium. Insulin sensitivity...

  5. Effect of gender on lipid-induced insulin resistance in obese subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vistisen, Bodil; Hellgren, Lars; Vadset, T.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: In obese subjects, chronically elevated plasma concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) exert a marked risk to contract insulin resistance and subsequently type 2 diabetes. When NEFA is acutely increased due to i.v. infusion of lipid, glucose disposal during...... a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp is reduced. This effect has been explained by a NEFA-induced decrease in skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity caused by accumulation of the lipid intermediates Such as ceramide and diacylglycerol in the myocytes. However, neither the lipid-induced reduction of glucose disposal nor...... the clamp was similar in females and males (46+/-10 and 60+/-4%,, respectively, NS). However, whole-body insulin sensitivity as well as non-oxidative glucose disposal was higher in obese females compared with obese males both during lipid and saline infusion (P...

  6. Starting bedtime glargine versus NPH insulin in poorly controlled type 2 diabetic patients with various hyperglycemia types (fasting type or postprandial type)

    OpenAIRE

    Vähätalo, Markku A.; Viikari, Jorma; Rönnemaa, Tapani

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to compare the effects of an intermediate acting human insulin (NPH) and a long-acting insulin analog, insulin glargine, in insulin naïve type 2 diabetes patients, stratified by the type of hyperglycemia (fasting or postprandial type). Based on different action profiles, we hypothesized that patients having different hyperglycemia types would react differently when treated with these insulins. This is a post hoc analysis of the Lanmet study data. The Lanmet study was a randomized,...

  7. Interactions of Dietary Whole-Grain Intake With Fasting Glucose– and Insulin-Related Genetic Loci in Individuals of European Descent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettleton, Jennifer A.; McKeown, Nicola M.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.; Hivert, Marie-France; Ngwa, Julius; van Rooij, Frank J.A.; Sonestedt, Emily; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Ye, Zheng; Tanaka, Tosh

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Whole-grain foods are touted for multiple health benefits, including enhancing insulin sensitivity and reducing type 2 diabetes risk. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with fasting glucose and insulin concentrations in individuals free of diabetes. We tested the hypothesis that whole-grain food intake and genetic variation interact to influence concentrations of fasting glucose and insulin. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Via meta-analysis of data from 14 cohorts comprising ∼48,000 participants of European descent, we studied interactions of whole-grain intake with loci previously associated in GWAS with fasting glucose (16 loci) and/or insulin (2 loci) concentrations. For tests of interaction, we considered a P value fasting glucose and insulin concentrations independent of demographics, other dietary and lifestyle factors, and BMI (β [95% CI] per 1-serving-greater whole-grain intake: −0.009 mmol/l glucose [−0.013 to −0.005], P fasting insulin (P = 0.006), where greater whole-grain intake was associated with a smaller reduction in fasting insulin concentrations in those with the insulin-raising allele. CONCLUSIONS Our results support the favorable association of whole-grain intake with fasting glucose and insulin and suggest a potential interaction between variation in GCKR and whole-grain intake in influencing fasting insulin concentrations. PMID:20693352

  8. [Postprandial lipemia induces endothelial dysfunction and higher insulin resistance in healthy subjects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson

    2011-12-01

    To assess the effect of postprandial lipemia on endothelial function, insulin resistance, and lipid profile in healthy subjects. A prospective', interventional study in 14 healthy young men aged 18-25 years who were given a high-fat meal. Endothelial function was measured using flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in the brachial artery, flow velocity, mean arterial pressure and serum nitrite/nitrate levels (NO(2)/NO(3)). Glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels were also tested. Insulin resistance was determined by calculating the HOMA-IR index (Homeostatic Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance). Baseline FMD was 5.9 ± 1.1%. Postprandial lipemia reduced endothelial function by approximately 50% in the first (3.3 ± 0.5%, p=0.03) and second (3.3 ± 0.4%, p=0.04) moment respectively. This finding was associated to an increased flow rate in the brachial artery and lower NO(2)/NO(3) levels (plipemia causes changes in circulating lipid profile and induces endothelial dysfunction and higher insulin resistance. Copyright © 2011 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of a 3-day low-fat diet on metabolic control, insulin sensitivity, lipids and adipocyte hormones in Norwegian subjects with hypertriacylglycerolaemia and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostad, I L; Qvigstad, E; Bjerve, K S; Grill, V E

    2004-01-01

    The metabolic and hormonal impact of rapid dietary changes in type 2 diabetes has not been clarified. The objective of this study was to test whether a short-term, low-fat diet affected metabolic control, insulin sensitivity, lipids and adipocyte hormones in patients with type 2 diabetes with hypertriacylglycerolaemia. Nineteen outpatient subjects (10 M, 9 F) with type 2 diabetes and triacylglycerols >2.2 mmol/L at screening were included in the study. Dietary intake was assessed by weighing during two periods of 3-day baseline diet followed by a 3-day low-fat dietary intervention. The two periods of baseline diet did not differ with respect to relevant variables during intervention. Subjects were advised to increase fibre-rich and low-fat foods and to decrease intake of visible fat in an isoenergetic manner. The percentage of energy from fat was reduced from 39 to 22 (p insulin and fasting glucose to insulin ratios were unaffected. Total cholesterol decreased from 6.3 to 6.2 mmol/L (p increased from 8.6 to 10.5 microg/mL (p fat diet intervention for 3 days in insulin-resistant type 2 diabetes affects lipid, adiponectin and leptin levels but fails to improve insulin sensitivity and metabolic control.

  10. Relationship between the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC), vitamin D levels, and insulin resistance in obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Martínez, Marcos M; Arrau, Carlos; Jerez, Saimar; Paoli, Mariela; González-Rivas, Juan P; Nieto-Martínez, Ramfis; Iacobellis, Gianluca

    2017-02-01

    To assess the relationship between 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] blood concentrations in subjects with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) risk according to the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC) modified for Latin America (LA-FINDRISC). This study was conducted in Ciudad Bolívar, Venezuela. Eighty two women and 20 men (53 obese and 49 nonobese), with an average age of 42.6±12.30 years were enrolled. Weight, height, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), fasting glucose, basal insulin, plasma lipids, Homeostasis Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR), and 25(OH)D levels were measured. FINDRISC with WC cutoff points modified for Latin America was applied. No difference in 25(OH)D levels between obese and nonobese subjects was found. When anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical variables according to the 25(OH)D status were compared, the only difference detected was higher LA-FINDRISC in the insufficient/low 25(OH)D group compared to normal 25(OH)D levels group (12.75±6.62; vs 10.15±5.21; p=0.031). LA-FINDRISC was negatively correlated with plasma 25(OH)D levels (r=-0.302; p=0.002) and positively correlated with the HOMA-IR index (r=0.637; p=0.0001). The LA-FINDRISC significantly correlated with both 25(OH)D levels and insulin resistance markers in this group of patients. Copyright © 2016 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Insulin resistance, exercise capacity and body composition in subjects with two hypertensive parents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, U B; Dige-Petersen, H; Ibsen, H

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study insulin resistance in subjects with strong genetic predisposition to essential hypertension, compared with non-disposed subjects. SUBJECTS: Thirty normotensive subjects aged 18-35 years whose parents both had essential hypertension, and 30 age- and sex matched subjects whose...... parents were both normotensive, were studied. Subjects or parents with diabetes and morbid obesity were excluded. METHODS: The study comprised (1) a frequent sampling oral glucose tolerance test; (2) an isoglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study; (3) an analysis of body composition by dual-energy X......-ray absorptiometry; (4) an exercise test with gas exchange analysis; and (5) investigation of composition of usual diet by diet registration for 5 days. RESULTS: The 24-h diastolic blood pressure was higher in subjects predisposed to hypertension compared with the controls: 78.1 versus 74.0 mmHg (confidence interval...

  12. Unprecedented high insulin secretion in a healthy human subject after intravenous glucagon-like peptide-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knop, Filip K; Lund, Asger; Madsbad, Sten

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The gut-derived incretin hormones, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide-1, are released in response to ingestion of nutrients. Both hormones are highly insulinotropic in strictly glucose-dependent fashions and glucagon-like peptide-1 is often referred...... of 13,770 and 22,380 pM, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge insulin and C-peptide concentrations of these magnitudes have never been reported. Thus, the present data support the view that glucagon-like peptide-1 is one of the most insulinotropic substances known....... to as one of the most insulinotropic substances known. CASE PRESENTATION: Plasma insulin and C-peptide concentrations were measured in a healthy Caucasian male (age: 53 years; body mass index: 28.6 kg/m2; fasting plasma glucose: 5.7 mM; 2 h plasma glucose value following 75 g-oral glucose tolerance test: 3...

  13. Insulin Resistance in Non-Obese Subjects Is Associated with Activation of the JNK Pathway and Impaired Insulin Signaling in Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masharani, Umesh B.; Maddux, Betty A.; Li, Xiaojuan; Sakkas, Giorgos K.; Mulligan, Kathleen; Schambelan, Morris; Goldfine, Ira D.; Youngren, Jack F.

    2011-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of insulin resistance in the absence of obesity is unknown. In obesity, multiple stress kinases have been identified that impair the insulin signaling pathway via serine phosphorylation of key second messenger proteins. These stress kinases are activated through various mechanisms related to lipid oversupply locally in insulin target tissues and in various adipose depots. Methodology/Principal Findings To explore whether specific stress kinases that have been implicated in the insulin resistance of obesity are potentially contributing to insulin resistance in non-obese individuals, twenty healthy, non-obese, normoglycemic subjects identified as insulin sensitive or resistant were studied. Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies obtained during euglycemic, hyperinsulinemic clamp were evaluated for insulin signaling and for activation of stress kinase pathways. Total and regional adipose stores and intramyocellular lipids (IMCL) were assessed by DXA, MRI and 1H-MRS. In muscle of resistant subjects, phosphorylation of JNK was increased (1.36±0.23 vs. 0.78±0.10 OD units, Pincreased (1.30±0.09 vs. 0.22±0.03 OD units, Pinsulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation decreased (10.97±0.95 vs. 0.89±0.50 OD units, Pinsulin resistant subjects (3.26±0.48 vs. 1.58±0.35% H2O peak, Pincreased total fat and abdominal fat when compared to insulin sensitive controls. Conclusions This is the first report demonstrating that insulin resistance in non-obese, normoglycemic subjects is associated with activation of the JNK pathway related to increased IMCL and higher total body and abdominal adipose stores. While JNK activation is consistent with a primary impact of muscle lipid accumulation on metabolic stress, further work is necessary to determine the relative contributions of the various mediators of impaired insulin signaling in this population. PMID:21589939

  14. Fasting insulin and endogenous hormones in relation to premenopausal breast density (Canada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borugian, Marilyn J; Spinelli, John J; Gordon, Paula B; Abanto, Zenaida; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Pollak, Michael N; Warren, Linda J; Hislop, T Gregory; Gallagher, Richard P

    2014-03-01

    Mammographic breast density (BD) is associated with increased risk of breast cancer. This study asks which circulating metabolic and reproductive biomarkers are associated with BD, particularly dense breast area, in premenopausal women not taking exogenous hormones. In a cross-sectional study, 299 premenopausal women aged 40-49 completed questionnaires, provided a fasting blood sample, had height, weight, percentage body fat, waist and hip measurements taken, and attended a screening mammogram. Multivariate linear regression was used to calculate adjusted means for percentage BD, absolute dense and non-dense area, across categories of covariates, adjusted for day of menstrual cycle, age, parity, body mass index, percentage body fat, and ethnicity. Fasting insulin levels were inversely associated, and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 levels directly associated with percentage BD, but lost statistical significance after multivariate adjustment. Sex hormone-binding globulin levels were directly associated with percentage BD, still significant after multivariate adjustment (p = 0.03). A significant inverse dose-response association was observed between progesterone levels and dense area (p cancer risk remains unclear.

  15. Affective Adaptation to Repeated SIT and MICT Protocols in Insulin-Resistant Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saanijoki, Tiina; Nummenmaa, Lauri; Koivumäki, Mikko; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Kalliokoski, Kari K; Hannukainen, Jarna C

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate affective responses to repeated sessions of sprint interval training (SIT) in comparison with moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) in insulin-resistant subjects. Twenty-six insulin-resistant adults (age, 49 (4) yr; 10 women) were randomized into SIT (n = 13) or MICT (n = 13) groups. Subjects completed six supervised training sessions within 2 wk (SIT session, 4-6 × 30 s all-out cycling/4-min recovery; MICT session, 40-60 min at 60% peak work load). Perceived exertion, stress, and affective state were assessed with questionnaires before, during and after each training session. Perceived exertion, displeasure, and arousal were higher during the SIT compared with MICT sessions (all P training (all P training period: perceived stress and positive activation were no longer different between the training groups after the third, and satisfaction after the fifth training session (P > 0.05). The perceptual and affective responses are more negative both during and acutely after SIT compared with MICT in untrained insulin-resistant adults. These responses, however, show significant improvements already within six training sessions, indicating rapid positive affective and physiological adaptations to continual exercise training, both SIT and MICT. These findings suggest that even very intense SIT is mentally tolerable alternative for untrained people with insulin resistance.

  16. Soy foods have low glycemic and insulin response indices in normal weight subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabor Aaron

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foods with a low glycemic index (GI may provide a variety of health benefits. The objective of the present study was to measure the GI and insulin index (II of select soy foods. Methods The study was conducted in two parts with low-carbohydrate products being tested separately. In Experiment 1, subjects averaged 23.2 years of age with BMI = 22.0 kg/m2, while subjects in Experiment 2 averaged 23.9 years of age with BMI = 21.6 kg/m2. The reference (glucose and test foods were served in portions containing 10 g of carbohydrates in Experiment 1 (two test foods and 25 g of carbohydrates in Experiment 2 (four test foods. Subjects consumed the reference food twice and each test food once. For each test, subjects were instructed to consume a fixed portion of the reference food or test food together with 250 g of water within 12 min. Blood samples were collected before each test and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after consumption of reference or test foods to quantify glucose and insulin. Two-hour blood glucose and plasma insulin curves were constructed and areas under the curves were calculated. GI and II values for each subject and test food were calculated. Results In Experiment 1, both low-carbohydrate soy foods were shown to have significantly (P Conclusion All but one of the soy foods tested had a low GI, suggesting that soy foods may be an appropriate part of diets intended to improve control of blood glucose and insulin levels.

  17. Beneficial effects of ethanol consumption on insulin resistance are only applicable to subjects without obesity or insulin resistance; drinking is not necessarily a remedy for metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Hirokazu

    2011-07-01

    Although moderate drinking has been shown to lower insulin resistance levels, it is still unclear whether alcoholic beverages could be remedies for insulin resistance. To elucidate this, the correlation between levels of ethanol consumption and insulin resistance were cross-sectionally examined in 371 non-diabetic male Japanese workers. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the ethanol consumption level was inversely correlated with the insulin resistance level assessed by homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR, p = 0.0014), the serum insulin level (p = 0.0007), and pancreatic β-cell function, also assessed by HOMA (HOMA-β, p = 0.0002), independently from age, body mass index (BMI), and blood pressure, liver function tests, and lipid profiles status, as well as serum adiponectin. The correlations were true in subjects with normal BMIs (up to 25.0 kg/m(2), n = 301) or normal HOMA-IR (up to 2.0 μIU·mg/μL·dL n = 337), whereas all of them were non-significant in those with excessive BMIs (n = 70) or in those with HOMA-IR of more than 2.0 (n = 34). Although it is still unclear whether the reductions of these parameters by ethanol consumption are truly due to the improvement of insulin resistance, at least, these effects are not applicable to subjects with obesity and/or insulin resistance. Thus, alcoholic beverages could not be remedies for insulin resistance or metabolic syndrome.

  18. In addition to obesity and insulin resistance, microalbuminuria and diminished insulin secretion are linked with the metabolic syndrome in community-dwelling nondiabetic Taiwanese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi-Ching; Wu, Jin-Shang; Lu, Feng-Hwa; Chang, Wan-Chi; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Chang, Chih-Jen

    2007-04-01

    Although insulin resistance and obesity are currently considered primary factors underlying development of the metabolic syndrome, microalbuminuria and inadequate insulin secretion may also be involved. The present study is the first to examine intercorrelations among these factors in a community-based Taiwanese population. An epidemiological survey of chronic diseases conducted in 1996 was utilized to evaluate 1340 community-dwelling, nondiabetic adults. Principal component factor analyses involving varimax orthogonal rotation of transformed continuously distributed variables were performed. Sex-specific factor analyses yielded four separate factors in women (obesity/insulin resistance, lipid, blood pressure and insulin resistance/secretion factors) and three in men (obesity/insulin resistance/secretion, lipid and blood pressure factors). For men the corrected insulin response clustered with obesity, and insulin resistance loaded on the same factor, explaining 31% of variance; however, microalbuminuria was closely linked with blood pressure variables, and the corrected insulin response loaded on the same factor, explaining 13.2% of variance. Obesity and insulin resistance were confirmed as central anomalies of all features of the metabolic syndrome. The observed linkage of impaired beta-cell function and microalbuminuria with the metabolic syndrome should facilitate prediction of the onset of cardio-vasculo-metabolic disorders. Inadequate beta-cell function and microalbuminuria are plausible components of the metabolic syndrome in Taiwanese subjects.

  19. Fasting serum levels of ferritin are associated with impaired pancreatic beta cell function and decreased insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonfils, Linéa; Ellervik, Christina; Friedrich, Nele

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: Elevated serum ferritin levels are associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, but the nature of this association remains elusive. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that an elevated fasting serum ferritin level is associated with an increased risk of type...... ferritin levels are associated with surrogate measures of both impaired beta cell function and decreased insulin sensitivity. Menopause seems to modify the association with insulin sensitivity....... diabetes due to its association with impaired beta cell function and decreased insulin sensitivity. Methods: We investigated 6,392 individuals from the Danish general population. Surrogate measures of beta cell function and insulin sensitivity were calculated for approximately 6,100 individuals based...... glucose levels at 0, 30 and 120 min (p beta cell function estimated as the insulinogenic index and corrected insulin response (p 

  20. Adjusting the basal insulin regimen of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus receiving insulin pump therapy during the Ramadan fast: A case series in adolescents and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawli, Yousra M A; Zantout, Mira S; Azar, Sami T

    2009-02-01

    Ramadan, the ninth month of the Islamic lunar calendar, is the holy month of fasting for adolescent and adult Muslims. Observance of Ramadan is considered obligatory for every healthy adult Muslim. During this time, Muslims refrain from eating, drinking, smoking, and administering oral or parenteral medications from sunrise to sunset daily for 28 to 30 days. We evaluated the need for changes in basal insulin regimen in 5 patients (4 males and 1 female; age range, 15-19 years) with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) who fasted during Ramadan. The patients were receiving insulin pump therapy with regular human insulin and maintained weekly visits with their endocrinologist at The Chronic Care Center (Beirut, Lebanon). They were instructed to break the fast after any episode of hypoglycemia (finger stick glucose stick glucose ≥300 mg/dL or any hyperglycemia associated with presence of urine ketone bodies on urinary dipstick). Blood glucose concentrations did not change significantly with fasting. Finger stick blood glucose taken at 4-hour intervals decreased in the afternoon (at 4 pm) and increased in the evening and morning (10 pm and 8 am, respectively) during this month in 4 of 5 patients, while no significant change in circadian rhythm of finger stick blood glucose was observed in 1 patient. Based on the investigators' findings, the basal insulin requirement decreased by 5.5% to 25.0% (4 patients) or did not change (1 patient) during the fast. Changes in regimens, based on collaboration between the endocrinologist and diabetes educational nurse, were determined by blood glucose self-monitoring done at 4-hour intervals during the fasting period, pre-Suhur (predawn breakfast), and ≥2 hours after Iftar (evening fast-breaking meal). No cases of keto-acidosis or severe hypoglycemia were reported. These 5 adolescent and adult patients with T1DM who were using an insulin pump were able to fast during Ramadan without incidences of severe hypoglycemia or ketoacidosis by

  1. Effects of Genetic Variants Previously Associated with Fasting Glucose and Insulin in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, Jose C.; Jablonski, Kathleen A.; McAteer, Jarred B.; Franks, Paul W.; Mason, Clinton C.; Mather, Kieren; Horton, Edward; Goldberg, Ronald; Dabelea, Dana; Kahn, Steven E.; Arakaki, Richard F.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Knowler, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Common genetic variants have been recently associated with fasting glucose and insulin levels in white populations. Whether these associations replicate in pre-diabetes is not known. We extended these findings to the Diabetes Prevention Program, a clinical trial in which participants at high risk for diabetes were randomized to placebo, lifestyle modification or metformin for diabetes prevention. We genotyped previously reported polymorphisms (or their proxies) in/near G6PC2, MTNR1B, GCK, DGKB, GCKR, ADCY5, MADD, CRY2, ADRA2A, FADS1, PROX1, SLC2A2, GLIS3, C2CD4B, IGF1, and IRS1 in 3,548 Diabetes Prevention Program participants. We analyzed variants for association with baseline glycemic traits, incident diabetes and their interaction with response to metformin or lifestyle intervention. We replicated associations with fasting glucose at MTNR1B (Pfasting glucose and impaired β-cell function persisted at 1 year despite adjustment for the baseline trait, indicating a sustained deleterious effect at this locus. We also replicated the association of MADD with fasting proinsulin levels (P<0.001). We detected no significant impact of these variants on diabetes incidence or interaction with preventive interventions. The association of several polymorphisms with quantitative glycemic traits is replicated in a cohort of high-risk persons. These variants do not have a detectable impact on diabetes incidence or response to metformin or lifestyle modification in the Diabetes Prevention Program. PMID:22984506

  2. Similar insulin secretory response to a gastric inhibitory polypeptide bolus injection at euglycemia in first-degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes and control subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Juris J; Nauck, Michael A; Siepmann, Nina

    2003-01-01

    control subjects were studied with (1) a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and (2) an intravenous bolus injection of 20 pmol GIP/kg BW with blood samples drawn over 30 minutes for determination of plasma glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and GIP. Statistical analysis applied repeated-measures analysis......Insulin secretion following the intravenous infusion of gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is diminished in patients with type 2 diabetes and at least a subgroup of their first-degree relatives at hyperglycemic clamp conditions. Therefore, we studied the effects of an intravenous bolus...... administration of GIP at normoglycemic conditions in the fasting state. Ten healthy control subjects were studied with an intravenous bolus administration of placebo, and of 7, 20, and 60 pmol GIP/kg body weight (BW), respectively. Forty-five first-degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes and 33 matched...

  3. Acute caffeine ingestion reduces insulin sensitivity in healthy subjects: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiuqin; Xue, Wenhua; Liang, Shuhong; Zhao, Jie; Zhang, Xiaojian

    2016-12-28

    According to previous meta-analyses, coffee consumption reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Whether caffeine, the key ingredient in coffee, has a beneficial effect on the glycemic homeostasis and the anti-diabetic effect is particularly controversial. The aim of this study was to summarize the effect of acute caffeine ingestion on insulin sensitivity in healthy men. A comprehensive literature search for papers published before April 2016 was conducted in EMBASE, PubMed, and Cochrane Library databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that investigated the effect of caffeine on insulin sensitivity in healthy humans without diabetes were included. A random effects meta-analysis was conducted using Review Manager 5.3. The search yielded 7 RCTs in which caffeine intake was the single variant. Compared with placebo, caffeine intake significantly decreased the insulin sensitivity index, with a standardized mean difference of -2.06 (95% confidence interval -2.67 to -1.44, I2 = 49%, P for heterogeneity = 0.06). Acute caffeine ingestion reduces insulin sensitivity in healthy subjects. Thus, in the short term, caffeine might shift glycemic homeostasis toward hyperglycemia. Long-term trials investigating the role of caffeine in the anti-diabetic effect of coffee are needed.

  4. Does green tea affect postprandial glucose, insulin and satiety in healthy subjects: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindstedt Sandra

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Results of epidemiological studies have suggested that consumption of green tea could lower the risk of type 2 diabetes. Intervention studies show that green tea may decrease blood glucose levels, and also increase satiety. This study was conducted to examine the postprandial effects of green tea on glucose levels, glycemic index, insulin levels and satiety in healthy individuals after the consumption of a meal including green tea. Methods The study was conducted on 14 healthy volunteers, with a crossover design. Participants were randomized to either 300 ml of green tea or water. This was consumed together with a breakfast consisting of white bread and sliced turkey. Blood samples were drawn at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 minutes. Participants completed several different satiety score scales at the same times. Results Plasma glucose levels were higher 120 min after ingestion of the meal with green tea than after the ingestion of the meal with water. No significant differences were found in serum insulin levels, or the area under the curve for glucose or insulin. Subjects reported significantly higher satiety, having a less strong desire to eat their favorite food and finding it less pleasant to eat another mouthful of the same food after drinking green tea compared to water. Conclusions Green tea showed no glucose or insulin-lowering effect. However, increased satiety and fullness were reported by the participants after the consumption of green tea. Trial registration number NCT01086189

  5. Branched Chain Amino Acids Are Associated with Insulin Resistance Independent of Leptin and Adiponectin in Subjects with Varying Degrees of Glucose Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Margery A; Wolak-Dinsmore, Justyna; Dullaart, Robin P F

    2017-05-01

    Branched chain amino acids (BCAA) may be involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and are associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) development. Adipokines such as leptin and adiponectin influence insulin resistance and reflect adipocyte dysfunction. We examined the extent to which the association of BCAA with insulin resistance is attributable to altered leptin and adiponectin levels in individuals with varying degrees of glucose tolerance. BCAA were measured by nuclear magnetic resonance, whereas leptin and adiponectin were measured by immunoassay, in subjects with normal fasting glucose (n = 30), impaired fasting glucose (n = 25), and T2DM (n = 15). Insulin resistance was estimated by homeostasis model assessment (HOMAir). BCAA were higher in men than in women (P BCAA were correlated with HOMAir (r = 0.46; P  0.05). Multivariable linear regression analysis, adjusting for age, sex, T2DM, and body mass index (BMI), demonstrated that BCAA were positively associated with HOMAir (β = 0.242, P = 0.023). When BCAA, leptin, and adiponectin were included together, the positive relationship of HOMAir with BCAA (β = 0.275, P = 0.012) remained significant. Insulin resistance was associated with BCAA. This association remained after adjusting for age, sex, T2DM, BMI, as well as leptin and adiponectin. It is unlikely that the relationship of insulin resistance with BCAA is to a major extent attributable to effects of leptin and adiponectin.

  6. Tolerance of centrifuge-simulated suborbital spaceflight in subjects with implanted insulin pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Dana R; Blue, Rebecca S; Castleberry, Tarah L; Vanderploeg, James M

    2015-04-01

    With commercial spaceflight comes the possibility of spaceflight participants (SFPs) with significant medical conditions. Those with previously untested medical conditions, such as diabetes mellitus (DM) and the use of indwelling medical devices, represent a unique challenge. It is unclear how SFPs with such devices will react to the stresses of spaceflight. This case report describes two subjects with Type I DM using insulin pumps who underwent simulated dynamic phases of spaceflight via centrifuge G force exposure. Two Type I diabetic subjects with indwelling Humalog insulin pumps, a 23-yr-old man averaging 50 u of Humalog daily and a 27-yr-old man averaging 60 u of Humalog daily, underwent seven centrifuge runs over 48 h. Day 1 consisted of two +Gz runs (peak = +3.5 Gz, run 2) and two +Gx runs (peak = +6.0 Gx, run 4). Day 2 consisted of three runs approximating suborbital spaceflight profiles (combined +Gx and +Gz). Data collected included blood pressure, electrocardiogram, pulse oximetry, neurovestibular evaluation, and questionnaires regarding motion sickness, disorientation, greyout, and other symptoms. Neither subject experienced adverse clinical responses to the centrifuge exposure. Both maintained blood glucose levels between 110-206 mg · dl(-1). Potential risks to SFPs with insulin pump dependent DM include hypo/hyperglycemia, pump damage, neurovestibular dysfunction, skin breakdown, and abnormal stress responses. A search of prior literature did not reveal any previous studies of individuals with DM on insulin pumps exposed to prolonged accelerations. These cases suggest that individuals with conditions dependent on continuous medication delivery might tolerate the accelerations anticipated for commercial spaceflight.

  7. Insulin induces a shift in lipid and primary carbon metabolites in a model of fasting-induced insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peripheral insulin resistance shifts metabolic fuel use away from carbohydrates, and towards lipids, and is most commonly associated with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, regulated insulin resistance is an evolved mechanism to preserve glucose for the brain in conditions of high demand or carbohy...

  8. Insulin resistance in non-obese subjects is associated with activation of the JNK pathway and impaired insulin signaling in skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh B Masharani

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of insulin resistance in the absence of obesity is unknown. In obesity, multiple stress kinases have been identified that impair the insulin signaling pathway via serine phosphorylation of key second messenger proteins. These stress kinases are activated through various mechanisms related to lipid oversupply locally in insulin target tissues and in various adipose depots.To explore whether specific stress kinases that have been implicated in the insulin resistance of obesity are potentially contributing to insulin resistance in non-obese individuals, twenty healthy, non-obese, normoglycemic subjects identified as insulin sensitive or resistant were studied. Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies obtained during euglycemic, hyperinsulinemic clamp were evaluated for insulin signaling and for activation of stress kinase pathways. Total and regional adipose stores and intramyocellular lipids (IMCL were assessed by DXA, MRI and (1H-MRS. In muscle of resistant subjects, phosphorylation of JNK was increased (1.36±0.23 vs. 0.78±0.10 OD units, P<0.05, while there was no evidence for activation of p38 MAPK or IKKβ. IRS-1 serine phosphorylation was increased (1.30±0.09 vs. 0.22±0.03 OD units, P<0.005 while insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation decreased (10.97±0.95 vs. 0.89±0.50 OD units, P<0.005. IMCL levels were twice as high in insulin resistant subjects (3.26±0.48 vs. 1.58±0.35% H(2O peak, P<0.05, who also displayed increased total fat and abdominal fat when compared to insulin sensitive controls.This is the first report demonstrating that insulin resistance in non-obese, normoglycemic subjects is associated with activation of the JNK pathway related to increased IMCL and higher total body and abdominal adipose stores. While JNK activation is consistent with a primary impact of muscle lipid accumulation on metabolic stress, further work is necessary to determine the relative contributions of the various mediators of impaired

  9. Fasting levels of insulin and amylin after acute pancreatitis are associated with pro-inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Nicola A; Pendharkar, Sayali A; Singh, Ruma G; Windsor, John A; Bhatia, Madhav; Petrov, Maxim S

    2017-10-01

    The prevalence of metabolic diseases continues to rise worldwide, with a growing recognition of metabolic dysregulation after acute inflammatory diseases such as acute pancreatitis (AP). Adipokines and cytokines play an important role in metabolism and the course of AP, but there is a paucity of research investigating their relationship with pancreatic hormones after AP. This study aimed to explore associations between pancreatic hormones and adipokines as well as cytokines to provide insights into the pathophysiology of altered pancreatic hormone secretion following AP. A total of 83 patients previously diagnosed with AP and no prior diabetes or pre-diabetes were recruited into this cross-sectional follow up study. Fasting venous blood samples were collected to analyse a panel of pancreatic hormones and derivatives (amylin, C-peptide, glucagon, insulin, pancreatic polypeptide, somatostatin), adipokines (adiponectin, leptin, retinol binding protein-4, and resistin), and cytokines (interleukin-6 (IL-6), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)). Linear regression analyses were used, and potential confounders were adjusted for in multivariate analyses. Insulin was significantly associated with IL-6 in both unadjusted and adjusted models (p = .029 and p = .040, respectively). Amylin was significantly associated with MCP-1 in the unadjusted model (p = .046), and TNF-α in unadjusted and adjusted models (p = .025 and p = .027, respectively). Insulin and amylin have a strong positive association with pro-inflammatory cytokines in patients following an episode of AP. These associations have possible relevance in the development of diabetes associated with diseases of the exocrine pancreas, providing the opportunity to develop novel treatment paradigms.

  10. Altered intestinal functions and increased local inflammation in insulin-resistant obese subjects: a gene-expression profile analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, Alain; Mayeur, Sylvain; Bérubé, Jean-Christophe; Beaulieu, Jean-François; Tremblay, Eric; Hould, Frédéric-Simon; Bossé, Yohan; Richard, Denis; Levy, Emile

    2015-09-16

    Metabolic alterations relevant to postprandial dyslipidemia were previously identified in the intestine of obese insulin-resistant subjects. The aim of the study was to identify the genes deregulated by systemic insulin resistance in the intestine of severely obese subjects. Transcripts from duodenal samples of insulin-sensitive (HOMA-IR insulin-resistant (HOMA-IR > 7, n = 9) obese subjects were assayed by microarray (Illumina HumanHT-12). A total of 195 annotated genes were identified as differentially expressed between these two groups (Fold change > 1.2). Of these genes, 36 were found to be directly involved in known intestinal functions, including digestion, extracellular matrix, endocrine system, immunity and cholesterol metabolism. Interestingly, all differentially expressed genes (n = 8) implicated in inflammation and oxidative stress were found to be upregulated in the intestine of insulin-resistant compared to insulin-sensitive subjects. Metabolic pathway analysis revealed that several signaling pathways involved in immunity and inflammation were significantly enriched in differently expressed genes and were predicted to be activated in the intestine of insulin-resistant subjects. Using stringent criteria (Fold change > 1.5; FDR insulin-resistant compared to insulin-sensitive subjects: the transcripts of the insulinotropic glucose-dependant peptide (GIP) and of the β-microseminoprotein (MSMB) were significantly reduced, but that of the humanin like-1 (MTRNR2L1) was significantly increased. These results underline that systemic insulin resistance is associated with remodeling of key intestinal functions. Moreover, these data indicate that small intestine metabolic dysfunction is accompanied with a local amplification of low-grade inflammatory process implicating several pathways. Genes identified in this study are potentially triggered throughout the development of intestinal metabolic abnormalities, which could contribute to

  11. Insulin deficiency among newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, Tahira; Yasmin, Riffat; Afzal, Naeema; Farrukh, Ambreen; Paul, Rubina Faisal; Hassan, Mukhtiar

    2012-01-01

    Any patient above the age of 40 years, coming with the symptoms of diabetes is labelled as type 2 diabetic. If insulin levels are included in the protocol for initial investigations of diabetic patients, they can be differentiated as having insulin deficiency or insulin resistance. They can thus be treated accordingly. This study was conducted to see the prevalence of insulin resistance and insulin deficiency in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics. This study was conducted on 75 newly diagnosed diabetic subjects, and 75 control subjects for comparison. Fasting serum insulin was assayed by ELISA and HOMA-IR index was calculated. The diabetic subjects with fasting hyperglycaemia and serum insulin level below 20 microIU/ml and HOMA-IR index below 3.5 were grouped as insulin deficient (Group-A), and the diabetic subjects with fasting insulin level above 20 microIU/ml and HOMA-IR index above 3.5 were grouped as insulin resistant (Group-B). Twenty-eight percent subjects were found to have insulin level below 20 microIU/ml while 72% subjects had insulin resistance. When gender was taken into consideration, it was seen that 18.7% males had fasting insulin level of 6.98 +/- 0.737 microIU/ml and 9.3% females had fasting insulin level of 5.21 +/- 0.885 microIU/ml while 32% males and 40% females had insulin resistance. The mean age of male subjects with insulin resistance was significantly higher compared to the male subjects with insulin deficiency. Mean weight and body mass index of the male and female subjects having insulin resistance was significantly higher than their respective control groups and also higher than the subjects with insulin deficiency. Pearson coefficient of correlation was calculated for fasting serum insulin level with age and BMI. A significant positive correlation was observed between fasting serum insulin and age of females with insulin resistance. A considerable number of persons who develop diabetes after 40 years of age but are not insulin resistant

  12. Effects of genetic variants previously associated with fasting glucose and insulin in the Diabetes Prevention Program.

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    Jose C Florez

    Full Text Available Common genetic variants have been recently associated with fasting glucose and insulin levels in white populations. Whether these associations replicate in pre-diabetes is not known. We extended these findings to the Diabetes Prevention Program, a clinical trial in which participants at high risk for diabetes were randomized to placebo, lifestyle modification or metformin for diabetes prevention. We genotyped previously reported polymorphisms (or their proxies in/near G6PC2, MTNR1B, GCK, DGKB, GCKR, ADCY5, MADD, CRY2, ADRA2A, FADS1, PROX1, SLC2A2, GLIS3, C2CD4B, IGF1, and IRS1 in 3,548 Diabetes Prevention Program participants. We analyzed variants for association with baseline glycemic traits, incident diabetes and their interaction with response to metformin or lifestyle intervention. We replicated associations with fasting glucose at MTNR1B (P<0.001, G6PC2 (P = 0.002 and GCKR (P = 0.001. We noted impaired β-cell function in carriers of glucose-raising alleles at MTNR1B (P<0.001, and an increase in the insulinogenic index for the glucose-raising allele at G6PC2 (P<0.001. The association of MTNR1B with fasting glucose and impaired β-cell function persisted at 1 year despite adjustment for the baseline trait, indicating a sustained deleterious effect at this locus. We also replicated the association of MADD with fasting proinsulin levels (P<0.001. We detected no significant impact of these variants on diabetes incidence or interaction with preventive interventions. The association of several polymorphisms with quantitative glycemic traits is replicated in a cohort of high-risk persons. These variants do not have a detectable impact on diabetes incidence or response to metformin or lifestyle modification in the Diabetes Prevention Program.

  13. Fasting plasma glucose after intensive insulin therapy predicted long-term glycemic control in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianbin; Liu, Juan; Fang, Donghong; Liu, Liehua; Huang, Zhimin; Wan, Xuesi; Cao, Xiaopei; Li, Yanbing

    2013-01-01

    Short term intensive insulin therapy has been reported to induce long term euglycemia remission in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus, but the factors that are responsible for long-term remission or hyperglycemia relapse are unknown. Original data of 188 patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes treated with short term intensive insulin therapy was reanalyzed. Patients who maintained glycemic control for 12 months with only life style intervention were defined as remission while those who failed to maintain glycemic control for 12 months as hyperglycemia relapse. Relationships of metabolic control, β cell function and insulin sensitivity with remission time and hyperglycemia relapse were explored. Totally 93 patients achieved 12-month euglycemic remission. Substantial improvement in blood glucose, parameters of β cell function and insulin sensitivity were obtained in both remission and relapse patients. The duration of remission was correlated with fasting plasma glucose measured after cessation of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy (fasting plasma glucose (FPG) after CSII, r= -0.349, p7.0 mmol/L (Hazard ratio=2.69, pintensive insulin therapy is a convenient and significant predictor for hyperglycemic relapse.

  14. Genetic variants associated with fasting glucose and insulin concentrations in an ethnically diverse population: results from the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesinmeyer, Megan D; Meigs, James B; North, Kari E; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Bůžková, Petra; Franceschini, Nora; Haessler, Jeffrey; Goodloe, Robert; Spencer, Kylee L; Voruganti, Venkata Saroja; Howard, Barbara V; Jackson, Rebecca; Kolonel, Laurence N; Liu, Simin; Manson, JoAnn E; Monroe, Kristine R; Mukamal, Kenneth; Dilks, Holli H; Pendergrass, Sarah A; Nato, Andrew; Wan, Peggy; Wilkens, Lynne R; Le Marchand, Loic; Ambite, José Luis; Buyske, Steven; Florez, Jose C; Crawford, Dana C; Hindorff, Lucia A; Haiman, Christopher A; Peters, Ulrike; Pankow, James S

    2013-09-25

    Multiple genome-wide association studies (GWAS) within European populations have implicated common genetic variants associated with insulin and glucose concentrations. In contrast, few studies have been conducted within minority groups, which carry the highest burden of impaired glucose homeostasis and type 2 diabetes in the U.S. As part of the 'Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) Consortium, we investigated the association of up to 10 GWAS-identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 8 genetic regions with glucose or insulin concentrations in up to 36,579 non-diabetic subjects including 23,323 European Americans (EA) and 7,526 African Americans (AA), 3,140 Hispanics, 1,779 American Indians (AI), and 811 Asians. We estimated the association between each SNP and fasting glucose or log-transformed fasting insulin, followed by meta-analysis to combine results across PAGE sites. Overall, our results show that 9/9 GWAS SNPs are associated with glucose in EA (p = 0.04 to 9 × 10-15), versus 3/9 in AA (p= 0.03 to 6 × 10-5), 3/4 SNPs in Hispanics, 2/4 SNPs in AI, and 1/2 SNPs in Asians. For insulin we observed a significant association with rs780094/GCKR in EA, Hispanics and AI only. Generalization of results across multiple racial/ethnic groups helps confirm the relevance of some of these loci for glucose and insulin metabolism. Lack of association in non-EA groups may be due to insufficient power, or to unique patterns of linkage disequilibrium.

  15. Regulation of mouse hepatic genes in response to diet induced obesity, insulin resistance and fasting induced weight reduction

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    Mantzoros Christos

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is associated with insulin resistance that can often be improved by caloric restriction and weight reduction. Although many physiological changes accompanying insulin resistance and its treatment have been characterized, the genetic mechanisms linking obesity to insulin resistance are largely unknown. We used DNA microarrys and RT-PCR to investigate significant changes in hepatic gene transcription in insulin resistant, diet-induced obese (DIO-C57/BL/6J mice and DIO-C57/BL/6J mice fasted for 48 hours, whose weights returned to baseline levels during these conditions. Results Transcriptional profiling of hepatic mRNA revealed over 1900 genes that were significantly perturbed between control, DIO, and fasting/weight reduced DIO mice. From this set, our bioinformatics analysis identified 41 genes that rigorously discriminate these groups of mice. These genes are associated with molecular pathways involved in signal transduction, and protein metabolism and secretion. Of particular interest are genes that participate in pathways responsible for modulating insulin sensitivity. DIO altered expression of genes in directions that would be anticipated to antagonize insulin sensitivity, while fasting/ weight reduction partially or completely normalized their levels. Among these discriminatory genes, Sh3kbp1 and RGS3, may have special significance. Sh3kbp1, an endogenous inhibitor of PI-3-kinase, was upregulated by high-fat feeding, but normalized to control levels by fasting/weight reduction. Because insulin signaling occurs partially through PI-3-kinase, increased expression of Sh3kbp1 by DIO mice may contribute to hepatic insulin resistance via inhibition of PI-3-kinase. RGS3, a suppressor of G-protein coupled receptor generation of cAMP, was repressed by high-fat feeding, but partially normalized by fasting/weight reduction. Decreased expression of RGS3 may augment levels of cAMP and thereby contribute to increased, c

  16. Fasting Plasma Insulin at 5 Years of Age Predicted Subsequent Weight Increase in Early Childhood over a 5-Year Period-The Da Qing Children Cohort Study.

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    Yan Yan Chen

    Full Text Available The association between hyperinsulinemia and obesity is well known. However, it is uncertain especially in childhood obesity, if initial fasting hyperinsulinemia predicts obesity, or obesity leads to hyperinsulinemia through insulin resistance.To investigate the predictive effect of fasting plasma insulin on subsequent weight change after a 5-year interval in childhood.424 Children from Da Qing city, China, were recruited at 5 years of age and followed up for 5 years. Blood pressure, anthropometric measurements, fasting plasma insulin, glucose and triglycerides were measured at baseline and 5 years later.Fasting plasma insulin at 5 years of age was significantly correlated with change of weight from 5 to 10 years (ΔWeight. Children in the lowest insulin quartile had ΔWeight of 13.08±0.73 kg compare to 18.39±0.86 in the highest insulin quartile (P<0.0001 in boys, and similarly 12.03±0.71 vs 15.80±0.60 kg (P<0.0001 in girls. Multivariate analysis showed that the predictive effect of insulin at 5 years of age on subsequent weight gain over 5 years remained statistically significant even after the adjustment for age, sex, birth weight, TV-viewing time and weight (or body mass index at baseline. By contrast, the initial weight at 5 years of age did not predict subsequent changes in insulin level 5 years later. Children who had both higher fasting insulin and weight at 5 years of age showed much higher levels of systolic blood pressures, fasting plasma glucose, the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and triglycerides at 10 years of age.Fasting plasma insulin at 5 years of age predicts weight gain and cardiovascular risk factors 5 year later in Chinese children of early childhood, but the absolute weight at 5 years of age did not predict subsequent change in fasting insulin.

  17. Postprandial blood glucose and insulin responses to pre-germinated brown rice in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yukihiko; Mizukuchi, Aya; Kise, Mitsuo; Aoto, Hiromichi; Yamamoto, Shigeru; Yoshihara, Rie; Yokoyama, Jyunichi

    2005-08-01

    Effects of pre-germinated brown rice (PGBR) on postprandial blood glucose and insulin concentrations were compared with brown rice (BR) and white rice (WR) in two studies. In the first study, we investigated the time course of postprandial blood glucose and insulin concentrations after ingesting 25% (W/V) glucose solution, PGBR, BR or WR in 19 healthy young subjects. In the second study, dose-dependent effect of PGBR on the time course of postprandial blood glucose concentrations was compared among 4 different mixtures of PGBR and WR in 13 healthy young subjects. They were solely PGBR, 2/3 PGBR (PGBR: WR = 2 : 1), 1/3 PGBR (PGBR : WR = 1 : 2) and solely WR. Each sample was studied on a different day. The samples were selected randomly by the subjects. All the rice samples contained 50 g of available carbohydrates. The previous day the subjects ate the assigned dinner by 9:00 pm and then were allowed only water until the examination. The next morning, they ingested each test rice sample with 150 ml of water in 5-10 min. Blood was collected into capillary tubes from finger at 0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 min after the ingestion. The incremental areas under the curve (IAUC) of blood glucose concentrations (IAUC-Glc) for 120 min after the administration of PGBR and BR were lower than those after WR. In contrast the IAUC-Glc of BR and PGBR were not different (Study 1). The higher the ratio of PGBR/WR, the lower the glycemic index became (Study 2). These results suggest that intake of PGBR instead of WR is effective for the control of postprandial blood glucose concentration without increasing the insulin secretion.

  18. Short-Term Exercise Training Improves Insulin Sensitivity but Does Not Inhibit Inflammatory Pathways in Immune Cells from Insulin-Resistant Subjects

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    Sara M. Reyna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Exercise has an anti-inflammatory effect against, and immune cells play critical roles in the development, of insulin resistance and atherosclerotic vascular disease (AVD. Thus, the goal of this study was to determine whether exercise improves insulin sensitivity in insulin-resistant subjects by downregulating proinflammatory signaling in immune cells. Methods. Seventeen lean, 8 obese nondiabetic, and 11 obese type 2 diabetic individuals underwent an aerobic exercise program for 15 days and an insulin clamp before and after exercise. Peripheral mononuclear cells (PMNC were obtained for determination of Toll-like receptor (TLR 2 and 4 protein content and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation. Results. Compared with that in lean individuals, TLR4 protein content was increased by 4.2-fold in diabetic subjects. This increase in TLR4 content was accompanied by a 3.0-fold increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK phosphorylation. Exercise improved insulin sensitivity in the lean, obese, and type 2 diabetes groups. However, exercise did not affect TLR content or ERK phosphorylation. Conclusions. TLR4 content and ERK phosphorylation are increased in PMNC of type 2 diabetic individuals. While exercise improves insulin sensitivity, this effect is not related to changes in TLR2/TLR4 content or ERK phosphorylation in PMNC of type 2 diabetic individuals.

  19. Consumption of meat is associated with higher fasting glucose and insulin concentrations regardless of glucose and insulin genetic risk scores: a meta-analysis of 50,345 Caucasians12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fretts, Amanda M; Follis, Jack L; Nettleton, Jennifer A; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Ngwa, Julius S; Wojczynski, Mary K; Kalafati, Ioanna Panagiota; Varga, Tibor V; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C; Houston, Denise K; Lahti, Jari; Ericson, Ulrika; van den Hooven, Edith H; Mikkilä, Vera; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Rice, Kenneth; Renström, Frida; North, Kari E; McKeown, Nicola M; Feitosa, Mary F; Kanoni, Stavroula; Smith, Caren E; Garcia, Melissa E; Tiainen, Anna-Maija; Sonestedt, Emily; Manichaikul, Ani; van Rooij, Frank JA; Dimitriou, Maria; Raitakari, Olli; Pankow, James S; Djoussé, Luc; Province, Michael A; Hu, Frank B; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Keller, Margaux F; Perälä, Mia-Maria; Rotter, Jerome I; Hofman, Albert; Graff, Misa; Kähönen, Mika; Mukamal, Kenneth; Johansson, Ingegerd; Ordovas, Jose M; Liu, Yongmei; Männistö, Satu; Uitterlinden, André G; Deloukas, Panos; Seppälä, Ilkka; Psaty, Bruce M; Cupples, L Adrienne; Borecki, Ingrid B; Franks, Paul W; Arnett, Donna K; Nalls, Mike A; Eriksson, Johan G; Orho-Melander, Marju; Franco, Oscar H; Lehtimäki, Terho; Dedoussis, George V; Meigs, James B; Siscovick, David S

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent studies suggest that meat intake is associated with diabetes-related phenotypes. However, whether the associations of meat intake and glucose and insulin homeostasis are modified by genes related to glucose and insulin is unknown. Objective: We investigated the associations of meat intake and the interaction of meat with genotype on fasting glucose and insulin concentrations in Caucasians free of diabetes mellitus. Design: Fourteen studies that are part of the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium participated in the analysis. Data were provided for up to 50,345 participants. Using linear regression within studies and a fixed-effects meta-analysis across studies, we examined 1) the associations of processed meat and unprocessed red meat intake with fasting glucose and insulin concentrations; and 2) the interactions of processed meat and unprocessed red meat with genetic risk score related to fasting glucose or insulin resistance on fasting glucose and insulin concentrations. Results: Processed meat was associated with higher fasting glucose, and unprocessed red meat was associated with both higher fasting glucose and fasting insulin concentrations after adjustment for potential confounders [not including body mass index (BMI)]. For every additional 50-g serving of processed meat per day, fasting glucose was 0.021 mmol/L (95% CI: 0.011, 0.030 mmol/L) higher. Every additional 100-g serving of unprocessed red meat per day was associated with a 0.037-mmol/L (95% CI: 0.023, 0.051-mmol/L) higher fasting glucose concentration and a 0.049–ln-pmol/L (95% CI: 0.035, 0.063–ln-pmol/L) higher fasting insulin concentration. After additional adjustment for BMI, observed associations were attenuated and no longer statistically significant. The association of processed meat and fasting insulin did not reach statistical significance after correction for multiple comparisons. Observed associations were not modified by genetic

  20. Metabolomics reveals differences in postprandial responses to breads and fasting metabolic characteristics associated with postprandial insulin demand in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazzami, Ali A; Shrestha, Aahana; Morrison, David A; Poutanen, Kaisa; Mykkänen, Hannu

    2014-06-01

    Changes in serum metabolic profile after the intake of different food products (e.g., bread) can provide insight into their interaction with human metabolism. Postprandial metabolic responses were compared after the intake of refined wheat (RWB), whole-meal rye (WRB), and refined rye (RRB) breads. In addition, associations between the metabolic profile in fasting serum and the postprandial concentration of insulin in response to different breads were investigated. Nineteen postmenopausal women with normal fasting glucose and normal glucose tolerance participated in a randomized, controlled, crossover meal study. The test breads, RWB (control), RRB, and WRB, providing 50 g of available carbohydrate, were each served as a single meal. The postprandial metabolic profile was measured using nuclear magnetic resonance and targeted LC-mass spectrometry and was compared between different breads using ANOVA and multivariate models. Eight amino acids had a significant treatment effect (P effect (P fasting metabolic profile and the postprandial concentration of insulin. Women with higher fasting concentrations of leucine and isoleucine and lower fasting concentrations of sphingomyelins and phosphatidylcholines had higher insulin responses despite similar glucose concentration after all kinds of bread (cross-validated ANOVA, P = 0.048). High blood concentration of branched-chain amino acids, i.e., leucine and isoleucine, has been associated with the increased risk of diabetes, which suggests that additional consideration should be given to bread proteins in understanding the beneficial health effects of different kinds of breads. The present study suggests that the fasting metabolic profile can be used to characterize the postprandial insulin demand in individuals with normal glucose metabolism that can be used for establishing strategies for the stratification of individuals in personalized nutrition. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  1. Insulin resistance is associated with the development of albuminuria in Korean subjects without diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Cheol Min; Hyun, Young Youl; Lee, Kyu Beck; Kim, Hyang

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that insulin resistance is associated with the development of albuminuria. However, most studies are done on a background of diabetes or metabolic syndrome and there is little data from general population. The aim of this study is to define the effect of insulin resistance on the development of albuminuria in healthy individuals without diabetes. We analyzed 60,047 participants without baseline diabetes or chronic kidney disease, who underwent at least two health maintenance visits at a 2-year interval between 2002 and 2009 at a tertiary hospital in Korea. We measured the incidence of albuminuria at the second examination and calculated the odds ratio for the development of albuminuria according to the quintile of the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). After 2 years, 880 cases of incident albuminuria were observed. The cumulative incidences of albuminuria were 1.08, 1.50, 1.35, 1.47, and 1.92% for the 1st to 5th quintiles of HOMA-IR. On multivariate logistic analysis, the odds ratios for incident albuminuria compared to those in the 1st quintile were 1.38 (95% CI 1.10-1.73; P=0.006), 1.23 (95% CI 0.97-1.55; P=0.087), 1.32 (95% CI 1.04-1.67; P=0.020), and 1.66 (95% CI 1.31-2.09; Palbuminuria in relatively healthy subjects without diabetes. Further research is needed to verify the role of insulin resistance in the development of albuminuria and renal injury.

  2. Guidelines for Premeal Insulin Dose Reduction for Postprandial Exercise of Different Intensities and Durations in Type 1 Diabetic Subjects Treated Intensively With a Basal-Bolus Insulin Regimen (Ultralente-Lispro)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rémi Rabasa-Lhoret; Josée Bourque; Francine Ducros; Jean-Louis Chiasson

    2001-01-01

    Guidelines for Premeal Insulin Dose Reduction for Postprandial Exercise of Different Intensities and Durations in Type 1 Diabetic Subjects Treated Intensively With a Basal-Bolus Insulin Regimen (Ultralente-Lispro...

  3. Alternate day fasting impacts the brain insulin-signaling pathway of young adult male C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianghua; E, Lezi; Wang, Wenfang; Frontera, Jennifer; Zhu, Hao; Wang, Wen-Tung; Lee, Phil; Choi, In Young; Brooks, William M; Burns, Jeffrey M; Aires, Daniel; Swerdlow, Russell H

    2011-04-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) has recognized health benefits that may extend to brain. We examined how DR affects bioenergetics-relevant enzymes and signaling pathways in the brains of C57BL/6 mice. Five-month-old male mice were placed in ad libitum or one of two repeated fasting and refeeding (RFR) groups, an alternate day (intermittent fed; IF) or alternate day plus antioxidants (blueberry, pomegranate, and green tea extracts) (IF + AO) fed group. During the 24-h fast blood glucose levels initially fell but stabilized within 6 h of starting the fast, thus avoiding frank hypoglycemia. DR in general appeared to enhance insulin sensitivity. After six weeks brain AKT and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta phosphorylation were lower in the RFR mice, suggesting RFR reduced brain insulin-signaling pathway activity. Pathways that mediate mitochondrial biogenesis were not activated; AMP kinase phosphorylation, silent information regulator 2 phosphorylation, peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha levels, and cytochrome oxidase subunit 4 levels did not change. ATP levels also did not decline, which suggests the RFR protocols did not directly impact brain bioenergetics. Antioxidant supplementation did not affect the brain parameters we evaluated. Our data indicate in young adult male C57BL/6 mice, RFR primarily affects brain energy metabolism by reducing brain insulin signaling, which potentially results indirectly as a consequence of reduced peripheral insulin production. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  4. Intensive lifestyle intervention including high-intensity interval training program improves insulin resistance and fasting plasma glucose in obese patients

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    Guillaume Marquis-Gravel

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Following a 9-month intensive lifestyle intervention combining HIIT and MedD counseling, obese subjects experienced significant improvements of FPG and insulin resistance. This is the first study to expose the effects of a long-term program combining HIIT and MedD on glycemic control parameters among obese subjects.

  5. Impact of ENPP1 K121Q on change of insulin resistance after web-based intervention in Korean men with diabetes and impaired fasting glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ji Yeon; Sung, Sook Hee; Lee, Yeon Ju; Choi, Tae In; Choi, Seung Jin

    2014-10-01

    Ectoenzyme nucleotide pyrophosphate phosphodiesterase 1 (ENPP1) gene has been studied in relation to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and insulin resistance (IR). We hypothesized that the difference in genotype may be one of the factors that affect the outcome of intervention. We genotyped 448 men with fasting glucose≥5.6 mM/L, including 371 in subjects with K allele (KK) (69 control group [CG]; and 302 intervention group [IG]) and 77 in subjects with Q allele (KQ+QQ) (13 CG and 64 IG). The web-based intervention based on a lifestyle modification was delivered by e-mail once a month for 10 months. In the KK, IG demonstrated significantly decreased levels of fasting serum insulin (FSI) as compared to CG and homeostasis model of assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). In the KQ+QQ IG group, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), FSI and HOMA-IR were significantly decreased, and showed further reduction in the HOMA-IR than KQ+QQ CG. After analysis of covariance, K121Q did significantly influence the change of HbA1c in CG after appropriate adjustment. In a multivariate model, BMI change predicted HOMA-IR change (adjusted β=0.801; P=0.022) in KK IG subjects with T2DM. ENPP1 K121Q did not influence the change in IR. However, individuals with T2DM carrying the K121 variant are very responsive to the effect of BMI reduction on HOMA-IR.

  6. Effects of metformin treatment on erythrocyte insulin binding in normal weight subjects, in obese non diabetic subjects, in type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizkalla, S W; Elgrably, F; Tchobroutsky, G; Slama, G

    1986-08-01

    We have evaluated the effects of metformin administration on erythrocyte insulin receptors in 21 subjects: 5 normal weight subjects, 5 obese non diabetics, 5 insulin-dependent diabetics (Type I) and 6 obese non insulin-dependent (Type II) diabetics. Plasma glucose, plasma insulin and erythrocyte insulin receptors were studied after 15 days of metformin (850 mg, t.d.) or placebo administered in a double blind random order. Maximum specific insulin binding to erythrocytes increased after metformin in the normals (p less than 0.01), in the obese non diabetics (p less than 0.01) and in the obese Type 2 diabetics (p less than 0.005), but not in Type I diabetics. Scatchard analysis showed that the receptor number per cell increased by 37% in the normals, by 17% in the obese non diabetics and by 182% in Type 2 diabetics. Receptor affinity increased in obese subjects but did not increase in normals and in diabetics. Only in Type II diabetics was there a significant decrease in plasma glucose. Metformin, thus, increased binding in normals by moderately increasing the capacity of cell receptors, in obese non diabetics by increasing the affinity, whereas in obese Type II diabetics it dramatically increases receptor capacity. This is consistent with the fact that metformin has a hypoglycaemic effect mainly in Type II diabetics, but not in non diabetics (whether obese or not), and could be due to a direct effect on the cell membrane.

  7. A simple way to identify insulin resistance in non-diabetic acute coronary syndrome patients with impaired fasting glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayantan Ray

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD is increasing in India. Recent data suggesting insulin resistance can predict cardiovascular disease independently of the other risk factors, such as hypertension, visceral obesity, or dyslipidemia, so a focus on the relation between acute coronary syndrome (ACS and insulin resistance is relevant. Several studies addressing serum lipoprotein ratios as surrogates for insulin resistance have found promising results. We analyzed the association of lipoprotein ratios with the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. Methods: One hundred non-diabetic patients with impaired fasting glucose admitted with a diagnosis of ACS were included in the study. Admission fasting glucose and insulin concentrations were measured. The HOMA-IR was used to calculate insulin resistance. The fasting serum total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C levels are used to calculate following lipid ratios: TC/HDL-C and TG/HDL-C. The areas under the curves (AUC of the receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC were used to compare the power of these serum lipoprotein ratio markers. Results: Lipoprotein ratios were significantly higher in patients with HOMA Index >2 as compared to patients with Index <2. TG/HDL-C ratio and TC/HDL-C ratio were significantly correlated with HOMA-IR (P < 0.05 as obtained by Pearson′s correlation analysis (r = 0.4459, P = 0.0012; r = 0.4815, P = 0.0004; r = 0.3993; P = 0.0041, respectively. The area under the ROC curve of the TG/HDL-C and TC/HDL-C ratios for predicting insulin resistance was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.67-0.93, 0.78 (95% CI, 0.65-0.91, respectively. Conclusion: A plasma TG/HDL-C ratio and TC/HDL-C ratio provide a simple means of identifying insulin resistant and can be used as the markers of insulin resistance and cardiovascular diseases risk in adult non-diabetic patients.

  8. High-fat diet feeding alters metabolic response to fasting/non fasting conditions. Effect on caveolin expression and insulin signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Ruiz, Ana; Milagro, Fermín I; Campión, Javier; Martínez, J Alfredo; de Miguel, Carlos

    2011-04-13

    The effect of food intake on caveolin expression in relation to insulin signalling was studied in skeletal muscle and adipocytes from retroperitoneal (RP) and subcutaneous (SC) adipose tissue, comparing fasted (F) to not fasted (NF) rats that had been fed a control or high-fat (HF) diet for 72 days. Serum glucose was analysed enzymatically and insulin and leptin by ELISA. Caveolins and insulin signalling intermediaries (IR, IRS-1 and 2 and GLUT4) were determined by RT-PCR and western blotting. Caveolin and IR phosphorylation was measured by immunoprecipitation. Data were analysed with Mann-Whitney U test. High-fat fed animals showed metabolic alterations and developed obesity and insulin resistance. In skeletal muscle, food intake (NF) induced activation of IR and increased expression of IRS-2 in control animals with normal metabolic response. HF animals became overweight, hyperglycaemic, hyperinsulinemic, hyperleptinemic and showed insulin resistance. In skeletal muscle of these animals, food intake (NF) also induced IRS-2 expression together with IR, although this was not active. Caveolin 3 expression in this tissue was increased by food intake (NF) in animals fed either diet. In RP adipocytes of control animals, food intake (NF) decreased IR and IRS-2 expression but increased that of GLUT4. A similar but less intense response was found in SC adipocytes. Food intake (NF) did not change caveolin expression in RP adipocytes with either diet, but in SC adipocytes of HF animals a reduction was observed. Food intake (NF) decreased caveolin-1 phosphorylation in RP but increased it in SC adipocytes of control animals, whereas it increased caveolin-2 phosphorylation in both types of adipocytes independently of the diet. Animals fed a control-diet show a normal response to food intake (NF), with activation of the insulin signalling pathway but without appreciable changes in caveolin expression, except a small increase of caveolin-3 in muscle. Animals fed a high-fat diet

  9. Comparison of 5% versus 15% sucrose intakes as part of a eucaloric diet in overweight and obese subjects: effects on insulin sensitivity, glucose metabolism, vascular compliance, body composition and lipid profile. A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Anthony S; McCourt, Hannah J; Ennis, Cieran N; Bell, Patrick M; Courtney, C Hamish; McKinley, Michelle C; Young, Ian S; Hunter, Steven J

    2013-05-01

    The effect of dietary sucrose on insulin resistance and the pathogenesis of diabetes and vascular disease is unclear. We assessed the effect of 5% versus 15% sucrose intakes as part of a weight maintaining, eucaloric diet in overweight/obese subjects. Thirteen subjects took part in a randomised controlled crossover study (M:F 9:4, median age 46 years, range 37-56 years, BMI 31.7±0.9 kg/m(2)). Subjects completed two 6 week dietary periods separated by 4 week washout. Diets were designed to have identical macronutrient profile. Insulin action was assessed using a two-step hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp; glucose tolerance, vascular compliance, body composition and lipid profiles were also assessed. There was no change in weight or body composition between diets. There was no difference in peripheral glucose utilization or suppression of endogenous glucose production. Fasting glucose was significantly lower after the 5% diet. There was no demonstrated effect on lipid profiles, blood pressure or vascular compliance. A low-sucrose diet had no beneficial effect on insulin resistance as measured by the euglycaemic glucose clamp. However, reductions in fasting glucose, one hour insulin and insulin area under the curve with the low sucrose diet on glucose tolerance testing may indicate a beneficial effect and further work is required to determine if this is the case. Clinical Trial Registration number ISRCTN50808730. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of nano-curcumin on HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, and lipid profile in diabetic subjects: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Rahimi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Diabetes mellitus is defined as a group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action, or both or insulin resistance. Curcumin inhibits NF-κB signaling pathway. The aim of this study is evaluation of the effect of Nano-curcumin on HbA1C, fast blood glucose and lipid profile in diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: Seventy type-2 diabetic patients (fasting blood glucose (FBG ≥ 126 mg/dL or 2-hr postprandial blood glucose ≥200 mg/dl randomly receivedeither Curcumin (as nano-micelle 80 mg/day or placebo for 3 months in a double blind randomized clinical trial. Fasting blood glucose, HbA1C, and lipids profile were checked before and after the intervention. Data analyses, including parametric and nonparametric tests were done using the SPSS 11.5 software. A p value < 0.05 was regarded as statistically significant. (RCT registration code: IRCT2013081114330N1 Results: Mean age, BMI, FBG, total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, LDL, HDL, HbA1c , and  sex and had no significant difference at the baseline between the groups. In Nano-curcumin group, a significant decrease was found in HbA1C, FBG, TG, and BMI comparing results of each subject before and after the treatment (p

  11. The Effect of Ramadan Fasting on Biochemical Parameters in Healthy Thai Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongsara, Sara; Boonpol, Sakulrat; Prompalad, Nussaree; Jeenduang, Nutjaree

    2017-09-01

    Although, the effect of Ramadan fasting on the risks for Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) has been reported in several studies, the results were inconsistent. In addition, the effect of Ramadan fasting on biochemical parameters in Thai subjects has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Ramadan fasting on anthropometry, blood pressure, Fasting Blood Glucose (FBG), lipid profiles, and body composition in healthy Thai subjects. A total of 65 healthy subjects (21 men and 44 women) aged between 19-24 years were randomly recruited. Anthropometry, blood pressure, FBG, Total Cholesterol (TC), Triglyceride (TG), High Density Lipoprotein-Cholesterol (HDL-C), Low Density Lipoprotein-Cholesterol (LDL-C), and body composition were measured before Ramadan, end of Ramadan and after one month of Ramadan. There were no changes in anthropometry, blood pressure, lipid profiles and body composition in both genders before Ramadan, end of Ramadan and after one month of Ramadan. Nevertheless, FBG levels were significantly increased after one month of Ramadan compared with baseline (5.09±0.50 versus 4.83±0.38 mmol/L, p=0.016, respectively) in women. The Ramadan fasting did not affect the lipid, anthropometric and body composition in healthy Thai subjects. However, the increased FBG levels after one month of Ramadan were observed in women. To improve the favourable biochemical parameters after Ramadan fasting, the lifestyle modifications such as, increased intake of healthy diets and increased physical activity should be recommended.

  12. Linking lifestyle factors and insulin resistance, based on fasting plasma insulin and HOMA-IR in middle-aged Japanese men: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otake, Toshie; Fukumoto, Jin; Abe, Masao; Takemura, Shigeki; Mihn, Pham Ngoc; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Kiyohara, Chikako

    2014-09-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is regarded as one of the earliest features of many metabolic diseases, and major efforts are aimed at improving insulin function to confront this issue. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of body mass index (BMI), cigarette smoking, alcohol intake, physical activity, green tea and coffee consumption to IR. We performed a cross-sectional study of 1542 male self defense officials. IR was defined as the highest quartile of the fasting plasma insulin (≥ 50 pmol/L) or the homeostasis model assessment-estimated IR (HOMA-IR ≥ 1.81). An unconditional logistic model was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association between IR and influential factors. Stratified analysis by obesity status (BMI < 25 kg/m(2), non-obese; ≥ 25 kg/m(2), obese) was performed. IR was significantly positively related to BMI and glucose tolerance, negatively related to alcohol use. Independent of obesity status, significant trends were observed between IR and alcohol use. Drinking 30 mL or more of ethanol per day reduced IR by less than 40%. Strong physical activity was associated with decreased risk of IR based on fasting plasma insulin only in the obese. Coffee consumption was inversely associated with the risk of IR based on HOMA-IR in the non-obese group. Higher coffee consumption may be protective against IR among only the non-obese. Further studies are warranted to examine the effect modification of the obesity status on the coffee-IR association.

  13. A non-traditional model of the metabolic syndrome: the adaptive significance of insulin resistance in fasting-adapted seals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorian S Houser

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance in modern society is perceived as a pathological consequence of excess energy consumption and reduced physical activity. Its presence in relation to the development of cardiovascular risk factors has been termed the metabolic syndrome, which produces increased mortality and morbidity and which is rapidly increasing in human populations. Ironically, insulin resistance likely evolved to assist animals during food shortages by increasing the availability of endogenous lipid for catabolism while protecting protein from use in gluconeogenesis and eventual oxidation. Some species that incorporate fasting as a predictable component of their life history demonstrate physiological traits similar to the metabolic syndrome during prolonged fasts. One such species is the northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris, which fasts from food and water for periods of up to three months. During this time, ~90% of the seals metabolic demands are met through fat oxidation and circulating non-esterified fatty acids are high (0.7-3.2 mM. All life history stages of elephant seal studied to date demonstrate insulin resistance and fasting hyperglycemia as well as variations in hormones and adipocytokines that reflect the metabolic syndrome to some degree. Elephant seals demonstrate some intriguing adaptations with the potential for medical advancement; for example, ketosis is negligible despite significant and prolonged fatty acid oxidation and investigation of this feature might provide insight into the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. The parallels to the metabolic syndrome are likely reflected to varying degrees in other marine mammals, most of which evolved on diets high in lipid and protein content but essentially devoid of carbohydrate. Utilization of these natural models of insulin resistance may further our understanding of the pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome in humans and better assist the development of preventative measures

  14. Insulin Treatment May Alter Fatty Acid Carriers in Placentas from Gestational Diabetes Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Palacios, Maria; Prieto-Sánchez, Maria Teresa; Ruiz-Alcaraz, Antonio José; Blanco-Carnero, José Eliseo; Sanchez-Campillo, Maria; Parrilla, Juan José; Larqué, Elvira

    2017-06-06

    There is little information available on the effect of Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) treatment (diet or insulin) on placental lipid carriers, which may influence fetal fat accretion. Insulin may activate placental insulin receptors protein kinase (AKT) and extracellular signal regulated kinase ERK mediators, which might affect lipid metabolism. Placenta was collected from 25 control women, 23 GDM-Diet and 20 GDM-Insulin. Western blotting of insulin signaling mediators and lipid carriers was performed. The human choricarcinoma-derived cell line BeWo was preincubated with insulin inhibitors protein kinase (AKT) and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and ERK inhibitors to evaluate insulin regulation of lipid carriers. Maternal serum insulin at recruitment correlated to ultrasound fetal abdominal circumference in offspring of GDM and placental endothelial lipase (EL). Lipoprotein lipase in placenta was significantly reduced in both GDM, while most of the other lipid carriers tended to higher values, although not significantly. There was a significant increase in both phosphorylated-Akt and ERK in placentas from GDM-Insulin patients; both were associated to placental fatty acid translocase (FAT), fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP), and EL. BeWo cells treated with insulin pathway inhibitors significantly reduced A-FABP, fatty acid transport protein (FATP-1), and EL levels, confirming the role of insulin on these carriers. We conclude that insulin promotes the phosphorylation of placental insulin mediators contributing to higher levels of some specific fatty acid carriers in the placenta and fetal adiposity in GDM.

  15. Alterations of sensory perceptions in healthy elderly subjects during fasting and refeeding. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Catherine; Moreau, Karine; Brandolini, Marion; Livingstone, Barbara; Beaufrère, Bernard; Boirie, Yves

    2002-01-01

    Sensory perception losses may contribute to age-related malnutrition by affecting food selection and consumption. To determine the effects of a 36-hour fast followed by a 6-hour refeeding period on sensory perceptions in 7 healthy elderly subjects (65-80 years of age) and 6 healthy young subjects (18-35 years of age). Self-perceived hunger and olfactory ratings were recorded on visual analogue scales in response to three different classes of odorant stimuli (salt, sweet and sour). Odorant stimuli were administered three times during the study, twice during the fasting period (12 and 24 h fasted) and once at the end of the re-nutrition period. A significant difference was found between the two groups for the self-perceived hunger ratings in response to the sour stimuli. A significant difference was observed between the two groups for olfactory ratings as regards the salt and sour odorant stimuli. Among the metabolic changes associated with fasting and refeeding, blood glucose was significantly related (r(2) = 0.97, p = 0.001) to the perception of hunger in the control group subjects, but no such relationship was found for the elderly subjects (r(2) = 0.16, p = NS). (1) Self-perceived hunger and olfactory ratings are specifically affected in healthy elderly. (2) Nutritional status can modulate sensory perceptions in elderly and young during the transition from fasting to refeeding. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  16. Intermittent fasting reduces body fat but exacerbates hepatic insulin resistance in young rats regardless of high protein and fat diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunmin; Yoo, Kyung Min; Hyun, Joo Suk; Kang, Suna

    2017-02-01

    Intermittent fasting (IMF) is a relatively new dietary approach to weight management, although the efficacy and adverse effects have not been full elucidated and the optimal diets for IMF are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that a one-meal-per-day intermittent fasting with high fat (HF) or protein (HP) diets can modify energy, lipid, and glucose metabolism in normal young male Sprague-Dawley rats with diet-induced obesity or overweight. Male rats aged 5 weeks received either HF (40% fat) or HP (26% protein) diets ad libitum (AL) or for 3 h at the beginning of the dark cycle (IMF) for 5 weeks. Epidydimal fat pads and fat deposits in the leg and abdomen were lower with HP and IMF. Energy expenditure at the beginning of the dark cycle, especially from fat oxidation, was higher with IMF than AL, possibly due to greater activity levels. Brown fat content was higher with IMF. Serum ghrelin levels were higher in HP-IMF than other groups, and accordingly, cumulative food intake was also higher in HP-IMF than HF-IMF. HF-IMF exhibited higher area under the curve (AUC) of serum glucose at the first part (0-40 min) during oral glucose tolerance test, whereas AUC of serum insulin levels in both parts were higher in IMF and HF. During intraperitoneal insulin tolerance test, serum glucose levels were higher with IMF than AL. Consistently, hepatic insulin signaling (GLUT2, pAkt) was attenuated and PEPCK expression was higher with IMF and HF than other groups, and HOMA-IR revealed significantly impaired attenuated insulin sensitivity in the IMF groups. However, surprisingly, hepatic and skeletal muscle glycogen storage was higher in IMF groups than AL. The higher glycogen storage in the IMF groups was associated with the lower expression of glycogen phosphorylase than the AL groups. In conclusion, IMF especially with HF increased insulin resistance, possibly by attenuating hepatic insulin signaling, and lowered glycogen phosphorylase expression despite decreased fat mass in young

  17. Impact of Insulin Resistance on Silent and Ongoing Myocardial Damage in Normal Subjects: The Takahata Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Narumi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Insulin resistance (IR is part of the metabolic syndrome (Mets that develops after lifestyle changes and obesity. Although the association between Mets and myocardial injury is well known, the effect of IR on myocardial damage remains unclear. Methods and Results. We studied 2200 normal subjects who participated in a community-based health check in the town of Takahata in northern Japan. The presence of IR was assessed by homeostasis model assessment ratio, and the serum level of heart-type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP was measured as a maker of silent and ongoing myocardial damage. H-FABP levels were significantly higher in subjects with IR and Mets than in those without metabolic disorder regardless of gender. Multivariate logistic analysis showed that the presence of IR was independently associated with latent myocardial damage (odds ratio: 1.574, 95% confidence interval 1.1–2.3 similar to the presence of Mets. Conclusions. In a screening of healthy subjects, IR and Mets were similarly related to higher H-FABP levels, suggesting that there may be an asymptomatic population in the early stages of metabolic disorder that is exposed to myocardial damage and might be susceptible to silent heart failure.

  18. Serum leptin levels in acromegaly--a significant role for adipose tissue and fasting insulin/glucose ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolanowski, Marek; Milewicz, Andrzej; Bidzińska, Bozena; Jedrzejuk, Diana; Daroszewski, Jacek; Mikulski, Emil

    2002-10-01

    Leptin plays an important role in controlling satiety and maintaining energy balance. Acromegaly is characterized by decreased fat, which increases after the disease is cured. Our objective was to investigate serum leptin in acromegaly in terms of disease activity, body fat content, insulin and glucose levels, and selected anthropometric variables. We examined 40 patients with acromegaly and 20 sex- and age-matched controls for the levels of serum GH, IGF-I, leptin, glucose, and insulin, and for body composition by DEXA, BMI and WHR. In 10 cases the acute effect on serum leptin of a somatostatin analogue, lanreotide, was studied. We observed lower leptin in patients with active acromegaly than in cured patients and controls. Body fat was higher in cured than active patients. In the patients, we found significant correlations (p<0.05) between leptin and percent body fat (r=0.77), leptin and body fat mass (r=0.74), leptin and fasting insulin (r=0.62), leptin and fasting insulin/glucose ratio (r=0.97), leptin and BMI (r=0.44), leptin and height (r=-0.47). In the controls there was a significant correlation (p<0.05) only between leptin and WHR (r=-0.45). A paradoxical decrease of the leptin level after lanreotide was observed in 7 out of 10 patients with active acromegaly. Changes in leptin release in acromegaly are related to differences in body fat content and mass, and in insulin resistance. Leptin in acromegaly is not influenced directly by GH or IGF-I secretion. The acute effect of medical treatment of acromegaly by a somatostatin analogue on leptin levels differs from the effect of a radical cure following pituitary adenoma surgery.

  19. Fasting gall bladder volume and lithogenicity in relation to glucose tolerance, total and intra-abdominal fat masses in obese non-diabetic subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendel, H W; Højgaard, L; Andersen, T

    1998-01-01

    with a specific radioimmunoassay. Insulin sensitivity was measured by the Minimal Model and glucose tolerance by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Serum lipid concentrations were measured by standard methods. RESULTS: The gallbladder volume in the fasting state increased with increasing intra-abdominal fat......OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether total body fat mass or fat distribution and associated metabolic disturbances in glucose and lipid metabolism influence the well known gallstone pathogenetic factors in obese subjects in order to explain why some obese subjects develop gallstones and some do not....... DESIGN: Cross sectional study of gallstone pathogenetic factors, body composition, fat distribution, glucose and lipid metabolism. SUBJECTS: 57 healthy overweight subjects (aged 26-64y, body mass index (BMI) 30-45 kg/m2). MEASUREMENTS: Total and intra-abdominal fat masses were measured by dual X...

  20. Is fasting leptin associated with insulin resistance among nondiabetic individuals? The Miami Community Health Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donahue, R P; Prineas, R J; Donahue, R D

    1999-01-01

    Whether serum leptin levels are associated with insulin resistance independent of the effects of hyperinsulinemia and adiposity is an important unanswered question. We examined the relationship between the rate of insulin-mediated glucose uptake and serum leptin concentrations among nondiabetic men...

  1. Prolonged Fasting Identifies Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Dysfunction as Consequence Rather Than Cause of Human Insulin Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeks, J.; Herpen, N.A.; Mensink, M.R.; Moonen-Kornips, E.; Beurden, van D.; Hesselink, M.K.C.; Schrauwen, P.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE-Type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance have been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, but it is debated whether this is a primary factor in the pathogenesis of the disease. To test the concept that mitochondrial dysfunction is secondary to the development of insulin resistance, we

  2. Fasting induces impairment of gastric mucosal integrity in non-insulin-dependent diabetic (db/db) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, M; Igarashi, S; Kume, E; Saito, N; Arakawa, K

    2000-03-01

    Although diabetic patients often have gastrointestinal complications, the gastric mucosal function in diabetes has not been well documented. To investigate the effect of fasting on the gastric mucosa in C57BL/KsJ-db +/+ db (db/db) mice, genetically non-insulin-dependent diabetic animals. Blood glucose levels, gastric mucosal morphology, and the amount of gastric mucin were examined before and after 18 h of fasting with free access to water in db/db mice and their non-diabetic littermates (db/m). Although 18 h of fasting reduced the blood glucose levels of both db/db and db/m mice, fasting decreased the amount of gastric adherent mucin and caused haemorrhagic gastric lesions only in db/db mice. After fasting, oral administration of ethanol induced much more severe gastric damage in db/db than in db/m mice. The above fasting-induced gastric damage such as haemorrhagic lesions, loss of the mucin, and the increased sensitivity to ethanol worsened as the duration of diabetes became longer. Glucose ingestion in drinking water during the fasting counteracted the fall in blood glucose and prevented the decrease in the amount of gastric mucin and the formation of gastric mucosal lesions in db/db mice. These findings indicate that fasting-induced glucose deficit causes gastric mucosal lesions and increases the susceptibility of gastric mucosa to noxious agents owing to the loss of mucus glycoprotein in db/db mice. Prolonged diabetes is likely to augment the severity of fasting-induced impairment of the gastric mucosal function.

  3. Fasting Glucose to Leptin Ratio as a New Diagnostic Marker in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayah S. Baban

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Overall, the glucose/leptin ratio can be used in addition to glucose/insulin ratio, Quantitative Insulin-Sensitivity Check Index, and Homeostasis Model Assessment to accurately assess insulin resistance in subjects with hyperglycemia.Objectives: To identify the fasting glucose/leptin ratio as a new simple method for the detection of insulin resistance in Iraqi diabetes mellitus patients, and to examine its usefulness as a new marker for insulin resistance.Methods: A case control study conducted at the National Diabetes Center, College of Medicine at Al-Mustansiryia University from 1 August 2008 to 30 January 2010. An enzyme spectrophotometric method was used to determine fasting glucose, while HPLC Technique determined leptin and insulin hormones in serum of patients with diabetes mellitus (n=61 and normal healthy subjects as controls (n=63.Results: A positive significant correlation with linear regression equations were found between fasting insulin and fasting leptin hormones, and fasting glucose/insulin and fasting glucose/leptin ratios among the diabetic patient group. While negative, significant correlations were found with linear regression equations between fasting insulin and fasting glucose/insulin ratio, and fasting insulin and fasting glucose/leptin ratio in patients group. Glucopse/leptin ratio had a higher sensitivity compared to glucose/insulin ratio, Quantitative Insulin-Sensitivity Check Index and Homeostasis Model Assessment indexes.

  4. Elevated risk of an intermediate or high SYNTAX score in subjects with impaired fasting glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xishan; Liu, Hui; Yang, Fangfang; Dong, Pingshuan; Fa, Xianen; Zhang, Qingyong; Li, Li; Wang, Zhikuan; Zhao, Di

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the SYNTAX score under different fasting plasma glucose (FPG) states in Chinese patients undergoing coronary angiography, particularly subjects with impaired FPG. Four hundred and forty-six subjects undergoing coronary angiography were enrolled in this study and divided into four groups based on the FPG level or a history of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM): normal FPG, impaired FPG, known and previously unknown T2DM. The angiographic SYNTAX scores were higher in the subjects with known (pimportance of achieving better glycemic control in order to prevent coronary atherosclerosis and improve the cardiovascular prognosis.

  5. Meta-analysis investigating associations between healthy diet and fasting glucose and insulin levels and modification by loci associated with glucose homeostasis in data from 15 cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whether loci that influence fasting glucose (FG) and fasting insulin (FI) levels, as identified by genome-wide association studies, modify associations of diet with FG or FI is unknown. We utilized data from 15 US and European cohort studies comprising 51,289 persons without diabetes to test whether...

  6. Effect of home-based exercise intervention on fasting insulin and Adipocytokines in colorectal cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, Dong-Il; Kang, Dong-Woo; Park, Ji-Hye; Ahn, Ki-Yong; In Yang, Hyuk; Lee, Dong Hoon; Roh, Yun Ho; Lee, Ji-Won; Chu, Sang-Hui; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Jones, Lee W; Kim, Nam-Kyu; Jeon, Justin Y

    2017-11-01

    Elevated circulating insulin is associated with increased risk of recurrence and cancer mortality in early-stage colorectal cancer (CRC). We conducted a randomized controlled trial to determine the effect of a 12-week home-based exercise program on fasting insulin, adipocytokines, and physical function in CRC survivors. One hundred and twenty-three stage II-III CRC patients were randomly assigned to either a home-based exercise (n=62) or standard care control group (n=61) for 12weeks. Home-based exercise consisted of aerobic and resistance training, with a goal of obtaining ≥18 metabolic equivalent task (MET)-h/wk. Participants in the exercise group were instructed to participate in >18MET-h/wk. of aerobic and resistance exercise while the participants in the control group were asked to maintain their usual daily activity. The primary outcome was fasting insulin levels. Secondary outcomes were adiponectin, TNF-α levels and 6min walk distance from baseline to post-intervention. After the 12-weeks, moderate-vigorous physical activity participation increased from 9.1±14.7MET-h/wk. to 26.6±21.7MET-h/wk. in the exercise group, with no change in the control group (pexercise group with no change in the control group (p=0.022 for group and time interaction). A similar trend was observed in TNF-α (p=0.030 for group and time interaction). Six minute walk distance increased by 25.2m in the exercise group with no change in the control group (p=0.061 for group and time interaction). The 12week home-based exercise program increased level of physical activity and decreased circulating insulin levels in CRC survivors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Legume consumption and its association with fasting glucose, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in the Indian Migration Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Preet K; Bowen, Liza; Kinra, Sanjay; Bharathi, Ankalmadugu Venkatsubbareddy; Agrawal, Sutapa; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Reddy, Kolli Srinath; Ebrahim, Shah

    2016-11-01

    Legume consumption is associated with lower fasting glucose (FG) and insulin levels in nutrition trials and lower CVD mortality in large-scale epidemiological studies. In India, legumes are widely consumed in various preparations, yet no epidemiological study has evaluated the association of legumes with FG levels, insulin resistance and diabetes risk. The present study aimed to fill this gap. Fasting blood samples, in-person interviews to obtain information on demographic/socio-economic factors, physical activity, alcohol and tobacco use, and anthropometric measurements were collected. Dietary intakes were assessed by an interviewer-administered, validated, semi-quantitative FFQ. Lucknow, Nagpur, Hyderabad and Bangalore, India. Men and women (n 6367) aged 15-76 years - urban residents, urban migrants and their rural siblings. In multivariate random-effects models adjusted for age, BMI, total energy intake, macronutrients, physical activity and rural/migration status, daily legume consumption was not associated with FG (P-for-trend=0·78), insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment score; P-for-trend=0·73) or the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (P-for-trend=0·41). Stratified analyses by vegetarian diet and migration status did not change the findings. Inverse associations between legumes and FG emerged for participants with lower BMI and higher carbohydrate, protein, fat and sugar intakes. Although legumes are essential in traditional Indian diets, as well as in prudent and Mediterranean diets in the West, we did not find an association between legumes and markers of glycaemic control, insulin resistance or diabetes, except for subgroups based on BMI and macronutrient intake. The ubiquitous presence and complexity of legume preparations in Indian diets may contribute to these findings.

  8. Simultaneous observation of the GnRH pulse generator activity and plasma concentrations of metabolites and insulin during fasting and subsequent refeeding periods in Shiba goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Shuichi; Ohkura, Satoshi; Ichimaru, Toru; Sakurai, Katsuyasu; Tsukamura, Hiroko; Maeda, Kei-ichiro; Okamura, Hiroaki

    2004-12-01

    The time course of GnRH pulse generator activity and plasma concentrations of energy substrates and insulin were simultaneously observed in female goats during 4-day fasting and subsequent refeeding in the presence or absence of estrogen for a better understanding of the mechanism of energetic control of gonadotropin secretion in ruminants. The GnRH pulse generator activity was electrophysiologically assessed with the intervals of characteristic increases in multiple-unit activity (MUA volleys) in the mediobasal hypothalamus. In estradiol-treated ovariectomized (OVX+E2) goats, the MUA volley intervals increased as fasting progressed. Plasma concentrations of non-esterified fatty acid and ketone body increased, while those of acetic acid and insulin decreased during fasting. The MUA volley intervals and plasma concentrations of those metabolites and insulin were restored to pre-fasting levels after subsequent refeeding. In ovariectomized (OVX) goats, changes in plasma metabolites and insulin concentrations were similar to those in OVX+E2 goats, but the MUA volley intervals were not altered. The present results demonstrated that fasting suppressed GnRH pulse generator activity in an estrogen-dependent manner. Changes in plasma concentrations of energy substrates and insulin during fasting were associated with the GnRH pulse generator activity in the presence of estrogen, but not in the absence of the steroid in female goats.

  9. Insulin resistance is accompanied by increased von Willebrand factor levels in nondiabetic women: a study of offspring of type 2 diabetic subjects compared to offspring of nondiabetic subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Anne-Catherine; Vestbo, Else; Frøland, Anders

    2002-01-01

    : We compared vWF, fibrinogen and fibronectin in 88 nondiabetic offspring of type 2 diabetic subjects (relatives) and 103 offspring of nondiabetic subjects (controls). Other measurements included urinary albumin excretion rate, blood pressure, lipid profile and insulin resistance using homeostasis......OBJECTIVES: To examine whether levels of von Willebrand factor (vWF), fibrinogen and fibronectin are related to a parental history of type 2 diabetes and to determine possible explanatory factors for high versus low vWF and fibrinogen. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SUBJECTS, MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES...

  10. [Strength training improves insulin sensitivity and plasma lipid levels without altering body composition in overweight and obese subjects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernán Jiménez, Oscar; Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson

    2011-04-01

    To assess the effect of long-term strength training on insulin sensitivity, lipid profile, and body composition in overweight and obese subjects. A prospective, randomized, interventional study in 16 overweight or obese subjects aged 18-35years who were investigated before and at the end of 8weeks of strength training. The experimental group (n=8) followed a strength training program consisting of 4 sessions per week at 50% to 80% of repetition maximum (RM), estimated through the 1RM test. The control group (n=8) did not perform the training program. Glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-C, VLDL-C, and LDL-C levels and arterial index were determined. Insulin sensitivity was measured by calculating HOMA-IR (Homeostatic Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance). Indicators of body composition included weight, height, waist circumference, body fat, fat weight, muscle mass, somatotype chart and distance. At the end of intervention, the experimental group showed a decrease of insulin sensitivity (3.5±0.9 vs. 2.9±1.2; p=0.04), LDL-C (106.9±20.8 vs. 95.5±14.2; p=0.03), and arterial index (4.0±0.6 vs. 3.5±0.5; p=0.01), as well as an increase in HDL-C levels (43.7±8.8 vs. 46.9±5.6; p=0.04), while the control group remained stable. There were no significant differences between groups in body composition, somatotype chart and distance after training. In overweight and obese subjects, strength training for eight weeks improved insulin sensitivity and lipid profile without altering body composition. Copyright © 2011 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Subjects with Impaired Fasting Glucose: Evolution in a Period of 6 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, E.; Mujica, V.; Orrego, R.; Wehinger, S.; Soto, A.; Icaza, G.; Vásquez, M.; Díaz, L.; Andrews, M.; Arredondo, M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To study the evolution of impaired fasting glucose (IFG), considering glucose and HbA1c levels and risk factors associated, in a period of 6 years. Methods. We studied 94 subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) that were diagnosed in 2005 and followed up to 2012. Glucose and HbA1c levels were determined. A descriptive analysis of contingence charts was performed in order to study the evolution in the development of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Results. Twenty-eight of ninety-four subjects became T2DM; 51/94 remained with IFG; and 20/94 presented normal fasting glucose. From the 28 diabetic subjects, 9 had already developed diabetes and were under treatment with oral hypoglycemic agents; 5 were diagnosed with plasma glucose < 126 mg/dL, but with HbA1c over 6.5%. In those who developed diabetes, 15/28 had a family history of T2DM in first relative degree. Also, diabetic subjects had a BMI significantly higher than nodiabetics (t test: P < 0.01). The individuals that in 2005 had the highest BMI are those who currently have diabetes. Conclusion. The IFG constitutes a condition of high risk of developing T2DM in a few years, especially over 110 mg/dL and in obesity patients. PMID:25215305

  12. Subjects with Impaired Fasting Glucose: Evolution in a Period of 6 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Leiva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the evolution of impaired fasting glucose (IFG, considering glucose and HbA1c levels and risk factors associated, in a period of 6 years. Methods. We studied 94 subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG that were diagnosed in 2005 and followed up to 2012. Glucose and HbA1c levels were determined. A descriptive analysis of contingence charts was performed in order to study the evolution in the development of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Results. Twenty-eight of ninety-four subjects became T2DM; 51/94 remained with IFG; and 20/94 presented normal fasting glucose. From the 28 diabetic subjects, 9 had already developed diabetes and were under treatment with oral hypoglycemic agents; 5 were diagnosed with plasma glucose < 126 mg/dL, but with HbA1c over 6.5%. In those who developed diabetes, 15/28 had a family history of T2DM in first relative degree. Also, diabetic subjects had a BMI significantly higher than nodiabetics (t test: P < 0.01. The individuals that in 2005 had the highest BMI are those who currently have diabetes. Conclusion. The IFG constitutes a condition of high risk of developing T2DM in a few years, especially over 110 mg/dL and in obesity patients.

  13. Prognostic implications of fasting plasma glucose in subjects with echocardiographic abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pareek, Manan; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Bhatt, Deepak L

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: To examine whether baseline fasting plasma glucose (FPG) modifies the prognostic role of left ventricular (LV) mass, geometric pattern, and diastolic function, for prediction of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. METHODS: Population-based cohort study comprising of 1047 men and 456 women...... proportional-hazards regression with interaction analysis was used to evaluate the risk associated with FPG and LV structure and function. RESULTS: Median age was 67years, and 31% had impaired fasting glucose, 31% diabetes, 17% LV hypertrophy, and 40% diastolic dysfunction. During a median follow-up duration.......001), and with the association between diastolic dysfunction and event risk (P=0.02), including grade 2 or 3 dysfunction (P=0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Echocardiographic abnormalities were more strongly associated with an adverse prognosis among subjects with impaired fasting glucose or diabetes....

  14. Effects of sex steroids on components of the insulin resistance syndrome in transsexual subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbers, Jolanda M H; Giltay, Erik J; Teerlink, Tom; Scheffer, Peter G; Asscheman, Henk; Seidell, Jacob C; Gooren, Louis J G

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Sex differences are found in most components of the insulin resistance syndrome and the associated cardiovascular risk profile. These differences are attributed to sex-specific sex steroid profiles, but the effects of sex steroids on the individual components of the insulin resistance

  15. Effects of sex steroids on components of the insulin resistance syndrome in transsexual subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbers, J.M.H.; Giltay, E.J.; Teerlink, T.; Scheffer, P.G.; Asscheman, H.; Seidell, J.C.; Gooren, L.J.G.

    2003-01-01

    objective Sex differences are found in most components of the insulin resistance syndrome and the associated cardiovascular risk profile. These differences are attributed to sex-specific sex steroid profiles, but the effects of sex steroids on the individual components of the insulin resistance

  16. Kinetics of insulin disappearance from plasma in cortisone-treated normal subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellemann, K; Thorsteinsson, B; Fugleberg, S

    1987-01-01

    The effect of glucocorticoid excess on insulin disappearance from plasma was examined in eight normal men during cortisone treatment (50 mg orally twice daily for 4 d) and in the absence of any medication (control) in random order. Constant infusion of insulin (1-5 mU/kg/min) was used to achieve ...

  17. Comparison of Attitudes Regarding Quality of Life between Insulin-Treated Subjects with Diabetes Mellitus and Healthy Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Hashemi Hefz Abad

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDiabetes mellitus is a chronic disease and one of the main causes of mortality in developing countries. The main objective of treating all chronic diseases, of course, is to improve well-being and attain a satisfactory quality of life (QOL. The major goal of this study is comparison of attitude toward QOL in insulin-dependent subjects with diabetes mellitus and healthy subjects.MethodsIn this study, insulin-dependent subjects with diabetes mellitus and healthy subjects were gathered via convenience sampling. The subjects were asked to complete the Hanestad & Albrektsen Attitude to Quality of Life Questionnaire. The questionnaire evaluates five quality of life dimensions-physical, social, mental-emotional, behavioral-activity, and economic-using a scoring system similar to the Likert scale. The Wilcoxon test was used to compare scores between the two groups.ResultsThe mean total score on attitude toward QOL in the healthy control group was 53.8, and it in the insulin-dependent subjects with diabetes mellitus group was 35.9. The mean total score of attitude toward QOL in the physical dimension, mental-emotional and feelings of well-being dimension, and behavioral-activity dimension were significantly higher in the healthy population than they were in diabetes mellitus groups. Such a difference was not seen in the social and economic dimensions.ConclusionSince the attitudes of insulin-dependent subjects with diabetes mellitus toward QOL are used as an index of individual and societal health levels, it appears that this group may benefit from education and professional counseling to improve their QOLs.

  18. Euphorbia kansui Attenuates Insulin Resistance in Obese Human Subjects and High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Wook Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obesity is a main cause of insulin resistance (IR, metabolic syndrome, and fatty liver diseases. This study evaluated Euphorbia kansui radix (Euphorbia as a potential treatment option for obesity and obesity-induced IR in obese human and high-fat diet- (HFD- induced obese mice. Methods. In the human study, we analyzed the body weight change of 14 patients who took a single dose of 6 g of Euphorbia powder. In the animal study, male mice were divided into three groups: normal chow, HFD, and Euphorbia (high-fat diet and 100 mg/Kg Euphorbia once per week. Body weight, epididymal fat pad weight, fasting blood glucose, fasting insulin, HOMA-IR, and oral glucose tolerance test were measured. Also, macrophage infiltration and expression of CD68, tumor necrosis factor- (TNF- α, interferon- (IFN- γ, and interleukin- (IL- 6 genes in the liver and adipose tissue were analyzed. Results. The human study showed that Euphorbia has a potential effect on body weight loss. In the in vivo study, body weight, epididymal fat weight, glucose level, IR, expression of CD68, TNF-α, IFN-r, and IL-6 genes, and macrophages in liver and adipose tissue were significantly reduced by Euphorbia. Conclusions. These results suggest that Euphorbia attenuates obesity and insulin resistance via anti-inflammatory effects.

  19. Effects of antihypertensive drugs losartan and levamlodipine besylate on insulin resistance in patients with essential hypertension combined with isolated impaired fasting glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wei-Yin; Ning, Ning; Tan, Ming-Hong; Jiang, Xue-Shu; Zhou, Liang; Liu, Ling; Yi, Dong; Wei, Ping

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to observe the antihypertensive effect of losartan and levamlodipine besylate on insulin resistance in patients with essential hypertension (EH) combined with isolated impaired fasting glucose (i-IFG). Patients (n=244) were randomly assigned to losartan potassium tablets (50-100 mg per day) or levamlodipine besylate tablets (2.5-5.0 mg per day) for intensive antihypertensive treatment with no lifestyle interventions for 3 years. The changes in fasting plasma glucose, fasting insulin (FINS) and insulin sensitivity index (ISI) from before to after treatment were observed. Blood pressure (BP) in each group was significantly reduced by treatment (Plosartan potassium group was significantly decreased and ISI was significantly increased compared with before treatment (P0.05). The incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus was not significantly different between two groups. The antihypertensive effect of losartan and levamlodipine besylate could amoliorate insulin resistance in patients with EH combined with i-IFG. The improvement of insulin resistance by losartan potassium at 12 months might be better than that by levamlodipine besylate; however, after 24 and 36 months of follow-up, both agents significantly alleviated insulin resistance. These results suggest that the effects of these two drugs on insulin resistance are not significantly different.

  20. Baseline levels, and changes over time in body mass index and fasting insulin, and their relationship to change in metabolic trait clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Martin K; Sullivan, Lisa M; Fox, Caroline S; Wilson, Peter W F; Nathan, David M; Vasan, Ramachandran S; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Meigs, James B

    2014-09-01

    Multiple abnormal metabolic traits are found together or "cluster" within individuals more often than is predicted by chance. The individual and combined role of adiposity and insulin resistance (IR) on metabolic trait clustering is uncertain. We tested the hypothesis that change in trait clustering is a function of both baseline level and change in these measures. In 2616 nondiabetic Framingham Offspring Study participants, body mass index (BMI) and fasting insulin were related to a within-person 7-year change in a trait score of 0-4 Adult Treatment Panel III metabolic syndrome traits (hypertension, high triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hyperglycemia). At baseline assessment, mean trait score was 1.4 traits, and 7-year mean (SEM) change in trait score was +0.25 (0.02) traits, Pfasting insulin were similarly related to trait score change. In models adjusted for age-sex-baseline cluster score, 7-year change in trait score was significantly related to both a 1-quintile difference in baseline BMI (0.07 traits) and fasting insulin (0.18 traits), and to both a 1-quintile 7-year increase in BMI (0.21 traits) and fasting insulin (0.18 traits). Change in metabolic trait clustering was significantly associated with baseline levels and changes in both BMI and fasting insulin, highlighting the importance of both obesity and IR in the clustering of metabolic traits.

  1. Fasting and refeeding differentially regulate NLRP3 inflammasome activation in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traba, Javier; Kwarteng-Siaw, Miriam; Okoli, Tracy C; Li, Jessica; Huffstutler, Rebecca D; Bray, Amanda; Waclawiw, Myron A; Han, Kim; Pelletier, Martin; Sauve, Anthony A; Siegel, Richard M; Sack, Michael N

    2015-11-03

    Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome is associated with metabolic dysfunction, and intermittent fasting has been shown to improve clinical presentation of NLRP3 inflammasome-linked diseases. As mitochondrial perturbations, which function as a damage-associated molecular pattern, exacerbate NLRP3 inflammasome activation, we investigated whether fasting blunts inflammasome activation via sirtuin-mediated augmentation of mitochondrial integrity. We performed a clinical study of 19 healthy volunteers. Each subject underwent a 24-hour fast and then was fed a fixed-calorie meal. Blood was drawn during the fasted and fed states and analyzed for NRLP3 inflammasome activation. We enrolled an additional group of 8 healthy volunteers to assess the effects of the sirtuin activator, nicotinamide riboside, on NLRP3 inflammasome activation. In the fasting/refeeding study, individuals showed less NLRP3 inflammasome activation in the fasted state compared with that in refed conditions. In a human macrophage line, depletion of the mitochondrial-enriched sirtuin deacetylase SIRT3 increased NLRP3 inflammasome activation in association with excessive mitochondrial ROS production. Furthermore, genetic and pharmacologic SIRT3 activation blunted NLRP3 activity in parallel with enhanced mitochondrial function in cultured cells and in leukocytes extracted from healthy volunteers and from refed individuals but not in those collected during fasting. Together, our data indicate that nutrient levels regulate the NLRP3 inflammasome, in part through SIRT3-mediated mitochondrial homeostatic control. Moreover, these results suggest that deacetylase-dependent inflammasome attenuation may be amenable to targeting in human disease. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02122575 and NCT00442195. Division of Intramural Research, NHLBI of the NIH.

  2. Intermittent fasting during Ramadan attenuates proinflammatory cytokines and immune cells in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Mo'ez Al-Islam E; Kacimi, Safia; Al-Kurd, Ref'at A; Fararjeh, Mohammad A; Bustanji, Yasser K; Mohammad, Mohammad K; Salem, Mohammad L

    2012-12-01

    Intermittent fasting and caloric restriction have been shown to extend life expectancy and reduce inflammation and cancer promotion in animal models. It was hypothesized that intermittent prolonged fasting practiced during the month of Ramadan (RIF) could positively affect the inflammatory state. To investigate this hypothesis, a cross-sectional study was designed to investigate the impact of RIF on selected inflammatory cytokines and immune biomarkers in healthy subjects. Fifty (21 men and 29 women) healthy volunteers who practiced Ramadan fasting were recruited for the investigation of circulating proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor α), immune cells (total leukocytes, monocytes, granulocytes, and lymphocytes), and anthropometric and dietary assessments. The investigations were conducted 1 week before Ramadan fasting, at the end of the third week of Ramadan, and 1 month after the cessation of Ramadan month. The proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor α; systolic and diastolic blood pressures; body weight; and body fat percentage were significantly lower (P fasting. Immune cells significantly decreased during Ramadan but still remained within the reference ranges. These results indicate that RIF attenuates inflammatory status of the body by suppressing proinflammatory cytokine expression and decreasing body fat and circulating levels of leukocytes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluating the cost-effectiveness of reduced mild hypoglycaemia in subjects with Type 1 diabetes treated with insulin detemir or NPH insulin in Denmark, Sweden, Finland and the Netherlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentine, W J; Jendle, J; Saraheimo, M

    2012-01-01

    -effectiveness based on mild (self-treated) hypoglycaemia and pharmacy costs over 1 year. Published rates of mild hypoglycaemia were used for NPH insulin and insulin detemir. Effectiveness was calculated in terms of quality-adjusted life expectancy. Pharmacy costs were accounted using published prices and defined......Diabet. Med. 29, 303-312 (2012) ABSTRACT: Aims To estimate short-term cost-effectiveness of insulin detemir vs. NPH insulin based on the incidence of mild hypoglycaemia in subjects with Type 1 diabetes in Denmark, Sweden, Finland and the Netherlands. Methods A model was developed to evaluate cost...... daily doses for both insulins. Costs were expressed in 2010 euros (€). Results Treatment with insulin detemir was associated with fewer mild hypoglycaemic events than NPH insulin (mean rates of 26.3 vs. 35.5 events per person-year), leading to an improvement in mean quality-adjusted life expectancy...

  4. Quantification of beta-cell function during IVGTT in Type II and non-diabetic subjects: assessment of insulin secretion by mathematical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, L L; Vølund, A; Madsbad, Sten

    2001-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We compared four methods to assess their accuracy in measuring insulin secretion during an intravenous glucose tolerance test in patients with Type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus and with varying beta-cell function and matched control subjects. METHODS: Eight control...... subjects and eight Type II diabetic patients underwent an intravenous glucose tolerance test with tolbutamide and an intravenous bolus injection of C-peptide to assess C-peptide kinetics. Insulin secretion rates were determined by the Eaton deconvolution (reference method), the Insulin SECretion method......-phase insulin response (r = 0.78). The two-compartment combined model failed to provide reliable estimates of insulin secretion in three of the control subjects and in two patients with Type II diabetes. The four methods were accurate with respect to mean basal and first-phase secretion response. The one...

  5. Interactions of dietary whole-grain intake with fasting glucose- and insulin-related genetic loci in individuals of European descent: a meta-analysis of 14 cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettleton, Jennifer A; McKeown, Nicola M; Kanoni, Stavroula; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Hivert, Marie-France; Ngwa, Julius; van Rooij, Frank J A; Sonestedt, Emily; Wojczynski, Mary K; Ye, Zheng; Tanaka, Tosh; Garcia, Melissa; Anderson, Jennifer S; Follis, Jack L; Djousse, Luc; Mukamal, Kenneth; Papoutsakis, Constantina; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Zillikens, M Carola; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Amanda J; Borecki, Ingrid B; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferrucci, Luigi; Forouhi, Nita G; Groves, Christopher J; Hallmans, Goran; Harris, Tamara; Hofman, Albert; Houston, Denise K; Hu, Frank B; Johansson, Ingegerd; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Langenberg, Claudia; Launer, Lenore; Liu, Yongmei; Loos, Ruth J; Nalls, Michael; Orho-Melander, Marju; Renstrom, Frida; Rice, Kenneth; Riserus, Ulf; Rolandsson, Olov; Rotter, Jerome I; Saylor, Georgia; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Sjogren, Per; Smith, Albert; Steingrímsdóttir, Laufey; Uitterlinden, André G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Prokopenko, Inga; Pankow, James S; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Florez, Jose C; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Dupuis, Josée; Dedoussis, George V; Ordovas, Jose M; Ingelsson, Erik; Cupples, L Adrienne; Siscovick, David S; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B

    2010-12-01

    Whole-grain foods are touted for multiple health benefits, including enhancing insulin sensitivity and reducing type 2 diabetes risk. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with fasting glucose and insulin concentrations in individuals free of diabetes. We tested the hypothesis that whole-grain food intake and genetic variation interact to influence concentrations of fasting glucose and insulin. Via meta-analysis of data from 14 cohorts comprising ∼ 48,000 participants of European descent, we studied interactions of whole-grain intake with loci previously associated in GWAS with fasting glucose (16 loci) and/or insulin (2 loci) concentrations. For tests of interaction, we considered a P value fasting glucose and insulin concentrations independent of demographics, other dietary and lifestyle factors, and BMI (β [95% CI] per 1-serving-greater whole-grain intake: -0.009 mmol/l glucose [-0.013 to -0.005], P fasting insulin (P = 0.006), where greater whole-grain intake was associated with a smaller reduction in fasting insulin concentrations in those with the insulin-raising allele. Our results support the favorable association of whole-grain intake with fasting glucose and insulin and suggest a potential interaction between variation in GCKR and whole-grain intake in influencing fasting insulin concentrations.

  6. Could Intermittent Energy Restriction and Intermittent Fasting Reduce Rates of Cancer in Obese, Overweight, and Normal-Weight Subjects? A Summary of Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvie, Michelle N; Howell, Tony

    2016-07-01

    Animal studies and human observational data link energy restriction (ER) to reduced rates of carcinogenesis. Most of these studies have involved continuous energy restriction (CER), but there is increasing public and scientific interest in the potential health and anticancer effects of intermittent energy restriction (IER) or intermittent fasting (IF), which comprise periods of marked ER or total fasting interspersed with periods of normal eating. This review summarizes animal studies that assessed tumor rates with IER and IF compared with CER or ad libitum feed consumption. The relevance of these animal data to human cancer is also considered by summarizing available human studies of the effects of IER or IF compared with CER on cancer biomarkers in obese, overweight, and normal-weight subjects. IER regimens that include periods of ER alternating with ad libitum feed consumption for 1, 2, or 3 wk have been reported to be superior to CER in reducing tumor rates in most spontaneous mice tumor models. Limited human data from short-term studies (≤6 mo) in overweight and obese subjects have shown that IER can lead to greater improvements in insulin sensitivity (homeostasis model assessment) than can CER, with comparable reductions in adipokines and inflammatory markers and minor changes in the insulin-like growth factor axis. There are currently no data comparing IER or IF with CER in normal-weight subjects. The benefits of IER in these short-term trials are of interest, but not sufficient evidence to recommend the use of IER above CER. Longer-term human studies of adherence to and efficacy and safety of IER are required in obese and overweight subjects, as well as normal-weight subjects. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  7. Could Intermittent Energy Restriction and Intermittent Fasting Reduce Rates of Cancer in Obese, Overweight, and Normal-Weight Subjects? A Summary of Evidence12

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies and human observational data link energy restriction (ER) to reduced rates of carcinogenesis. Most of these studies have involved continuous energy restriction (CER), but there is increasing public and scientific interest in the potential health and anticancer effects of intermittent energy restriction (IER) or intermittent fasting (IF), which comprise periods of marked ER or total fasting interspersed with periods of normal eating. This review summarizes animal studies that assessed tumor rates with IER and IF compared with CER or ad libitum feed consumption. The relevance of these animal data to human cancer is also considered by summarizing available human studies of the effects of IER or IF compared with CER on cancer biomarkers in obese, overweight, and normal-weight subjects. IER regimens that include periods of ER alternating with ad libitum feed consumption for 1, 2, or 3 wk have been reported to be superior to CER in reducing tumor rates in most spontaneous mice tumor models. Limited human data from short-term studies (≤6 mo) in overweight and obese subjects have shown that IER can lead to greater improvements in insulin sensitivity (homeostasis model assessment) than can CER, with comparable reductions in adipokines and inflammatory markers and minor changes in the insulin-like growth factor axis. There are currently no data comparing IER or IF with CER in normal-weight subjects. The benefits of IER in these short-term trials are of interest, but not sufficient evidence to recommend the use of IER above CER. Longer-term human studies of adherence to and efficacy and safety of IER are required in obese and overweight subjects, as well as normal-weight subjects. PMID:27422504

  8. Insulin resistance after a 72-h fast is associated with impaired AS160 phosphorylation and accumulation of lipid and glycogen in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelbo, M; Clasen, B F F; Treebak, Jonas Thue

    2012-01-01

    . This was associated with accumulation of both lipid and glycogen in skeletal muscle. Intracellular insulin signaling to glucose transport was impaired by regulation of phosphorylation at specific sites on AS160 but not TBC1D1, both key regulators of glucose uptake. In contrast, fasting did not impact phosphorylation...... transport. In addition, substrate oxidation, skeletal muscle lipid content, regulation of glycogen synthesis, and AMPK signaling were assessed. Skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity was reduced profoundly in response to a 72-h fast and substrate oxidation shifted to predominantly lipid oxidation...... of AMPK or insulin regulation of Akt, both of which are established upstream kinases of AS160. These findings show that insulin resistance in muscles from healthy individuals is associated with suppression of site-specific phosphorylation of AS160, without Akt or AMPK being affected. This impairment of AS...

  9. Effect of whey on blood glucose and insulin responses to composite breakfast and lunch meals in type 2 diabetic subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frid, Anders H; Nilsson, Mikael; Holst, Jens Juul

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whey proteins have insulinotropic effects and reduce the postprandial glycemia in healthy subjects. The mechanism is not known, but insulinogenic amino acids and the incretin hormones seem to be involved. OBJECTIVE: The aim was to evaluate whether supplementation of meals with a high ...... insulin release and reduces postprandial blood glucose excursion after a lunch meal consisting of mashed potatoes and meatballs in type 2 diabetic subjects....... glycemic index (GI) with whey proteins may increase insulin secretion and improve blood glucose control in type 2 diabetic subjects. DESIGN: Fourteen diet-treated subjects with type 2 diabetes were served a high-GI breakfast (white bread) and subsequent high-GI lunch (mashed potatoes with meatballs......). The breakfast and lunch meals were supplemented with whey on one day; whey was exchanged for lean ham and lactose on another day. Venous blood samples were drawn before and during 4 h after breakfast and 3 h after lunch for the measurement of blood glucose, serum insulin, glucose-dependent insulinotropic...

  10. Histopathological nerve and skeletal muscle changes in rats subjected to persistent insulin-induced hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vivi Flou Hjorth; Mølck, Anne-Marie; Heydenreich, Annette

    2016-01-01

    New insulin analogues with a longer duration of action and a flatter pharmacodynamic profile are developed to improve convenience and safety for diabetic patients. During the nonclinical development of such analogues, safety studies must be conducted in nondiabetic rats, which consequently...... are rendered chronically hypoglycemic. A rat comparator model using human insulin would be valuable, as it would enable differentiation between effects related to either persistent insulin-induced hypoglycemia (IIH) or a new analogue per se. Such a model could alleviate the need for an in...... nerve and skeletal myofiber degeneration within the same animals. This suggests that the model can serve as a nonclinical comparator model during development of long-acting insulin analogues....

  11. A simple and fast non-radioactive bridging immunoassay for insulin autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikkas, Ingrid; Mallone, Roberto; Tubiana-Rufi, Nadia; Chevenne, Didier; Carel, Jean Claude; Créminon, Christophe; Volland, Hervé; Boitard, Christian; Morel, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease which results from the destruction of pancreatic beta cells. Autoantibodies directed against islet antigens are valuable diagnostic tools. Insulin autoantibodies (IAAs) are usually the first to appear and also the most difficult to detect amongst the four major islet autoantibodies. A non-radioactive IAA bridging ELISA was developed to this end. In this assay, one site of the IAAs from serum samples is bound to a hapten-labeled insulin (GC300-insulin), which is subsequently captured on anti-GC300 antibody-coated 96-well plates. The other site of the IAAs is bound to biotinylated insulin, allowing the complex to be detected by an enzyme-streptavidin conjugate. In the present study, 50 serum samples from patients with newly diagnosed T1D and 100 control sera from non-diabetic individuals were analyzed with our new assay and the results were correlated with an IAA radioimmunoassay (RIA). Using IAA bridging ELISA, IAAs were detected in 32 out of 50 T1D children, whereas with IAA RIA, 41 out of 50 children with newly diagnosed T1D were scored as positive. In conclusion, the IAA bridging ELISA could serve as an attractive approach for rapid and automated detection of IAAs in T1D patients for diagnostic purposes.

  12. Prolonged fasting induces peripheral insulin resistance, which is not ameliorated by high-dose salicylate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Crabben, Saskia N.; Allick, Gideon; Ackermans, Mariette T.; Endert, Erik; Romijn, Johannes A.; Sauerwein, Hans P.

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: Elevated plasma free fatty acids, excess reactive oxygen species, inflammation, and gluco-counterregulatory hormones induce insulin resistance (IR) through activation of Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase and nuclear factor-kappaB inhibitor kappaB kinase, which leads to hyperphosphorylation of the

  13. A simple and fast non-radioactive bridging immunoassay for insulin autoantibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Kikkas

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D is an autoimmune disease which results from the destruction of pancreatic beta cells. Autoantibodies directed against islet antigens are valuable diagnostic tools. Insulin autoantibodies (IAAs are usually the first to appear and also the most difficult to detect amongst the four major islet autoantibodies. A non-radioactive IAA bridging ELISA was developed to this end. In this assay, one site of the IAAs from serum samples is bound to a hapten-labeled insulin (GC300-insulin, which is subsequently captured on anti-GC300 antibody-coated 96-well plates. The other site of the IAAs is bound to biotinylated insulin, allowing the complex to be detected by an enzyme-streptavidin conjugate. In the present study, 50 serum samples from patients with newly diagnosed T1D and 100 control sera from non-diabetic individuals were analyzed with our new assay and the results were correlated with an IAA radioimmunoassay (RIA. Using IAA bridging ELISA, IAAs were detected in 32 out of 50 T1D children, whereas with IAA RIA, 41 out of 50 children with newly diagnosed T1D were scored as positive. In conclusion, the IAA bridging ELISA could serve as an attractive approach for rapid and automated detection of IAAs in T1D patients for diagnostic purposes.

  14. Serum retinol-binding protein 4 correlates with obesity, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia in HIV-infected subjects receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang Hoon; Chin, Bum Sik; Lee, Han Sung; Jeong, Su Jin; Choi, Hee Kyoung; Kim, Chang Oh; Choi, Jun Yong; Song, Young Goo; Lee, Hyun Chul; Kim, June Myung

    2009-11-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) contributes to the development of metabolic complications including dyslipidemia, insulin resistance (IR), and lipodystrophy (LD). Recent studies reported that retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) is associated with IR, dyslipidemia, and obesity in non-HIV-infected populations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations between RBP4 and LD or metabolic abnormalities in HIV-infected subjects receiving HAART. We performed a cross-sectional study with 113 HIV-infected subjects receiving HAART for more than 6 months. Body composition and abdominal fat were measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis and ultrasonography, and fasting serum RBP4 was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Retinol-binding protein 4 levels in subjects with LD were similar to those without LD (P = .839). Retinol-binding protein 4 had significantly positive correlations with waist circumference (r = 0.298, P = .002), waist-to-hip ratio (r = 0.336, P = .001), body mass index (r = 0.310, P = .002), total body fat mass (r = 0.323, P = .001), total cholesterol (r = 0.188, P = .048), log (triglyceride) (r = 0.269, P = .004), and log (homeostasis model assessment of IR) (r = 0.207, P = .036), and negative correlations with quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (r = -0.209, P = .034) after adjustment for age and sex. In stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis, waist-to-hip ratio was the most significant independent predictor of increased RBP4 (standardized beta = .351, P = .001). These results suggest that serum RBP4 is associated with obesity, IR, and dyslipidemia in HIV-infected subjects receiving HAART.

  15. Effect of high and low glycemic index breakfast on postprandial metabolic parameters and satiety in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus under intensive insulin therapy: Controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobos, Daniela R; Vicuña, Isabella A; Novik, Victoria; Vega, Claudia A

    2017-08-01

    The results of studies evaluating the metabolic effects of glycemic index (GI) in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) have been contradictory. Consequently, the benefits of its application are controversial and polarized opinions of international organizations have been disclosed. The above situation leads this study to evaluate the acute effect of low and high GI breakfast on the glycemic response and satiety in subjects with DM2 under intensive insulin therapy (IIT). A controlled, crossover and single-blind clinical trial was developed involving 10 obese subjects with DM2 under IIT, with a period of at least six months under IIT and with fast insulin prescription before breakfast. Subjects ingested on two different occasions a high or low GI breakfast. In both stages, glycemia was evaluated at 0 (basal), 30, 60 and 120 min, and satiety and satiation were evaluated through a visual analogue scale. In contrast to high GI breakfast, the low GI meal generated a significant decrease of 46% for the area under the curve of glucose (Δ 1940 mg/dL × 120 min, p = 0.022) and in mean glycemia evaluated at 30, 60 and 120 min. Moreover, in the low GI stage 8 of 10 patients achieved a 2 h postprandial glycemia lower than 180 mg/dL, without statistical significance. A nonsignificant increase of 12.7% (Δ 1.06 cm, p = 0.271) in satiety at 120 min in the low GI stage was observed. In contrast to high GI breakfast, the low GI breakfast generated a significantly lower glycemic response. This assay allowed for the contribution of more in depth nutritional recommendations for this group of patients. Registered under ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier no. NCT02881164. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of nopal intake upon fasting glycemia in type II diabetics and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frati, A C; Gordillo, B E; Altamirano, P; Ariza, C R; Cortés-Franco, R; Chávez-Negrete, A; Islas-Andrade, S

    1991-01-01

    To assess if the acute hypoglycemic effect of nopal which occurs in diabetic patients also appears in healthy individuals, 500 g of nopal stems (O. streptacantha Lem.) were given orally to 14 healthy volunteers and to 14 patients with NIDDM. Serum glucose and insulin levels were measured at 0, 60, 120 and 180 minutes after nopal ingestion. A control test was performed with the intake of 400 ml of water. The intake of nopal by the NIDDM group was followed by a significant reduction of serum glucose and insulin concentration reaching 40.8 + 4.6 mg/dl (n = 14) (mean+SEM) and 7.8 + 1.5 uU/ml (n = 7) less than basal value, respectively, at 180 minutes. (P less than 0.001 vs control test). No significant changes were noticed in the healthy group as compared with the control test (P greater than 0.05). Acute hypoglycemic effect of nopal was observed in patients with NIDDM but not in healthy subjects, thus the mechanisms of this effect differs from current hypoglycemic agents.

  17. Fasting plasma glucose in the screening for type 2 diabetes in morbidly obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofsø, Dag; Jenssen, Trond; Hager, Helle; Røislien, Jo; Hjelmesaeth, Jøran

    2010-03-01

    Higher mortality rates among morbidly obese (BMI of > or =40 or > or =35 kg/m2 with weight-related comorbidities) subjects are mainly explained by comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes. As bariatric surgery ameliorates diabetes, obese diabetic subjects will receive great benefits from bariatric surgery. Screening for diabetes prior to surgical referral is therefore crucial. We studied 1,253 consecutively recruited (2005-2008) morbidly obese subjects (67% women). Among subjects without known diabetes, 70% (670/961) performed an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Screen-detected diabetes was defined as fasting plasma glucose (fPG) > or =7.0 mmol/l and/or 2-h glucose concentration (2hPG) > or = 11.1 mmol/l. Within the study population, 31% had diabetes, of which 8% were screen-detected. Eighty percent of those with screen-detected diabetes were diagnosed by fPG. In subjects with nondiabetic fPG concentrations, elevating the fPG cutoff value from 5.2 mmol/l to the World Health Organization's (WHO's) recommended value of 6.1 mmol/l reduced the percentage of the population needing an OGTT considerably (78-23%), but only slightly reduced the sensitivity of fPG in detecting a diabetic 2hPG concentration (100-77%). Only 7% of the patients with fPG between 6.1 and 6.9 mmol/l had a diabetic 2hPG concentration. Following the WHO's recommendations, we found that 95% of all subjects with unknown diabetes were identified. Fasting glucose identified four out of five morbidly obese subjects with unknown diabetes. A supplemental OGTT in selected persons identified the majority of the remaining diabetic cases.

  18. Empowerment-Based Diabetes Self-Management Education to Maintain Glycemic Targets During Ramadan Fasting in People With Diabetes Who Are on Conventional Insulin: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Yara M; Sahmoud, Sahar I; Abdelsalam, Mona M; Eichorst, Barbara

    2017-02-01

    This study aims to assess the feasibility of promoting safe Ramadan fasting through diabetes self-management education (DSME) and to determine the effect of such education on hypoglycemic episodes. This prospective study included subjects attending Ramadan reinforcement sessions for participants in the Educational Program for People with Diabetes (EPPWD) at the Ain-Shams University Diabetes Center in Cairo, Egypt. The DSME sessions started 2-3 weeks before Ramadan and included one experimental fasting day during the first week and one during the second week. Participants' A1C and serum fructosamine levels were measured before and after Ramadan, and they completed weekly self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) logs. Among 21 participants who were intending to fast for Ramadan, 14 completed the program. Their mean A1C was 6.7 ± 1.6%, and SMBG results showed a statistically nonsignificant difference in mean blood glucose levels before and after Ramadan (123.84 ± 39.96 and 123.84 ± 25.92 mg/dL, respectively; P >0.05). Serum fructosamine after Ramadan declined by 10% from pre-Ramadan levels. The mean number of hypoglycemic events before Ramadan was 3 ± 1.04, which declined to 1.4 ± 0.5 during Ramadan. Differences between group 1 (those without hypoglycemia, n = 8) and group 2 (those with hypoglycemia, n = 6) were nonsignificant for all variables, including A1C. Ramadan fasting is feasible for people with diabetes who are on a multiple daily injection insulin regimen and participate in the EPPWD. The number of hypoglycemic events per month declined with the attainment of DSME.

  19. Serum lipoprotein ratios as markers of insulin resistance: A study among non-diabetic acute coronary syndrome patients with impaired fasting glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Ray

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Recent data suggest that insulin resistance can predict cardiovascular disease independently of the other risk factors, such as hypertension, visceral obesity or dyslipidaemia. However, the majority of available methods to evaluate insulin resistance are complicated to operate, expensive, and time consuming. This study was undertaken to assess whether serum lipoprotein ratios could predict insulin resistance in non-diabetic acute coronary syndrome (ACS patients. Methods: Ninety non-diabetic patients with impaired fasting glucose admitted with a diagnosis of ACS were included in the study. At the time of admission fasting glucose and insulin concentrations were measured. The homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR was used for insulin resistance. The fasting serum total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C levels were checked, and then TC/HDL-C and TG/HDL-C ratios were calculated. The areas under the curves (AUC of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves were used to compare the power of these serum lipoprotein ratios as markers. Results: Lipoprotein ratios were significantly higher in patients with HOMA-IR index > 2.5 as compared to patients with index <2.5 (P < 0.05. Both TG/HDL-C and TC/HDL-C ratios were significantly correlated with HOMA-IR (P<0.05. The area under the ROC curve of the TG/HDL-C and TC/HDL-C ratio for predicting insulin resistance was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.67 to 0.93, 0.78 (95% CI, 0.65 to 0.91, respectively. Interpretation & conclusions: The findings of this study demonstrate that serum lipoprotein ratios can provide a simple means of identifying insulin resistance and can be used as markers of insulin resistance and cardiovascular diseases risk in adult non-diabetic patients.

  20. The thermoluminescence response of doped SiO2 optical fibres subjected to fast neutrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, S; Bradley, D A; Saripan, M I; Ramli, A T; Wagiran, H

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a preliminary study of the thermoluminescence (TL) response of doped SiO(2) optical fibres subjected to (241)AmBe neutron irradiation. The TL materials, which comprise Al- and Ge-doped silica fibres, were exposed in close contact with the (241)AmBe source to obtain fast neutron interactions through use of measurements obtained with and without a Cd filter (the filter being made to entirely enclose the fibres). The neutron irradiations were performed for exposure times of 1-, 2-, 3-, 5- and 7-days in a neutron tank filled with water. In this study, use was also made of the Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) code version 5 (V5) to simulate the neutron irradiations experiment. It was found that the commercially available Ge-doped and Al-doped optical fibres show a linear dose response subjected to fast neutrons from (241)AmBe source up to seven days of irradiations. The simulation performed using MCNP5 also exhibits a similar pattern, albeit differing in sensitivity. The TL response of Ge-doped fibre is markedly greater than that of the Al-doped fibre, the total absorption cross section for Ge in both the fast and thermal neutrons region being some ten times greater than that of Al. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of whey on blood glucose and insulin responses to composite breakfast and lunch meals in type 2 diabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frid, Anders H; Nilsson, Mikael; Holst, Jens Juul; Björck, Inger M E

    2005-07-01

    Whey proteins have insulinotropic effects and reduce the postprandial glycemia in healthy subjects. The mechanism is not known, but insulinogenic amino acids and the incretin hormones seem to be involved. The aim was to evaluate whether supplementation of meals with a high glycemic index (GI) with whey proteins may increase insulin secretion and improve blood glucose control in type 2 diabetic subjects. Fourteen diet-treated subjects with type 2 diabetes were served a high-GI breakfast (white bread) and subsequent high-GI lunch (mashed potatoes with meatballs). The breakfast and lunch meals were supplemented with whey on one day; whey was exchanged for lean ham and lactose on another day. Venous blood samples were drawn before and during 4 h after breakfast and 3 h after lunch for the measurement of blood glucose, serum insulin, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). The insulin responses were higher after both breakfast (31%) and lunch (57%) when whey was included in the meal than when whey was not included. After lunch, the blood glucose response was significantly reduced [-21%; 120 min area under the curve (AUC)] after whey ingestion. Postprandial GIP responses were higher after whey ingestion, whereas no differences were found in GLP-1 between the reference and test meals. It can be concluded that the addition of whey to meals with rapidly digested and absorbed carbohydrates stimulates insulin release and reduces postprandial blood glucose excursion after a lunch meal consisting of mashed potatoes and meatballs in type 2 diabetic subjects.

  2. Metabolic syndrome and related variables, insulin resistance, leptin levels, and PPAR-γ2 and leptin gene polymorphisms in a pedigree of subjects with bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trino Baptista

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Evidence points to a high prevalence of metabolic dysfunction in bipolar disorder (BD, but few studies have evaluated the relatives of subjects with BD. We conducted a cross-sectional study in an extended family of patients with BD type I.Methods:The available relatives of the same family were interviewed (DSM-IV-R and assessed in fasting conditions for body mass index, constituent variables of the metabolic syndrome (MS, leptin levels, insulin resistance index, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for the leptin receptor and promoter and PPAR-γ2 genes. The frequency of MS was compared with that recorded in the local general population.Results:Ninety-three relatives of three adults with BD were evaluated (30 aged 18 years. The frequency of MS was similar to that of the general population. Significantly higher frequencies of abnormal glucose, total and low density cholesterol (LDL-c levels (all p < 0.05, waist circumference (p = 0.057, and leptin and insulin resistance values (in adults only were observed in the family. Adults with the QQ genotype of the leptin receptor displayed higher LDL-c levels than carriers of the R allele.Conclusions:The associations among BD consanguinity, familial hypercholesterolemia, and leptin receptor SNPs reported herein should be replicated and extended in other pedigrees.

  3. Adipose tissue gene expression analysis reveals changes in inflammatory, mitochondrial respiratory and lipid metabolic pathways in obese insulin-resistant subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soronen Jarkko

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To get insight into molecular mechanisms underlying insulin resistance, we compared acute in vivo effects of insulin on adipose tissue transcriptional profiles between obese insulin-resistant and lean insulin-sensitive women. Methods Subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies were obtained before and after 3 and 6 hours of intravenously maintained euglycemic hyperinsulinemia from 9 insulin-resistant and 11 insulin-sensitive females. Gene expression was measured using Affymetrix HG U133 Plus 2 microarrays and qRT-PCR. Microarray data and pathway analyses were performed with Chipster v1.4.2 and by using in-house developed nonparametric pathway analysis software. Results The most prominent difference in gene expression of the insulin-resistant group during hyperinsulinemia was reduced transcription of nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial respiration (mitochondrial respiratory chain, GO:0001934. Inflammatory pathways with complement components (inflammatory response, GO:0006954 and cytokines (chemotaxis, GO:0042330 were strongly up-regulated in insulin-resistant as compared to insulin-sensitive subjects both before and during hyperinsulinemia. Furthermore, differences were observed in genes contributing to fatty acid, cholesterol and triglyceride metabolism (FATP2, ELOVL6, PNPLA3, SREBF1 and in genes involved in regulating lipolysis (ANGPTL4 between the insulin-resistant and -sensitive subjects especially during hyperinsulinemia. Conclusions The major finding of this study was lower expression of mitochondrial respiratory pathway and defective induction of lipid metabolism pathways by insulin in insulin-resistant subjects. Moreover, the study reveals several novel genes whose aberrant regulation is associated with the obese insulin-resistant phenotype.

  4. Insulin requirement in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: relation to simple tests of islet B-cell function and insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjessing, H J; Matzen, L E; Pedersen, P C

    1988-01-01

    Evaluation of simple tests of islet B-cell function and insulin sensitivity as predictors of metabolic control was performed during 3 months of insulin withdrawal in 25 insulin-treated diabetic subjects. All patients had a glucagon stimulated plasma C-peptide concentration above 0.33 nmol....../l and a fasting plasma C-peptide concentration above 0.20 nmol/l a few days before insulin withdrawal. Insulin sensitivity was measured as the glucose disappearance rate (k) during an intravenous insulin tolerance test. Two patients were considered insulin-requiring due to high fasting blood glucose levels......-peptide levels the predictive value of a positive test was 100% while the predictive value of a negative test was as low as 33% or 27% depending on whether fasting or stimulated C-peptide concentration was used. Including the k value in the prediction only increased the predictive values of negative tests to 40...

  5. The Efficacy of Vildagliptin Concomitant With Insulin Therapy in Type 2 Diabetic Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Daisuke; Inoue, Kazuyuki; Kaneko, Kimie; Yanagisawa, Morifumi; Sumita, Takashi; Ikegami, Yuichi; Awata, Takuya; Ishida, Hitoshi; Katayama, Shigehiro; Inukai, Kouichi

    2015-01-01

    Background In Japan, dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitors have become standard therapeutic agents for type 2 diabetes, and numbers of patients receiving insulin therapy combined with DPP4 inhibitors, which is a highly effective regimen, are increasing. Methods In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of vildagliptin administered at the dose of 100 mg twice daily in 57 patients with type 2 diabetes already receiving insulin treatment. Results The 36 patients who simply received add-on vildagliptin showed a 0.6% decrease in HbA1c levels, despite a marked insulin dose reduction, mainly bolus insulin, of approximately 8.3 units. In addition, body mass index exhibited a significant negative correlation with the efficacy of vildagliptin, i.e., ΔHbA1c. On the other hand, the 21 patients switched from 50 mg of sitagliptin to vildagliptin showed HbA1c decreases approaching 0.7%. Conclusion Taking into consideration that twice-daily oral vildagliptin has already been reported to be advantageous in reducing postprandial hyperglycemia, this drug was suggested to be more effective in reducing HbA1c than sitagliptin under conditions in which it is used as a supplement to basal insulin, as in this study. PMID:25780477

  6. Normal sweat secretion despite impaired growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-I axis in obese subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael Højby; Juul, Anders; Main, Katharina M

    2011-01-01

    Adults with GH deficiency are known to exhibit reduced sweating. Whether sweating capacity is impacted in obese subjects with impaired GH secretion have not previously been investigated. The main objective was to investigate sweat secretion rate and the GH-IGF-I axis in obese subjects before......, and impaired insulin sensitivity, which all were normalised after diet-induced weight loss of 30 ± 5 kg. Sweat secretion rates were similar comparing obese and nonobese subjects (78 ± 10 versus 82 ± 9 mg/30 minutes) and sweat secretion did not change after a diet-induced weight loss in obese subjects. We...... conclude that although obese subjects have markedly reduced GH release and impaired IGF-I levels, sweat secretion rate is found to be normal....

  7. Normal sweat secretion despite impaired growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-I axis in obese subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M H; Juul, Anders; Main, Katharina M

    2011-01-01

    and after weight loss. Sixteen severely obese women (BMI, 40.6 ± 1.1 kg/m(2)) were investigated before and after a diet-induced weight loss. Sixteen age-matched nonobese women served as controls. The obese subjects presented the characteristic decreased GH release, hyperinsulinaemia, increased FFA levels......, and impaired insulin sensitivity, which all were normalised after diet-induced weight loss of 30 ± 5 kg. Sweat secretion rates were similar comparing obese and nonobese subjects (78 ± 10 versus 82 ± 9 mg/30 minutes) and sweat secretion did not change after a diet-induced weight loss in obese subjects. We......Adults with GH deficiency are known to exhibit reduced sweating. Whether sweating capacity is impacted in obese subjects with impaired GH secretion have not previously been investigated. The main objective was to investigate sweat secretion rate and the GH-IGF-I axis in obese subjects before...

  8. Vegetarian diet improves insulin resistance and oxidative stress markers more than conventional diet in subjects with Type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahleova, H; Matoulek, M; Malinska, H; Oliyarnik, O; Kazdova, L; Neskudla, T; Skoch, A; Hajek, M; Hill, M; Kahle, M; Pelikanova, T

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of calorie-restricted vegetarian and conventional diabetic diets alone and in combination with exercise on insulin resistance, visceral fat and oxidative stress markers in subjects with Type 2 diabetes. A 24-week, randomized, open, parallel design was used. Seventy-four patients with Type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to either the experimental group (n = 37), which received a vegetarian diet, or the control group (n = 37), which received a conventional diabetic diet. Both diets were isocaloric, calorie restricted (-500 kcal/day). All meals during the study were provided. The second 12 weeks of the diet were combined with aerobic exercise. Participants were examined at baseline, 12 weeks and 24 weeks. Primary outcomes were: insulin sensitivity measured by hyperinsulinaemic isoglycaemic clamp; volume of visceral and subcutaneous fat measured by magnetic resonance imaging; and oxidative stress measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. Analyses were by intention to treat. Forty-three per cent of participants in the experimental group and 5% of participants in the control group reduced diabetes medication (P vegetarian diet had greater capacity to improve insulin sensitivity compared with a conventional diabetic diet over 24 weeks. The greater loss of visceral fat and improvements in plasma concentrations of adipokines and oxidative stress markers with this diet may be responsible for the reduction of insulin resistance. The addition of exercise training further augmented the improved outcomes with the vegetarian diet. © 2011 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2011 Diabetes UK.

  9. Impact of short-term high-fat feeding and insulin-stimulated FGF21 levels in subjects with low birth weight and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vienberg, Sara G; Brøns, Charlotte; Nilsson, Emma; Astrup, Arne; Vaag, Allan; Andersen, Birgitte

    2012-07-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a metabolic factor involved in glucose and lipid metabolism. However, little is known about the physiological role of FGF21 during a dietary challenge in humans. Twenty healthy low birth weight (LBW) with known risk of type 2 diabetes and 26 control (normal birth weight (NBW)) young men were subjected to 5 days of high-fat (HF) overfeeding (+50%). Basal and clamp insulin-stimulated serum FGF21 levels were examined before and after the diet, and FGF21 mRNA expression was measured in muscle and fat biopsies respectively. Five days of HF overfeeding diet significantly (Pincreased fasting serum FGF21 levels in both the groups (Pinsulin infusion additionally increased serum FGF21 levels to a similar extent in both the groups. Basal mRNA expression of FGF21 in muscle was near the detection limit and not present in fat in both the groups before and after the dietary challenge. However, insulin significantly (Pincreased FGF21 mRNA in both muscle and fat in both the groups during both diets. Short-term HF overfeeding markedly increased serum FGF21 levels in healthy young men with and without LBW but failed to increase muscle or fat FGF21 mRNA levels. This suggests that the liver may be responsible for the rise of serum FGF21 levels during overfeeding. In contrast, the increase in serum FGF21 levels during insulin infusion may arise from increased transcription in muscle and fat. We speculate that increased serum FGF21 levels during HF overfeeding may be a compensatory response to increase fatty acid oxidation and energy expenditure.

  10. Comparison of verbal and pictorial measures of hunger during fasting in normal weight and obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, M R; Friedman, M I; Mattes, R; Kopyt, D; Gayda, C

    2000-11-01

    Friedman, Ulrich, and Mattes described a new pictorial instrument for assessing hunger wherein respondents outline areas on a drawing of a human figure to depict the location of their hunger sensations. The present study compared normal weight and obese individuals on the pictorial measure and on more traditional verbal hunger measures during a 22-hour fast. The pictorial measure, along with 13 verbal items assessing hunger and hunger-related symptoms, was administered to 29 normal weight college students and 46 overweight clinic patients four times during a 22-hour fast. Factor analyses of verbal hunger items produced Hunger, Somatic Symptoms, and Stomach Symptoms factors. The pictorial measure was divided into peripheral (arms, legs, head) and central (trunk) body areas. The increases in hunger during the fast were greater when measured using the pictorial as opposed to the verbal instrument. Correlations between and within the three verbal hunger measures and two pictorial measures were generally few in number and modest in size. The overall pattern of correlations suggested that the verbally based hunger measures more adequately reflected the experience of hunger in normal weight than in obese individuals. A significant interaction between weight status and assessment period was found for the pictorial measure, indicating that normal weight subjects experienced more bodily hunger than overweight subjects initially but experienced less hunger than obese subjects after a prolonged period of food deprivation. Although more testing is needed, these results suggest that the pictorial hunger assessment provides information about the experience of hunger that could complement information provided by traditional verbally based hunger measures.

  11. Hypertriglyceridemic subjects exhibit an accumulation of small dense chylomicron particles in the fasting state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irawati, Deasy; Mamo, John C L; Soares, Mario J; Slivkoff-Clark, Karin M; James, Anthony P

    2015-11-01

    Normocholesterolemic subjects with elevated fasting plasma triglycerides are at increased risk of atherosclerosis through mechanisms that are not yet delineated. We hypothesized that elevated plasma triglyceride is associated with increased vascular exposure to pro-atherogenic lipoprotein remnants. To test this hypothesis, the abundance, and size distribution of chylomicron particles were determined in individuals with and without hypertriglyceridemia. Twelve hypertriglyceridemic subjects (HTG group, triglyceride concentration ≥1.7 mmol/L) and twelve normotriglyceridemic subjects (NTG group) matched for age and gender were studied. The distribution of chylomicron particles was assessed by determining the fasting concentration of apo B-48 in serum lipoprotein fractions with Svedberg flotation rates of (Sf) > 400, Sf 20-400 and Sf HTG was almost twice that observed in NTG controls with ∼80% of the increase residing in the Sf HTG: 8.7 ± 1.0 μg/mL vs NTG: 5.0 ± 0.6 μg/mL; P = 0.016). Significantly greater concentrations of apo B-48 were also observed in the less dense Sf 20-400 (HTG: 1.1 ± 0.2 μg/mL vs NTG: 0.4 ± 0.07 μg/mL; P 400 (HTG: 1.1 ± 0.3 μg/mL vs NTG: 0.3 ± 0.04 μg/mL; P HTG subjects compared to NTG (Sf 400 & Sf 20-400: P < 0.001 and Sf < 20: P = 0.013). Normocholesterolemic, moderately hypertriglyceridemic subjects are at increased atherogenic risk due to greater apo B-48 concentration in the small, dense lipoprotein fraction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Macroscopic behavior of fast reactor fuel subjected to simulated thermal transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenske, G.R.; Emerson, J.E.; Savoie, F.E.

    1983-06-01

    High-speed cinematography has been used to characterize the macroscopic behavior of irradiated and unirradiated fuel subjected to thermal transients prototypical of fast reactor transients. The results demonstrate that as the cladding melts, the fuel can disperse via spallation if the fuel contains in excess of approx. 16 ..mu..moles/gm of fission gas. Once the cladding has melted, the macroscopic behavior (time to failure and dispersive nature) was strongly influenced by the presence of volatile fission products and the heating rate.

  13. Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with improved insulin sensitivity, reduced basal insulin secretion rate and lower fasting glucagon concentration in healthy women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnet, F; Disse, E; Laville, M

    2012-01-01

    Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes with a stronger effect in women. As the underlying mechanisms remain poorly characterised, we investigated its relationship with insulin resistance, insulin secretion, clearance of insulin and glucagon concentration....

  14. Effect of fructose consumption on insulin sensitivity in nondiabetic subjects: a systematic review and meta-analysis of diet-intervention trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Horst, Kasper W.; Schene, Merle R.; Holman, Rebecca; Romijn, Johannes A.; Serlie, Mireille J.

    2016-01-01

    High fructose consumption has been suggested to contribute to several features of metabolic syndrome including insulin resistance, but to our knowledge, no previous meta-analyses have investigated the effect of fructose on insulin sensitivity in nondiabetic subjects. We performed a systematic review

  15. Postprandial insulin and glucose levels are reduced in healthy subjects when a standardised breakfast meal is supplemented with a filtered sugarcane molasses concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Timothy P; Wright, Alison G; Clifton, Peter M; Ilag, Leodevico L

    2016-12-01

    A phytochemical- and mineral-rich filtered sugarcane molasses concentrate (FMC), when added to carbohydrate-containing foods as a functional ingredient, lowers postprandial blood glucose and insulin responses. We hypothesised that this beneficial effect would also occur if FMC was administered as an oral supplement taken before a meal. This study measured the postprandial glucose and insulin responses elicited by different doses of FMC administered immediately prior to a standard breakfast to healthy subjects. Each subject was given three or five breakfast meals once, on different days. The composition of the meals was identical, except for the addition of either placebo syrup (test meal 1) or increasing doses of FMC (test meals 2-5). The plasma glucose concentration curves were similar for the five test meals. Plasma insulin curves were lowered in a dose-dependent manner. Stratifying subjects based on age, BMI and insulin resistance showed greater effects of low doses of FMC on lowering insulin responses in those subjects with potentially greater insulin resistance. When insulin response is standardised to amount of carbohydrate in the meal/dose combination, the reduction in response is linear and inversely proportional to the FMC dose. FMC shows promise as an agent that can reduce insulin responses and lessen the load on the pancreatic beta cells.

  16. Replacing Insulin Glargine with Neutral Protamine Hagedorn (NPH) Insulin in a Subpopulation of Study Subjects in the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD): Effects on Blood Glucose Levels, Hypoglycemia and Patient Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berard, Lori; Cameron, Brett; Woo, Vincent; Stewart, John

    2015-08-01

    To ensure patient safety when replacing insulin glargine (IG) with neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin and to determine differences in blood glucose control, frequency of hypoglycemia, insulin dosing, health resource utilization and quality of life between users of IG and NPH insulin. A single-site, open-label, randomized, 6-month comparative study of 66 patients from the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial. Randomization was 1:1 to receive IG or NPH insulin. Data regarding blood glucose control, insulin dosage adjustment and recording of hypoglycemia episodes were obtained through telephone calls; office visits were conducted to measure weight, glycated hemoglobin, fasting plasma glucose and blood glucose profile. The Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (DTSQ) was used to measure patients' satisfaction with their diabetes treatment. Rates of symptomatic hypoglycemia did not differ significantly between groups: 37.5±2.2 for the IG group and 31.1±2.1 for the NPH group. However, patients treated with NPH insulin had higher frequencies of severe hypoglycemia (6.1±0.9) compared with 2.7±0.6 for the IG group. A significant difference in changes in glycated hemoglobin (A1C) was observed between the groups: the mean ± standard error A1C decreases from baseline were -0.34%±0.11 for the IG group, vs -0.01%±0.10 for the NPH insulin group. The data obtained from the DTSQ showed greater treatment satisfaction in the IG group compared with the NPH insulin group. Switching from IG to NPH insulin resulted in more than double the rate of severe hypoglycemias and led to decreased metabolic control. Greater treatment satisfaction was observed with IG, compared with NPH insulin, as measured by change from baseline in the DTSQ scores. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Insulin resistance adds to endothelial dysfunction in hypertensive patients and in normotensive offspring of subjects with essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zizek, B; Poredos, P

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate whether endothelium-dependent (nitric oxide-mediated) dilation of the brachial artery (BA) is impaired in patients being treated for essential hypertension (EH), and whether this abnormality can be detected in normotensive offspring of subjects with EH (familial trait, FT); and to investigate the interrelationship between flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) and hyperinsulinaemia/insulin resistance. Cross-sectional study. Angiology department at a teaching hospital. The study encompassed 172 subjects, of whom 46 were treated hypertonics aged 40-55 (49) years, and 44 age-matched, normotensive volunteers as controls. We also investigated 41 normotonics with FT aged 20-30 (25) years and 41 age-and sex-matched controls without FT. Using high-resolution ultrasound, BA diameters at rest, during reactive hyperaemia (endothelium-dependent dilation) and after sublingual glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) application (endothelium-independent dilation) were measured. In hypertonics FMD was significantly lower than in controls [2.4 (2.9) vs. 7.4 (2.5)%; P < 0.00005], as was GTN-induced dilation [12.1 (4.3) vs. 16.1 (4.6)%; P=0.0007]. In subjects with FT, FMD was also decreased compared with the control group [5.8 (4.1) vs. 10.0 (3.0)%; P < 0.00005]. The response to GTN was comparable in both groups of young subjects. FMD was negatively related to insulin concentration in all subjects studied (P < 0.00005). In treated patients with EH, flow-mediated dilation of the BA as well as endothelium-independent dilation are decreased. In individuals with FT the endothelial function of the peripheral arteries is also altered in the absence of elevated blood pressure. Endothelial dysfunction is related to hyperinsulinaemia/insulin resistance, which could be one of the pathogenetic determinants of EH and its complications.

  18. Modulation of the postprandial phase by beta-glucan in overweight subjects: effects on glucose and insulin kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazare, Julie-Anne; Normand, Sylvie; Oste Triantafyllou, Angeliki; Brac de la Perrière, Aude; Desage, Michel; Laville, Martine

    2009-03-01

    Decreasing the postprandial glucose response is potentially of major importance to public health when low-glycemic index or high-fibre content foods are associated with a decreased risk of diabetes. We investigated in overweight subjects the effect of adding beta-glucan (BG) to a polenta (Pol) meal on postprandial metabolism and glucose bioavailability using stable isotopes. In this single-blind, randomized, crossover trial, 12 subjects ate two meals containing Pol with (Pol + BG) or without (Pol) 5 g BG. Concentrations of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, nonesterified fatty acids, triacylglycerol, total and exogenous glucose kinetics were assessed for 6 h postprandially. The kinetics of total and exogenous glucose importantly differed between the meals, but not the quantity of total and exogenous glucose appearing in plasma. Less total and exogenous glucose appeared during the first 120 min after the Pol + BG meal; the phenomenon was then reversed (both p < 0.0001). After 120 min, glucose and insulin responses declined, but remained higher after the Pol + BG meal (p < 0.05) in parallel to the inhibition of lipolysis. The endogenous glucose production (EGP) was significantly more inhibited after the Pol + BG meal. The addition of BG slowed the appearance of glucose in plasma, resulting in longer-lasting insulin secretion which exerted a prolonged inhibition of EGP and lipolysis.

  19. Metabolic consequences of incorrect insulin administration techniques in aging subjects with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Sandro; Agrusta, Mariano; Guarino, Giuseppina; Carbone, Lucia; Cavallaro, Vincenzo; Carucci, Iarba; Strollo, Felice

    2011-06-01

    Only few insulin-treated (IT) people with diabetes mellitus (DM) reach the target due to poor compliance and/or to sedentary lifestyle and/or to inadequate treatment regimen. The latter may be also brought about by often overlooked factors including insulin injection into altered skin areas, often brought about by incorrect habits, namely needle reutilization or poor compliance to the suggestion to continuously rotate skin injection areas. The aim of our study was to evaluate the rate of skin lesions within the sites commonly used for insulin injection in our IT DM patients and to verify whether a short-acting insulin analogue yielded different metabolic effects when injected in altered vs. normal skin areas. One hundred and eighty well-trained IT people with type 1 and type 2 DM (64 ± 15 years of age) consecutively referring to our unit underwent a standard clinical examination involving an accurate skin inspection protocol meant at looking for any alterations eventually affecting all possible injection sites, including bruising, multiple needle pricks and lipodystrophic nodules (LN). They were also tested for HPLC HbA1c determination and asked to fill in a standard questionnaire on injection habits. Furthermore, seven male, T1DM glulisine-glargine basal-bolus-treated patients in this group were randomly injected 10 IU glulisine into either normal skin (NS) or an LN by a nurse before a standard, 405 kcal breakfast, for blood glucose and free insulin determination at 0, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 120 and 150 min. More lesions were found in people over sixty (P 7.5% was found in patients with lesions (with an O.R. of 3.74) and further confirmed by data obtained from head-to-head comparison of insulin injection into an LN and NS. In fact, injection into an LN proved to impair and slow down insulin absorption, resulting in a higher absolute value and a larger variability of blood glucose levels than those observed by utilizing NS. This suggests us to pay more attention to

  20. The Insuline Analogues

    OpenAIRE

    Garrido Carrasco, Elizabeth; Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Insulin analogues are a new pharmaceutical family, designed to overcome deficiencies that still exist with the rDNA insulin. There are rapid-acting insulin analogues such as lispro insulin and insulin aspart. They avoid postprandial and nocturnal hypoglycemia. There are also intermediate-acting insulin analogues like NPL and Mix 25 (a mixture between NPL and lispro), which join the neutral protamine insulin length of action and the fast onset of the rapid-acting analogue lispro. Finally, ther...

  1. Up-regulation of the complement system in subcutaneous adipocytes from nonobese, hypertriglyceridemic subjects is associated with adipocyte insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Greevenbroek, M M J; Ghosh, S; van der Kallen, C J H; Brouwers, M C G J; Schalkwijk, C G; Stehouwer, C D A

    2012-12-01

    Dysfunctional adipose tissue plays an important role in the etiology of the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying adipocyte dysfunction are incompletely understood. The aim of the study was to identify differentially regulated pathways in sc adipocytes of dyslipidemic subjects. Whole-genome expression profiling was conducted on sc adipocytes from a discovery group of nine marginally overweight subjects with familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCHL) and nine controls of comparable body sizes as well as two independent confirmation groups. In this study, FCHL served as a model of familial insulin resistance and dyslipidemia, in the absence of frank obesity. Functional analyses and gene set enrichment analysis using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes or a custom pathway database identified the complement system and complement regulators as one of the top up-regulated pathways in FCHL [false discovery rate (FDR) complement expression in FCHL was confirmed in the appropriate confirmation group. Higher complement gene expression was associated with lower adipocyte insulin receptor substrate-1 expression as marker of adipocyte insulin resistance, independent of age, sex, or disease status, and this association was corroborated in the two confirmation groups. Additionally, complement gene expression was associated with triglycerides in the discovery set and with triglycerides and/or waist circumference in the confirmation groups. Complement pathway up-regulation did not appear to be driven by hypertriglyceridemia because a 40% pharmacological reduction in triglycerides did not affect complement expression. These findings point to an up-regulation of a complement-related transcriptome in sc adipocytes under metabolically stressed conditions, even in the absence of overt obesity. Such up-regulation may subsequently influence downstream processes, including macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue and

  2. Differential regulation of lipid and protein metabolism in obese vs. lean subjects before and after a 72-h fast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Ann Mosegaard; Møller, Andreas Buch; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm

    2016-01-01

    release in obese subjects under basal and fasting conditions. We therefore studied nine lean and nine obese subjects twice, after 12 and 72 h of fasting, using measurements of mRNA and protein expression and phosphorylation of lipolytic and protein metabolic signaling molecules in fat and muscle together...... with whole body and forearm tracer techniques. Obese subjects displayed increased whole body lipolysis, decreased urea production rates, and decreased forearm muscle protein breakdown per 100 ml of forearm tissue, differences that persisted after 72 h of fasting. Lipolysis per fat mass unit was reduced...... in obese subjects and, correspondingly, adipose tissue hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) phosphorylation and mRNA and protein levels of the adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) coactivator CGI58 were decreased. Fasting resulted in higher HSL phosphorylations and lower protein levels of the ATGL inhibitor G0S2...

  3. Peripheral insulin resistance rather than beta cell dysfunction accounts for geographical differences in impaired fasting blood glucose among sub-Saharan African individuals : findings from the RODAM study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeks, Karlijn A C; Stronks, Karien; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Addo, Juliet; Bahendeka, Silver; Beune, Erik; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Danquah, Ina; Galbete, Cecilia; Henneman, Peter; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Osei, Kwame; Schulze, Matthias B; Spranger, Joachim; Smeeth, Liam; Agyemang, Charles

    2017-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction account for differences in impaired fasting blood glucose (IFBG) levels in sub-Saharan African individuals living in different locations in Europe and Africa. We also aimed to

  4. The effects of fat and protein on glycemic responses in nondiabetic humans vary with waist circumference, fasting plasma insulin, and dietary fiber intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Elham; Vogt, Janet A; Wolever, Thomas M S

    2006-10-01

    The effects of protein and fat on glycemic responses have not been studied systematically. Therefore, our aim was to determine the dose-response effects of protein and fat on the glycemic response elicited by 50 g glucose in humans and whether subjects' fasting plasma insulin (FPI) and diet influenced the results. Nondiabetic humans, 10 with FPI 40 pmol/L, were studied on 18 occasions after 10 14-h overnight fasts. Subjects consumed 50 g glucose dissolved in 250 mL water plus 0, 5, 10, or 30 g fat and/or 0, 5, 10, or 30 g protein. Each level of fat was tested with each level of protein. Dietary intake was measured using a 3-d food record. Gram per gram, protein reduced glucose responses approximately 2 times more than fat (P fat x protein interaction (P = 0.051). The effect of protein on glycemic responses was related to waist circumference (WC) (r = -0.56, P = 0.011) and intake of dietary fiber (r = -0.60, P = 0.005) but was unrelated to FPI or other nutrient intakes. The effect of fat on glycemic responses was related to FPI (r = 0.49, P = 0.029) but was unrelated to WC or diet. We conclude that, across the range of 0-30 g, protein and fat reduced glycemic responses independently from each other in a linear, dose-dependent fashion, with protein having approximately 3-times the effect of fat. A large protein effect was associated with high WC and high dietary-fiber intake, whereas a large fat effect was associated with low FPI. These conclusions may not apply to solid meals. Further studies are needed to determine the mechanisms for these effects.

  5. Temporal Patterns of Subjective Experiences and Self-Regulation during Ramadan Fasting among Elite Archers: A Qualitative Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Jolly; Hamidan, Shazarina; Singh, Rabindarjeet

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Some major competitions (e.g. London Olympics, 2012) are scheduled during the Ramadan fasting month. Little attention has been given to explore the archers’ performance related subjective experiences with a qualitative method. Therefore, this study addressed individual archers’ subjective experiences within the framework of self-regulation during Ramadan. Methods Eleven elite Malaysian Muslim fasting archers volunteered to participate in the study. Grounded theory was the qualitative ...

  6. Fetal and perinatal outcomes in type 1 diabetes pregnancy: a randomized study comparing insulin aspart with human insulin in 322 subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hod, Moshe; Damm, Peter; Kaaja, Risto

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study was a comparison of insulin aspart (IAsp) with human insulin (HI) in basal-bolus therapy with neutral protamine Hagedorn for fetal and perinatal outcomes of type 1 diabetes in pregnancy....

  7. A prospective assessment of dietary patterns in Muslim subjects with type 2 diabetes who undertake fasting during Ramadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil K Vasan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim was to assess the dietary pattern during Ramadan season among type 2 diabetic Muslim subjects who underwent fasting and intensive dietary counseling. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted among 70 Muslim subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus who undertook fasting during Ramadan and was part of a randomized control trial using pioglitazone published previously. All subjects were subjected to a dietary assessment and counseling at three stages, i.e., initiation of the study, mid-Ramadan and post-Ramadan, by a trained dietician. Dietary assessment was done by the 24-hour dietary recall method and the food frequency questionnaire. Diabetic diet sheets were dispensed to subjects based on their body mass index (BMI, daily activity, and needs. Results: The mean caloric intake between pre-Ramadan (before fasting and mid-Ramadan (15 days after fasting were 1506.80 kcal and 1614.29 (P = 0.001 respectively. The distribution of active components pre and during Ramadan were: carbohydrates (g 260.76 and 265.35 g (P = 0.001, proteins (g 43.64 and 46.19 (P = 0.001 and fat (g was 32.88 and 44.16 (P = 0.0001 respectively. The percentage of energy from dietary carbohydrate prior to fasting (64.11 ± 6.73 and during fasting (68.41 ± 4.41 remained almost unchanged but statistically significant when compared at different intervals before and during fasting. Fat intake increased significantly during fasting (P = < 0.001. Conclusions: The dietary composition in a type 2 diabetic Muslim population who undertook fasting during Ramadan showed a mean increase in consumption of all components of diet during the period of fasting. Nutritional compliance during such a time seems to be difficult and warrants repeated counseling and regular follow-up to achieve targets.

  8. The adipose transcriptional response to insulin is determined by obesity, not insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydén, Mikael; Hrydziuszko, Olga; Mileti, Enrichetta

    2016-01-01

    Metabolically healthy obese subjects display preserved insulin sensitivity and a beneficial white adipose tissue gene expression pattern. However, this observation stems from fasting studies when insulin levels are low. We investigated adipose gene expression by 5'Cap-mRNA sequencing in 17 healthy...... non-obese (NO), 21 insulin-sensitive severely obese (ISO), and 30 insulin-resistant severely obese (IRO) subjects, before and 2 hr into a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. ISO and IRO subjects displayed a clear but globally similar transcriptional response to insulin, which differed from the small...... effects observed in NO subjects. In the obese, 231 genes were altered; 71 were enriched in ISO subjects (e.g., phosphorylation processes), and 52 were enriched in IRO subjects (e.g., cellular stimuli). Common cardio-metabolic risk factors and gender do not influence these findings. This study demonstrates...

  9. The metabolic responses induced by acute dexamethasone predict glucose tolerance and insulin secretion over 10 years in relatives of type 2 diabetic subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durck, Tina Trier; Henriksen, Jan Erik; Egede, Mette Brogaard

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the metabolic and insulin secretory responses to dexamethasone with the metabolic responses observed at 10 years in normoglycaemic relatives of type 2 diabetic and healthy control subjects.......This study aimed to compare the metabolic and insulin secretory responses to dexamethasone with the metabolic responses observed at 10 years in normoglycaemic relatives of type 2 diabetic and healthy control subjects....

  10. Circulating complement-C1q TNF-related protein 1 levels are increased in patients with type 2 diabetes and are associated with insulin sensitivity in Chinese subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuebo Pan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Complement-C1q TNF-related protein 1 (CTRP1, a member of the CTRP superfamily, possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-diabetic effects in mice. However, the clinical relevance of CTRP1 has been seldom explored. The current study aimed to investigate the association of circulating CTRP1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in a Chinese population. DESIGN AND METHODS: Serum CTRP1 and adiponectin levels of 96 T2DM patients and 85 healthy subjects were determined by ELISA, and their associations with adiposity, glucose and lipid profiles were studied. In a subgroup of this study, the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT was performed in 20 healthy and 20 T2DM subjects to evaluate the relationship among serum levels of CTRP1 and adiponectin, insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. RESULTS: Serum CTRP1 levels were significantly increased in patients with T2DM, compared with healthy controls (p<0.001. Similar to adiponectin, serum levels of CTRP1 were significantly correlated to several parameters involved in glucose metabolism and insulin resistance, and independently associated with fasting glucose levels (p<0.05 after BMI and gender adjustments. Furthermore, CTRP1 levels were positively correlated to insulin secretion, while negatively to insulin sensitivity, as measured by OGTT. CONCLUSION: CTRP1 is a novel adipokine associated with T2DM in humans. The paradoxical increase of serum CTRP1 levels in T2DM subjects may be due to a compensatory response to the adverse glucose and lipid metabolism, which warrants further investigation.

  11. Evaluation of fasting state-/oral glucose tolerance test-derived measures of insulin release for the detection of genetically impaired β-cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke A Herzberg-Schäfer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To date, fasting state- and different oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT-derived measures are used to estimate insulin release with reasonable effort in large human cohorts required, e.g., for genetic studies. Here, we evaluated twelve common (or recently introduced fasting state-/OGTT-derived indices for their suitability to detect genetically determined β-cell dysfunction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A cohort of 1364 White European individuals at increased risk for type 2 diabetes was characterized by OGTT with glucose, insulin, and C-peptide measurements and genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs known to affect glucose- and incretin-stimulated insulin secretion. One fasting state- and eleven OGTT-derived indices were calculated and statistically evaluated. After adjustment for confounding variables, all tested SNPs were significantly associated with at least two insulin secretion measures (p≤0.05. The indices were ranked according to their associations' statistical power, and the ranks an index obtained for its associations with all the tested SNPs (or a subset were summed up resulting in a final ranking. This approach revealed area under the curve (AUC(Insulin(0-30/AUC(Glucose(0-30 as the best-ranked index to detect SNP-dependent differences in insulin release. Moreover, AUC(Insulin(0-30/AUC(Glucose(0-30, corrected insulin response (CIR, AUC(C-Peptide(0-30/AUC(Glucose(0-30, AUC(C-Peptide(0-120/AUC(Glucose(0-120, two different formulas for the incremental insulin response from 0-30 min, i.e., the insulinogenic indices (IGI(2 and IGI(1, and insulin 30 min were significantly higher-ranked than homeostasis model assessment of β-cell function (HOMA-B; p<0.05. AUC(C-Peptide(0-120/AUC(Glucose(0-120 was best-ranked for the detection of SNPs involved in incretin-stimulated insulin secretion. In all analyses, HOMA-β displayed the highest rank sums and, thus, scored last. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: With AUC(Insulin(0

  12. Identification of direct and indirect social network effects in the pathophysiology of insulin resistance in obese human subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian H C A Henning

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to examine to what extent different social network mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of obesity and insulin-resistance. DESIGN: We used nonparametric and parametric regression models to analyse whether individual BMI and HOMA-IR are determined by social network characteristics. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A total of 677 probands (EGO and 3033 social network partners (ALTER were included in the study. Data gathered from the probands include anthropometric measures, HOMA-IR index, health attitudes, behavioural and socio-economic variables and social network data. RESULTS: We found significant treatment effects for ALTERs frequent dieting (p<0.001 and ALTERs health oriented nutritional attitudes (p<0.001 on EGO's BMI, establishing a significant indirect network effect also on EGO's insulin resistance. Most importantly, we also found significant direct social network effects on EGO's insulin resistance, evidenced by an effect of ALTERs frequent dieting (p = 0.033 and ALTERs sport activities (p = 0.041 to decrease EGO's HOMA-IR index independently of EGO's BMI. CONCLUSIONS: Social network phenomena appear not only to be relevant for the spread of obesity, but also for the spread of insulin resistance as the basis for type 2 diabetes. Attitudes and behaviour of peer groups influence EGO's health status not only via social mechanisms, but also via socio-biological mechanisms, i.e. higher brain areas might be influenced not only by biological signals from the own organism, but also by behaviour and knowledge from different human individuals. Our approach allows the identification of peer group influence controlling for potential homophily even when using cross-sectional observational data.

  13. Targeted metabolomic analysis reveals the association between the postprandial change in palmitic acid, branched-chain amino acids and insulin resistance in young obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liyan; Feng, Rennan; Guo, Fuchuan; Li, Ying; Jiao, Jundong; Sun, Changhao

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is the result of a positive energy balance and often leads to difficulties in maintaining normal postprandial metabolism. The changes in postprandial metabolites after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in young obese Chinese men are unclear. In this work, the aim is to investigate the complex metabolic alterations in obesity provoked by an OGTT using targeted metabolomics. We used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ultra high performance liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry to analyze serum fatty acids, amino acids and biogenic amines profiles from 15 control and 15 obese subjects at 0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 min during an OGTT. Metabolite profiles from 30 obese subjects as independent samples were detected in order to validate the change of metabolites. There were the decreased levels of fatty acid, amino acids and biogenic amines after OGTT in obesity. At 120 min, percent change of 20 metabolites in obesity has statistical significance when comparing with the controls. The obese parameters was positively associated with changes in arginine and histidine (Pchange in palmitic acid (PA), branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and phenylalanine between 1 and 120 min were positively associated with fasting insulin and HOMA-IR (all Presistance in obesity. Our findings offer new insights in the complex physiological regulation of the metabolism during an OGTT in obesity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Temporal Patterns of Subjective Experiences and Self-Regulation during Ramadan Fasting among Elite Archers: A Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Jolly; Hamidan, Shazarina; Singh, Rabindarjeet

    2011-09-01

    Some major competitions (e.g. London Olympics, 2012) are scheduled during the Ramadan fasting month. Little attention has been given to explore the archers' performance related subjective experiences with a qualitative method. Therefore, this study addressed individual archers' subjective experiences within the framework of self-regulation during Ramadan. Eleven elite Malaysian Muslim fasting archers volunteered to participate in the study. Grounded theory was the qualitative approach used to examine the subjective experiences of athletes during Ramadan. Interviews were conducted and inductive content analysis was adopted to identify the temporal patterns of self-regulation of subjective experiences across the fasting period. Inductive content analysis identified (a) physical, (b) mental,(c) emotional, (d) behavioral, and (e) spiritual experiences. Overall patterns revealed that experiences associated with physical, emotional, behavioral, and spiritual dimensions dominated in the first phase of fasting, while the mental dimension surfaced increasingly in the latter phase of fasting. The trend showed changes in the patterns of experiences among the major domains across the temporal dimension. Athletes reported increased subjective experiences in mental factors toward the latter half of the fasting period. Practitioners should emphasize on mental aspects of training, as these appear to be salient in archery performance.

  15. Effects of acute exposure to increased plasma branched-chain amino acid concentrations on insulin-mediated plasma glucose turnover in healthy young subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Everman

    Full Text Available Plasma branched-chain amino acids (BCAA are inversely related to insulin sensitivity of glucose metabolism in humans. However, currently, it is not known whether there is a cause-and-effect relationship between increased plasma BCAA concentrations and decreased insulin sensitivity.To determine the effects of acute exposure to increased plasma BCAA concentrations on insulin-mediated plasma glucose turnover in humans.Ten healthy subjects were randomly assigned to an experiment where insulin was infused at 40 mU/m2/min (40U during the second half of a 6-hour intravenous infusion of a BCAA mixture (i.e., BCAA; N = 5 to stimulate plasma glucose turnover or under the same conditions without BCAA infusion (Control; N = 5. In a separate experiment, seven healthy subjects were randomly assigned to receive insulin infusion at 80 mU/m2/min (80U in association with the above BCAA infusion (N = 4 or under the same conditions without BCAA infusion (N = 3. Plasma glucose turnover was measured prior to and during insulin infusion.Insulin infusion completely suppressed the endogenous glucose production (EGP across all groups. The percent suppression of EGP was not different between Control and BCAA in either the 40U or 80U experiments (P > 0.05. Insulin infusion stimulated whole-body glucose disposal rate (GDR across all groups. However, the increase (% in GDR was not different [median (1st quartile - 3rd quartile] between Control and BCAA in either the 40U ([199 (167-278 vs. 186 (94-308] or 80 U ([491 (414-548 vs. 478 (409-857] experiments (P > 0.05. Likewise, insulin stimulated the glucose metabolic clearance in all experiments (P 0.05.Short-term exposure of young healthy subjects to increased plasma BCAA concentrations does not alter the insulin sensitivity of glucose metabolism.

  16. Effects of acute exposure to increased plasma branched-chain amino acid concentrations on insulin-mediated plasma glucose turnover in healthy young subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everman, Sarah; Mandarino, Lawrence J; Carroll, Chad C; Katsanos, Christos S

    2015-01-01

    Plasma branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are inversely related to insulin sensitivity of glucose metabolism in humans. However, currently, it is not known whether there is a cause-and-effect relationship between increased plasma BCAA concentrations and decreased insulin sensitivity. To determine the effects of acute exposure to increased plasma BCAA concentrations on insulin-mediated plasma glucose turnover in humans. Ten healthy subjects were randomly assigned to an experiment where insulin was infused at 40 mU/m2/min (40U) during the second half of a 6-hour intravenous infusion of a BCAA mixture (i.e., BCAA; N = 5) to stimulate plasma glucose turnover or under the same conditions without BCAA infusion (Control; N = 5). In a separate experiment, seven healthy subjects were randomly assigned to receive insulin infusion at 80 mU/m2/min (80U) in association with the above BCAA infusion (N = 4) or under the same conditions without BCAA infusion (N = 3). Plasma glucose turnover was measured prior to and during insulin infusion. Insulin infusion completely suppressed the endogenous glucose production (EGP) across all groups. The percent suppression of EGP was not different between Control and BCAA in either the 40U or 80U experiments (P > 0.05). Insulin infusion stimulated whole-body glucose disposal rate (GDR) across all groups. However, the increase (%) in GDR was not different [median (1st quartile - 3rd quartile)] between Control and BCAA in either the 40U ([199 (167-278) vs. 186 (94-308)] or 80 U ([491 (414-548) vs. 478 (409-857)] experiments (P > 0.05). Likewise, insulin stimulated the glucose metabolic clearance in all experiments (P BCAA in either of the experiments (P > 0.05). Short-term exposure of young healthy subjects to increased plasma BCAA concentrations does not alter the insulin sensitivity of glucose metabolism.

  17. Study of optimal basal insulin glargine dose requirement in Indian population as an add on therapy to oral hypoglycaemic agents to achieve target fasting blood glucose levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, S K; Singh, B K; Wadhwa, Roopak

    2013-09-01

    Optimal dosing of basal insulin is needed to achieve target fasting blood glucose and to avoid hypoglycaemia on the other hand in patients of type 2 diabetes on bedtime basal insulin and daytime sulfonylureas. This is an open label, randomised prospective study done in 40 type 2 diabetics having uncontrolled diabetes. Statistical analysis was performed by the SPSS programme for windows, version 17.0. Continuous variables are presented as mean +/- SD, and categorical variables are presented as absolute numbers and percentage. Data were checked for normality before statistical analysis. Normally distributed continuous variables were compared from baseline to 12th week using paired t-test. The average dose requirement of insulin glargine was 33.55 +/- 11.94 units (mean +/- SD). The average insulin glargine dose requirement per kg body weight was 0.48 +/- 0.17 units/kg body weight. The range of insulin dose was 0.23 to 0.96 units/kg body weight. Dose titration is patient specific and should be done in order to achieve target fasting blood glucose.

  18. A randomized controlled trial using glycemic plus fetal ultrasound parameters versus glycemic parameters to determine insulin therapy in gestational diabetes with fasting hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjos, S L; Schaefer-Graf, U; Sardesi, S; Peters, R K; Buley, A; Xiang, A H; Bryne, J D; Sutherland, C; Montoro, M N; Buchanan, T A

    2001-11-01

    To compare management based on maternal glycemic criteria with management based on relaxed glycemic criteria and fetal abdominal circumference (AC) measurements in order to select patients for insulin treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) with fasting hyperglycemia. In a pilot study, 98 women with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) concentrations of 105-120 mg/dl were randomized. The standard group received insulin treatment. The experimental group received insulin if the AC, measured monthly, was > or =70th percentile and/or if any venous FPG measurement was >120 mg/dl. Power was projected to detect a 250-g difference in birth weights. Gestational ages, maternal glycemia, and AC percentiles were similar at randomization. After initiation of protocol, venous FPG (P = 0.003) and capillary blood glucose levels (P = 0.049) were significantly lower in the standard group. Birth weights (3,271 +/- 458 vs. 3,369 +/- 461 g), frequencies of birth weights >90th percentile (6.3 vs 8.3%), and neonatal morbidity (25 vs. 25%) did not differ significantly between the standard and experimental groups, respectively. The cesarean delivery rate was significantly lower (14.6 vs. 33.3%, P = 0.03) in the standard group; this difference was not explained by birth weights. In the experimental group, infants of women who did not receive insulin had lower birth weights than infants of mothers treated with insulin (3,180 +/- 425 vs. 3,482 +/- 451 g, P = 0.03). In women with GDM and fasting hyperglycemia, glucose plus fetal AC measurements identified pregnancies at low risk for macrosomia and resulted in the avoidance of insulin therapy in 38% of patients without increasing rates of neonatal morbidity.

  19. Alterations in insulin-signaling and coagulation pathways in platelets during hyperglycemia-hyperinsulinemia in healthy non-diabetic subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, A Koneti; Freishtat, Robert J; Jalagadugula, Gauthami; Singh, Anamika; Mao, Guangfen; Wiles, Andrew; Cheung, Peter; Boden, Guenther

    2014-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a prothrombotic and proinflammatory state. Hyperglycemia (HG) is encountered even in patients without DM. We have shown that combined HG and hyperinsulinemia (HI) in healthy non-diabetic subjects increased circulating tissue factor (TF) and thrombin generation. To understand the changes in platelet and monocyte pathways induced by combined HG and HI in healthy non-diabetic state, we performed whole genome expression profiling of leukocyte-depleted platelets and monocytes before and after 24 hours of combined HG (glucose ~200mg/dL) and HI by glucose infusion clamp in a healthy non-diabetic subject. We defined time-dependent differential mRNA expression (24 versus 0 hour fold change (FC) ≥ 2) common to platelets and monocytes. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis revealed alterations in canonical insulin receptor signaling and coagulation pathways. A preliminary group of 9 differentially expressed genes was selected for qRT-PCR confirmation. Platelet 24 hour sample was compared to the 0 hour sample plus 4 controls. Five transcripts in platelets and 6 in monocytes were confirmed. Platelet GSK3B and PTPN1 were upregulated, and STXBP4 was downregulated in insulin signaling, and F3 and TFPI were upregulated in coagulation pathways. Monocyte, PIK3C3, PTPN11 and TFPI were downregulated. Platelet GSKβ3 and PTPN11 protein and TF antigen in platelets and monocytes was increased. Even in non-diabetic state, HG+HI for 24 hours induces changes in platelets and monocytes. They suggest downregulation of insulin signaling and upregulation of TF. Further studies are needed to elucidate cellular alterations leading to the prothrombotic and proinflammatory state in DM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Intranasal insulin: from nose to brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkin, R I

    2010-06-01

    Intranasal insulin has proven useful to control hyperglycemia in diabetics but its mechanism of action has not been well defined. We attempted to understand several aspects of human insulin metabolism by measurement of and interaction of insulin and its associated moieties in nasal mucus, saliva and blood plasma under various physiological and pathological conditions. Insulin, insulin receptors, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and insulin-like growth receptor 3 (IGFR3) were measured in nasal mucus, saliva and blood plasma in normal subjects, in thin and obese subjects and in diabetics under fasting and fed conditions. There are complex relationships among each of these moieties in each biological fluid. Insulin and its associated moieties are present in both nasal mucus and saliva. These moieties in nasal mucus and saliva report on physiological and pathological changes in glucose metabolism as do these moieties in plasma. Indeed, insulin and its associated moieties in nasal mucus may offer specific data on how insulin enters the brain and thereby play essential roles in control of insulin metabolism. These data support the concept that insulin is synthesized not only in parotid glands but also in nasal serous glands. They also support the concept that insulin enters the brain following intranasal administration either 1) by direct entry through the cribriform plate, along the olfactory nerves and into brain parenchyma, 2) by entry through specific receptors in blood-brain barrier and thereby into the brain or 3) some combination of 1) and 2). Conversely, data also show that insulin introduced directly into the brain is secreted out of brain into the peripheral circulation. Data in this study demonstrate for the first time that insulin and its associated moieties are present not only in saliva but also in nasal mucus. How these complex relationships among nasal mucus, saliva and plasma occur are unclear but results demonstrate these relationships play separate

  1. Increased mortality risk in diabetic patients discharged from hospital with insulin therapy after an acute myocardial infarction: Data from the FAST-MI 2005 registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, Vincent; Ferrières, Jean; Danchin, Nicolas; Puymirat, Etienne; Zeller, Marianne; Simon, Tabassome; Carrié, Didier

    2017-07-01

    Merits of insulin use for diabetes treatment in patients with advanced atherosclerosis are debated. This observational study conducted in diabetic patients after an acute myocardial infarction aimed to assess whether insulin prescription at discharge (IPD) was related to all-cause mortality during follow-up. Subjects were diabetic patients admitted in intensive- or coronary-care units for acute myocardial infarction (consecutively recruited in 223 centres in France) and discharged alive from the hospital, with or without an IPD. Vital status after five years was obtained and the relationship between insulin prescription at discharge and survival was studied. Overall, 1221 diabetic patients were discharged alive and 38% had an IPD. Factors independently related to IPD were female gender, hospitalization in a public hospital, duration of diabetes, HbA1c level, smoking, peripheral artery disease, history of coronary heart disease and Killip class. After adjustment, IPD was independently related to all-cause mortality after five years of follow-up (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.72 (1.42-2.09), p<0.001). This increased mortality in subjects with IPD was also observed in propensity matched analyses, when subjects actually treated or actually not treated with insulin at discharge were compared in two groups matched on their computed probability of having had insulin prescribed. Insulin was preferably prescribed in seriously affected patients, regarding diabetes and cardiovascular risk. However, insulin prescription at discharge was associated with increased all-cause mortality after extensive adjustments for confounders. These results suggest possible intrinsic harmful effects of insulin in high-risk diabetic patients after myocardial infarction.

  2. Sex and muscle structural lipids in obese subjects - an impact on insulin action?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, SB; Vaag, A.; Høy, Carl-Erik

    2008-01-01

    resistance, despite the fact that an android fat distribution is detrimental to insulin action. The increased extramyocellular fat mass of obese women may act in a paracrine manner such that its release of free FA and cytokines may hamper in situ desaturation and elongation of FA in skeletal muscle...... distribution, nine non-diabetic obese men with a typical android fat distribution and 12 (seven females) lean age matched healthy controls (body mass index 34.6 +/- 1.0 kg m(-2), 36.5 +/- 1.2 and 22.5 +/- 0.5; age 47 +/- 2 years, 51 +/- 3 and 49 +/- 2). RESULTS: Obese women displayed decreased LCPUFA n-3...... to controls (Ps android...

  3. Subjective Perception of Sports Performance, Training, Sleep and Dietary Patterns of Malaysian Junior Muslim Athletes during Ramadan Intermittent Fasting

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Rabindarjeet; Hwa, Ooi Cheong; Roy, Jolly; Jin, Chai Wen; Ismail, Siti Musyrifah; Lan, Mohamad Faizal; Hiong, Loo Lean; Aziz, Abdul-Rashid

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To examine the subjective perception of daily acute fasting on sports performance, training, sleep and dietary patterns of Muslim athletes during the Ramadan month. Methods Seven hundred and thirty-four (411 male and 323 female) Malaysian Junior-level Muslim athletes (mean age 16.3 ± 2.6 y) participated in the survey which was designed to establish the personal perception of their sport performance, sleep pattern, food and fluid intake during Ramadan fasting. The survey was conducted ...

  4. The rs553668 polymorphism of the ADRA2A gene predicts the worsening of fasting glucose values in a cohort of subjects without diabetes. A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, S; Cassader, M; Cavallo-Perin, P; Durazzo, M; Rosato, R; Gambino, R

    2012-04-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the human ADRA2A gene have been associated with increased risk of Type 2 diabetes. The associations between the rs553668 polymorphism and fasting glucose concentrations both cross-sectionally and longitudinally after 6-year follow-up were evaluated in an adult Caucasian population-based cohort. From a cohort of 1658 individuals, after excluding patients with diabetes, those who died and those whose blood samples were not available for genotyping, data of 1345 individuals were analysed. Subjects homozygous for the A allele showed significantly increased baseline fasting glucose values and a significant worsening of fasting glucose (β = 0.48; 95% CI 0.10-0.86) and insulin secretion (β =-20.75; -32.67 to -8.82 for homeostasis model assessment for β-cell function) at follow-up by using generalized estimating equations. Incidence of impaired fasting glucose and diabetes was almost twofold higher in subjects homozygous for the A allele (respectively: incident impaired fasting glucose 7.6-8.2, 16.1%, incident diabetes 1.7-2.3, 3.2% in GG, AG, AA carriers). Our results suggested that the rs553668 polymorphism is associated with glucose worsening in subjects without diabetes at baseline. © 2011 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2011 Diabetes UK.

  5. Special considerations with insulin therapy in older adults with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooradian, Arshag D

    2011-06-01

    Aging is associated with alterations in insulin secretion and action. However, aging per se does not alter the pharmacokinetics of commercially available insulin and its analogues. Insulin therapy in older adults is complicated by psychosocial and physiological changes of aging. Several new insulin and insulin analogue preparations are now available for clinical use. Used as prandial (e.g. insulin lispro, insulin aspart or insulin glulisine) and basal insulin (e.g. insulin glargine, insulin detemir), these analogues simulate physiological insulin profiles more closely than the older conventional insulins. The availability of multiple insulin products provides new opportunities to achieve control of diabetes mellitus. The choice of initial insulin therapy can be made based on blood glucose profiles. Overall, these profiles can be divided into three general patterns that include: (i) round-the-clock hyperglycaemia; (ii) fasting hyperglycaemia with daytime euglycaemia; and (iii) daytime hyperglycaemia with normal fasting blood glucose levels. The prescription of insulin is a dynamic process, and the insulin regimen should be adjusted based on individual response. The goal of diabetes care in older adults is to enhance quality of life without subjecting individuals to complicated treatment regimens that may interfere with their independence in carrying out daily activities.

  6. Tesaglitazar, a dual peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha/gamma agonist, improves apolipoprotein levels in non-diabetic subjects with insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuster, H.; Fagerberg, B.; Edwards, S.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To determine the effects of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) alpha/gamma agonist tesaglitazar on serum levels of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, apoB, and apoCIII in non-diabetic insulin-resistant subjects. Methods: This randomized, double-blind, multicentre, placebo...... associated with insulin resistance. (C) 2007 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2008/3...

  7. Fatty Acids, Obesity and Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arner, Peter; Rydén, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Although elevated free fatty acid (FFA) levels in obesity have been considered to be of importance for insulin resistance, a recent meta-analysis suggested normal FFA levels in obese subjects. We investigated fasting circulating FFA and glycerol levels in a large cohort of non-obese and obese subjects. Subjects recruited for a study on obesity genetics were investigated in the morning after an overnight fast (n = 3,888). Serum FFA (n = 3,306), plasma glycerol (n = 3,776), and insulin sensitivity index (HOMA-IR,n = 3,469) were determined. Obesity was defined as BMI ≥ 30 kg/m 2 and insulin resistance as HOMA-IR ≥ 2.21. In obese subjects, circulating FFA and glycerol levels were higher than in non-obese individuals (by 26% and 47%, respectively; both p Insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes were associated with a further minor increase in FFA/glycerol among obese subjects. When comparing insulin-sensitive non-obese with insulin-sensitive or -resistant obese individuals, FFA and glycerol were 21–29% and 43–49% higher in obese individuals, respectively. Circulating FFA and glycerol levels are markedly elevated in obesity but only marginally influenced by insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Whether these differences persist during diurnal variations in circulating FFA/glycerol, remains to be established

  8. Associations between self-reported sleep duration and sleeping disorder with concentrations of fasting and 2-h glucose, insulin, and glycosylated hemoglobin among adults without diagnosed diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Earl S; Wheaton, Anne G; Chapman, Daniel P; Li, Chaoyang; Perry, Geraldine S; Croft, Janet B

    2014-07-01

    There is limited information from population-based investigations of the associations between sleep duration and sleep disorders and parameters of glucose homeostasis. The objective of the present study was to examine cross-sectional associations between sleep duration and sleep disordered breathing with concentrations of insulin, fasting and 2-h glucose, and HbA1c. Data from 11 815 adults aged ≥20 years without diagnosed diabetes (5002 with an oral glucose tolerance test) from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2010 were used. Information about sleep duration (2005-2010) and sleep apnea and sleep-disordered breathing (2005-2008) was obtained via questionnaire. An estimated 36.0% of participants reported sleeping ≤6 h/night, 62.0% reported sleeping 7-9 h/night, and 2.0% reported sleeping ≥10 h/night. In 2005-2008, 33.0% reported snoring ≥5 nights per week, 5.9% reported they snorted, gasped, or stopped breathing ≥5 nights/week, and 4.2% reported sleep apnea. Sleep duration was significantly associated with fasting concentrations of insulin and concentrations of HbA1c only in models that did not adjust for body mass index (BMI). Concentrations of fasting and 2-h glucose were significantly associated with sleep duration in models that adjusted only for age. Snoring frequency was positively associated with concentrations of insulin and HbA1c. Frequency of snorting or stopping breathing and sleep apnea status were associated with concentrations of insulin and of HbA1c only when BMI was not accounted for. In a representative sample of US adults, concentrations of insulin and HbA1c were significantly associated with short sleep duration, possibly mediated by BMI. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. Lower cardiorespiratory fitness contributes to increased insulin resistance and fasting glycaemia in middle-aged South Asian compared with European men living in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghouri, N; Purves, D; McConnachie, A; Wilson, J; Gill, J M R; Sattar, N

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to determine the extent to which increased insulin resistance and fasting glycaemia in South Asian men, compared with white European men, living in the UK, was due to lower cardiorespiratory fitness (maximal oxygen uptake [VO(2max)]) and physical activity. One hundred South Asian and 100 age- and BMI-matched European men without diagnosed diabetes, aged 40-70 years, had fasted blood taken for measurement of glucose concentration, HOMA-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA(IR)), plus other risk factors, and underwent assessment of physical activity (using accelerometry), VO(2max), body size and composition, and demographic and other lifestyle factors. For 13 South Asian and one European man, HbA1c levels were >6.5% (>48 mmol/mol), indicating potential undiagnosed diabetes; these men were excluded from the analyses. Linear regression models were used to determine the extent to which body size and composition, fitness and physical activity variables explained differences in HOMA(IR) and fasting glucose between South Asian and European men. HOMA(IR) and fasting glucose were 67% (p < 0.001) and 3% (p < 0.018) higher, respectively, in South Asians than Europeans. Lower VO(2max), lower physical activity and greater total adiposity in South Asians individually explained 68% (95% CI 45%, 91%), 29% (11%, 46%) and 52% (30%, 80%), respectively, and together explained 83% (50%, 119%) (all p < 0.001) of the ethnic difference in HOMA(IR). Lower VO(2max) and greater total adiposity, respectively, explained 61% (9%, 111%) and 39% (9%, 76%) (combined effect 63% [8%, 115%]; all p < 0.05) of the ethnic difference in fasting glucose. Lower cardiorespiratory fitness is a key factor associated with the excess insulin resistance and fasting glycaemia in middle-aged South Asian, compared with European, men living in the UK.

  10. Glucose tolerance, insulin release, and insulin binding to monocytes in kidney transplant recipients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, W.A.; Wielechowski, K.S.; Mahajan, S.K.; Migdal, S.D.; McDonald, F.D.

    1982-03-01

    In order to evaluate glucose tolerance following renal transplantation, intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTT), with evaluation of hormonal responses to the intravenous glucose load and percent specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding to peripheral blood monocytes, were studied in eight clinically stable kidney transplant recipients. For comparison purposes, identical studies were done in eight control subjects and seven clinically stable hemodialysis patients. One transplant recipient was glucose intolerant, with fasting hyperglycemia, elevated HbA1C, and abnormal glucose decay constant. Impaired pancreatic insulin release appeared to be the major factor accounting for his glucose intolerance. The seven glucose-tolerant transplant recipients had significantly increased insulin release during IVGTT compared to control subjects, and significant correlations were found among insulin release, glucose decay constant, and fasting blood sugar in those patients. Insulin binding to monocytes was significantly greater in transplant recipients than control subjects due to an increase in insulin binding capacity per cell. A significant correlation was found between percent specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding and steroid dose, expressed as mg/kg body weight/day, in those patients. Thus, chronic steroid administration does not cause glucose intolerance in transplant recipients who manifest steroid-associated increases in pancreatic insulin release and cellular insulin binding capacity.

  11. Hepatic insulin sensitivity in healthy and prediabetic subjects: from a dual- to a single-tracer oral minimal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visentin, Roberto; Dalla Man, Chiara; Basu, Rita; Basu, Ananda; Rizza, Robert A; Cobelli, Claudio

    2015-07-15

    Recently, a model was proposed to assess hepatic insulin sensitivity during a meal, i.e., the ability of insulin to suppress glucose production (EGP), SI (P). The model was developed on EGP data obtained from a triple-tracer meal and the tracer-to-tracee clamp technique and validated against the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. The aim of this study was to assess whether SI (P) can be obtained from plasma concentrations measured after a single-tracer meal by incorporating the above EGP model into the oral glucose minimal model by describing both glucose production and disposal (OMM(PD)). Triple-tracer meal data of two databases (20 healthy and 60 healthy and prediabetic subjects) were used. Virtually model-independent EGP estimates were calculated. OMM(PD) was identified on exogenous and endogenous glucose concentrations, providing indices of SI (P), disposal insulin sensitivity (SI (D)), and EGP. The model fitted the data well, and SI (P) and SI (D) were estimated with precision in both databases (SI (P) = 5.48 ± 0.54 10(-4) dl·kg(-1)·min(-1) per μU/ml and SI (D) = 9.93 ± 2.18 10(-4) dl·kg(-1)·min(-1) per μU/ml in healthy; SI (P) = 5.41 ± 3.55 10(-4) dl·kg(-1)·min(-1) per μU/ml and SI (D) = 5.34 ± 6.17 10(-4) dl·kg(-1)·min(-1) per μU/ml, in healthy and prediabetic subjects). Estimated SI (P) and that derived from the triple-tracer EGP model were very similar on average. Moreover, the time course of EGP normalized to basal EGP (EGPb), and EGP/EGPb agreed with the results obtained using the triple-tracer method. In this study, we have demonstrated that SI (P), SI (D), and EGP/EGPb time course can be estimated reliably from a single-tracer meal protocol in both healthy and prediabetic subjects. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Hypoglycemic effect of triphala on selected non insulin dependent Diabetes mellitus subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Sowmya S; Antony, Seema

    2008-01-01

    Modern life style is characterized by high stress, increased automation, junk food consumption and sedentary life style which have lead to the incidence of Diabetes. The study involved selection of NIDDM subjects who were supplemented with Triphala powder called, The Three Myrobalans (Terminalia bellirica- Belliric myrobalan, Terminalia chebula-Inknut, Embilica officinalis - Indian gooseberry) for a period of 45 days. Statistical evaluation of the blood profile showed significant reduction in the blood glucose level of the subjects.

  13. A low-frequency inactivating AKT2 variant enriched in the Finnish population is associated with fasting insulin levels and type 2 diabetes risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grarup, Niels; Rivas, Manuel A; Mahajan, Anubha; Locke, Adam E; Cingolani, Pablo; Pers, Tune H; Viñuela, Ana; Brown, Andrew A; Wu, Ying; Flannick, Jason; Fuchsberger, Christian; Gamazon, Eric R; Gaulton, Kyle J; Im, Hae Kyung; Teslovich, Tanya M; Blackwell, Thomas W; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Burtt, Noël P; Chen, Yuhui; Green, Todd; Hartl, Christopher; Kang, Hyun Min; Kumar, Ashish; Ladenvall, Claes; Ma, Clement; Moutsianas, Loukas; Pearson, Richard D; Perry, John R B; Rayner, N William; Robertson, Neil R; Scott, Laura J; van de Bunt, Martijn; Eriksson, Johan G; Jula, Antti; Koskinen, Seppo; Lehtimäki, Terho; Palotie, Aarno; Raitakari, Olli T; Jacobs, Suzanne BR; Wessel, Jennifer; Chu, Audrey Y; Scott, Robert A; Goodarzi, Mark O; Blancher, Christine; Buck, Gemma; Buck, David; Chines, Peter S; Gabriel, Stacey; Gjesing, Anette P; Groves, Christopher J; Hollensted, Mette; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Jackson, Anne U; Jun, Goo; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Mangino, Massimo; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Neville, Matt; Onofrio, Robert; Small, Kerrin S; Stringham, Heather M; Trakalo, Joseph; Banks, Eric; Carey, Jason; Carneiro, Mauricio O; DePristo, Mark; Farjoun, Yossi; Fennell, Timothy; Goldstein, Jacqueline I; Grant, George; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Maguire, Jared; Neale, Benjamin M; Poplin, Ryan; Purcell, Shaun; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Shakir, Khalid; Smith, Joshua D; Strom, Tim M; Wieland, Thomas; Lindstrom, Jaana; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; Lakka, Timo A; Doney, Alex S F; Nilsson, Peter; Wareham, Nicholas J; Langenberg, Claudia; Varga, Tibor V; Franks, Paul W; Rolandsson, Olov; Rosengren, Anders H; Farook, Vidya S; Thameem, Farook; Puppala, Sobha; Kumar, Satish; Lehman, Donna M; Jenkinson, Christopher P; Curran, Joanne E; Hale, Daniel Esten; Fowler, Sharon P; Arya, Rector; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Abboud, Hanna E; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Hicks, Pamela J; Palmer, Nicholette D; Ng, Maggie C Y; Bowden, Donald W; Freedman, Barry I; Esko, Tõnu; Mägi, Reedik; Milani, Lili; Mihailov, Evelin; Metspalu, Andres; Narisu, Narisu; Kinnunen, Leena; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Swift, Amy; Pasko, Dorota; Wood, Andrew R; Fadista, João; Pollin, Toni I; Barzilai, Nir; Atzmon, Gil; Glaser, Benjamin; Thorand, Barbara; Strauch, Konstantin; Peters, Annette; Roden, Michael; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Liang, Liming; Kriebel, Jennifer; Illig, Thomas; Grallert, Harald; Gieger, Christian; Meisinger, Christa; Lannfelt, Lars; Musani, Solomon K; Griswold, Michael; Taylor, Herman A; Wilson, Gregory; Correa, Adolfo; Oksa, Heikki; Scott, William R; Afzal, Uzma; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Loh, Marie; Chambers, John C; Sehmi, Jobanpreet; Kooner, Jaspal Singh; Lehne, Benjamin; Cho, Yoon Shin; Lee, Jong-Young; Han, Bok-Ghee; Käräjämäki, Annemari; Qi, Qibin; Qi, Lu; Huang, Jinyan; Hu, Frank B; Melander, Olle; Orho-Melander, Marju; Below, Jennifer E; Aguilar, David; Wong, Tien Yin; Liu, Jianjun; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Chia, Kee Seng; Lim, Wei Yen; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chan, Edmund; Tai, E Shyong; Aung, Tin; Linneberg, Allan; Isomaa, Bo; Meitinger, Thomas; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Hakaste, Liisa; Kravic, Jasmina; Jørgensen, Marit E; Lauritzen, Torsten; Deloukas, Panos; Stirrups, Kathleen E; Owen, Katharine R; Farmer, Andrew J; Frayling, Timothy M; O'Rahilly, Stephen P; Walker, Mark; Levy, Jonathan C; Hodgkiss, Dylan; Hattersley, Andrew T; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Stančáková, Alena; Barroso, Inês; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan; Chan, Juliana; Chandak, Giriraj R; Daly, Mark J; Donnelly, Peter J; Ebrahim, Shah B; Elliott, Paul; Fingerlin, Tasha; Froguel, Philippe; Hu, Cheng; Jia, Weiping; Ma, Ronald C W; McVean, Gilean; Park, Taesung; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Sandhu, Manjinder; Scott, James; Sladek, Rob; Tandon, Nikhil; Teo, Yik Ying; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Watanabe, Richard M; Koistinen, Heikki A; Kesaniemi, Y Antero; Uusitupa, Matti; Spector, Timothy D; Salomaa, Veikko; Rauramaa, Rainer; Palmer, Colin N A; Prokopenko, Inga; Morris, Andrew D; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Lind, Lars; Ingelsson, Erik; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Karpe, Fredrik; Groop, Leif; Jørgensen, Torben; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Kuusisto, Johanna; Abecasis, Gonçalo; Bell, Graeme I; Blangero, John; Cox, Nancy J; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Seielstad, Mark; Wilson, James G; Dupuis, Josee; Ripatti, Samuli; Hanis, Craig L; Florez, Jose C; Mohlke, Karen L; Meigs, James B; Laakso, Markku; Morris, Andrew P; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David; McCarthy, Mark I; Gloyn, Anna L; Lindgren, Cecilia M

    2017-01-01

    To identify novel coding association signals and facilitate characterization of mechanisms influencing glycemic traits and type 2 diabetes risk, we analyzed 109,215 variants derived from exome array genotyping together with an additional 390,225 variants from exome sequence in up to 39,339 normoglycemic individuals from five ancestry groups. We identified a novel association between the coding variant (p.Pro50Thr) in AKT2 and fasting insulin, a gene in which rare fully penetrant mutations are causal for monogenic glycemic disorders. The low-frequency allele is associated with a 12% increase in fasting plasma insulin (FI) levels. This variant is present at 1.1% frequency in Finns but virtually absent in individuals from other ancestries. Carriers of the FI-increasing allele had increased 2-hour insulin values, decreased insulin sensitivity, and increased risk of type 2 diabetes (odds ratio=1.05). In cellular studies, the AKT2-Thr50 protein exhibited a partial loss of function. We extend the allelic spectrum for coding variants in AKT2 associated with disorders of glucose homeostasis and demonstrate bidirectional effects of variants within the pleckstrin homology domain of AKT2. PMID:28341696

  14. The complement system is dysfunctional in metabolic disease: Evidences in plasma and adipose tissue from obese and insulin resistant subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2017-10-26

    The relationship between chronic low-grade inflammation, insulin resistance and other obesity-associated metabolic disturbances is increasingly recognized. The possible mechanisms that trigger these immunologic alterations remain to be fully understood. The complement system is a crucial element of immune defense system, being important in the activation of innate and adaptative immune response, promoting the clearance of apoptotic and damaged endogenous cells and participating in processes of tissue development, degeneration, and regeneration. Circulating components of the complement system appear to be dysregulated in obesity-associated metabolic disturbances. The activation of the complement system is also evident in adipose tissue from obese subjects, in association with subclinical inflammation and alterations in glucose metabolism. The possible contribution of some components of the complement system in the development of insulin resistance and obesity-associated metabolic disturbances, and the possible role of complement system in adipose tissue physiology is reviewed here. The modulation of the complement system could constitute a potential target in the pathophysiology and therapy of obesity and associated metabolic disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Low-Frequency Inactivating Akt2 Variant Enriched in the Finnish Population is Associated With Fasting Insulin Levels and Type 2 Diabetes Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Manning, A; Highland, HM; Gasser, J.; Sim, X.; Tukiainen, T.; Fontanillas, P.; Grarup, N.; Rivas, MA; Mahajan, A.; Locke, AE; Cingolani, P; Pers, TH; Viñuela, A; Brown, AA; Wu, Y.

    2017-01-01

    To identify novel coding association signals and facilitate characterization of mechanisms influencing glycemic traits and type 2 diabetes risk, we analyzed 109,215 variants derived from exome array genotyping together with an additional 390,225 variants from exome sequence in up to 39,339 normoglycemic individuals from five ancestry groups. We identified a novel association between the coding variant (p.Pro50Thr) in AKT2 and fasting insulin, a gene in which rare fully penetrant mutations are...

  16. Improvement of glycaemia control in subjects with type 2 diabetes by self-monitoring of blood glucose: comparison of two management programs adjusting bedtime insulin dosage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H-S; Wu, T-E; Jap, T-S; Lin, S-H; Hsiao, L-C; Lin, H-D

    2008-01-01

    Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is important for patients treated with insulin to detect asymptomatic hypoglycaemia and to guide patients towards reaching blood glucose goal. This study compared two management programs for adjusting bedtime insulin dose: program 1 (performed by study subjects) vs. program 2 (performed by study subjects and reminded by investigators). This is a prospective, open-level, 28-week randomized trial in poorly controlled type 2 diabetic subjects. One hundred subjects treated with oral antidiabetic drugs plus bedtime insulin with glycated haemoglobin A(1C) (A1C) >8.0% were screened and received a structure education package in a 4-week run-in period. Seventy-eight subjects were randomized to two treatment programs (adjust insulin dose by themselves with or without investigators' reminder) and reviewed by the investigators at a 4-week interval clinical visit. The mean SMBG decreased significantly in both groups, with a greater decrease observed in program 2 vs. program 1 (from 198.7 +/- 43.1 to 122.6 +/- 21.9 mg/dl vs. from 194.0 +/- 42.7 to 151.6 +/- 37.7 mg/dl, p Bedtime insulin dose increased in both groups with a greater increase in program 2 (from 14.4 +/- 8.7 to 27.4 +/- 12.8 IU vs. from 14.3 +/- 8.3 to 18.4 +/- 6.2 IU, p weight changes. Systematically titrating bedtime insulin dose added to oral therapy, especially combined with health care reminders, can safely improve glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes with poor glycaemic control. This regimen may facilitate safe and effective insulin therapy in routine medical practice and improve achievement of recommended standards of diabetes care.

  17. Effects of short-term very low-calorie diet on intramyocellular lipid and insulin sensitivity in nondiabetic and type 2 diabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara-Castro, Cristina; Newcomer, Bradley R; Rowell, Jennifer; Wallace, Penny; Shaughnessy, Sara M; Munoz, A Julian; Shiflett, Alanna M; Rigsby, Dana Y; Lawrence, Jeannine C; Bohning, Daryl E; Buchthal, Steven; Garvey, W Timothy

    2008-01-01

    The study aimed to analyze the effects of a short-term very low-calorie diet (VLCD) on intramyocellular lipid (IMCL), total body fat, and insulin sensitivity in a group of obese nondiabetic and type 2 diabetic subjects. Seven untreated type 2 diabetic and 5 obese nondiabetic individuals were studied before and after a 6-day VLCD using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to quantify IMCL, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry to assess body fat, and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps to measure peripheral insulin sensitivity. In both groups, decrements in total body fat mass and body mass index were small but statistically significant. In contrast, the diet resulted in a pronounced reduction in IMCL compared with baseline values in nondiabetic subjects (56% decrease) and type 2 diabetic subjects (40% decrease) (P increase in maximally stimulated glucose disposal rate (P lipid was significantly correlated with insulin sensitivity (r = -0.69, P insulin sensitivity was related to measures of general adiposity such as body mass index, percentage of body fat, or total body fat (P = not significant). In conclusion, short-term VLCD is accompanied by small decrements in general adiposity, marked decrease in IMCL, and an increase in insulin sensitivity in nondiabetic and type 2 diabetic subjects. Therefore, rapid amelioration of insulin resistance by VLCD can be partially explained by loss of IMCL both in nondiabetic and type 2 diabetic subjects in the absence of substantial changes in total body fat. These observations are consistent with the idea that insulin resistance is more directly related to IMCL rather than to body fat per se.

  18. Effects of a meal rich in 1,3-diacylglycerol on postprandial cardiovascular risk factors and the glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide in subjects with high fasting triacylglycerol concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Kentaro; Mizuno, Tomohito; Shiiba, Daisuke; Kawagoe, Tadanobu; Mitsui, Yuuki

    2012-03-14

    It was previously reported that compared to triacylglycerol (TAG) oil, diacylglycerol (DAG) oil improves postprandial lipid response. However, the effects of DAG oil on postprandial hyperglycemia and incretin response have not yet been determined. In this study, the effects of DAG oil on both postprandial hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia and the response to the glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) were studied. This randomized, double-blind, crossover study analyzed data for 41 individuals with high fasting triacylglycerol concentrations. The subjects ingested test meals (30.3 g of protein, 18.6 g of fat, and 50.1 g of carbohydrate) containing 10 g of DAG oil (DAG meal) or TAG oil (TAG meal) after fasting for at least 12 h. Blood samples were collected prior to and 0.5, 2, 3, 4, and 6 h after ingestion of the test meal. Postprandial TAG concentrations were significantly lower after the DAG meal compared with the TAG meal. Postprandial TAG, insulin, and GIP concentrations were significantly lower after the DAG meal compared with the TAG meal in 26 subjects with fasting serum TAG levels between 1.36 and 2.83 mmol/L. DAG-oil-based meals, as a replacement for TAG oil, may provide cardiovascular benefits in high-risk individuals by limiting lipid and insulin excursions.

  19. Impaired basal glucose effectiveness but unaltered fasting glucose release and gluconeogenesis during short-term hypercortisolemia in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael F; Caumo, Andrea; Chandramouli, Visvanathan

    2004-01-01

    Excess cortisol has been demonstrated to impair hepatic and extrahepatic insulin action. To determine whether glucose effectiveness and, in terms of endogenous glucose release (EGR), gluconeogenesis, also are altered by hypercortisolemia, eight healthy subjects were studied after overnight infusion...... contribution of gluconeogenesis to EGR (P = 0.33) did not differ on the two study days. During the prandial glucose infusion, the integrated glycemic response above baseline was higher in the presence of hydrocortisone than during saline infusion (P .... In conclusion, short-term hypercortisolemia in healthy individuals with normal beta-cell function decreases insulin action but does not alter rates of EGR and gluconeogenesis. In addition, cortisol impairs the ability of glucose to suppress its own production, which due to accumulation of glucose in the glucose...

  20. Relationship of body fat with insulin resistance and cardiometabolic risk factors among normal glucose-tolerant subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gokulakrishnan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The amount of body fat, rather than the amount of excess weight, determines the health risks of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease. Aims : To look at the association of body fat percentage with cardiometabolic risk factors in subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT. Settings and Design : Cross-section study from the Chennai Urban Rural Epidemiology Study. Materials and Methods : Body fat was measured by Beurer body fat analyzer. Metabolic syndrome (MS was diagnosed based on modified ATPIII guidelines. Statistical Analysis : Student′s t test or one-way ANOVA (with Tukey′s HSD was used to compare groups for continuous variables. Results : Body mass index, waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, HOMA IR, serum cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol increased significantly with increasing tertiles of body fat (P<0.001. There was a linear increase in the percentage of body fat with increase in number of components of MS (no metabolic abnormality: 25±11, one metabolic abnormality: 28±10, two metabolic abnormalities: 33±8, and three and more metabolic abnormalities: 35±7 (P<0.001. Regression models showed significant association of body fat with MS after adjusting for age, gender, insulin resistance, and glycated hemoglobin (Odds ratio: 1.04, 95% confidence interval: 1.04 - 1.08, P<0.001. In linear regression analysis, body fat showed a significant association with insulin resistance after adjusting for age, gender, and glycated hemoglobin (β=0.030, P<0.001. Conclusions : A significant association exists between body fat, MS, and cardiometabolic risk factors even among subjects with NGT.

  1. Insulin and fiber type in the offspring of T2DM subjects with resistance training and detraining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schofield, Katherine L; Rehrer, Nancy J; Perry, Tracy L

    2012-01-01

    Effects of resistance training and detraining on glucose and insulin responses to an oral glucose load, muscle fiber type, and muscular performance in the offspring of those with type 2 diabetes (familial insulin resistant (FIR)) were investigated.......Effects of resistance training and detraining on glucose and insulin responses to an oral glucose load, muscle fiber type, and muscular performance in the offspring of those with type 2 diabetes (familial insulin resistant (FIR)) were investigated....

  2. Higher magnesium intake is associated with lower fasting glucose and insulin, with no evidence of interaction with select genetic loci, in a meta-analysis of 15 charge consortium studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favorable associations between magnesium intake and glycemic traits, such as fasting glucose and insulin, are observed in observational and clinical studies, but whether genetic variation affects these associations is largely unknown. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) assoc...

  3. Higher magnesium intake is associated with lower fasting glucose and insulin, with no evidence of interaction with select genetic loci, in a meta-analysis of 15 CHARGE consortium studies1-4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hruby (Adela); J.S. Ngwa; F. Renström (Frida); M.K. Wo.jczynski (Mary); A. Ganna (Andrea); G. Hallmans (Göran); D.K. Houston (Denise); P.F. Jacques (Paul); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); R.N. Lemaitre (Rozenn ); A. Manichaikul (Ani); K.E. North (Kari); I. Ntalla (Ioanna); E. Sonestedt (Emily); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); F.J.A. van Rooij (Frank); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); L. Djousse (Luc); E. Grigoriou (Efi); I. Johansson (Ingegerd); K. Lohman (Kurt); J.S. Pankow (James); O. Raitakari (Olli); U. Riserus (Ulf); M. Yannakoulia (Mary); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); N. Hassanali (Neelam); Y. Liu (Yongmei); D. Mozaffarian (Dariush); C. Papoutsakis (Constantina); A.C. Syvanen; A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J. Viikari (Jorma); C.J. Groves (Christopher); L. Lind (Lars); L. Lind (Lars); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); V. Mikkilä (Vera); K. Mukamal (Kenneth); O.H. Franco (Oscar); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); G.V. Dedoussis (George); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); F. Hu; E. Ingelsson (Erik); M. Kähönen (Mika); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); S.B. Kritchevsky (Stephen); M. Orho-Melander (Marju); I. Prokopenko (Inga); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); D.S. Siscovick (David); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); P.W. Franks (Paul); J.B. Meigs (James); N.M. McKeown (Nicola ); J.A. Nettleton (Jennifer )

    2013-01-01

    textabstractFavorable associations between magnesium intake and glycemic traits, such as fasting glucose and insulin, are observed in observational and clinical studies, but whether genetic variation affects these associations is largely unknown. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms

  4. Haemoglobin A1c, fasting glucose, serum C-peptide and insulin resistance in relation to serum uric acid levels-the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Choi, H. K; Ford, E. S

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fasting glucose, serum C-peptide and insulin resistance in relation to serum uric acid levels in a nationally representative sample of men and women. Methods...

  5. Green Tea Extract and Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Genotype Modify Fasting Serum Insulin and Plasma Adiponectin Concentrations in a Randomized Controlled Trial of Overweight and Obese Postmenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostal, Allison M; Samavat, Hamed; Espejo, Luis; Arikawa, Andrea Y; Stendell-Hollis, Nicole R; Kurzer, Mindy S

    2016-01-01

    Green tea consumption has been associated with favorable changes in body weight and obesity-related hormones, although it is not known whether these changes result from green tea polyphenols or caffeine. We examined the impact of decaffeinated green tea extract (GTE) containing 843 mg of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate on anthropometric variables, obesity-associated hormones, and glucose homeostasis. The Minnesota Green Tea Trial was a 12-mo randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of 937 healthy postmenopausal women assigned to either decaffeinated GTE (1315 mg total catechins/d) or a placebo, stratified by catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) genotype. This study was conducted in a subset of 237 overweight and obese participants [body mass index (BMI) ≥25 kg/m(2)]. No changes in energy intake, body weight, BMI, or waist circumference (WC) were observed over 12 mo in women taking GTE (n = 117) or placebo (n = 120). No differences were seen in circulating leptin, ghrelin, adiponectin, or glucose concentrations at month 12. Participants randomly assigned to GTE with baseline insulin ≥10 μIU/mL (n = 23) had a decrease in fasting serum insulin from baseline to month 12 (-1.43 ± 0.59 μIU/mL), whereas those randomly assigned to placebo with baseline insulin ≥10 μIU/mL (n = 19) had an increase in insulin over 12 mo (0.55 ± 0.64 μIU/mL, P < 0.01). Participants with the homozygous high-activity (G/G) form of COMT had significantly lower adiponectin (5.97 ± 0.50 compared with 7.58 ± 0.53 μg/mL, P = 0.03) and greater insulin concentrations (7.63 ± 0.53 compared with 6.18 ± 0.36 μIU/mL, P = 0.02) at month 12 compared with those with the low-activity (A/A) genotype, regardless of treatment group. Decaffeinated GTE was not associated with reductions in body weight, BMI, or WC and did not alter energy intake or mean hormone concentrations in healthy postmenopausal women over 12 mo. GTE decreased fasting insulin concentrations in those with

  6. Comparative Evaluation of Whole Body and Hepatic Insulin Resistance Using Indices from Oral Glucose Tolerance Test in Morbidly Obese Subjects with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Qureshi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and is a marker of Insulin Resistance (IR. Euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp is the gold standard for measuring whole body IR (hepatic + peripheral IR. However, it is an invasive and expensive procedure. Homeostasis Model Assessment Index for Insulin Sensitivity (HOMA-IS, Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI for hepatic IR and Insulin Sensitivity Index (ISI0,120, and Whole Body Insulin Sensitivity Index (WBISI for whole body IR are the indices calculated after Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT. We used these indices as noninvasive methods of IR (inverse of insulin sensitivity estimation and compared hepatic/peripheral components of whole body IR in NAFLD. Methods. 113 morbidly obese, nondiabetic subjects who underwent gastric bypass surgery and intraoperative liver biopsy were included in the study. OGTT was performed preoperatively and the indices were calculated. Subjects were divided into closely matched groups as normal, fatty liver (FL and Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH based on histology. Results. Whole body IR was significantly higher in both FL and NASH groups (NAFLD as compared to Normal, while hepatic IR was higher only in NASH from Normal. Conclusions. FL is a manifestation of peripheral IR but not hepatic IR.

  7. Pretreatment fasting plasma glucose and insulin modify dietary weight loss success: results from 3 randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, Mads F; Ritz, Christian; Blaak, Ellen E; Saris, Wim Hm; Langin, Dominique; Poulsen, Sanne Kellebjerg; Larsen, Thomas Meinert; Sørensen, Thorkild Ia; Zohar, Yishai; Astrup, Arne

    2017-08-01

    Background: Which diet is optimal for weight loss and maintenance remains controversial and implies that no diet fits all patients.Objective: We studied concentrations of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and fasting insulin (FI) as prognostic markers for successful weight loss and maintenance through diets with different glycemic loads or different fiber and whole-grain content, assessed in 3 randomized trials of overweight participants.Design: After an 8-wk weight loss, participants in the DiOGenes (Diet, Obesity, and Genes) trial consumed ad libitum for 26 wk a diet with either a high or a low glycemic load. Participants in the Optimal well-being, development and health for Danish children through a healthy New Nordic Diet (OPUS) Supermarket intervention (SHOPUS) trial consumed ad libitum for 26 wk the New Nordic Diet, which is high in fiber and whole grains, or a control diet. Participants in the NUGENOB (Nutrient-Gene Interactions in Human Obesity) trial consumed a hypocaloric low-fat and high-carbohydrate or a high-fat and low-carbohydrate diet for 10 wk. On the basis of FPG before treatment, participants were categorized as normoglycemic (FPG diabetic (FPG ≥7.0 mmol/L). Modifications of the dietary effects of FPG and FI before treatment were examined with linear mixed models.Results: In the DiOGenes trial, prediabetic individuals regained a mean of 5.83 kg (95% CI: 3.34, 8.32 kg; P diabetic individuals lost a mean of 2.04 kg (95% CI: -0.20, 4.28 kg; P = 0.07) more on the high-fat and low-carbohydrate diet than on the low-fat and high-carbohydrate diet, whereas normoglycemic individuals lost a mean of 0.43 kg (95% CI: 0.03, 0.83 kg; P = 0.03) more on the low-fat and high-carbohydrate diet [mean group difference: 2.47 kg (95% CI: 0.20, 4.75 kg); P = 0.03]. The addition of FI strengthened these associations.Conclusion: Elevated FPG before treatment indicates success with dietary weight loss and maintenance among overweight patients consuming diets with a low

  8. Bioequivalence study of two formulations of candesartan cilexetil tablet in healthy subjects under fasting conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjandrawinata, Raymond R; Setiawati, Effi; Yunaidi, Danang Agung; Simanjuntak, Ronal; Santoso, Iwan Dwi; Susanto, Liana W

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The present study was conducted to compare the bioavailability of two candesartan cilexetil 16 mg tablet formulations (test and reference formulations). Materials and methods This study was a randomized, single- blind, two-period, cross-over study which included 24 healthy adult male and female subjects under fasting conditions. The pharmacokinetic parameters were determined based on the concentrations of candesartan (CAS 139481-59-7), using ultra-pressure high-performance liquid chromatography with a tandem mass spectrometer detector. In each of the two study periods (separated by a washout period of 1 week), a single dose of test or reference product was administered. The pharmacokinetic parameters assessed were area under the plasma concentration time curve (AUC) from time 0 hours to 24 hours, AUC from time zero to infinity, the peak plasma concentration of the drug (Cmax), time to achieve the Cmax, and the elimination half-life. Results The geometric mean ratios (90% confidence interval) of the test drug/reference drug for candesartan were 100.92% (92.15%–110.52%) for the AUC from 0 hours to 24 hours, 100.24% (92.24%–108.95%) for the AUC from time zero to infinity, and 106.71% (93.20%–122.18%) for the Cmax. The differences between the test and reference product in the time to achieve Cmax values and elimination half-life values were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The 90% confidence intervals of the test/reference AUC ratio and Cmax ratio of candesartan were within the acceptance range for bioequivalence. There was no adverse event encountered during this bioequivalence study. Conclusion It was concluded that the two candesartan tablet formulations (the test and reference product) were bioequivalent. PMID:23990709

  9. Bioequivalence study of two formulations of candesartan cilexetil tablet in healthy subjects under fasting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjandrawinata, Raymond R; Setiawati, Effi; Yunaidi, Danang Agung; Simanjuntak, Ronal; Santoso, Iwan Dwi; Susanto, Liana W

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to compare the bioavailability of two candesartan cilexetil 16 mg tablet formulations (test and reference formulations). This study was a randomized, single- blind, two-period, cross-over study which included 24 healthy adult male and female subjects under fasting conditions. The pharmacokinetic parameters were determined based on the concentrations of candesartan (CAS 139481-59-7), using ultra-pressure high-performance liquid chromatography with a tandem mass spectrometer detector. In each of the two study periods (separated by a washout period of 1 week), a single dose of test or reference product was administered. The pharmacokinetic parameters assessed were area under the plasma concentration time curve (AUC) from time 0 hours to 24 hours, AUC from time zero to infinity, the peak plasma concentration of the drug (Cmax), time to achieve the Cmax, and the elimination half-life. The geometric mean ratios (90% confidence interval) of the test drug/reference drug for candesartan were 100.92% (92.15%-110.52%) for the AUC from 0 hours to 24 hours, 100.24% (92.24%-108.95%) for the AUC from time zero to infinity, and 106.71% (93.20%-122.18%) for the Cmax. The differences between the test and reference product in the time to achieve Cmax values and elimination half-life values were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The 90% confidence intervals of the test/reference AUC ratio and Cmax ratio of candesartan were within the acceptance range for bioequivalence. There was no adverse event encountered during this bioequivalence study. It was concluded that the two candesartan tablet formulations (the test and reference product) were bioequivalent.

  10. Hypoglycemic effect of triphala on selected non insulin dependent Diabetes mellitus subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Rajan, Sowmya S.; Antony, Seema

    2008-01-01

    Modern life style is characterized by high stress, increased automation, junk food consumption and sedentary life style which have lead to the incidence of Diabetes. The study involved selection of NIDDM subjects who were supplemented with Triphala powder called, The Three Myrobalans ( Terminalia bellirica - Belliric myrobalan, Terminalia chebula -Inknut, Embilica officinalis - Indian gooseberry) for a period of 45 days. Statistical evaluation of the blood profile showed significant reduction...

  11. Chromosome X-wide association study identifies Loci for fasting insulin and height and evidence for incomplete dosage compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukiainen, Taru; Pirinen, Matti; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Ladenvall, Claes; Kettunen, Johannes; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Perola, Markus; Sinisalo, Juha; Vlachopoulou, Efthymia; Eriksson, Johan G; Groop, Leif; Jula, Antti; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Raitakari, Olli T; Salomaa, Veikko; Ripatti, Samuli

    2014-02-01

    The X chromosome (chrX) represents one potential source for the "missing heritability" for complex phenotypes, which thus far has remained underanalyzed in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Here we demonstrate the benefits of including chrX in GWAS by assessing the contribution of 404,862 chrX SNPs to levels of twelve commonly studied cardiometabolic and anthropometric traits in 19,697 Finnish and Swedish individuals with replication data on 5,032 additional Finns. By using a linear mixed model, we estimate that on average 2.6% of the additive genetic variance in these twelve traits is attributable to chrX, this being in proportion to the number of SNPs in the chromosome. In a chrX-wide association analysis, we identify three novel loci: two for height (rs182838724 near FGF16/ATRX/MAGT1, joint P-value = 2.71×10(-9), and rs1751138 near ITM2A, P-value = 3.03×10(-10)) and one for fasting insulin (rs139163435 in Xq23, P-value = 5.18×10(-9)). Further, we find that effect sizes for variants near ITM2A, a gene implicated in cartilage development, show evidence for a lack of dosage compensation. This observation is further supported by a sex-difference in ITM2A expression in whole blood (P-value = 0.00251), and is also in agreement with a previous report showing ITM2A escapes from X chromosome inactivation (XCI) in the majority of women. Hence, our results show one of the first links between phenotypic variation in a population sample and an XCI-escaping locus and pinpoint ITM2A as a potential contributor to the sexual dimorphism in height. In conclusion, our study provides a clear motivation for including chrX in large-scale genetic studies of complex diseases and traits.

  12. Exposure to p,p′-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) induces fasting hyperglycemia without insulin resistance in male C57BL/6H mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, George E.; Meek, Edward; Kilic, Jessica; Mohns, Mariel; Mulligan, Charlee; Chambers, Janice E.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 8.3% of the United States (U.S.) population have either diagnosed or undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. Out of all the cases of diabetes mellitus, approximately 90–95% of these cases are type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Although the exact cause of T2D remains elusive, predisposing factors include age, weight, poor diet, and a sedentary lifestyle. Until recently the association between exposure to environmental contaminants and the occurrence of diabetes had been unexplored. However, recent epidemiological studies have revealed that elevated serum concentrations of certain persistent organic pollutants (POPs), especially organochlorine pesticides, are positively associated with increased prevalence of T2D and insulin resistance. The current study seeks to investigate if this association is causative or coincidental. Male C57BL/6H mice were exposed to DDE (2.0 mg/kg or 0.4 mg/kg) or vehicle (corn oil; 1 ml/kg) for five days via oral gavage; fasting blood glucose, glucose tolerance, and insulin challenge tests were performed following a seven day resting period. Exposure to DDE caused significant hyperglycemia compared to vehicle and this hyperglycemic effect persisted for up to 21 days following cessation of DDE administration. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests and phosphorylation of Akt in the liver, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue following insulin challenge were comparable between vehicle and DDE treated animals. To determine the direct effect of exposure to DDE on glucose uptake, in vitro glucose uptake assays following DDE exposure were performed in L6 myotubules and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In summary, subacute exposure to DDE does produce fasting hyperglycemia, but this fasting hyperglycemia does not appear to be mediated by insulin resistance. Thus, the current study reveals that subacute exposure to DDE does alter systemic glucose homeostasis and may be a contributing factor to the development of hyperglycemia associated with diabetes. PMID

  13. FAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuidmeer-Jongejan, Laurian; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Poulsen, Lars K.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The FAST project (Food Allergy Specific Immunotherapy) aims at the development of safe and effective treatment of food allergies, targeting prevalent, persistent and severe allergy to fish and peach. Classical allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), using subcutaneous injections with aqu......ABSTRACT: The FAST project (Food Allergy Specific Immunotherapy) aims at the development of safe and effective treatment of food allergies, targeting prevalent, persistent and severe allergy to fish and peach. Classical allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), using subcutaneous injections...... with aqueous food extracts may be effective but has proven to be accompanied by too many anaphylactic side-effects. FAST aims to develop a safe alternative by replacing food extracts with hypoallergenic recombinant major allergens as the active ingredients of SIT. Both severe fish and peach allergy are caused...... in depth serological and cellular immune analyses will be performed, allowing identification of novel biomarkers for monitoring treatment efficacy. FAST aims at improving the quality of life of food allergic patients by providing a safe and effective treatment that will significantly lower their threshold...

  14. Fasting serum hippuric acid is elevated after bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) consumption and associates with improvement of fasting glucose levels and insulin secretion in persons at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello, Vanessa Df; Lankinen, Maria A; Lindström, Jaana; Puupponen-Pimiä, Riitta; Laaksonen, David E; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Lehtonen, Marko; Uusitupa, Matti; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Törrönen, Riitta; Hanhineva, Kati

    2017-09-01

    Urinary hippuric acid has been proposed as a biomarker for fruit, vegetable, and polyphenol consumption. We assessed how serum hippuric acid changes after a bilberry-enriched diet (BB; high anthocyanin intake) and another berry diet including strawberries, raspberries, and cloudberries (SRC; lower anthocyanin intake) and how these changes associate with insulin and glucose metabolism. Hippuric acid was measured with LC-QTOF-MS metabolite profiling analysis from fasting serum samples at baseline and after an 8-week intervention in 47 individuals with features of the metabolic syndrome who were randomized to either a BB diet (n = 15), an SRC diet (n = 20) or a control diet (n = 12). Fasting serum hippuric acid increased significantly (3.5-fold, p = 0.001) only in the BB group and correlated with changes in fasting plasma glucose concentration (r = -0.54, p < 0.05) and insulin secretion (r = 0.59, p < 0.05). These associations were confirmed in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study (n = 198). Fasting serum hippuric acid is increased after consumption of anthocyanin-rich bilberries, and may contribute to the beneficial effect of bilberry consumption through its associations with better glycemic control and β-cell function. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Massive weight loss restores 24-hour growth hormone release profiles and serum insulin-like growth factor-I levels in obese subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M H; Hvidberg, A; Juul, A

    1995-01-01

    In the present study, we 1) determined whether the impaired spontaneous 24-h GH secretion as well as the blunted GH response to provocative testing in obese subjects are persistent disorders or transient defects reversed with weight loss and 2) investigated 24-h urinary GH excretion and basal...... levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), as well as insulin in obese subjects before and after a massive weight loss. We studied 18 obese subjects (age, 26 +/- 1 yr; body mass index, 40.9 +/- 1.1 kg/m2); 18 normal age-, and sex-matched control subjects; and 9...... reversible defects in 24-h spontaneous GH release profiles, basal IGF-I levels, and the IGF-I/IGFBP-3 molar ratio in obese subjects. The recovery of the 24-h GH release points to an acquired transient defect rather than a persistent preexisting disorder....

  16. A genome-wide approach accounting for body mass index identifies genetic variants influencing fasting glycemic traits and insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manning, Alisa K.; Hivert, Marie-France; Scott, Robert A.; Grimsby, Jonna L.; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Chen, Han; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Prokopenko, Inga; Amin, Najaf; Barnes, Daniel; Cadby, Gemma; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ingelsson, Erik; Jackson, Anne U.; Johnson, Toby; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ladenvall, Claes; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lahti, Jari; Lecoeur, Cecile; Liu, Yongmei; Martinez-Larrad, Maria Teresa; Montasser, May E.; Navarro, Pau; Perry, John R. B.; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Salo, Perttu; Sattar, Naveed; Shungin, Dmitry; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Tanaka, Toshiko; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; An, Ping; de Andrade, Mariza; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Aspelund, Thor; Atalay, Mustafa; Aulchenko, Yurii; Balkau, Beverley; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Beilby, John P.; Bellis, Claire; Bergman, Richard N.; Blangero, John; Boban, Mladen; Boehnke, Michael; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Boettcher, Yvonne; Bouchard, Claude; Brunner, Eric; Budimir, Danijela; Campbell, Harry; Carlson, Olga; Chines, Peter S.; Clarke, Robert; Collins, Francis S.; Corbaton-Anchuelo, Arturo; Couper, David; de Faire, Ulf; Dedoussis, George V.; Deloukas, Panos; Dimitriou, Maria; Egan, Josephine M.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Erdos, Michael R.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Eury, Elodie; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G.; Fox, Caroline S.; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Franks, Paul W.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Froguel, Philippe; Galan, Pilar; de Geus, Eco; Gigante, Bruna; Glazer, Nicole L.; Goel, Anuj; Groop, Leif; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hallmans, Goeran; Hamsten, Anders; Hansson, Ola; Harris, Tamara B.; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Simon; Hercberg, Serge; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hingorani, Aroon; Hofman, Albert; Hui, Jennie; Hung, Joseph; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jhun, Min A.; Johnson, Paul C. D.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Jula, Antti; Kao, W. H.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Kivimaki, Mika; Kolcic, Ivana; Kovacs, Peter; Kumari, Meena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo; Lannfelt, Lars; Lathrop, G. Mark; Launer, Lenore J.; Leander, Karin; Li, Guo; Lind, Lars; Lindstrom, Jaana; Lobbens, Stephane; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Luan, Jian'an; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Magi, Reedik; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Marmot, Michael; Meneton, Pierre; Mohlke, Karen L.; Mooser, Vincent; Morken, Mario A.; Miljkovic, Iva; Narisu, Narisu; O'Connell, Jeff; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Palotie, Aarno; Pankow, James S.; Peden, John F.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Pehlic, Marina; Peltonen, Leena; Penninx, Brenda; Pericic, Marijana; Perola, Markus; Perusse, Louis; Peyser, Patricia A.; Polasek, Ozren; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Province, Michael A.; Raikkonen, Katri; Rauramaa, Rainer; Rehnberg, Emil; Rice, Ken; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Saaristo, Timo; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Salomaa, Veikko; Savage, David B.; Saxena, Richa; Schwarz, Peter; Seedorf, Udo; Sennblad, Bengt; Serrano-Rios, Manuel; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Siscovick, David S.; Smit, Johannes H.; Small, Kerrin S.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Stancakova, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stumvoll, Michael; Sun, Yan V.; Swift, Amy J.; Toenjes, Anke; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Trompet, Stella; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Uusitupa, Matti; Vikstrom, Max; Vitart, Veronique; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Voight, Benjamin F.; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Watkins, Hugh; Wheeler, Eleanor; Widen, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H.; Willems, Sara M.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Wright, Alan F.; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Zelenika, Diana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; Wareham, Nicholas J.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Barroso, Ines; Watanabe, Richard M.; Florez, Jose C.; Dupuis, Josee; Meigs, James B.; Langenberg, Claudia

    Recent genome-wide association studies have described many loci implicated in type 2 diabetes (T2D) pathophysiology and beta-cell dysfunction but have contributed little to the understanding of the genetic basis of insulin resistance. We hypothesized that genes implicated in insulin resistance

  17. A genome-wide approach accounting for body mass index identifies genetic variants influencing fasting glycemic traits and insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manning, Alisa K; Hivert, Marie-France; Scott, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have described many loci implicated in type 2 diabetes (T2D) pathophysiology and β-cell dysfunction but have contributed little to the understanding of the genetic basis of insulin resistance. We hypothesized that genes implicated in insulin resistance pathw...

  18. Impact of Bromocriptine-QR Therapy on Glycemic Control and Daily Insulin Requirement in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Subjects Whose Dysglycemia Is Poorly Controlled on High-Dose Insulin: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Erin D; Chamarthi, Bindu; Raskin, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The concurrent use of a postprandial insulin sensitizing agent, such as bromocriptine-QR, a quick release formulation of bromocriptine, a dopamine D2 receptor agonist, may offer a strategy to improve glycemic control and limit/reduce insulin requirement in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients on high-dose insulin. This open label pilot study evaluated this potential utility of bromocriptine-QR. Ten T2DM subjects on metformin (1-2 gm/day) and high-dose (TDID ≥ 65 U/day) basal-bolus insulin were enrolled to receive once daily (morning) bromocriptine-QR (1.6-4.8 mg/day) for 24 weeks. Subjects with at least one postbaseline HbA1c measurement (N = 8) were analyzed for change from baseline HbA(1c), TDID, and postprandial glucose area under the curve of a four-hour mixed meal tolerance test (MMTT). Compared to the baseline, average HbA1c decreased 1.76% (9.74 ± 0.56 to 7.98 ± 0.36, P = 0.01), average TDID decreased 27% (199 ± 33 to 147 ± 31, P = 0.009), and MMTT AUC(60-240) decreased 32% (P = 0.04) over the treatment period. The decline in HbA(1c) and TDID was observed at 8 weeks and sustained over the remaining 16-week study duration. In this study, bromocriptine-QR therapy improved glycemic control and meal tolerance while reducing insulin requirement in T2DM subjects poorly controlled on high-dose insulin therapy.

  19. Original paper: Efficacy and safety analysis of insulin degludec/insulin aspart compared with biphasic insulin aspart 30: A phase 3, multicentre, international, open-label, randomised, treat-to-target trial in patients with type 2 diabetes fasting during Ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, Mohamed; Echtay, Akram Salim; Malek, Rachid; Omar, Mahomed; Shaikh, Shehla Sajid; Ekelund, Magnus; Kaplan, Kadriye; Kamaruddin, Nor Azmi

    2017-11-26

    To compare the efficacy and safety of insulin degludec/insulin aspart (IDegAsp) and biphasic insulin aspart 30 (BIAsp 30) before, during and after Ramadan in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who fasted during Ramadan. In this multinational, randomised, treat-to-target trial, patients with T2DM who intended to fast and were on basal, pre- or self-mixed insulin ± oral antidiabetic drugs for ≥90 days were randomised (1:1) to IDegAsp twice daily (BID) or BIAsp 30 BID. Treatment period included pre-Ramadan treatment initiation (with insulin titration for 8-20 weeks), Ramadan (4 weeks) and post-Ramadan (4 weeks). Insulin doses were reduced by 30-50% for the pre-dawn meal (suhur) on the first day of Ramadan, and readjusted to the pre-Ramadan levels at the end of Ramadan. Hypoglycaemia was analysed as overall (severe or plasma glucose Ramadan, despite achieving significantly lower pre-iftar (meal at sunset) self-measured plasma glucose (estimated treatment difference: -0.54 mmol/L [-1.02; -0.07]95% CI, p = .0247; post hoc) with similar overall glycaemic efficacy, IDegAsp showed significantly lower overall and nocturnal hypoglycaemia rates versus BIAsp 30. IDegAsp is a suitable therapeutic agent for patients who need insulin for sustained glucose control before, during and after Ramadan fasting, with a significantly lower risk of hypoglycaemia, versus BIAsp 30, an existing premixed insulin analogue. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Impact of metformin versus the prandial insulin secretagogue, repaglinide, on fasting and postprandial glucose and lipid responses in non-obese patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Søren S; Tarnow, Lise; Frandsen, Merete

    2008-01-01

    the curve (AUC) for plasma glucose, triglycerides and free fatty acids (FFA) changed equally between treatments. In contrast, fasting levels and AUC of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, non-high-density lipoprotein (non-HDL) cholesterol and serum insulin were lower during...... daily or vice versa each during 4 months with 1-month washout between interventions. METHODS: Postprandial metabolism was evaluated by a standard test meal (3515 kJ; 54% fat, 13% protein and 33% carbohydrate) with blood sampling 0-6 h postprandially. RESULTS: Fasting levels and total area under...... metformin than repaglinide (mean (95% confidence intervals), LDL cholesterol difference metformin versus repaglinide: AUC: -0.17 mmol/l (-0.26; -0.08)). AUC differences remained significant after adjusting for fasting levels. CONCLUSIONS: In non-obese T2DM patients, metformin reduced postprandial levels...

  1. Fasting and postprandial remnant-like particle cholesterol concentrations in obese participants are associated with plasma triglycerides, insulin resistance, and body fat distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Hees, Anneke M. J.; Saris, Wim H. M.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.

    2008-01-01

    (n = 613) also participated in a 10-wk weight loss program (-2510 kJ/d), being randomized to either a low-fat or a high-fat diet (20-25 vs. 40-45en% fat). Postprandial RLP-C was associated with fasting RLP-C, waist:hip ratio (WHR), HOMA(IR) (homeostasis model assessment index for insulin resistance......, independently mediated by weight loss, improvements in HOMA(IR), and the fat content of the prescribed diet. However, after inclusion of plasma triglyceride (TG), HDL-cholesterol, and FFA concentrations in the models, HOMA(IR) and WHR no longer significantly predicted fasting RLP-C, although WHR remained...... of lean and obese participants. All participants (n = 740) underwent a test meal challenge containing 95 energy % (en%) fat (energy content 50% of predicted daily resting metabolic rate). Fasting and postprandial concentrations of circulating metabolites were measured over a 3-h period. Obese participants...

  2. Post-exercise abdominal, subcutaneous adipose tissue lipolysis in fasting subjects is inhibited by infusion of the somatostatin analogue octreotide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Lotte H; Polak, Jan; Simonsen, Lene

    2007-01-01

    -clearance method. Nine subjects were studied during 1-h basal rest, and then during continuous octreotide infusion during 1-h rest, 1-h exercise at 50% of maximal oxygen consumption and 4-h post-exercise rest. A control study on seven subjects was performed under similar conditions but without octreotide infusion.......c., abdominal adipose tissue metabolism, before, during and after exercise in healthy, fasting, young male subjects. The adipose tissue net releases of fatty acids and glycerol were measured by arterio-venous catheterizations and simultaneous measurements of adipose tissue blood flow with the local Xe...

  3. Random non-fasting C-peptide testing can identify patients with insulin-treated type 2 diabetes at high risk of hypoglycaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Suzy V; Knight, Bridget A; Shields, Beverley M; Hill, Anita V; Choudhary, Pratik; Strain, W David; McDonald, Timothy J; Jones, Angus G

    2017-10-05

    The aim of this study was to determine whether random non-fasting C-peptide (rCP) measurement can be used to assess hypoglycaemia risk in insulin-treated type 2 diabetes. We compared continuous glucose monitoring-assessed SD of blood glucose and hypoglycaemia duration in 17 patients with insulin-treated type 2 diabetes and severe insulin deficiency (rCP  600 pmol/l). We then assessed the relationship between rCP and questionnaire-based measures of hypoglycaemia in 256 patients with insulin-treated type 2 diabetes and a comparison group of 209 individuals with type 1 diabetes. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM)-assessed glucose variability and hypoglycaemia was greater in individuals with rCP C-peptide, SD of glucose was 4.2 (95% CI 3.7, 4.6) vs 3.0 (2.6, 3.4) mmol/l (p C-peptide vs high-C-peptide group, the proportion of individuals experiencing sustained hypoglycaemia ≤ 4 mmol/l was 94% vs 41% (p C-peptide (1.8 [1.2, 2.6] episodes per person per week vs 0.4 [0.1, 0.8] episodes per person per week for low vs high C-peptide, p = 0.04) and only occurred at night. In a population-based cohort with insulin-treated type 2 diabetes, self-reported hypoglycaemia was twice as frequent in those with rCP C-peptide was similar in individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Low rCP is associated with increased glucose variability and hypoglycaemia in patients with insulin-treated type 2 diabetes and represents a practical, stable and inexpensive biomarker for assessment of hypoglycaemia risk.

  4. Is fast food addictive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Andrea K; Lustig, Robert H

    2011-09-01

    Studies of food addiction have focused on highly palatable foods. While fast food falls squarely into that category, it has several other attributes that may increase its salience. This review examines whether the nutrients present in fast food, the characteristics of fast food consumers or the presentation and packaging of fast food may encourage substance dependence, as defined by the American Psychiatric Association. The majority of fast food meals are accompanied by a soda, which increases the sugar content 10-fold. Sugar addiction, including tolerance and withdrawal, has been demonstrated in rodents but not humans. Caffeine is a "model" substance of dependence; coffee drinks are driving the recent increase in fast food sales. Limited evidence suggests that the high fat and salt content of fast food may increase addictive potential. Fast food restaurants cluster in poorer neighborhoods and obese adults eat more fast food than those who are normal weight. Obesity is characterized by resistance to insulin, leptin and other hormonal signals that would normally control appetite and limit reward. Neuroimaging studies in obese subjects provide evidence of altered reward and tolerance. Once obese, many individuals meet criteria for psychological dependence. Stress and dieting may sensitize an individual to reward. Finally, fast food advertisements, restaurants and menus all provide environmental cues that may trigger addictive overeating. While the concept of fast food addiction remains to be proven, these findings support the role of fast food as a potentially addictive substance that is most likely to create dependence in vulnerable populations.

  5. Subjective Perception of Sports Performance, Training, Sleep and Dietary Patterns of Malaysian Junior Muslim Athletes during Ramadan Intermittent Fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rabindarjeet; Hwa, Ooi Cheong; Roy, Jolly; Jin, Chai Wen; Ismail, Siti Musyrifah; Lan, Mohamad Faizal; Hiong, Loo Lean; Aziz, Abdul-Rashid

    2011-09-01

    To examine the subjective perception of daily acute fasting on sports performance, training, sleep and dietary patterns of Muslim athletes during the Ramadan month. Seven hundred and thirty-four (411 male and 323 female) Malaysian Junior-level Muslim athletes (mean age 16.3 ± 2.6 y) participated in the survey which was designed to establish the personal perception of their sport performance, sleep pattern, food and fluid intake during Ramadan fasting. The survey was conducted during and immediately after the month of Ramadan in 2009. Twenty-four percent of the athletes perceived that there was an adverse effect of the Ramadan fast on their sporting performance and 29.3% reported that quality of training during Ramadan was also negatively influenced. Majority (48.2%) of the athletes stated that Ramadan fasting did not affect their normal sleep pattern but 66.6% of them complained of sleepiness during the daytime. Half of the athletes (41.4%) maintained the caloric intake during Ramadan as they normally would with the majority of them (76.2%) reporting that they consumed more fluids during Ramadan. Overall, Malaysian Junior-level Muslim athletes showed diverse views in their perception of changes in their training, sleep and dietary patterns during Ramadan fast. These individual differences probably indicate differences in the athletes' adaptability and coping strategies during fasting and training in Ramadan.

  6. Subjective Perception of Sports Performance, Training, Sleep and Dietary Patterns of Malaysian Junior Muslim Athletes during Ramadan Intermittent Fasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rabindarjeet; Hwa, Ooi Cheong; Roy, Jolly; Jin, Chai Wen; Ismail, Siti Musyrifah; Lan, Mohamad Faizal; Hiong, Loo Lean; Aziz, Abdul-Rashid

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To examine the subjective perception of daily acute fasting on sports performance, training, sleep and dietary patterns of Muslim athletes during the Ramadan month. Methods Seven hundred and thirty-four (411 male and 323 female) Malaysian Junior-level Muslim athletes (mean age 16.3 ± 2.6 y) participated in the survey which was designed to establish the personal perception of their sport performance, sleep pattern, food and fluid intake during Ramadan fasting. The survey was conducted during and immediately after the month of Ramadan in 2009. Results Twenty-four percent of the athletes perceived that there was an adverse effect of the Ramadan fast on their sporting performance and 29.3% reported that quality of training during Ramadan was also negatively influenced. Majority (48.2%) of the athletes stated that Ramadan fasting did not affect their normal sleep pattern but 66.6% of them complained of sleepiness during the daytime. Half of the athletes (41.4%) maintained the caloric intake during Ramadan as they normally would with the majority of them (76.2%) reporting that they consumed more fluids during Ramadan. Conclusions Overall, Malaysian Junior-level Muslim athletes showed diverse views in their perception of changes in their training, sleep and dietary patterns during Ramadan fast. These individual differences probably indicate differences in the athletes’ adaptability and coping strategies during fasting and training in Ramadan. PMID:22375236

  7. Bioequivalence study of two formulations of candesartan cilexetil tablet in healthy subjects under fasting conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjandrawinata RR

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Raymond R Tjandrawinata,1 Effi Setiawati,2 Danang Agung Yunaidi,2 Ronal Simanjuntak,2 Iwan Dwi Santoso,2 Liana W Susanto1 1Dexa Laboratories of Biomolecular Sciences (DLBS, Cikarang, Indonesia; 2Bioavailability and Bioequivalence Laboratory, PT Equilab International, Jakarta, Indonesia Introduction: The present study was conducted to compare the bioavailability of two candesartan cilexetil 16 mg tablet formulations (test and reference formulations. Materials and methods: This study was a randomized, single- blind, two-period, cross-over study which included 24 healthy adult male and female subjects under fasting conditions. The pharmacokinetic parameters were determined based on the concentrations of candesartan (CAS 139481-59-7, using ultra-pressure high-performance liquid chromatography with a tandem mass spectrometer detector. In each of the two study periods (separated by a washout period of 1 week, a single dose of test or reference product was administered. The pharmacokinetic parameters assessed were area under the plasma concentration time curve (AUC from time 0 hours to 24 hours, AUC from time zero to infinity, the peak plasma concentration of the drug (Cmax, time to achieve the Cmax, and the elimination half-life. Results: The geometric mean ratios (90% confidence interval of the test drug/reference drug for candesartan were 100.92% (92.15%–110.52% for the AUC from 0 hours to 24 hours, 100.24% (92.24%–108.95% for the AUC from time zero to infinity, and 106.71% (93.20%–122.18% for the Cmax. The differences between the test and reference product in the time to achieve Cmax values and elimination half-life values were not statistically significant (P > 0.05. The 90% confidence intervals of the test/reference AUC ratio and Cmax ratio of candesartan were within the acceptance range for bioequivalence. There was no adverse event encountered during this bioequivalence study. Conclusion: It was concluded that the two candesartan tablet

  8. Chronic fructose substitution for glucose or sucrose in food or beverages has little effect on fasting blood glucose, insulin, or triglycerides: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Rebecca A; Frese, Michael; Romero, Julio; Cunningham, Judy H; Mills, Kerry E

    2017-08-01

    Background: Conflicting evidence exists on the role of long-term fructose consumption on health. No systematic review has addressed the effect of isoenergetic fructose replacement of other sugars and its effect on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting blood glucose, insulin, and triglycerides.Objective: The objective of this study was to review the evidence for a reduction in fasting glycemic and insulinemic markers after chronic, isoenergetic replacement of glucose or sucrose in foods or beverages by fructose. The target populations were persons without diabetes, those with impaired glucose tolerance, and those with type 2 diabetes.Design: We searched the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform Search Portal, and clinicaltrials.gov The date of the last search was 26 April 2016. We included randomized controlled trials of isoenergetic replacement of glucose, sucrose, or both by fructose in adults or children with or without diabetes of ≥2 wk duration that measured fasting blood glucose. The main outcomes analyzed were fasting blood glucose and insulin as well as fasting triglycerides, blood lipoproteins, HbA1c, and body weight.Results: We included 14 comparison arms from 11 trials, including 277 patients. The studies varied in length from 2 to 10 wk (mean: 28 d) and included doses of fructose between 40 and 150 g/d (mean: 68 g/d). Fructose substitution in some subgroups resulted in significantly but only slightly lowered fasting blood glucose (-0.14 mmol/L; 95% CI: -0.24, -0.036 mmol/L), HbA1c [-10 g/L (95% CI: -12.90, -7.10 g/L; impaired glucose tolerance) and -6 g/L (95% CI: -8.47, -3.53 g/L; normoglycemia)], triglycerides (-0.08 mmol/L; 95% CI: -0.14, -0.02 mmol/L), and body weight (-1.40 kg; 95% CI: -2.07, -0.74 kg). There was no effect on fasting blood insulin or blood lipids.Conclusions: The evidence suggests that the substitution of fructose for glucose or sucrose in food or beverages may be of benefit to

  9. Microneedle-array patches loaded with hypoxia-sensitive vesicles provide fast glucose-responsive insulin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jicheng; Zhang, Yuqi; Ye, Yanqi; DiSanto, Rocco; Sun, Wujin; Ranson, Davis; Ligler, Frances S; Buse, John B; Gu, Zhen

    2015-07-07

    A glucose-responsive "closed-loop" insulin delivery system mimicking the function of pancreatic cells has tremendous potential to improve quality of life and health in diabetics. Here, we report a novel glucose-responsive insulin delivery device using a painless microneedle-array patch ("smart insulin patch") containing glucose-responsive vesicles (GRVs; with an average diameter of 118 nm), which are loaded with insulin and glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme. The GRVs are self-assembled from hypoxia-sensitive hyaluronic acid (HS-HA) conjugated with 2-nitroimidazole (NI), a hydrophobic component that can be converted to hydrophilic 2-aminoimidazoles through bioreduction under hypoxic conditions. The local hypoxic microenvironment caused by the enzymatic oxidation of glucose in the hyperglycemic state promotes the reduction of HS-HA, which rapidly triggers the dissociation of vesicles and subsequent release of insulin. The smart insulin patch effectively regulated the blood glucose in a mouse model of chemically induced type 1 diabetes. The described work is the first demonstration, to our knowledge, of a synthetic glucose-responsive device using a hypoxia trigger for regulation of insulin release. The faster responsiveness of this approach holds promise in avoiding hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia if translated for human therapy.

  10. Reference intervals for glucose, beta-cell polypeptides and counterregulatory factors during prolonged fasting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Wildner-Christensen, M; Eshøj, O

    2001-01-01

    To establish reference intervals for the pancreatic beta-cell response and the counterregulatory hormone response to prolonged fasting, we studied 33 healthy subjects (16 males, 17 females) during a 72-h fast. Glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and proinsulin levels decreased (P ... of counterregulatory factors increased during the fast [P fasting (P ... decreased from the second to third day of fasting (P = 0.03). Males had higher glucose and glucagon levels and lower FFA levels during the fast (P

  11. n-3 PUFA Esterified to Glycerol or as Ethyl Esters Reduce Non-Fasting Plasma Triacylglycerol in Subjects with Hypertriglyceridemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedengran, Anne; Szecsi, Pal B; Dyerberg, Jørn

    2015-01-01

    To date, treatment of hypertriglyceridemia with long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) has been investigated solely in fasting and postprandial subjects. However, non-fasting triacylglycerols are more strongly associated with risk of cardiovascular disease. The objective......-PUFA group (P omega-3 index (EPA + DHA content in erythrocyte membranes). The omega-3 index increased 63.2 % in the AG......-associated phospholipase A2 (LpPLA2) decreased in the EE-PUFA group (P = 0.001). No serious adverse events were observed. Supplementation with long-chain n-3 PUFA lowered non-fasting triacylglycerol levels, suggestive of a reduction in cardiovascular risk. Regardless of the different effects on heart rate, HDL, and LpPLA2...

  12. Changes in platelet function, blood coagulation and fibrinolysis during insulin-induced hypoglycaemia in juvenile diabetics and normal subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard-Nielsen, J; Madsbad, S; Hilsted, J

    1982-01-01

    Haemostatic parameters were assessed before insulin induced hypoglycaemia and 0, 1 and 2 hr after discontinuation of insulin infusion in 7 non-diabetics, aged 28 (22-31) years (mean and range), and 8 juvenile diabetics, aged 31 (27-35) years, with a mean duration of diabetes of 4 years. The patie...... infusion; highest values were seen in the diabetics. The euglobulin clot lysis time (ELT) was reduced in both groups during insulin infusion; 120 min after end of insulin infusion ELT was significantly longer in the diabetics than in the control group....

  13. Chromosome X-wide association study identifies Loci for fasting insulin and height and evidence for incomplete dosage compensation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taru Tukiainen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The X chromosome (chrX represents one potential source for the "missing heritability" for complex phenotypes, which thus far has remained underanalyzed in genome-wide association studies (GWAS. Here we demonstrate the benefits of including chrX in GWAS by assessing the contribution of 404,862 chrX SNPs to levels of twelve commonly studied cardiometabolic and anthropometric traits in 19,697 Finnish and Swedish individuals with replication data on 5,032 additional Finns. By using a linear mixed model, we estimate that on average 2.6% of the additive genetic variance in these twelve traits is attributable to chrX, this being in proportion to the number of SNPs in the chromosome. In a chrX-wide association analysis, we identify three novel loci: two for height (rs182838724 near FGF16/ATRX/MAGT1, joint P-value = 2.71×10(-9, and rs1751138 near ITM2A, P-value = 3.03×10(-10 and one for fasting insulin (rs139163435 in Xq23, P-value = 5.18×10(-9. Further, we find that effect sizes for variants near ITM2A, a gene implicated in cartilage development, show evidence for a lack of dosage compensation. This observation is further supported by a sex-difference in ITM2A expression in whole blood (P-value = 0.00251, and is also in agreement with a previous report showing ITM2A escapes from X chromosome inactivation (XCI in the majority of women. Hence, our results show one of the first links between phenotypic variation in a population sample and an XCI-escaping locus and pinpoint ITM2A as a potential contributor to the sexual dimorphism in height. In conclusion, our study provides a clear motivation for including chrX in large-scale genetic studies of complex diseases and traits.

  14. Light physical activity determined by a motion sensor decreases insulin resistance, improves lipid homeostasis and reduces visceral fat in high-risk subjects: PreDiabEx study RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzig, K-H; Ahola, R; Leppäluoto, J; Jokelainen, J; Jämsä, T; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, S

    2014-08-01

    To examine physical activity (PA) thresholds affecting glucose, insulin and lipid concentrations and body fat composition in high-risk patients for type 2 diabetes (T2D). A total of 113 subjects of both genders having abnormal glucose levels in the oral glucose tolerance test were contacted. A total of 78 subjects with age 58.8±10.4 years and body mass index 31.7±5.3 kg m(-2) were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups. INTERVENTION consisted of a supervised walking (60 min three times weekly) for 3 months. All the subjects received standard care for PA and weight reduction and wore an accelerometer during the whole wakeful time. Over 80% of the daily steps clustered at an acceleration level of 0.3-0.7 g (2-3 km h(-1) of walking) and were 5870 in the intervention and 4434 in the control group (P<0.029). Between 0 and 3 months no significant changes were observed in fasting and 2-h glucose, body weight or maximal oxygen uptake. In contrast, changes in fasting and 2-h insulin (-3.4 mU l(-1), P=0.035 and -26.6, P=0.003, respectively), homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (-1.0, P=0.036), total cholesterol (-0.55 mmol l(-1), P=0.041), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (-0.36 mmol l(-1), P=0.008) and visceral fat area (-5.5 cm(2), P=0.030) were significantly greater in the intervention than in control subjects. The overall effects of PA were analyzed by quartiles of daily steps of all subjects. There were significant reductions in total and LDL cholesterol and visceral fat area between the highest (daily steps over 6520) and the lowest quartile (1780-2810 daily steps). The changes associated with PA remained significant after adjustments of baseline, sex, age and body weight change. Habitual and structured PAs with the acceleration levels of 0.3-0.7 g and daily steps over 6520, equivalent to walking at 2-3 km h(-1) for 90 min daily, standing for the relative PA intensity of 30-35% of the

  15. Fasting Serum Taurine-Conjugated Bile Acids Are Elevated in Type 2 Diabetes and Do Not Change With Intensification of Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wewalka, Marlene; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth; Barbato, Corinne; Houten, Sander M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Bile acids (BAs) are newly recognized signaling molecules in glucose and energy homeostasis. Differences in BA profiles with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) remain incompletely understood. Objective: The objective of the study was to assess serum BA composition in impaired glucose-tolerant, T2D, and normal glucose-tolerant persons and to monitor the effects of improving glycemia on serum BA composition in T2D patients. Design and Setting: This was a cross-sectional cohort study in a general population (cohort 1) and nonrandomized intervention (cohort 2). Patients and Interventions: Ninety-nine volunteers underwent oral glucose tolerance testing, and 12 persons with T2D and hyperglycemia underwent 8 weeks of intensification of treatment. Main Outcome Measures: Serum free BA and respective taurine and glycine conjugates were measured by HPLC tandem mass spectrometry. Results: Oral glucose tolerance testing identified 62 normal-, 25 impaired glucose-tolerant, and 12 T2D persons. Concentrations of total taurine-conjugated BA were higher in T2D and intermediate in impaired- compared with normal glucose-tolerant persons (P = .009). Univariate regression revealed a positive association between total taurine-BA and fasting glucose (R = 0.37, P fasting insulin (R = 0.21, P = .03), and homeostatic model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (R = 0.26, P = .01) and an inverse association with oral disposition index (R = −0.36, P fasting serum total BA or BA composition. Conclusion: Fasting taurine-conjugated BA concentrations are higher in T2D and intermediate in impaired compared with normal glucose-tolerant persons and are associated with fasting and postload glucose. Serum BAs are not altered in T2D in response to improved glycemia. Further study may elucidate whether this pattern of taurine-BA conjugation can be targeted to provide novel therapeutic approaches to treat T2D. PMID:24432996

  16. Subject-driven titration of biphasic insulin aspart 30 twice daily is non-inferior to investigator-driven titration in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with premixed human insulin: A randomized, open-label, parallel-group, multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenying; Zhu, Lvyun; Meng, Bangzhu; Liu, Yu; Wang, Wenhui; Ye, Shandong; Sun, Li; Miao, Heng; Guo, Lian; Wang, Zhanjian; Lv, Xiaofeng; Li, Quanmin; Ji, Qiuhe; Zhao, Weigang; Yang, Gangyi

    2016-01-01

    The present study was to compare the efficacy and safety of subject-driven and investigator-driven titration of biphasic insulin aspart 30 (BIAsp 30) twice daily (BID). In this 20-week, randomized, open-label, two-group parallel, multicenter trial, Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled by premixed/self-mixed human insulin were randomized 1:1 to subject-driven or investigator-driven titration of BIAsp 30 BID, in combination with metformin and/or α-glucosidase inhibitors. Dose adjustment was decided by patients in the subject-driven group after training, and by investigators in the investigator-driven group. Eligible adults (n = 344) were randomized in the study. The estimated glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) reduction was 14.5 mmol/mol (1.33%) in the subject-driven group and 14.3 mmol/mol (1.31%) in the investigator-driven group. Non-inferiority of subject-titration vs investigator-titration in reducing HbA1c was confirmed, with estimated treatment difference -0.26 mmol/mol (95% confidence interval -2.05, 1.53) (-0.02%, 95% confidence interval -0.19, 0.14). Fasting plasma glucose, postprandial glucose increment and self-measured plasma glucose were improved in both groups without statistically significant differences. One severe hypoglycemic event was experienced by one subject in each group. A similar rate of nocturnal hypoglycemia (events/patient-year) was reported in the subject-driven (1.10) and investigator-driven (1.32) groups. There were 64.5 and 58.1% patients achieving HbA1c titration of BIAsp 30 BID was as efficacious and well-tolerated as investigator-titration. The present study supported patients to self-titrate BIAsp 30 BID under physicians' supervision.

  17. Generational change in fasting glucose and insulin among children at ages 5-16y: Modelled on the EarlyBird study (2015) and UK growth standards (1990) (EarlyBird 69).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostazir, Mohammod; Jeffery, Alison; Voss, Linda; Wilkin, Terence

    2017-01-01

    Pre-diabetes is a state of beta-cell stress caused by excess demand for insulin. Body mass is an important determinant of insulin demand, and BMI has risen substantially over recent time. We sought to model changes in the parameters of glucose control against rising BMI over the past 25years. Using random coefficient mixed models, we established the correlations between HbA1C, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, HOMA2-IR and BMI in contemporary (2015) children (N=307) at ages 5-16y from the EarlyBird study, and modelled their corresponding values 25years ago according to the distribution of BMI in the UK Growth Standards (1990). There was little change in HbA1C or fasting glucose over the 25y period at any age or in either gender. On the other hand, the estimates for fasting insulin and HOMA2-IR were substantially higher in both genders in 2015 compared with 1990. Insofar as it is determined by body mass, there has been a substantial rise in beta cell demand among children over the past 25years. The change could be detected by fasting insulin and HOMA2-IR, but not by fasting glucose or HbA1C. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Improvement of both fasting and postprandial glycemic control by the two-step addition of miglitol and mitiglinide to basal insulin therapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihana, Noriko; Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Yamamoto-Honda, Ritsuko; Kishimoto, Miyako; Kajio, Hiroshi; Noto, Hiroshi; Kakei, Masafumi; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Combination therapy consisting of basal insulin and oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs) is effective for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) that cannot be adequately controlled using OHAs alone. Though basal insulin with metformin or sulfonylurea is an effective therapy, it cannot reduce postprandial glycemia without the risk of hypoglycemia. We examined a two-step regimen consisting of the addition of postprandial hypoglycemic agents (an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor and a glinide) in patients whose T2DM was poorly controlled using basal insulin therapy. Inpatients between the ages of 30-79 years who had T2DM and an HbA1c level of more than 7.0% were recruited. The patients were treated with once-daily insulin glargine with or without metformin, depending on the patient's age and renal function. Insulin glargine was titrated to achieve a target fasting glucose level of 70-130 mg/dL as a first step (STEP0). If the 2-hour postprandial glucose (PBG) level was higher than the target of 180 mg/dL, miglitol treatment (150 mg/day) was initiated, with dose adjustments (75-225 mg) allowed depending on abdominal symptoms and the PBG (STEP1). If the PBG of the patients remained higher than the target after 3 days of treatment, mitiglinide (30 mg/day, titrated up to 60 mg) was added (STEP2). We then evaluated the proportion of patients who achieved the target PBG before and after the two-step regimen. Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) was performed throughout the two-step protocol in most of the patients. Of the 16 patients who were recruited (median age, 67.0 [58.0-71.0] years; body mass index, 25.0 [22.0-27.9] kg/m(2); HbA1c level at admission, 9.1% [8.35-10.4%]), 1 patient (6.25%) achieved the target PBG at STEP 0 and 14 patients (87.5%) had achieved the target PBG at the end of the treatment protocol (P = 0.002). CGM showed a significant decrease in the glucose level at each step of the protocol. The standard deviations in the CGM glucose levels for 24

  19. Lactobacillus gasseri SBT2055 reduces postprandial and fasting serum non-esterified fatty acid levels in Japanese hypertriacylglycerolemic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Akihiro; Kadooka, Yukio; Kato, Ken; Shirouchi, Bungo; Sato, Masao

    2014-02-19

    Lactobacillus gasseri SBT2055 (LG2055) inhibits dietary fat absorption in rats and exerts preventive effects on abdominal adiposity in rats and humans. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of LG2055 on postprandial serum lipid responses in Japanese subjects with hypertriacylglycerolemia after the intake of oral fat-loading test (OFLT) meals. We conducted a single-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subject, repeated-measure intervention trial. Twenty subjects initially ingested the fermented milk (FM) without LG2055 for 4 weeks (control FM period), followed by a 4-week washout period, and then consumed FM containing LG2055 for 4 weeks (active FM period). The subjects were asked to consume FM at 200 g/day. At the end of each 4-week period, an 8-h OFLT was conducted. Blood samples were collected at fasting and every hour for 8 h after OFLT meal intake. Thereafter, postprandial serum non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) and triacylglycerol (TAG) levels and fasting blood parameters were measured. The OFLT showed that the postprandial serum NEFA levels from 120 to 480 min and the postprandial serum TAG level at 120 min in the active FM period were significantly (P < 0.05) lower than those in the control FM period. The fasting serum NEFA level in the active FM period significantly (P < 0.001) decreased at week 4 from the initial period compared with the control FM period. The consumption of probiotic LG2055 reduced postprandial and fasting serum NEFA levels, suggesting its possible contribution to the reduction of the risk for obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. UMIN000011605.

  20. The relationship between thyrotropin and low density lipoprotein cholesterol is modified by insulin sensitivity in healthy euthyroid subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, SJL; ter Maaten, JC; Popp-Snijders, C; Slaets, JPJ; Heine, RJ; Gans, ROB

    High levels of TSH are associated with an increased cardiovascular risk. Many cardiovascular risk factors cluster within the insulin resistance syndrome. It is not known whether levels of TSH cluster as well. We conducted this research to test the hypothesis that TSH, insulin sensitivity, and levels

  1. A single night of partial sleep deprivation induces insulin resistance in multiple metabolic pathways in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donga, Esther; van Dijk, Marieke [Leiden Univ., LUMC; van Dijk, J. Gert; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Lammers, Gert-Jan; van Kralingen, Klaas W.; Corssmit, Eleonara P. M.; Romijn, Johannes A.

    2010-01-01

    Subsequent nights with partial sleep restriction result in impaired glucose tolerance, but the effects on insulin sensitivity have not been characterized. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a single night of partial sleep restriction on parameters of insulin sensitivity. Nine

  2. Retinol Binding Protein-4 Is Associated with TNF-α and Not Insulin Resistance in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser M. Al-Daghri

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the association between RBP4 and various markers related to insulin resistance and diabetic complications as well as inflammatory markers in Saudi population suffering from type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. Patients with type 2 diabetes were divided into 3 groups according to the type of treatment and involvement of coronary artery disease. Serum RBP4, TNF-α, insulin, CRP, resistin, leptin and adiponectin were analysed in all samples. RBP4 levels increased significantly in the group of diabetic subjects treated with oral hypoglycemic agents and diabetic patients with coronary heart disease (30.2 ± 11.8; 33.4 ± 13.6 respectively, while there was no significant change in the other group for diabetic subjects on low-carbohydrate diet (25.1 ± 10.9 compared to control group (22.6 ± 9.5. RPB4 levels were positively correlated with TNF-α in the group of diabetic subjects on oral hypoglycemic agents and diabetic patients with coronary heart disease (r = 0.52, P < 0.05; r = 0.58, P < 0.05 respectively. No correlations were found between RBP4 levels and insulin resistance in all studied groups. Our findings suggest that serum RBP4 levels is associated with pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α and is not associated with insulin resistance among patients with type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease.

  3. Abnormal release of incretins and cortisol after oral glucose in subjects with insulin-resistant myotonic dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Asa; Olsson, Tommy; Cederquist, Kristina

    2002-01-01

    patients and controls, although long CTG repeat expansions were associated with a more pronounced GIP response. Interestingly, the GLP-1 response to oral glucose correlated with the insulin response in patients but not in controls whereas, in controls, the insulin response closely correlated with the GIP...... response. Furthermore, cortisol and ACTH levels increased paradoxically in patients after glucose; this was more pronounced in patients with long CTG repeat expansions. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that the GLP-1 and ACTH/cortisol responses to oral glucose are abnormal in insulin-resistant DM1 patients...... and that CTG triplet repeats are linked to GIP release. These abnormalities may contribute both to the severe insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia in DM1 and to the preservation of adequate islet function, enabling glucose tolerance to be normal in spite of this marked insulin resistance in DM1....

  4. Insulin sensitivity and secretory status of a healthy malay population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mahmood, Abu Kholdun; Ismail, Aziz Al-Safi; Rashid, Faridah Abdul; Wan Bebakar, Wan Mohamad

    2006-07-01

    Insulin insensitivity is a common finding in several metabolic disorders including glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, hyperuricemia and hypertension. Most of the previous studies on insulin sensitivity were performed on diabetic or obese population. So our knowledge about insulin sensitivity of healthy population remains limited. Rising prevalence of obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome is a serious issue in Malaysia and some other rapidly developing countries. So it is important to look at the insulin sensitivity status of healthy Malaysian subjects and to compare it in future with those of diabetic, obese or metabolic syndrome patients. In this study we sampled subjects who were independent of confounding factors such as obesity (including abdominal obesity), hypertension and glucose intolerance (diabetes, IGT or IFG) which may influence insulin sensitivity. Fasting plasma glucose, fasting insulin and lipid profile were determined. Insulin sensitivity and secretory status were calculated using the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) software (HOMA%S, HOMA%B and HOMA-IR). The insulin sensitivity (HOMA%S) of healthy Malay subjects aged between 30-60 years was 155.17%, HOMA-IR was 1.05 and HOMA%B was 116.65% (values adjusted for age, sex, BMI and waist circumference). It was seen that non-obese Malaysians can prevent age related lowering of insulin sensitivity if they can retain their BMI within limit.

  5. Oral glutamine increases circulating glucagon-like peptide 1, glucagon, and insulin concentrations in lean, obese, and type 2 diabetic subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greenfield, Jerry R; Farooqi, I Sadaf; Keogh, Julia M

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Incretin hormones, such as glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), play an important role in meal-related insulin secretion. We previously demonstrated that glutamine is a potent stimulus of GLP-1 secretion in vitro. OBJECTIVE: Our...... objective was to determine whether glutamine increases circulating GLP-1 and GIP concentrations in vivo and, if so, whether this is associated with an increase in plasma insulin. DESIGN: We recruited 8 healthy normal-weight volunteers (LEAN), 8 obese individuals with type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose...... tolerance (OB-DIAB) and 8 obese nondiabetic control subjects (OB-CON). Oral glucose (75 g), glutamine (30 g), and water were administered on 3 separate days in random order, and plasma concentrations of GLP-1, GIP, insulin, glucagon, and glucose were measured over 120 min. RESULTS: Oral glucose led...

  6. Plasma vitamin D is associated with fasting insulin and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance in young adult males, but not females, of the Jerusalem Perinatal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Amy; Hochner, Hagit; Sitlani, Colleen M; Williams, Michelle A; Hoofnagle, Andrew N; de Boer, Ian H; Kestenbaum, Bryan; Siscovick, David S; Friedlander, Yechiel; Enquobahrie, Daniel A

    2015-05-01

    To examine cross-sectional relationships between plasma vitamin D and cardiometabolic risk factors in young adults. Data were collected from interviews, physical examinations and biomarker measurements. Total plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) was measured using LC-tandem MS. Associations between 25(OH)D and cardiometabolic risk factors were modelled using weighted linear regression with robust estimates of standard errors. Individuals born in Jerusalem during 1974-1976. Participants of the Jerusalem Perinatal Study (n 1204) interviewed and examined at age 32 years. Participants were oversampled for low and high birth weight and for maternal pre-pregnancy obesity. Mean total 25(OH)D concentration among participants was 21·7 (sd 8·9) ng/ml. Among males, 25(OH)D was associated with homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (natural log-transformed, β=-0·011, P=0·004) after adjustment for BMI. However, these associations were not present among females (P for sex interaction=0·005). We found evidence for inverse associations of 25(OH)D with markers of insulin resistance among males, but not females, in a healthy, young adult Caucasian population. Prospective studies and studies conducted on other populations investigating sex-specific effects of vitamin D on cardiometabolic risk factors are warranted.

  7. Structure and Spatial Distribution of Ge Nanocrystals Subjected to Fast Neutron Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander N. Ionov

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The influence of fast neutron irradiation on the structure and spatial distribution of Ge nanocrystals (NC embedded in an amorphous SiO2 matrix has been studied. The investigation was conducted by means of laser Raman Scattering (RS, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The irradiation of Ge- NC samples by a high dose of fast neutrons lead to a partial destruction of the nanocrystals. Full reconstruction of crystallinity was achieved after annealing the radiation damage at 8000C, which resulted in full restoration of the RS spectrum. HR-TEM images show, however, that the spatial distributions of Ge-NC changed as a result of irradiation and annealing. A sharp decrease in NC distribution towards the SiO2 surface has been observed. This was accompanied by XPS detection of Ge oxides and elemental Ge within both the surface and subsurface region.

  8. A Low-Frequency Inactivating AKT2 Variant Enriched in the Finnish Population Is Associated With Fasting Insulin Levels and Type 2 Diabetes Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Alisa; Highland, Heather M; Gasser, Jessica; Sim, Xueling; Tukiainen, Taru; Fontanillas, Pierre; Grarup, Niels; Rivas, Manuel A; Mahajan, Anubha; Locke, Adam E; Cingolani, Pablo; Pers, Tune H; Viñuela, Ana; Brown, Andrew A; Wu, Ying; Flannick, Jason; Fuchsberger, Christian; Gamazon, Eric R; Gaulton, Kyle J; Im, Hae Kyung; Teslovich, Tanya M; Blackwell, Thomas W; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Burtt, Noël P; Chen, Yuhui; Green, Todd; Hartl, Christopher; Kang, Hyun Min; Kumar, Ashish; Ladenvall, Claes; Ma, Clement; Moutsianas, Loukas; Pearson, Richard D; Perry, John R B; Rayner, N William; Robertson, Neil R; Scott, Laura J; van de Bunt, Martijn; Eriksson, Johan G; Jula, Antti; Koskinen, Seppo; Lehtimäki, Terho; Palotie, Aarno; Raitakari, Olli T; Jacobs, Suzanne B R; Wessel, Jennifer; Chu, Audrey Y; Scott, Robert A; Goodarzi, Mark O; Blancher, Christine; Buck, Gemma; Buck, David; Chines, Peter S; Gabriel, Stacey; Gjesing, Anette P; Groves, Christopher J; Hollensted, Mette; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Jackson, Anne U; Jun, Goo; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Mangino, Massimo; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Neville, Matt; Onofrio, Robert; Small, Kerrin S; Stringham, Heather M; Trakalo, Joseph; Banks, Eric; Carey, Jason; Carneiro, Mauricio O; DePristo, Mark; Farjoun, Yossi; Fennell, Timothy; Goldstein, Jacqueline I; Grant, George; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin; Maguire, Jared; Neale, Benjamin M; Poplin, Ryan; Purcell, Shaun; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Shakir, Khalid; Smith, Joshua D; Strom, Tim M; Wieland, Thomas; Lindstrom, Jaana; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; Lakka, Timo A; Doney, Alex S F; Nilsson, Peter; Wareham, Nicholas J; Langenberg, Claudia; Varga, Tibor V; Franks, Paul W; Rolandsson, Olov; Rosengren, Anders H; Farook, Vidya S; Thameem, Farook; Puppala, Sobha; Kumar, Satish; Lehman, Donna M; Jenkinson, Christopher P; Curran, Joanne E; Hale, Daniel Esten; Fowler, Sharon P; Arya, Rector; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Abboud, Hanna E; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Hicks, Pamela J; Palmer, Nicholette D; Ng, Maggie C Y; Bowden, Donald W; Freedman, Barry I; Esko, Tõnu; Mägi, Reedik; Milani, Lili; Mihailov, Evelin; Metspalu, Andres; Narisu, Narisu; Kinnunen, Leena; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Swift, Amy; Pasko, Dorota; Wood, Andrew R; Fadista, João; Pollin, Toni I; Barzilai, Nir; Atzmon, Gil; Glaser, Benjamin; Thorand, Barbara; Strauch, Konstantin; Peters, Annette; Roden, Michael; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Liang, Liming; Kriebel, Jennifer; Illig, Thomas; Grallert, Harald; Gieger, Christian; Meisinger, Christa; Lannfelt, Lars; Musani, Solomon K; Griswold, Michael; Taylor, Herman A; Wilson, Gregory; Correa, Adolfo; Oksa, Heikki; Scott, William R; Afzal, Uzma; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Loh, Marie; Chambers, John C; Sehmi, Jobanpreet; Kooner, Jaspal Singh; Lehne, Benjamin; Cho, Yoon Shin; Lee, Jong-Young; Han, Bok-Ghee; Käräjämäki, Annemari; Qi, Qibin; Qi, Lu; Huang, Jinyan; Hu, Frank B; Melander, Olle; Orho-Melander, Marju; Below, Jennifer E; Aguilar, David; Wong, Tien Yin; Liu, Jianjun; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Chia, Kee Seng; Lim, Wei Yen; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chan, Edmund; Tai, E Shyong; Aung, Tin; Linneberg, Allan; Isomaa, Bo; Meitinger, Thomas; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Hakaste, Liisa; Kravic, Jasmina; Jørgensen, Marit E; Lauritzen, Torsten; Deloukas, Panos; Stirrups, Kathleen E; Owen, Katharine R; Farmer, Andrew J; Frayling, Timothy M; O'Rahilly, Stephen P; Walker, Mark; Levy, Jonathan C; Hodgkiss, Dylan; Hattersley, Andrew T; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Stančáková, Alena; Barroso, Inês; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan; Chan, Juliana; Chandak, Giriraj R; Daly, Mark J; Donnelly, Peter J; Ebrahim, Shah B; Elliott, Paul; Fingerlin, Tasha; Froguel, Philippe; Hu, Cheng; Jia, Weiping; Ma, Ronald C W; McVean, Gilean; Park, Taesung; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Sandhu, Manjinder; Scott, James; Sladek, Rob; Tandon, Nikhil; Teo, Yik Ying; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Watanabe, Richard M; Koistinen, Heikki A; Kesaniemi, Y Antero; Uusitupa, Matti; Spector, Timothy D; Salomaa, Veikko; Rauramaa, Rainer; Palmer, Colin N A; Prokopenko, Inga; Morris, Andrew D; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Lind, Lars; Ingelsson, Erik; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Karpe, Fredrik; Groop, Leif; Jørgensen, Torben; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Kuusisto, Johanna; Abecasis, Gonçalo; Bell, Graeme I; Blangero, John; Cox, Nancy J; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Seielstad, Mark; Wilson, James G; Dupuis, Josee; Ripatti, Samuli; Hanis, Craig L; Florez, Jose C; Mohlke, Karen L; Meigs, James B; Laakso, Markku; Morris, Andrew P; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David; McCarthy, Mark I; Gloyn, Anna L; Lindgren, Cecilia M

    2017-07-01

    To identify novel coding association signals and facilitate characterization of mechanisms influencing glycemic traits and type 2 diabetes risk, we analyzed 109,215 variants derived from exome array genotyping together with an additional 390,225 variants from exome sequence in up to 39,339 normoglycemic individuals from five ancestry groups. We identified a novel association between the coding variant (p.Pro50Thr) in AKT2 and fasting plasma insulin (FI), a gene in which rare fully penetrant mutations are causal for monogenic glycemic disorders. The low-frequency allele is associated with a 12% increase in FI levels. This variant is present at 1.1% frequency in Finns but virtually absent in individuals from other ancestries. Carriers of the FI-increasing allele had increased 2-h insulin values, decreased insulin sensitivity, and increased risk of type 2 diabetes (odds ratio 1.05). In cellular studies, the AKT2-Thr50 protein exhibited a partial loss of function. We extend the allelic spectrum for coding variants in AKT2 associated with disorders of glucose homeostasis and demonstrate bidirectional effects of variants within the pleckstrin homology domain of AKT2. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  9. Elevation of Fasting Ghrelin in Healthy Human Subjects Consuming a High-Salt Diet: A Novel Mechanism of Obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Fenxia; Liu, Fu-Qiang; Chu, Chao; Wang, Yang; Wang, Dan; Guo, Tong-Shuai; Wang, Jun-Kui; Guan, Gong-Chang; Ren, Ke-Yu; Mu, Jian-Jun

    2016-05-26

    Overweight/obesity is a chronic disease that carries an increased risk of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and premature death. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated a clear relationship between salt intake and obesity, but the pathophysiologic mechanisms remain unknown. We hypothesized that ghrelin, which regulates appetite, food intake, and fat deposition, becomes elevated when one consumes a high-salt diet, contributing to the progression of obesity. We, therefore, investigated fasting ghrelin concentrations during a high-salt diet. Thirty-eight non-obese and normotensive subjects (aged 25 to 50 years) were selected from a rural community in Northern China. They were sequentially maintained on a normal diet for three days at baseline, a low-salt diet for seven days (3 g/day, NaCl), then a high-salt diet for seven days (18 g/day). The concentration of plasma ghrelin was measured using an immunoenzyme method (ELISA). High-salt intake significantly increased fasting ghrelin levels, which were higher during the high-salt diet (320.7 ± 30.6 pg/mL) than during the low-salt diet (172.9 ± 8.9 pg/mL). The comparison of ghrelin levels between the different salt diets was statistically-significantly different (p salt diet elevates fasting ghrelin in healthy human subjects, which may be a novel underlying mechanism of obesity.

  10. Higher Magnesium Intake Is Associated with Lower Fasting Glucose and Insulin, with No Evidence of Interaction with Select Genetic Loci, in a Meta-Analysis of 15 CHARGE Consortium Studies1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruby, Adela; Ngwa, Julius S.; Renström, Frida; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Ganna, Andrea; Hallmans, Göran; Houston, Denise K.; Jacques, Paul F.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.; Manichaikul, Ani; North, Kari E.; Ntalla, Ioanna; Sonestedt, Emily; Tanaka, Toshiko; van Rooij, Frank J. A.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Djoussé, Luc; Grigoriou, Efi; Johansson, Ingegerd; Lohman, Kurt K.; Pankow, James S.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Riserus, Ulf; Yannakoulia, Mary; Zillikens, M. Carola; Hassanali, Neelam; Liu, Yongmei; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Papoutsakis, Constantina; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Uitterlinden, André G.; Viikari, Jorma; Groves, Christopher J.; Hofman, Albert; Lind, Lars; McCarthy, Mark I.; Mikkilä, Vera; Mukamal, Kenneth; Franco, Oscar H.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Dedoussis, George V.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Hu, Frank B.; Ingelsson, Erik; Kähönen, Mika; Kao, W. H. Linda; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Orho-Melander, Marju; Prokopenko, Inga; Rotter, Jerome I.; Siscovick, David S.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Franks, Paul W.; Meigs, James B.; McKeown, Nicola M.; Nettleton, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Favorable associations between magnesium intake and glycemic traits, such as fasting glucose and insulin, are observed in observational and clinical studies, but whether genetic variation affects these associations is largely unknown. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with either glycemic traits or magnesium metabolism affect the association between magnesium intake and fasting glucose and insulin. Fifteen studies from the CHARGE (Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology) Consortium provided data from up to 52,684 participants of European descent without known diabetes. In fixed-effects meta-analyses, we quantified 1) cross-sectional associations of dietary magnesium intake with fasting glucose (mmol/L) and insulin (ln-pmol/L) and 2) interactions between magnesium intake and SNPs related to fasting glucose (16 SNPs), insulin (2 SNPs), or magnesium (8 SNPs) on fasting glucose and insulin. After adjustment for age, sex, energy intake, BMI, and behavioral risk factors, magnesium (per 50-mg/d increment) was inversely associated with fasting glucose [β = −0.009 mmol/L (95% CI: −0.013, −0.005), P magnesium-related SNP or interaction between any SNP and magnesium reached significance after correction for multiple testing. However, rs2274924 in magnesium transporter-encoding TRPM6 showed a nominal association (uncorrected P = 0.03) with glucose, and rs11558471 in SLC30A8 and rs3740393 near CNNM2 showed a nominal interaction (uncorrected, both P = 0.02) with magnesium on glucose. Consistent with other studies, a higher magnesium intake was associated with lower fasting glucose and insulin. Nominal evidence of TRPM6 influence and magnesium interaction with select loci suggests that further investigation is warranted. PMID:23343670

  11. Correlations between fasting plasma C-peptide, glucagon-stimulated plasma C-peptide, and urinary C-peptide in insulin-treated diabetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjessing, H J; Matzen, L E; Frøland, A

    1987-01-01

    This study correlated fasting plasma C-peptide (CP), plasma CP 6 min after stimulation with 1 mg glucagon i.v., and the mean of three 24-h urinary excretions of C-peptide (UCP)/creatinine in 132 insulin-treated diabetics. Patients were divided into three groups: group 1, stimulated CP less than 0.......06 nM (n = 51); group 2, stimulated CP 0.06-0.60 nM (n = 48); and group 3, stimulated CP greater than 0.60 nM (n = 33). In all patients fasting CP was closely correlated to stimulated CP (r = .988, P less than .001), whereas the correlations between UCP and both fasting CP (r = .904, P less than .001......) and stimulated CP r = .902, P less than .001) were slightly less pronounced. The associations between UCP and both fasting CP (r = .716, P less than .001) and stimulated CP (r = .731, P less than .001) were modest in group 2, and even more so in group 3 (r = .557, P less than .001 and r = .641, P less than .001...

  12. Subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Vega Encabo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I claim that subjectivity is a way of being that is constituted through a set of practices in which the self is subject to the dangers of fictionalizing and plotting her life and self-image. I examine some ways of becoming subject through narratives and through theatrical performance before others. Through these practices, a real and active subjectivity is revealed, capable of self-knowledge and self-transformation. 

  13. A randomized, double blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled clinical trial to assess the effects of Candesartan on the insulin sensitivity on non diabetic, non hypertense subjects with dysglyce mia and abdominal obesity. "ARAMIA"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rueda-Clausen Christian F

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The raising prevalence of type-2 diabetes mellitus and obesity has been recognized as a major problem for public health, affecting both developed and developing countries. Impaired fasting plasma glucose has been previously associated with endothelial dysfunction, higher levels of inflammatory markers and increased risk of developing insulin resistance and cardiovascular events. Besides life-style changes, the blockade of the renin-angiotensin system has been proposed as a useful alternative intervention to improve insulin resistance and decrease the number of new type-2 diabetes cases. The aim of this clinical trial is to study the effect of the treatment with Candesartan, an angiotensin II receptor antagonist, on the insulin resistance, the plasma levels of adipoquines, oxidative stress and prothrombotic markers, in a group of non diabetic, non hypertensive, dysglycemic and obese subjects. Methods and design A randomized, double blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled, clinical trial was designed to assess the effects of Candesartan (up to 32 mg/day during 6 months on the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA index, lipid profile, protrombotic state, oxidative stress and plasma levels of inflammatory markers. The participants will be recruited in the "Fundación Cardiovascular de Colombia". Subjects who fullfil selection criteria will receive permanent educational, nutritional and exercise support during their participation in the study. After a 15 days-run-in period with placebo and life-style recommendations, the patients who have a treatment compliance equal or greater than 80% will be randomlly assigned to one of the treatment groups. Group A will receive Candesartan during 6 months and placebo during 6 months. Group B will receive placebo during the first 6 months, and then, Candesartan during the last 6 months. Control visits will be programed monthly and all parameters of interest will be evaluated every 6 months

  14. Effect of a high bicarbonate mineral water on fasting and postprandial lipemia in moderately hypercholesterolemic subjects: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zair, Yassine; Kasbi-Chadli, Fatima; Housez, Beatrice; Pichelin, Mathieu; Cazaubiel, Murielle; Raoux, François; Ouguerram, Khadija

    2013-07-18

    During postprandial state, TG concentration is increasing and HDL cholesterol decreasing, leading to a transitory pro-atherosclerotic profile. Previous studies have reported that bicarbonate water improve postprandial lipemia. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of a strongly bicarbonated mineral water on lipoprotein levels during fasting and postprandial state. A controlled, randomised, double-blind cross-over design was conducted in 12 moderately hypercholesterolemic subjects after a daily ingestion of 1.25 L of mineral (SY) or low mineral water during eight weeks separated by a one week wash-out period. Blood samples were collected in first visit to the hospital (V1) before water consumption (referent or SY) and in a second visit (V2) after eight week water consumption period. The effect of the consumed water was studied in fasting and in postprandial state during ingestion of a meal and 0.5 L of water. Comparison of data between V1 and V2 after SY consumption showed a significant decrease in triglyceridemia (23%), VLDL TG (31%) and tendency to a decrease of VLDL cholesterol (p = 0.066) at fasting state. Whatever the consumed water during postprandial state, the measurement of total areas under curves did not show a significant difference. No difference was observed between SY and referent water consumption for measured parameters at fasting and postprandial state. When subjects consumed SY we showed a decrease of their basal TG and VLDLTG. The unexpected absence of effect of high mineralized water on postprandial lipemia, probably related to experimental conditions, is discussed in the discussion section.

  15. Elevation of Fasting Ghrelin in Healthy Human Subjects Consuming a High-Salt Diet: A Novel Mechanism of Obesity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Overweight/obesity is a chronic disease that carries an increased risk of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and premature death. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated a clear relationship between salt intake and obesity, but the pathophysiologic mechanisms remain unknown. We hypothesized that ghrelin, which regulates appetite, food intake, and fat deposition, becomes elevated when one consumes a high-salt diet, contributing to the progression of obesity. We, therefore, investigated fasting ghrelin concentrations during a high-salt diet. Thirty-eight non-obese and normotensive subjects (aged 25 to 50 years were selected from a rural community in Northern China. They were sequentially maintained on a normal diet for three days at baseline, a low-salt diet for seven days (3 g/day, NaCl, then a high-salt diet for seven days (18 g/day. The concentration of plasma ghrelin was measured using an immunoenzyme method (ELISA. High-salt intake significantly increased fasting ghrelin levels, which were higher during the high-salt diet (320.7 ± 30.6 pg/mL than during the low-salt diet (172.9 ± 8.9 pg/mL. The comparison of ghrelin levels between the different salt diets was statistically-significantly different (p < 0.01. A positive correlation between 24-h urinary sodium excretion and fasting ghrelin levels was demonstrated. Our data indicate that a high-salt diet elevates fasting ghrelin in healthy human subjects, which may be a novel underlying mechanism of obesity.

  16. Obesity and the development of insulin resistance and impaired fasting glucose in black and white adolescent girls - A longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, DJ; Friedman, LA; Harlan, WR; Barton, BA; Schreiber, GB; Cohen, RM; Harlan, LC; Morrison, JA

    Objective-Age at onset of type 2 diabetes has decreased during the past 20 years, especially in black women. Studies of factors associated with insulin resistance and hyperglycemia in preadolescent and adolescent populations are essential to understanding diabetes development. Research Design and

  17. Effects of food-related stimuli on visual spatial attention in fasting and nonfasting normal subjects: Behavior and electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leland, D S; Pineda, J A

    2006-01-01

    Attention biases toward food-related stimuli were examined as mediators of normal, healthy motivated behavior. Reaction times (RTs) and event-related potentials (ERPs) were used to assess the impact of food-related words on normal food-deprived individuals when used as spatial cues that frequently predicted the location of targets in a simple detection task (75% validity). In Experiment 1, fasting and nonfasting subjects showed a magnified cost/benefit of invalid/valid cueing by food words relative to a neutral category of words. In Experiment 2, the RT effect was replicated in a group of fasting subjects. The amplitude of a P3-like positivity (P420) was enhanced in response to food words, as was that of a prominent early anterior negativity (AN). These findings demonstrate that food-related stimuli can bias spatial attention in normal subjects and that electrophysiological markers can index the motivational salience of food words and/or their effect on attentional capture in food-deprived individuals. Even when the motivational salience of spatial cues is irrelevant to task demands, it can have an observable effect on attention. This design allows for the behavioral and electrophysiological study of motivation-attention interactions through loading of spatial cues with motivation-related semantic properties.

  18. Peripheral insulin resistance rather than beta cell dysfunction accounts for geographical differences in impaired fasting blood glucose among sub-Saharan African individuals: findings from the RODAM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Karlijn A C; Stronks, Karien; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Addo, Juliet; Bahendeka, Silver; Beune, Erik; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Danquah, Ina; Galbete, Cecilia; Henneman, Peter; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Osei, Kwame; Schulze, Matthias B; Spranger, Joachim; Smeeth, Liam; Agyemang, Charles

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction account for differences in impaired fasting blood glucose (IFBG) levels in sub-Saharan African individuals living in different locations in Europe and Africa. We also aimed to identify determinants associated with insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction among this population. Data from the cross-sectional multicentre Research on Obesity and Diabetes among African Migrants (RODAM) study were analysed. Participants included Ghanaian individuals without diabetes, aged 18-96 years old, who were residing in Amsterdam (n = 1337), Berlin (n = 502), London (n = 961), urban Ghana (n = 1309) and rural Ghana (n = 970). Glucose and insulin were measured in fasting venous blood samples. Anthropometrics were assessed during a physical examination. Questionnaires were used to assess demographics, physical activity, smoking status, alcohol consumption and energy intake. Insulin resistance and beta cell function were determined using homeostatic modelling (HOMA-IR and HOMA-B, respectively). Logistic regression analysis was used to study the contribution of HOMA-IR and inverse HOMA-B (beta cell dysfunction) to geographical differences in IFBG (fasting glucose 5.6-6.9 mmol/l). Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to identify determinants associated with HOMA-IR and inverse HOMA-B. IFBG was more common in individuals residing in urban Ghana (OR 1.41 [95% CI 1.08, 1.84]), Amsterdam (OR 3.44 [95% CI 2.69, 4.39]) and London (OR 1.58 [95% CI 1.20 2.08), but similar in individuals living in Berlin (OR 1.00 [95% CI 0.70, 1.45]), compared with those in rural Ghana (reference population). The attributable risk of IFBG per 1 SD increase in HOMA-IR was 69.3% and in inverse HOMA-B was 11.1%. After adjustment for HOMA-IR, the odds for IFBG reduced to 0.96 (95% CI 0.72, 1.27), 2.52 (95%CI 1.94, 3.26) and 1.02 (95% CI 0.78, 1.38) for individuals in Urban Ghana

  19. Fast increase of motor cortical inhibition following postural changes in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveri, Massimiliano; Caltagirone, Carlo; Loriga, Rita; Pompa, Maria Novella; Versace, Viviana; Souchard, Philippe

    2012-11-14

    Postural reactions are associated with changes in the excitability of the motor system. In the present study we investigated the presence of neurophysiological changes of motor cortical areas targeting muscles of the inferior limbs following treatment with a physiotherapy technique aimed to treat postural dysfunctions by stretching postural muscles, global postural reeducation (GPR). Twenty healthy subjects were evaluated with paired-transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex and recording of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from peripheral muscles of the inferior limb before and after two GPR manoeuvres applied in different experiments (1 and 2). The effects of GPR were posture- and task-specific: indeed, a GPR manoeuvre applied in standing subjects increased inhibition in cortical areas controlling flexor muscles (Biceps Femoris: ppostural changes on motor cortical disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Occurrence of diabetes mellitus in obese nondiabetic patients, with correlative analysis of visceral fat, fasting insulin, and insulin resistance: A 3-year follow-up study (mysore visceral adiposity in diabetes follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Premanath

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the occurrence of diabetes in obese nondiabetic patients over a 3-year follow-up period with a correlative analysis of visceral fat (VF, fasting insulin levels, (FILs and insulin resistance (IR. Material and Methods: Thirty-seven obese and nineteen nonobese nondiabetics of our previous study, Mysore Visceral Adiposity in Diabetes were followed for the next 3 years. Their blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference (WC, fasting blood sugar (FBS, FIL, lipid profile and subcutaneous fat (SCF, and VF measurement by US method were repeated every 6 months for the next 3 years. The findings were analyzed with appropriate statistical methods. Results: Twenty-three obese and 18 nonobese nondiabetics completed the study. There were 17 dropouts. The changes in the physical and biochemical characteristics of the two groups before and after the study were not significant. SCF had no correlation with IR whereas VF correlated with FIL and IR. There were three diabetics in the obese group and two from the control group at the end of the study. There were 12 impaired glucose tolerance (IGT in the test group and 2 in the control group. Those who developed diabetes had higher VF, WC, FBS, FIL, and IR. Those who showed IGT also had these at higher levels compared to others. There was no change in the VF at the end of the study. Conclusions: This follow-up study on South Indians has shown that VF is a significant risk factor for the development of IR. IR can develop without any increase in the volume of the VF, is the essential finding of this study. SCF has not shown any significant relationship with IR. We recommend FBS and FIL in all the obese nondiabetics to calculate IR, which has given much insight in the development of IGT and diabetes. Large multicentric, longitudinal studies are required to establish the cause of IR.

  1. Decreased insulin clearance in individuals with elevated 1-h post-load plasma glucose levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Adelaide Marini

    Full Text Available Reduced insulin clearance has been shown to predict the development of type 2 diabetes. Recently, it has been suggested that plasma glucose concentrations ≥ 8.6 mmol/l (155 mg/dl at 1 h during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT can identify individuals at high risk for type 2 diabetes among those who have normal glucose tolerance (NGT 1 h-high. The aim of this study was to examine whether NGT 1 h-high have a decrease in insulin clearance, as compared with NGT individuals with 1-h post-load glucose <8.6 mmol/l (l (155 mg/dl, NGT 1 h-low. To this end, 438 non-diabetic White individuals were subjected to OGTT and euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp to evaluate insulin clearance and insulin sensitivity. As compared with NGT 1 h-low individuals, NGT 1 h-high had significantly higher 1-h and 2-h post-load plasma glucose and 2-h insulin levels as well as higher fasting glucose and insulin levels. NGT 1 h-high exhibited also a significant decrease in both insulin sensitivity (P<0.0001 and insulin clearance (P = 0.006 after adjusting for age, gender, adiposity measures, and insulin sensitivity. The differences in insulin clearance remained significant after adjustment for fasting glucose (P = 0.02 in addition to gender, age, and BMI. In univariate analyses adjusted for gender and age, insulin clearance was inversely correlated with body weight, body mass index, waist, fat mass, 1-h and 2-h post-load glucose levels, fasting, 1-h and 2-h post-load insulin levels, and insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. In conclusion, our data show that NGT 1 h-high have a reduction in insulin clearance as compared with NGT 1 h-low individuals; this suggests that impaired insulin clearance may contribute to sustained fasting and post-meal hyperinsulinemia.

  2. Insulin resistance is associated with carotid intima-media thickness in non-diabetic subjects. A cross-sectional analysis of the ELSA-Brasil cohort baseline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Itamar S; Bittencourt, Márcio S; Goulart, Alessandra C; Schmidt, Maria Inês; Diniz, Maria de Fátima H S; Lotufo, Paulo A; Benseñor, Isabela M

    2017-05-01

    Epidemiological studies have analyzed the association between carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and insulin resistance, glucose levels or glycated hemoglobin with mixed results. We aimed to evaluate the association between CIMT and homeostasis model assessment - insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), fasting and post-load plasma glucose and glycated hemoglobin in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil) baseline. We included 8028 participants (aged 35-74 years) without diabetes or overt cardiovascular disease who had complete CIMT data at baseline. We built crude and adjusted linear and binary logistic models to evaluate the association between CIMT and (a) HOMA-IR; (b) fasting plasma glucose; (c) post-load plasma glucose; and (d) glycated hemoglobin. We also built post-hoc models, stratified by sex. In the fully-adjusted linear models, only the association between CIMT (in mm) and HOMA-IR remained significant (β = 0.004; 95% confidence interval [95%CI]:0.001 to 0.006). Consistent with these results, only the association between the highest age- sex- and race-specific CIMT quartile and HOMA-IR was significant in the adjusted logistic model (odds ratio [OR]:1.10; 95% CI:1.04-1.17). The association between HOMA-IR and the highest CIMT quartile remained significant in sex-specific analyses (OR:1.10; 95% CI:1.02-1.20 for men and OR:1.10; 95% CI:1.02-1.20 for women). We did not find an independent association between CIMT and glucose or glycated hemoglobin. We found a direct association between HOMA-IR and CIMT in a large sample of non-diabetic participants. Mechanisms unrelated to glucose homeostasis, as a direct effect of insulin on atherosclerosis, or medial hypertrophy, may be involved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of cigarette smoking on insulin resistance risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj Mouhamed, D; Ezzaher, A; Neffati, F; Douki, W; Gaha, L; Najjar, M F

    2016-02-01

    Smoking is one of the main risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The mechanism(s) of the effects of smoking on CVD are not clearly understood; however, a number of atherogenic characteristics, such as insulin resistance have been reported. We aim to investigate the effects of cigarette smoking on insulin resistance and to determine the correlation between this parameter with smoking status characteristics. This study was conducted on 138 non-smokers and 162 smokers aged respectively 35.6±16.0 and 38.5±21.9 years. All subjects are not diabetic. Fasting glucose was determined by enzymatic methods and insulin by chemiluminescence method. Insulin resistance (IR) was estimated using the Homeostasis Model of Assessment equation: HOMA-IR=[fasting insulin (mU/L)×fasting glucose (mmol/L)]/22.5. IR was defined as the upper quartile of HOMA-IR. Values above 2.5 were taken as abnormal and reflect insulin resistance. Compared to non-smokers, smokers had significantly higher levels of fasting glucose, fasting insulin and HOMA-IR index. These associations remained significant after adjustment for confounding factors (age, gender, BMI and alcohol consumption). A statistically significant association was noted between the smoking status parameters, including both the number of cigarettes smoked/day and the duration of smoking, and fasting insulin levels as well for HOMA-IR index. Among smokers, we noted a positive correlation between HOMA-IR index and both plasma thiocyanates and urinary cotinine. Our results show that smokers have a high risk to developing an insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, compared with a matched group of non-smokers, and may help to explain the high risk of cardiovascular diseases in smokers. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  4. Identification of insulin in the tear film and insulin receptor and IGF-1 receptor on the human ocular surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Eduardo M; Cunha, Daniel A; Carneiro, Everardo M; Boschero, Antonio C; Saad, Mário J A; Velloso, Lício A

    2002-04-01

    Insulin produces pleiotropic effects on sensitive tissues, including the ocular surface, through the tyrosine kinase insulin receptor. Cerebrospinal fluid and secreted fluids, such as milk and saliva, have been reported to contain insulin. In the present study, the presence of insulin was examined in tear film, and the expression of insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptor was examined in the human cornea and conjunctiva. Stimulated tear samples collected from 33 volunteers (17 men, 16 women), aged 23 to 51 years, who were fed or fasted for 12 hours, were assayed for total protein and insulin content by the biuret dye test and a radioimmunoassay, respectively. Frozen sections of human cornea (n = 4) and conjunctiva (n = 3) were incubated with anti-insulin receptor and anti-IGF-1 receptor antibodies and developed with a secondary antibody-peroxidase conjugate. Insulin was detected in all tear samples analyzed, the mean concentration being 0.404 +/- 0.129 ng/mL. There were no gender-related differences. In fed subjects, tears tended toward a higher insulin content than those in fasted individuals. There was no linear correlation between insulin and total protein content (mean, 4.61 +/- 0.79 mg/mL) in the tear film. Insulin and IGF-1 receptors were detected in the plasma membrane and cytoplasm of corneal and conjunctival epithelial cells. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this study represents the first demonstration of insulin in human tear film and the presence of insulin and IGF-1 receptor on the human ocular surface. These results suggest that the pancreatic hormone may play a metabolic and/or mitogenic role on the ocular surface.

  5. Massive weight loss restores 24-hour growth hormone release profiles and serum insulin-like growth factor-I levels in obese subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M H; Hvidberg, A; Juul, A

    1995-01-01

    In the present study, we 1) determined whether the impaired spontaneous 24-h GH secretion as well as the blunted GH response to provocative testing in obese subjects are persistent disorders or transient defects reversed with weight loss and 2) investigated 24-h urinary GH excretion and basal...... levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), as well as insulin in obese subjects before and after a massive weight loss. We studied 18 obese subjects (age, 26 +/- 1 yr; body mass index, 40.9 +/- 1.1 kg/m2); 18 normal age-, and sex-matched control subjects; and 9...... reduced weight obese subjects after a diet-induced average weight loss of 30.3 +/- 4.6 kg. Twenty-four-hour spontaneous GH secretion was estimated by obtaining 3240 integrated 20-min blood samples using a constant blood withdrawal technique and computerized algorithms. Body composition was determined...

  6. Polymorphism rs3123554 in the cannabinoid receptor gene type 2 (CNR2) reveals effects on body weight and insulin resistance in obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luis, Daniel Antonio; Izaola, Olatz; Primo, David; de la Fuente, Beatriz; Aller, Rocio

    2017-10-01

    Few studies assessing the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms in CNR2 and obesity or its related metabolic parameters are available. To investigate the influence of polymorphism rs3123554 in the CNR2 receptor gene on obesity anthropometric parameters, insulin resistance, and adipokines in subjects with obesity. The study population consisted of 1027 obese subjects, who were performed bioelectrical impedance analyses, blood pressure measurements, serial assessments of dietary intake during three days, and biochemical tests. Genotypes GG, GA, and AA were found in 339 (33.0%), 467 (45.5%), and 221 (21.5%) respectively. Body mass index, weight, fat mass, waist circumference, insulin, HOMA-IR, and triglyceride and leptin levels were higher in A-allele carriers as compared to non A-allele carriers. No differences were seen in these parameters between the GA and AA genotypes. There were no statistical differences in dietary intake. The main study finding was the association of the minor allele of the SNP rs3123554 in the CNR2 gene with body weight and triglyceride, HOMA-IR, insulin, and leptin levels. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein activity is independently determined by obesity and insulin resistance in non-diabetic subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Rindert; Kappelle, Paul J.W.H.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    Background: Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) is an emerging cardio-metabolic risk factor which is intricately involved in lipoprotein metabolism. Elevated plasma PLTP activity levels are reported in obesity and diabetes mellitus, but the relative contributions of obesity and insulin resistance

  8. Identification of direct and indirect social network effects in the pathophysiology of insulin resistance in obese human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Christian H C A; Zarnekow, Nana; Hedtrich, Johannes; Stark, Sascha; Türk, Kathrin; Laudes, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine to what extent different social network mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of obesity and insulin-resistance. We used nonparametric and parametric regression models to analyse whether individual BMI and HOMA-IR are determined by social network characteristics. A total of 677 probands (EGO) and 3033 social network partners (ALTER) were included in the study. Data gathered from the probands include anthropometric measures, HOMA-IR index, health attitudes, behavioural and socio-economic variables and social network data. We found significant treatment effects for ALTERs frequent dieting (pnetwork effect also on EGO's insulin resistance. Most importantly, we also found significant direct social network effects on EGO's insulin resistance, evidenced by an effect of ALTERs frequent dieting (p = 0.033) and ALTERs sport activities (p = 0.041) to decrease EGO's HOMA-IR index independently of EGO's BMI. Social network phenomena appear not only to be relevant for the spread of obesity, but also for the spread of insulin resistance as the basis for type 2 diabetes. Attitudes and behaviour of peer groups influence EGO's health status not only via social mechanisms, but also via socio-biological mechanisms, i.e. higher brain areas might be influenced not only by biological signals from the own organism, but also by behaviour and knowledge from different human individuals. Our approach allows the identification of peer group influence controlling for potential homophily even when using cross-sectional observational data.

  9. A longitudinal study of plasma insulin and glucagon in women with previous gestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, P; Kühl, C; Hornnes, P

    1995-01-01

    response) at all time points investigated; this was also found when only nonobese glucose-tolerant women were examined. Low insulin secretion during pregnancy together with a high fasting plasma glucose level at the diagnostic OGTT in pregnancy and hyperglycemia during the postpartum OGTT were predictive......OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether plasma insulin or glucagon predicts later development of diabetes in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The subjects studied were 91 women with diet-treated GDM and 33 healthy women. Plasma insulin and glucagon during a 50...... at follow-up (2 had insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, 13 had non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and 12 had impaired glucose tolerance). Compared with the control subjects, women with previous GDM had relatively impaired insulin secretion (decreased insulinogenic index and delayed peak insulin...

  10. Does the association of the triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio with fasting serum insulin differ by race/ethnicity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokdad Ali H

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG/HDL-C ratio has been reported to be as closely correlated with insulin resistance as is the fasting serum insulin concentration (FSI, and therefore it is seen as a clinically useful way to identify the concomitant presence of insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. However, conflicting findings exist for the association of the TG/HDL-C ratio with FSI by race/ethnicity. Methods The associations of FSI concentration, serum triglyceride concentrations, and HDL-C were analyzed using log-binomial regression analyses and receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis among nondiabetic adults (n = 2652, aged ≥ 20 years, 51.2% men in the United States. Results After adjustment for potential confounding effects, the prevalence ratio of hyperinsulinemia was 2.16 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.74 to 2.08 when using a single cutoff point of 3.5, and 2.23 (95% CI, 1.83 to 2.72 when using race/ethnicity-specific cutoff points of 3.0 for non-Hispanic whites and Mexican Americans and 2.0 for non-Hispanic blacks for the TG/HDL-C ratio. The area under the ROC curve of the TG/HDL-C ratio for predicting hyperinsulinemia was 0.77 (95% CI, 0.74 to 0.79, 0.75 (95% CI, 0.69 to 0.77, and 0.74 (95% CI, 0.69 to 0.76 for non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, and Mexican Americans, respectively. Conclusion There was a significant association between the TG/HDL-C ratio and FSI among three major racial/ethnic groups in the United States. Our results add further support to the notion that the TG/HDL-C ratio may be a clinically simple and useful indicator for hyperinsulinemia among nondiabetic adults regardless of race/ethnicity.

  11. Dietary intervention increases n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in sceletal muscle membrane phospholipids of obese subjects. Inplications for insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Madsbad, Sten; Høy, C-E

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cross-sectional studies suggest that the fatty acid (FA) composition of phospholipids in skeletal muscle cell membrane may modulate insulin sensitivity in humans. We examined the impact of a hypocaloric low-fat dietary intervention on membrane FA composition and insulin sensitivity....... DESIGN Muscle membrane FA profiles were determined in muscle (vastus lateralis) biopsies from 21 obese subjects before and after 6 months of dietary restriction. Diet instructions emphasized low intake of FA of marine origin by recommending lean fish and prohibiting fatty fish and fish oil supplements......-chain PUFAn-3 increased 51% (P= 0.0001), mainly due to a 75% increase (Pacid. Changes in HOMA-IR correlated significantly with changes in long-chain PUFAn-3 (R=-0.57, P

  12. Dietary intervention increases n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in skeletal muscle membrane phospholipids of obese subjects. Implications for insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, S.B.; Madsbad, S.; Høy, Carl-Erik

    2006-01-01

    Objective Cross-sectional studies suggest that the fatty acid (FA) composition of phospholipids in skeletal muscle cell membrane may modulate insulin sensitivity in humans. We examined the impact of a hypocaloric low-fat dietary intervention on membrane FA composition and insulin sensitivity....... Design Muscle membrane FA profiles were determined in muscle (vastus lateralis) biopsies from 21 obese subjects before and after 6 months of dietary restriction. Diet instructions emphasized low intake of FA of marine origin by recommending lean fish and prohibiting fatty fish and fish oil supplements......-chain PUFAn-3 increased 51% (P = 0.0001), mainly due to a 75% increase (P acid. Changes in HOMA-IR correlated significantly with changes in long-chain PUFAn-3 (R = -0.57, P

  13. Long-term effects of a carbohydrate-rich diet on fasting blood sugar, lipid profile, and serum insulin values in rural Bengalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sutapa; Thakur, Goutam; Kumar, Balasubramaniam Dinesh; Mitra, Analava; Chakraborty, Chandan

    2009-12-01

    The prevalence of Type 2 diabetes is increasing in rural areas of India, where there is also often a lack of health infrastructure. Thus, a proper dietary study with the view of combating diabetes is essential. The aim of the present study was to determine the long-term effect of a carbohydrate-rich diet in rural Bengal. Volunteers (n = 320) were selected from three villages in Kharagpur and were randomly divided into a control and experimental group (n = 160 in each). The design of the study was such that non-significant differences in any of the dependent variables were maintainted prior to the application of control or treatment modes. In the control group, volunteers consumed carbohydrate as part of their diet, whereas in the experimental group carbohydrate consumption was >70%. Blood samples from both groups were collected on yearly basis for 5 years and fasting blood sugar (FBS), lipid profile and serum insulin values were analyzed. The blood biochemistry profiles were monitored before the start and at the end of the study. The results indicate that increased intake of carbohydrate causes significant increases in FBS (P carbohydrate on FBS, serum insulin, triglycerides and VLDL-C indicate that a proper nutritional policy needs to be implemented for this population of rural, low-income Bengalis. © 2009 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. The association between fasting serum insulin, apo-lipoproteins level, and severity of coronary artery involvement in non-diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Golshahi

    2014-01-01

    The evaluation of non-diabetic patients afflicted with CADs, included the fasting glucose level less than 126 mg/dl or non-consumption of blood glucose reduction drugs or negativity history of diabetes. Results: In this study, there were 300 non-diabetic patients afflicted with CAD in three groups of low, medium, and high extremity. Due to attained results, the patients afflicted with high CAD had a higher level of insulin (18.3 ± 0.8 in relation with low and medium groups (P < 0.001. As it was observed, the level of serum apo-lipoproteins of A1 (APO-A1 in low group of CAD (175 ± 36.4 is meaningfully higher than its quantity in high-CAD group (158 ± 42.4, P < 0.001. Furthermore, the quantity of serum apo-lipoproteins of B (APO-B in mild CAD group (139 ± 30.4 is meaningfully less than severe CAD group (155.21 ± 29.7, P < 0.001. Conclusion: Our findings show that insulin, APO-A1, APO-B, and total cholesterol measurement is a good case for defining the severity of coronary artery involvement, while high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, and triglyceride are not important risk-factors.

  15. Dietary glycemic index and glycemic load, carbohydrate and fiber intake, and measures of insulin sensitivity, secretion, and adiposity in the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, Angela D; Schulz, Mandy; Fang, Fang; Wolever, Thomas M S; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Sparks, Karen C; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J

    2005-12-01

    We studied the association of digestible carbohydrates, fiber intake, glycemic index, and glycemic load with insulin sensitivity (S(I)), fasting insulin, acute insulin response (AIR), disposition index, BMI, and waist circumference. Data on 979 adults with normal (67%) and impaired (33%) glucose tolerance from the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study (1992-1994) were analyzed. Usual dietary intake was assessed via a 114-item interviewer-administered food frequency questionnaire from which nutrient intakes were estimated. Published glycemic index values were assigned to food items and average dietary glycemic index and glycemic load calculated per subject. S(I) and AIR were determined by frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test. Disposition index was calculated by multiplying S(I) with AIR. Multiple linear regression modeling was employed. No association was observed between glycemic index and S(I), fasting insulin, AIR, disposition index, BMI, or waist circumference after adjustment for demographic characteristics or family history of diabetes, energy expenditure, and smoking. Associations observed for digestible carbohydrates and glycemic load, respectively, with S(I), insulin secretion, and adiposity (adjusted for demographics and main confounders) were entirely explained by energy intake. In contrast, fiber was associated positively with S(I) and disposition index and inversely with fasting insulin, BMI, and waist circumference but not with AIR. Carbohydrates as reflected in glycemic index and glycemic load may not be related to measures of insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and adiposity. Fiber intake may not only have beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity and adiposity, but also on pancreatic functionality.

  16. A variant in the G6PC2/ABCB11 locus is associated with increased fasting plasma glucose, increased basal hepatic glucose production and increased insulin release after oral and intravenous glucose loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, C S; Grarup, N; Krarup, N T

    2009-01-01

    An association between elevated fasting plasma glucose and the common rs560887 G allele in the G6PC2/ABCB11 locus has been reported. In Danes we aimed to examine rs560887 in relation to plasma glucose and serum insulin responses following oral and i.v. glucose loads and in relation to hepatic...

  17. Diagrams for fast transient conduction in sphere and long cylinder subject to sudden and violent thermal effects on its surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bairi, Abderrahmane; Laraqi, Najib [Universite Paris-10, GTE Lab. d' Energetique et d' Economie d' Energie, Ville d' Avray, 92 (France)

    2003-08-01

    Analytical solutions for fast transient conduction in spherical and cylindrical geometries subject to sudden and violent thermal effects on its surface are presented in this paper. The numerical solutions are presented in the form of simple diagrams that can be easily and readily used in some engineering applications such as aeronautics, electronics, fire dynamics, tribology, metallurgy or food and agricultural technologies. These data are useful for the optimization of numerical codes in fluid mechanics in association with heat transfer and inverse methods for the determination of thermal characteristics of the surface phenomena in various cases. These diagrams are for specific ranges of Fo and Bi numbers corresponding to the fast transient problems characterized by weak Fourier numbers, associated with a large combination of dimensions of the body and values of thermal surface conductance (large range of Bi). These diagrams constitute a special implementation (violent and sudden thermal effects) of the well known Heisler's charts and are very useful for understanding and teaching transient heat transfer. A numerical solution is proposed. It overcomes the problems due to a too slow convergence. The main difficulty is encountered when solving characteristic equations based on a combination of the parameters involved in the particular equations of temperature and energy. That may take asymptotic values for the specific phenomenon addressed in this study. The results are successfully compared to those based on a different calculation procedure. (Author)

  18. Diagrams for fast transient conduction in sphere and long cylinder subject to sudden and violent thermal effects on its surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baieri, Abderrahmane; Laraqi, Najib

    2003-08-01

    Analytical solutions for fast transient conduction in spherical and cylindrical geometries subject to sudden and violent thermal effects on its surface are presented in this paper. The numerical solutions are presented in the form of simple diagrams that can be easily and readily used in some engineering applications such as aeronautics, electronics, fire dynamics, tribology, metallurgy or food and agricultural technologies. These data are useful for the optimization of numerical codes in fluid mechanics in association with heat transfer and inverse methods for the determination of thermal characteristics of the surface phenomena in various cases. These diagrams are for specific ranges of Fo and Bi numbers corresponding to the fast transient problems characterized by weak Fourier numbers, associated with a large combination of dimensions of the body and values of thermal surface conductance (large range of Bi). These diagrams constitute a special implementation (violent and sudden thermal effects) of the well known Heisler's charts and are very useful for understanding and teaching transient heat transfer. A numerical solution is proposed. It overcomes the problems due to a too slow convergence. The main difficulty is encountered when solving characteristic equations based on a combination of the parameters involved in the particular equations of temperature and energy. That may take asymptotic values for the specific phenomenon addressed in this study. The results are successfully compared to those based on a different calculation procedure.

  19. Ultrastructural immunolocalization of polyamines in HeLa cells subjected to fast-freezing fixation and freeze substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roch, A M; Nicolas, M T; Quash, G

    1997-04-01

    Polyamines have been localized at the ultrastructural level in HeLa cells subjected first to fast-freezing fixation (FFF)-freeze substitution (FS) and then to an immunocytochemical method combining anti-polyamine antibodies and immunogold labelling. Polyamines were found in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus and, in the latter, particularly over the dense chromatin area. To our knowledge, this is the first example of the electron microscopic localization of a hapten after FFF-FS. For the preservation of fine ultrastructural details, this FFF-FS method is not only adequate but also greatly reduces, if not totally eliminates, any leeching-out and redistribution of the polyamines during the preparation of the sample. For the preservation of antigenicity in situ during FS, epoxy resin was more effective than hydrophilic LR white resin, probably due to the solubility of polyamines in the latter.

  20. Minimal intensity physical activity (standing and walking of longer duration improves insulin action and plasma lipids more than shorter periods of moderate to vigorous exercise (cycling in sedentary subjects when energy expenditure is comparable.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard M F M Duvivier

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies suggest that excessive sitting time is associated with increased health risk, independent of the performance of exercise. We hypothesized that a daily bout of exercise cannot compensate the negative effects of inactivity during the rest of the day on insulin sensitivity and plasma lipids.Eighteen healthy subjects, age 21±2 year, BMI 22.6±2.6 kgm(-2 followed randomly three physical activity regimes for four days. Participants were instructed to sit 14 hr/day (sitting regime; to sit 13 hr/day and to substitute 1 hr of sitting with vigorous exercise 1 hr (exercise regime; to substitute 6 hrs sitting with 4 hr walking and 2 hr standing (minimal intensity physical activity (PA regime. The sitting and exercise regime had comparable numbers of sitting hours; compared to the exercise regime, the minimal intensity PA regime had a higher estimated daily energy expenditure (238kcal/day [corrected]. PA was assessed continuously by an activity monitor (ActivPAL and a diary. Measurements of insulin sensitivity (oral glucose tolerance test, OGTT and plasma lipids were performed in the fasting state, the morning after the 4 days of each regime. In the sitting regime, daily energy expenditure was about 500 kcal lower than in both other regimes. Area under the curve for insulin during OGTT was significantly lower after the minimal intensity PA regime compared to both sitting and exercise regimes 6727.3±4329.4 vs 7752.0±3014.4 and 8320.4±5383.7 mU•min/ml, respectively. Triglycerides, non-HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein B plasma levels improved significantly in the minimal intensity PA regime compared to sitting and showed non-significant trends for improvement compared to exercise.One hour of daily physical exercise cannot compensate the negative effects of inactivity on insulin level and plasma lipids if the rest of the day is spent sitting. Reducing inactivity by increasing the time spent walking/standing is more effective than

  1. A Dietary Supplement Containing Cinnamon, Chromium and Carnosine Decreases Fasting Plasma Glucose and Increases Lean Mass in Overweight or Obese Pre-Diabetic Subjects: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuejun Liu

    Full Text Available Preventing or slowing the progression of prediabetes to diabetes is a major therapeutic issue.Our aim was to evaluate the effects of 4-month treatment with a dietary supplement containing cinnamon, chromium and carnosine in moderately obese or overweight pre-diabetic subjects, the primary outcome being change in fasting plasma glucose (FPG level. Other parameters of plasma glucose homeostasis, lipid profile, adiposity and inflammatory markers were also assessed.In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 62 subjects with a FPG level ranging from 5.55 to 7 mmol/L and a body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m(2, unwilling to change their dietary and physical activity habits, were allocated to receive a 4-month treatment with either 1.2 g/day of the dietary supplement or placebo. Patients were followed up until 6 months post-randomization.Four-month treatment with the dietary supplement decreased FPG compared to placebo (-0.24 ± 0.50 vs +0.12 ± 0.59 mmol/L, respectively, p = 0.02, without detectable significant changes in HbA1c. Insulin sensitivity markers, plasma insulin, plasma lipids and inflammatory markers did not differ between the treatment groups. Although there were no significant differences in changes in body weight and energy or macronutrient intakes between the two groups, fat-free mass (% increased with the dietary supplement compared to placebo (p = 0.02. Subjects with a higher FPG level and a milder inflammatory state at baseline benefited most from the dietary supplement.Four-month treatment with a dietary supplement containing cinnamon, chromium and carnosine decreased FPG and increased fat-free mass in overweight or obese pre-diabetic subjects. These beneficial effects might open up new avenues in the prevention of diabetes.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01530685.

  2. Effect of deferoxamine therapy on insulin resistance in end-stage renal disease patients with iron overload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsayed Ahmed Alnahal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are a common cause of morbidity and mortality in subjects on regular hemodialysis. Insulin resistance is associated with increased cardiovascular diseases. Elevated serum ferritin is linked to insulin resistance. The aim of this work is to study the effect of desferoxamine therapy on some of the cardiovascular risk factors such as fasting insulin, B-cell function, insulin resistance, glucose, HbA1c%, lipid profile, blood pressure and carotid intima media thickness (CAIMT. Our study included ten subjects on regular hemodialysis with elevated serum ferritin. We measured the fasting serum glucose, HbA1c%, insulin, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, fasting lipid profile, alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST levels and complete blood count (CBC. Statis-tically significant decreases in fasting serum insulin, B-cell function, glucose, HbA1c% and HOMA-IR were noted after deferoxamine therapy. No statistically significant difference was seen with regard to lipid profile, blood pressure and CAIMT. Iron overload increases insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk in hemodialysis subjects. Correction of anemia by iron therapy should keep target ferritin as per guidelines. Further studies are needed to determine the safest ferritin level among hemodialysis subjects.

  3. Impact of insulin resistance, insulin and adiponectin on kidney stones in the Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Ryosuke; Suzuki, Sadao; Nagaya, Teruo; Yamada, Tamaki; Okada, Atsushi; Yasui, Takahiro; Tozawa, Keiichi; Tokudome, Shinkan; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2011-02-01

    It has been reported that kidney stones are linked to metabolic syndrome (MetS), which is characterized by insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to examine the association of insulin resistance, insulin and adiponectin with kidney stones in a Japanese population. From February 2007 to March 2008, 1036 (529 men and 507 women) apparently healthy Japanese subjects, aged 35-79 years, were analyzed. Weight, height, waist circumference and blood pressure were measured. Overnight fasting blood was collected to measure insulin and adiponectin levels. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated to assess insulin resistance. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals for a self-reported history of kidney stones across tertiles of HOMA-IR, insulin and adiponectin. Of the participants, 84 men (15.6%) and 35 women (6.9%) had a history of kidney stones. Age, body mass index, waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, HOMA-IR and insulin were significantly higher in women with than in women without kidney stones. There was no difference in adiponectin level between subjects with and without a history of kidney stones in either sex. Furthermore, a significant positive trend was observed in the age-adjusted OR for a history of kidney stones across insulin tertiles (P-value for trend = 0.04) in women. For Japanese women, HOMA-IR and insulin are associated with a history of kidney stones. The findings suggest that MetS components could increase the risk of kidney stones through subclinical hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. © 2010 The Japanese Urological Association.

  4. The influence of GLP-1 on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion: effects on beta-cell sensitivity in type 2 and nondiabetic subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, Lise L; Holst, Jens J; Vølund, Aage

    2003-01-01

    The intestinally derived hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) (7-36 amide) has potent effects on glucose-mediated insulin secretion, insulin gene expression, and beta-cell growth and differentiation. It is, therefore, considered a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of type 2 diabetes....... However, the dose-response relationship between GLP-1 and basal and glucose-stimulated prehepatic insulin secretion rate (ISR) is currently not known. Seven patients with type 2 diabetes and seven matched nondiabetic control subjects were studied. ISR was determined during a graded glucose infusion of 2......, 4, 6, 8, and 12 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1) over 150 min on four occasions with infusion of saline or GLP-1 at 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 pmol x kg(-1) x min(-1). GLP-1 enhanced ISR in a dose-dependent manner during the graded glucose infusion from 332 +/- 51 to 975 +/- 198 pmol/kg in the patients with type 2...

  5. Evaluation of a Novel Continuous Glucose Monitoring-Based Method for Mealtime Insulin Dosing—the iBolus—in Subjects with Type 1 Diabetes Using Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampudia-Blasco, F. Javier; Laguna, Alejandro; Revert, Ana; Vehì, Josep; Ascaso, Juan F.; Bondia, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective Prandial insulin dosing is an empirical practice associated frequently with poor reproducibility in postprandial glucose response. Based on continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), a method for prandial insulin administration (iBolus) is presented and evaluated for people with type 1 diabetes using CSII therapy. Subjects and Methods An individual patient's model for a 5-h postprandial period was obtained from 6-day ambulatory CGM and used for iBolus calculation in 12 patients with type 1 diabetes. In a double-blind, crossover study each patient underwent four meal tests with 40 g or 100 g of carbohydrates (CHOs), both on two occasions. For each meal, the iBolus or the traditional bolus (tBolus) was given before mealtime (t0) in a randomized order. We measured the postprandial glycemic response as the area under the curve of plasma glucose (AUC-PG0–5h) and variability as the individual coefficient of variation (CV) of AUC-PG0–5h. The contribution of the insulin-to-CHO ratio, CHO, plasma glucose at t0 (PGt0), and insulin dose to AUC-PG0–5h and its CV was also investigated. Results AUC-PG0–5h was similar with either bolus for 40-g (iBolus vs. tBolus, 585.5±127.5 vs. 689.2±180.7 mg/dL·h) or 100-g (752.1±237.7 vs. 760.0±263.2 mg/dL·h) CHO meals. A multiple regression analysis revealed a significant model only for the tBolus, with PGt0 being the best predictor of AUC-PG0–5h explaining approximately 50% of the glycemic response. Observed variability was greater with the iBolus (CV, 16.7±15.3% vs. 10.1±12.5%) but independent of the factors studied. Conclusions A CGM-based algorithm for calculation of prandial insulin is feasible, although it does not reduce unpredictability of individual glycemic responses. Causes of variability need to be identified and analyzed for further optimization of postprandial glycemic control. PMID:23003329

  6. The influence of GLP-1 on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion: effects on beta-cell sensitivity in type 2 and nondiabetic subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, Lise L; Holst, Jens J; Vølund, Aage

    2003-01-01

    , 4, 6, 8, and 12 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1) over 150 min on four occasions with infusion of saline or GLP-1 at 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 pmol x kg(-1) x min(-1). GLP-1 enhanced ISR in a dose-dependent manner during the graded glucose infusion from 332 +/- 51 to 975 +/- 198 pmol/kg in the patients with type 2....... However, the dose-response relationship between GLP-1 and basal and glucose-stimulated prehepatic insulin secretion rate (ISR) is currently not known. Seven patients with type 2 diabetes and seven matched nondiabetic control subjects were studied. ISR was determined during a graded glucose infusion of 2...... that of the control subjects without GLP-1. Our results show that GLP-1 increases insulin secretion in patients with type 2 diabetes and control subjects in a dose-dependent manner and that the beta-cell responsiveness to glucose may be increased to normal levels with a low dose of GLP-1 infusion. Nevertheless...

  7. Association of Serum Magnesium Deficiency with Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutia, Happy; Lynrah, Kyrshanlang G

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is the key pathophysiological defect that leads to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study was to estimate serum magnesium level and insulin sensitivity indices among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and to see an association between them. This study was carried out among 38 type 2 diabetic patients and forty age and sex matched controls. Serum fasting glucose, magnesium, insulin, urea, and creatinine levels were estimated. Insulin sensitivity indices, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) levels were calculated as per formulae. A highly significant low serum magnesium level was found in diabetic subjects as compared to the controls. Statistically significant high HOMA levels (>2.6) and low QUICKI levels (magnesium and fasting insulin level. A highly statistically significant inverse correlation was found between serum magnesium and HOMA level, and a positive correlation was found between serum magnesium and QUICKI level, that is, serum magnesium level decreases with increase in IR. A strong association was also found between fasting serum insulin level and insulin sensitivity indices. This study showed a lower serum magnesium level in diabetic patients compared to control. A strong association was also found between serum magnesium level and insulin sensitivity indices. For proper management of type 2 diabetes, it may, therefore, be necessary to treat hypomagnesemia in these patients.

  8. Fatty Acids, Obesity and Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Arner

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although elevated free fatty acid (FFA levels in obesity have been considered to be of importance for insulin resistance, a recent meta-analysis suggested normal FFA levels in obese subjects. We investigated fasting circulating FFA and glycerol levels in a large cohort of non-obese and obese subjects. Methods: Subjects recruited for a study on obesity genetics were investigated in the morning after an overnight fast (n = 3,888. Serum FFA (n = 3,306, plasma glycerol (n = 3,776, and insulin sensitivity index (HOMA-IR,n = 3,469 were determined. Obesity was defined as BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 and insulin resistance as HOMA-IR ≥ 2.21. Results: In obese subjects, circulating FFA and glycerol levels were higher than in non-obese individuals (by 26% and 47%, respectively; both p Conclusion: Circulating FFA and glycerol levels are markedly elevated in obesity but only marginally influenced by insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Whether these differences persist during diurnal variations in circulating FFA/glycerol, remains to be established.

  9. Insulin sensitivity and albuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilz, Stefan; Rutters, Femke; Nijpels, Giel

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Accumulating evidence suggests an association between insulin sensitivity and albuminuria, which, even in the normal range, is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We evaluated whether insulin sensitivity is associated with albuminuria in healthy subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN...... albuminuria. This finding suggests that reduced insulin sensitivity either is simply related to or might causally contribute to the initial pathogenesis of albuminuria....

  10. Combining protein and carbohydrate increases postprandial insulin levels but does not improve glucose response in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Meidjie; Müller, Andreas S; Wagenlehner, Florian; Pilatz, Adrian; Linn, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    A combined load of carbohydrate and protein stimulates insulin secretion. However, results on postprandial glucose responses in type 2 diabetic (T2D) subjects have been inconclusive. Therefore, we investigated the effects of co-ingestion of carbohydrate and protein on glucose and insulin responses in these subjects. After an overnight fast, 30 subjects consumed a drink containing 50 g of slowly-digested isomaltulose (ISO), combined either with a mixture of 21 g whey/soy (ISO+WS) or with 21 g casein (ISO+C) in a randomized order on separate days. In another experiment, the subjects consumed a control drink containing only 50 g ISO. No significant differences in glucose responses were observed after ingestion of the drinks. Compared to ingestion of ISO alone, insulin response was ~190%-270% higher (Pprotein can elevate postprandial insulin levels, but decreases insulin action, and therefore does not improve glucose response in T2D subjects. Our results further suggest that different types of proteins (i.e., fast-absorbing whey/soy vs. slow-absorbing casein) differently modulate insulin response and insulin action. A fast-absorbing protein mixture reduces insulin action to a greater extent than a slow-absorbing protein, and therefore may not be recommended for glycemic control in T2D patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Associations of Apolipoprotein A, High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and Fasting Plasma Insulin in Obese Children With and Without Family History of Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabouta, Zacharoula; Papandreou, Dimitrios; Makedou, Areti; Rousso, Israel; Athanassiadou, Fani

    2016-01-01

    Background The worldwide prevalence of childhood obesity has increased from 4.2% to 6.7% during the last two decades. Pediatric obesity is a major health problem, which is dramatically increasing in Greece. A variety of inflammatory variables have been also found to associate with cardiometabolic (CV) risk in obese children. The purpose of this study was to identify and examine the effects of possible CV risk factors in obese and non-obese children with and without family history (FH) of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Methods Sixty-eight (68) healthy children and adolescents aged 7 - 13 years participated in the study. Anthropometrical and biochemical indexes were obtained from all children as well as FH of CVD. Results Systolic blood pressure (SBP), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), fasting plasma insulin (FPI) and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) levels were found statistically significantly higher in the obese group compared to the non-obese one. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels were observed to be statistically significantly lower in the obese children compared to their normal peers. Conclusions Apolipoprotein A, hsCRP and FPI levels were significantly higher in the obese children with FH of CVD compared to the ones without FH of CVD. TC and SBP were found to be independently associated with obesity (odds ratio (OR): 1.965, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.935 - 2.97, P < 0.031 and OR: 1.045, 95% CI: 1.016 - 1.074, P < 0.002, respectively). PMID:27222670

  12. Association of fasting serum insulin and cancer mortality in a healthy population - 28-year follow-up of the French TELECOM Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargny, M; Balkau, B; Lange, C; Charles, M-A; Giral, P; Simon, D

    2018-02-01

    Epidemiologic, pharmacoepidemiologic and pathophysiologic evidence points consistently to an association between type 2 diabetes and cancer. This association could be explained by hyperinsulinemia induced by insulin resistance. We studied the association between fasting serum insulin (FSI) and cancer mortality in a population of non-diabetic individuals. We followed 3117 healthy workers (50.2% women), included in the TELECOM cohort study, between 1985 and 1987; their median age was 38 years (Q1-Q3=30-50). Baseline FSI was measured by radioimmunoassay, the INSI-PR method. People with diabetes or cancer at baseline were excluded. Vital status and causes of death were available until December 2013. The association between FSI and cancer deaths was analysed by sex, using a Cox proportional hazards model with age as the time scale, adjusting for body mass index, smoking habits, alcohol consumption, occupational category and ethnic origin. After a 28-year follow-up, 330 (10.6%) deaths were reported, among which, 150 were cancer-related (80 men, 70 women). In men, the association between FSI and death by cancer was J-shaped: compared to the average FSI of 7.1mU/L, men with 5mU/L and 12.9mU/L had respectively adjusted hazard-ratios (HR) of 1.88 (95% confidence interval, 1.00-3.56) and 2.30 (95% CI, 1.34-3.94). Among women, no significant association was found (adjusted HR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.96-1.11) for an increase of 1mU/L in FSI. These results strengthen the hypothesis of an independent risk of cancer death associated with extreme values of FSI, mainly the highest, among men, but not among women. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Plasma vitamin D is associated with fasting insulin and HOMA-IR in young adult males, but not females, of the Jerusalem Perinatal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Amy; Hochner, Hagit; Sitlani, Colleen M; Williams, Michelle A; Hoofnagle, Andrew N; de Boer, Ian H; Kestenbaum, Bryan; Siscovick, David S; Friedlander, Yechiel; Enquobahrie, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine cross-sectional relationships between plasma vitamin D and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in young adults. Design Data were collected from interviews, physical examinations, and biomarker measurements. Total plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) was measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Associations between 25[OH]D and CMR were modeled using weighted linear regression with robust standard error estimates. Setting Individuals born in Jerusalem during 1974-1976. Subjects Participants of the Jerusalem Perinatal Study (n = 1,204) interviewed and examined at age 32 years. Participants were oversampled for low and high birthweight and for maternal pre-pregnancy obesity. Results Mean total 25[OH]D concentration among participants was 21.7 ng/mL (SD 8.9). Among males, 25[OH]D was associated with Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) (natural log-transformed, β = -0.011, p = 0.004) after adjustment for body mass index. However, these associations were not present among females (p for sex interaction = 0.005). Conclusions We found evidence for inverse associations of 25[OH]D with markers of insulin resistance among males, but not females, in a health, young adult Caucasian population. Prospective studies and studies conducted on other populations investigating sex specific effects of vitamin D on CMR are warranted. PMID:25145881

  14. Possible metabolic impact of Ramadan fasting in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardarli, Mustafa Cumhur; Hammes, Hans-Peter; Vardarli, İrfan

    2014-01-01

    Insulin sensitivity and β-cell function during Ramadan fasting in healthy male subjects have not been investigated so far. We assessed the changes of these and other metabolic parameters to judge the potential metabolic benefits of Ramadan fasting. Twenty-four healthy males of Turkish origin living in Germany, with normal glucose tolerance, participated in this study during Ramadan of 2009; 19 who completed fasting were analyzed. Blood was drawn at sunset after a period of fasting lasting approximately 15 h on days 0, 16, and 30 of Ramadan, as well as 7 and 28 days later. Insulin sensitivity (Homeostasis Model Assessment, HOMA), β-cell function, and other parameters were assessed. Ramadan fasting was associated with a significant reduction (-) or increment (+) for the following variables: insulin sensitivity (-20%; P = 0.04), β-cell function (+10%; P = 0.049), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (-23%; P = 0.0003), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (+14%; P = 0.007), nonesterified fatty acids (-62%; P Ramadan fasting is associated with transiently impaired insulin sensitivity, compensated for by an increased β-cell function. However, the pattern of insulin resistance-mediating adipocytokines suggests a potentially beneficial metabolic effect of Ramadan fasting.

  15. Dapagliflozin in patients with type 1 diabetes: A post hoc analysis of the effect of insulin dose adjustments on 24-hour continuously monitored mean glucose and fasting β-hydroxybutyrate levels in a phase IIa pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Robert R; Dandona, Paresh; Pettus, Jeremy; Mudaliar, Sunder; Xu, John; Hansen, Lars

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the effects of total daily insulin dose (TDD) reductions on 24-hour continuously monitored mean glucose and fasting β-hydroxybutyrate (a marker for diabetic ketosis/ketoacidosis [DKA]) levels, using patient-level data from a 14-day, pilot study of dapagliflozin in type 1 diabetes (T1DM). A post hoc exploratory correlation analysis was performed to determine the relationship between change in TDD and (1) 24-hour mean glucose, assessed by continuous glucose monitoring, and (2) fasting β-hydroxybutyrate, in 70 patients with T1DM receiving insulin and dapagliflozin (1, 2.5, 5 or 10 mg) or placebo. The pharmacodynamic effect of dapagliflozin was estimated as a virtual "insulin dose" using 24-hour urinary glucose excretion values and a recognized insulin-to-carbohydrate counting technique. Trends for correlations were observed between change in TDD and 24-hour glucose (day 7: r = -0.264, P = .056) and β-hydroxybutyrate (day 7: r = -0.187, P = .133; day 14: r = -0.274, P = .047). The pharmacodynamic effect of dapagliflozin 5 or 10 mg was estimated as equivalent to ~20% of baseline TDD. Higher mean and maximum β-hydroxybutyrate levels were observed on days 7 and 14 in patients with a TDD reduction >20% vs ≤20%. Over 14 days, decreasing the insulin dose diminished the glucose-lowering effect of dapagliflozin-insulin combination therapy and increased levels of β-hydroxybutyrate. While insulin dose adjustments should always be individualized, these analyses suggest that, as a general rule, TDD reduction in dapagliflozin-treated patients with T1DM should not exceed 20%, to ensure glycaemic control does not deteriorate and to mitigate the potential for an increased risk of DKA. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Insulin Secretagogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Spikes Is mealtime insulin right for you? Insulin Secretagogues September 2017 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors ... Additional Resources Affordable Insulin Project FDA What are insulin secretagogues? Insulin secretagogues are one type of medicine ...

  17. Increased insulin secretory capacity but decreased insulin sensitivity after correction of iron overload by phlebotomy in hereditary haemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, D; Rogers, J; Gault, P; Kushner, J P; McClain, D A

    2006-11-01

    We recently demonstrated that humans with hereditary haemochromatosis have decreased insulin secretory capacity with a compensatory increase in insulin sensitivity. We therefore determined how these measures change after correction of tissue iron overload. Five non-diabetic subjects who had been studied previously at the time of initial diagnosis by means of the OGTT and frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance tests (FSIVGTT) underwent phlebotomy to normalise their serum ferritin. After normalisation of ferritin they were studied again (33+/-4 months after the initial studies) by OGTT and FSIVGTT. Normalisation of tissue iron stores resulted in an average 1.8-fold increase in the integrated area under the insulin curve during OGTT (pdisposition index (AIRgxSi) was unchanged (5% increase, p=0.90). BMI and fasting glucose were unchanged. At the time of diagnosis of haemochromatosis, four of the subjects had IGT. After normalisation of ferritin, two achieved NGT and two remained with IGT, despite 2.5- and 3.7-fold increases in insulin secretory capacity. Insulin secretory capacity improves after normalisation of iron stores in subjects with hereditary haemochromatosis. Glucose tolerance status improves incompletely because of decreased insulin sensitivity after phlebotomy. We conclude that tissue iron levels are an important determinant of insulin secretion and insulin action.

  18. A 3-basepair in-frame deletion ({Delta}Leu{sup 999}) in exon 17 of the insulin receptor gene in a family with insulin resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awata, T.; Matsumoto, C.; Iwamoto, Y. [Jichi Medical School, Tochigi (Japan)] [and others

    1994-12-01

    We studied a woman with acanthosis nigricans and insulin resistance. The patient`s Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphocytes revealed slightly decreased insulin binding and markedly decreased insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation of the insulin receptor. The nucleotide sequence analysis of the patient`s genomic DNA revealed a 3-basepair in-frame deletion of one allele, resulting in the loss of leucine at position 999 of the insulin receptor ({Delta}Leu{sup 999}). The messenger ribonucleic acid transcripts from the mutant allele in the patient`s lymphocytes were not decreased. Insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation of the insulin receptor from cells expressing {Delta}Leu{sup 999} mutant insulin receptor complementary DNA was markedly decreased. The proband, her mother, elder brother, and younger brother, who were heterozygous for this mutation, showed moderate or marked hyperinsulinemia during oral glucose tolerance tests. Although fasting glucose levels were normal and fasting insulin values were preserved in all subjects with the mutation for the 8-yr period of observation, a tendancy of progressive increase in postload glucose levels were observed. These results suggest that the {Delta}Leu{sup 999} mutation, which reduces tyrosine kinase activity, was responsible for insulin resistance and contributed to postload hyperglycemia. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Preservation of blood glucose homeostasis in slow-senescing somatotrophism-deficient mice subjected to intermittent fasting begun at middle or old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arum, Oge; Saleh, Jamal K; Boparai, Ravneet K; Kopchick, John J; Khardori, Romesh K; Bartke, Andrzej

    2014-06-01

    Poor blood glucose homeostatic regulation is common, consequential, and costly for older and elderly populations, resulting in pleiotrophically adverse clinical outcomes. Somatotrophic signaling deficiency and dietary restriction have each been shown to delay the rate of senescence, resulting in salubrious phenotypes such as increased survivorship. Using two growth hormone (GH) signaling-related, slow-aging mouse mutants we tested, via longitudinal analyses, whether genetic perturbations that increase survivorship also improve blood glucose homeostatic regulation in senescing mammals. Furthermore, we institute a dietary restriction paradigm that also decelerates aging, an intermittent fasting (IF) feeding schedule, as either a short-term or a sustained intervention beginning at either middle or old age, and assess its effects on blood glucose control. We find that either of the two genetic alterations in GH signaling ameliorates fasting hyperglycemia; additionally, both longevity-inducing somatotrophic mutations improve insulin sensitivity into old age. Strikingly, we observe major and broad improvements in blood glucose homeostatic control by IF: IF improves ad libitum-fed hyperglycemia, glucose tolerance, and insulin sensitivity, and reduces hepatic gluconeogenesis, in aging mutant and normal mice. These results on correction of aging-resultant blood glucose dysregulation have potentially important clinical and public health implications for our ever-graying global population, and are consistent with the Longevity Dividend concept.

  20. RELATIONSHIP OF SERUM RESISTIN WITH INSULIN RESISTANCE AND OBESITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Syeda Ijlal Zehra; Shirwany, Tanvir Ali Khan

    2015-01-01

    Adipokines have been implicated in the modulation of insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance and have thus gained importance in the study of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Resistin, a unique signalling molecule, is being proposed as a significant factor in the pathogenesis of obesity-related insulin resistance. However, its relevance to human diabetes mellitus remains uncertain and controversial. This study was therefore planned to compare and correlate the potential role of resistin in obese patients with T2DM and obese non-diabetic controls and also to evaluate the correlation between resistin and marker of obesity and glycaemic parameters. Fasting serum resistin, glucose and insulin were measured in forty obese diabetics (mean±SD BMI 35±5 kg/m2) and forty obese non-diabetics (mean±SD BMI 33±3 kg/m2). Insulin resistance was assessed using the HOMA-IR formula derived from fasting insulin and glucose levels. Serum resistin levels (38±8 ng/ml) were significantly higher in type 2 diabetic patients as compared with the controls. Fasting blood glucose (164±46 mg/dl), serum insulin (37±7 µU/ml) and insulin resistance (19±8), were considerably higher among the studied diabetics than in the controls. Pearson's correlation analysis revealed positive correlation between serum resistin and BMI (p=0.001) and HOMA-IR (p=0.561) in diabetic subjects. Similarly, a correlation also existed between serum resistin and BMI (p=0.016) and HOMA-IR (p=0.307) in control obese subjects. However, it was highly significant in diabetics as compared to non-diabetic controls. A significant BMI-dependent association exists between resistin and insulin resistance in patients with T2DM. It appears that resistin may play a role in the pathogenesis of obesity and insulin resistance and that both of these may contribute to the development of T2DM.

  1. No increased risk of hypoglycaemic episodes during 48 h of subcutaneous glucagon-like-peptide-1 administration in fasting healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Susanne; Soendergaard, Liselotte; Rungby, Joergen

    2008-01-01

    glucose tolerance test (OGTT). GLP-1(7-36 amide) or placebo was continuously infused subcutaneously and titrated to a dose of 4.8 pmol/kg per min. RESULTS: Two subjects in the GLP-1 group and one subject in the placebo group were withdrawn due to protocol specified plasma glucose (PG) ... of insulin and C-peptide were higher with GLP-1 infusion. However, PG was similar during GLP-1 vs. placebo infusions. GLP-1 infusion increased norepinephrine and cortisol levels during OGTT. CONCLUSION: The counter-regulatory response during 48 h of subcutaneous GLP-1 infusion was preserved despite long...

  2. Association between dietary phylloquinone intake and peripheral metabolic risk markers related to insulin resistance and diabetes in elderly subjects at high cardiovascular risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanola-Falgarona Martí

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vitamin K has been related to glucose metabolism, insulin sensitivity and diabetes. Because inflammation underlies all these metabolic conditions, it is plausible that the potential role of vitamin K in glucose metabolism occurs through the modulation of cytokines and related molecules. The purpose of the study was to assess the associations between dietary intake of vitamin K and peripheral adipokines and other metabolic risk markers related to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods Cross-sectional and longitudinal assessments of these associations in 510 elderly participants recruited in the PREDIMED centers of Reus and Barcelona (Spain. We determined 1-year changes in dietary phylloquinone intake estimated by food frequency questionnaires, serum inflammatory cytokines and other metabolic risk markers. Results In the cross-sectional analysis at baseline no significant associations were found between dietary phylloquinone intake and the rest of metabolic risk markers evaluated, with exception of a negative association with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. After 1-year of follow-up, subjects in the upper tertile of changes in dietary phylloquinone intake showed a greater reduction in ghrelin (−15.0%, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (−12.9%, glucagon-like peptide-1 (−17.6%, IL-6 (−27.9%, leptin (−10.3%, TNF (−26.9% and visfatin (−24.9% plasma concentrations than those in the lowest tertile (all p Conclusion These results show that dietary phylloquinone intake is associated with an improvement of cytokines and other markers related to insulin resistance and diabetes, thus extending the potential protection by dietary phylloquinone on chronic inflammatory diseases. Trial registration http://www.controlled-trials.com as ISRCTN35739639

  3. Novopen Echo® for the delivery of insulin: a comparison of usability, functionality and preference among pediatric subjects, their parents, and health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Birthe S; Lilleøre, Søren Kruse; Korsholm, Conny Nøhr; Kracht, Thorben

    2010-11-01

    Despite advances in insulin pen design and functionality, the selection of pens available for children with diabetes is limited. This study assessed the usability, functionality and attitudes towards NovoPen Echo®, a new durable insulin pen designed for pediatric patients that combines a simple memory function with half-increment dosing, versus NovoPen® Junior and HumaPen® Luxura™ HD in pediatric subjects, their parents, and health care professionals (HCPs). Pens were evaluated in random order during 1:1 interviews in the three target groups (pediatric subjects, parents, and HCPs) in Germany, France, and Canada. Study participants were asked to prepare each pen, perform injections into foam cushions, and provide feedback via a standardized questionnaire. In total, 205 participants were included in the study. On a scale of 1-6 (1=most favorable; 6=least favorable regarding overall appearance, shape, colors, thickness and length), NovoPen Echo received the most favorable rating for design and overall appearance (mean±standard deviation=1.71±0.79) compared with NovoPen Junior (2.02±0.93) and HumaPen Luxura HD (2.36±1.01). Furthermore, 89% of pediatric subjects and 94% of parents rated the memory function of NovoPen Echo as very easy/easy to use. When asked to rate the pens overall, 80% of participants preferred NovoPen Echo to the other pens (pmemory function, half-increment units and, ease of use and design, may contribute towards promoting treatment adherence, which is essential in the pediatric setting. © 2010 Diabetes Technology Society.

  4. Insulin and Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    As obesity and diabetes reach epidemic proportions in the developed world, the role of insulin resistance and its consequences are gaining prominence. Understanding the role of insulin in wide-ranging physiological processes and the influences on its synthesis and secretion, alongside its actions from the molecular to the whole body level, has significant implications for much chronic disease seen in Westernised populations today. This review provides an overview of insulin, its history, structure, synthesis, secretion, actions and interactions followed by a discussion of insulin resistance and its associated clinical manifestations. Specific areas of focus include the actions of insulin and manifestations of insulin resistance in specific organs and tissues, physiological, environmental and pharmacological influences on insulin action and insulin resistance as well as clinical syndromes associated with insulin resistance. Clinical and functional measures of insulin resistance are also covered. Despite our incomplete understanding of the complex biological mechanisms of insulin action and insulin resistance, we need to consider the dramatic social changes of the past century with respect to physical activity, diet, work, socialisation and sleep patterns. Rapid globalisation, urbanisation and industrialisation have spawned epidemics of obesity, diabetes and their attendant co-morbidities, as physical inactivity and dietary imbalance unmask latent predisposing genetic traits. PMID:16278749

  5. Effects of LX4211, a dual sodium-dependent glucose cotransporters 1 and 2 inhibitor, on postprandial glucose, insulin, glucagon-like peptide 1, and peptide tyrosine tyrosine in a dose-timing study in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrowicz, Brian; Ogbaa, Ike; Frazier, Kenny; Banks, Phillip; Turnage, Anne; Freiman, Joel; Boehm, Kristi A; Ruff, Dennis; Powell, David; Sands, Arthur

    2013-08-01

    LX4211 is a first-in-class dual inhibitor of sodium-dependent glucose cotransporters 1 and 2 (SGLT1 and SGLT2). SGLT1 is the primary transporter for glucose absorption from the gastrointestinal tract, and SGLT2 is the primary transporter for glucose reabsorption in the kidney. SGLT1 inhibition reduces postprandial glucose (PPG) levels and increases the release of gastrointestinal peptides such as glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY), whereas SGLT2 inhibition results in increased urinary glucose excretion (UGE). This study evaluated how timing of dose relative to meals changes the pharmacodynamic (PD) effects of LX4211 treatment, including effects on UGE, fasting plasma glucose, PPG, insulin, total and active GLP-1, and PYY. The safety and tolerability of LX4211 in healthy subjects were also assessed. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple-dose study to determine the PD effects of LX4211 dose timing relative to meals in 12 healthy subjects. Blood and urine were collected for the analysis of PD variables. Twelve healthy subjects 30 to 51 years of age were enrolled and treated. Treatment with LX4211 resulted in significant elevation of total and active GLP-1, and PYY while significantly decreasing PPG levels relative to placebo, likely by reducing SGLT1-mediated intestinal glucose absorption. Comparisons performed among the dosing schedules indicated that dosing immediately before breakfast maximized the PD effects of LX4211 on both SGLT1 and SGLT2 inhibition. The comparative results suggested distinct SGLT1 effects on GLP-1, PYY, glucose, and insulin, which were separate from SGLT2-mediated effects, indicating that SGLT1 inhibition with LX4211 may be clinically meaningful. All treatments were well tolerated with no evidence of diarrhea with LX4211 treatment. This clinical study indicates that dosing of LX4211 immediately before breakfast maximized the PD effects of both SGLT1 and SGLT 2 inhibition and provided

  6. TAK-875, an orally available G protein-coupled receptor 40/free fatty acid receptor 1 agonist, enhances glucose-dependent insulin secretion and improves both postprandial and fasting hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujihata, Yoshiyuki; Ito, Ryo; Suzuki, Masami; Harada, Ayako; Negoro, Nobuyuki; Yasuma, Tsuneo; Momose, Yu; Takeuchi, Koji

    2011-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 40/free fatty acid receptor 1 (GPR40/FFA(1)) is highly expressed in pancreatic β cells and mediates free fatty acid-induced insulin secretion. This study examined the pharmacological effects and potential for avoidance of lipotoxicity of [(3S)-6-({2',6'-dimethyl-4'-[3-(methylsulfonyl)propoxy]biphenyl-3-yl}meth-oxy)-2,3-dihydro-1-benzofuran-3-yl]acetic acid hemi-hydrate) (TAK-875), a novel, orally available, selective GPR40 agonist. Insulinoma cell lines and primary rat islets were used to assess the effects of TAK-875 in vitro. The in vivo effects of TAK-875 on postprandial hyperglycemia, fasting hyperglycemia, and normoglycemia were examined in type 2 diabetic and normal rats. In rat insulinoma INS-1 833/15 cells, TAK-875 increased intracellular inositol monophosphate and calcium concentration, consistent with activation of the Gqα signaling pathway. The insulinotropic action of TAK-875 (10 μM) in INS-1 833/15 and primary rat islets was glucose-dependent. Prolonged exposure of cytokine-sensitive INS-1 832/13 to TAK-875 for 72 h at pharmacologically active concentrations did not alter glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, insulin content, or caspase 3/7 activity, whereas prolonged exposure to palmitic or oleic acid impaired β cell function and survival. In an oral glucose tolerance test in type 2 diabetic N-STZ-1.5 rats, TAK-875 (1-10 mg/kg p.o.) showed a clear improvement in glucose tolerance and augmented insulin secretion. In addition, TAK-875 (10 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly augmented plasma insulin levels and reduced fasting hyperglycemia in male Zucker diabetic fatty rats, whereas in fasted normal Sprague-Dawley rats, TAK-875 neither enhanced insulin secretion nor caused hypoglycemia even at 30 mg/kg. TAK-875 enhances glucose-dependent insulin secretion and improves both postprandial and fasting hyperglycemia with a low risk of hypoglycemia and no evidence of β cell toxicity.

  7. Effect of calorie restriction with or without exercise on insulin sensitivity, beta-cell function, fat cell size, and ectopic lipid in overweight subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson-Meyer, D Enette; Heilbronn, Leonie K; Redman, Leanne M; Newcomer, Bradley R; Frisard, Madlyn I; Anton, Steve; Smith, Steven R; Alfonso, Anthony; Ravussin, Eric

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this article was to determine the relationships among total body fat, visceral adipose tissue (VAT), fat cell size (FCS), ectopic fat deposition in liver (intrahepatic lipid [IHL]) and muscle (intramyocellular lipid [IMCL]), and insulin sensitivity index (S(i)) in healthy overweight, glucose-tolerant subjects and the effects of calorie restriction by diet alone or in conjunction with exercise on these variables. Forty-eight overweight volunteers were randomly assigned to four groups: control (100% of energy requirements), 25% calorie restriction (CR), 12.5% calorie restriction +12.5% energy expenditure through structured exercise (CREX), or 15% weight loss by a low-calorie diet followed by weight maintenance for 6 months (LCD). Weight, percent body fat, VAT, IMCL, IHL, FCS, and S(i) were assessed at baseline and month 6. At baseline, FCS was related to VAT and IHL (P fat, and IHL were reduced in the three intervention groups (P increased at month 6 (P = 0.05) in the CREX (37 +/- 18%) and LCD (70 +/- 34%) groups (P increase in the CR group (40 +/- 20%, P = 0.08). Together the improvements in S(i) were related to loss in weight, fat mass, and VAT, but not IHL, IMCL, or FCS. Large adipocytes lead to lipid deposition in visceral and hepatic tissues, promoting insulin resistance. Calorie restriction by diet alone or with exercise reverses this trend.

  8. Metformin and insulin receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigneri, R.; Gullo, D.; Pezzino, V.

    The authors evaluated the effect of metformin (N,N-dimethylbiguanide), a biguanide known to be less toxic than phenformin, on insulin binding to its receptors, both in vitro and in vivo. Specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding to cultured IM-9 human lymphocytes and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells was determined after preincubation with metformin. Specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding to circulating monocytes was also evaluated in six controls, eight obese subjects, and six obese type II diabetic patients before and after a short-term treatment with metformin. Plasma insulin levels and blood glucose were also measured on both occasions. Metformin significantly increased insulin binding in vitro to both IM-9 lymphocytes and MCF-7 cells; the maximum increment was 47.1% and 38.0%, respectively. Metformin treatment significantly increased insulin binding in vivo to monocytes of obese subjects and diabetic patients. Scatchard analysis indicated that the increased binding was mainly due to an increase in receptor capacity. Insulin binding to monocytes of normal controls was unchanged after metformin as were insulin levels in all groups; blood glucose was significantly reduced after metformin only in diabetic patients. These data indicate that metformin increases insulin binding to its receptors in vitro and in vivo. The effect in vivo is observed in obese subjects and in obese type II diabetic patients, paralleling the clinical effectiveness of this antidiabetic agent, and is not due to receptor regulation by circulating insulin, since no variation in insulin levels was recorded.

  9. Cerebral blood flow links insulin resistance and baroreflex sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P Ryan

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance confers risk for diabetes mellitus and associates with a reduced capacity of the arterial baroreflex to regulate blood pressure. Importantly, several brain regions that comprise the central autonomic network, which controls the baroreflex, are also sensitive to the neuromodulatory effects of insulin. However, it is unknown whether peripheral insulin resistance relates to activity within central autonomic network regions, which may in turn relate to reduced baroreflex regulation. Accordingly, we tested whether resting cerebral blood flow within central autonomic regions statistically mediated the relationship between insulin resistance and an indirect indicator of baroreflex regulation; namely, baroreflex sensitivity. Subjects were 92 community-dwelling adults free of confounding medical illnesses (48 men, 30-50 years old who completed protocols to assess fasting insulin and glucose levels, resting baroreflex sensitivity, and resting cerebral blood flow. Baroreflex sensitivity was quantified by measuring the magnitude of spontaneous and sequential associations between beat-by-beat systolic blood pressure and heart rate changes. Individuals with greater insulin resistance, as measured by the homeostatic model assessment, exhibited reduced baroreflex sensitivity (b = -0.16, p < .05. Moreover, the relationship between insulin resistance and baroreflex sensitivity was statistically mediated by cerebral blood flow in central autonomic regions, including the insula and cingulate cortex (mediation coefficients < -0.06, p-values < .01. Activity within the central autonomic network may link insulin resistance to reduced baroreflex sensitivity. Our observations may help to characterize the neural pathways by which insulin resistance, and possibly diabetes mellitus, relates to adverse cardiovascular outcomes.

  10. Postexercise insulin action in African-American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, Rebecca E; Freedson, Patty S; Braun, Barry

    2006-11-01

    African Americans are more insulin resistant than Caucasians. A single bout of moderate-intensity exercise reduces insulin resistance in sedentary Caucasian individuals. The impact of a single bout of exercise on insulin resistance has never been studied in African Americans. The purpose of this experiment was to evaluate the impact of a single bout of exercise on insulin resistance in African-American women. Insulin resistance was assessed in 10 sedentary, over-weight or obese African-American women during a sedentary and exercise condition over a two-day period. During the sedentary condition, participants fasted overnight and sat quietly in the laboratory for 75 minutes. During the exercise condition, participants completed 75 minutes of brisk walking on a treadmill. Ninety minutes following each condition, participants completed an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Three-and-a-half hours later, subjects consumed a standardized meal [meal tolerance test (MTT)]. The insulin response to the OGTT was 18% lower (p=0.046), and insulin sensitivity was 18% higher (p=0.042) in the exercise condition compared to the sedentary condition. There were no differences between conditions following the MTT. These results indicate that overweight/obese, sedentary, insulin resistant African-American women had a significant improvement in insulin sensitivity from 75 minutes of brisk walking.

  11. Insulin aspart in diabetic pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2008-01-01

    in insulin requirements during pregnancy necessitate short-acting insulins for postprandial control of hyperglycemia. The fast-acting insulin analogue insulin aspart has been tested in a large, randomized trial of pregnant women with Type 1 diabetes and offers benefits in control of postprandial......Pregnancy in women with diabetes is associated with an increased risk of obstetric complications and perinatal mortality. Maintenance of near-normal glycemia during pregnancy can bring the prevalence of fetal, neonatal and maternal complications closer to that of the nondiabetic population. Changes...... and no increase in insulin antibodies was found. Thus, the use of insulin aspart in pregnancy is regarded safe....

  12. Serum HER-2 concentration is associated with insulin resistance and decreases after weight loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno-Navarrete José

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HER2/neu is a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor family easily detectable in the serum of cancer patients. We aimed to evaluate circulating HER-2 concentrations in association with insulin resistance in healthy and obese subjects. Methods Insulin sensitivity (minimal model and serum HER-2 concentrations were evaluated in a cross sectional study in men (cohort 1, n = 167 and longitudinally after weight loss in obese subjects (cohort 2, n = 30. Results Serum HER-2 concentrations were positively associated with BMI and waist circumference (both r = 0.18, p = 0.02, post-load glucose (r = 0.28, p = 0.001 and fasting triglycerides (r = 0.26, p = 0.001; and negatively associated with insulin sensitivity (r = -0.29, p = 0.002, n = 109. Subjects with type 2 diabetes showed significantly increased soluble serum HER-2 concentrations. In different multivariate regression models, fasting triglycerides emerged as the factor that independently contributed to 10-11% of serum HER-2 variance. Serum HER-2 concentrations correlated significantly with fasting triglycerides and insulin sensitivity index in subjects from cohort 2. Weight loss led to a significant decrease of serum HER-2 concentrations. The change in serum HER-2 concentrations were significantly associated with the change in percent body fat and fasting triglycerides in young (below the median age of the cohort subjects. Conclusions Serum HER-2 concentrations might be implicated in the pathophysiology of insulin resistance and associated comorbidities.

  13. Low diagnostic value of fasting and post-methionine load homocysteine tests. A study in Dutch subjects with homocysteine test indications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, M R; Dijck-Brouwer, D A J; van Doormaal, J J; Reijngoud, D J; Muskiet, F A J

    BACKGROUND: Homocysteine is a cardiovascular disease risk factor. We investigated, both in subjects with past plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) test indications and healthy adults, the diagnostic value of a fasting (tHcy) (f-tHcy) and the added value of a post-methionine-load tHcy (postload-tHcy).

  14. Dietary intervention increases n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in sceletal muscle membrane phospholipids of obese subjects. Inplications for insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Madsbad, Sten; Høy, C-E

    2006-01-01

    . DESIGN Muscle membrane FA profiles were determined in muscle (vastus lateralis) biopsies from 21 obese subjects before and after 6 months of dietary restriction. Diet instructions emphasized low intake of FA of marine origin by recommending lean fish and prohibiting fatty fish and fish oil supplements....... Insulin resistance was estimated by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR). RESULTS The mean weight loss was 5.1 kg (range -15.3 to +1.3 kg). BMI decreased from 36.5 to 34.9 kg/m(2) (P=0.003). Saturated FA (SFA) decreased 11% (P=0.0001). Polyunsaturated FA (PUFA)n-6 increased 4% (P =0.003). Long...

  15. Temporal Relationship Between Hyperuricemia and Insulin Resistance and Its Impact on Future Risk of Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tianshu; Lan, Li; Qu, Rongge; Xu, Qian; Jiang, Ruyue; Na, Lixin; Sun, Changhao

    2017-10-01

    Although hyperuricemia and insulin resistance significantly correlated, their temporal sequence and how the sequence influence on future risk of hypertension are largely unknown. This study assessed temporal relationship between uric acid and insulin resistance and its impact on future risk of hypertension by examining a longitudinal cohort including 8543 subjects aged 20 to 74 years from China, with an average follow-up of 5.3 years. Measurements of fasting uric acid, as well as fasting and 2-hour serum glucose and insulin, were obtained at baseline and follow-up. Indicators of hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance were calculated. Cross-lagged panel and mediation analysis were used to examine the temporal relationship between uric acid and insulin resistance and its impact on follow-up hypertension. After adjusting for covariates, the cross-lagged path coefficients ( β 1 values) from baseline uric acid to follow-up insulin resistance indices were significantly greater than path coefficients ( β 2 values) from baseline insulin resistance indices to follow-up uric acid ( β 1 =0.110 versus β 2 =0.017; P hypertensive group were significantly greater than that in the normotensive group ( P hypertension, and the mediation effect of peripheral insulin resistance was significantly greater than that of hepatic insulin resistance (31.3% versus 13.2%; P hypertension than hepatic insulin resistance does. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Minor long-term changes in weight have beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function in obese subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfalck, A M; Hendel, Helle Westergren; Rasmussen, M H

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term effect of changes in body composition induced by weight loss on insulin sensitivity (SI), non-insulin mediated glucose disposal, glucose effectiveness (SG)and beta-cell function.......To evaluate the long-term effect of changes in body composition induced by weight loss on insulin sensitivity (SI), non-insulin mediated glucose disposal, glucose effectiveness (SG)and beta-cell function....

  17. Simulation-Based Evaluation of Dose-Titration Algorithms for Rapid-Acting Insulin in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Inadequately Controlled on Basal Insulin and Oral Antihyperglycemic Medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaosu; Chien, Jenny Y; Johnson, Jennal; Malone, James; Sinha, Vikram

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this prospective, model-based simulation approach was to evaluate the impact of various rapid-acting mealtime insulin dose-titration algorithms on glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c]). Seven stepwise, glucose-driven insulin dose-titration algorithms were evaluated with a model-based simulation approach by using insulin lispro. Pre-meal blood glucose readings were used to adjust insulin lispro doses. Two control dosing algorithms were included for comparison: no insulin lispro (basal insulin+metformin only) or insulin lispro with fixed doses without titration. Of the seven dosing algorithms assessed, daily adjustment of insulin lispro dose, when glucose targets were met at pre-breakfast, pre-lunch, and pre-dinner, sequentially, demonstrated greater HbA1c reduction at 24 weeks, compared with the other dosing algorithms. Hypoglycemic rates were comparable among the dosing algorithms except for higher rates with the insulin lispro fixed-dose scenario (no titration), as expected. The inferior HbA1c response for the "basal plus metformin only" arm supports the additional glycemic benefit with prandial insulin lispro. Our model-based simulations support a simplified dosing algorithm that does not include carbohydrate counting, but that includes glucose targets for daily dose adjustment to maintain glycemic control with a low risk of hypoglycemia.

  18. Tissue-specific regulation of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor axis during fasting and re-feeding: Importance of muscle expression of IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA in the tilapia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Bradley K; Breves, Jason P; Davis, Lori K; Pierce, Andrew L; Hirano, Tetsuya; Grau, E Gordon

    2010-05-01

    The effects of prolonged nutrient restriction (fasting) and subsequent restoration (re-feeding) on the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis were investigated in the tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). Mean weight and specific growth rate declined within 1 week in fasted fish, and remained lower than controls throughout 4 weeks of fasting. Plasma levels of IGF-I were lower than fed controls during 4 weeks of fasting, suggesting a significant catabolic state. Following re-feeding, fasted fish gained weight continuously, but did not attain the weight of fed controls at 8 weeks after re-feeding. Specific growth rate increased above the continuously-fed controls during the first 6 weeks of re-feeding, clearly indicating a compensatory response. Plasma IGF-I levels increased after 1 week of re-feeding and levels were not otherwise different from fed controls. Plasma GH levels were unaffected by either fasting or re-feeding. No consistent effect of fasting or re-feeding was observed on liver expression of GH receptor (GH-R), somatolactin (SL) receptor (SL-R), IGF-I or IGF-II. In contrast, muscle expression of GH-R increased markedly during 4 weeks of fasting, and then declined below control levels upon re-feeding for weeks 1 and 2. Similarly, muscle expression of SL-R increased after 4 weeks of fasting, and reduced below control levels after 1 and 2 weeks of re-feeding. On the other hand, muscle expression of IGF-I was strongly reduced throughout the fasting period, and levels recovered 2 weeks after re-feeding. Muscle expression of IGF-II was not affected by fasting, but was reduced after 1 and 2 weeks of re-feeding. These results indicate that GH/IGF axis, particularly muscle expression of GH-R, SL-R and IGF-I and -II, is sensitive to nutritional status in the tilapia. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Consumption of meat is associated with higher fasting glucose and insulin concentrations regardless of glucose and insulin genetic risk scores: a meta-analysis of 50,345 Caucasians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent studies suggest that meat intake is associated with diabetes-related phenotypes. However, whether the associations of meat intake and glucose and insulin homeostasis are modified by genes related to glucose and insulin is unknown. We investigated the associations of meat intake and the intera...

  20. Consumption of meat is associated with higher fasting glucose and insulin concentrations regardless of glucose and insulin genetic risk scores: A meta-analysis of 50,345 Caucasians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Fretts (Amanda M.); J.L. Follis (Jack ); J.A. Nettleton (Jennifer ); R.N. Lemaitre (Rozenn ); J.S. Ngwa; M.K. Wojczynski (Mary ); I.-P. Kalafati (Ioanna-Panagiota); T.V. Varga (Tibor V.); A.C. Frazier-Wood (Alexis C.); D.K. Houston (Denise); J. Lahti (Jari); U. Ericson (Ulrika); E.H. van den Hooven (Edith); V. Mikkilä (Vera); J.C. Kiefte-de Jong (Jessica); D. Mozaffarian (Dariush); K.M. Rice (Kenneth); F. Renström (Frida); K.E. North (Kari); N.M. McKeown (Nicola ); M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); C.E. Smith (Caren); M. Garcia (Melissa); A.-M. Tiainen (Anna-Maija); E. Sonestedt (Emily); A. Manichaikul (Ani); F.J.A. van Rooij (Frank); M. Dimitriou (Maria); O. Raitakari (Olli); J.S. Pankow (James); L. Djoussé (Luc); M.A. Province (Mike); F.B. Hu (Frank); C.-Q. Lai (Chao-Qiang); M.F. Keller (Margaux); M.-M. Perälä (Mia-Maria); J.I. Rotter (Jerome I.); A. Hofman (Albert); M.J. Graff (Maud J.L.); M. Kähönen (Mika); K. Mukamal (Kenneth); I. Johansson (Ingegerd); J.M. Ordovas (Jose); Y. Liu (YongMei); S. Männistö (Satu); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); I. Seppälä (Ilkka); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); P.W. Franks (Paul W.); D.K. Arnett (Donna); M.A. Nalls (Michael); K. Hagen (Knut); M. Orho-Melander (Marju); O.H. Franco (Oscar); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); G.V. Dedoussis (George); J.B. Meigs (James); D.S. Siscovick (David)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Recent studies suggest that meat intake is associated with diabetes-related phenotypes. However, whether the associations of meat intake and glucose and insulin homeostasis are modified by genes related to glucose and insulin is unknown. Objective: We investigated the

  1. Validation of insulin resistance indexes in a stable renal transplant population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oterdoom, Leendert H.; de Vries, Aiko P. J.; van Son, Willem J.; Homan van der Heide, Jaap J.; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; de Jong, Paul E.; Gans, Rijk O. B.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the validity of established insulin resistance indexes, based on fasting blood parameters, in a stable renal transplant population. Fasting insulin, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), and

  2. Validation of insulin resistance indexes in a stable renal transplant population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oterdoom, LH; De Vries, APJ; Van Son, WJ; Van Der Heide, JJH; Ploeg, RJ; Gansevoort, RT; De Jong, PE; Gans, ROB; Bakker, SJL

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - The purpose of this study was to investigate the validity of established insulin resistance indexes, based on fasting blood parameters, in a stable renal transplant population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Fasting insulin, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), the quantitative insulin

  3. Insulin Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Insulin Basics There are different types of insulin depending ... you may be experiencing a reaction. Types of Insulin Rapid-acting insulin , begins to work about 15 ...

  4. Potential Benefits and Harms of Intermittent Energy Restriction and Intermittent Fasting Amongst Obese, Overweight and Normal Weight Subjects-A Narrative Review of Human and Animal Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvie, Michelle; Howell, Anthony

    2017-01-19

    Intermittent energy restriction (IER) has become popular as a means of weight control amongst people who are overweight and obese, and is also undertaken by normal weight people hoping spells of marked energy restriction will optimise their health. This review summarises randomised comparisons of intermittent and isoenergetic continuous energy restriction for weight loss to manage overweight and obesity. It also summarises the potential beneficial or adverse effects of IER on body composition, adipose stores and metabolic effects from human studies, including studies amongst normal weight subjects and relevant animal experimentation. Six small short term (intermittent energy restriction is equal to continuous restriction for weight loss, with one study reporting greater reductions in body fat, and two studies reporting greater reductions in HOMA insulin resistance in response to IER, with no obvious evidence of harm. Studies amongst normal weight subjects and different animal models highlight the potential beneficial and adverse effects of intermittent compared to continuous energy restriction on ectopic and visceral fat stores, adipocyte size, insulin resistance, and metabolic flexibility. The longer term benefits or harms of IER amongst people who are overweight or obese, and particularly amongst normal weight subjects, is not known and is a priority for further investigation.

  5. Do type 2 diabetes patients without diabetic retinopathy or subjects with impaired fasting glucose have impaired colour vision? The Okubo Color Study Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, T; Sakurai, Y; Sato, H; Chihara, E; Takeuchi, M

    2011-07-01

    To investigate associations between fasting plasma glucose level and the prevalence of acquired colour vision impairment in type 2 diabetes patients without diabetic retinopathy. Participants in this cross-sectional study of male officials aged 20-60 yr in the Japanese Self Defence Force, underwent colour vision testing, ophthalmic examination, a standardized interview and examination of venous blood samples. Ishihara plates, a Lanthony 15-hue desaturated panel and Standard Pseudoisochromatic Plates Part 2 were used to examine colour vision. The Farnsworth-Munsell 100-hue test was performed to define acquired colour vision impairment. Cardiovascular disease risk factors were determined from serum blood samples, physical records and an interview. We performed logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, diagnosed hypertension, dyslipidaemia, cataract, glaucoma, being overweight, smoking status and alcohol intake. Crude and adjusted odds ratios were calculated for three glucose levels, which included normal fasting glucose, impaired fasting glucose and diabetes. Out of a total of 1042 men enrolled, 872 were eligible for the study, and 31 were diagnosed with acquired colour vision impairment. As compared with the subjects with normal fasting glucose (colour vision impairment was 0.93 (95% CI 0.32-2.74) for the subjects with impaired fasting glucose (5.6-6.9 mmol/l) and 8.07 (95% CI 2.48-26.22) for the patients with type 2 diabetes. The multiple-adjusted odds ratios were 0.77 (95% CI 0.25-2.34) for the subjects with impaired fasting glucose and 5.89 (95% CI 1.55-22.40) for the patients with type 2 diabetes. Our findings suggest that there is a dramatically increased prevalence of acquired colour vision impairment in type 2 diabetes patients without diabetic retinopathy which might be attributable to another pathogenesis associated with diabetic retinopathy. © 2011 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2011 Diabetes UK.

  6. INSULIN THERAPY TODAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saša Živić

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available The insulin classification regarding the duration of its effect gradually be-comes outdated; it is necessary to speak first about the insulin therapy regimes. The intensified insulin therapy regarding the type of multiple daily insulin injections be-comes an indisputable standard. The progress in the "protein engineering" with the formation of a wide spectrum of insulin analogues provides for moving forward to-wards modern diabetology and the concept of strict individualization of the insulin therapy. The experience becomes a pattern in creating two existing formulas of the insulin "short" analogues, namely HUMALAG with the replacement of the proline and lysinane places with those of 28 and 29, and NOVORAPID with aspartic acid at the 28th place in the B chain. The most recent long-effect analogues are created by amino acid changes with the glycine residual at the position A21 and two ariginines added to the positions B31 and B32 - insulin "glargin" - LANTUS. The development of short and long effect analogues imposed the logical need for formulating "new" fixed insulin combination's as well. New combination's are made of two kinds of ac-tual insulin, namely, the fast-effect analogues of the aspart type or lystroinsulin and protamine-retarded preparations - neutral protamine - lystroinsulin. Three kinds of combinations are made.

  7. The influence of the polymorphism in apolipoprotein B codon 2488 on insulin and lipid levels in a Danish twin population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, J; Poulsen, P; Vaag, A

    2002-01-01

    AIMS: The apolipoprotein B codon 2488 polymorphism has been associated with the metabolism of lipoproteins in subjects with Type 2 diabetes. However, no data are available on the influence of the polymorphism on insulin or glucose metabolism. This study examines the impact of the polymorphism...... on parameters associated with the insulin resistance syndrome in Danish twins. METHODS: The effect of the polymorphism on lipid, glucose and insulin measures was studied in 548 same sex twins aged 55-74 years. RESULTS: The codon 2488 polymorphism influenced fasting triglyceride levels, as well as insulin...... of triglyceride (P = 0.04) and insulin (P = 0.02) and lower levels of HDL-cholesterol (P = 0.04). CONCLUSION: The T-allele of the codon 2488 polymorphism influenced parameters related to the insulin resistance syndrome, i.e. increased levels of insulin, increased levels of triglyceride and decreased levels of HDL...

  8. Effects of Ramadan fasting on glucose homeostasis and adiponectin levels in healthy adult males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanou, Justin V; Caszo, Brinnell A; Khalil, Khalifah M; Abdullah, Shahidah L; Knight, Victor F; Bidin, Mohd Z

    2015-01-01

    Adiponectin is a hormone secreted by adipocytes during the fasting phase of the fast-fed cycle. Ramadan fasting involves prolonged fasting for up to twelve hours and thus could lead to increased secretion of adiponectin by adipocytes. However, studies on the role of adiponectin on glucose and body weight homeostasis during Ramadan fasting is still a matter of controversy. Thus the specific aim of this study was to assess the effect of fasting during Ramadan on the adiponectin levels, body weight and glucose homeostasis in healthy male Malaysian subjects. Twenty healthy male (19-23 years) Muslim subjects were followed up during the fasting month of Ramadan. Anthropometry and blood samples were taken one week before and during the fourth week of fasting. Plasma glucose, insulin and adiponectin were estimated and insulin sensitivity indices were estimated using the Homeostasis Model Assessment. Subjects experienced a significant decrease in body weight (2.4 %, p Ramadan fasting in young healthy individuals has a positive impact on the maintenance of glucose homeostasis. It also shows that adiponectin levels dropped along with significant loss in weight. We feel caloric restriction during the Ramadan fasting is in itself sufficient to improve insulin sensitivity in healthy individuals.

  9. IRS-1 serine phosphorylation and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle from pancreas tranplant recipient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzakri, K; Karlsson, HRK; Vestergaard, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetic recipients of successful pancreas allografts achieve self-regulatory insulin secretion and discontinue exogenous insulin therapy; however, chronic hyperinsulinemia and impaired insulin sensitivity generally develop. To determine whether insulin resistance is accompanied...... by altered signal transduction, skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from pancreas-kidney transplant recipients (n = 4), nondiabetic kidney transplant recipients (receiving the same immunosuppressive drugs; n = 5), and healthy subjects (n = 6) before and during a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. Basal...... insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 Ser (312) and Ser (616) phosphorylation, IRS-1-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2 phosphorylation were elevated in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients, coincident with fasting hyperinsulinemia. Basal...

  10. IRS-1 serine phosphorylation and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle from pancreas transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzakri, Karim; Karlsson, Håkan K R; Vestergaard, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetic recipients of successful pancreas allografts achieve self-regulatory insulin secretion and discontinue exogenous insulin therapy; however, chronic hyperinsulinemia and impaired insulin sensitivity generally develop. To determine whether insulin resistance is accompanied...... by altered signal transduction, skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from pancreas-kidney transplant recipients (n = 4), nondiabetic kidney transplant recipients (receiving the same immunosuppressive drugs; n = 5), and healthy subjects (n = 6) before and during a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. Basal...... insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 Ser (312) and Ser (616) phosphorylation, IRS-1-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2 phosphorylation were elevated in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients, coincident with fasting hyperinsulinemia. Basal...

  11. Effect of Ramadan fasting on glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of Ramadan fasting on body mass index (BMI) and on certain biochemical parameters of serum in women patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. Sixty-six subjects from 3 regions located in the west of Algeria participated in this study. All participating ...

  12. Serum acylated ghrelin is negatively correlated with the insulin resistance in the CODING study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyvand Amini

    Full Text Available Ghrelin is a 28-amino acid orexigenic peptide synthesized mainly in the stomach. Acute administration of ghrelin has been found to decrease insulin secretion. However, little data is available regarding whether ghrelin contributes to the long-term regulation of insulin resistance at the population level. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between circulating ghrelin and insulin resistance in a large population based study.A total of 2082 CODING study (Complex Diseases in the Newfoundland population: Environment and Genetics subjects were assessed. Subjects were of at least third generation Newfoundland descent, between the ages of 20 and 79 years, and had no serious metabolic, cardiovascular, or endocrine diseases. Ghrelin was measured with an Enzyme Immunoassay method. Insulin and fasting glucose were measured by Immulite 2500 autoanalyzer and Lx20 clinical chemistry analyzer, respectively. Homeostatic Model Assessment of β cell function (HOMA-β and Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR and Quantitative Insulin-sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI were used for measurement of insulin resistance.Partial correlation analyses showed a significant negative correlation between circulating ghrelin and insulin level and insulin resistance in the entire cohort and also in men and women separately. The aforementioned correlation was independent of age, percentage of trunk fat and HDL-cholesterol. According to menopausal status, only pre-menopausal women revealed negative correlations.Our results suggest that except for postmenopausal women, high circulating ghrelin level is associated with lower insulin resistance in the general population.

  13. Effect of normalization of fasting glucose by intensified insulin therapy and influence of eNOS polymorphisms on the incidence of restenosis after peripheral angioplasty in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized, open-label clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatti, Pier Marco; Marone, Enrico; Mantero, Manuela; Setola, Emanuela; Galluccio, Elena; Lucotti, Pietro; Shehaj, Ermal; Villa, Valentina; Perticone, Francesca; Venturini, Massimo; Palini, Alessio; Airoldi, Flavio; Faglia, Ezio; Del Maschio, Alessandro; Colombo, Antonio; Chiesa, Roberto; Bosi, Emanuele; Monti, Lucilla D

    2013-06-01

    Primary objective was to evaluate whether an intensified insulin therapy (IIT) incorporating the target of normal fasting glucose and HbA1c levels could halve the incidence of restenosis/amputation/SCA/death at 6 months after peripheral angioplasty compared with standard care (SC) in patients with type 2 diabetes (DMT2) affected by critical limb ischemia (CLI). Forty-six consecutive patients with DMT2 and CLI were randomly assigned to a parallel, open-label study with IIT (basal-bolus glulisine + glargine administrations) or SC (glargine administration + oral antidiabetic drugs). A SNP of eNOS (rs753482-A>C) and circulating CD34(+) and CD34(+)KDR(+) progenitor cells were determined. At the end of the study, although HbA1c levels were lower in IIT than in SC (6.9 ± 1.3 % vs. 7.6 ± 1.2 %, p incidence of restenosis/amputation/SCA/death (52 and 65 %, respectively, odd ratio 0.59; CI 95 %: 0.21-1.62, p = 0.59). rs753482AC+CC as compared with rs753482AA increased the cumulative incidence of restenosis/amputation/SCA/death (79 and 42 %; odd ratio 5.3; CI 95 %: 1.41-19.5, p incidence of restenosis/amputation/SCA/death in DMT2 and CLI patients. These patients correspond to a class of fragile subjects at high risk of cardiovascular events, and new predictors of restenosis should be contemplated, such as of eNOS polymorphism, (rs753482-A>C SNP) and circulating endothelial progenitor cells.

  14. Tracking weight change, insulin resistance, stress, and aerobic fitness over 4 years of college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Mari K; Moninger, Shana Lynn

    2017-01-01

    To determine if weight gain is accompanied by development of insulin resistance (IR) during 4 years in college. Two cohorts of college students were enrolled in fall semesters 2009 and 2010 and tracked for 4 years. Following a 12-hour fast, subjects reported for measurement of body mass index (BMI), perceived stress (PSS), aerobic fitness, and blood glucose, insulin, and lipids. In the first year, 33% of subjects were overweight or obese, and 20% were hyperinsulinemic. Year 4 had 29 remaining subjects with disproportionate attrition of overweight and obese individuals. Just over half the subjects gained weight (WI), whereas nearly 30% lost considerable amounts (WD). WD showed significant decline in fasting insulin, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and PSS from year 1. WI was primarily highly fit men who did not demonstrate increased IR. WI was not associated with IR over 4 years of college.

  15. Mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle is normal and unrelated to insulin action in young men born with low birth weight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Charlotte; Jensen, Christine B; Storgaard, Heidi

    2008-01-01

    . RESULTS: The LBW subjects displayed a variety of metabolic and prediabetic abnormalities, including elevated fasting blood glucose and plasma insulin levels, reduced insulin-stimulated glycolytic flux, and hepatic insulin resistance. Nevertheless, in vivo mitochondrial function was normal in LBW subjects......OBJECTIVE: Low birth weight (LBW) is an independent risk factor of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Recent studies suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired expression of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) may play a key role in the pathogenesis of insulin......, as was the expression of OXPHOS genes. CONCLUSIONS: These data support and expand previous findings of abnormal glucose metabolism in young men with LBW. In addition, we found that the young, healthy men with LBW exhibited hepatic insulin resistance. However, the study does not support the hypothesis that muscle...

  16. New genetic loci implicated in fasting glucose homeostasis and their impact on type 2 diabetes risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupuis, Josée; Langenberg, Claudia; Prokopenko, Inga

    2010-01-01

    Levels of circulating glucose are tightly regulated. To identify new loci influencing glycemic traits, we performed meta-analyses of 21 genome-wide association studies informative for fasting glucose, fasting insulin and indices of beta-cell function (HOMA-B) and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in up...... to 46,186 nondiabetic participants. Follow-up of 25 loci in up to 76,558 additional subjects identified 16 loci associated with fasting glucose and HOMA-B and two loci associated with fasting insulin and HOMA-IR. These include nine loci newly associated with fasting glucose (in or near ADCY5, MADD, ADRA...... proliferation, development, glucose-sensing and circadian regulation. Our results demonstrate that genetic studies of glycemic traits can identify type 2 diabetes risk loci, as well as loci containing gene variants that are associated with a modest elevation in glucose levels but are not associated with overt...

  17. Progression from impaired fasting glucose to type 2 diabetes mellitus among Chinese subjects with and without hypertension in a primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Sau Nga; Luk, Wan; Wong, Carlos King Ho; Cheung, Kwok Leung

    2014-09-01

    The progression from impaired fasting glucose (IFG) to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Chinese subjects, with and without hypertension, in a primary care setting was unknown. The present retrospective multicenter 5-year (2002-2007) cohort study was performed on IFG subjects attending 23 general outpatient clinics who were identified by their elevated fasting blood glucose laboratory results. Development of T2DM was determined by physician diagnosis of T2DM or starting of oral antidiabetic drugs within 5 years. The relationship between the time of T2DM diagnosis and subject characteristics was assessed by adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) from Cox hazards model. Of the 9161 IFG subjects, 4080 (45%) were men and 5081 (55%) were women. There were 1998 subjects who developed T2DM. The 5-year cumulative incidence was 0.218, whereas the overall annual incidence rate was 5.981/100 person-years. Subjects were more likely to develop T2DM if they were hypertensive (aHR = 1.44; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28-1.62; P primary care setting developed T2DM within 5 years. Health care professionals can target interventions to patients with risk factors for disease progression. © 2014 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Chromium and polyphenols from cinnamon improve insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Richard A

    2008-02-01

    Naturally-occurring compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include Cr and polyphenols found in cinnamon (Cinnamomon cassia). These compounds also have similar effects on insulin signalling and glucose control. The signs of Cr deficiency are similar to those for the metabolic syndrome and supplemental Cr has been shown to improve all these signs in human subjects. In a double-blind placebo-controlled study it has been demonstrated that glucose, insulin, cholesterol and HbA1c are all improved in patients with type 2 diabetes following Cr supplementation. It has also been shown that cinnamon polyphenols improve insulin sensitivity in in vitro, animal and human studies. Cinnamon reduces mean fasting serum glucose (18-29%), TAG (23-30%), total cholesterol (12-26%) and LDL-cholesterol (7-27%) in subjects with type 2 diabetes after 40 d of daily consumption of 1-6 g cinnamon. Subjects with the metabolic syndrome who consume an aqueous extract of cinnamon have been shown to have improved fasting blood glucose, systolic blood pressure, percentage body fat and increased lean body mass compared with the placebo group. Studies utilizing an aqueous extract of cinnamon, high in type A polyphenols, have also demonstrated improvements in fasting glucose, glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in women with insulin resistance associated with the polycystic ovary syndrome. For both supplemental Cr and cinnamon not all studies have reported beneficial effects and the responses are related to the duration of the study, form of Cr or cinnamon used and the extent of obesity and glucose intolerance of the subjects.

  19. An International, Multicenter, Observational Survey to Evaluate Diabetes Control in Subjects using Insulin for the Treatment of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in the Czech Republic and Slovak Republic: Study Protocol for a Cross-Sectional Survey

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brož, J.; Janíčková Žďárská, D.; Urbanová, J.; Brabec, Marek; Křivská, B.; Doničová, V.; Štěpánová, R.; Martinka, M.; Kvapil, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 8, 9 June (2016), s. 13-20 ISSN 1179-1519 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : insulin therapy * glycemic control * HbA1c * hypoglycemia * education * diabetes regimen adherence Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  20. New Insulins and New Aspects in Insulin Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Vincent C

    2015-08-01

    The major abnormality in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is insulin deficiency. The methods of replacing insulin have improved throughout the decades, but hypoglycemia is still the limiting factor for many individuals with diabetes, and it prevents them from achieving ideal glycemic targets. New insulin and newer delivery systems are being developed that can improve some of the limitations of current insulins or make the delivery of insulins more acceptable for some patients. Extending the duration of action of basal insulins and shortening the peak of fast-acting insulins may have advantages for individuals with diabetes. Different delivery systems may make insulin more acceptable to patients and may have other advantages, which may aid in attaining better glycemic control. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The ethnic distribution of antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase: presence and levels of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in Europid and Asian subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmet, P Z; Rowley, M J; Mackay, I R; Knowles, W J; Chen, Q Y; Chapman, L H; Serjeantson, S W

    1993-01-01

    Our objective was to ascertain the frequency of antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in Europids and four Asian ethnic groups with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) to gain insight into why the prevalence and incidence of IDDM varies so widely among ethnic and/or geographically diverse population groups. The subjects in this study were Europid (n = 49), Japanese (n = 16), Thai (n = 7), Korean (n = 21), and Chinese (n = 13) persons with IDDM with a duration ranging from 5 to 14 years. There were similar numbers of healthy controls matched for each ethnic group. A validated radioimmunoprecipitation assay used GAD from pig brain radiolabeled with 125I using chloramine T. Islet cell cytoplasmic antibodies measured by indirect immunofluorescence were expressed as Juvenile Diabetes Foundation units. The prevalence of antibodies to GAD, compared with Europids (63%), was much lower in all Asian populations with IDDM: Japanese (31%), Thai (29%), Korean (5%), and Chinese (27%). The mean level of antibodies to GAD, however, among diabetics from each population who gave a positive reaction, was similar. For all groups, the prevalence of antibodies to GAD was much higher than that of islet cell cytoplasmic antibodies. Almost all IDDM subjects positive for islet cell antibodies had antibodies to GAD, but the converse did not hold. A radioimmunoprecipitation assay for antibodies to GAD applied to serum from subjects with IDDM in various ethnic groups showed that Europids with IDDM had a much higher prevalence of such antibodies than did Asians. This held for all ethnic groups, and particularly Koreans. Thus, among different populations, there may be etiologic heterogeneity of IDDM.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. G-allele of intronic rs10830963 in MTNR1B confers increased risk of impaired fasting glycemia and type 2 diabetes through an impaired glucose-stimulated insulin release: studies involving 19,605 Europeans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparsø, Thomas; Bonnefond, Amélie; Andersson, Ehm

    2009-01-01

    ,656), in the North Finland Birth Cohort 86 (n = 5,258), and in the Haguenau study (n = 1,461). RESULTS: The MTNR1B intronic variant, rs10830963, carried most of the effect on FPG and showed the strongest association with FPG (combined P = 5.3 x 10(-31)) and type 2 diabetes. The rs10830963 G-allele increased the risk...... independent effect on FPG with isolated impaired fasting glycemia (i-IFG), isolated impaired glucose tolerance (i-IGT), type 2 diabetes, and measures of insulin release and peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We examined European-descent participants in the Inter99 study...

  3. Studies of the relationship between the ENPP1 K121Q polymorphism and type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and obesity in 7,333 Danish white subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grarup, N.; Urhammer, S.A.; Ek, J.

    2006-01-01

    ENPP1; genetic epidemiology; K121Q polymorphism; insulin resistance; meta-analysis; obesity; plasma cell membrane glycoprotein 1; type 2 diabetes......ENPP1; genetic epidemiology; K121Q polymorphism; insulin resistance; meta-analysis; obesity; plasma cell membrane glycoprotein 1; type 2 diabetes...

  4. Prevalence and clinical characteristics of insulin-treated, anti-GAD-positive, type 2 diabetic subjects in an outpatient clinical department of a Dutch teaching hospital.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romkens, T.E.H.; Kusters, G.C.M.; Netea, M.G.; Netten, P.M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In clinical practice, type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients are sometimes difficult to distinguish. Type 1 diabetes has an immune-mediated pathogenesis, resulting in a loss of insulin-secreting beta-cells. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterised by a relative insulin insufficiency,

  5. Branched Chain Amino Acids Are Associated with Insulin Resistance Independent of Leptin and Adiponectin in Subjects with Varying Degrees of Glucose Tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Connelly, Margery A.; Wolak-Dinsmore, Justyna; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    Background: Branched chain amino acids (BCAA) may be involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and are associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) development. Adipokines such as leptin and adiponectin influence insulin resistance and reflect adipocyte dysfunction. We examined the

  6. Reduced insulin secretion in normoglycaemic patients with beta-thalassaemia major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelopoulos, N G; Zervas, A; Livadas, S; Adamopoulos, I; Giannopoulos, D; Goula, A; Tolis, G

    2006-12-01

    To assess insulin sensitivity and secretion in the fasting state in regularly transfused patients with beta-thalassaemia major with normal glucose response during an oral glucose tolerance test and to estimate its possible relation to iron overload. We measured fasting glucose, insulin and C-peptide levels in 24 patients with beta-thalassaemia major and 18 control subjects matched for age and body mass index. Insulin sensitivity and insulin release index were calculated according to the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA). Correlations with age, body mass index and serum ferritin were also calculated. Fasting glucose levels in patients were increased compared with control subjects (5.5 +/- 0.12 vs. 4.7 +/- 0.13 mmol/l, mean +/- SEM, P < 0.001). Pancreatic B-cell insulin secretion in the fasting state (estimated by SC(HOMA)) was lower in thalassaemic patients (SC(HOMA) 88.5 +/- 11.11 vs. 184.3 +/- 23.72 in control subjects, P < 0.001). Patients were then divided into those with impaired (IFG) and normal (NFG) fasting glucose. SC(HOMA) was higher in the patients with NFG compared with those with IFG patients (110.6 +/- 17.63 vs. 66.3 +/- 10.88, respectively, P < 0.05) but estimated insulin sensitivity (ISI(HOMA)) was similar. Plasma values of C-peptide correlated positively with ferritin (r = 0.42, P = 0.04) and SC(HOMA) (r = 0.45, P = 0.02) and negatively with ISI(HOMA) (r = -0.43, P = 0.03). These results support the concept that impaired B-cell function, as reflected by a reduction in the insulin secretion index, is present in beta-thalassaemic patients with normoglycaemia before changes in oral glucose tolerance tests are apparent.

  7. Impaired incretin effect and fasting hyperglucagonaemia characterizing type 2 diabetic subjects are early signs of dysmetabolism in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knop, Filip K; Aaboe, K; Vilsbøll, T

    2012-01-01

    subjects with NGT [BMI: 33 (35-38) kg/m(2) ]; (iii) Eight lean patients with T2DM [BMI: 24 (22-25) kg/m(2) ]; and (iv) Eight lean healthy subjects [BMI: 23 (20-25) kg/m(2) ]. Results: The incretin effect was significantly (p error...

  8. Insulin Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Resources Drugs, Procedures & Devices Prescription Medicines Insulin Therapy Insulin Therapy Share Print When you digest food, your ... you eat into glucose (a form of sugar). Insulin allows this glucose to enter all the cells ...

  9. Effects of 1 and 3 g cinnamon on gastric emptying, satiety, and postprandial blood glucose, insulin, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, glucagon-like peptide 1, and ghrelin concentrations in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hlebowicz, Joanna; Hlebowicz, Anna; Lindstedt, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A previous study of healthy subjects showed that intake of 6 g cinnamon with rice pudding reduced postprandial blood glucose and the gastric emptying rate (GER) without affecting satiety. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to study the effect of 1 and 3 g cinnamon on GER, postprandial blood...... cinnamon (P = 0.0082 and P = 0.0138, respectively, after Bonferroni correction). CONCLUSIONS: Ingestion of 3 g cinnamon reduced postprandial serum insulin and increased GLP-1 concentrations without significantly affecting blood glucose, GIP, the ghrelin concentration, satiety, or GER in healthy subjects...... glucose, plasma concentrations of insulin and incretin hormones [glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1)], the ghrelin response, and satiety in healthy subjects. DESIGN: GER was measured by using real-time ultrasonography after ingestion of rice pudding...

  10. Ultra-fast speech comprehension in blind subjects engages primary visual cortex, fusiform gyrus, and pulvinar – a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Individuals suffering from vision loss of a peripheral origin may learn to understand spoken language at a rate of up to about 22 syllables (syl) per second - exceeding by far the maximum performance level of normal-sighted listeners (ca. 8 syl/s). To further elucidate the brain mechanisms underlying this extraordinary skill, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed in blind subjects of varying ultra-fast speech comprehension capabilities and sighted individuals while listening to sentence utterances of a moderately fast (8 syl/s) or ultra-fast (16 syl/s) syllabic rate. Results Besides left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), bilateral posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) and left supplementary motor area (SMA), blind people highly proficient in ultra-fast speech perception showed significant hemodynamic activation of right-hemispheric primary visual cortex (V1), contralateral fusiform gyrus (FG), and bilateral pulvinar (Pv). Conclusions Presumably, FG supports the left-hemispheric perisylvian “language network”, i.e., IFG and superior temporal lobe, during the (segmental) sequencing of verbal utterances whereas the collaboration of bilateral pulvinar, right auditory cortex, and ipsilateral V1 implements a signal-driven timing mechanism related to syllabic (suprasegmental) modulation of the speech signal. These data structures, conveyed via left SMA to the perisylvian “language zones”, might facilitate – under time-critical conditions – the consolidation of linguistic information at the level of verbal working memory. PMID:23879896

  11. Hepatocyte-Specific Ptpn6 Deletion Protects From Obesity-Linked Hepatic Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Elaine; Charbonneau, Alexandre; Rolland, Yannève; Bellmann, Kerstin; Pao, Lily; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Neel, Benjamin G.; Beauchemin, Nicole; Marette, André

    2012-01-01

    The protein-tyrosine phosphatase Shp1 negatively regulates insulin action on glucose homeostasis in liver and muscle, but its potential role in obesity-linked insulin resistance has not been examined. To investigate the role of Shp1 in hepatic insulin resistance, we generated hepatocyte-specific Shp1 knockout mice (Ptpn6H-KO), which were subjected to extensive metabolic monitoring throughout an 8-week standard chow diet (SD) or high-fat diet (HFD) feeding. We report for the first time that Shp1 expression is upregulated in metabolic tissues of HFD-fed obese mice. When compared with their Shp1-expressing Ptpn6f/f littermates, Ptpn6H-KO mice exhibited significantly lowered fasting glycemia and heightened hepatic insulin sensitivity. After HFD feeding, Ptpn6H-KO mice developed comparable levels of obesity as Ptpn6f/f mice, but they were remarkably protected from liver insulin resistance, as revealed by euglycemic clamps and hepatic insulin signaling determinations. Although Ptpn6H-KO mice still acquired diet-induced peripheral insulin resistance, they were less hyperinsulinemic during a glucose tolerance test because of reduced insulin secretion. Ptpn6H-KO mice also exhibited increased insulin clearance in line with enhanced CC1 tyrosine phosphorylation in liver. These results show that hepatocyte Shp1 plays a critical role in the development of hepatic insulin resistance and represents a novel therapeutic target for obesity-linked diabetes. PMID:22698917

  12. Investigation of mean platelet volume in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and in subjects with impaired fasting glucose: a cost-effective tool in primary health care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozder, Aclan; Eker, Hasan Huseyin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare mean platelet volume (MPV) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), in subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG), and in non-diabetic controls. A total of 201 adults with T2DM and 201 subjects with IFG from the Family Medicine out-patient clinic as well as 201 healthy controls were included in the study. We measured blood fasting glucose, complete blood count and LDL-cholesterol and compared the results between the groups enrolled. In the patients with diabetes and subjects with IFG, MPV was significantly higher (10.66 ± 0.94 fL and 10.49 ± 0.96 fL, respectively ) as compared to the non-diabetic group (10.04 ± 1.01 fL) (p = 0.000). Among the diabetic subjects, a positive statistical Pearson correlation was seen between MPV and HbA1c levels (r = 0.357; p = 0.000) and fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels (r = 0.306; p = 0.000). The mean MPV in patients having HbA1C < 7.5% was 10.17 ± 0.83 fL and significantly lower than that of patients with HbA1c ≥ 7.5% (10.80 ± 0.92 fL) (p = 0.001). MPV could be used as a simple and cost-effective tool to monitor the progression and control of T2DM and thereby in preventing vascular events in primary health care. PMID:25232423

  13. MEG reveals a fast pathway from somatosensory cortex to occipital areas via posterior parietal cortex in a blind subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas A Ioannides

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cross-modal activity in visual cortex of blind subjects has been reported during performance of variety of non-visual tasks. A key unanswered question is through which pathways non-visual inputs are funneled to the visual cortex. Here we used tomographic analysis of single trial magnetoencephalography (MEG data recorded from one congenitally blind and two sighted subjects after stimulation of the left and right median nerves at three intensities: below sensory threshold, above sensory threshold and above motor threshold; the last sufficient to produce thumb twitching. We identified reproducible brain responses in the primary somatosensory (S1 and motor (M1 cortices at around 20 ms post-stimulus, which were very similar in sighted and blind subjects. Time-frequency analysis revealed strong 45 to 70 Hz activity at latencies of 20 to 50 ms in S1 and M1, and posterior parietal cortex Brodmann areas (BA 7 and 40, which compared to lower frequencies, were substantially more pronounced in the blind than the sighted subjects. Critically, at frequencies from α-band up to 100 Hz we found clear, strong and widespread responses in the visual cortex of the blind subject, which increased with the intensity of the somatosensory stimuli. Time-delayed mutual information (MI revealed that in blind subject the stimulus information is funneled from the early somatosensory to visual cortex through posterior parietal BA 7 and 40, projecting first to visual areas V5 and V3, and eventually V1. The flow of information through this pathway occured in stages characterized by convergence of activations into specific cortical regions. In sighted subjects, no linked activity was found that led from the somatosensory to the visual cortex through any of the studied brain regions. These results provide the first evidence from MEG that in blind subjects, tactile information is routed from primary somatosensory to occipital cortex via the posterior parietal cortex.

  14. MEG reveals a fast pathway from somatosensory cortex to occipital areas via posterior parietal cortex in a blind subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannides, Andreas A; Liu, Lichan; Poghosyan, Vahe; Saridis, George A; Gjedde, Albert; Ptito, Maurice; Kupers, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Cross-modal activity in visual cortex of blind subjects has been reported during performance of variety of non-visual tasks. A key unanswered question is through which pathways non-visual inputs are funneled to the visual cortex. Here we used tomographic analysis of single trial magnetoencephalography (MEG) data recorded from one congenitally blind and two sighted subjects after stimulation of the left and right median nerves at three intensities: below sensory threshold, above sensory threshold and above motor threshold; the last sufficient to produce thumb twitching. We identified reproducible brain responses in the primary somatosensory (S1) and motor (M1) cortices at around 20 ms post-stimulus, which were very similar in sighted and blind subjects. Time-frequency analysis revealed strong 45-70 Hz activity at latencies of 20-50 ms in S1 and M1, and posterior parietal cortex Brodmann areas (BA) 7 and 40, which compared to lower frequencies, were substantially more pronounced in the blind than the sighted subjects. Critically, at frequencies from α-band up to 100 Hz we found clear, strong, and wi