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Sample records for subjects developed signs

  1. Translating Signs, Producing Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Neilson

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper moves between two streets: Liverpool Road in the Sydney suburb of Ashfield and Via Sarpi in the Italian city of Milan. What connects these streets is that both have become important sites for businesses in the Chinese diaspora. Moreover, both are streets on which locals have expressed desires for Chinese signs to be translated into the national lingua franca. The paper argues that the cultural politics inherent in this demand for translation cannot be fully understood in the context of national debates about diversity and integration. It is also necessary to consider the emergence of the official Chinese Putonghua as global language, which competes with English but also colonizes dialects and minority languages. In the case of these dual language signs, the space between languages can neither be reduced to a contact zone of minority and majority cultures nor celebrated as a ‘third space’ where the power relations implied by such differences are subverted. At stake is rather a space characterised by what Naoki Sakai calls the schema of co-figuration, which allows the representation of translation as the passage between two equivalents that resemble each other and thus makes possible their determination as conceptually different and comparable. Drawing on arguments about translation and citizenship, the paper critically interrogates the ethos of interchangeability implied by this regime of translation. A closing argument is made for a vision of the common that implies neither civilisational harmony nor the translation of all values into a general equivalent. Primary sources include government reports, internet texts and media stories. These are analyzed using techniques of discourse analysis and interpreted with the help of secondary literature concerning globalisation, language and migration. The disciplinary matrix cuts and mixes between cultural studies, translation studies, citizenship studies, globalization studies and

  2. Clinical Signs and Subjective Symptoms of Temporomandibular Disorders in Instrumentalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jae Young; Kwon, Jeong Seung; Lee, Debora H; Bae, Jung Hee; Kim, Seong Taek

    2016-11-01

    Most of the reports on instrumentalists' experiences of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) have been reported not by clinical examinations but by subjective questionnaires. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical signs and subjective symptoms of TMD in a large number of instrumentalists objectively. A total of 739 musicians from a diverse range of instrument groups completed a TMD questionnaire. Among those who reported at least one symptom of TMD, 71 volunteers underwent clinical examinations and radiography for diag-nosis. Overall, 453 participants (61.3%) reported having one or more symptoms of TMD. The most frequently reported symptom was a clicking or popping sound, followed by temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain, muscle pain, crepitus, and mouth opening limitations. Compared with lower-string instrumentalists, a clicking or popping sound was about 1.8 and 2 times more frequent in woodwind and brass instrumentalists, respectively. TMJ pain was about 3.2, 2.8, and 3.2 times more frequent in upper-string, woodwind, and brass instrumentalists, respectively. Muscle pain was about 1.5 times more frequent in instrumentalists with an elevated arm position than in those with a neutral arm position. The most frequent diagnosis was myalgia or myofascial pain (MFP), followed by disc displacement with reduction. Myalgia or MFP was 4.6 times more frequent in those practicing for no less than 3.5 hours daily than in those practicing for less than 3.5 hours. The results indicate that playing instruments can play a contributory role in the development of TMD.

  3. Historical Development of Hong Kong Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Felix; Lo, Connie; Lo, Lisa; Chu, Kenny

    2013-01-01

    This article traces the origins of Hong Kong Sign Language (hereafter HKSL) and its subsequent development in relation to the establishment of Deaf education in Hong Kong after World War II. We begin with a detailed description of the history of Deaf education with a particular focus on the role of sign language in such development. We then…

  4. Development of Geography and Geology Terminology in British Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meara, Rhian; Cameron, Audrey; Quinn, Gary; O'Neill, Rachel

    2016-04-01

    The BSL Glossary Project, run by the Scottish Sensory Centre at the University of Edinburgh focuses on developing scientific terminology in British Sign Language for use in the primary, secondary and tertiary education of deaf and hard of hearing students within the UK. Thus far, the project has developed 850 new signs and definitions covering Chemistry, Physics, Biology, Astronomy and Mathematics. The project has also translated examinations into BSL for students across Scotland. The current phase of the project has focused on developing terminology for Geography and Geology subjects. More than 189 new signs have been developed in these subjects including weather, rivers, maps, natural hazards and Geographical Information Systems. The signs were developed by a focus group with expertise in Geography and Geology, Chemistry, Ecology, BSL Linguistics and Deaf Education all of whom are deaf fluent BSL users.

  5. Adapting the Assessing British Sign Language Development: Receptive Skills Test into American sign language

    OpenAIRE

    Enns, C. J.; Herman, R.

    2011-01-01

    Signed languages continue to be a key element of deaf education programs that incorporate a bilingual approach to teaching and learning. In order to monitor the success of bilingual deaf education programs, and in particular to monitor the progress of children acquiring signed language, it is essential to develop an assessment tool of signed language skills. Although researchers have developed some checklists and experimental tests related to American Sign Language (ASL) assessment, at this t...

  6. Development of a remote vital signs sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladd, M.D.; Pacheco, M.S.; Rivas, R.R.

    1997-06-01

    This paper describes the work at Sandia National Laboratories to develop sensors that remotely detect unique life-form characteristics, such as breathing patterns or heartbeat patterns. This paper will address the Technical Support Working Group`s (TSWG) objective: to develop a remote vital signs detector which can be used to assess someone`s malevolent intent. The basic concept of operations for the projects, system development issues, and the preliminary results for a radar device currently in-house and the implications for implementation are described. A survey that identified the in-house technology currently being evaluated is reviewed, as well as ideas for other potential technologies to explore. A radar unit for breathing and heartbeat detection is being tested, and the applicability of infrared technology is being explored. The desire for rapid prototyping is driving the need for off-the-shelf technology. As a conclusion, current status and future directions of the effort are reviewed.

  7. Signs and symptoms associated with digestive tract development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Mauro Batista de

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the development and prevalence of gastrointestinal signs and symptoms associated with the development of the digestive tract, and to assess the measures aimed to reduce their negative impacts. Considering the scope and comprehensiveness of the subject, a systematic review of the literature was not carried out. The Medline database was used to identify references that would allow the analysis of the study topics. Infants frequently show several gastrointestinal signs and symptoms. These clinical manifestations can be part of gastrointestinal functional disorders such as infantile colic, infant regurgitation, and functional constipation. Allergy to cow's milk protein and gastroesophageal reflux disease are also causes of these clinical manifestations and represent an important and difficult differential diagnosis. The diseases that course with gastrointestinal signs and symptoms can have an impact on family dynamics and maternal emotional status, and may be associated with future problems in the child's life. Comprehensive pediatric care is essential for diagnosis and treatment. Maternal breastfeeding should always be maintained. Some special formulas can contribute to the control of clinical manifestations depending on the established diagnosis. During the normal development of the digestive tract, several gastrointestinal signs and symptoms may occur, usually resulting from functional gastrointestinal disorders, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and allergy to cow's milk protein. Breastfeeding should always be maintained. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Signs and symptoms associated with digestive tract development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Batista de Morais

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze the development and prevalence of gastrointestinal signs and symptoms associated with the development of the digestive tract, and to assess the measures aimed to reduce their negative impacts. Source of data: Considering the scope and comprehensiveness of the subject, a systematic review of the literature was not carried out. The Medline database was used to identify references that would allow the analysis of the study topics. Synthesis of results: Infants frequently show several gastrointestinal signs and symptoms. These clinical manifestations can be part of gastrointestinal functional disorders such as infantile colic, infant regurgitation, and functional constipation. Allergy to cow's milk protein and gastroesophageal reflux disease are also causes of these clinical manifestations and represent an important and difficult differential diagnosis. The diseases that course with gastrointestinal signs and symptoms can have an impact on family dynamics and maternal emotional status, and may be associated with future problems in the child's life. Comprehensive pediatric care is essential for diagnosis and treatment. Maternal breastfeeding should always be maintained. Some special formulas can contribute to the control of clinical manifestations depending on the established diagnosis. Conclusion: During the normal development of the digestive tract, several gastrointestinal signs and symptoms may occur, usually resulting from functional gastrointestinal disorders, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and allergy to cow's milk protein. Breastfeeding should always be maintained.

  9. Adapting the Assessing British Sign Language Development: Receptive Skills Test into American sign language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enns, Charlotte J; Herman, Rosalind C

    2011-01-01

    Signed languages continue to be a key element of deaf education programs that incorporate a bilingual approach to teaching and learning. In order to monitor the success of bilingual deaf education programs, and in particular to monitor the progress of children acquiring signed language, it is essential to develop an assessment tool of signed language skills. Although researchers have developed some checklists and experimental tests related to American Sign Language (ASL) assessment, at this time a standardized measure of ASL does not exist. There have been tests developed in other signed languages, for example, British Sign Language, that can serve as models in this area. The purpose of this study was to adapt the Assessing British Sign Language Development: Receptive Skills Test for use in ASL in order to begin the process of developing a standardized measure of ASL skills. The results suggest that collaboration between researchers in different signed languages can provide a valuable contribution toward filling the gap in the area of signed language assessment. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  10. Adapting the "Assessing British Sign Language Development: Receptive Skills Test" into American Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enns, Charlotte J.; Herman, Rosalind C.

    2011-01-01

    Signed languages continue to be a key element of deaf education programs that incorporate a bilingual approach to teaching and learning. In order to monitor the success of bilingual deaf education programs, and in particular to monitor the progress of children acquiring signed language, it is essential to develop an assessment tool of signed…

  11. Development of a prehospital vital signs chart sharing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Taka-aki; Masunaga, Naohisa; Nakao, Shota; Narita, Maiko; Fuse, Takashi; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Mizushima, Yasuaki; Matsuoka, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Physiological parameters are crucial for the caring of trauma patients. There is a significant loss of prehospital vital signs data of patients during handover between prehospital and in-hospital teams. Effective strategies for reducing the loss remain a challenging research area. We tested whether the newly developed electronic automated prehospital vital signs chart sharing system would increase the amount of prehospital vital signs data shared with a remote trauma center prior to hospital arrival. Fifty trauma patients, transferred to a level I trauma center in Japan, were studied. The primary outcome variable was the number of prehospital vital signs shared with the trauma center prior to hospital arrival. The prehospital vital signs chart sharing system significantly increased the number of prehospital vital signs, including blood pressure, heart rate, and oxygen saturation, shared with the in-hospital team at a remote trauma center prior to patient arrival at the hospital (P prehospital vital signs during ambulance transfer between patients who had severe bleeding and non-severe bleeding within 24 hours after injury onset. Vital signs data collected during ambulance transfer via patient monitors could be automatically converted to easily visible patient charts and effectively shared with the remote trauma center prior to hospital arrival. The prehospital vital signs chart sharing system increased the number of precise vital signs shared prior to patient arrival at the hospital, which can potentially contribute to better trauma care without increasing labor and reduce information loss during clinical handover. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Signs and symptoms related to temporomandibular disorders--Follow-up of subjects with shortened and complete dental arches.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witter, D.J.; Kreulen, C.M.; Mulder, J.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess prevalence of cardinal signs and symptoms related to temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in subjects with shortened dental arches and to clarify the individual course of these signs and symptoms. METHODS: In this 9-year follow-up study, subjects with shortened dental arches (n=74)

  13. Phonological development in hearing learners of a sign language: The role of sign complexity and iconicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ortega, G.; Morgan, G.

    2015-01-01

    The present study implemented a sign-repetition task at two points in time to hearing adult learners of British Sign Language and explored how each phonological parameter, sign complexity, and iconicity affected sign production over an 11-week (22-hour) instructional period. The results show that

  14. Phonological development in hearing learners of a sign language: the role of sign complexity and iconicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ortega, G.; Morgan, G.

    2015-01-01

    The present study implemented a sign-repetition task at two points in time to hearing adult learners of British Sign Language and explored how each phonological parameter, sign complexity, and iconicity affected sign production over an 11-week (22-hour) instructional period. The results show that

  15. A Method for Remotely Sensing Vital Signs of Human Subjects Outdoors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuantao; Chen, Fuming; Jin, Jingxi; Lv, Hao; Li, Sheng; Lu, Guohua; Wang, Jianqi

    2015-06-24

    After chemical or nuclear leakage or explosions, finding survivors is a huge challenge. Although human bodies can be found by smart vehicles and drones equipped with cameras, it is difficult to verify if the person is alive or dead this way. This paper describes a continuous wave radar sensor for remotely sensing the vital signs of human subjects. Firstly, a compact and portable 24 GHz Doppler radar system is designed to conduct non-contact detection of respiration signal. Secondly, in order to improve the quality of the respiration signals, the self-correlation and adaptive line enhancer (ALE) methods are proposed to minimize the interferences of any moving objects around the human subject. Finally, the detection capabilities of the radar system and the signal processing method are verified through experiments which show that human respiration signals can be extracted when the subject is 7 m away outdoors. The method provided in this paper will be a promising way to search for human subjects outdoors.

  16. A Method for Remotely Sensing Vital Signs of Human Subjects Outdoors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuantao Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available After chemical or nuclear leakage or explosions, finding survivors is a huge challenge. Although human bodies can be found by smart vehicles and drones equipped with cameras, it is difficult to verify if the person is alive or dead this way. This paper describes a continuous wave radar sensor for remotely sensing the vital signs of human subjects. Firstly, a compact and portable 24 GHz Doppler radar system is designed to conduct non-contact detection of respiration signal. Secondly, in order to improve the quality of the respiration signals, the self-correlation and adaptive line enhancer (ALE methods are proposed to minimize the interferences of any moving objects around the human subject. Finally, the detection capabilities of the radar system and the signal processing method are verified through experiments which show that human respiration signals can be extracted when the subject is 7 m away outdoors. The method provided in this paper will be a promising way to search for human subjects outdoors.

  17. Condylar and disk position and signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in stress-free subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos Filho, José Osmar; Menezes, Alynne Vieira de; Freitas, Deborah Queiroz de; Manzi, Flávio Ricardo; Bóscolo, Frab Norberto; de Almeida, Solange Maria

    2007-09-01

    The authors conducted a study in subjects who tested free of psychological stress to determine the position of the condyle and whether that position was related to signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Forty subjects underwent psychological evaluation to ensure freedom from psychological stress. The authors evaluated tenderness of the masticatory muscles and temporomandibular joints (TMJs) by means of bimanual digital palpation, and they determined the positions of the condyle and disk by using magnetic resonance imaging. A total of 23.75 percent of the condyles were displaced away from the centric position either anteriorly (3.75 percent) or posteriorly (20.00 percent). chi(2) analysis showed a relationship between the position of the condyle and displacement of the disk, as well as a relationship between the position of the condyle and tenderness of the TMJs. Although these relationships proved significant, it cannot be assumed that displacement of the condyle away from the centric position is predictive of TMD. Only two subjects were judged to have had TMJ internal derangement. Thus, the absence of psychological stress seems to have played a role in this finding.

  18. Development of a vital-sign/fluid-balance flow sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozuna, L A; Adkins, A T

    1993-01-01

    An improved flow sheet for recording vital signs and fluid balance on a medical oncology unit was developed and tested using quality-assurance techniques. The new form, which replaced three separate forms, measurably improved documentation on all quality-assurance monitors tested. Additional benefits include cost-savings and decreased time expenditures by nursing staff.

  19. Subjective truths: participatory development assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietz, T.; Obeng, F.; Obure, J.; Zaal, F.

    2009-01-01

    The starting point for development evaluations should be how the recipients of development assistance experience change, rather than the set perspectives of the evaluators. The participatory development assessment (PDA) methodology is designed to involve recipients in evaluations.

  20. Signing and lexical development in children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clibbens, J

    2001-10-01

    Language development in children with Down syndrome is delayed, on average, relative to general cognitive, motor and social development, and there is also evidence for specific delays in morphology and syntax, with many adults showing persistent problems in these areas. It appears that the combined use of signed and spoken input can boost early language development significantly, this evidence coming initially from single case-studies, and more recently from larger scale controlled studies. Research with typically developing hearing and deaf children, as well as children with Down syndrome, has demonstrated the importance of establishing joint attention for vocabulary development. Furthermore, studies carried out with children with Down syndrome indicate that reducing attentional demands may be especially important in scaffolding language development in this group. The use of signing strategies which have been found to facilitate language development in deaf children when signing to children with Down syndrome is discussed, as is the need for further research on this topic and on the importance of joint attention for the use of other augmentative and alternative communication systems, such as graphic symbol and picture systems.

  1. A Poisson-like model of sub-clinical signs from the examination of healthy aging subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Stephen J; Myklebust, Barbara; Myklebust, Joel; Reynolds, Norman; Duthie, Edmund

    2008-08-01

    Our studies of the standard neurological examination on 66 middle-aged (50-64 yrs) and elderly subjects (65-84 yrs) demonstrate that healthy elders have neurological deficits (or "signs") that are not associated with specific known neurological disease. The purpose of the current study is to describe this loss of neurological function in healthy aging subjects as seen through accumulated subclinical neurological signs present. Logistic regression is applied to the data on each of six signs. Parameters determined are used to describe the distribution of first occurrence times for each sign. The results are then used to construct a Poisson-like model that describes the accumulation in the number of signs present over time on average. This model is also used to simulate a longitudinal population to explore the variability in the number of signs present over time in an aging population. As the rate of arrival of the signs is heterogeneous, as determined through logistic regression, and the number of signs detected is finite, the resulting distributions of the number of signs over time have a different nature than Poisson. Our results suggest that we can expect to see on average one neurological deficit in healthy people by the age of 62, and that the expected number of deficits increases linearly at the rate of 1 additional sign every 12 years over a wide age range (age 70-90). The distribution of the number of deficits over time is also described. The linearity in the average rate at which signs appear in this population is somewhat of a surprise, in that an increasing (accelerating) rate might be anticipated. In addition to characterizing the neurological exam results in this group, we demonstrate a methodology that allows the comparison of groups and defines a rate of neurological aging.

  2. Subject to Form: Research Interviews, Performative Subjectivity, Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarigianides, Sophia Tatiana

    2010-01-01

    In this dissertation, I analyze teacher, literacy coach and researcher subjectivities in a five-year study of on-site professional development with middle-grade Language Arts teachers in a school designated by its district and state as severely underperforming. Interested in the role of research interviews as both research method and cultural…

  3. Policy and Practice in Sign Bilingual Education: Development, Challenges and Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanwick, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    A sign bilingual approach to the education of deaf children was first introduced in the UK in 1990. This paper reviews the growth of sign bilingual education in the UK and documents significant milestones in the development of sign bilingual policy and practice since the 1980s. This overview demonstrates how key issues in sign bilingual education…

  4. Cross-Modal Recruitment of Auditory and Orofacial Areas During Sign Language in a Deaf Subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Juan; Velasquez, Carlos; Vázquez-Bourgon, Javier; de Lucas, Enrique Marco; Gomez, Elsa

    2017-09-01

    Modern sign languages used by deaf people are fully expressive, natural human languages that are perceived visually and produced manually. The literature contains little data concerning human brain organization in conditions of deficient sensory information such as deafness. A deaf-mute patient underwent surgery of a left temporoinsular low-grade glioma. The patient underwent awake surgery with intraoperative electrical stimulation mapping, allowing direct study of the cortical and subcortical organization of sign language. We found a similar distribution of language sites to what has been reported in mapping studies of patients with oral language, including 1) speech perception areas inducing anomias and alexias close to the auditory cortex (at the posterior portion of the superior temporal gyrus and supramarginal gyrus); 2) speech production areas inducing speech arrest (anarthria) at the ventral premotor cortex, close to the lip motor area and away from the hand motor area; and 3) subcortical stimulation-induced semantic paraphasias at the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus at the temporal isthmus. The intraoperative setup for sign language mapping with intraoperative electrical stimulation in deaf-mute patients is similar to the setup described in patients with oral language. To elucidate the type of language errors, a sign language interpreter in close interaction with the neuropsychologist is necessary. Sign language is perceived visually and produced manually; however, this case revealed a cross-modal recruitment of auditory and orofacial motor areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Use of Information and Communication Technologies in Sign Language Test Development: Results of an International Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Sign language test development is a relatively new field within sign linguistics, motivated by the practical need for assessment instruments to evaluate language development in different groups of learners (L1, L2). Due to the lack of research on the structure and acquisition of many sign languages, developing an assessment instrument poses…

  6. Developing Written Literacy in Deaf Children through Analyzing Sign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Carol Tane; Armour, Victoria A.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of complementary sign language instruction on three measures of literacy were evaluated with six severely to profoundly deaf high school residential students. Instruction involved comparing American Sign Language and English, literal and figurative translation, and editing and grammatical English skills. Positive results have…

  7. The Effects of Baby Sign Training on Child Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Vannesa; Sepulveda, Amanda; Rodriguez, Sarai

    2014-01-01

    Although Baby Sign is gaining in popularity, there is a scarcity of research supporting its use. The research that has been conducted is conflicting. In the current study, nine families with children ranging in age from six months to two years and five months participated in a baby sign workshop. A pre--post-test design was used to assess the…

  8. Local Development of Subject Area Item Banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Annie W.; Barlow, Gene

    1984-01-01

    It is feasible for school districts to develop and use subject area tests as reliable as those previously available only from commercial publishers. Three projects in local item development in a large school district are described. The first involved only Algebra 1. The second involved life science and career education at the elementary level; and…

  9. Atypical Speech and Language Development: A Consensus Study on Clinical Signs in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser-Bochane, Margot I.; Gerrits, Ellen; van der Schans, Cees P.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Luinge, Margreet R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Atypical speech and language development is one of the most common developmental difficulties in young children. However, which clinical signs characterize atypical speech-language development at what age is not clear. Aim: To achieve a national and valid consensus on clinical signs and red flags (i.e. most urgent clinical signs) for…

  10. Type of Iconicity Matters in the Vocabulary Development of Signing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Gerardo; Sümer, Beyza; Özyürek, Asli

    2017-01-01

    Recent research on signed as well as spoken language shows that the iconic features of the target language might play a role in language development. Here, we ask further whether different types of iconic depictions modulate children's preferences for certain types of sign-referent links during vocabulary development in sign language. Results from…

  11. Subjective Signs Of The State Off-Budget Funds Inappropriate Expenditure Legal Analysis

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    Oleg G. Solovev

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present article, author discusses controversial issues of the criminal law assessment of subjective symptoms of improper spending of state budget funds, offered legal solutions to separate problems. In particular, analysis of the disposition of Art. 285.2 of the Criminal Code allowed the author to come to the conclusion that in this case we are talking about the even narrower subject, than the official - of the state extra-budgetary fund official. Author notes that the weak point of the technical legal rules, the subjects of the crime cannot be persons, performing managerial functions in the company management, which under the Federal Law of July 24, 2002 No. 111-FL "On the Investment of Funds for Financing funded part of labor pensions in the Russian Federation" pension savings of insured claims transferred to the trust. However, in the case of misuse of these funds, these persons may be held in the presence of all other grounds of criminal responsibility under Art. 201 of the Criminal Code. The subjective aspect of the act is characterized by the acts of guilt in the form of direct intent, when a perpetrator (official understands that spending budget funds illegally and wants them to spend. This purpose of committing crime has no legal significance and do not affect characterization of the offense. Motives of the official (falsely understood interests of the Fund, careerist considerations, greed, and other personal motives, do not affect qualification of his actions, but may be considered in the individualization of responsibility.

  12. Ibie'ka (Ideographs): Developing Visual Signs for Expressing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Visual signs (ideographs) are artistic codified expressions that promote social and cultural integration. They are normally based on popular conventions which over a period of time become generally accepted. In pre-western literate Africa, apart from oral communication, visual codes were employed within social groups.

  13. Phonological Development in Hearing Learners of a Sign Language: The Influence of Phonological Parameters, Sign Complexity, and Iconicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Gerardo; Morgan, Gary

    2015-01-01

    The present study implemented a sign-repetition task at two points in time to hearing adult learners of British Sign Language and explored how each phonological parameter, sign complexity, and iconicity affected sign production over an 11-week (22-hour) instructional period. The results show that training improves articulation accuracy and that…

  14. Early Vocabulary Development in Deaf Native Signers: A British Sign Language Adaptation of the Communicative Development Inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfe, Tyron; Herman, Rosalind; Roy, Penny; Woll, Bencie

    2010-01-01

    Background: There is a dearth of assessments of sign language development in young deaf children. This study gathered age-related scores from a sample of deaf native signing children using an adapted version of the MacArthur-Bates CDI (Fenson et al., 1994). Method: Parental reports on children's receptive and expressive signing were collected…

  15. LINGUISTIC ASPECTS OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF COMPUTER SIGN LANGUAGE INTERPRETERS RUSSIAN LANGUAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Davidovna Ganelina

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the actual direction of modern linguistics – describing the features of Russian sign language identified by the analysis of theoretical and empirical lexicographical sources, as well as in the process of communication with native «speakers» – people using Russian sign language as native language. Another purpose of the article is detecting and confirming the practical significance of such research – solving problems of social adaptation for hard of hearing people. The paper presents the results of linguistic research of Russian sign language that the developers of the computer Russian sign language translator rely on: peculiarities of lexis, word derivation, morphology and syntax of sign language for deaf citizens of the Russian Federation are described. Approaches to developing a system for computer sign language translation used by the employees of the Institute of Social Rehabilitation, Novosibirsk State Technical University, are justified in the paper. The results of the research can be interested to specialists studying and describing lexical and grammatical systems of Russian sign language, developers of the system for a two-way machine translation from Russian spoken language to Russian sign language and vice versa, sign language interpreters and teachers of sign language.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-7-28

  16. Atypical speech and language development: a consensus study on clinical signs in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Margot I. Visser-Bochane; Sijmen A. Reijneveld; Cees P. van der Schans; Ellen Gerrits; Margreet R. Luinge

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atypical speech and language development is one of the most common developmental difficulties in young children. However, which clinical signs characterize atypical speech–language development at what age is not clear. Aim: To achieve a national and valid consensus on clinical signs and

  17. Atypical speech and language development : a consensus study on clinical signs in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser-Bochane, Margot I.; Gerrits, Ellen; van der Schans, Cees P.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Luinge, Margreet R.

    Background: Atypical speech and language development is one of the most common developmental difficulties in young children. However, which clinical signs characterize atypical speech-language development at what age is not clear. Aim: To achieve a national and valid consensus on clinical signs and

  18. Developing brain vital signs: Initial framework for monitoring brain function changes over time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujoy eGhosh Hajra

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Clinical assessment of brain function relies heavily on indirect behavior-based tests. Unfortunately, behavior-based assessments are subjective and therefore susceptible to several confounding factors. Event-related brain potentials (ERPs, derived from electroencephalography (EEG, are often used to provide objective, physiological measures of brain function. Historically, ERPs have been characterized extensively within research settings, with limited but growing clinical applications. Over the past 20 years, we have developed clinical ERP applications for the evaluation of functional status following serious injury and/or disease. This work has identified an important gap: the need for a clinically accessible framework to evaluate ERP measures. Crucially, this enables baseline measures before brain dysfunction occurs, and might enable the routine collection of brain function metrics in the future much like blood pressure measures today. Here, we propose such a framework for extracting specific ERPs as potential brain vital signs. This framework enabled the translation/transformation of complex ERP data into accessible metrics of brain function for wider clinical utilization. To formalize the framework, three essential ERPs were selected as initial indicators: 1 the auditory N100 (Auditory sensation; 2 the auditory oddball P300 (Basic attention; and 3 the auditory speech processing N400 (Cognitive processing. First step validation was conducted on healthy younger and older adults (age range: 22-82 years. Results confirmed specific ERPs at the individual level (86.81%-98.96%, verified predictable age-related differences (P300 latency delays in older adults, p<0.05, and demonstrated successful linear transformation into the proposed brain vital sign (BVS framework (basic attention latency sub-component of BVS framework reflects delays in older adults, p<0.05. The findings represent an initial critical step in developing, extracting, and

  19. Type of iconicity matters in the vocabulary development of signing children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ortega, G.; Sümer, B.; Özyürek, A.

    2017-01-01

    Recent research on signed as well as spoken language shows that the iconic features of the target language might play a role in language development. Here, we ask further whether different types of iconic depictions modulate children's preferences for certain types of sign-referent links during

  20. Spoken english language development among native signing children with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Kathryn; Lillo-Martin, Diane; Chen Pichler, Deborah

    2014-04-01

    Bilingualism is common throughout the world, and bilingual children regularly develop into fluently bilingual adults. In contrast, children with cochlear implants (CIs) are frequently encouraged to focus on a spoken language to the exclusion of sign language. Here, we investigate the spoken English language skills of 5 children with CIs who also have deaf signing parents, and so receive exposure to a full natural sign language (American Sign Language, ASL) from birth, in addition to spoken English after implantation. We compare their language skills with hearing ASL/English bilingual children of deaf parents. Our results show comparable English scores for the CI and hearing groups on a variety of standardized language measures, exceeding previously reported scores for children with CIs with the same age of implantation and years of CI use. We conclude that natural sign language input does no harm and may mitigate negative effects of early auditory deprivation for spoken language development.

  1. Manual therapy for the management of pain and limited range of motion in subjects with signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calixtre, L B; Moreira, R F C; Franchini, G H; Alburquerque-Sendín, F; Oliveira, A B

    2015-11-01

    There is a lack of knowledge about the effectiveness of manual therapy (MT) on subjects with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The aim of this systematic review is to synthetise evidence regarding the isolated effect of MT in improving maximum mouth opening (MMO) and pain in subjects with signs and symptoms of TMD. MEDLINE(®) , Cochrane, Web of Science, SciELO and EMBASE(™) electronic databases were consulted, searching for randomised controlled trials applying MT for TMD compared to other intervention, no intervention or placebo. Two authors independently extracted data, PEDro scale was used to assess risk of bias, and GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) was applied to synthetise overall quality of the body of evidence. Treatment effect size was calculated for pain, MMO and pressure pain threshold (PPT). Eight trials were included, seven of high methodological quality. Myofascial release and massage techniques applied on the masticatory muscles are more effective than control (low to moderate evidence) but as effective as toxin botulinum injections (moderate evidence). Upper cervical spine thrust manipulation or mobilisation techniques are more effective than control (low to high evidence), while thoracic manipulations are not. There is moderate-to-high evidence that MT techniques protocols are effective. The methodological heterogeneity across trials protocols frequently contributed to decrease quality of evidence. In conclusion, there is widely varying evidence that MT improves pain, MMO and PPT in subjects with TMD signs and symptoms, depending on the technique. Further studies should consider using standardised evaluations and better study designs to strengthen clinical relevance. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Danger Signs of Childhood Pneumonia: Caregiver Awareness and Care Seeking Behavior in a Developing Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikenna K. Ndu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Efforts to reduce child mortality especially in Africa must as a necessity aim to decrease mortality due to pneumonia. To achieve this, preventive strategies such as expanding vaccination coverage are key. However once a child develops pneumonia prompt treatment which is essential to survival is dependent on mothers and caregiver recognition of the symptoms and danger signs of pneumonia. Methods. This community based cross-sectional study enrolled four hundred and sixty-six caregivers in Enugu state. It aimed to determine knowledge of caregivers about danger signs of pneumonia and the sociodemographic factors that influence knowledge and care seeking behaviour of caregivers. Results. There is poor knowledge of the aetiology and danger signs of pneumonia among caregivers. Higher maternal educational attainment and residence in semiurban area were significantly associated with knowledge of aetiology, danger signs, and vaccination of their children against pneumonia. Fast breathing and difficulty in breathing were the commonest known and experienced WHO recognized danger signs while fever was the commonest perceived danger sign among caregivers. Conclusion. Knowledge of danger signs and health seeking behaviour among caregivers is inadequate. There is need for intensified public and hospital based interventions targeted at mothers to improve their knowledge about pneumonia.

  3. Covariation between motor signs and negative symptoms in drug-naive subjects with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders before and after antipsychotic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Victor; de Jalón, Elena García; Campos, María S; Cuesta, Manuel J

    2017-08-29

    Objective To examine the covariation between negative symptoms and motor signs in a broad sample of drug-naïve subjects with schizophrenia-spectrum psychoses before and after inception of antipsychotic medication. One-hundred and eighty-nine antipsychotic-naïve subjects with DSM-IV schizophrenia-spectrum psychoses were assessed for negative symptoms including affective flattening, alogia, avolition/apathy and anhedonia/associality, and motor signs including catatonia, parkinsonism and dyskinesia. We examined the association between negative and motor features at baseline, 4-weeks after inception of antipsychotic treatment and that of their mean change over the treatment period, such as their trajectories and treatment response pattern. At the drug-naïve state, motor signs were strongly related to affective flattening and alogia (p0.01). Although to a different extent, motor and negative features showed drug-responsive, drug-worsening, of drug-unchanged patterns of response to antipsychotic medication. The main predictors of negative and motor features in treated subjects were their corresponding baseline ratings (p<0.001). Negative and motor features are differentiated, but to some extent, overlapping domains that are meaningfully influenced by antipsychotic medication. At the drug-naïve state, motor signs and the diminished expression domain of negative symptoms may share underlying neurobiological mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. On language acquisition in speech and sign: development of combinatorial structure in both modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Languages are composed of a conventionalized system of parts which allow speakers and signers to generate an infinite number of form-meaning mappings through phonological and morphological combinations. This level of linguistic organization distinguishes language from other communicative acts such as gestures. In contrast to signs, gestures are made up of meaning units that are mostly holistic. Children exposed to signed and spoken languages from early in life develop grammatical structure following similar rates and patterns. This is interesting, because signed languages are perceived and articulated in very different ways to their spoken counterparts with many signs displaying surface resemblances to gestures. The acquisition of forms and meanings in child signers and talkers might thus have been a different process. Yet in one sense both groups are faced with a similar problem: "how do I make a language with combinatorial structure"? In this paper I argue first language development itself enables this to happen and by broadly similar mechanisms across modalities. Combinatorial structure is the outcome of phonological simplifications and productivity in using verb morphology by children in sign and speech.

  5. On language acquisition in speech and sign:development drives combinatorial structure in both modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary eMorgan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Languages are composed of a conventionalized system of parts which allow speakers and signers to compose an infinite number of form-meaning mappings through phonological and morphological combinations. This level of linguistic organization distinguishes language from other communicative acts such as gestures. In contrast to signs, gestures are made up of meaning units that are mostly holistic. Children exposed to signed and spoken languages from early in life develop grammatical structure following similar rates and patterns. This is interesting, because signed languages are perceived and articulated in very different ways to their spoken counterparts with many signs displaying surface resemblances to gestures. The acquisition of forms and meanings in child signers and talkers might thus have been a different process. Yet in one sense both groups are faced with a similar problem: 'how do I make a language with combinatorial structure’? In this paper I argue first language development itself enables this to happen and by broadly similar mechanisms across modalities. Combinatorial structure is the outcome of phonological simplifications and productivity in using verb morphology by children in sign and speech.

  6. Atypical signed language development: a case study of challenges with visual-spatial processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinto-Pozos, David; Singleton, Jenny L; Hauser, Peter C; Levine, Susan C; Garberoglio, Carrie Lou; Hou, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    In signed languages, the articulatory space in front of the signer is used grammatically, topographically, and to depict a real or imagined space around a signer and thus is an important consideration in signed language acquisition. It has been suggested that children who acquire signed languages rely on concomitant visual-spatial development to support their linguistic development. We consider the case of a native-signing deaf adolescent female with average intelligence who had been reported to struggle with spatial aspects of American Sign Language (ASL) as a child. Results of a battery of linguistic and nonlinguistic tests suggest that she has relatively good ASL skills with the exception of some specific difficulties on spatial tasks that require attention to ASL and nonlinguistic topographic space or changes in visual perspective (e.g., classifiers and referential shift). This child has some difficulties with visual-spatial abilities, and we suggest that this has affected her acquisition of those aspects of ASL that are heavily dependent on visual-spatial processing.

  7. Development of Sign Language Communication Skill on Children through Augmented Reality and the MuCy Mode

    OpenAIRE

    Angélica GONZÁLEZ ARRIETA; Cadeñanes Garnica, Jorge J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper shows a Sign Language Teaching Model (SLTM) called: Multi-language Cycle for Sign Language Understanding (MuCy). It serves as complementary pedagogical resource for Sign Language (SL) teaching. A pilot lesson with the Rainbow Colors was conducted at the Association of Parents of Deaf Children of Salamanca in order to determine the Percentage of Development of the Sign Language Communication Skill (SLCS) and others within a Collaborative Learning Environment with Mixed-Reality (CLEMR).

  8. Assessment of Sign Language Development: The Case of Deaf Children in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Daan; Knoors, Harry; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we will describe the development of an assessment instrument for Sign Language of the Netherlands (SLN) for deaf children in bilingual education programs. The assessment instrument consists of nine computerized tests in which the receptive and expressive language skills of deaf children at different linguistic levels (phonology,…

  9. Role of sign language in intellectual and social development of deaf children: Review of foreign publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khokhlova A. Yu.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article provides an overview of foreign psychological publications concerning the sign language as a means of communication in deaf people. The article addresses the question of sing language's impact on cognitive development, efficiency and positive way of interacting with parents as well as academic achievement increase in deaf children.

  10. Alcohol consumption, smoking and development of visible age-related signs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Anne L; Mølbak, Marie-Louise; Schnor, Peter

    2017-01-01

    and earlobe crease, but not xanthelasmata. CONCLUSIONS: High alcohol consumption and smoking predict development of visible age-related signs. This is the first prospective study to show that heavy alcohol use and smoking are associated with generally looking older than one's actual age.......BACKGROUND: Visible age-related signs indicate biological age, as individuals that appear old for their age are more likely to be at poor health, compared with people that appear their actual age. The aim of this study was to investigate whether alcohol and smoking are associated with four visible...... age-related signs (arcus corneae, xanthelasmata, earlobe crease and male pattern baldness). METHODS: We used information from 11 613 individuals in the Copenhagen City Heart Study (1976-2003). Alcohol intake, smoking habits and other lifestyle factors were assessed prospectively and visible age...

  11. Alcohol consumption, smoking and development of visible age-related signs: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schou, Anne L; Mølbak, Marie-Louise; Schnor, Peter; Grønbæk, Morten; Tolstrup, Janne S

    2017-12-01

    Visible age-related signs indicate biological age, as individuals that appear old for their age are more likely to be at poor health, compared with people that appear their actual age. The aim of this study was to investigate whether alcohol and smoking are associated with four visible age-related signs (arcus corneae, xanthelasmata, earlobe crease and male pattern baldness). We used information from 11 613 individuals in the Copenhagen City Heart Study (1976-2003). Alcohol intake, smoking habits and other lifestyle factors were assessed prospectively and visible age-related signs were inspected during subsequent examinations. The risk of developing arcus corneae, earlobe crease and xanthelasmata increased stepwise with increased smoking as measured by pack-years. For alcohol consumption, a high intake was associated with the risk of developing arcus corneae and earlobe crease, but not xanthelasmata. High alcohol consumption and smoking predict development of visible age-related signs. This is the first prospective study to show that heavy alcohol use and smoking are associated with generally looking older than one's actual age. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Subjective dimension in the analysis of human development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LÓPEZ NOVAL, Borja

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years subjective evaluations about own quality of life, resumed in levels of life satisfactionor happiness, are gaining importance as indicators of development. Some authors state that subjectivewell-being is a necessary and sufficient condition for human development. In this work the arguments ofthese authors are explained and it is discussed the role subjective evaluations must play on developmentstudies. The main conclusion is that although it is necessary to integrate subjective well-being into humandevelopment studies we cannot identify subjective well-being and development.

  13. Development and validation of a measure of health literacy in the UK: the newest vital sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, Gill; Khazaezadeh, Nina; Oteng-Ntim, Eugene; Seed, Paul; Barr, Suzanne; Weiss, Barry D

    2013-02-07

    Health literacy (HL) is an important public health issue. Current measures have drawbacks in length and/or acceptability. The US-developed Newest Vital Sign (NVS) health literacy instrument measures both reading comprehension and numeracy skills using a nutrition label, takes 3 minutes to administer, and has proven to be acceptable to research subjects. This study aimed to amend and validate it for the UK population. We used a three-stage process; (1) a Delphi study with academic and clinical experts to amend the NVS label to reflect UK nutrition labeling (2) community-based cognitive testing to assess and improve ease of understanding and acceptability of the test (3) validation of the NVS-UK against an accepted standard test of health literacy, the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA) (Pearson's r and the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve) and participant educational level. A sample size calculation indicated that 250 participants would be required. Inclusion criteria were age 18-75 years and ability to converse in English. We excluded people working in the health field and those with impaired vision or inability to undertake the interview due to cognitive impairment or inability to converse in English. In the Delphi study, 28 experts reached consensus (3 cycles). Cognitive testing (80 participants) yielded an instrument that needed no further refinement. Validation testing (337 participants) showed high internal consistency (Cronbach's Alpha = 0.74). Validation against the TOFHLA demonstrated a Pearson's r of 0.49 and an area under the ROC curve of 0.81. The NVS-UK is a valid measure of HL. Its acceptability and ease of application makes it an ideal tool for use in the UK. It has potential uses in public health research including epidemiological surveys and randomized controlled trials, and in enabling practitioners to tailor care to patient need.

  14. Impaired incretin effect and fasting hyperglucagonaemia characterizing type 2 diabetic subjects are early signs of dysmetabolism in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knop, Filip K; Aaboe, K; Vilsbøll, T

    2012-01-01

    subjects with NGT [BMI: 33 (35-38) kg/m(2) ]; (iii) Eight lean patients with T2DM [BMI: 24 (22-25) kg/m(2) ]; and (iv) Eight lean healthy subjects [BMI: 23 (20-25) kg/m(2) ]. Results: The incretin effect was significantly (p error...

  15. Early vocabulary development in deaf native signers: a British Sign Language adaptation of the communicative development inventories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfe, Tyron; Herman, Rosalind; Roy, Penny; Woll, Bencie

    2010-03-01

    There is a dearth of assessments of sign language development in young deaf children. This study gathered age-related scores from a sample of deaf native signing children using an adapted version of the MacArthur-Bates CDI (Fenson et al., 1994). Parental reports on children's receptive and expressive signing were collected longitudinally on 29 deaf native British Sign Language (BSL) users, aged 8-36 months, yielding 146 datasets. A smooth upward growth curve was obtained for early vocabulary development and percentile scores were derived. In the main, receptive scores were in advance of expressive scores. No gender bias was observed. Correlational analysis identified factors associated with vocabulary development, including parental education and mothers' training in BSL. Individual children's profiles showed a range of development and some evidence of a growth spurt. Clinical and research issues relating to the measure are discussed. The study has developed a valid, reliable measure of vocabulary development in BSL. Further research is needed to investigate the relationship between vocabulary acquisition in native and non-native signers.

  16. Subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Vega Encabo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I claim that subjectivity is a way of being that is constituted through a set of practices in which the self is subject to the dangers of fictionalizing and plotting her life and self-image. I examine some ways of becoming subject through narratives and through theatrical performance before others. Through these practices, a real and active subjectivity is revealed, capable of self-knowledge and self-transformation. 

  17. Developing a biomedical expert finding system using medical subject headings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harpreet; Singh, Reema; Malhotra, Arjun; Kaur, Manjit

    2013-12-01

    Efficient identification of subject experts or expert communities is vital for the growth of any organization. Most of the available expert finding systems are based on self-nomination, which can be biased, and are unable to rank experts. Thus, the objective of this work was to develop a robust and unbiased expert finding system which can quantitatively measure expertise. Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) is a controlled vocabulary developed by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) for indexing research publications, articles and books. Using the MeSH terms associated with peer-reviewed articles published from India and indexed in PubMed, we developed a Web-based program which can be used to identify subject experts and subjects associated with an expert. We have extensively tested our system to identify experts from India in various subjects. The system provides a ranked list of experts where known experts rank at the top of the list. The system is general; since it uses information available with the PubMed, it can be implemented for any country. The expert finding system is able to successfully identify subject experts in India. Our system is unique because it allows the quantification of subject expertise, thus enabling the ranking of experts. Our system is based on peer-reviewed information. Use of MeSH terms as subjects has standardized the subject terminology. The system matches requirements of an ideal expert finding system.

  18. Subjective age in the academic development of Algerian students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. MERABET

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Subjective age has been studied in various domains (health, consumption, work, but the works which investigated the subjective age that the students give themselves during their academic development are rare (Pavalache & Rioux, 2014. One-hundred-and-twenty-two Algerian students answered a questionnaire comprising (a an identification part (b the subjective age questionnaire by Gana, Alaphilippe and Bailly, (2002 and (c the questionnaire of subjective age in academic development (Pavalache & Rioux, 2014. The results show that the Algerian students have a tendency to rejuvenate themselves, all the more so if they are of male gender. They show the impact of the societal and cultural factors on subjective age in academic development of university students.

  19. The role of religiosity, religious norms, subjective norms, and bodily integrity in signing an organ donor card.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Michael T; Morgan, Susan E; Roberts-Perez, Samaria D; Harrison, Tyler; Afifi, Walid; Long, Shawn D

    2008-09-01

    This article examines the influence of religiosity, religious norms, subjective norms, and bodily integrity (the extent to which people think the body should remain unaltered after death) on intent to donate organs postmortem. A total of 4,426 participants from 6 universities completed surveys for this study. The results indicate that religiosity and religious norms had a nonsignificant effect on willingness to donate. In addition, attitudes toward donation had a weak positive relationship on intent to donate, whereas subjective norms exerted a modest positive relationship on intent to donate. Finally, the results reveal a strong direct and indirect effect of bodily integrity on intent to donate.

  20. Neurological soft signs, dissociation and alexithymia in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapancı, Zafer; Yıldırım, Abdullah; Boysan, Murat

    2017-11-21

    A body of evidence has supported that patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have increased rates of various neurological soft signs (NSS) compared to controls. Various lines of research has documented robust relationships between OCD and dissociative symptomatology. The study aimed to examine the associations between obsessive-compulsive symptoms, dissociative experiences alexithymia, and NSS. The study included thirty OCD patients and thirty healthy controls, matched for age, marital status, education, and income. The Neurological Evaluation Scale (NES), Padua Inventory-Revised (PI-R), Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) and Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) were administered. In comparison to healthy controls, patients with OCD had difficulty sequencing for complex motor acts and greater absorption/ imaginative involvement. Using latent class analysis, the study sample was classified into two homogenous subsets as mild NSS (n = 45) and severe NSS (n = 15). Majority of the participants who were grouped into severe NSS latent class were OCD patient (n = 14, 93.3%). Furthermore, those with severe NSS reported greater levels of alexithymia and more severe obsessive-compulsive symptoms, particularly precision. We concluded that relationships between OCD severity and NSS appear to be of crucial importance. Our data along with accumulated evidence suggest that OCD associated with pronounced NSS may represent a specific subtype of the disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Testing the Development of Linguistic Knowledge in Adult Naive Learners of American Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Pein, Margreta; Altarriba, Jeanette

    2011-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the ways in which notions of semantics and phonology are acquired by adult naive learners of American Sign Language (ASL) when they are first exposed to a set of simple signs. First, a set of ASL signs was tested for nontransparency and a set of signs was selected for subsequent use. Next, a set of…

  2. SIGNS The sandwich sign

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    214. 5. Kunimasa K, Jo T, Takaiwa T, Ishida T. Thoracic sandwich sign. Intern Med 2011;50:2865. 6. Caceres J, Mata JM, Castaner E, Villanueva A. CT recognition of traumatic herniation of stomach: the sandwich sign. J Thorac Imaging 1995 ...

  3. Development and evaluation of a double antibody sandwich ELISA for the detection of human sDC-SIGN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shang-Liang; Li, Yan-Li; Tang, Yuan; Chen, Zhi-Cheng; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Jia; Lu, Xiao; Zhao, Na; Chen, Zheng-Liang; Zuo, Daming

    2016-09-01

    sDC-SIGN is the soluble form of dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN, CD209), which is a molecule involved with pathogen recognition and immune regulation. However, there is no commercially available ELISA kit for detecting human sDC-SIGN, and the normal range of this molecule is unknown. Here, we describe an ELISA for detecting human sDC-SIGN with high specificity. First, sDC-SIGN protein was expressed and purified. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies were then raised against the purified protein and subsequently characterized. A sandwich ELISA was developed using polyclonal antibodies specific for sDC-SIGN for capture and a biotin-labeled monoclonal antibody specific for sDC-SIGN for detection of protein. This method has sensitivity up to 0.2 ng/ml. Using this ELISA, we found that the concentration of sDC-SIGN in sera of healthy volunteers ranges from 0-319 ng/ml with a mean concentration of 27.14 ng/ml. Interestingly, the concentration of sDC-SIGN in sera from patients with cancer or chronic hepatitis B virus (CHB) infection was lower than that of health controls. The mean concentrations of sDC-SIGN in cancer patients and chronic hepatitis B virus infection patients were 3.2 ng/ml and 3.8 ng/ml, respectively. We developed a sandwich ELISA for detecting human sDC-SIGN and demonstrated its use by assessing sera concentrations of sDC-SIGN in patients with cancer and chronic CHB infection compared to that of healthy controls. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Issues in Development of the Test Battery for Australian Sign Language Morphology and Syntax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schembri, Adam; Wigglesworth, Gillian; Johnston, Trevor; Leigh, Greg; Adam, Robert; Barker, Roz

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the adaptation of the Test Battery for American Sign Language Morphology and Syntax for Australian Sign Language. Data collected from a group of native signers who were deaf (n=25) demonstrate the range of variability in key grammatical features of Australian Sign Language and raise methodological issues. (Contains…

  5. Sign Language Interpreters' Training

    OpenAIRE

    Andriakopoulou, Eirini; Bouras, Christos; Giannaka, Eri

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays, the evolution of technology and the increasing use of computers gave the opportunity for developing new methods of education of deaf individuals and sign language interpreters. The e-learning environments that have been developed for the education of sign language provide web-based courses, designed to effectively teach to anyone the Sign Language. Recognizing the difficulties and barriers of sign language training as well as the importance of sign language interpreters for the comm...

  6. Exacerbation of signs and symptoms of allergic conjunctivitis by a controlled adverse environment challenge in subjects with a history of dry eye and ocular allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes PJ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paulo J Gomes,1 George W Ousler,1 Donna L Welch,1 Lisa M Smith,1 Jeffrey Coderre,1 Mark B Abelson1,21Ora Inc, Andover, MA; 2Harvard Medical School, Schepens Eye Research Institute, Boston, MA, USABackground: The goal of this study was to assess the effect of a controlled adverse environment (CAE challenge on subjects with both allergic conjunctivitis and dry eye.Methods: Thirty-three subjects were screened and 17 completed this institutional review board-approved study. Subjects underwent baseline ocular assessments and conjunctival allergen challenge (CAC on days 0 and 3. Those who met the ocular redness and itching criteria were randomized to receive either the controlled adverse environment (CAE challenge (group A, n = 9 or no challenge (group B, n = 8 at day 6. Thirty minutes after CAE/no-CAE, subjects were challenged with allergen and their signs and symptoms graded. Exploratory confocal microscopy was carried out in a subset of subjects at hourly intervals for 5 hours post-CAC on days 3 and 6.Results: Seven minutes post-CAC, subjects exposed to the CAE had significantly greater itching (difference between groups, 0.55 ± 0.25, P = 0.028, conjunctival redness (0.59 ± 0.19, P = 0.002, episcleral redness (0.56 ± 0.19, P = 0.003 and mean overall redness (mean of conjunctival, episcleral, and ciliary redness, 0.59 ± 0.14, P < 0.001. The mean score at 7, 15, and 20 minutes post-CAC for conjunctival redness (0.43 ± 0.17, P = 0.012, episcleral redness (0.49 ± 0.15, P = 0.001, mean overall redness in all regions (0.43 ± 0.15, P = 0.005, and mean chemosis (0.20 ± 0.08, P = 0.017 were also all significantly greater in CAE-treated subjects. Confocal microscopic images of conjunctival vessels after CAC showed more inflammation in CAE-treated subjects.Conclusion: In subjects with both dry eye and allergic conjunctivitis, exposure to adverse environmental conditions causes an ocular surface perturbation that can intensify allergic reactions

  7. The Diagnostic Method Features of Communication Subject Development (ORSO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lioznova E.V.,

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is familiarization with the development of questionnaire "Features of communication subject development" (ORSO. This new psychodiagnostic tool assesses communicative personality traits, its characteristics as the subject of communication. We present the theoretical foundation of the approach to the personality as a subject of communication, propose a structure of such subject, including two levels of properties: generic and specific. The latter include the responsibility in communication, unconditional acceptance of self, attitude to the partner as an absolute value. The questionnaire comprises five scales and measures the level of these features, as well as integrated communication success rate. The accuracy of responses is controlled by the scale of the adequacy of self-esteem. We describe communication styles, revealed by the ratio of the generic properties. The test is intended for men and women older than 12 years and allows to predict the success of communication with different partners in different situations and features of communicative behavior, attitudes, experiences of the respondent. We presented satisfactory performance criteria of test quality: reliability, validity and representativeness of the ORSO technique, provide examples of its application in scientific and applied purposes and prospects for future work.

  8. Towards the Development of a Mexican Speech-to-Sign-Language Translator for the Deaf Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago-Omar Caballero-Morales

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Una parte significativa de la población mexicana es sorda. Esta discapacidad restringe sus habilidades de interacción social con personas que no tienen dicha discapacidad y viceversa. En este artículo presentamos nuestros avances hacia el desarrollo de un traductor Voz-a-Lenguaje-de-Señas del español mexicano para asistir a personas sin discapacidad a interactuarcon personas sordas. La metodología de diseño propuesta considera limitados recursos para(1 el desarrollo del Reconocedor Automático del Habla (RAH mexicano, el cual es el módulo principal del traductor, y (2 el vocabulario del Lenguaje de Señas Mexicano (LSM disponible para representar las oraciones reconocidas. La traducción Voz-a-Lenguaje-de-Señas fue lograda con un nivel de precisión mayor al 97% para usuarios de prueba diferentes de aquellos seleccionados para el entrenamiento del RAH.A significant population of Mexican people are deaf. This disorder restricts their social interac-tion skills with people who don't have such disorder and viceversa. In this paper we presentour advances towards the development of a Mexican Speech-to-Sign-Language translator toassist normal people to interact with deaf people. The proposed design methodology considerslimited resources for (1 the development of the Mexican Automatic Speech Recogniser (ASRsystem, which is the main module in the translator, and (2 the Mexican Sign Language(MSL vocabulary available to represent the decoded speech. Speech-to-MSL translation wasaccomplished with an accuracy level over 97% for test speakers different from those selectedfor ASR training.

  9. Lung function and breathing pattern in subjects developing high altitude pulmonary edema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian F Clarenbach

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The purpose of the study was to comprehensively evaluate physiologic changes associated with development of high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE. We tested whether changes in pulmonary function and breathing pattern would herald clinically overt HAPE at an early stage. METHODS: In 18 mountaineers, spirometry, diffusing capacity, nitrogen washout, nocturnal ventilation and pulse oximetry were recorded at 490 m and during 3 days after rapid ascent to 4559 m. Findings were compared among subjects developing HAPE and those remaining well (controls. RESULTS: In 8 subjects subsequently developing radiographically documented HAPE at 4559 m, median FVC declined to 82% of low altitude baseline while closing volume increased to 164% of baseline (P<0.05, both instances. In 10 controls, FVC decreased slightly (to 93% baseline, P<0.05 but significantly less than in subjects with HAPE and closing volume remained unchanged. Sniff nasal pressure was reduced in both subjects with and without subsequent HAPE. During nights at 4559 m, mean nocturnal oxygen saturation dropped to lower values while minute ventilation, the number of periodic breathing cycles and heart rate were higher (60%; 8.6 L/min; 97 cycles/h; 94 beats/min, respectively in subjects subsequently developing HAPE than in controls (73%; 5.1 L/min; 48 cycles/h; 79 beats/min; P<0.05 vs. HAPE, all instances. CONCLUSION: The results comprehensively represent the pattern of physiologic alterations that precede overt HAPE. The changes in lung function are consistent with reduced lung compliance and impaired gas exchange. Pronounced nocturnal hypoxemia, ventilatory control instability and sympathetic stimulation are further signs of subsequent overt HAPE.

  10. Developing the Immunology Book for Animal and Human Physiology Subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuni Mitasari

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available he objective of the study was to develop an immunology book for Animal and Human Physiology subject. This book was developed based on the Thiagarajan development model which was modified of: Define, Design, Develop, dan Disseminate (4D. The data expert validation instrument was questionnaire using Likert scales, comments, and recommendation sheets. Expert appraisal was done by material expert and media and design learning expert. The developmental testing was conducted using questionnaire to test the readibility. The expert validation was conducted by material expert as well as design and media learning expert validator; meanwhile, the field test was done to measure the readability. The validity test results were: the material expert state that the material is valid (97.14%, as well as the design and learning media expert (84.88% and field test by students (88.17%.

  11. The impact of input quality on early sign development in native and non-native language learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jenny; Jones, Anna; Morgan, Gary

    2016-05-01

    There is debate about how input variation influences child language. Most deaf children are exposed to a sign language from their non-fluent hearing parents and experience a delay in exposure to accessible language. A small number of children receive language input from their deaf parents who are fluent signers. Thus it is possible to document the impact of quality of input on early sign acquisition. The current study explores the outcomes of differential input in two groups of children aged two to five years: deaf children of hearing parents (DCHP) and deaf children of deaf parents (DCDP). Analysis of child sign language revealed DCDP had a more developed vocabulary and more phonological handshape types compared with DCHP. In naturalistic conversations deaf parents used more sign tokens and more phonological types than hearing parents. Results are discussed in terms of the effects of early input on subsequent language abilities.

  12. DEVELOPING STUDENTS’ ENTREPRENEURIAL SPIRIT THROUGH THE SUBJECT ILMU HITUNG KEUANGAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retno Subekti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article was written to share the experiences of teaching 'trading or doing business' in the subject of Ilmu Hitung Keuangan in 2010. This Article also share about the phenomenon of appeared ‘kantin kejujuran’ or the honesty canteen in Mathematics and Natural Sciences Faculty of Yogyakarta State University in early 2011. Based on the syllabus of the subject, there is a topic of trading that makes lecturer is motivated to participate in developing the entrepreneurial spirit of students. The way taken by the lecturer was giving big trust to the students to manage funds for trading. Before trading begins, students should discuss about what are the things that can be bought cheaply and then sold with ease so that will give them the advantage. The result is that all groups got benefit. 4 groups formed are the group of ‘donuts’, ‘accessories’, ‘snacks’, and ‘stickers’. Then groups of food division that are donuts group and snack’s one were part of the pioneers of honesty canteen. This method is in line with lecturers expectancy to participate and develop entrepreneurship on campus.

  13. The MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory: Normative Data for American Sign Language

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Diane Anderson; Judy Reilly

    2002-01-01

    .... The form has demonstrated excellent reliability and validity. To date, normative data have been collected from 69 deaf children with deaf parents who are learning sign language as a first language...

  14. Toward the Ideal Signing Avatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Adamo-Villani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses ongoing research on the effects of a signing avatar's modeling/rendering features on the perception of sign language animation. It reports a recent study that aimed to determine whether a character's visual style has an effect on how signing animated characters are perceived by viewers. The stimuli of the study were two polygonal characters presenting two different visual styles: stylized and realistic. Each character signed four sentences. Forty-seven participants with experience in American Sign Language (ASL viewed the animated signing clips in random order via web survey. They (1 identified the signed sentences (if recognizable, (2 rated their legibility, and (3 rated the appeal of the signing avatar. Findings show that while character's visual style does not have an effect on subjects' perceived legibility of the signs and sign recognition, it has an effect on subjects' interest in the character. The stylized signing avatar was perceived as more appealing than the realistic one.

  15. Linguistic aspects of the development of computer sign language interpreters Russian language

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia Davidovna Ganelina; Mikhail Gennadyevich Grif; Olga Оlegovna Korolkova

    2013-01-01

    The article is devoted to the actual direction of modern linguistics – describing the features of Russian sign language identified by the analysis of theoretical and empirical lexicographical sources, as well as in the process of communication with native «speakers» – people using Russian sign language as native language. Another purpose of the article is detecting and confirming the practical significance of such research – solving problems of social adaptation for hard of hearing people. Th...

  16. Advances to the development of a basic Mexican sign-to-speech and text language translator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Bautista, G.; Trujillo-Romero, F.; Diaz-Gonzalez, G.

    2016-09-01

    Sign Language (SL) is the basic alternative communication method between deaf people. However, most of the hearing people have trouble understanding the SL, making communication with deaf people almost impossible and taking them apart from daily activities. In this work we present an automatic basic real-time sign language translator capable of recognize a basic list of Mexican Sign Language (MSL) signs of 10 meaningful words, letters (A-Z) and numbers (1-10) and translate them into speech and text. The signs were collected from a group of 35 MSL signers executed in front of a Microsoft Kinect™ Sensor. The hand gesture recognition system use the RGB-D camera to build and storage data point clouds, color and skeleton tracking information. In this work we propose a method to obtain the representative hand trajectory pattern information. We use Euclidean Segmentation method to obtain the hand shape and Hierarchical Centroid as feature extraction method for images of numbers and letters. A pattern recognition method based on a Back Propagation Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is used to interpret the hand gestures. Finally, we use K-Fold Cross Validation method for training and testing stages. Our results achieve an accuracy of 95.71% on words, 98.57% on numbers and 79.71% on letters. In addition, an interactive user interface was designed to present the results in voice and text format.

  17. Vocabulary Instruction for the Development of American Sign Language in Deaf Children: An Investigation into Teacher Knowledge and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, Lianna

    2013-01-01

    The acquisition of vocabulary is an important aspect of young children's development that may impact their later literacy skills (National Reading Panel, 2000; Cunningham & Stanovitch, 1997). Deaf children who are American Sign Language users, however, often have smaller vocabularies and lower literacy levels than their hearing peers…

  18. The Development of Sensitivity to Grammatical Violations in American Sign Language: Native versus Nonnative Signers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novogrodsky, Rama; Henner, Jon; Caldwell-Harris, Catherine; Hoffmeister, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Factors influencing native and nonnative signers' syntactic judgment ability in American Sign Language (ASL) were explored for 421 deaf students aged 7;6-18;5. Predictors for syntactic knowledge were chronological age, age of entering a school for the deaf, gender, and additional learning disabilities. Mixed-effects linear modeling analysis…

  19. Vital Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your vital signs show how well your body is functioning. They are usually measured at doctor's offices, often as part of ... slow or fast breathing can also be a sign of a serious breathing problem. Temperature, which measures ...

  20. Signes Iconiques, Signes Linguistiques (Iconic Signs, Linguistic Signs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, Henri

    1974-01-01

    This article discusses the audiovisual image as sign; the classification of signs according to two different semiologies, and two different semantic theories; and the relation to different pedagogical approaches. (Text is in French.) (AM)

  1. Exploring early warning signs of failure in offshore-outsourced software development projects at the team level

    OpenAIRE

    Philip, Tom; Wende, Erik; Schwabe, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Organizations face many challenges in executing offshore-outsourced software development (OOSD) projects involving several countries. In such contexts, complex software development efforts are exposed to a greater number of risks, which make OOSD projects prone to failures. We analyzed 19 cases of OOSD project failures to explore the concept of early warning signs (EWS) in OOSD projects at the team level. Using the grounded theory methodology, we studied the EWSs specific to OOSD project fail...

  2. Measuring Subjective Happiness by Newly Developed Scale in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Abachizadeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Happiness as one of the main positive health indicators has drawn more attention in recent years among policy makers and health system managers. There are few studies performed to measure happiness in population-based settings in Iran. In response to this need, our study tends to assess Iranians subjective happiness in Tehran, Capital city of Iran.Materials and Methods: Present study was conducted in Tehran, Capital of Iran, with more than 7 Million populations in January 2013, using a two-step approach. In first step c conceptual framework of Iranians’ happiness was developed. In the second phase of study, a survey recruiting 700 participants was conducted. Stratified cluster sampling method was employed. Participants were recruited from all the 22 municipal divisions of Tehran as strata, proportional to the population size and its gender and age distribution. Happiness was measure by a 40-item questionnaire with scores ranged among 40 to 200.Results: Conceptual framework of Iranians’ happiness based on reviewed documents and consensus building process was the product of first step. At second step, from a pool of 700 persons, 696 (97% agreed to participate and filled out the questionnaire completely.  The mean of happiness score was 143.9 (95% confidence interval, 142.5 to 145.4. The results show that the happiness score of jobless people (135.1, 95%CI: 128.1-142.0 and widowed singles (126.6, 95%CI: 113.0-140.2 were significantly lower than other corresponding groups. There was no significant association between gender, age group, educational level as determinants and happiness.Conclusion: Happiness level of Tehranians is somewhat higher than the moderate level. This finding is consistent with findings of other conducted studies in country. However, it is not consistent with some of international reports of happiness, For instance, Happy Planet Index. Due to inadequate information, it is necessary to conduct more research to

  3. Development of an obstetric vital sign alert to improve outcomes in acute care obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behling, Diana J; Renaud, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Maternal morbidity and mortality is a national health problem. Causal analysis of near-miss and actual serious patient safety events, including those resulting in maternal death, within obstetric units often highlights a failure to promptly recognize and treat women who were exhibiting signs of decompensation/deterioration. The Obstetric Vital Sign Alert (OBVSA) is an early warning tool that leverages discrete data points in the electronic health record, calculating a risk score that is displayed as a visual cue for acute care obstetric staff. When studied in a cohort of women with postpartum hemorrhage, use of the OBVSA reduced symptom-to-response time and intervention time, as well as key process and outcome measures. © 2015 AWHONN.

  4. Rosebud syncoal partnership SynCoal{sup {reg_sign}} demonstration technology development update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheldon, R.W. [Rosebud SynCoal Company, Billings, MT (United States); Heintz, S.J. [Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Rosebud SynCoal{reg_sign} Partnership`s Advanced Coal Conversion Process (ACCP) is an advanced thermal coal upgrading process coupled with physical cleaning techniques to upgrade high moisture, low-rank coals to produce a high-quality, low-sulfur fuel. The coal is processed through two vibrating fluidized bed reactors where oxygen functional groups are destroyed removing chemically bound water, carboxyl and carbonyl groups, and volatile sulfur compounds. After thermal upgrading, the SynCoal{reg_sign} is cleaned using a deep-bed stratifier process to effectively separate the pyrite rich ash. The SynCoal{reg_sign} process enhances low-rank western coals with moisture contents ranging from 2555%, sulfur contents between 0.5 and 1.5 %, and heating values between 5,500 and 9,000 Btu/lb. The upgraded stable coal product has moisture contents as low as 1 %, sulfur contents as low as 0.3%, and heating values up to 12,000 Btu/lb.

  5. Beyond human subjects: risk, ethics, and clinical development of nanomedicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Clinical testing of nanomedicines presents two challenges to prevailing, human subject-centered frameworks governing research ethics. First, some nanomedical applications may present risk to persons other than research subjects. Second, pressures encountered in testing nanomedicines may present threats to the kinds of collaborations and collective activities needed for supporting clinical translation and redeeming research risk. In this article, I describe how similar challenges were encountered and addressed in gene transfer, and sketch policy options that might be explored in the nanomedicine translation arena. © 2012 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  6. How HANDy Are Baby Signs? A Systematic Review of the Impact of Gestural Communication on Typically Developing, Hearing Infants under the Age of 36 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth M.; Thibert, Jonelle; Grandpierre, Viviane; Johnston, J. Cyne

    2014-01-01

    Baby sign language is advocated to improve children's communication development. However, the evidence to support the advantages of baby sign has been inconclusive. A systematic review was undertaken to summarize and appraise the research related to the effectiveness of symbolic gestures for typically developing, hearing infants with hearing…

  7. General Lack of Correlations between Age and Signs of the Metabolic Syndrome in Subjects with Non-diabetic Fasting Glucose Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, Harry G; Mrvichin, Nate; Clouatre, Dallas; Bagchi, Debasis; Preuss, Jeffrey M; Perricone, Nicholas V; Swaroop, Anand; Kaats, Gilbert R

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance and advancing age are well-recognized risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Recent reports indicate that fasting glucose levels in non-diabetic patients correlate appropriately with the development of certain elements in metabolic syndrome, which suggest a cause-effect relationship with insulin resistance. The present investigation assessed whether a significant association exists between chronological age and various elements of metabolic syndrome in this same group of subjects possessing non-diabetic fasting glucose levels. Baseline data were taken from 288 subjects (age 17-87 years) with fasting glucose levels ≤ 125 mg/dl. Correlations between chronological age and different metabolic parameters were assessed to determine any statistically significant relationships and compare these with previously demonstrated metabolic parameters. With the exception of systolic blood pressure, the following correlations between age and components of metabolic syndrome were not significant or even significant in the opposite direction compared to those found in the same population using fasting glucose as the independent variable: body weight, body fat, diastolic blood pressure, white blood cell count (WBC)/neutrophil count, and circulating levels of insulin, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). Although systolic blood pressure still increased, it was to a lesser extent than might be expected. In the present investigation, a cross-sectional analysis was carried out over a wide age range of subjects. It is noteworthy that fasting glucose levels and the other major elements of metabolic syndrome did not change significantly with advancing age. These results demonstrate that decreasing insulin resistance and fasting glucose levels may be an important way to overcome the adverse effects and perturbations of advancing age

  8. Attitudes towards vital signs monitoring in the detection of clinical deterioration: scale development and survey of ward nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Wenqi; Wang, Wenru; Cooper, Simon; Ang, Emily Neo Kim; Liaw, Sok Ying

    2015-06-01

    To develop and determine the psychometrics properties of an instrument (V-scale) and to explore nurses' attitudes towards vital signs monitoring in the detection of clinical deterioration in general wards. Scale development with psychometric testing and a descriptive quantitative survey. Tertiary acute care hospital. A total of 614 general ward nurses. Principal component analysis revealed a 16-item instrument in a five-factor solution (key indicators, knowledge, communication, workload and technology) that explained 56.27% of the variance. The internal consistency was sufficient with Cronbach's alpha of 0.71 and strong item subscale correlations (0.56-0.89). The test-retest reliability was adequate with an Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) of 0.85. Many nurses (56.9%) erroneously perceived blood pressure changes as the first indicator of deterioration, and 46% agreed that an altered respiratory rate was the least important indicator. Most nurses (59.8%) also reported relying on oxygen saturation to evaluate respiratory dysfunction, and 27.4% indicated that they make quick estimates of the respiratory rate. Current practices for vital signs monitoring were considered to be time consuming (21.0%) and overwhelming (35.3%). Nurses' attitudes were most significantly influenced by whether they had a degree qualification followed by whether they worked in a general ward with a specialty and had >5 years of experience. This exploratory study provides evidence for the psychometric properties of the V-scale. It reveals a need for continuous professional development to improve ward nurses' attitudes towards vital signs monitoring. Vital signs monitoring needs to be prioritized in workload planning. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  9. Subject Knowledge Development by Science Student Teachers: The Role of University Tutors and School-Based Subject Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youens, Bernadette; McCarthy, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Following the introduction of a National Curriculum for Science, all secondary science teachers in England need to be prepared to teach all aspects of a broad and balanced science curriculum. This is the second paper in which we explore science student teachers' subject knowledge development during a one-year postgraduate teacher preparation…

  10. How Achieving the Millennium Development Goals Increases Subjective Well-Being in Developing Nations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shizuki Fukuda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The target date in 2015 for the United Nation’s Millennium Development Goals (MDGs was reached, and a new period of global goals for the post-2015 is dawning. To assess whether and how regional progress towards achieving the MDGs has contributed to better quality of life in developing nations, we formulated a correlation between various aspects of human development, indicated by MDG indicators, and subjective well-being (SWB, a response to the question of how much people feel happy or satisfied. We demonstrated that national levels of SWB can be explained by the degree of development; poverty reduction is the strongest determinant, and achieving the MDGs is associated with higher SWB levels. Scenario assessment of SWB allowed which domain of development should be improved preferentially in each region to be determined, hence the SWB approach is expected to offer an innovative proxy of human development for the assessment of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs.

  11. Sign language and autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvillian, J D; Nelson, K E; Rhyne, J M

    1981-03-01

    Research findings and issues in teaching sign language to nonspeaking autistic children are reviewed. Data on over 100 children indicate that nearly all autistic children learn receptive and expressive signs, and many learn to combine signs. These children also exhibit marked improvement in adaptive behaviors. Speech skills are acquired by fewer children and may be developed through simultaneous speech and sign training. Possible explanations for these results are given, together with suggestions for future research and data collection. Recommended innovations include exposure to fluent signers and training in discourse and code-switching. Different sign language teaching methods need to be investigated more fully, including emphasis on training sign language within the children's total environment and with greater staff and parental participation.

  12. Standardization of Sign Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Over the years attempts have been made to standardize sign languages. This form of language planning has been tackled by a variety of agents, most notably teachers of Deaf students, social workers, government agencies, and occasionally groups of Deaf people themselves. Their efforts have most often involved the development of sign language books…

  13. Subject of research on effects of tourism on population development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devedžić Mirjana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of tourism in the context of economic and demographic recovery of certain regions has created an image of tourism as a development catalyst. Thus strategies of revitalization in depopulated and passive regions often consider tourism as an activity that can speed up the development and successfully valorize existing natural, cultural and demographic potentials. This "key" is used mainly in the absence of other development resources since tourism valorizes issues that other industries ignore (landscape features, ethnical heritage, authentic folk architecture, etc. In addition it is more difficult to recommend the right forms of tourism to be developed in depopulated regions, as well as to estimate the resulting economic and demographic effects. To this end, there are success stories, but there is also evidence of non-rational initiatives and projects that were never completed. This paper attempts to discover the most logical links between population development and tourism development, based on some important characteristics of population development. The characteristics used are overall population increase, population migrations, population structures and changes in households. They were selected because they best reflect not only direct, but also indirect multiplicative effects of tourism. Along with the theoretical and methodological background, the research is also supported by selected examples, interviews, and demographic analyzes. The effects are not universal. They depend on the region, the kind of tourism and the degree of its development, the demographic situation as it is, and the research approach, since global and local effects need not necessarily be unidirectional. Population increase initiated by tourism development is achieved due to the migration component, but the effects are most obvious at the level of tourist regions and their tourist centers. One can also note counter processes in some places that have tourist

  14. Student feedback on a pioneer subject on leadership and intrapersonal development in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Yu, Lu; Xie, Qiu Zhi

    2017-02-01

    To promote leadership and intrapersonal development in university students, a subject entitled "Tomorrow's Leaders" was developed and offered at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. To assess the perceived effectiveness of this subject, 647 students completed the student feedback questionnaire (SFQ). Results showed that the feedback questionnaire had very good psychometric properties, including internal consistency reliability and construct validity. Regarding students' views of the subject, results showed that students generally had good evaluation of the content of the subject, teaching quality, and perceived benefits of the subject. The present findings have implications for the teaching of general education regarding leadership development.

  15. Effect of Training Programme on Developing Functional Sign Language among Parents of Students with Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuvaneswari, N. R.; Srivastava, Abhishek Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Parents' involvement is highly needed for ensuring holistic development of their words; however parents can only assist the child when they themselves have adequate knowledge, required skills, and proper awareness regarding various aspects of children's growth and development. To have adequate communication skill among parents, ensuring better…

  16. Influence on Calculated Blood Pressure of Measurement Posture for the Development of Wearable Vital Sign Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouhei Koyama

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied a wearable blood pressure sensor using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensor, which is a highly accurate strain sensor. This sensor is installed at the pulsation point of the human body to measure the pulse wave signal. A calibration curve is built that calculates the blood pressure by multivariate analysis using the pulse wave signal and a reference blood pressure measurement. However, if the measurement height of the FBG sensor is different from the reference measurement height, an error is included in the reference blood pressure. We verified the accuracy of the blood pressure calculation with respect to the measurement height difference and the posture of the subject. As the difference between the measurement height of the FBG sensor and the reference blood pressure measurement increased, the accuracy of the blood pressure calculation decreased. When the measurement height was identical and only posture was changed, good accuracy was achieved. In addition, when calibration curves were built using data measured in multiple postures, the blood pressure of each posture could be calculated from a single calibration curve. This will allow miniaturization of the necessary electronics of the sensor system, which is important for a wearable sensor.

  17. Transportation energy strategy: Project {number_sign}5 of the Hawaii Energy Strategy Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This study was prepared for the State Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT) as part of the Hawaii Energy Strategy program. Authority and responsibility for energy planning activities, such as the Hawaii Energy Strategy, rests with the State Energy Resources Coordinator, who is the Director of DBEDT. Hawaii Energy Strategy Study No. 5, Transportation Energy Strategy Development, was prepared to: collect and synthesize information on the present and future use of energy in Hawaii`s transportation sector, examine the potential of energy conservation to affect future energy demand; analyze the possibility of satisfying a portion of the state`s future transportation energy demand through alternative fuels; and recommend a program targeting energy use in the state`s transportation sector to help achieve state goals. The analyses and conclusions of this report should be assessed in relation to the other Hawaii Energy Strategy Studies in developing a comprehensive state energy program. 56 figs., 87 tabs.

  18. What You Don't Know Can Hurt You: The Risk of Language Deprivation by Impairing Sign Language Development in Deaf Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Wyatte C

    2017-05-01

    A long-standing belief is that sign language interferes with spoken language development in deaf children, despite a chronic lack of evidence supporting this belief. This deserves discussion as poor life outcomes continue to be seen in the deaf population. This commentary synthesizes research outcomes with signing and non-signing children and highlights fully accessible language as a protective factor for healthy development. Brain changes associated with language deprivation may be misrepresented as sign language interfering with spoken language outcomes of cochlear implants. This may lead to professionals and organizations advocating for preventing sign language exposure before implantation and spreading misinformation. The existence of one-time-sensitive-language acquisition window means a strong possibility of permanent brain changes when spoken language is not fully accessible to the deaf child and sign language exposure is delayed, as is often standard practice. There is no empirical evidence for the harm of sign language exposure but there is some evidence for its benefits, and there is growing evidence that lack of language access has negative implications. This includes cognitive delays, mental health difficulties, lower quality of life, higher trauma, and limited health literacy. Claims of cochlear implant- and spoken language-only approaches being more effective than sign language-inclusive approaches are not empirically supported. Cochlear implants are an unreliable standalone first-language intervention for deaf children. Priorities of deaf child development should focus on healthy growth of all developmental domains through a fully-accessible first language foundation such as sign language, rather than auditory deprivation and speech skills.

  19. Developing a magnetic sign system to ensure patients receive appropriate nutritional care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabiner, Ann; Lewis, Lianne

    The Department of Health has acknowledged that at times patients are not receiving the correct nutritional care to support them to eat and drink. Nutritional link nurses at Milton Keynes Hospital Foundation Trust developed a tool to ensure that all staff, patients and relatives were aware opatients' current andcorrect nutritional status.

  20. Battlefield triage life signs detection techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boric-Lubecke, Olga; Lin, Jenshan; Park, Byung-Kwon; Li, Changzhi; Massagram, Wansuree; Lubecke, Victor M.; Host-Madsen, Anders

    2008-04-01

    Getting to wounded soldiers on the battlefield is a precarious task, and medics have a very high casualty rate. It is therefore a vital importance to prioritize which soldiers to attend to first. The first step is to detect life signs - if a soldier is dead or alive, and prioritize recovery of live soldiers. The second step is to obtain vital signs from live soldiers, and use this to prioritize which are in most urgent need of attention. Our team at Kai Sensors, University of Hawaii and University of Florida is developing Doppler radar heart sensing technology that provides the means to detect life signs, respiration and/or heart beat, at a distance, even for subjects lying motionless, e.g., unconscious subjects, wearing body armor, and hidden from direct view. Since this technology can deliver heart rate information with high accuracy, it may also enable the assessment of a subject's physiological and psychological state based on heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. Thus, the degree of a subject's injury may also be determined. The software and hardware developments and challenges for life signs detection and monitoring for battlefield triage will be discussed, including heart signal detection from all four sides of the human body, detection in the presence of body armor, and the feasibility of HRV parameter extraction.

  1. Customer service, access and capacity: vital signs for developing a marketing plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendycki, N; Zeroske, J

    1994-01-01

    Marketing plans that do not include an analysis of customer service, access and capacity issues are incomplete documents. Unresolved customer service, access and capacity issues can undermine an otherwise well-designed marketing plan. The medical and administrative leadership of the group practice or clinical department must work together to identify customer service, access and capacity issues which are affecting the practice's ability to respond to the needs of the marketplace. Someone with marketing expertise can provide valuable input to this process. The resulting solutions need to be developed which are realistic and in keeping with the general marketing direction of the practice.

  2. Creating Learning Objects to Enhance the Educational Experiences of American Sign Language Learners: An Instructional Development Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Conceição

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Little attention has been given to involving the deaf community in distance teaching and learning or in designing courses that relate to their language and culture. This article reports on the design and development of video-based learning objects created to enhance the educational experiences of American Sign Language (ASL hearing participants in a distance learning course and, following the course, the creation of several new applications for use of the learning objects. The learning objects were initially created for the web, as a course component for review and rehearsal. The value of the web application, as reported by course participants, led us to consider ways in which the learning objects could be used in a variety of delivery formats: CD-ROM, web-based knowledge repository, and handheld device. The process to create the learning objects, the new applications, and lessons learned are described.

  3. Sign language typology: The contribution of rural sign languages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, C.; Pfau, R.

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1990s, the field of sign language typology has shown that sign languages exhibit typological variation at all relevant levels of linguistic description. These initial typological comparisons were heavily skewed toward the urban sign languages of developed countries, mostly in the Western

  4. DEVELOPING SIGNS AND SONGS MATERIALS DEALING WITH THE 2013 CURRICULUM FOR THE SEVENTH GRADE STUDENTS IN MTSN BALANG-BALANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardiana

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to develop Signs and Songs Materials based on 2013 curriculum for the Seventh Grade Student at MTsN. BalangBalang, Gowa. It was Research and Development (R&D applied ADDIE model standing for Analysis, Design, Develop, Implement, and Evaluate. The procedures were; 1 analyzing materials needed by students; 2designing the blueprint; 3 developing the materials through the syllabus of 2013 Curriculum; 4 implementing the product (try-out product; and 5 evaluating the product. The product was tried out to the seventh grade students at MTsN Balang-balang. Type of data obtained in this study was qualitative. The instruments used in this study were questionnaire and rubrics for teacher and expert. Then, the teacher and expert were involved in order to validate the product. They validated three systematic aspects of the product, namely; the organization of the Materials, English Teaching strategies or method, and the content of the materials. Finally, based on the teacher and expert judgment as well as try-out design result, it was found that the developed materials were applicable to be taught for the Seventh Grade of Junior High School as additional learning and teaching materials which help both students and teachers in learning process based on 2013 Curriculum.

  5. Imaginary companions in adolescence: sign of a deficient or positive development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffge-Krenke, I

    1997-04-01

    The present study was designed to find out to what extent imaginary companions are created in the diaries of adolescents. A total of 241 adolescents aged 12 to 17 years were investigated to determine the incidence as well as the characteristics and functions of such fictitious individuals in this age group. Content analysis of data obtained from questionnaires revealed that the imaginary companion was similar to the writer in many aspects. The imaginary companion supported the adolescent during the process of developing his/her identity. The relative influence of self-concept, creativity, role-taking ability, coping behavior, and egocentrism was then investigated using a hierarchical regression model. Three hypotheses were tested: (1) the deficit hypothesis, i.e. only adolescents with a deficit in social interaction create an imaginary companion, (2) the giftedness hypothesis, i.e. especially creative adolescents invent such a companion and (3) the egocentrism hypothesis, i.e. the construction of an imaginary companion is the result of perceived uniqueness and related to personal fable and imaginary audience behaviour. The results showed that the imaginary companion was not the result of an egocentric orientation, and by no means was a substitute for other trustworthy partners such as family members or friends. On the contrary, socially competent and creative adolescents with good coping abilities were particularly prone to create such a "very special friend".

  6. How Does That Work? Developing Pedagogical Content Knowledge from Subject Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Judith

    2013-01-01

    The development of subject knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge has been the focus of much educational research and debate in recent years. Of particular interest is the process by which preservice science teachers develop pedagogical content knowledge from their subject knowledge. In the study presented here, a process of writing narrative…

  7. A protocol for developing early warning score models from vital signs data in hospitals using ensembles of decision trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Michael; Tam, Benjamin; Thabane, Lehana; Fox-Robichaud, Alison

    2015-09-09

    Multiple early warning scores (EWS) have been developed and implemented to reduce cardiac arrests on hospital wards. Case-control observational studies that generate an area under the receiver operator curve (AUROC) are the usual validation method, but investigators have also generated EWS with algorithms with no prior clinical knowledge. We present a protocol for the validation and comparison of our local Hamilton Early Warning Score (HEWS) with that generated using decision tree (DT) methods. A database of electronically recorded vital signs from 4 medical and 4 surgical wards will be used to generate DT EWS (DT-HEWS). A third EWS will be generated using ensemble-based methods. Missing data will be multiple imputed. For a relative risk reduction of 50% in our composite outcome (cardiac or respiratory arrest, unanticipated intensive care unit (ICU) admission or hospital death) with a power of 80%, we calculated a sample size of 17,151 patient days based on our cardiac arrest rates in 2012. The performance of the National EWS, DT-HEWS and the ensemble EWS will be compared using AUROC. Ethics approval was received from the Hamilton Integrated Research Ethics Board (#13-724-C). The vital signs and associated outcomes are stored in a database on our secure hospital server. Preliminary dissemination of this protocol was presented in abstract form at an international critical care meeting. Final results of this analysis will be used to improve on the existing HEWS and will be shared through publication and presentation at critical care meetings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Predicting crash-relevant violations at stop sign-controlled intersections for the development of an intersection driver assistance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, John M; Sherony, Rini; Gabler, Hampton C

    2016-09-01

    Intersection crashes resulted in over 5,000 fatalities in the United States in 2014. Intersection Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (I-ADAS) are active safety systems that seek to help drivers safely traverse intersections. I-ADAS uses onboard sensors to detect oncoming vehicles and, in the event of an imminent crash, can either alert the driver or take autonomous evasive action. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a predictive model for detecting whether a stop sign violation was imminent. Passenger vehicle intersection approaches were extracted from a data set of typical driver behavior (100-Car Naturalistic Driving Study) and violations (event data recorders downloaded from real-world crashes) and were assigned weighting factors based on real-world frequency. A k-fold cross-validation procedure was then used to develop and evaluate 3 hypothetical stop sign warning algorithms (i.e., early, intermediate, and delayed) for detecting an impending violation during the intersection approach. Violation detection models were developed using logistic regression models that evaluate likelihood of a violation at various locations along the intersection approach. Two potential indicators of driver intent to stop-that is, required deceleration parameter (RDP) and brake application-were used to develop the predictive models. The earliest violation detection opportunity was then evaluated for each detection algorithm in order to (1) evaluate the violation detection accuracy and (2) compare braking demand versus maximum braking capabilities. A total of 38 violating and 658 nonviolating approaches were used in the analysis. All 3 algorithms were able to detect a violation at some point during the intersection approach. The early detection algorithm, as designed, was able to detect violations earlier than all other algorithms during the intersection approach but gave false alarms for 22.3% of approaches. In contrast, the delayed detection algorithm sacrificed

  9. American Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Info » Voice, Speech, and Language American Sign Language On this page: What is American Sign Language? ... signs "I love you." What is American Sign Language? American Sign Language (ASL) is a complete, complex ...

  10. DC-SIGN expression in Hofbauer cells may play an important role in immune tolerance in fetal chorionic villi during the development of preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Seung Woo; Cho, Eun Hee; Choi, So Young; Lee, Yun Kyung; Park, Jae Hyun; Kim, Min Kyung; Park, Jin Yeon; Choi, Hyeong Jwa; Lee, Jeong Ik; Ko, Hyun Myung; Park, Seung Hwa; Hwang, Han Sung; Kang, Young Sun

    2017-11-01

    Immune tolerance at feto-maternal interfaces is a complex phenomenon. Although maternal decidual macrophages are well-known immune cells, little is known about fetal-derived macrophages (Hofbauer cells) within chorionic villi. Preeclampsia (PE) is a major cause of maternal mortality in the field of obstetrics, and the innate immunological role of maternal decidual macrophages is well known. In this study, we assessed the differential phenotypes and marker expression in fetal macrophages, known as dendritic cell-specific ICAM-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN)-positive Hofbauer cells. We compared Hofbauer cell properties between normal and PE placenta chorionic villi and performed sequential staining of DC-SIGN, CD14, and CD68 to evaluate the existence of Hofbauer cells. Furthermore, to evaluate the immunological function of these cells, we stained the cells for CD163, a marker of immunoregulatory type 2 (M2) macrophages. Additionally, we examined the expression of the immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin (IL)-10, which is known to be produced by M2 macrophages. DC-SIGN+/CD14+, DC-SIGN+/CD68+, and CD163+/DC-SIGN+ cells were quantified based on photomicrographs. The results showed that CD14, CD163, DC-SIGN, and IL-10 levels were significantly downregulated in PE compared with normal. Additionally, CD163+/DC-SIGN+ Hofbauer cells were significantly less frequent in PE than in normal. DC-SIGN Hofbauer cells produced IL-10 at lower levels in the PE than in the normal. Thus, we speculate that fetal-derived Hofbauer cells may play an important role in normal pregnancy with immunosuppressive effects based on their M2 macrophage characteristics to maintain immune tolerance during pregnancy. Additionally, in PE, these functions were defective, supporting the roles of these macrophages in PE development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Students who are deaf and hard of hearing and use sign language: considerations and strategies for developing spoken language and literacy skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaum, Debra; Waddy-Smith, Bettie; Doyle, Jane

    2012-11-01

    There is a core body of knowledge, experience, and skills integral to facilitating auditory, speech, and spoken language development when working with the general population of students who are deaf and hard of hearing. There are additional issues, strategies, and challenges inherent in speech habilitation/rehabilitation practices essential to the population of deaf and hard of hearing students who also use sign language. This article will highlight philosophical and practical considerations related to practices used to facilitate spoken language development and associated literacy skills for children and adolescents who sign. It will discuss considerations for planning and implementing practices that acknowledge and utilize a student's abilities in sign language, and address how to link these skills to developing and using spoken language. Included will be considerations for children from early childhood through high school with a broad range of auditory access, language, and communication characteristics. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. Development of Subjective Recollection: Understanding of and Introspection on Memory States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghetti, Simona; Mirandola, Chiara; Angelini, Laura; Cornoldi, Cesare; Ciaramelli, Elisa

    2011-01-01

    The development of subjective recollection was investigated in participants aged 6-18 years. In Experiment 1 (N = 90), age-related improvements were found in understanding of the subjective experience of recollection, although robust levels of understanding were observed even in the youngest group. In Experiment 2 (N = 100), age-related…

  13. Assessing Adolescents' Positive Psychological Functioning at School: Development and Validation of the Student Subjective Wellbeing Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Tyler L.; Long, Anna C. J.; Cook, Clayton R.

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on the initial development and validation of the Student Subjective Wellbeing Questionnaire (SSWQ) with a sample of 1,002 students in Grades 6-8. The SSWQ is a 16-item self-report instrument for assessing youths' subjective wellbeing at school, which is operationalized via 4 subscales measuring school connectedness, academic…

  14. How HANDy Are Baby Signs? A Commentary on a Systematic Review of the Impact of Gestural Communication on Typically Developing, Hearing Infants under the Age of 36 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Lorraine E.; Doherty-Sneddon, Gwyneth

    2014-01-01

    The ethos behind provision of early intervention programmes to infants and young children with additional support needs has been established for some time (e.g. Right-from-the-Start), but targeting the development of typically developing infants has been a relatively recent phenomenon. Baby sign is one of the many intervention techniques…

  15. Development of a novel ArcCHECK{sup Trade-Mark-Sign} insert for routine quality assurance of VMAT delivery including dose calculation with inhomogeneities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakir, H.; Gaede, S.; Mulligan, M.; Chen, J. Z. [Department of Physics, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada)

    2012-07-15

    insert depending on the inhomogeneity configuration and measurement location. SmartArc{sup Registered-Sign} and RapidArc{sup Registered-Sign} plans had similar plan quality but RapidArc{sup Registered-Sign} plans had significantly higher monitor units (up to 70%). Conclusions: A versatile, nonhomogeneous insert was developed for ArcCHECK{sup Trade-Mark-Sign} for an easy and quick evaluation of dose calculations with nonhomogeneous media and for comparison of different treatment planning systems. The device was tested for SmartArc{sup Registered-Sign} and RapidArc{sup Registered-Sign} plans for lung SBRT, showing the uncertainties of dose calculations with inhomogeneities. The new insert combines the convenience of the ArcCHECK{sup Trade-Mark-Sign} and the possibility of assessing dose distributions in inhomogeneous media.

  16. The development of optimal on-premise Electronic Message Center (EMC) lighting levels and sign lighting measurement techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Research conducted recently for the United States Sign Council Foundation found no consensus in the research : literature or the practices of the commercial electronic message center (EMC) industry on lighting measurement : or appropriate lighting le...

  17. Decoding development in the XXI century: subjectivity, complexity, sinapsis, sinergy, recursivity, lidership and territorial dependency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sergio Boisier

    2010-01-01

      BOISIER, Sergio. Decoding development in the XXI century: subjectivity, complexity, sinapsis, sinergy, recursivity, lidership and territorial dependency. Semest. Econ. [online]. 2010, vol.13, n.27, pp. 11-37. ISSN 0120-6346...

  18. THE DEVELOPMENT OF PROFESSIONAL SUBJECTIVE POSITION OF MANAGEMENT HUMAN RESOURCES FOR HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ol'ga L. Zadvornaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the problem of development of professional-subjective position of managerial staff of health care in the system of continuous professional education in the conditions of optimization of activities of the health system. Professional and subject position reflects the position of individual managers in a professional environment, its relationship to the quality of professional activity, to himself, to patients and colleagues to level their skills.Purpose/objectives: analysis of core competencies, forming the professional and subject position of heads of medical organizations; identify possible ways of development of professional-subjective position of managerial staff of the public health based on the use of modern technologies and active methods of training in system of continuous professional education. Methodology. In conducting the present study used data from official sources, literature review, scientific methods of analysis and synthesis, comparative analysis and modeling. The results of the study indicate the necessity of actualization of the subject position of heads of medical organizations. Conclusions /Significance. The necessity of formation and development of professional subjective position of the heads due to the needs of society and the health care system with modern requirements for quality management training of health. Professional and subject position is a characteristic feature of a highly qualified specialist in the area of governance, reflecting its active attitude toward self and professional activity, factor of efficiency of activity of medical organizations. The real practice of activity of medical organizations requires improved approaches in the preparation of healthcare managers. Most of the leaders are having difficulties, associated not only with necessity of development of universal and professional competences, but also the necessity of development of professional-subjective position

  19. Towards Development of Robotic Aid for Rehabilitation of Locomotion-Impaired Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejczy, Antal K.

    2000-01-01

    Manual assistance of therapists to help movement of legs of spinal cord injured (SCI) subjects during stepping on a treadmill for locomotion rehabilitation has severe economic and technical limitations. Scientists at the Department of Physiological Science at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) and roboticists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) initiated a joint effort to develop a robotic mechanism capable of performing controlled motions equivalent to the arm and hand motions of therapists assisting the stepping of locomotion impaired subjects on a treadmill, while the subjects' body weight is partially supported by an overhead harness. A first necessary technical step towards this development is to measure and understand the kinematics and dynamics of the therapists' arm and hand motions as they are reflected on the subjects' leg movement. This paper describes an initial measurement system developed for this purpose together with the related measurement results, and outlines the planned future technical work.

  20. Agreement and correlation between the self-report leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs and Douleur Neuropathique 4 Questions neuropathic pain screening tools in subjects with low back-related leg pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jeremy; Rabey, Martin I; Hall, Toby M

    2012-01-01

    The self-report Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (S-LANSS) and Douleur Neuropathique 4 Questions (DN4) neuropathic pain screening tools have been shown to be reliable, valid, and able to differentiate neuropathic pain from inflammatory or mixed pain syndromes. However, no studies have compared these tools to determine whether their outcomes are similar. This study evaluated agreement and correlation between the S-LANSS and DN4 in the identification of neuropathic pain in subjects with low back-related leg pain. This observational study compared S-LANSS and DN4 scores in 45 patients with low back-related leg pain. The S-LANSS and DN4 cutoff scores of 12 and 4, respectively, were used to classify subjects as positive or negative for the presence of neuropathic pain for each screening tool. The κ statistic was used to determine whether there was agreement in classification of neuropathic pain between the 2 screening tools. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to determine correlation between scores of the 2 screening tools. Neuropathic pain was identified in 15 subjects (33%) using the S-LANSS and in 19 subjects (42%) using the DN4. Agreement on neuropathic pain classification was fair, with a κ value of 0.34. There was moderate to good correlation (r = 0.62; P < .001) between scores obtained from the 2 tools. The finding of fair agreement suggests that despite the moderate to good correlation between scores, the cutoff points for the classification of neuropathic pain of the 2 tools may not be congruent. Copyright © 2012 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Sign-Lingo : Feasibility of a Serious Game for Involving Parents in the Language Development of their Deaf or Hearing Impaired Child

    OpenAIRE

    Schalk, I; Spruit, M

    2017-01-01

    Family involvement plays a critical factor in the language development of a deaf or hearing impaired child. Hearing parents often have major difficulties in communicating with their child when it is deaf or hearing impaired. These difficulties often lead to issues in the language development of the child. In this research we investigate the feasibility of a serious game for involving parents in the language development of their deaf or hearing impaired child by using sign language together in...

  2. Synesthesia for manual alphabet letters and numeral signs in second-language users of signed languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Joanna; Lyons, Tanya; Eagleman, David; Woll, Bencie; Ward, Jamie

    2016-08-01

    Many synesthetes experience colors when viewing letters or digits. We document, for the first time, an analogous phenomenon among users of signed languages who showed color synesthesia for fingerspelled letters and signed numerals. Four synesthetes experienced colors when they viewed manual letters and numerals (in two cases, colors were subjectively projected on to the hands). There was a correspondence between the colors experienced for written graphemes and their manual counterparts, suggesting that the development of these two types of synesthesia is interdependent despite the fact that these systems are superficially distinct and rely on different perceptual recognition mechanisms in the brain.

  3. Baldwin Borough Signs

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — An inventory by location of the signs on Borough of Baldwin roads and properties, such as street signs, traffic signs, and warning signs.

  4. Subjective wellbeing and income: Empirical patterns in the rural developing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-García, Victoria; Babigumira, Ronnie; Pyhälä, Aili; Wunder, Sven; Zorondo-Rodríguez, Francisco; Angelsen, Arild

    2016-01-01

    A commonality in the economics of happiness literature is that absolute income matters more for the subjective wellbeing of people at low income levels. In this article, we use a large sample of people in rural areas of developing countries with relatively low income levels to test whether subjective wellbeing an increasing function of absolute income in our sample, and to analyze the existence of adaptation and social comparison effects on subjective wellbeing. Our sample includes 6973 rural households in 23 countries throughout Asia, Africa, and Latin America. The average total income per adult equivalent in our sample was US$1555, whereas levels of subjective wellbeing resembled levels found in previous research using cross-country data. We find that, despite low levels of absolute income, levels of subjective wellbeing of our respondents resemble levels found in previous research using cross-country data. We also find remarkable similarities in many of the determinants of subjective wellbeing previously tested. Our data show that absolute income covariates with subjective wellbeing, but -as for richer samples- the magnitude of the association is lower once we control for adaptation and social comparison. Finally, our results suggest that social comparison has a stronger effect than adaptation in explaining the subjective wellbeing of our sample. Our findings highlight the importance of adaptation and social comparison even at low levels of absolute income. PMID:27642259

  5. Social existence: between subjective and objective conditions. Impact on the theoretical discussion on development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aura González Serna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to instill reflections on the theoretical debate around the development. The premise for fixing the analysis is to consider the impact of modes of apprehending social existence, since it is demarcated between subjectivities and objective conditions. Different conceptions appear to interpret and represent the individual and collective imagination. Fragmentation between subjectivity and objectivity, constitute an impediment to understanding the generic nature of being that builds and permanently transformed the social existence.

  6. Spanish sign language interpreter for mexican linguistics

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Barragán, Francisco Javier; Pérez Grana, José Arturo; Cervantes, Francisco; Schwarzblat y Katz, Morris; Olide Márquez, María Guadalupe; Pérez Sánchez, Ana Paola

    2013-01-01

    We present here the first visual interface for a Mexican Spanish Sign Language translator on its first development stage: sign-writing recognition. The software was developed for the unique characteristics of Mexican linguistics and was designed in order to use sentences or a sequence of signs in sign-writing system which are decoded by the program and converted into a series of images with movement that correspond to the Mexican sign language system. Using a lexical, syntactic and semantic...

  7. The Impact of Input Quality on Early Sign Development in Native and Non-Native Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jenny; Jones, Anna; Morgan, Gary

    2016-01-01

    There is debate about how input variation influences child language. Most deaf children are exposed to a sign language from their non-fluent hearing parents and experience a delay in exposure to accessible language. A small number of children receive language input from their deaf parents who are fluent signers. Thus it is possible to document the…

  8. The Development of Antonym Knowledge in American Sign Language (ASL) and Its Relationship to Reading Comprehension in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novogrodsky, Rama; Caldwell-Harris, Catherine; Fish, Sarah; Hoffmeister, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    It is unknown if the developmental path of antonym knowledge in deaf children increases continuously with age and correlates with reading comprehension, as it does in hearing children. In the current study we tested 564 students aged 4-18 on a receptive multiple-choice American Sign Language (ASL) antonym test. A subgroup of 138 students aged 7-18…

  9. The Relationship between American Sign Language Vocabulary and the Development of Language-Based Reasoning Skills in Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henner, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The language-based analogical reasoning abilities of Deaf children are a controversial topic. Researchers lack agreement about whether Deaf children possess the ability to reason using language-based analogies, or whether this ability is limited by a lack of access to vocabulary, both written and signed. This dissertation examines factors that…

  10. 13 CFR 305.12 - Project sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Project sign. 305.12 Section 305... WORKS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENTS Requirements for Approved Projects § 305.12 Project sign. The... the construction period of a sign or signs at a conspicuous place at the Project site indicating that...

  11. Lexicography and sign language engineering: the Zambian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examines the genesis and implementation of a dictionary project for sign language, the Zambian Sign Language Dictionary Project, regarded as a first step towards the development of a Zambian National Sign Language. The article highlights the specificity of sign language lexicography. Keywords: american ...

  12. Signing off

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    Physics Related Aptitude Test As the teacher shortage bites anyone with a degree in science expects to walk into a school and be received, with open arms, as a physics teacher. Are they really suitable? To help you decide Signing Off provides the following invaluable psychometric test. Extensively researched and, for single users only, it comes completely free to Physics Education subscribers! (Copies of this Physics Related Aptitude Test are available to credit-card customers from prat@realripoff.com priced #35 per client, 125 dollars to US customers.) This invaluable psychometric test has been extensively researched. Your first lesson of the new school year introduces the study of electricity. Do you: A Use the notes prepared by your predecessor. B Find a video on electricity and play it to the class. C Arrange a series of exciting practical demonstrations to stimulate the young inquiring mind. D Let the children design and make their own circuits to light flashlight bulbs. Your 14-year-olds have completed a written test on heat and energy. Do you: A Mark correct only the work of students who have written their names neatly at the top LEFT HAND corner, as required. B Only set multiple choice tests, so that the computer can mark them for you. C Mark carefully by hand, explaining in detail to each student exactly how and why they have made errors and adding encouraging comments with lots of praise. D Give out correct sets of answers and allow students to mark their own work. There is a staff social. Do you: A Ask for a definition of the term 'social'. B Ask for a web-based version. C Determine to go, so that you can discuss setting up cross-curricular links with colleagues. D Join the organizing committee. Who do you admire most? A Sir Isaac Newton. B Bill Gates. C Leonardo da Vinci. D Leonardo di Caprio. You are required to teach biology class. Your response is: A Denial. B To ask for an appropriate computer simulation. C To attend a specialized course for biology

  13. Subject- and Experience-Bound Differences in Teachers' Conceptual Understanding of Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, C.; Gericke, N.; Höglund, H.-O.; Bergman, E.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the results of a nationwide questionnaire study of 3229 Swedish upper secondary school teachers' conceptual understanding of sustainable development in relation to their subject discipline and teaching experience. Previous research has shown that teachers have difficulties understanding the complex concept of sustainable…

  14. "Biosphere Reserve"--The Actual Research Subject of the Sustainable Development Process"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasaev, Gabibulla R.; Sadovenko, Marina Yu.; Isaev, Roman O.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the analyzed issue is caused by the growing slippage of research funds of sustainable development in its practice. The purpose of the article is the theoretical basis of the biosphere reserve as a scientific research subject that is relevant to rules of the scientific activity. The leading approach to the study of this issue is…

  15. Satisfaction with travel and subjective well-being: development and test of a measurement tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, D.F.; Gärling, T.; Eriksson, L.; Friman, M.; Olsson, L.E.; Fujii, S.

    2011-01-01

    Subjective well-being (SWB) that includes individuals’ cognitive and affective evaluations of life in general is proposed to be a more appropriate measure capturing the benefits individuals derive from travel improvements. We develop and testa measure of travel-related SWB, the nine item self-report

  16. 86Rubidium uptake in mononuclear leucocytes from young subjects at increased risk of developing essential hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J R; Johansen, Torben; Pedersen, K E

    1988-01-01

    parents. 86Rubidium uptake was significantly increased in the borderline hypertensive subjects, especially in the borderline hypertensive offspring of hypertensive patients. Our results indicate that the sodium-potassium pump is activated in mononuclear leucocytes from borderline hypertensives......, and especially in those borderline hypertensives with at least one hypertensive parent. The latter group was also the group at greatest risk of developing essential hypertension....

  17. Development of Web Based Learning Material in Physics Subject for Kalor and Temperature Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatwa Aji Kurniawan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been done, the research which aims to develop a web-based teaching materials on the subjects of physics subject with subject mater of temperature and heat. This study using a modified model of the 4D development by eliminating the deployment phase. The validation of product development conducted by validator media experts and experts matter of physics, whereas small-scale trials conducted by physics teacher and 10 students. Validator review results stating that the quality of the product development were included in the category very well with the average percentage rating of 83.93%. The percentage value assigned by media expert by 75% in the good category and the percentage of the value provided by a matter expert 92.85% were in the very good category. Experiments by physics teacher to obtain result of equal to 94.44% were in the very good category and the average percentage of the test results by the students of 90.5% were in the very good category. The characteristics of the products developed include material composition using the curriculum in 2013, there was a recording facility and the results of evaluation of students' activities, there were feedback evaluation results were immediately known by the students and there were some links related to the material either youtube or other learning website.

  18. Lifitegrast ophthalmic solution in the treatment of signs and symptoms of dry eye disease: design, development, and place in therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Morgan R; Gupta, Preeya K

    2017-01-01

    A new topical ophthalmic medication, lifitegrast 5%, was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in dry eye patients. Lifitegrast is an integrin antagonist that decreases inflammation on the ocular surface, thereby improving dry eye disease (DED). Through a series of prospective, multicenter, randomized, masked, placebo-controlled studies in >2,000 patients total, lifitegrast was shown to be effective for improvement in both the signs and symptoms of DED. A subsequent study focused on the safety profile of lifitegrast and demonstrated that the majority of adverse events were mild and resolved over time. Lifitegrast is now available for use in clinical practice.

  19. Training-related brain plasticity in subjects at risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belleville, Sylvie; Clément, Francis; Mellah, Samira; Gilbert, Brigitte; Fontaine, Francine; Gauthier, Serge

    2011-06-01

    Subjects with mild cognitive impairment are at risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Cognitive stimulation is an emerging intervention in the field of neurology and allied sciences, having already been shown to improve cognition in subjects with mild cognitive impairment. Yet no studies have attempted to unravel the brain mechanisms that support such improvement. This study uses functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure the effect of memory training on brain activation in older adults with mild cognitive impairment and to assess whether it can reverse the brain changes associated with mild cognitive impairment. Brain activation associated with verbal encoding and retrieval was recorded twice prior to training and once after training. In subjects with mild cognitive impairment, increased activation was found after training within a large network that included the frontal, temporal and parietal areas. Healthy controls showed mostly areas of decreased activation following training. Comparison with pre-training indicated that subjects with mild cognitive impairment used a combination of specialized areas; that is, areas activated prior to training and new alternative areas activated following training. However, only activation of the right inferior parietal lobule, a new area of activation, correlated with performance. Furthermore, the differences between the brain activation patterns of subjects with mild cognitive impairment and those of healthy controls were attenuated by training in a number of brain regions. These results indicate that memory training can result in significant neural changes that are measurable with brain imaging. They also show that the brains of people with mild cognitive impairment remain highly plastic.

  20. Warning Signs After Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy > Postpartum care > Warning signs after birth Warning signs after birth E-mail to a friend Please ... infection Postpartum bleeding Postpartum depression (PPD) What warning signs should you look for? Call your provider if ...

  1. Development of a baby friendly non-contact method for measuring vital signs: First results of clinical measurements in an open incubator at a neonatal intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaessens, John H.; van den Born, Marlies; van der Veen, Albert; Sikkens-van de Kraats, Janine; van den Dungen, Frank A.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2014-02-01

    For infants and neonates in an incubator vital signs, such as heart rate, breathing, skin temperature and blood oxygen saturation are measured by sensors and electrodes sticking to the skin. This can damage the vulnerable skin of neonates and cause infections. In addition, the wires interfere with the care and hinder the parents in holding and touching the baby. These problems initiated the search for baby friendly 'non-contact' measurement of vital signs. Using a sensitive color video camera and specially developed software, the heart rate was derived from subtle repetitive color changes. Potentially also respiration and oxygen saturation could be obtained. A thermal camera was used to monitor the temperature distribution of the whole body and detect small temperature variations around the nose revealing the respiration rate. After testing in the laboratory, seven babies were monitored (with parental consent) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) simultaneously with the regular monitoring equipment. From the color video recordings accurate heart rates could be derived and the thermal images provided accurate respiration rates. To correct for the movements of the baby, tracking software could be applied. At present, the image processing was performed off-line. Using narrow band light sources also non-contact blood oxygen saturation could be measured. Non-contact monitoring of vital signs has proven to be feasible and can be developed into a real time system. Besides the application on the NICU non-contact vital function monitoring has large potential for other patient groups.

  2. Development of a credit-bearing service leadership subject for university students in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Yu, Lu; Ma, Cecilia M S; Sun, Rachel C F; Liu, Ting Ting

    2013-01-01

    Given that service industries contribute to 93% of Hong Kong's GDP, an important question that should be asked is whether the education system can promote the development of service leadership among young people in Hong Kong. Unfortunately, service leadership programs specifically designed for university students are lacking in Hong Kong. In this paper, the basic tenets of the Service Leadership and Management framework are presented. Based on the fundamental postulation that effective service leadership is a function of moral character, competence and care (E=MC(2)), a subject called "Service Leadership" has recently been developed at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. This paper outlines the objectives, intended learning outcomes, syllabus, assessment, and references of the subject. The proposed evaluation strategies are also described.

  3. Recognition and development of "educational technology" as a scientific field and school subject

    OpenAIRE

    Danilović Mirčeta S.

    2004-01-01

    The paper explores the process of development, establishment and recognition of "educational technology" as an independent scientific field and a separate teaching subject at universities. The paper points to: (a) the problems that this field deals with or should deal with, (b) knowledge needed for the profession of "educational technologist", (c) various scientific institutions across the world involved in educational technology, (d) scientific journals treating issues of modern educational ...

  4. Development of a mnemonic screening tool for identifying subjects with Hunter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Gabriel M; Morin, Isabelle; Whiteman, David A H

    2013-07-01

    The Hunter Outcome Survey (HOS), an international, long-term observational registry of patients with Hunter syndrome, was used to develop a simple mnemonic screening tool (HUNTER) to aid in the diagnosis of Hunter syndrome. Data regarding the prediagnosis prevalence of ten specific signs and symptoms present in individual patients enrolled in the HOS were used to develop the HUNTER mnemonic screening tool. A total score of 6 or greater using a weighting scheme in which certain manifestations were assigned a weight of 2 (facial dysmorphism, nasal obstruction or rhinorrhea, enlarged tongue, enlarged liver, enlarged spleen, joint stiffness) and others assigned a weight of 1 (hernia, hearing impairment, enlarged tonsils, airway obstruction or sleep apnea) correctly identified 95 % of patients who had no family history of Hunter syndrome or who were not diagnosed prenatally. No association between age at diagnosis and HUNTER score was found. The HUNTER mnemonic appears to be a useful screening tool. Further validation in the clinical setting will be necessary to confirm its utility.

  5. TRAFFIC SIGN RECOGNATION WITH VIDEO PROCESSING TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa AYDIN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, traffic signs are aimed to be recognized and identified from a video image which is taken through a video camera. To accomplish our aim, a traffic sign recognition program has been developed in MATLAB/Simulink environment. The target traffic sign are recognized in the video image with the developed program.

  6. Lifitegrast ophthalmic solution in the treatment of signs and symptoms of dry eye disease: design, development, and place in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godin MR

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Morgan R Godin, Preeya K Gupta Department of Ophthalmology, Division of Cornea and Refractive Surgery, Duke University Eye Center, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: A new topical ophthalmic medication, lifitegrast 5%, was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in dry eye patients. Lifitegrast is an integrin antagonist that decreases inflammation on the ocular surface, thereby improving dry eye disease (DED. Through a series of prospective, multicenter, randomized, masked, placebo-controlled studies in >2,000 patients total, lifitegrast was shown to be effective for improvement in both the signs and symptoms of DED. A subsequent study focused on the safety profile of lifitegrast and demonstrated that the majority of adverse events were mild and resolved over time. Lifitegrast is now available for use in clinical practice. Keywords: OPUS-1, OPUS-2, OPUS-3, SONATA, LFA-1, ICAM-1, OSDI, ocular surface

  7. DEET potentiates the development and persistence of anticholinesterase dependent chronic pain signs in a rat model of Gulf War Illness pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flunker, L K; Nutter, T J; Johnson, R D; Cooper, B Y

    2017-02-01

    Exposure to DEET (N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide) may have influenced the pattern of symptoms observed in soldiers with GWI (Gulf War Illness; Haley and Kurt, 1997). We examined how the addition of DEET (400mg/kg; 50% topical) to an exposure protocol of permethrin (2.6mg/kg; topical), chlorpyrifos (CP; 120mg/kg), and pyridostigmine bromide (PB;13mg/kg) altered the emergence and pattern of pain signs in an animal model of GWI pain (Nutter et al., 2015). Rats underwent behavioral testing before, during and after a 4week exposure: 1) hindlimb pressure withdrawal threshold; 2) ambulation (movement distance and rate); and 3) resting duration. Additional studies were conducted to assess the influence of acute DEET (10-100μM) on muscle and vascular nociceptor Kv7, KDR, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9. We report that a 50% concentration of DEET enhanced the development and persistence of pain-signs. Rats exposed to all 4 compounds exhibited ambulation deficits that appeared 5-12weeks post-exposure and persisted through weeks 21-24. Rats exposed to only three agents (CP or PB excluded), did not fully develop ambulation deficits. When PB was excluded, rats also developed rest duration pain signs, in addition to ambulation deficits. There was no evidence that physiological doses of DEET acutely modified nociceptor Kv7, KDR, Nav1.8 or Nav1.9 activities. Nevertheless, DEET augmented protocols decreased the conductance of Kv7 expressed in vascular nociceptors harvested from chronically exposed rats. We concluded that DEET enhanced the development and persistence of pain behaviors, but the anticholinesterases CP and PB played a determinant role. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Therapeutic misconception in research subjects: development and validation of a measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, Paul S; Anatchkova, Milena; Albert, Karen; Dunn, Laura B; Lidz, Charles W

    2012-12-01

    Therapeutic misconception (TM), which occurs when research subjects fail to appreciate the distinction between the imperatives of clinical research and ordinary treatment, may undercut the process of obtaining meaningful consent to clinical research participation. Previous studies have found that TM is widespread, but progress in addressing TM has been stymied by the absence of a validated method for assessing its presence. The goal of this study was to develop and validate a theoretically grounded measure of TM, assess its diagnostic accuracy, and test previous findings regarding TM's prevalence. A total of 220 participants were recruited from clinical trials at four academic medical centers in the United States. Participants completed a 28-item Likert-type questionnaire to assess the presence of beliefs associated with TM, and a semistructured TM interview designed to elicit their perceptions of the nature of the clinical trial in which they were participating. Data from the questionnaires were subjected to factor analysis, and items with poor factor loadings were excluded. This resulted in a 10-item scale, with three strongly correlated factors and excellent internal consistency; the fit indices of the model across 10 training sets were consistent with the original results, suggesting a stable factor solution. The scale was validated against the TM interview, with significantly higher scores among subjects coded as displaying evidence of TM. Receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis based on a 10-fold internal cross-validation yielded area under the ROC (AUC) = 0.682 for any evidence of TM. When sensitivity (0.72) and specificity (0.61) were both optimized, positive predictive value was 0.65 and negative predictive value was 0.68, with a positive likelihood ratio of 1.89 and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.47. In all, 50.5% (n = 101) of the participants manifested evidence of TM on the TM interview, a somewhat lower rate than in most previous studies. The

  9. Recognition and development of "educational technology" as a scientific field and school subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilović Mirčeta S.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the process of development, establishment and recognition of "educational technology" as an independent scientific field and a separate teaching subject at universities. The paper points to: (a the problems that this field deals with or should deal with, (b knowledge needed for the profession of "educational technologist", (c various scientific institutions across the world involved in educational technology, (d scientific journals treating issues of modern educational technology, (e the authors i.e. psychologists and educators who developed and formulated the basic principles of this scientific field, (f educational features and potentials of educational technologies. Emphasis is placed on the role and importance of AV technology in developing, establishing and recognition of educational technology, and it is also pointed out that AV technology i.e. AV teaching aids and a movement for visualization of teaching were its forerunners and crucial factors for its establishing and developing into an independent area of teaching i.e. school subject. In summary it is stressed that educational technology provides for the execution of instruction through emission transmission, selection, coding, decoding, reception, memorization transformation of all types of pieces of information in teaching.

  10. The Forbidden Signs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilstrup, Mogens

    2016-01-01

    is an important addition that offers insight into the hardware requirements for bio-semiosis. As any type of semiosis must be dependent upon Semiotic scaffolds, I recently argued that the process of semiosis has to be divided into two separate processes of sign establishment and sign interpretation......, and that misalignment between the two processes result in faulty sign interpretation and over-signification. Such faulty signs were forbidden in the sign classification system of Peirce, so I defined them as forbidden signs. Here I present an analysis of the forbidden sign categories with examples from Occult semiotics...... as the combination of two processes; one leading to diversity generation within semiotic scaffolds followed by a second process of decimation of faulty signs during selection in specific learning environments. The analysis suggests that forbidden signs are always used as early stages in the iterative sign...

  11. Planetary Vital Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennel, Charles; Briggs, Stephen; Victor, David

    2016-07-01

    The climate is beginning to behave in unusual ways. The global temperature reached unprecedented highs in 2015 and 2016, which led climatologists to predict an enormous El Nino that would cure California's record drought. It did not happen the way they expected. That tells us just how unreliable temperature has become as an indicator of important aspects of climate change. The world needs to go beyond global temperature to a set of planetary vital signs. Politicians should not over focus policy on one indicator. They need to look at the balance of evidence. A coalition of scientists and policy makers should start to develop vital signs at once, since they should be ready at the entry into force of the Paris Agreement in 2020. But vital signs are only the beginning. The world needs to learn how to use the vast knowledge we will be acquiring about climate change and its impacts. Is it not time to use all the tools at hand- observations from space and ground networks; demographic, economic and societal measures; big data statistical techniques; and numerical models-to inform politicians, managers, and the public of the evolving risks of climate change at global, regional, and local scales? Should we not think in advance of an always-on social and information network that provides decision-ready knowledge to those who hold the responsibility to act, wherever they are, at times of their choosing?

  12. The Subject and the Setting: Re-Imagining Opportunities for Primary Teachers' Subject Knowledge Development on School-Based Teacher Education Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Rupert

    2017-01-01

    The landscape of teacher education is undergoing significant change in many countries and this is often associated with a move towards greater school involvement in the preparation of teachers. One aspect of teaching expertise that is particularly challenging for primary student-teachers is the development of subject knowledge across a wide range…

  13. Supernumerary human hair cells-signs of regeneration or impaired development? A field emission scanning electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rask-Andersen, Helge; Li, Hao; Löwenheim, Hubert; Müller, Marcus; Pfaller, Kristian; Schrott-Fischer, Annelies; Glueckert, Rudolf

    2017-03-01

    Current attempts to regenerate cochlear sensorineural structures motivate further inspection of the human organ of hearing. Here, we analyzed the supernumerary inner hair cell (sIHC), a possible sign of regeneration and cell replacement. Human cochleae were studied using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM; maximum resolution 2 nm) obtained from individuals aged 44, 48, and 58 years with normal sensorineural pure-tone average (PTA) thresholds (PTA <20 dB). The wasted tissue was harvested during trans-cochlear approaches and immediately fixed for ultrastructural analysis. All specimens exhibited sIHCs at all turns except at the extreme lower basal turn. In one specimen, it was possible to image and count the inner hair cells (IHCs) along the cochlea representing the 0.2 kHz-8 kHz region according to the Greenwood place/frequency scale. In a region with 2,321 IHCs, there were 120 scattered one-cell losses or 'gaps' (5%). Forty-two sIHCs were present facing the modiolus. Thirty-eight percent of the sIHCs were located near a 'gap' in the IHC row (±6 IHCs). The prevalence of ectopic inner hair cells was higher than expected. The morphology and placement could reflect a certain ongoing regeneration. Further molecular studies are needed to verify if the regenerative capacity of the human auditory periphery might have been underestimated.

  14. Development of ICT competences in the environmental studies subject in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasta Husa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital literacy is one of eight key competences that were defined by the European Parliament and Council as those that member states should develop as a part of their strategies for lifelong learning (Official Journal of the European Union, 2006, p.11. It would contribute to a more successful life in a knowledge society. The purpose of this paper is to Npresent the results of empirical research on the use of ICT in the lessons of the environmental studies subject in the first triennium of primary schools in the Republic of Slovenia. Data were collected through a questionnaire and according to the protocol. We found that among all of the ICT tools, teachers mostly use the computer. The majority of the teachers use the computer once a week, most often in mathematics and environmental studies subject. In the observed lessons of the environmental studies subject, less than half of teachers use the computer in the lessons. This was followed by the use of computer and the LCD projector, and the interactive whiteboard. Among the obstacles that teachers indicate when they try to include ICT in the learning process are insufficient, out of date equipment, lack of time and lack of their own competence.

  15. Empirical Model Development for Predicting Shock Response on Composite Materials Subjected to Pyroshock Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentz, Steven J.; Ordway, David O; Parsons, David S.; Garrison, Craig M.; Rodgers, C. Steven; Collins, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) received a request to develop an analysis model based on both frequency response and wave propagation analyses for predicting shock response spectrum (SRS) on composite materials subjected to pyroshock loading. The model would account for near-field environment (approx. 9 inches from the source) dominated by direct wave propagation, mid-field environment (approx. 2 feet from the source) characterized by wave propagation and structural resonances, and far-field environment dominated by lower frequency bending waves in the structure. This report documents the outcome of the assessment.

  16. Empirical Model Development for Predicting Shock Response on Composite Materials Subjected to Pyroshock Loading: Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentz, Steven J.; Ordway, David O.; Parsons, David S.; Garrison, Craig M.; Rodgers, C. Steven; Collins, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) received a request to develop an analysis model based on both frequency response and wave propagation analyses for predicting shock response spectrum (SRS) on composite materials subjected to pyroshock loading. The model would account for near-field environment (approx. 9 inches from the source) dominated by direct wave propagation, mid-field environment (approx. 2 feet from the source) characterized by wave propagation and structural resonances, and far-field environment dominated by lower frequency bending waves in the structure. This document contains appendices to the Volume I report.

  17. Empirical Model Development for Predicting Shock Response on Composite Materials Subjected to Pyroshock Loading. [Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentz, Steven J.; Ordway, David O.; Parsons, David S.; Garrison, Craig M.; Rodgers, C. Steven; Collins, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) received a request to develop an analysis model based on both frequency response and wave propagation analyses for predicting shock response spectrum (SRS) on composite materials subjected to pyroshock loading. The model would account for near-field environment (9 inches from the source) dominated by direct wave propagation, mid-field environment (approximately 2 feet from the source) characterized by wave propagation and structural resonances, and far-field environment dominated by lower frequency bending waves in the structure. This document contains appendices to the Volume I report.

  18. [Reliability and validity of warning signs checklist for screening psychological, behavioral and developmental problems of children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X N; Zhang, Y; Feng, W W; Wang, H S; Cao, B; Zhang, B; Yang, Y F; Wang, H M; Zheng, Y; Jin, X M; Jia, M X; Zou, X B; Zhao, C X; Robert, J; Jing, Jin

    2017-06-02

    Objective: To evaluate the reliability and validity of warning signs checklist developed by the National Health and Family Planning Commission of the People's Republic of China (NHFPC), so as to determine the screening effectiveness of warning signs on developmental problems of early childhood. Method: Stratified random sampling method was used to assess the reliability and validity of checklist of warning sign and 2 110 children 0 to 6 years of age(1 513 low-risk subjects and 597 high-risk subjects) were recruited from 11 provinces of China. The reliability evaluation for the warning signs included the test-retest reliability and interrater reliability. With the use of Age and Stage Questionnaire (ASQ) and Gesell Development Diagnosis Scale (GESELL) as the criterion scales, criterion validity was assessed by determining the correlation and consistency between the screening results of warning signs and the criterion scales. Result: In terms of the warning signs, the screening positive rates at different ages ranged from 10.8%(21/141) to 26.2%(51/137). The median (interquartile) testing time for each subject was 1(0.6) minute. Both the test-retest reliability and interrater reliability of warning signs reached 0.7 or above, indicating that the stability was good. In terms of validity assessment, there was remarkable consistency between ASQ and warning signs, with the Kappa value of 0.63. With the use of GESELL as criterion, it was determined that the sensitivity of warning signs in children with suspected developmental delay was 82.2%, and the specificity was 77.7%. The overall Youden index was 0.6. Conclusion: The reliability and validity of warning signs checklist for screening early childhood developmental problems have met the basic requirements of psychological screening scales, with the characteristics of short testing time and easy operation. Thus, this warning signs checklist can be used for screening psychological and behavioral problems of early childhood

  19. Writing Signed Languages: What For? What Form?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grushkin, Donald A

    2017-01-01

    Signed languages around the world have tended to maintain an "oral," unwritten status. Despite the advantages of possessing a written form of their language, signed language communities typically resist and reject attempts to create such written forms. The present article addresses many of the arguments against written forms of signed languages, and presents the potential advantages of writing signed languages. Following a history of the development of writing in spoken as well as signed language populations, the effects of orthographic types upon literacy and biliteracy are explored. Attempts at writing signed languages have followed two primary paths: "alphabetic" and "icono-graphic." It is argued that for greatest congruency and ease in developing biliteracy strategies in societies where an alphabetic script is used for the spoken language, signed language communities within these societies are best served by adoption of an alphabetic script for writing their signed language.

  20. Development, Validity and Reliability of the Londrina Activities of Daily Living Protocol for Subjects With COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant'Anna, Thaís; Donária, Leila; Furlanetto, Karina C; Morakami, Fernanda; Rodrigues, Antenor; Grosskreutz, Talita; Hernandes, Nidia A; Gosselink, Rik; Pitta, Fabio

    2017-03-01

    To avoid symptoms, patients with COPD may reduce the amount of activities of daily living (ADL). Therefore, the aim of the present study was to develop a standardized protocol to evaluate ADL performance in subjects with COPD (Londrina ADL protocol) and to assess the validity and reliability of the protocol in this population. The Londrina ADL protocol was created based on activities included in previous studies aimed at investigating outcomes from ADL. Activities were included in the protocol because they could represent other activities of similar patterns and because they could be actually performed, not simulated. Twenty subjects with COPD (12 men, 70 ± 7 y old, FEV1 = 54 ± 15% predicted) wore 2 motion sensors while performing the protocol 4 times, 2 of them wearing a portable gas analyzer. Subjects were also submitted to assessments of lung function, functional exercise capacity, functional status, impact on health status, and physical activity in daily life. The Londrina ADL protocol comprised of 5 activities representing ADL, involving upper limbs, lower limbs, and trunk movements. Londrina ADL protocol duration presented high values of intraclass correlation coefficient, even using a mask for gas analysis (intraclass correlation coefficient >0.90, P < .001). Intensity of movement during the protocol performance was highly correlated to intensity of movement in daily life (r = 0.71). The protocol duration was correlated with functional status and impact on health status variables from questionnaires (0.36 ≤ r ≤ 0.59). There was also correlation between functional exercise capacity and the protocol duration (r = -0.64). The Londrina ADL protocol was a valid and reliable protocol to evaluate ADL performance in subjects with COPD. It is a protocol that can be used in clinical practice and in future studies to investigate ADL outcomes, including those studies that require gas analysis and the wearing of a mask. Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  1. Wavelets for sign language translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Beth J.; Anspach, Gretel

    1993-10-01

    Wavelet techniques are applied to help extract the relevant parameters of sign language from video images of a person communicating in American Sign Language or Signed English. The compression and edge detection features of two-dimensional wavelet analysis are exploited to enhance the algorithms under development to classify the hand motion, hand location with respect to the body, and handshape. These three parameters have different processing requirements and complexity issues. The results are described for applying various quadrature mirror filter designs to a filterbank implementation of the desired wavelet transform. The overall project is to develop a system that will translate sign language to English to facilitate communication between deaf and hearing people.

  2. A Field Guide for Sign Language Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokoe, William; Kuschel, Rolf

    Field researchers of sign language are the target of this methodological guide. The prospective researcher is briefed on the rationale of sign language study as language study and as distinct from the study of kinesics. Subjects covered include problems of translating, use of interpreters, and ethics. Instruments for obtaining social and language…

  3. Development and optimization of a noncontact optical device for online monitoring of jaundice in human subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polley, Nabarun; Saha, Srimoyee; Singh, Soumendra; Adhikari, Aniruddha; Das, Sukhen; Choudhury, Bhaskar Roy; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Jaundice is one of the notable markers of liver malfunction in our body, revealing a significant rise in the concentration of an endogenous yellow pigment bilirubin. We have described a method for measuring the optical spectrum of our conjunctiva and derived pigment concentration by using diffused reflection measurement. The method uses no prior model and is expected to work across the races (skin color) encompassing a wide range of age groups. An optical fiber-based setup capable of measuring the conjunctival absorption spectrum from 400 to 800 nm is used to monitor the level of bilirubin and is calibrated with the value measured from blood serum of the same human subject. We have also developed software in the LabVIEW platform for use in online monitoring of bilirubin levels in human subjects by nonexperts. The results demonstrate that relative absorption at 460 and 600 nm has a distinct correlation with that of the bilirubin concentration measured from blood serum. Statistical analysis revealed that our proposed method is in agreement with the conventional biochemical method. The innovative noncontact, low-cost technique is expected to have importance in monitoring jaundice in developing/underdeveloped countries, where the inexpensive diagnosis of jaundice with minimally trained manpower is obligatory.

  4. The pharmaceutical industry's responsibility for protecting human subjects of clinical trials in developing nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Finnuala

    2004-01-01

    Pharmaceutical companies increasingly perform clinical trials in developing nations. Governments of host nations see the trials as a way to provide otherwise unaffordable medical care, while trial sponsors are drawn to those countries by lower costs, the prevalence of diseases rare in developed nations, and large numbers of impoverished patients. Local governments, however, fail to police trials, and the FDA does not monitor trials in foreign countries, resulting in the routine violation of international standards for the protection of human subjects. This Note proposes independent accreditation of those institutions involved in clinical trials--the institutional review boards which oversee trial protocol; the organizations, such as pharmaceutical companies, which sponsor the trials; and the research organizations that conduct the trials. Accreditation, similar to that used in the footwear and apparel industries, would increase the transparency of pharmaceutical trials and would enable the United States government and consumers to hold trial sponsors accountable for their actions.

  5. How Do Typically Developing Deaf Children and Deaf Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Use the Face When Comprehending Emotional Facial Expressions in British Sign Language?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denmark, Tanya; Atkinson, Joanna; Campbell, Ruth; Swettenham, John

    2014-01-01

    Facial expressions in sign language carry a variety of communicative features. While emotion can modulate a spoken utterance through changes in intonation, duration and intensity, in sign language specific facial expressions presented concurrently with a manual sign perform this function. When deaf adult signers cannot see facial features, their…

  6. Graphical symbols -- Safety colours and safety signs -- Part 1: Design principles for safety signs in workplaces and public areas

    CERN Document Server

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    This International Standard establishes the safety identification colours and design principles for safety signs to be used in workplaces and in public areas for the purpose of accident prevention, fire protection, health hazard information and emergency evacuation. It also establishes the basic principles to be applied when developing standards containing safety signs. This part of ISO 3864 is applicable to workplaces and all locations and all sectors where safety-related questions may be posed. However, it is not applicable to the signalling used for guiding rail, road, river, maritime and air traffic and, generally speaking, to those sectors subject to a regulation which may differ.

  7. 4 April 2013 - Spanish State Secretary of Science, Development and Innovation C. Vela Olmo in the LHC tunnel with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    4 April 2013 - Spanish State Secretary of Science, Development and Innovation C. Vela Olmo in the LHC tunnel with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  8. 15th March 2011 - Singapore National Research Foundation Permanent Secretary(National Research and Development)T. M. Kian signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and visiting CMS control centre with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    15th March 2011 - Singapore National Research Foundation Permanent Secretary(National Research and Development)T. M. Kian signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and visiting CMS control centre with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli.

  9. Development of a new connection for precast concrete walls subjected to cyclic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaghei, Ramin; Hejazi, Farzad; Taheri, Hafez; Jaafar, Mohd Saleh; Aziz, Farah Nora Aznieta Abdul

    2017-01-01

    The Industrialized Building System (IBS) was recently introduced to minimize the time and cost of project construction. Accordingly, ensuring the integration of the connection of precast components in IBS structures is an important factor that ensures stability of buildings subjected to dynamic loads from earthquakes, vehicles, and machineries. However, structural engineers still lack knowledge on the proper connection and detailed joints of IBS structure construction. Therefore, this study proposes a special precast concrete wall-to-wall connection system for dynamic loads that resists multidirectional imposed loads and reduces vibration effects (PI2014701723). This system is designed to connect two adjacent precast wall panels by using two steel U-shaped channels (i.e., male and female joints). During casting, each joint is adapted for incorporation into a respective wall panel after considering the following conditions: one side of the steel channel opens into the thickness face of the panel; a U-shaped rubber is implemented between the two channels to dissipate the vibration effect; and bolts and nuts are used to create an extension between the two U-shaped male and female steel channels. The developed finite element model of the precast wall is subjected to cyclic loads to evaluate the performance of the proposed connection during an imposed dynamic load. Connection performance is then compared with conventional connections based on the energy dissipation, stress, deformation, and concrete damage in the plastic range. The proposed precast connection is capable of exceeding the energy absorption of precast walls subjected to dynamic load, thereby improving its resistance behavior in all principal directions.

  10. Positive youth development programs for adolescents with greater psychosocial needs: subjective outcome evaluation over 3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Sun, Rachel C F

    2014-06-01

    This study examined the views of 153,761 students participating in a positive youth development program designed for participants with greater psychosocial needs (the Tier 2 Program) in the context of the Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong. The program was implemented in the extension phase of the project from 2009/10 to 2011/12 school years. A validated subjective outcome evaluation scale was used to assess the views of the program participants toward the program qualities, implementer qualities, and program effectiveness after completion of the program. Nine datasets were used which were derived from the aggregated reports submitted by social service providers designing the Tier 2 Program. Participants generally held favorable views of program qualities, implementer qualities, as well as program effectiveness of the Tier 2 Program. Some small grade and program differences on subjective outcome evaluation were also found. Both program qualities and implementer qualities were significant predictors of program effectiveness in different grades. Consistent with the findings of the initial phase of the Project P.A.T.H.S., the present study suggests that the Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong is perceived favorably by program participants and its perceived effectiveness was high. Significant but small grade and program approach differences on subjective outcome evaluation were found. Both program and implementer qualities were predictive of perceived program effectiveness in different grades. Copyright © 2014 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Informed consent for inclusion into clinical trials: a serious subject to note in the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadi, Morteza; Fazel, Mozhgan; Nasiri-Vanashi, Taha; Saadat, Seyed Hasan; Taheri, Saeed

    2012-05-01

    Informed consent is a critical issue especially in conducting clinical trials that expose human life to medical or surgical interventions. It necessitates a long and complex process through which the participant is presented with all potential favorable and non-favorable consequences upon getting enrolled in the study. The process of taking informed consent is well-understood in developed countries, with every effort taken to enhance and maintain the autonomy of patients and their right to make an informed choice of whether to participate or not. This may not be the case in the developing world.The information given to patients before the trial might not be properly developed and presented, an issue that can result in serious threat to the decision-making process. On the other hand, investigators should remember that enrolling people into a trial with no potential benefit for themselves cannot be considered ethical. In the current debate, we aim to address the issue of how respectfully and ethically clinical research trials can be done on human subjects and what we can do to enhance the practice in an ethical context. Development of a system through which we could warrant all rights of study participants in all cases around the world seems far from view. However, if we are in doubt about the ethics of a clinical trial, we can ask ourselves: "what would we do, if we were in the same position our patients are in now?"

  12. On the System of Person-Denoting Signs in Estonian Sign Language: Estonian Name Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paales, Liina

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses Estonian personal name signs. According to study there are four personal name sign categories in Estonian Sign Language: (1) arbitrary name signs; (2) descriptive name signs; (3) initialized-descriptive name signs; (4) loan/borrowed name signs. Mostly there are represented descriptive and borrowed personal name signs among…

  13. The split hand sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Benny

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral sclerosis (ALS is a disease characterized by pure motor asymmetric wasting of various muscles with associated upper motor neuron signs. The split hand sign, which is because of dissociated muscle weakness in the hands (thenar muscles disproportionately wasted as compared to the hypothenar muscles is a useful clinical sign for bed side diagnosis of ALS.

  14. Signed languages and globalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiddinga, A.; Crasborn, O.

    2011-01-01

    Deaf people who form part of a Deaf community communicate using a shared sign language. When meeting people from another language community, they can fall back on a flexible and highly context-dependent form of communication called international sign, in which shared elements from their own sign

  15. British Sign Name Customs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Linda; Sutton-Spence, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Research presented here describes the sign names and the customs of name allocation within the British Deaf community. While some aspects of British Sign Language sign names and British Deaf naming customs differ from those in most Western societies, there are many similarities. There are also similarities with other societies outside the more…

  16. Developing Buoyancy Driven Flow of a Nanofluid in a Vertical Channel Subject to Heat Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal C. Sacheti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The developing natural convective flow of a nanofluid in an infinite vertical channel with impermeable bounding walls has been investigated. It is assumed that the nanofluid is dominated by two specific slip mechanisms and that the channel walls are subject to constant heat flux and isothermal temperature, respectively. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations coupling different transport processes have been solved numerically. The variations of velocity, temperature, and nanoparticles concentration have been discussed in relation to a number of physical parameters. It is seen that the approach to the steady-state profiles of velocity and temperature in the present work is different from the ones reported in a previous study corresponding to isothermal wall conditions.

  17. Some recent developments in the international guidelines on the ethics of research involving human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, R J

    2000-11-01

    We are in a period of reconsideration and revision of international ethical guidelines for the conduct of biomedical research involving human subjects. The proximate cause of much of this activity is the recent controversy over the ethics of the use of a placebo control in the clinical trials of the short-duration regimen of zidovudine for prevention of perinatal transmission of HIV infection, trials that were carried out in several so-called technologically developing countries. Critics of these trials claimed that they were in violation of Article II.3 of the Declaration of Helsinki, which states: "In any medical study, every patient--including those of a control group, if any--should be assured of the best proven diagnostic and therapeutic method. This does not exclude the use of inert placebo in studies where no proven diagnostic or therapeutic method exists." The critics claimed that since the "best proven ... method" is the 076 regimen, this is what must be provided to members of the control groups. Failure to do so, they asserted, was a serious breach of ethics. In response to this allegation, several major international and national agencies convened multidisciplinary groups to consider the ethics of multinational clinical research. The first thing they realized was that Article II.3 was in error in that it did not reflect contemporary ethical thinking. Moreover, it was routinely violated in research conducted in developed as well as in developing countries. What replaces this standard? The 1993 CIOMS International Ethical Guidelines for Biomedical Research Involving Human Subjects include several criteria for justification of research carried out in developing countries. Most importantly, the research must be responsive to the health needs and priorities of the host country. They also require that any therapeutic products developed in such research must be made "reasonably available" to residents of the host country. A new standard is emerging for

  18. Mechanical Anisotropy Development of a Two-Phase Composite Subject to Large Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowski, M.; Schmid, D. W.; Yu, Podladchikov, Yu,

    2009-04-01

    Evolution of overall mechanical properties has been demonstrated in large strain deformation experiments. Strain softening is frequently employed in geodynamic simulations. In this paper, we quantify the structural and mechanical evolution of a two-phase composite rock subject to pure and simple shear. An inclusion-host type of geometry is assumed, we focus on the weak inclusion scenario and both materials obey a linear viscous behavior. Finite deformation leads to a shape preferred orientation development that results in an overall mechanical anisotropy. We derive the shape evolution model based on an analytical solution for an isolated elliptical inclusion embedded in an anisotropic host and subject to a uniform far field load. The presence of a strong anisotropy in the host leads to an enhanced inclusion stretching. A differential effective medium type of scheme predicting an overall anisotropic viscosity of a composite consisting of aligned elliptical inclusions is proposed and validated by finite element modeling. A comparison with an existing self-consistent averaging scheme is given and the new scheme is shown to provide an improved estimate of the effective normal and shear viscosity for high inclusion concentrations. The two models are combined into a final set of equations describing evolution of a two-phase rock under a shear. Hardening is predicted in pure shear. In simple shear, the hardening phase is followed by a pronounced softening after a shear strain of one, irrespective of inclusion concentration. Numerical simulations resolving evolution of inclusion-host systems under pure and simple shear demonstrate the high accuracy of our model prediction. The shape evolution model provides a sufficient approximation to the shape preferred orientation developing in an aggregate of interacting inclusions. Both in pure and simple shear, deformation localizes into conjugate trails of inclusions leading to formation of complex sigmoidal inclusion shapes.

  19. Evaluation of Sustainable Development Indicators With Fuzzy TOPSIS Based on Subjective and Objective Weights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nang Idayu Nik Zahari

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Sustainable development aims at improving and maintaining the well-being of people and the ecology. However, this paper focuses only on the ecological aspects. The selection of the proper ecological protection determinant plays a very important role in improving the environment of Malaysia. This paper will propose a method from Wang and Lee (2009, and Yong (2006 which applies a fuzzy TOPSIS method -- based on subjective and objective weights – to make the required selection. Four alternatives will be tested which are: prevent pollution (A1, conservation (A2, well-manage (A3, and public awareness (A4. Along with these, four criteria need to be considered: water quality factor (C1, land integrity factor (C2, air quality factor (C3, and biodiversity factor (C4. Finally, a numerical example of ecological protection determinant selection is used to illustrate the proposed method. ABSTRAK: Pembangunan lestari bermatlamat memperbaiki dan mengekalkan kesejahteraan rakyat serta ekologi. Walau bagaimanapun, kertas kajian ini hanya memberi tumpuan kepada aspek-aspek ekologi. Pemilihan penentu perlindungan serta keselamatan bagi aspek ekologi memainkan peranan yang amat penting dalam meningkatkan kualiti alam sekitar di Malaysia. Kertas kajian ini telah menggunakan kaedah Wang dan Lee (2009 dan Yong (2006 yang mengaplikasikan kaedah TOPSIS kabur berdasarkan pemberat subjektif dan objektif. Terdapat empat alternatif yang akan diuji iaitu: pencegahan pencemaran (A1, pemuliharaan (A2, pengurusan yang baik (A3, kesedaran orang awam (A4. Selain itu, terdapat empat kriteria yang perlu dipertimbangkan: faktor kualiti air (C1, faktor kualiti tanah (C2, faktor kualiti udara (C3, faktor kepelbagaian biologi (C4. Kesimpulannya, contoh pengiraan untuk memperoleh penentu pemilihan perlindungan ekologi telah digunakan bagi menunjukkan kaedah yang dicadangkan.KEYWORDS: sustainable development; ecological factors; subjective and objective weight; fuzzy TOPSIS

  20. Breast cancer development in transsexual subjects receiving cross-sex hormone treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooren, Louis J; van Trotsenburg, Michael A A; Giltay, Erik J; van Diest, Paul J

    2013-12-01

    Transsexual people receive cross-sex hormones as part of their treatment, potentially inducing hormone-sensitive malignancies. To examine the occurrence of breast cancer in a large cohort of Dutch male and female transsexual persons, also evaluating whether the epidemiology accords with the natal sex or the new sex. Number of people with breast cancer between 1975 and 2011. We researched the occurrence of breast cancer among transsexual persons 18-80 years with an exposure to cross-sex hormones between 5 to >30 years. Our study included 2,307 male-to-female (MtF) transsexual persons undergoing androgen deprivation and estrogen administration (52,370 person-years of exposure), and 795 female-to-male (FtM) subjects receiving testosterone (15,974 total years of exposure). Among MtF individuals one case was encountered, as well as a probable but not proven second case. The estimated rate of 4.1 per 100,000 person-years (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.8-13.0) was lower than expected if these two cases are regarded as female breast cancer, but within expectations if viewed as male breast cancer. In FtM subjects, who were younger and had shorter exposure to cross-sex hormones compared with the MtF group, one breast cancer case occurred. This translated into a rate of 5.9 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI: 0.5-27.4), again lower than expected for female breast cancer but within expected norms for male breast cancer. The number of people studied and duration of hormone exposure are limited but it would appear that cross-sex hormone administration does not increase the risk of breast cancer development, in either MtF or FtM transsexual individuals. Breast carcinoma incidences in both groups are comparable to male breast cancers. Cross-sex hormone treatment of transsexual subjects does not seem to be associated with an increased risk of malignant breast development. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  1. [Laennec and the creation of auscultation signs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, José G

    2003-01-01

    Toward the end of the 18th century, clinical diagnosis in medicine shifted its focus from reliance on symptoms, which translates to subjective experience of illness, to signs, objective manifestations of pathologic changes. Several techniques were developed to elicit signs in clinical practice, and Laennec used them routinely. He palpated and prodded his patients to get an idea of changes in internal organs. He also applied his ear directly to his patient's chest to hear their heartbeat. On one occassion, he was unable to use these techniques and had the happy occurrence of rolling up a notebook to hear his patient's chest. This led him to hear a great number of new sounds. Through detailed observations, he was able to describe, classify, and correlate these sounds with autopsy findings, thus creating a new semiology of chest diseases. In this essay explore how in which Laennec created his instrument and system of signs of chest diseases, and how he was able to transmit his inventions to his colleagues.

  2. Road Signs: Geosemiotics and Human Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamid, Salmiah Binti Abdul

    In order to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art developments, this thesis presents a theoretical lens that is used to anchor the subjects of the studies of ‘people’, ‘road signs’ and ‘built environment’ through the theories of geosemiotics and mobility. The fields of geosemiotics and mobi......In order to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art developments, this thesis presents a theoretical lens that is used to anchor the subjects of the studies of ‘people’, ‘road signs’ and ‘built environment’ through the theories of geosemiotics and mobility. The fields of geosemiotics...... to answer the question of whether road signs have significant impact on human behaviour when moving in an urban environment. Selected cities in Denmark and Scotland were used as study areas in this research project. The methods were conducted within urban settings as well as controlled settings...... that emphasised the interaction between the participants and the visual representations of road signs. The key contribution of the findings in this research project is the methodological triangulations of qualitative data used in the field observations, photographic documentation and focus group interviews which...

  3. Agreement and Null Subjects in German L2 Development: New Evidence from Reaction-Time Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clahsen, Harald; Hong, Upyong

    1995-01-01

    Reports on reaction time experiments investigating subject-verb agreement and null subjects in 33 Korean learners of German and a control group of 20 German native speakers. Results found that the two phenomena do not covary in the Korean learners, indicating that properties of agreement and null subjects are acquired separately from one another.…

  4. The development of multiple drug use among anabolic-androgenic steroid users: six subjective case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyberg Fred

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inappropriate use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS was originally a problem among athletes but AAS are now often used in nonsport situations and by patients attending regular addiction clinics. The aim of this study was to improve understanding of the development of multiple drug use in patients seeking treatment at an addiction clinic for AAS-related problems. Methods We interviewed six patients (four men and two women with experience of AAS use who were attending an addiction clinic for what they believed were AAS-related problems. The patients were interviewed in-depth about their life stories, with special emphasis on social background, substance use, the development of total drug use and subjective experienced psychological and physical side effects. Results There was significant variation in the development of drug use in relation to social background, onset of drug use, relationship to AAS use and experience of AAS effects. All patients had initially experienced positive effects from AAS but, over time, the negative experiences had outweighed the positive effects. All patients were dedicated to excess training and took AAS in combination with gym training, indicating that the use of these drugs is closely related to this form of training. Use of multiple drugs was common either in parallel with AAS use or serially. Conclusion The study shows the importance of understanding how AAS use can develop either with or without the concomitant use of other drugs of abuse. The use of AAS can, however, progress to the use of other drugs. The study also indicates the importance of obtaining accurate, comprehensive information about the development of AAS use in designing treatment programmes and prevention strategies in this area.

  5. DEVELOPING OF ELECTRONIC TEACHING MATERIAL BASED ON MOBILE LEARNING IN THE WAVE SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Rif’ati

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the advanced and modern era, technological sophistication led to learning which initially runs, in which teachers and students meet each other and communicate in the classroom, can be implemented through of information technology. Along with the development of information, where books and teachers who initially as a primary source of learning, are now beginning to experience growth from the internet. Mobile learning defined as mobile devices that are used in the learning process. The wave course is one of subject that must be taken by students of physics education in the third semester. This course emphasizes the concepts of wave were reviewed mathematically and the phenomenon that occurs in everyday life. Mobile learning developed in this study in the form of electronic teaching materials on subjects of waves. The aim of this study was to develop electronic teaching material in the form of mobile learning. The sample of this study is 80 students in the third semester students who are taking waves courses. The results show that mobile learning that has been developed has score 3.8 and included valid criteria. Pada era yang serba maju dan modern, kecanggihan teknologi menyebabkan pembelajaran yang awalnya berjalan satu arah, dimana guru dan siswa saling bertemu dan berkomunikasi di dalam kelas, dapat dilaksanakan melalui bantuan teknologi.informasi. Seiring dengan perkembangan informasi, buku dan guru yang awalnya sebagai sumber belajar utama, saat ini sudah mulai mengalami perkembangan dimana sumber belajar yang berasal dari internet sudah mulai sering dimanfaatkan dalam proses pembelajaran. Mobile larning didefinisikan sebagai perangkat mobile yang dipergunakan dalam proses belajar mengajar. Mata kuliah gelombang sendiri merupakan salah satu mata kuliah yang wajib ditempuh oleh mahasiswa program studi pendidikan fisika semester 3. Mata kuliah ini menekankan pada konsep gelombang yang ditinjau secara matematis dan fenomenanya yang terjadi

  6. Identification and characterization of DC-SIGN-binding glycoproteins in allergenic foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalakannan, M; Chang, L M; Grishina, G; Sampson, H A; Masilamani, M

    2016-08-01

    DC-SIGN (dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin) is a C-type lectin receptor expressed on macrophages and dendritic cells. DC-SIGN has high affinity for fucosylated glycans in several plant glycoproteins and pathogens. DC-SIGN is thought to be crucial for the development of allergic sensitization. However, the precise role of DC-SIGN in food allergy pathogenesis is not yet understood. We sought to characterize DC-SIGN-binding glycoproteins in a panel of allergenic and non-allergenic foods. Fluorescent-labeled peanut and soy extracts were used to test protein binding to human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) by flow cytometry. DC-SIGN-blocking assays were performed by incubating DCs with food extracts followed by staining with anti-DC-SIGN antibody. Using a DC-SIGN-Fc chimera, food extracts were tested for binding by ELISA and autoradiography. IgE immunoblotting was performed with pooled sera from food-allergic subjects. DC activation and maturation were assessed by flow cytometry. We demonstrate that peanut agglutinin, a minor peanut allergen, is a novel ligand for DC-SIGN. Peanut agglutinin activates DCs to induce the expression of costimulatory molecules in vitro. We present a comprehensive report on the characterization of DC-SIGN-binding proteins in common allergenic foods such as peanut, soy, tree nuts, egg, and milk. Foods that rarely induce allergy, such as pine nuts, chickpea, and corn, showed no binding to DC-SIGN. Several DC-SIGN-binding proteins show reactivity in serum IgE immunoblots. We have also identified novel non-IgE-binding proteins that interact with DC-SIGN; these proteins may be important for regulating immune responses to these foods. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. INFINITY construction contract signed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Key state and community leaders celebrated April 6 with the signing of a construction contract for the state-of-the-art INFINITY Science Center planned near John C. Stennis Space Center in south Mississippi. Gulfport Mayor George Schloegel (l to r), chair of non-profit INFINITY Science Center Inc., was joined for the signing ceremony at the Hancock Bank in Gulfport by Virginia Wagner, sister of late Hancock Bank President Leo Seal Jr.; and Roy Anderson III, president and CEO of Roy Anderson Corp. Seal was the first chair of INFINITY Science Center Inc., which has led in development of the project. Roy Anderson Corp. plans to begin construction on the 72,000-square-foot, $28 million science and education center in May. The Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT) also is set to begin construction of a $2 million access road to the new center. The April 6 ceremony was attended by numerous officials, including former Stennis Space Center Directors Jerry Hlass and Roy Estess; Mississippi Senate President Pro Tempore Billy Hewes, R-Gulfport; Mississippi Rep. Diane Peranich, D-Pass Christian; and MDOT Southern District Commissioner Wayne Brown.

  8. Development of a coal-fueled Internal Manifold Heat Exchanger (IMHEX reg sign ) molten carbonate fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    The design of a CGMCFC electric generation plant that will provide a cost of eletricity (COE) which is lower than that of current electric generation technologies and which is competitive with other long-range electric generating systems is presented. This effort is based upon the Internal Manifold Heat Exchanger (IMHEX) technology as developed by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT). The project was executed by selecting economic and performance objectives for alternative plant arrangements while considering process constraints identified during IMHEX fuel cell development activities at ICT. The four major subsystems of a coal-based MCFC power plant are coal gasification, gas purification, fuel cell power generation and the bottoming cycle. The design and method of operation of each subsystem can be varied, and, depending upon design choices, can have major impact on both the design of other subsystems and the resulting cost of electricity. The challenge of this project was to select, from a range of design parameters, those operating conditions that result in a preferred plant design. Computer modelling was thus used to perform sensitivity analyses of as many system variables as program resources and schedules would permit. In any systems analysis, it is imperative that the evaluation methodology be verifiable and comparable. The TAG Class I develops comparable (if imprecise) data on performance and costs for the alternative cases being studied. It identifies, from a range of options, those which merit more exacting scrutiny to be undertaken at the second level, TAG class II analysis.

  9. E-MODULE DEVELOPMENT FOR THE SUBJECT OF MEASURING INSTRUMENTS AND MEASUREMENT IN ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuryake Fajaryati

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to develop an e-module as a medium of learning for the practice course of Measuring Instruments and Measurement in the Department of Electronics Engineering Education of Yogyakarta State University and to determine the feasibility of the e-module. This study employed a method of research and development. The development process was conducted through four phases by using the model of Lee and Owens which consisted of analysis phase, design phase, developing and implementation phase, as well as evaluation phase.The evaluation was conducted in several stages. Firstly, an alpha test for product validation was conducted by the experts on material and media. After that, a beta test was conducted by testing the product in small group users. The subjects of this study were the students of Electronics Engineering. The instruments used to collect the data were a validation sheet and questionnaires. The results of qualitative data were then modified into quantitative data with a range of 1 to 5, then they were converted with a rating scale to determine the feasibility of the medium. The results showed that based on the alpha test, the medium was in a very high quality. Meanwhile, in the beta test of the instructional aspect, in terms of material and evaluation and the multimedia aspect the e-module was respectively considered feasible and quite feasible. The four indicators namely text, image, animation and video were all generally considered feasible. In terms of usage aspect, the e-module was considered feasible where its two indicators, namely instructions and navigation, were generally regarded as very feasible by all respondents.

  10. Seventy Years of Biochemical Subjects' Development in Pharmacy Curricula: Experience from Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Andrijana Milošević; Krajnović, Dušanka; Manojlović, Jelena; Ignjatović, Svetlana; Majkić Singh, Nada

    2016-01-01

    The pharmacists played an important role in the development of biochemistry as applied chemistry in Serbia. What is more, the first seven state chemists in Serbia were pharmacists. State chemists performed the chemical-toxicological analysis as well as some medical and biochemical ones. When it comes to the education of medical biochemists as health workers, the period after the beginning of the second half of the twentieth century should be taken into account because that is when the training of pharmaceutical staff of the Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Belgrade, begins on the territory of Serbia. This paper presents the development of medical biochemistry through the development of curriculum, personnel and literature since the foundation of the Faculty of Pharmacy in Serbia until today. The aim of this paper is to present the historical development of biochemistry at the Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Belgrade, through analysis of three indicators: undergraduate and postgraduate education of medical biochemists, teaching literature and professional associations and trade associations. The method of direct data was applied in this paper. Also, desktop analysis was used for analyzing of secondary data, regulations, curricula, documents and bibliographic material. Desktop research was conducted and based on the following sources: Archives of the University of Belgrade-Faculty of Pharmacy, Museum of the History of Pharmacy at the University of Belgrade-Faculty of Pharmacy, the Society of Medical Biochemists of Serbia and the Serbian Chamber of Biochemists. The curricula, the Bologna process of improving education, the expansion of the range of subjects, the number of students, professional literature for teaching biochemistry, as well as professional associations and trade associations are presented through the results.

  11. Insulin resistance is associated with the development of albuminuria in Korean subjects without diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Cheol Min; Hyun, Young Youl; Lee, Kyu Beck; Kim, Hyang

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that insulin resistance is associated with the development of albuminuria. However, most studies are done on a background of diabetes or metabolic syndrome and there is little data from general population. The aim of this study is to define the effect of insulin resistance on the development of albuminuria in healthy individuals without diabetes. We analyzed 60,047 participants without baseline diabetes or chronic kidney disease, who underwent at least two health maintenance visits at a 2-year interval between 2002 and 2009 at a tertiary hospital in Korea. We measured the incidence of albuminuria at the second examination and calculated the odds ratio for the development of albuminuria according to the quintile of the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). After 2 years, 880 cases of incident albuminuria were observed. The cumulative incidences of albuminuria were 1.08, 1.50, 1.35, 1.47, and 1.92% for the 1st to 5th quintiles of HOMA-IR. On multivariate logistic analysis, the odds ratios for incident albuminuria compared to those in the 1st quintile were 1.38 (95% CI 1.10-1.73; P=0.006), 1.23 (95% CI 0.97-1.55; P=0.087), 1.32 (95% CI 1.04-1.67; P=0.020), and 1.66 (95% CI 1.31-2.09; Palbuminuria in relatively healthy subjects without diabetes. Further research is needed to verify the role of insulin resistance in the development of albuminuria and renal injury.

  12. Research Project "Subject Developing Environment of Preschool Education" for Russian Preschool Bilinguals (By the Example of Textile Educational Materials)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latipova, Liliya A.; Krapotkina, Irene E.; Koudrjavtseva, Ekaterina L.

    2016-01-01

    The problem's relevance stated in the article is determined by the following: forming preschool bilinguals' subject developing environment is connected with their active education and development, as well as with flexible preparation for studying at school. The purpose of this article is to develop methodology of textile developing materials' use…

  13. Quadrantal macular retinal thickness changes in strabismus subjects with abnormal binocular vision development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Mayumi; Yamashita, Tsutomu; Ono, Shizuka; Kubo, Ikumi; Tabuchi, Akio

    2013-03-01

    To investigate retinal morphological changes in strabismus patients with abnormal binocular vision development by comparing differences in quadrantal macular retinal thickness. Six strabismus patients (6 dominant and 5 non-dominant eyes) with abnormal binocular vision (mean age 22 years), and 11 control subjects (11 dominant and 11 non-dominant eyes) (mean age 21 years) were enrolled. Macular retinal thickness measurements were performed by optical coherence tomography, with total macular retinal (TMR) and ganglion cell complex (GCC) thicknesses measured in 3- and 6-mm regions in each quadrant. Measurement values were then used to determine quadrant ratios. Compared to the dominant eyes of the controls, the superior/inferior (S/I) ratio of the TMR thickness and GCC thickness in the 3-mm region was significantly lower in the dominant eyes of the strabismus group (P binocular vision development exhibited thinner superior temporal GCC thicknesses in the 3-mm region. Retinal ganglion cells in this region might be affected by efferent neural degeneration that originates in the visual pathway responsible for adaptations to the visual experience.

  14. Research and Development on Automatic Information Organization and Subject Analysis in Recent Decades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen-Hsien Tseng

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Information organization and subject analysis (IOSA is an important issue in the field of library and information science(LIS.As the fast advance in information technology, more and more digital documents are emerging in a pace such that automated IOSA become inevitable. This article firstly introduces the development of related automatic techniques in recent decades and promotes a tranditional viewpoint based on the workflow of:(1 data collection and aggregation, (2 cataloguing, (3 regulation, (4 archving, and (5 usage,to regulate the whole process when applying automated techniques to any IOSA task.Some application examples are then described to let the readers have a feel of the feasibility of these techniques; specifically the applications of keyword extraction, association analysis, document clustering, and topic categorization are mentioned.We conclude that the related techniques and applications are still developing in a quick pace such that only a few percentages of them can be mentioned.This article is intended to promote the mutual cooperation among the LIS and other fields.

  15. The Predictors of Subjective Career Success: An Empirical Study of Employee Development in a Korean Financial Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yongho

    2010-01-01

    Subjective career success has recently been discussed widely in the academic field of career development. The purpose of this study was to investigate the predictors of subjective career success. It examined the effects of the calling work orientation, the individual's career-enhancing strategy and the organizational learning climate on the…

  16. The city as a sign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharlamov, Nikita

    2012-01-01

    . This question is tackled through Jaan Valsiner’s notions of semiotic mediation and regulation. I specifically focus on spatial signs that humans use to regulate the meaning-making process that creates as meaningful what Georges Perec called species of spaces, such as towns and cities. “The city,” from...... this standpoint, becomes one of the most important signs that mediate and regulate our experience of environments we inhabit. I discuss a number of theoretical and methodological directions in which this framework could be further developed to revive the urban, or settlement, psychology, which failed to develop...

  17. Signs of dysregulated fibrinolysis precede the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernestål-Boman Jenny

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetic patients experience stimulated coagulation and dysfibrinolysis, which is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. This imbalance may precede the manifest diagnosis. We investigated whether elevated antigen levels of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, the tPA/PAI-1 complex, or von Willebrand Factor (VWF precede type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM diagnosis, and whether this elevation occurs before increased fasting plasma glucose (FPG or 2-hour plasma glucose (2hPG in individuals who later develop T2DM. Methods We conducted a prospective incident case-referent study within the Västerbotten Intervention Programme. Cardiovascular risk factor data as well as FPG and 2hPG and blood samples for future research were collected at a baseline health examination between 1989 and 2000, (n= 28 736. During follow-up in January 2001, 157 cases had developed T2DM. Referents without T2DM were matched for sex, age, and year of participation (n=277. Subgroup analysis was performed for cases with normal baseline glucose levels (FPG Results After adjusting for BMI, family history of diabetes, physical activity, smoking, systolic blood pressure and levels of C-reactive protein and triglycerides, independent associations were found between incident T2DM and elevated levels of tPA (OR=1.54, 95% CI 1.06-2.23, PAI-1 (OR=1.61, 95% CI 1.14-2.28, and tPA/PAI-1 complex (OR=2.45, 95% CI 1.56-3.84. In participants with normal glucose levels, PAI-1 (OR=2.06, 95% CI 1.10 - 3.86 exhibited an independent relationship with incident T2DM after the adjustments. Conclusions Elevated levels of fibrinolytic variables precede the manifestation of T2DM after adjusting for metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors and can be detected several years before changes in glucose tolerance.

  18. Factors associated with developing a fear of falling in subjects with primary open-angle glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Sayaka; Yuki, Kenya; Awano-Tanabe, Sachiko; Ono, Takeshi; Shiba, Daisuke; Murata, Hiroshi; Asaoka, Ryo; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2018-02-13

    To investigate the relationship between clinical risk factors, including visual field (VF) defects and visual acuity, and a fear of falling, among patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). All participants answered the following question at a baseline ophthalmic examination: Are you afraid of falling? The same question was then answered every 12 months for 3 years. A binocular integrated visual field was calculated by merging a patient's monocular Humphrey field analyzer VFs, using the 'best sensitivity' method. The means of total deviation values in the whole, superior peripheral, superior central, inferior central, and inferior peripheral VFs were calculated. The relationship between these mean VF measurements, and various clinical factors, against patients' baseline fear of falling and future fear of falling was analyzed using multiple logistic regression. Among 392 POAG subjects, 342 patients (87.2%) responded to the fear of falling question at least twice in the 3 years study period. The optimal regression model for patients' baseline fear of falling included age, gender, mean of total deviation values in the inferior peripheral VF and number of previous falls. The optimal regression equation for future fear of falling included age, gender, mean of total deviation values in the inferior peripheral VF and number of previous falls. Defects in the inferior peripheral VF area are significantly related to the development of a fear of falling.

  19. Where the signs prevail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dardo Scavino

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose to show in our paper that through his semiotic theory, Barthes developed a theory of subjectivity and society continued with the anti-utilitarian tradition of the Collège de Sociologie where George Bataille, Carl Einstein or Michel Leiris had favored the mythical and ritual dimension of collective life.

  20. Library Subject Guides: A Case Study of Evidence-Informed Library Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeham, Maurice; Roberts, Angharad; Shelley, Jane; Wells, Paul

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the process whereby a university library investigated the value of its subject guides to its users. A literature review and surveys of library staff, library users and other libraries were carried out. Existing library subject guides and those of other higher education libraries were evaluated. The project team reported…

  1. Brief assessment of subjective health complaints: Development, validation and population norms of a brief form of the Giessen Subjective Complaints List (GBB-8).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliem, Sören; Lohmann, Anna; Klatt, Thimna; Mößle, Thomas; Rehbein, Florian; Hinz, Andreas; Beutel, Manfred; Brähler, Elmar

    2017-04-01

    Although there is no causal relationship to medical morbidity, routine clinical assessment of somatic symptoms aids medical diagnosis and assessment of treatment effectiveness. Regardless of their causes, somatic symptoms indicate suffering, distress, and help-seeking behavior. The aim of the present study was to develop and validate a brief self-report questionnaire to assess somatic symptom strain. A brief form of the Giessen Subjective Complaints List (GBB-8) was developed and validated in a large population sample representative of the Federal Republic of Germany (N=2008). Psychometric analyses included confirmation of factor structure, classical item analysis, and measurement invariance tests. The sample furthermore served as a norm group. As indicators of construct validity, correlations with measures of anxiety, depression, alexithymia, and primary care contact were computed. Psychometric analyses yielded excellent scale properties regarding item characteristics, factor structure, and measurement invariance tests (Cronbach's alpha=0.88; CFI=0.980, TLI=0.965, RMSEA=0.049) for the second-order four-factor model; strict invariance was confirmed for gender, depression status, and physician contacts; strong invariance was confirmed regarding age and age×gender. The GBB-8 with its four subscales exhaustion, gastrointestinal complaints, musculoskeletal complaints, and cardiovascular complaints proves to be an economic measure of subjective symptom strain. Psychometric analyses deem it suitable for epidemiological research. The availability of norms makes it a potential everyday tool for general practitioners and psychosomatic clinics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Formal Devices for Creating New Signs in American Sign Languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellugi, Ursula; Newkirk, Don

    1981-01-01

    Examines recently coined American Sign Language signs to show how the ASL lexicon is expanded. Included are elicited signs for relatively new objects or ideas, signs referring to metalinguistics concepts in ASL, signs used as jargon or specialized vocabulary, and signs "invented" by young deaf children. (Author/PJM)

  3. Redefining the Pulvinar Sign in Fabry Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocozza, S; Russo, C; Pisani, A; Olivo, G; Riccio, E; Cervo, A; Pontillo, G; Feriozzi, S; Veroux, M; Battaglia, Y; Concolino, D; Pieruzzi, F; Mignani, R; Borrelli, P; Imbriaco, M; Brunetti, A; Tedeschi, E; Palma, G

    2017-12-01

    The pulvinar sign refers to exclusive T1WI hyperintensity of the lateral pulvinar. Long considered a common sign of Fabry disease, the pulvinar sign has been reported in many pathologic conditions. The exact incidence of the pulvinar sign has never been tested in representative cohorts of patients with Fabry disease. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of the pulvinar sign in Fabry disease by analyzing T1WI in a large Fabry disease cohort, determining whether relaxometry changes could be detected in this region independent of the pulvinar sign positivity. We retrospectively analyzed brain MR imaging of 133 patients with Fabry disease recruited through specialized care clinics. A subgroup of 26 patients underwent a scan including 2 FLASH sequences for relaxometry that were compared with MRI scans of 34 healthy controls. The pulvinar sign was detected in 4 of 133 patients with Fabry disease (3.0%). These 4 subjects were all adult men (4 of 53, 7.5% of the entire male population) with renal failure and under enzyme replacement therapy. When we tested for discrepancies between Fabry disease and healthy controls in quantitative susceptibility mapping and relaxometry maps, no significant difference emerged for any of the tested variables. The pulvinar sign has a significantly lower incidence in Fabry disease than previously described. This finding, coupled with a lack of significant differences in quantitative MR imaging, allows hypothesizing that selective involvement of the pulvinar is a rare neuroradiologic sign of Fabry disease. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  4. Validating Signs and Symptoms From An Actual Mass Casualty Incident to Characterize An Irritant Gas Syndrome Agent (IGSA) Exposure: A First Step in The Development of a Novel IGSA Triage Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culley, Joan M; Richter, Jane; Donevant, Sara; Tavakoli, Abbas; Craig, Jean; DiNardi, Salvatore

    2017-07-01

    • Chemical exposures daily pose a significant threat to life. Rapid assessment by first responders/emergency nurses is required to reduce death and disability. Currently, no informatics tools for Irritant Gas Syndrome Agents (IGSA) exposures exist to process victims efficiently, continuously monitor for latent signs/symptoms, or make triage recommendations. • This study uses actual patient data from a chemical incident to characterize and validate signs/symptoms of an IGSA Syndrome. Validating signs/symptoms is the first step in developing new emergency department informatics tools with the potential to revolutionize the process by which emergency nurses manage triage victims of chemical incidents. Chemical exposures can pose a significant threat to life. Rapid assessment by first responders/emergency nurses is required to reduce death and disability. Currently, no informatics tools for irritant gas syndrome agents (IGSA) exposures exist to process victims efficiently, continuously monitor for latent signs/symptoms, or make triage recommendations. This study describes the first step in developing ED informatics tools for chemical incidents: validation of signs/symptoms that characterize an IGSA syndrome. Data abstracted from 146 patients treated for chlorine exposure in one emergency department during a 2005 train derailment and 152 patients not exposed to chlorine (a comparison group) were mapped to 93 possible signs/symptoms within 2 tools (WISER and CHEMM-IST) designed to assist emergency responders/emergency nurses with managing hazardous material exposures. Inferential statistics (χ(2)/Fisher's exact test) and diagnostics tests were used to examine mapped signs/symptoms of persons who were and were not exposed to chlorine. Three clusters of signs/symptoms are statistically associated with an IGSA syndrome (P signs/symptoms from at least 2 of these clusters. The latency period must also be considered for exposed/potentially exposed persons. This study uses

  5. Parkinsonian axial signs in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgante, Francesca; Barbui, Corrado; Tinazzi, Michele

    2017-03-01

    We have recently demonstrated evidence of nigro-striatal denervation, disease progression and response to levodopa in a subgroup of patients with schizophrenia who developed parkinsonism. In the present study, we investigated whether axial parkinsonian signs might be an early manifestation of parkinsonism in schizophrenia not necessarily related to chronic administration of antipsychotic drugs (AP) drugs. From a baseline cohort of 299 schizophrenic patients who did not satisfy the diagnostic criteria for parkinsonism (presence of at least two of the following appendicular signs: bradykinesia, tremor, rigidity), we identified a group of patients who manifested two out of three axial parkinsonian signs (abnormality of trunk posture, hypomimia and short-step gait). Accordingly, we obtained two sub-groups of patients with schizophrenia, with (Schiz-Axial, N = 26), and without parkinsonian axial signs (Schiz-NO-Axial, N = 273). Clinical and demographical variables were compared between groups. The motor section of the Unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS) was employed to measure motor disability. Schiz-Axial patients were significantly older (p = 0.007) and had longer disease duration (p = 0.04) compared to Schiz-NO-Axial. The two groups did not differ for variables related to AP treatment. Total UPDRS motor score (p signs might be an early manifestation of parkinsonism in schizophrenia associated to older age and longer disease duration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Expanding subjectivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda; Soldz, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A major theme in recent psychoanalytic thinking concerns the use of therapist subjectivity, especially “countertransference,” in understanding patients. This thinking converges with and expands developments in qualitative research regarding the use of researcher subjectivity as a tool to understa...

  7. Prevalence of temporomandibular disorder signs in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbuz, O; Alatas, G; Kurt, E

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) signs in a group of institutionalized patients with schizophrenia. Three hundred thirty-nine patients with schizophrenia were examined and compared with 107 age-matched and gender-matched control subjects. TMD signs were evaluated according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria to assess temporomandibular joint pain to palpation, limitation of maximum mouth opening, alteration of mouth opening pathway (deviation/deflection) and temporomandibular joint noises. In addition, tooth wear was recorded for the assessment of bruxism. The prevalence of any TMD signs was observed higher (P = 0.001) in the patients with schizophrenia (284/339, 83.7%) than in the controls (72/107, 67.3%). The prevalence of more than one TMD sign was also significantly higher (P = 0.03) in the patients with schizophrenia (131/339, 38.6%) than in the controls (29/107, 27.1%). Significant differences between the two groups were apparent for joint pain on palpation (P = 0.006), deflection (P = 0.006) and joint sounds (P = 0.002). Severe tooth wear was evident in 39.2% of the patients with schizophrenia compared with 21.2% in the control group (P = 0.001). The finding of the present study showed that, compared to control population, chronically hospitalized patients with schizophrenia seem to be more prone to the development of TMD signs and severe tooth wear and bruxism.

  8. Signed Networks in Social Media

    CERN Document Server

    Leskovec, Jure; Kleinberg, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Relations between users on social media sites often reflect a mixture of positive (friendly) and negative (antagonistic) interactions. In contrast to the bulk of research on social networks that has focused almost exclusively on positive interpretations of links between people, we study how the interplay between positive and negative relationships affects the structure of on-line social networks. We connect our analyses to theories of signed networks from social psychology. We find that the classical theory of structural balance tends to capture certain common patterns of interaction, but that it is also at odds with some of the fundamental phenomena we observe --- particularly related to the evolving, directed nature of these on-line networks. We then develop an alternate theory of status that better explains the observed edge signs and provides insights into the underlying social mechanisms. Our work provides one of the first large-scale evaluations of theories of signed networks using on-line datasets, as ...

  9. Rhetorical meta-language to promote the development of students' writing skills and subject matter understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelger, Susanne; Sigrell, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Background: Feedback is one of the most significant factors for students' development of writing skills. For feedback to be successful, however, students and teachers need a common language - a meta-language - for discussing texts. Not least because in science education such a meta-language might contribute to improve writing training and feedback-giving. Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore students' perception of teachers' feedback given on their texts in two genres, and to suggest how writing training and feedback-giving could become more efficient. Sample: In this study were included 44 degree project students in biology and molecular biology, and 21 supervising teachers at a Swedish university. Design and methods: The study concerned students' writing about their degree projects in two genres: scientific writing and popular science writing. The data consisted of documented teacher feedback on the students' popular science texts. It also included students' and teachers' answers to questionnaires about writing and feedback. All data were collected during the spring of 2012. Teachers' feedback, actual and recalled - by students and teachers, respectively - was analysed and compared using the so-called Canons of rhetoric. Results: While the teachers recalled the given feedback as mainly positive, most students recalled only negative feedback. According to the teachers, suggested improvements concerned firstly the content, and secondly the structure of the text. In contrast, the students mentioned language style first, followed by content. Conclusions: The disagreement between students and teachers regarding how and what feedback was given on the students texts confirm the need of improved strategies for writing training and feedback-giving in science education. We suggest that the rhetorical meta-language might play a crucial role in overcoming the difficulties observed in this study. We also discuss how training of writing skills may contribute to

  10. DESIGNING CROSS SUBJECT COMMUNICATIONS AS THE CONDITION FOR DEVELOPING SOCIAL SKILLS IN TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Ivanovna Lygina

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we will present the results of a pedagogical experiment aimed at studying the level of social skills in university professors. Planning cross subject communications in an academic subject with consideration of the previous and associated knowledge and skills of students in the educational programme formed the basis of the pedagogical experiment. Problems have occurred when university professors are faced with elaborating cross subject communications. It was discovered that the problems professors had were connected to their responsiveness and to the various strategies they applied while working within small groups. We will analyze the results, provide recommendations and show the change in the level of the professors’ social skills during elaboration of  cross subject communications.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-8-21

  11. The Sign Learning Theory

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KING OF DAWN

    The Sign Learning Theory. Although a blend of both Gestalt psychology and behaviourism, the sign learning theory is actually a drift from the behaviourist perspective with an attempt to explain certain phenomena commonly seen in behaviour which could not be satisfactorily accounted for by stimulus-response paradigms.

  12. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin; Nolte, Adam C; Sturgeon, Gregory M; Segars, William P; Ghate, Sujata V; Nolte, Loren W; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y

    2015-07-01

    Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power-law descriptions of the phantom images

  13. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Nolte, Adam C. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Ghate, Sujata V. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Segars, William P. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Nolte, Loren W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. Methods: The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. Results: The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power

  14. Sign Language with Babies: What Difference Does It Make?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Susan Kubic

    2010-01-01

    Teaching sign language--to deaf or other children with special needs or to hearing children with hard-of-hearing family members--is not new. Teaching sign language to typically developing children has become increasingly popular since the publication of "Baby Signs"[R] (Goodwyn & Acredolo, 1996), now in its third edition. Attention to signing with…

  15. Report on a study of fires with smoke gas development : determination of blood cyanide levels, clinical signs and laboratory values in victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldner, G; Koch, E M; Gottwald-Hostalek, U; Baud, F; Burillo, G; Fauville, J-P; Levi, F; Locatelli, C; Zilker, T

    2013-08-01

    This is a report on an international non-interventional study of patients exposed to fires with smoke development in closed rooms. The objective of the study was to document clinical symptoms, relevant laboratory values and blood cyanide concentrations from fire victims in order to confirm or rule out presumptive correlations between the individual parameters. The study was conducted in five European countries with patients being included if they presented with the characteristic clinical signs, such as soot deposits and altered neurological status. Venous blood samples were taken from victims prior to administration of an antidote in all cases and determination of cyanide concentration was performed in a central laboratory using high performance liquid chromatography. Data from 102 patients (62 % male, average age 49 years) were included in the evaluation with no blood samples being available for analysis from 2 patients. In 25 patients the blood cyanide concentration was below the limit of detection of 1.2 μmol/l. Cyanide levels between 1.2 and 10 μmol/l were measured in 54 patients, 7 patients had values between 10 and 20 μmol/l, 4 patients between 20 and 40 μmol/l while levels above 40 μmol/l were determined in 10 patients. The results of the study could not demonstrate that the cyanide level was influenced either by the interval between smoke exposure and blood sampling or the duration presence at the fire scene. The following clinical signs or laboratory values were recorded as relevant for increased and possibly toxic cyanide levels: respiratory arrest, dyspnea, resuscitation requirement, tracheal intubation, respiratory support measures, low Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score and respiratory frequency. A correlation between cyanide concentration and the total amount of soot deposits on the face and neck, in the oral cavity and in expectoration was confirmed. A correlation between cyanide and carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels in the blood of fire victims was

  16. Development and validation of a biomarker for diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome in human subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Pimentel

    Full Text Available Diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is diagnosed through clinical criteria after excluding "organic" conditions, and can be precipitated by acute gastroenteritis. Cytolethal distending toxin B (CdtB is produced by bacteria that cause acute gastroenteritis, and a post-infectious animal model demonstrates that host antibodies to CdtB cross-react with vinculin in the host gut, producing an IBS-like phenotype. Therefore, we assessed circulating anti-CdtB and anti-vinculin antibodies as biomarkers for D-IBS in human subjects. Subjects with D-IBS based on Rome criteria (n=2375 were recruited from a large-scale multicenter clinical trial for D-IBS (TARGET 3. Subjects with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD (n=142, subjects with celiac disease (n=121, and healthy controls (n=43 were obtained for comparison. Subjects with IBD and celiac disease were recruited based on the presence of intestinal complaints and histologic confirmation of chronic inflammatory changes in the colon or small intestine. Subjects with celiac disease were also required to have an elevated tTG and biopsy. All subjects were aged between 18 and 65 years. Plasma levels of anti-CdtB and anti-vinculin antibodies were determined by ELISA, and compared between groups. Anti-CdtB titers were significantly higher in D-IBS subjects compared to IBD, healthy controls and celiac disease (P<0.001. Anti-vinculin titers were also significantly higher in IBS (P<0.001 compared to the other groups. The area-under-the-receiver operating curves (AUCs were 0.81 and 0.62 for diagnosis of D-IBS against IBD for anti-CdtB and anti-vinculin, respectively. Both tests were less specific in differentiating IBS from celiac disease. Optimization demonstrated that for anti-CdtB (optical density≥2.80 the specificity, sensitivity and likelihood ratio were 91.6%, 43.7 and 5.2, respectively, and for anti-vinculin (OD≥1.68 were 83.8%, 32.6 and 2.0, respectively. These results confirm that anti-CdtB and

  17. Development and validation of a biomarker for diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Mark; Morales, Walter; Rezaie, Ali; Marsh, Emily; Lembo, Anthony; Mirocha, James; Leffler, Daniel A; Marsh, Zachary; Weitsman, Stacy; Chua, Kathleen S; Barlow, Gillian M; Bortey, Enoch; Forbes, William; Yu, Allen; Chang, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is diagnosed through clinical criteria after excluding "organic" conditions, and can be precipitated by acute gastroenteritis. Cytolethal distending toxin B (CdtB) is produced by bacteria that cause acute gastroenteritis, and a post-infectious animal model demonstrates that host antibodies to CdtB cross-react with vinculin in the host gut, producing an IBS-like phenotype. Therefore, we assessed circulating anti-CdtB and anti-vinculin antibodies as biomarkers for D-IBS in human subjects. Subjects with D-IBS based on Rome criteria (n=2375) were recruited from a large-scale multicenter clinical trial for D-IBS (TARGET 3). Subjects with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (n=142), subjects with celiac disease (n=121), and healthy controls (n=43) were obtained for comparison. Subjects with IBD and celiac disease were recruited based on the presence of intestinal complaints and histologic confirmation of chronic inflammatory changes in the colon or small intestine. Subjects with celiac disease were also required to have an elevated tTG and biopsy. All subjects were aged between 18 and 65 years. Plasma levels of anti-CdtB and anti-vinculin antibodies were determined by ELISA, and compared between groups. Anti-CdtB titers were significantly higher in D-IBS subjects compared to IBD, healthy controls and celiac disease (PIBS (PIBS against IBD for anti-CdtB and anti-vinculin, respectively. Both tests were less specific in differentiating IBS from celiac disease. Optimization demonstrated that for anti-CdtB (optical density≥2.80) the specificity, sensitivity and likelihood ratio were 91.6%, 43.7 and 5.2, respectively, and for anti-vinculin (OD≥1.68) were 83.8%, 32.6 and 2.0, respectively. These results confirm that anti-CdtB and anti-vinculin antibodies are elevated in D-IBS compared to non-IBS subjects. These biomarkers may be especially helpful in distinguishing D-IBS from IBD in the workup of chronic diarrhea.

  18. Recent developments in single-subject methodology: methods for analyzing generalization, maintenance, and multicomponent treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, B A; Hartmann, D P

    1988-01-01

    At the outset of this chapter we asked whether or not single-subject methodology has outlived its usefulness to behavior therapy. We did so because serious doubts have been expressed about the ability of single-subject methodology to address the salient issues of the day. This chapter allays many of these doubts. This chapter reveals that single-subject researchers are far from helpless when investigating generalization and maintenance and identifying the active (and inactive) components in their compound treatments. In fact, a number of powerful strategies are at their disposal--strategies that are not strangers to the armamentarium of single-case researchers. These strategies are in essence nothing more than extensions of the reversal, multiple baseline, and simultaneous and alternating-treatments designs. In the case of the assessment of generalization, these extensions involve little more than the inclusion of continuous measures (or regular probes) of untrained responses throughout the investigation. In the case of the assessment of maintenance, they involve the replacement of a comparison of two or more acquisition procedures with a comparison of two or more maintenance procedures. And in the case of the identification of active (and inactive) components of compound treatments, they involve the aggregation of the findings from a series of single-subject investigations. When the requirements of single-subject designs and their extensions cannot be met, investigators still have available a set of traditional group designs (e.g., factorial and additive designs) for attacking these same issues. Assessment of generalization, maintenance, and the components of compound treatments are not the only salient issues facing behavior therapy today. Another is the widening gap between the researcher and the practitioner (e.g., Barlow, 1980; Wilson, 1981). It is thought by some that single-subject methodology may be the means of bridging this gap; that through single-subject

  19. Sign patterns of J-orthogonal matrices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hall, F.J.; Li, Z.; Parnass, C.; Rozložník, Miroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 1 (2017), s. 225-241 ISSN 2300-7451 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : G-matrix * J-orthogonal matrix * sign pattern matrix * sign patterns that allow J-orthogonality Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/spma.2017.5.issue-1/spma-2017-0016/spma-2017-0016. xml ?format=INT

  20. Using Portfolios to Engage Introductory Geoscience Students in Their Subject and to Develop Learning Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, A. P.; Prior, D. J.

    2008-12-01

    It is often difficult to deal with wide-ranging, exciting geoscience topics at introductory level when the background geoscience knowledge of the incoming students is limited. This means that new students can often be confronted by self-contained, subject-based topics (e.g. introductory mineralogy) and fail to see where the bigger pictures may be. Another issue, partly arising from massification and thus increasing diversity of student cohorts but also to changes in UK school education goals, is the realisation that incoming students have difficulties combining lecture note taking, reading and general organisation of paper-based materials into a learning package that can help them write structured essays. They need help with the transfer from school to university education. Two years ago, a curriculum review provided the opportunity to develop a new module that could address these issues. The module deals with current topics. Students attend a series of 8 lectures given by 8 different faculty staff covering topics like The Origin of the Moon, Earthquake Prediction, Mass Extinctions, Snowball Earth, and Geohazards spread over the introductory year. Each lecturer uses whatever delivery style they want (PowerPoint, chalk and talk), but the lecture must be an illustration of the scientific method dealing with evidence, models and uncertainty, and must direct students towards a range of associated reading. The students develop a portfolio with a section for each lecture topic. Each section contains their notes, annotated copies of the reading and a one page (A4) summary of the main points of the topic, derived from both the notes and reading. The students also develop a glossary of geological terms. In addition, the students must attend 6 extra talks given by guest speakers at either the student society meetings or the departmental seminar series. Assessment is by the portfolio (40%) and a final essay paper (60%). The portfolio is collected in at the end of the first

  1. Imbalances of innovative industrial development of subjects of Federation, members of the Russian Arctic zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zharov V. S.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of testing the previously developed methodological approach and methods of assessing the innovativeness level of the industrial development of the regions – subjects of the Federation (members of the Russian Arctic zone – on the basis of the calculation and analysis of scorecard values have been presented. It has been shown that during the years 2005–2013, the highest level of technological innovation of industrial development had been achieved in the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia. Представлены результаты апробации разработанных ранее методологического подхода и методики оценки уровня инновационности промышленного развития регионов – субъектов Федерации, входящих в Арктическую зону РФ, – на основе расчета и анализа значений системы показателей. Показано, что в течение 2005–2013 гг. наиболее высокий уровень технологической инновационности промышленного развития достигнут в Республике Саха (Якутия

  2. Performance of pile supported sign structures : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Foundations for sign structures are subjected primarily to overturning loads, but published methods for designing driven pile groups only address groups subjected either to compression or uplift, not both simultaneously. A lateral load test of two fo...

  3. Learning and the development of social identities in the subjects Care and Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volman, M.L.L.; ten Dam, G.

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the way in which social identities structure the learning processes of students in two subjects in the Dutch secondary school curriculum - Care and Technology. It analyses interviews with 23 students and their teachers with a view to explaining the disappointing results in

  4. Learning and the development of social identities in the subjects: Care and Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volman, M.L.L.; ten Dam, G.T.M.

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the way in which social identities structure the learning processes of students in two subjects in the Dutch secondary school curriculum - Care and Technology. It analyzes interviews with 23 students and their teachers with a view to explaining the disappointing results in

  5. Developing Multimedia Enhanced Content to Upgrade Subject Content Knowledge of Secondary School Teachers in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtebe, Joel S.; Kibga, Elia Y.; Mwambela, Alfred A.; Kissaka, Mussa M.

    2015-01-01

    The failure rates and lack of interest amongst students in science and mathematics in secondary schools in Tanzania is a serious problem. The Ministry of Education and Vocational Training (MoEVT) implemented a project to enhance and upgrade the pedagogical knowledge and subject content knowledge of teachers in selected difficult topics in science…

  6. The Role of Subjectivity in Teacher Expertise Development: Mindfully Embracing the "Black Sheep" of Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    In Western cultures, subjectivity has often been seen as the "black sheep" of educational research because of its heavy emphasis on objectivity. Consequently many research initiatives in education share the assumption that objective reasoning should play a central role. However, mentoring teachers' practice improvement research often…

  7. The ATIS sign language corpus

    OpenAIRE

    Bungeroth, Jan; Stein, Daniel; Dreuw, Philippe; Ney, Hermann; Morrissey, Sara; Way, Andy; van Zijl, Lynette

    2008-01-01

    Systems that automatically process sign language rely on appropriate data. We therefore present the ATIS sign language corpus that is based on the domain of air travel information. It is available for five languages, English, German, Irish sign language, German sign language and South African sign language. The corpus can be used for different tasks like automatic statistical translation and automatic sign language recognition and it allows the specific modelling of spatial references in sign...

  8. Impaired Recognition of Traffic Signs in Adults with Dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachacki, Gregory W. Z.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This study, involving 10 adults with dyslexia and 11 controls, found that controls differentiated between real and false traffic signs better than subjects did and that there was a significant correlation between traffic sign recognition and driving experience for controls but not for subjects. Results are interpreted in terms of a deficit in…

  9. Purdue RVL-SLLL American Sign Language Database

    OpenAIRE

    Wilbur, Ronnie; Kak, Avinash C.

    2006-01-01

    Development of automatic recognition systems for American Sign Language (ASL) needs a comprehensive database that provides a range of signed material under controlled and less-controlled lighting conditions. The database we created contains (a) handshapes in isolation and in single signs, (b) the American fingerspelling alphabet, (c) numbers, (d) movement in single signs, and (e) examples of short discourse narratives for testing sign recognition in connected linguistic contexts. All of th...

  10. Infant Sign Training and Functional Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normand, Matthew P.; Machado, Mychal A.; Hustyi, Kristin M.; Morley, Allison J.

    2011-01-01

    We taught manual signs to typically developing infants using a reversal design and caregiver-nominated stimuli. We delivered the stimuli on a time-based schedule during baseline. During the intervention, we used progressive prompting and reinforcement, described by Thompson et al. (2004, 2007), to establish mands. Following sign training, we…

  11. Phonological Awareness for American Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corina, David P.; Hafer, Sarah; Welch, Kearnan

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the concept of phonological awareness (PA) as it relates to the processing of American Sign Language (ASL). We present data from a recently developed test of PA for ASL and examine whether sign language experience impacts the use of metalinguistic routines necessary for completion of our task. Our data show that deaf signers…

  12. Signs of Overload

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Building Resilience Sleep Growing Healthy Healthy Children > Healthy Living > Emotional Wellness > Signs of ...

  13. The Babinski sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Jasper M; Reilly, Mary M

    2011-10-01

    Joseph Babinski (1857-1932), a French neurologist of Polish descent, was the first person to describe extension of the big toe following stimulation of the sole of the foot on 22 February 1896 (Babinski, 1896). He referred to the sign as 'phénomène des orteils' (toes phenomenon) but it is now usually referred to eponymously as the 'Babinski sign' or descriptively as the extensor plantar response.

  14. Consolidation of the subjects of the Russian Federation as an element of economic development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev Aleksandrovich Korshunov

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The discussion on the optimality of the currently existing structure of the subjects of the Russian Federation is illustrating the contradictions that have been accumulated in the dominion form of government of our country in recent years. In this paper, we attempt to assess the impact of past enlargements, which are considered as a part of the process called modernization of the country as a whole. A system of criteria for the process of consolidating and enlarging the regions was elaborated. The main criterion proposed is the quality of life in the enlarged regions. Diagnostics of the state, as well as the estimated dynamics of the socio-demographic security of the individual subjects of the Russian Federation, members of the Siberian Federal District in the period 2000-2009, was done. An integrated assessment of the socio-demographic security in the discussed subjects on the basis of estimates was obtained for the six indicative blocks: reproduction of the population, health status, level of life and material well-being of the population, quality of life, migration flows and indicators of age-sex and marriage-family structure.

  15. Africa: signs of hope?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.F. Kirsten

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The dawning of the 21st century generally brought new hope to African leaders and countless thousands of ordinary citizens of many countries on the continent. The first signs of a new turn of events shone through by the end of the last decade of the previous century. This was manifested by economic growth rates that started to pick up in a number of African states, by pro-democracy movements which in country after country succeeded in replacing authoritarian regimes, and by the winding down and termination of some of Africa’s most devastating wars. The results of this analysis confirm the above-mentioned positive political, economic and conflict trends in Africa. It is clearly a significant turn of events given the well-known political and economic predicament with which Africa is struggling. When this negative legacy and Cold War background of Africa is considered, the importance of present developments is clear to see. The identified heightened sense of purpose among the leaders and peoples of Africa and the changed mood and need among Africans to take charge of their own future that found expression in the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD are indeed significant and bode well for the future of the continent. A word of warning here is, however, necessary. Our conduct with Africa must be very cautious and we must guard against over-optimism and the exaggerated belief that Africa is now on a trajectory of sustained development and peace. We cannot generalise about Africa – for that the continent is just too big and diverse from a geographical, cultural, economic and political point of view.

  16. Longitudinal Study of Neurological Soft Signs in First-Episode Early-Onset Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayoral, M.; Bombin, I.; Castro-Fornieles, J.; Gonzalez-Pinto, A.; Otero, S.; Parellada, M.; Moreno, D.; Baeza, I.; Graell, M.; Rapado, M.; Arango, C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In recent decades, the assessment of neurological soft signs (NSS) in patients with psychosis has become a subject of special interest. The study of the progression of NSS during adolescence will provide valuable information about the role of NSS as endophenotypes or biomarkers and about brain development at a stage in which brain…

  17. Population Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Modeling of Lusutrombopag, a Newly Developed Oral Thrombopoietin Receptor Agonist, in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsube, Takayuki; Ishibashi, Toru; Kano, Takeshi; Wajima, Toshihiro

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) model for describing plasma lusutrombopag concentrations and platelet response following oral lusutrombopag dosing and for evaluating covariates in the PK/PD profiles. A population PK/PD model was developed using a total of 2539 plasma lusutrombopag concentration data and 1408 platelet count data from 78 healthy adult subjects following oral single and multiple (14-day once-daily) dosing. Covariates in PK and PK/PD models were explored for subject age, body weight, sex, and ethnicity. A three-compartment model with first-order rate and lag time for absorption was selected as a PK model. A three-transit and one-platelet compartment model with a sigmoid E max model for drug effect and feedback of platelet production was selected as the PD model. The PK and PK/PD models well described the plasma lusutrombopag concentrations and the platelet response, respectively. Body weight was a significant covariate in PK. The bioavailability of non-Japanese subjects (White and Black/African American subjects) was 13 % lower than that of Japanese subjects, while the simulated platelet response profiles using the PK/PD model were similar between Japanese and non-Japanese subjects. There were no significant covariates of the tested background data including age, sex, and ethnicity (Japanese or non-Japanese) for the PD sensitivity. A population PK/PD model was developed for lusutrombopag and shown to provide good prediction for the PK/PD profiles. The model could be used as a basic PK/PD model in the drug development of lusutrombopag.

  18. Is the Non-unitary Subject a Plausible and Productive Way to Understand Development Bureaucrats?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamas, P.A.; Sato, C.

    2012-01-01

    Development bureaucrats are the human instruments of the policies that mobilise funds, create organisations and underwrite interventions. For their home audiences development organisations need to present bureaucrats who are reliable instruments. In the field these same organisations need staff who

  19. How HANDy Are Baby Signs? A Systematic Review of the Impact of Gestural Communication on Typically Developing, Hearing Infants under the Age of 36 Months: Response to Howard and Doherty-Sneddon's Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth M.; Johnston, J. Cyne; Thibert, Jonelle; Grandpierre, Viviane

    2014-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to synthesize the evidence related to the effectiveness of baby sign language for children with typical development. This response to a Commentary on the review stresses that the primary purpose of the review was to assist caregivers and policy makers with informed decision-making related to the benefits of the…

  20. The Development of a Novel Perfused Cadaver Model With Dynamic Vital Sign Regulation and Real-World Scenarios to Teach Surgical Skills and Error Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minneti, Michael; Baker, Craig J; Sullivan, Maura E

    2017-10-13

    The landscape of graduate medical education has changed dramatically over the past decade and the traditional apprenticeship model has undergone scrutiny and modifications. The mandate of the 80-hour work-week, the introduction of integrated residency programs, increased global awareness about patient safety along with financial constraints have spurred changes in graduate educational practices. In addition, new technologies, more complex procedures, and a host of external constraints have changed where and how we teach technical and procedural skills. Simulation-based training has been embraced by the surgical community and has quickly become an essential component of most residency programs as a method to add efficacy to the traditional learning model. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to describe the development of a perfused cadaver model with dynamic vital sign regulation, and (2) to assess the impact of a curriculum using this model and real world scenarios to teach surgical skills and error management. By providing a realistic training environment our aim is to enhance the acquisition of surgical skills and provide a more thorough assessment of resident performance. Twenty-six learners participated in the scenarios. Qualitative data showed that participants felt that the simulation model was realistic, and that participating in the scenarios helped them gain new knowledge, learn new surgical techniques and increase their confidence performing the skill in a clinical setting. Identifying the importance of both technical and nontechnical skills in surgical education has hastened the need for more realistic simulators and environments in which they are placed. Team members should be able to interact in ways that allow for a global display of their skills thus helping to provide a more comprehensive assessment by faculty and learners. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Adolf Kussmaul and Kussmaul's sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navreet Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kussmaul's has provided us with three important signs: Pulses paradoxus, Kussmaul's sign and Kussmaul Breathing. This article discusses Kussmaul's sign, its discovery, first description, pathophyiology and exceptions.

  2. Emotions over time: synchronicity and development of subjective, physiological, and facial affective reactions to music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewe, Oliver; Nagel, Frederik; Kopiez, Reinhard; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2007-11-01

    Most people are able to identify basic emotions expressed in music and experience affective reactions to music. But does music generally induce emotion? Does it elicit subjective feelings, physiological arousal, and motor reactions reliably in different individuals? In this interdisciplinary study, measurement of skin conductance, facial muscle activity, and self-monitoring were synchronized with musical stimuli. A group of 38 participants listened to classical, rock, and pop music and reported their feelings in a two-dimensional emotion space during listening. The first entrance of a solo voice or choir and the beginning of new sections were found to elicit interindividual changes in subjective feelings and physiological arousal. Quincy Jones' "Bossa Nova" motivated movement and laughing in more than half of the participants. Bodily reactions such as "goose bumps" and "shivers" could be stimulated by the "Tuba Mirum" from Mozart's Requiem in 7 of 38 participants. In addition, the authors repeated the experiment seven times with one participant to examine intraindividual stability of effects. This exploratory combination of approaches throws a new light on the astonishing complexity of affective music listening.

  3. Hard Times in Higher Education: The Closure of Subject Centres and the Implications for Education for Sustainable Development (ESD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Chalkley

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Within many British Universities and, indeed, across higher education internationally, how best to provide education for sustainable development (ESD has become an increasingly important issue. There is now a widespread view that higher education sectors have a key part to play in preparing societies for the transition to a low carbon economy and the shift towards more sustainable ways of living and working. In the UK, a leading role in this field has been played by the Higher Education Academy and especially its network of 24 Subject Centres, each of which promotes curriculum enhancement in a particular discipline area. The mission of the Higher Education Academy has been to help raise the overall quality of the student learning experience across all disciplines and all Higher Education institutions (HEIs. As part of promoting and supporting many kinds of curriculum innovation and staff development, the HE Academy has championed the cause of ESD. Now, however, as a result of government spending cuts, the Academy is facing severe budget reductions and all its Subject Centres are soon to close. At this pivotal moment, the purpose of this paper is, therefore, to review the HE Academy’s past contribution to ESD and to explore the likely future implications of the demise of its Subject Centres. The paper ends by outlining some ideas as to how the ESD agenda might be advanced in the post-Subject Centre era, in the light of the Academy’s intention to support subject communities under its new structure. The paper has been developed through participation in key committees, engagement with Academy and Subject Centre staff, as well as through a literature review.

  4. Evaluating a Professional Development Programme for Implementation of a Multidisciplinary Science Subject

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Visser, Talitha Christine; Coenders, Ferdinand G.M; Terlouw, C; Pieters, Julius Marie

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate a professional development programme that prepares and assists teachers with the implementation of a multidisciplinary science module, basing the evaluation on participants...

  5. Computational triadic algebras of signs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zadrozny, W. [T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States)

    1996-12-31

    We present a finite model of Peirce`s ten classes of signs. We briefly describe Peirce`s taxonomy of signs; we prove that any finite collection of signs can be extended to a finite algebra of signs in which all interpretants are themselves being interpreted; and we argue that Peirce`s ten classes of signs can be defined using constraints on algebras of signs. The paper opens the possibility of defining multimodal cognitive agents using Peirce`s classes of signs, and is a first step towards building a computational logic of signs based on Peirce`s taxonomies.

  6. The Attitude of the College Students to Entrepreneurial Skills Development in the Subject E-Commerce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beránek, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    One of the main goals of many educational courses at various colleges, especially those which focus on applied economics and management, is the development of students' entrepreneurship skills. It is usually accomplished through various project-oriented tasks. The development of the students' entrepreneurship skills is also the primary objective…

  7. Model of the Students' Key Competences Development through Interactive Whiteboard in the Subject of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecka, Peter; Valentová, Monika

    2017-01-01

    The basis of the submitted study are the continuously rising demands to alter the curricula with the aim to develop students' key competences in order to increase their professional versatility. The lack of scientific research and discussions show that little investigation has been done on the issue of development of key competences. Therefore,…

  8. Comparative Analysis of Participation of Teachers of STEM and Non-STEM Subjects in Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiyaka, Edward T.; Kibirige, Joachim; Sithole, Alec; McCarthy, Peter; Mupinga, Davison M.

    2017-01-01

    School administrators continuously consider teacher professional development (PD) as one of the key strategies to improving teachers' pedagogical skills. Modern proposals for advancing education by improving student learning outcomes are centered on high quality professional development for teachers. However, teachers face a number of barriers…

  9. These signs here now

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    1995-01-01

    Hallidays (1984) formulations of systemic-functional linguistics together with Hodge and Kress' (1988) social semiotics share the assumption that signs are not arbitrary: People make choices out of a web of possible constructions or expressions, and those choices can be shown to be motivated......, could be advocated as am improvement to the social semiotic analyses, and whether the Peircean idea of dynamic interpretants could be applied to turn-taking or vica versa. I shall be referring to Kress' paper on the non-arbitrary character of signs (Kress 1993) as a point of departure and comparison....

  10. Sign Vocabulary Recognition in Students of American Sign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupton, Linda; Fristoe, Macalyne

    1992-01-01

    This investigation explored recognition memory for sign language vocabulary in sign language students. Ten beginning and 10 advanced students were asked to judge their familiarity with 50 old and new vocabulary items presented in both written (sign gloss) and signed stimulus modes. (JL)

  11. The Distribution of Signs in New Zealand Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, David; Kennedy, Graeme

    2006-01-01

    Until now, teachers and learners of NZSL have not had access to information on the most frequently used signs in the Deaf community. This article describes the first study of the distribution of signs in New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL). We hope that it will help teachers of NZSL make decisions about which signs to teach first and suggest…

  12. Louisiana traffic sign inventory and management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    The Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (DOTD), like many state highway agencies in the United States, lacks a comprehensive system for inventorying and maintaining records of traffic signs. To address this problem, state highway d...

  13. Predictors of the Development of Elementary-School Children=s Intentions to Smoke Cigarettes: Hostility, Prototypes, and Subjective Norms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Sarah E.; Andrews, Judy A.; Barckley, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    Children’s intentions to smoke are reliable predictors of subsequent smoking and precede smoking initiation, so identifying predictors of intentions is important for preventing or delaying smoking initiation. Children’s hostility and sociability, mediated by the development of prototypes (i.e., social images of children who smoke cigarettes) and subjective norms regarding smoking among peers, were expected to predict the development of their intentions to smoke cigarettes in the future. Children in 2nd through 5th grades (N = 809) from a Western Oregon community participated in a longitudinal study. Hostility and sociability were assessed by teachers = ratings, and prototypes, subjective norms, and intentions were assessed by self-report at each of the first four annual assessments. Children’s intentions to smoke predicted whether they had tried cigarettes by the fifth assessment. For both genders, latent growth modeling demonstrated that hostility, but not sociability, predicted the development of smoking intentions. More hostile children were more likely to have higher initial levels of intentions to smoke and, for boys, this effect was mediated by their higher initial levels of subjective norms about smoking. Sociability was not related to the development of smoking cognitions for boys or girls. These results were discussed in terms of opportunities to intervene on early influences on smoking intentions. PMID:17577804

  14. Predictors of the development of elementary-school children's intentions to smoke cigarettes: hostility, prototypes, and subjective norms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Sarah E; Andrews, Judy A; Barckley, Maureen

    2007-07-01

    Children's intentions to smoke are reliable predictors of subsequent smoking and precede smoking initiation; thus identifying predictors of intentions is important for preventing or delaying smoking initiation. Children's hostility and sociability, mediated by the development of prototypes (i.e., social images of children who smoke cigarettes) and subjective norms regarding smoking among peers, were expected to predict the development of their intentions to smoke cigarettes in the future. Children in 2nd through 5th grades (N = 809) from a western Oregon community participated in a longitudinal study. Hostility and sociability were assessed by teachers' ratings, and prototypes, subjective norms, and intentions were assessed by self-report at each of the first four annual assessments. Children's intentions to smoke predicted whether they had tried cigarettes by the fifth assessment. For both genders, latent growth modeling demonstrated that hostility, but not sociability, predicted the development of smoking intentions. Children who were more hostile were more likely to have higher initial levels of intentions to smoke, and for boys this effect was mediated by their higher initial levels of subjective norms about smoking. Sociability was not related to the development of smoking cognitions for boys or girls. These results are discussed in terms of opportunities to intervene in early influences on smoking intentions.

  15. Visual cortex entrains to sign language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookshire, Geoffrey; Lu, Jenny; Nusbaum, Howard C; Goldin-Meadow, Susan; Casasanto, Daniel

    2017-06-13

    Despite immense variability across languages, people can learn to understand any human language, spoken or signed. What neural mechanisms allow people to comprehend language across sensory modalities? When people listen to speech, electrophysiological oscillations in auditory cortex entrain to slow ([Formula: see text]8 Hz) fluctuations in the acoustic envelope. Entrainment to the speech envelope may reflect mechanisms specialized for auditory perception. Alternatively, flexible entrainment may be a general-purpose cortical mechanism that optimizes sensitivity to rhythmic information regardless of modality. Here, we test these proposals by examining cortical coherence to visual information in sign language. First, we develop a metric to quantify visual change over time. We find quasiperiodic fluctuations in sign language, characterized by lower frequencies than fluctuations in speech. Next, we test for entrainment of neural oscillations to visual change in sign language, using electroencephalography (EEG) in fluent speakers of American Sign Language (ASL) as they watch videos in ASL. We find significant cortical entrainment to visual oscillations in sign language sign is strongest over occipital and parietal cortex, in contrast to speech, where coherence is strongest over the auditory cortex. Nonsigners also show coherence to sign language, but entrainment at frontal sites is reduced relative to fluent signers. These results demonstrate that flexible cortical entrainment to language does not depend on neural processes that are specific to auditory speech perception. Low-frequency oscillatory entrainment may reflect a general cortical mechanism that maximizes sensitivity to informational peaks in time-varying signals.

  16. Sign Communication in Cri du Chat Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlenkamp, Sonja; Kristoffersen, Kristian Emil

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a study on the use of sign supported Norwegian (SSN) in two individuals with Cri du chat syndrome (CCS). The study gives a first account of some selected aspects of production and intelligibility of SSN in CCS. Possible deviance in manual parameters, in particular inter- and/or intra-subject variation in the use…

  17. Sign Lowering and Phonetic Reduction in American Sign Language

    OpenAIRE

    Tyrone, Martha E.; Mauk, Claude E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines sign lowering as a form of phonetic reduction in American Sign Language. Phonetic reduction occurs in the course of normal language production, when instead of producing a carefully articulated form of a word, the language user produces a less clearly articulated form. When signs are produced in context by native signers, they often differ from the citation forms of signs. In some cases, phonetic reduction is manifested as a sign being produced at a lower location than in ...

  18. Neurological soft signs in antisocial men and relation with psychopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, Omer Faruk; Demirel, Aysegul; Kadak, Muhammed Tayyib; Emül, Murat; Duran, Alaattin

    2016-06-30

    Neurological soft signs (NSS) were studied in some axis-I disorders like schizophrenia, obsessive compulsive disorder, bipolar disorder, alcohol and substance abuse disorder. Aim of this study is detection of neurological soft signs in antisocial personality disorder and relation of these signs with psychopathy. The study was included 41 antisocial men and 41 healthy control subjects. Sociodemographic form, neurological evaluation scale and Hare psychopathy checklist was applied to the antisocial subjects, whereas sociodemographic form and neurological evaluation scale were applied to the controls. Antisocial men exhibited significiantly more NSS in total score and subgroups scales (ppsychopathy scores and NSS sequencing complex motor tasks (r=0.309; p=0.049) and NSS other tests subgroup scores (r=0.328; p=0.037). Similar relation was also observed in comparison between psychopathy subgroups. NSS accepted as being endophenotypes in schizophrenia, were also detected in antisocial group significantly more than controls in our study. Significant relationship between psychopathy and NSS may also hint the role of genetic mechanisms in personality development, though new extended studies with larger sample size are needed for clarification of this relationship. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluating a Professional Development Programme for Implementation of a Multidisciplinary Science Subject

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Talitha Christine; Coenders, Ferdinand G.M.; Terlouw, C.; Pieters, Julius Marie

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate a professional development programme that prepares and assists teachers with the implementation of a multidisciplinary science module, basing the evaluation on participants’ reactions, the first level of Guskey’s five-level model for evaluation (2002). Positive

  20. Academic Developers as Change Agents Improving Quality in a Large Interprofessional Undergraduate Subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordiner, Moira

    2014-01-01

    Much has been written about academic developers as change agents but not in an interprofessional education (IPE) context. IPE involves teaching students in different health professions how to work effectively in teams across professional boundaries to improve the quality of patient care. Extensive evidence reveals that implementing sustainable IPE…

  1. Thyroid peroxidase antibodies, levels of thyroid stimulating hormone and development of hypothyroidism in euthyroid subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, A.; Links, T.P.; de Jong-van den Berg, L.T.; Gans, R.O.; Wolffenbuttel, B.H.; Bakker, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) have been found to be related to the levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and to predict future development of thyroid failure in selected populations. We investigated these relations in a euthyroid general population. Design: Cross-sectional

  2. Creative Workshop as a Form of Contemporary Art and a Space for Subjective Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Józefowski, Eugeniusz

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the original concept of the author's creative workshop which is treated as an art form and the method of education. It contains a presentation of the structure of the original workshop developed by the author in the context of multi-layered relations occurring in the interconnected areas of art and education leading to…

  3. Why do certain consumers avoid new media developments? : An investigation of three prudent users’ subjectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gauttier, Stéphanie; Gauzente, Claire

    2015-01-01

    New media development constantly challenges consumer’s habits. While innovations are supposed to bring new facilities to users, a certain number of them still remain reluctant in accepting, adopting and using new media offers. The aim of this research is to review the theoretical frameworks that are

  4. It Takes Two to Tango: Studying How Students Constitute Political Subjects in Discourses on Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundegard, Iann; Wickman, Per-Olof

    2012-01-01

    A great deal of the ongoing discussion about environmental education and education for sustainable development has to do with democracy and deliberation. Here, for example, the normative approach has been challenged. As an alternative, there is sometimes a call for a curriculum and education that is characterized by democracy, participation, and…

  5. Developing, Using, and Interacting in the Flipped Learning Movement: Gaps among Subject Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-liang; Summers, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the current video collection of an open-access video website (TED-Ed). The research questions focus on its content as evidence of development, its viewership as evidence of use, and flipping as evidence of interaction in informal learning. In late September 2013, 686 video lessons were posted on the…

  6. Rhetorical Meta-Language to Promote the Development of Students' Writing Skills and Subject Matter Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelger, Susanne; Sigrell, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Background: Feedback is one of the most significant factors for students' development of writing skills. For feedback to be successful, however, students and teachers need a common language--a meta-language--for discussing texts. Not least because in science education such a meta-language might contribute to improve writing training and…

  7. Signing in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Rachael

    2013-01-01

    This article describes British Sign Language (BSL) as a viable option for teaching science. BSL is used by a vast number of people in Britain but is seldom taught in schools or included informally alongside lessons. With its new addition of a large scientific glossary, invented to modernise the way science is taught to deaf children, BSL breaks…

  8. Flemish Sign Language Standardisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herreweghe, Mieke; Vermeerbergen, Myriam

    2009-01-01

    In 1997, the Flemish Deaf community officially rejected standardisation of Flemish Sign Language. It was a bold choice, which at the time was not in line with some of the decisions taken in the neighbouring countries. In this article, we shall discuss the choices the Flemish Deaf community has made in this respect and explore why the Flemish Deaf…

  9. Sign-away Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Catherine E.

    1976-01-01

    Why would mental health clients sign release-of-information forms unless they thought a refusal to do so would jeopardize their access to service? The author believes that the practice of not advising clients of their rights to privacy has ethical implications that can compromise the value of the treatment. (Author)

  10. Buffer Zone Sign Template

    Science.gov (United States)

    The certified pesticide applicator is required to post a comparable sign, designating a buffer zone around the soil fumigant application block in order to control exposure risk. It must include the don't walk symbol, product name, and applicator contact.

  11. Chest HRCT signs predict deaths in long-term follow-up among asbestos exposed workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vehmas, Tapio, E-mail: tapio.vehmas@ttl.fi [Health and Work Ability, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, FI-00250 Helsinki (Finland); Oksa, Panu, E-mail: panu.oksa@ttl.fi [Health and Work Ability, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Uimalankatu 1, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Much lung and pleural pathology is found in chest CT studies. • HRCT signs were screened and subsequent mortality followed up. • Several signs were related to all-cause and disease specific deaths. • The HRCT classification system used was able to predict mortality. • Secondary preventive strategies should be developed for patients with such signs. - Abstract: Objectives: To study associations between chest HRCT signs and subsequent deaths in long-term follow-up. Methods: Lung and pleural signs of 633 asbestos exposed workers (age 45–86, mean 65) screened with HRCT were recorded by using the International Classification of Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases (ICOERD) system, which contains detailed instructions for use and reference images. Subsequent mortality was checked from the national register. Cox regression adjusted for covariates (age, sex, BMI, asbestos exposure, pack-years) was used to explore the relations between HRCT signs and all-cause deaths, cardiovascular and benign respiratory deaths, and deaths from neoplasms – all according to the ICD-10 diagnostic system. Results: The follow-up totalled 5271.9 person-years (mean 8.3 y/person, range .04–10.3). 119 deaths were reported. Irregular/linear opacities, honeycombing, emphysema, large opacities, visceral pleural abnormalities and bronchial wall thickening were all significantly related to all-cause deaths. Most of these signs were associated also with deaths from neoplasms and benign respiratory disease. Deaths from cardiovascular disease were predicted by emphysema and visceral pleural abnormalities. Conclusions: Several HRCT signs predicted deaths. Careful attention should be paid on subjects with radiological signs predictive of deaths and new secondary preventive strategies developed. This calls for further focused studies among different populations.

  12. [Early mother-infant separation and psychosocial development. II. Longitudinal study on 42 subjects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenici, R; Papini, M A

    1988-01-01

    It is the purpose of the present investigation to obtain some information as they can be drown from the activity of our follow-up for premature babies and infants at higher risk. The main objectives of the study were: - to evaluate the aspects of parent's emotional status and parent-infant interaction in the first year of life; - to evaluate possible effects of the early separation on later development of the children. We have observed 42 LBW infants (hospitalized at birth for a period of one-three months) and their parents for 7-8 years. Our study has included: interviews with parents, observation of interaction, clinical examinations, designs. Recurrent interactive patterns have been defined in their peculiarities in the first year of life. Patterns of later psychosocial development are also exposed: they are strictly related to the kind of the precocious interaction.

  13. MATHEMATICS TOOLS DEVELOPMENT BASED ON WEB WITH MOODLE APPLICATIONS IN BASED STATISTICS SUBJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    rina dwi s, febrian dewanto, bagus ardi s

    2016-02-01

    The results the influence of motivation and activity of learning achievement of 89.7% d and the average of  learning achievement experimental class achieve exhaustiveness 74.25 e Average learning achievement of  experimental class 74.25, better than average learning achievement for control class 64.57. Based on the research results obtained are valid learning tools and effective learning that show the development of learning tools goals achieved.

  14. The Development of Molecular Gastronomy as a Subject Discipline at the Dublin Institute of Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Roisin; Danaher, Pauline; Traynor, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Molecular gastronomy is the study of the physical and chemical culinary transformations that occur during preparation, cooking and consumption. Molecular gastronomy differs from food science as the social, artistic and technical components of culinary and gastronomic phenomena are explored. At the Dublin Institute of Technology (DIT) the aim of developing molecular gastronomy modules is to use them as a tool to teach scientific principles to those who work in the Culinary Arts. Students and g...

  15. Development of a Medical Care Terminal for Efficient Monitoring of Bedridden Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is developed in the context of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL and has as main objective the development of a mechatronic system that allows the care of bedridden patients with ongoing medical care handled by a single person. The developed Medical Care Terminal (MCT improves autonomy in home care, safety, comfort, and hygiene of bedridden patients. The MCT has six biomedical sensors and four environmental sensors. Data acquisition and processing is performed using Arduino and LabVIEW platforms, respectively. The proposed solution has, as main feature, its adaptability to the patient needs. One of the MCT functionalities is the remote access to the patient data through the web. The caregiver may request help from a specialist who sends back information in real time to perform first aid assistance. This device has a flexible configuration allowing a fast and cheap reconfiguration according the specific needs of the patient. The proposed mechatronic system intends to meet the needs of bedridden patients improving their quality of life, health, safety, and comfort, while enabling the remote monitoring of the patients.

  16. Application of Fuzzy Borda Combination Evaluation in Subjective and Objective Evaluation Methods in Comprehensive Evaluation of Population Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jiajia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper constructs the comprehensive index evaluation of population development from the three aspects of human development, population and economic society and population, resources and environment, according to the movement course and changing trend of population development at home and abroad, and the guiding ideology of national population development strategy system. The index system consists of 3 first level indexes, 8 Secondary indexes, 22 tertiary level indexes and 42 fourth level indexes. And on the basis of commonly used comprehensive evaluation methods. The comprehensive evaluation of the population development in China in 2013 was made by using the combined evaluation method, which effectively overcomes the shortcomings of the objective evaluation method and the subjective evaluation method, and obtains a more credible comprehensive evaluation value.

  17. The Danish Sign Language Dictionary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jette Hedegaard; Troelsgård, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The entries of the The Danish Sign Language Dictionary have four sections:  Entry header: In this section the sign headword is shown as a photo and a gloss. The first occurring location and handshape of the sign are shown as icons.  Video window: By default the base form of the sign headword...... function signs) and mouth movement, cross-references to synonyms etc., information about restricted use, and example sentences. Semantically opaque compounds with the sign are shown below the regular meanings.  Additional information: This section holds cross-references to homonyms and to common frozen...... forms of the sign (only for classifier entries). In addition to this, frequent co-occurrences with the sign are shown in this section. The signs in the The Danish Sign Language Dictionary can be looked up through:  Handshape: Particular handshapes for the active and the passive hand can be specified...

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF A CREDIT POLICY FOR MARKETS SUBJECT TO CREDIT RATIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobov A. A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Effective credit policy is an essential condition for bank’s successful operation. In this article methods of developing a credit policy that accounts for information asymmetry and «reverse selection» effect in the credit market are considered. In the course of research, relationships between interest rates, “pass” credit score, total bank’s income, average profitability of a credit product and the amount of capital required to be allocated to a new product, were revealed. Noting these relationships, bank’s credit department is able to set optimal interest rates, credit score and capital, as well as to apply credit rationing, if necessary.

  19. Persistent depression is a significant risk factor for the development of arteriosclerosis in middle-aged Japanese male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Hiroki; Fujii, Satoshi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Depression often coexists with hypertension and various cardiovascular diseases. However, the relationship between depression and the development of arteriosclerosis has not been fully established. We assessed depression and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in 828 middle-aged Japanese male subjects at baseline and during 3 years of follow-up. Depression was assessed using Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression questionnaires, and the study subjects were divided into the following three groups: persistent depression, transient depression and no depression. The number (%) of subjects with persistent, transient and no depression were 104 (12.6), 76 (9.2) and 648 (78.2), respectively. Blood pressure and baPWV did not differ among the three groups at baseline. The changes in the baPWV values (⊿baPWV) correlated significantly and positively with age, body mass index, baseline systolic blood pressure and persistent depression (r = 0.32, P arteriosclerosis in middle-aged Japanese male subjects.

  20. Sexuality in subjects with intellectual disability: an educational intervention proposal for parents and counselors in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Gregorio; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    In developing countries, the study of intellectual disability has enormous knowledge gaps, especially in the areas of intervention, utilization of services and legislation. This article provides information not only for aiding in the potential development of sexuality in individuals with intellectual disability, but also for fostering their social integration. In Mexico and the region, in order to develop educational interventions for promoting sexual health, it is necessary to consider the following priorities: a) mental health professionals should have the knowledge or receive training for carrying out a sexual education and counseling program; b) educational interventions for subjects with intellectual disability should be adapted for the different stages of life (childhood, adolescence and adulthood); c) during childhood, educational intervention should emphasize the concept of public and private conducts; d) in adolescence, intervention should consider the actual mental age and not the chronological age of the subjects receiving intervention; e) the expression of sexuality in the adult with intellectual disability depends on the early incorporation of factors for promoting social inclusion; f) for educational interventions to be successful, it is fundamental that sexual educators and counselors, in addition to working with the clients, also work with their parents and other close family members; g) intervention programs should establish development objectives for developing in persons with intellectual disability a positive attitude towards sexuality and the improvement in self-esteem; h) in subjects with intellectual disability, their linguistic comprehension level should be taken into consideration and techniques for open discussion and non-inductive education should be used; i) social integration programs should address the needs of developing countries and their individuals, since it is not feasible to import external programs due to differences in

  1. EFFICIENCY OF SIMPLE SUPER PHOSPHATE IN THE VETIVER GRASS DEVELOPMENT SUBJECTED TO SOIL BIOENGINEERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RENISSON NEPONUCENO DE ARAÚJO FILHO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of vetiver grass (Chrysopogon zizanioides L. has been evaluated under differ-ent levels of phosphorus on slopes of the right-side bank of the San Francisco River, in the municipality of Am-paro do São Francisco, SE. Techniques of soil bioengineering were used, characterized by the combination of vegetated riprap with stakes, seedlings of vetiver grass and sediment retainers. The experimental design was randomized blocks with five doses (0, 4, 8, 12, and 16 g pit-1 of simple superphosphate and five replicates. The growth of vetiver seedlings were observed in periods of 30, 60, 90, e 180 days, carrying out the following pa-rameters: number of roots, external root surface, root density, root length, root length density, root and shoot dry weight, root and shoot fresh weight, and shoot length, at each evaluation period. The phosphorus doses and periods of morphological development interacted in all variables of plant biomass mentioned above. Higher superphosphate doses than 9.0 g pit-1 did not offer advantages in terms of cost-benefit for the production of vetiver seedings.

  2. Development of a questionnaire to assess the relative subjective benefits of presbyopia correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckhurst, Phillip J; Wolffsohn, James S; Gupta, Navneet; Naroo, Shehzad A; Davies, Leon N; Shah, Sunil

    2012-01-01

    To develop a standardized questionnaire of near visual function and satisfaction to complement visual function evaluations of presbyopic corrections. Eye Clinic, School of Life and Health Sciences, Aston University, Midland Eye Institute and Solihull Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom. Questionnaire development. A preliminary 26-item questionnaire of previously used near visual function items was completed by patients with monofocal intraocular lenses (IOLs), multifocal IOLs, accommodating IOLs, multifocal contact lenses, or varifocal spectacles. Rasch analysis was used for item reduction, after which internal and test-retest reliabilities were determined. Construct validity was determined by correlating the resulting Near Activity Visual Questionnaire (NAVQ) scores with near visual acuity and critical print size (CPS), which was measured using the Minnesota Low Vision Reading Test chart. Discrimination ability was assessed through receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. One hundred fifty patients completed the questionnaire. Item reduction resulted in a 10-item NAVQ with excellent separation (2.92), internal consistency (Cronbach α = 0.95), and test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.72). Correlations of questionnaire scores with near visual acuity (r = 0.32) and CPS (r = 0.27) provided evidence of validity, and discrimination ability was excellent (area under ROC curve = 0.91). Results show the NAVQ is a reliable, valid instrument that can be incorporated into the evaluation of presbyopic corrections. Copyright © 2011 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Relationship between mathematics teacher subject matter knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge and professional development needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajudin, Nor'ain Mohd; Chinnappan, Mohan; Saad, Noor Shah

    2017-05-01

    Two key variables emerged from the literature review is that Specific Matter Knowledge [SMK] and Pedagogical Content Knowledge [PCK] can influence the mathematics teachers' Professional Development [PD] needs. However, the key variables of SMK and PCK that were being investigated were not defined clearly. Empirical evidence that support relationship between SMK and PD and PCK and PD were not verified. In addition, how does PCK mediate SMK and PD is not clear and somewhat lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was to examine the relationship between primary mathematics teacher's SMK, PCK and PD needs. Results of path analysis with SmartPLS indicated that the direct effect of SMK on PD was mediated via PCK. This data provide support for the claim that PD programs for future teachers of primary mathematics should be driven by a more nuanced understanding of the link between SMK and PCK.

  4. ASL-LEX: A lexical database of American Sign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caselli, Naomi K; Sehyr, Zed Sevcikova; Cohen-Goldberg, Ariel M; Emmorey, Karen

    2017-04-01

    ASL-LEX is a lexical database that catalogues information about nearly 1,000 signs in American Sign Language (ASL). It includes the following information: subjective frequency ratings from 25-31 deaf signers, iconicity ratings from 21-37 hearing non-signers, videoclip duration, sign length (onset and offset), grammatical class, and whether the sign is initialized, a fingerspelled loan sign, or a compound. Information about English translations is available for a subset of signs (e.g., alternate translations, translation consistency). In addition, phonological properties (sign type, selected fingers, flexion, major and minor location, and movement) were coded and used to generate sub-lexical frequency and neighborhood density estimates. ASL-LEX is intended for use by researchers, educators, and students who are interested in the properties of the ASL lexicon. An interactive website where the database can be browsed and downloaded is available at http://asl-lex.org .

  5. Black and Korean: Racialized Development and the Korean American Subject in Korean/American Fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeehyun Lim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the representation of the encounters and exchanges between Asian and black Americans in Sŏk-kyŏng Kang’s “Days and Dreams,” Heinz Insu Fenkl’s Memories of My Ghost Brother, and Chang-rae Lee’s A Gesture Life. While one popular mode of looking at Asian and black Americans relationally in the postwar era is to compare the success of Asian American assimilation to the failure of black Americans, Lim argues that such a mode of comparison cannot account for the ways in which Asian American racialization takes places within the global currents of militarism and migration. Against the popular view that attributes Asian American success to cultural difference, Lim relies on political scientist Claire Kim’s understanding of culture as something that is constructed in the process of racialization to explore how the above texts imagine the terms of comparative racialization between black and Asian Americans. The black-Korean encounters in these texts demand a heuristic of comparative racialization that goes beyond the discussion of the black-white binary as a national construct and seeks the reification and modification of this racial frame as it travels along the routes of US military and economic incursions in the Pacific. Lim suggests that the literary imagining of black-Korean encounters across the Pacific illustrates race and racialization as effects of a regime of economic development that is supported by military aggression.

  6. Hearing Status and Language Fluency as Predictors of Automatic Word and Sign Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Shroyer, Edgar H.

    1993-01-01

    This study of the automatic word and sign recognition of 66 hearing and deaf adults found that responding in sign took longer and created more Stroop interference than responding orally, independent of hearing status. Deaf subjects showed greater automaticity in recognizing signs than words, whereas hearing subjects showed greater automaticity in…

  7. Visual Signs of Ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helle Rexbye

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Consumer culture has placed the ageing body in a dilemma of representation. Physical appearance has become increasingly important as a symbol of identity, and at the same time society idealizes youth. This study explores visual ageing empirically. By using photographs of older persons (70+ as starting point, it is explored how visual age is assessed and interpreted. It is shown that informants read age in a spread of stages and categories. Main age indicators are biological markers: skin, eyes, and hair colour, but supplemented by vigour, style, and grooming. Furthermore, in-depth interviews indicate that visual age is mainly interpreted into categories and moral regulations rooted in early modernity. Subsequently the question of a postmodern perspective of visual ageing is discussed in this article. The empirical findings in the study question a postmodern fluidity of visual signs – at least when the concern is signs of ageing.

  8. Dense MCA Sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Chen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 77-year-old female presented to the emergency department after being found down at home, last seen normal 7 ½ hours prior to arrival. Patient had a history of hypertension, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation and breast cancer status post chemotherapy/radiation and lumpectomy. Physical exam showed right gaze preference, left facial droop and tongue deviation and flaccid left hemiplegia. Significant findings: A non-contrast computed tomography (CT scan showed a hyperdensity along the right middle cerebral artery (MCA consistent with acute thrombus. The red arrow highlights the hyperdensity in the annotated image. Discussion: The dense MCA sign can serve as an important tool in the diagnosis of acute stroke. It typically appears before other signs of infarct are apparent on CT imaging, and identifies an intracranial large artery occlusion and corresponding infarct, in the correct clinical setting.1 Calcifications in the same area of the brain could be mistaken for an MCA sign, but this sign carries a high specificity (95% and lower sensitivity (52% for arterial obstruction in ischemic stroke.2 Early identification allows for a wider array of treatment options for a patient with an ischemic stroke, including intra-venous or intra-arterial thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy. This patient was subsequently taken for mechanical thrombectomy. Mechanical thrombectomy was chosen for this patient because the resources were available, and recent clinical trials have shown that newer types of mechanical thrombectomy have a positive functional outcome in patients with an ischemic stroke from an intracranial large artery occlusion, as compared to intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPa alone.3,4,5,6 In facilities lacking the capability for mechanical thrombectomy, treatment considerations include rapid transfer to a facility with capability, or proceeding with intravenous tPa. After intervention, this

  9. Warning signs prior to aggressive behavior in child psychiatric units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faay, M.D.M.; Valenkamp, M.W.; Nijman, H.L.I.

    2017-01-01

    This study aims at detecting and categorizing early warning signs of aggressive behavior in child psychiatric units. We analyzed 575 violent incident report forms and developed a coding scheme consisting of 16 warning signs. From the 575 incident report forms, a total of 1087 signs were coded. Most

  10. 24 CFR 200.218 - Who must certify and sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who must certify and sign. 200.218... Previous Participation Review and Clearance Procedure § 200.218 Who must certify and sign. All principals must certify and sign the certificate personally as to their individual record and are responsible for...

  11. A Stronger Reason for the Right to Sign Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovato, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Is the right to sign language only the right to a minority language? Holding a capability (not a disability) approach, and building on the psycholinguistic literature on sign language acquisition, I make the point that this right is of a stronger nature, since only sign languages can guarantee that each deaf child will properly develop the…

  12. Development of “OQALE” Based Reference Module for School Geometry Subject and Analysis of Mathematical Creative Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulandari, N. A. D.; Sukestiyarno, Y. L.

    2017-04-01

    This research aims to develop an OQALE based reference module for school geometry subject that meets the criteria of a valid and practical. OQALE approach is learning by of O = observation, Q = question, A = Analyze, L = Logic, E = Express. Geometry subject presented in the module are a triangle, the Pythagorean theorem, and rectangular. Mathematical skills of creative thinking shown from four aspects: fluency, flexibility, originality and elaboration. Research procedures in the development of reference module using a strategy of the investigation and development described by [2], which is limited to the sixth stage is leading field testing. The focus of this research is to develop a reference module that is valid, practical and able to increase the mathematical creative thinking skills of students. The testing is limited to three teachers, nine students and two mathematic readers using purposive sampling technique. The data validity, practicality, and creative thinking skills upgrading collected through questionnaires, observations, and interviews and analysed with a valid test, practical test, gain test and qualitative descriptive. The results were obtained (1) the validity of the module = 4.52, which is 4.20 ≤ Vmthinking mathematically nine students through the test of the gain included in the high and medium category. The conclusions of this research are the generated OQALE based reference module for school geometry subjectis valid and practical.

  13. A Survey of Signed Network Mining in Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Jiliang; Chang, Yi; Aggarwal, Charu; Liu, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Many real-world relations can be represented by signed networks with positive and negative links, as a result of which signed network analysis has attracted increasing attention from multiple disciplines. With the increasing prevalence of social media networks, signed network analysis has evolved from developing and measuring theories to mining tasks. In this article, we present a review of mining signed networks in the context of social media and discuss some promising research directions an...

  14. To see or not to see : symptoms and signs

    OpenAIRE

    Grech Sammut, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    Symptoms and signs are the backbone of diagnosis and central in the assessment of success of treatment. Prior to the development of techniques of investigation, the physician relied solely on symptoms and signs. Even today, symptoms and signs still play an important part in the family doctor's practice, more so than for the hospital-based physician. Symptoms and signs are also the reason why the patient consults his doctor in the first place (barring in the practice of preventive medicine).

  15. Central structure preservation of the reversal sign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan)

    1999-12-01

    We report serial changes of central structure preservation of the reversal sign in a case of child abuse. The serial CT images show that the relatively spared attenuation at the basal ganglia, thalami, and posterior fossa develops before the occurrence of transtentorial herniation. This finding makes the theory that central preservation of the reversal sign is due to pressure relief after transtentorial herniation less convincible. (orig.)

  16. Determining a strategy for efficiently managing sign retroreflectivity in New Hampshire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    The Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) has developed minimum retroreflectivity requirements for sign sheeting that will : become a federal mandate for roadside signs in 2015 and for overhead signs in 2018. In 2012, the New Hampshire De...

  17. Sign language perception research for improving automatic sign language recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Holt, Gineke A.; Arendsen, Jeroen; de Ridder, Huib; Koenderink-van Doorn, Andrea J.; Reinders, Marcel J. T.; Hendriks, Emile A.

    2009-02-01

    Current automatic sign language recognition (ASLR) seldom uses perceptual knowledge about the recognition of sign language. Using such knowledge can improve ASLR because it can give an indication which elements or phases of a sign are important for its meaning. Also, the current generation of data-driven ASLR methods has shortcomings which may not be solvable without the use of knowledge on human sign language processing. Handling variation in the precise execution of signs is an example of such shortcomings: data-driven methods (which include almost all current methods) have difficulty recognizing signs that deviate too much from the examples that were used to train the method. Insight into human sign processing is needed to solve these problems. Perceptual research on sign language can provide such insights. This paper discusses knowledge derived from a set of sign perception experiments, and the application of such knowledge in ASLR. Among the findings are the facts that not all phases and elements of a sign are equally informative, that defining the 'correct' form for a sign is not trivial, and that statistical ASLR methods do not necessarily arrive at sign representations that resemble those of human beings. Apparently, current ASLR methods are quite different from human observers: their method of learning gives them different sign definitions, they regard each moment and element of a sign as equally important and they employ a single definition of 'correct' for all circumstances. If the object is for an ASLR method to handle natural sign language, then the insights from sign perception research must be integrated into ASLR.

  18. Development of common metrics for donation attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, and intention for the blood donation context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Janis L; Kowalsky, Jennifer M; France, Christopher R; McGlone, Sarah T; Himawan, Lina K; Kessler, Debra A; Shaz, Beth H

    2014-03-01

    The Theory of Planned Behavior has been widely used in blood donation research, but the lack of uniform, psychometrically sound measures makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions or compare results across studies. Accordingly, the goal of this study was to develop such measures of donation attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, and intention. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) were conducted on survey responses collected from college students (n = 1080). The resulting scales were then administered to an independent sample of experienced donors (n = 433) for additional CFAs and to test whether the Theory of Planned Behavior model provided a good fit to the data. CFAs conducted on both samples support the use of six-item scales, with two factors each, to measure donation attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control and a single-factor three-item scale to measure donation intention. Further, structural equation modeling of these measures revealed that the Theory of Planned Behavior provided a strong fit to the data (comparative fit index, 0.976; root mean square error of approximation, 0.041; standardized root mean square residual, 0.055) and accounted for 73.7% of the variance in donation intention. The present findings confirm the applicability of the Theory of Planned Behavior to the blood donation context and more importantly provide psychometric support for the future use of four brief measures of donation attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, and intention. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  19. Developing Pedagogical Content Knowledge for Teaching a New Topic: More Than Teaching Experience and Subject Matter Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kennedy Kam Ho; Yung, Benny Hin Wai

    2017-03-01

    Teaching experience has been identified as an important factor in pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) development. However, little is known about how experienced teachers may draw on their previous experience to facilitate their PCK development. This study examined how two experienced high school biology teachers approached the teaching of a newly introduced topic in the curriculum, polymerase chain reaction and their PCK development from the pre-lesson planning phase through the interactive phase to the post-lesson reflection phase. Multiple data sources included classroom observations, field notes, semi-structured interviews and classroom artefacts. It was found that the teachers' previous experience informed their planning for teaching the new topic, but in qualitatively different ways. This, in turn, had a bearing on their new PCK development. Subject matter knowledge (SMK) can not only facilitate but may also hinder this development. Our findings identify two types of experienced teachers: those who can capitalise on their previous teaching experiences and SMK to develop new PCK and those who do not. The critical difference is whether in the lesson planning stage, the teacher shows the disposition to draw on a generalised mental framework that enables the teacher to capitalise on his existing SMK to develop new PCK. Helping teachers to acquire this disposition should be a focus for teacher training in light of continuous curriculum changes.

  20. Empirical Model Development for Predicting Shock Response on Composite Materials Subjected to Pyroshock Loading. Volume 2, Part 1; Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentz, Steven J.; Ordway, David O.; Parsons, David S.; Garrison, Craig M.; Rodgers, C. Steven; Collins, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) received a request to develop an analysis model based on both frequency response and wave propagation analyses for predicting shock response spectrum (SRS) on composite materials subjected to pyroshock loading. The model would account for near-field environment (approximately 9 inches from the source) dominated by direct wave propagation, mid-field environment (approximately 2 feet from the source) characterized by wave propagation and structural resonances, and far-field environment dominated by lower frequency bending waves in the structure. This document contains appendices to the Volume I report.

  1. Sign language perception research for improving automatic sign language recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Holt, G.A.; Arendsen, J.; De Ridder, H.; Van Doorn, A.J.; Reinders, M.J.T.; Hendriks, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    Current automatic sign language recognition (ASLR) seldom uses perceptual knowledge about the recognition of sign language. Using such knowledge can improve ASLR because it can give an indication which elements or phases of a sign are important for its meaning. Also, the current generation of

  2. Sign Lowering and Phonetic Reduction in American Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrone, Martha E.; Mauk, Claude E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines sign lowering as a form of phonetic reduction in American Sign Language. Phonetic reduction occurs in the course of normal language production, when instead of producing a carefully articulated form of a word, the language user produces a less clearly articulated form. When signs are produced in context by native signers, they often differ from the citation forms of signs. In some cases, phonetic reduction is manifested as a sign being produced at a lower location than in the citation form. Sign lowering has been documented previously, but this is the first study to examine it in phonetic detail. The data presented here are tokens of the sign WONDER, as produced by six native signers, in two phonetic contexts and at three signing rates, which were captured by optoelectronic motion capture. The results indicate that sign lowering occurred for all signers, according to the factors we manipulated. Sign production was affected by several phonetic factors that also influence speech production, namely, production rate, phonetic context, and position within an utterance. In addition, we have discovered interesting variations in sign production, which could underlie distinctions in signing style, analogous to accent or voice quality in speech. PMID:20607146

  3. Real-Time Traffic Sign Recognition using SURF Descriptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Htet Wai Kyu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available For road safety traffic sign is essential for drivers by giving valuable safety and navigation information pedestrians and even for the development of autonomous driver assistance system. Traffic sign can be classified by two methods can be approached. First approach is color base segmentation which is the region of traffic sign by using HSV color space Hue Saturation and Value and the next approach is shape base segmentation using Hough Circle Detection. In thissystem we use circle shape base detection for every traffic sign. At first keypoints descriptor is extracted from each standard traffic sign image in database and then keypoints descriptor is taken from region of traffic sign extracted from Hough circle detection. After that the nearest distance is matched keypoints descriptor between in each standard traffic sign image in database and extracted traffic sign image.

  4. Effects of translation and performance on memory of words of Sign Language as a second language

    OpenAIRE

    松見, 法男

    2004-01-01

    An experiment was designed to investigate the effects of translation and performance on memory of words of Sign Language as a second language. An intermediate class of Sign Language learners, whose first language was Japanese, was required to carried out four tasks : translating from Japanese word into Sign Language word, oral reading of Japanese word, translating from Sign Language word into Japanese word, and performing (expressing) of Sign Language word. The subjects were then asked unexpe...

  5. Entrepreneurs As a Subject of Modern Russian Economy Development: General Characteristics and «Resource Type» Regions Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levin Sergey, N.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, special urgency has the question about the ability of entrepreneurs to act as a subject of the Russian economy development. Analysis of the specificity of targets and resource potential of the modern Russian entrepreneurs is fulfilled in the context of the general features of entrepreneurship development in the countries with "emerging markets". Distinction between "politicized" entrepreneurs, as prevailing type of entrepreneurs in these countries, and "classic" entrepreneurs is shown. Two basic strategies of their behavior in the form of "rent-seeking" and "institutional" entrepreneurship are highlighted. Incentives and constraints of "institutional" entrepreneurship strategies selection made by "politicized" entrepreneurs are considered in the context of assessing the potential of the Russian entrepreneurs as a subject of economic development as well as emerging positive externalities. Analysis is regionalized to consider the specificity of the behavior of entrepreneurs in the economy of the "resource type" regions. Models of "enclave dual economy" and "integrated regional economy" are discrete structural alternatives for "resource type" regions development. "Sectoral" frontiers of net positive externalities that emerge from institutional entrepreneurs’ activity related to the implementation of productive configurations institutions are considered as well as a choice between the "rent-seeking" and "institutional" entrepreneurship. Kemerovo region and Krasnoyarsk region are the basic regions to analyze incentives and constraints of entrepreneurs in the economy of the "resource type" regions. The authors use sociological tools in the form of semi-structured interviews. Initial evaluation of the eight entrepreneurs’ strategies of Kemerovo region and Krasnoyarsk region shows that the most of them used elements of the institutional entrepreneurs’ strategy and focused on the diversification of the regional economy. At the same time

  6. Refuting the lipstick sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassbaugh, Jason A; Bean, Betsey R; Greenhouse, Alyssa R; Yu, Henry H; Arrington, Edward D; Friedman, Richard J; Eichinger, Josef K

    2017-08-01

    Arthroscopic examination of the tendon has been described as the "gold standard" for diagnosis of tendinitis of the long head of the biceps (LHB). An arthroscopic finding of an inflamed and hyperemic LHB within the bicipital groove has been described as the "lipstick sign." Studies evaluating direct visualization in diagnosis of LHB tendinitis are lacking. During a 1-year period, 363 arthroscopic shoulder procedures were performed, with 16 and 39 patients prospectively selected as positive cases and negative controls, respectively. All positive controls had groove tenderness, positive Speed maneuver, and diagnostic ultrasound-guided bicipital injection. Negative controls had none of these findings. Six surgeons reviewed randomized deidentified arthroscopic pictures of enrolled patients The surgeons were asked whether the images demonstrated LHB tendinitis and if the lipstick sign was present. Overall sensitivity and specificity were 49% and 66%, respectively, for detecting LHB tendinitis and 64% and 31%, respectively, for erythema. The nonweighted κ score for interobserver reliability ranged from 0.042 to 0.419 (mean, 0.215 ± 0.116) for tendinitis and from 0.486 to 0.835 (mean, 0.680 ± 0.102) for erythema. The nonweighted κ score for intraobserver reliability ranged from 0.264 to 0.854 (mean, 0.615) for tendinitis and from 0.641 to 0.951 (mean, 0.783) for erythema. The presence of the lipstick sign performed only moderately well in a rigorously designed level III study to evaluate its sensitivity and specificity. There is only fair agreement among participating surgeons in diagnosing LHB tendinitis arthroscopically. Consequently, LHB tendinitis requiring tenodesis remains a clinical diagnosis that should be made before arthroscopic examination. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Cholelithiasis: WES Sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Ehsani-Nia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 33-year-old female with multiple previous episodes of biliary colic presented to the emergency department with severe right upper quadrant pain that started 30 minutes prior to arrival. She characterized her pain as sharp and pulling and radiating to the back. Upon physical examination, patient was in acute distress with severe tenderness to right upper quadrant palpation. Her abdomen was soft, with no guarding or rebound tenderness. Significant findings: Abdominal ultrasound showed the classic presentation of the Wall-Echo-Shadow (WES sign. The superficial aspect of the gallbladder wall is represented by a hyperechogenic curve. Below this, bile fluid is represented by hypoechogenicity. Underneath the bile fluid is the echo of the dense border created by the collection of gallstones, represented by a hyperechogenic curve. Due to the high density of the gallstones, nothing deeper can be visualized (including other gallstones or the far end of the gallbladder; this is the shadow. Discussion: The WES sign, first described in the early 1980s, is a clear way of identifying cholelithiasis when the condition has progressed to fill the entire lumen of the gallbladder.1 In this case, the lumen of the gallbladder looks hypoechogenic relative to the surrounding tissue, much like an empty gallbladder. This is due to the border of the dense stones opposing the near wall of the gallbladder casting a shadow over everything distal to the stones. These key visualization techniques decrease non-visualization of chronic cholelithiasis.2,3,4 In most cases, WES sign is sufficient to diagnose cholelithiasis. Of note, “porcelain gallbladder” or collapsed duodenum can have the potential produce similar ultrasonographic findings.4,5

  8. Parkinsonian signs are a risk factor for falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahodwala, Nabila; Nwadiogbu, Chinwe; Fitts, Whitney; Partridge, Helen; Karlawish, Jason

    2017-06-01

    Parkinsonian signs are common, non-specific findings in older adults and associated with increased rates of dementia and mortality. It is important to understand which motor outcomes are associated with parkinsonian signs. To determine the role of parkinsonian signs on fall rates among older adults. We conducted a longitudinal study of primary care patients from the University of Pennsylvania Health System. Adults over 55 years were assessed at baseline through surveys and a neurological examination. We recorded falls over the following 2 years. Parkinsonian signs were defined as the presence of 2 of 4 cardinal signs. Incident falls were compared between subjects with and without parkinsonian signs, and modified Poisson regression used to adjust for potential confounders in the relationship between parkinsonian signs and falls. 982 subjects with a mean age of 68 (s.d. 8.8) years participated. 29% of participants fell and 12% exhibited parkinsonian signs at baseline. The unadjusted RR for falls among individuals with parkinsonian signs was 1.36 (95% CI 1.05-1.76, p=0.02). After adjusting for age, cognitive function, urinary incontinence, depression, diabetes, stroke and arthritis, individuals with parkinsonian signs were still 38% more likely to fall than those without parkinsonian signs (RR 1.38, 95% CI 1.04-1.82; p=0.03). Falls among those with parkinsonian signs were more likely to lead to injury (53% vs 37%; p=0.04). Parkinsonian signs are a significant, independent risk factor for falls. Early detection of this clinical state is important in order to implement fall prevention programs among primary care patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Signs In Place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamid, Salmiah Binti Abdul; Jensen, Ole B.; Silva, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Travelling in unfamiliar areas is usually very interesting; however, it can also be stressful. People travel or move around in an urban space according to their needs, and the environment can influence the way people move about from one place to another. If a person gets lost, a map or GPS can...... and geosemiotic studies with regards to the road traffic signs used in urban spaces. The paper ends with a discussion on how people choreograph their movement in their everyday life from two different perspectives: above vs. below...

  10. Signs in Place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamid, Salmiah Binti Abdul; Jensen, Ole B.; Silva, Victor

    Travelling in unfamiliar areas is usually very interesting, however it can also be stressful. People travel or move around in an urban space according to their needs, and the environment can also influence the way people move about from one place to another. If a person gets lost, a map or GPS can...... and geosemiotic studies with regards to the road traffic signs used in urban spaces. The paper ends with a discussion on how people choreograph their movement in their everyday life from two different perspectives: above vs. below....

  11. Oral mucosa: an alternative epidermic cell source to develop autologous dermal-epidermal substitutes from diabetic subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela GUZMÁN-URIBE

    Full Text Available Abstract Oral mucosa has been highlighted as a suitable source of epidermal cells due to its intrinsic characteristics such as its higher proliferation rate and its obtainability. Diabetic ulcers have a worldwide prevalence that is variable (1%-11%, meanwhile treatment of this has been proven ineffective. Tissue-engineered skin plays an important role in wound care focusing on strategies such autologous dermal-epidermal substitutes. Objective The aim of this study was to obtain autologous dermal-epidermal skin substitutes from oral mucosa from diabetic subjects as a first step towards a possible clinical application for cases of diabetic foot. Material and Methods Oral mucosa was obtained from diabetic and healthy subjects (n=20 per group. Epidermal cells were isolated and cultured using autologous fibrin to develop dermal-epidermal in vitro substitutes by the air-liquid technique with autologous human serum as a supplement media. Substitutes were immunocharacterized with collagen IV and cytokeratin 5-14 as specific markers. A Student´s t- test was performed to assess the differences between both groups. Results It was possible to isolate epidermal cells from the oral mucosa of diabetic and healthy subjects and develop autologous dermal-epidermal skin substitutes using autologous serum as a supplement. Differences in the expression of specific markers were observed and the cytokeratin 5-14 expression was lower in the diabetic substitutes, and the collagen IV expression was higher in the diabetic substitutes when compared with the healthy group, showing a significant difference. Conclusion Cells from oral mucosa could be an alternative and less invasive source for skin substitutes and wound healing. A difference in collagen production of diabetic cells suggests diabetic substitutes could improve diabetic wound healing. More research is needed to determine the crosstalk between components of these skin substitutes and damaged tissues.

  12. Study on road sign recognition in LabVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panoiu, M.; Rat, C. L.; Panoiu, C.

    2016-02-01

    Road and traffic sign identification is a field of study that can be used to aid the development of in-car advisory systems. It uses computer vision and artificial intelligence to extract the road signs from outdoor images acquired by a camera in uncontrolled lighting conditions where they may be occluded by other objects, or may suffer from problems such as color fading, disorientation, variations in shape and size, etc. An automatic means of identifying traffic signs, in these conditions, can make a significant contribution to develop an Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) that continuously monitors the driver, the vehicle, and the road. Road and traffic signs are characterized by a number of features which make them recognizable from the environment. Road signs are located in standard positions and have standard shapes, standard colors, and known pictograms. These characteristics make them suitable for image identification. Traffic sign identification covers two problems: traffic sign detection and traffic sign recognition. Traffic sign detection is meant for the accurate localization of traffic signs in the image space, while traffic sign recognition handles the labeling of such detections into specific traffic sign types or subcategories [1].

  13. Adapting tests of sign language assessment for other sign languages--a review of linguistic, cultural, and psychometric problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Tobias; Mann, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Given the current lack of appropriate assessment tools for measuring deaf children's sign language skills, many test developers have used existing tests of other sign languages as templates to measure the sign language used by deaf people in their country. This article discusses factors that may influence the adaptation of assessment tests from one natural sign language to another. Two tests which have been adapted for several other sign languages are focused upon: the Test for American Sign Language and the British Sign Language Receptive Skills Test. A brief description is given of each test as well as insights from ongoing adaptations of these tests for other sign languages. The problems reported in these adaptations were found to be grounded in linguistic and cultural differences, which need to be considered for future test adaptations. Other reported shortcomings of test adaptation are related to the question of how well psychometric measures transfer from one instrument to another.

  14. Traffic sign detection and analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelmose, Andreas; Trivedi, Mohan M.; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    Traffic sign recognition (TSR) is a research field that has seen much activity in the recent decade. This paper introduces the problem and presents 4 recent papers on traffic sign detection and 4 recent papers on traffic sign classification. It attempts to extract recent trends in the field...

  15. Say It with Sign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Wendy

    2001-01-01

    Impressed by Marilyn Daniels' research on the educational benefits of signing for hearing children, a New Jersey early childhood education center trained its staff in sign language as a teaching tool. Students enthusiastically incorporated sign language into their activities as they increased word recognition and vocabulary growth. (MLH)

  16. Issues in Sign Language Lexicography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwitserlood, Inge; Kristoffersen, Jette Hedegaard; Troelsgård, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    ge lexicography has thus far been a relatively obscure area in the world of lexicography. Therefore, this article will contain background information on signed languages and the communities in which they are used, on the lexicography of sign languages, the situation in the Netherlands as well...... as a review of a sign language dictionary that has recently been published in the Netherlands...

  17. Sign language: an international handbook

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfau, R.; Steinbach, M.; Woll, B.

    2012-01-01

    Sign language linguists show here that all the questions relevant to the linguistic investigation of spoken languages can be asked about sign languages. Conversely, questions that sign language linguists consider - even if spoken language researchers have not asked them yet - should also be asked of

  18. Kinship in Mongolian Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geer, Leah

    2011-01-01

    Information and research on Mongolian Sign Language is scant. To date, only one dictionary is available in the United States (Badnaa and Boll 1995), and even that dictionary presents only a subset of the signs employed in Mongolia. The present study describes the kinship system used in Mongolian Sign Language (MSL) based on data elicited from…

  19. Sign language for telemanipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pook, Polly K.; Ballard, Dana H.

    1995-12-01

    Literal teleoperation doesn't work very well. Limited bandwidth, long latencies, non- anthropomorphic mappings all make the effort of teleoperation tedious at best and ineffective at worst. Instead, users of teleoperated and semi-autonomous systems want their robots to `just do it for them,' without sacrificing the operator's intent. Our goal is to maximize human strategic control in teleoperator assisted robotics. In our teleassisted regime, the human operator provides high-level contexts for low-level autonomous robot behaviors. The operator wears an EXOS hand master to communicate via a natural sign language, such as pointing to objects and adopting a grasp preshape. Each sign indicates intention: e.g., reaching or grasping; and, where applicable, a spatial context: e.g., the pointing axis or preshape frame. The robot, a Utah/MIT hand on a Puma arm, acts under local servo control within the proscribed contexts. This paper extends earlier work [Pook & Ballard 1994a] by adding remote visual sensors to the teleassistance repertoire. To view the robot site, the operator wears a virtual research helmet that is coupled to binocular cameras mounted on a second Puma 760. The combined hand-head sensors allows teleassistance to be performed remotely. The example task is to open a door. We also demonstrate the flexibility of the teleassistance model by bootstrapping a `pick and place' task from the door opening task.

  20. [Information technology in learning sign language].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Cesar; Pulido, Jose L; Arias, Jorge E

    2015-01-01

    To develop a technological tool that improves the initial learning of sign language in hearing impaired children. The development of this research was conducted in three phases: the lifting of requirements, design and development of the proposed device, and validation and evaluation device. Through the use of information technology and with the advice of special education professionals, we were able to develop an electronic device that facilitates the learning of sign language in deaf children. This is formed mainly by a graphic touch screen, a voice synthesizer, and a voice recognition system. Validation was performed with the deaf children in the Filadelfia School of the city of Bogotá. A learning methodology was established that improves learning times through a small, portable, lightweight, and educational technological prototype. Tests showed the effectiveness of this prototype, achieving a 32 % reduction in the initial learning time for sign language in deaf children.

  1. Pregnancy physiology pattern prediction study (4P study): protocol of an observational cohort study collecting vital sign information to inform the development of an accurate centile-based obstetric early warning score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Fiona; Kemp, Jude; Edwards, Clare; Pullon, Rebecca M; Loerup, Lise; Triantafyllidis, Andreas; Salvi, Dario; Gibson, Oliver; Gerry, Stephen; MacKillop, Lucy H; Tarassenko, Lionel; Watkinson, Peter J

    2017-09-01

    Successive confidential enquiries into maternal deaths in the UK have identified an urgent need to develop a national early warning score (EWS) specifically for pregnant or recently pregnant women to aid more timely recognition, referral and treatment of women who are developing life-threatening complications in pregnancy or the puerperium. Although many local EWS are in use in obstetrics, most have been developed heuristically. No current obstetric EWS has defined the thresholds at which an alert should be triggered using evidence-based normal ranges, nor do they reflect the changing physiology that occurs with gestation during pregnancy. An observational cohort study involving 1000 participants across three UK sites in Oxford, London and Newcastle. Pregnant women will be recruited at approximately 14 weeks' gestation and have their vital signs (heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation and temperature) measured at 4 to 6-week intervals during pregnancy. Vital signs recorded during labour and delivery will be extracted from hospital records. After delivery, participants will measure and record their own vital signs daily for 2 weeks. During the antenatal and postnatal periods, vital signs will be recorded on an Android tablet computer through a custom software application and transferred via mobile internet connection to a secure database. The data collected will be used to define reference ranges of vital signs across normal pregnancy, labour and the immediate postnatal period. This will inform the design of an evidence-based obstetric EWS. The study has been approved by the NRES committee South East Coast-Brighton and Sussex (14/LO/1312) and is registered with the ISRCTN (10838017). All participants will provide written informed consent and can withdraw from the study at any point. All data collected will be managed anonymously. The findings will be disseminated in international peer-reviewed journals and through research conferences.

  2. Joint optimization of word alignment and epenthesis generation for Chinese to Taiwanese sign synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yu-Hsien; Wu, Chung-Hsien; Su, Hung-Yu; Cheng, Chih-Jen

    2007-01-01

    This work proposes a novel approach to translate Chinese to Taiwanese sign language and to synthesize sign videos. An aligned bilingual corpus of Chinese and Taiwanese Sign Language (TSL) with linguistic and signing information is also presented for sign language translation. A two-pass alignment in syntax level and phrase level is developed to obtain the optimal alignment between Chinese sentences and Taiwanese sign sequences. For sign video synthesis, a scoring function is presented to develop motion transition-balanced sign videos with rich combinations of intersign transitions. Finally, the maximum a posteriori (MAP) algorithm is employed for sign video synthesis based on joint optimization of two-pass word alignment and intersign epenthesis generation. Several experiments are conducted in an educational environment to evaluate the performance on the comprehension of sign expression. The proposed approach outperforms the IBM Model 2 in sign language translation. Moreover, deaf students perceived sign videos generated by the proposed method to be satisfactory.

  3. Differential representation of liver proteins in obese human subjects suggests novel biomarkers and promising targets for drug development in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caira, Simonetta; Iannelli, Antonio; Sciarrillo, Rosaria; Picariello, Gianluca; Renzone, Giovanni; Scaloni, Andrea; Addeo, Pietro

    2017-12-01

    The proteome of liver biopsies from human obese (O) subjects has been compared to those of nonobese (NO) subjects using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Differentially represented proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS)-based peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) and nanoflow-liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-ESI-MS/MS). Overall, 61 gene products common to all of the liver biopsies were identified within 65 spots, among which 25 ones were differently represented between O and NO subjects. In particular, over-representation of short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, Δ(3,5)-Δ(2,4)dienoyl-CoA isomerase, acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase, glyoxylate reductase/hydroxypyruvate reductase, fructose-biphosphate aldolase B, peroxiredoxin I, protein DJ-1, catalase, α- and β-hemoglobin subunits, 3-mercaptopyruvate S-transferase, calreticulin, aminoacylase 1, phenazine biosynthesis-like domain-containing protein and a form of fatty acid-binding protein, together with downrepresentation of glutamate dehydrogenase, glutathione S-transferase A1, S-adenosylmethionine synthase 1A and a form of apolipoprotein A-I, was associated with the obesity condition. Some of these metabolic enzymes and antioxidant proteins have already been identified as putative diagnostic markers of liver dysfunction in animal models of steatosis or obesity, suggesting additional investigations on their role in these syndromes. Their differential representation in human liver was suggestive of their consideration as obesity human biomarkers and for the development of novel antiobesity drugs.

  4. The sawtooth sign is predictive of obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Michael H; Scanlon, Paul D; Schroeder, Darrell R; Olson, Eric J

    2017-05-01

    The sawtooth sign in spirometry is associated with redundant upper airway tissue and snoring, but its predictive value for identifying obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is disputed. We retrospectively assessed the predictive value of the spirometric sawtooth sign in terms of the odds ratio (OR) of association with a diagnosis of OSA compared to those without the sign. Consecutive spirometry reports showing a sawtooth sign were identified from our laboratory. We identified 50 subjects with sawtooth sign and 100 control subjects without sawtooth sign, matched for age, BMI, and gender. The electronic medical record of each patient was queried for a diagnosis of OSA based on physician-reported diagnoses. Of the 50 subjects with sawtooth sign, 22 were found to have a current diagnosis of OSA (44%). Twenty-seven of the 100 controls (27%) also had OSA. From logistic regression analysis, sawtooth sign was associated with an increased likelihood of OSA (OR = 2.12, 95% C.I. 1.04 to 4.35). Similar results were obtained after adjustment for age, gender, pack years, and BMI (OR = 2.61, 95% C.I. 1.13 to 6.21). Patients with the sawtooth sign have greater odds of having a diagnosis of OSA compared with those without the sign. If prospectively evaluated, as a result of improved identification, we hypothesize that the sawtooth sign may show an even stronger association with OSA. This relatively common finding, which adds no cost to routine spirometry, may serve as an indicator for OSA workup for some individuals not already identified as having OSA.

  5. Examining, framing, adapting the curriculum and developing sign language: strategies to normalize deaf students with Down syndrome in a deaf school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liège Gemelli Kuchenbecker

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available From the understanding that modern school education is always normalizing, this paper problematizes strategies meant to normalize deaf subjects with Down syndrome in a deaf school. The research was carried out through the analysis of both evaluation and clinical reports, and interviews with teachers that work with those students. As analytical tools, we used the notions of norm and normalization, from Michel Foucault’s theorizations. The recurrences found in the materials allowed for the constitution of the following analysis units: (1 Clinical reports: examination and framing of subjects, (2 Curriculum adaptation as a normalization strategy, and (3 Linguistic normalization: management of non-learning risk. Such recurrences enabled us to assume that in/exclusion processes similar to those seen in regular schools also occur in the deaf school when subjects deviating from the established norm become part of it.

  6. Clothing-related eponyms and signs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valencia Long

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The world of dermatology is pieced together by clinical conditions unique in their colors, morphology, and configuration. Dermatological signs and terms are influenced by etymology, language, and history. Eponyms also make dermatology a fascinating but linguistically challenging subject. This article reviews dermatological conditions described in relation to fashion, and what we wear in everyday life from top to toe, demonstrating that dermatology can be inspired even in the most common things.

  7. Medical diagnosis through semiotics. Giving meaning to the sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnum, J F

    1993-11-01

    Physicians are engaged in incorporating quantitative methods for making clinical decisions into their practices. An acquaintance with semiotics, the doctrine of signs, may complement this project. A sign stands for something. We communicate indirectly through signs, and by interpreting what signs mean we make sense of our world and diagnose and understand our patients. Thus, through association and inference, we transform flowers into love, Othello into jealousy, and staring eyes into thyrotoxicosis. Characteristically in diagnosis, beginning with an unstable inference, we test and otherwise ask questions likely to produce signs that support (or discredit) our hypothesis. In a literary sense, we join with the author to clarify and rewrite the text; creative interpretation is the key. Diagnosis is concluded through narration, by the meaning that is revealed by telling the story of the patient. Diagnosis will succeed only to the extent that we respect the principles and caveats of sign interpretation. The sign is both the key to the unknown and the master impersonator. The sign and its meaning are usually not the same; meaning has to be inferred. Because interpretations are made subjectively, they are circumscribed by the experience and bias of the clinician. Moreover, the contexts in which the sign appears shape the meaning of the sign and may change it altogether.

  8. Negation switching invariant signed graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Sinha

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A signed graph (or, $sigraph$ in short is a graph G in which each edge x carries a value $\\sigma(x \\in \\{-, +\\}$ called its sign. Given a sigraph S, the negation $\\eta(S$ of the sigraph S is a sigraph obtained from S by reversing the sign of every edge of S. Two sigraphs $S_{1}$ and $S_{2}$ on the same underlying graph are switching equivalent if it is possible to assign signs `+' (`plus' or `-' (`minus' to vertices of $S_{1}$ such that by reversing the sign of each of its edges that has received opposite signs at its ends, one obtains $S_{2}$. In this paper, we characterize sigraphs which are negation switching invariant and also see for what sigraphs, S and $\\eta (S$ are signed isomorphic.

  9. Heed the signs: Operation signs have spatial associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinhas, Michal; Shaki, Samuel; Fischer, Martin H

    2014-01-01

    Mental arithmetic shows systematic spatial biases. The association between numbers and space is well documented, but it is unknown whether arithmetic operation signs also have spatial associations and whether or not they contribute to spatial biases found in arithmetic. Adult participants classified plus and minus signs with left and right button presses under two counterbalanced response rules. Results from two experiments showed that spatially congruent responses (i.e., right-side responses for the plus sign and left-side responses for the minus sign) were responded to faster than spatially incongruent ones (i.e., left-side responses for the plus sign and right-side responses for the minus sign). We also report correlations between this novel operation sign spatial association (OSSA) effect and other spatial biases in number processing. In a control experiment with no explicit processing requirements for the operation signs there were no sign-related spatial biases. Overall, the results suggest that (a) arithmetic operation signs can evoke spatial associations (OSSA), (b) experience with arithmetic operations probably underlies the OSSA, and (c) the OSSA only partially contributes to spatial biases in arithmetic.

  10. Signes et artefacts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Périgois

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Les opérations de requalification des centres des petites villes se sont multipliées depuis deux décennies. Cet article analyse comment le réaménagement des centres-villes s’inscrit dans un processus de patrimonialisation qui participe à une nouvelle conception de l’urbanité à travers une mise en scène des espaces centraux. Cette mise en scène des espaces publics passe par la multiplication de signes d’ancienneté. On peut distinguer des modalités différentes selon que les artefacts mobilisés renvoient à l’histoire du lieu, à des éléments hérités du passé et réinscrits dans l’espace ou qu’ils relèvent d’une ancienneté générique telle qu’elle s’est popularisée dans l’usage des mobiliers urbains « de style » — comme les candélabres « tradition » et bornes en fonte symbolisant l’appartenance à une urbanité d’apparence. Ce phénomène identitaire particulier vise à produire une urbanité, au moins physique. Cette artefactualisation amène à une redéfinition de la patrimonialisation. La tendance actuelle à la substitution d’« objets patrimoines » par des signes rappelant leur existence passée et les artefacts simulant de l’ancienneté et suscitant de l’historicité mobilisent les notions d’ambiance, d’esthétique et de « simulacre » selon le terme utilisé par Jean Baudrillard. La combinaison des références au patrimoine local et à l’ancien générique participe d’une mise en scène plus globale visant à inscrire le centre dans le temps long et à la production esthétique d’une néo-archéo urbanité « petite ville ». Refitting operations of downtown areas of small cities have increased for two decades. This article analyzes how this restructuring falls under a process of “patrimonialisation” which takes part in a new design of “urbanity” through a setting in scene of central spaces. This setting in scene of public spaces finds expression in

  11. Italy-Japan international project-based learning for developing human resources using design of welfare equipment as a subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafusa, A; Komeda, T; Ito, K; Zobel, P Beomonte

    2015-08-01

    Project-based learning (PBL) is effective for developing human resources of young students. The design of welfare equipment, such as wheelchairs and gait assistive devices, is taken as the subject in this study because these devices must be fit to their environment, users, and method of use; students must consider the circumstances of each country concerned. The program commenced in 2012 at L'Aquila, Italy, and the Shibaura Institute of Technology, Japan and has been continuing for three years. Students were divided into four groups and discussions were held on how to adapt the equipment to the user and environment. After discussion, they designed and simulated a model of the equipment using CAD. Finally, they presented their designs to each other. Through the program, students had fruitful discussions, exchanged ideas from different cultures, and learned from each other. Furthermore, friendships among the students were nurtured. It is believed that the objective of the program was satisfactorily accomplished.

  12. Development and validation of a subject-specific finite element model of the functional spinal unit to predict vertebral strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chu-Hee; Landham, Priyan R; Eastell, Richard; Adams, Michael A; Dolan, Patricia; Yang, Lang

    2017-09-01

    Finite element models of an isolated vertebral body cannot accurately predict compressive strength of the spinal column because, in life, compressive load is variably distributed across the vertebral body and neural arch. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a patient-specific finite element model of a functional spinal unit, and then use the model to predict vertebral strength from medical images. A total of 16 cadaveric functional spinal units were scanned and then tested mechanically in bending and compression to generate a vertebral wedge fracture. Before testing, an image processing and finite element analysis framework (SpineVox-Pro), developed previously in MATLAB using ANSYS APDL, was used to generate a subject-specific finite element model with eight-node hexahedral elements. Transversely isotropic linear-elastic material properties were assigned to vertebrae, and simple homogeneous linear-elastic properties were assigned to the intervertebral disc. Forward bending loading conditions were applied to simulate manual handling. Results showed that vertebral strengths measured by experiment were positively correlated with strengths predicted by the functional spinal unit finite element model with von Mises or Drucker-Prager failure criteria ( R 2  = 0.80-0.87), with areal bone mineral density measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry ( R 2  = 0.54) and with volumetric bone mineral density from quantitative computed tomography ( R 2  = 0.79). Large-displacement non-linear analyses on all specimens did not improve predictions. We conclude that subject-specific finite element models of a functional spinal unit have potential to estimate the vertebral strength better than bone mineral density alone.

  13. Leg joint power output during progressive resistance FES-LCE cycling in SCI subjects: developing an index of fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faghri Pouran D

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the biomechanics of the hip, knee and ankle during a progressive resistance cycling protocol in an effort to detect and measure the presence of muscle fatigue. It was hypothesized that knee power output can be used as an indicator of fatigue in order to assess the cycling performance of SCI subjects. Methods Six spinal cord injured subjects (2 incomplete, 4 complete between the ages of twenty and fifty years old and possessing either a complete or incomplete spinal cord injury at or below the fourth cervical vertebra participated in this study. Kinematic data and pedal forces were recorded during cycling at increasing levels of resistance. Ankle, knee and hip power outputs and resultant pedal force were calculated. Ergometer cadence and muscle stimulation intensity were also recorded. Results The main findings of this study were: (a ankle and knee power outputs decreased, whereas hip power output increased with increasing resistance, (b cadence, stimulation intensity and resultant pedal force in that combined order were significant predictors of knee power output and (c knowing the value of these combined predictors at 10 rpm, an index of fatigue can be developed, quantitatively expressing the power capacity of the knee joint with respect to a baseline power level defined as fatigue. Conclusion An index of fatigue was successfully developed, proportionalizing knee power capacity during cycling to a predetermined value of fatigue. The fatigue index value at 0/8th kp, measured 90 seconds into active, unassisted pedaling was 1.6. This indicates initial power capacity at the knee to be 1.6 times greater than fatigue. The fatigue index decreased to 1.1 at 2/8th kp, representing approximately a 30% decrease in the knee's power capacity within a 4 minute timespan. These findings suggest that the present cycling protocol is not sufficient for a rider to gain the benefits of FES and thus

  14. Rigler’s sign and the football sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal Daya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Rigler’s sign was first described in 1941 by L G Rigler as a new radiological sign for recognising free air in the peritoneal cavity on supine radiograph. The presence of pneumoperitoneum allows free intraperitoneal air to be contrasted with intraluminal gas, accentuating the wall of gas-containing viscera. It is observed in infants and very ill patients where only limited radiographs of the abdomen are possible. The football sign was first described by R E Miller in the 1960s. Seen on supine abdominal radiographs, this describes an oval radiolucency resembling an American football. It is important for the radiologist to recognise the supporting signs of pneumoperitoneum, such as Rigler’s sign and the football sign, on supine abdominal radiographs, especially in neonates and infants, where erect chest/abdominal radiographs are not always possible.

  15. The Subject-Modeling Approach to Developing the Methodol- ogy Competence of the Future Teachers-Psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Gilmanov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Any practical activity of a modern specialist requires the methodology knowledge – the ability of setting and transforming goals, operating with summarized approaches and plans, creating and reconstructing them, etc. The paper deals with the role of the methodology competence in professional thinking; the subject-modeling approach to developing the professional thinking and methodology competence is considered regarding the future teachers-psychologists.The substantiation of the above approach is given concerning the content and structure of the competence in question, as well as the students’ personal characteristics. The psychological mechanism of gaining the experience and professional thinking ability is described as interaction of two models – the cognitive and dynamic emotional ones – both reflecting the professional activity. The results of experimental work, based on such methods as analysis, theoretical modeling, supervision and polling, demon- strated the main developing factors of methodology competence: the general culture level, interest to the future profession, the professional activity presentation in educational process. The research results imply the conclusion that the purposeful pedagogic activity based on the methodology competence is necessary for developing the future specialists’ professional thinking. 

  16. Interpreting sign components from accelerometer and sEMG data for automatic sign language recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Kongqiao; Yang, Jihai

    2011-01-01

    The identification of constituent components of each sign gesture is a practical way of establishing large-vocabulary sign language recognition (SLR) system. Aiming at developing such a system using portable accelerometer (ACC) and surface electromyographic (sEMG) sensors, this work proposes a method for automatic SLR at the component level. The preliminary experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method and the feasibility of interpreting sign components from ACC and sEMG data. Our study improves the performance of SLR based on ACC and sEMG sensors and will promote the realization of a large-vocabulary portable SLR system.

  17. LSE-Sign: A lexical database for Spanish Sign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Sigut, Eva; Costello, Brendan; Baus, Cristina; Carreiras, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    The LSE-Sign database is a free online tool for selecting Spanish Sign Language stimulus materials to be used in experiments. It contains 2,400 individual signs taken from a recent standardized LSE dictionary, and a further 2,700 related nonsigns. Each entry is coded for a wide range of grammatical, phonological, and articulatory information, including handshape, location, movement, and non-manual elements. The database is accessible via a graphically based search facility which is highly flexible both in terms of the search options available and the way the results are displayed. LSE-Sign is available at the following website: http://www.bcbl.eu/databases/lse/.

  18. Phantom-based standardization of CT angiography images for spot sign detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morotti, Andrea; Rosand, Jonathan [Harvard Medical School, Division of Neurocritical Care and Emergency Neurology, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, J. P. Kistler Stroke Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Romero, Javier M. [Harvard Medical School, Division of Neurocritical Care and Emergency Neurology, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, J. P. Kistler Stroke Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Neuroradiology Service, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Jessel, Michael J.; Vashkevich, Anastasia; Schwab, Kristin; Greenberg, Steven M. [Harvard Medical School, J. P. Kistler Stroke Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Hernandez, Andrew M.; Boone, John M. [University of California Davis, Department of Radiology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Burns, Joseph D. [Lahey Hospital and Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Burlington, MA (United States); Shah, Qaisar A. [Abington Memorial Hospital, Abington, PA (United States); Bergman, Thomas A. [Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Suri, M.F.K. [St. Cloud Hospital, St. Cloud, MN (United States); Ezzeddine, Mustapha [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Kirmani, Jawad F. [JFK Medical Center, Stroke and Neurovascular Center, Edison, NJ (United States); Agarwal, Sachin [Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Hays Shapshak, Angela [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Messe, Steven R. [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Venkatasubramanian, Chitra [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Palmieri, Katherine [The University of Kansas Health System, Kansas City, KS (United States); Lewandowski, Christopher [Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States); Chang, Tiffany R. [University of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX (United States); Chang, Ira [Colorado Neurological Institute, Swedish Medical Center, Englewood, CO (United States); Rose, David Z. [Tampa General Hospital, University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, FL (United States); Smith, Wade [UCSF Medical Center, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hsu, Chung Y.; Liu, Chun-Lin [China Medical University Hospital, Taichung (China); Lien, Li-Ming; Hsiao, Chen-Yu [Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei (China); Iwama, Toru [Gifu University Hospital, Gifu (Japan); Afzal, Mohammad Rauf; Qureshi, Adnan I. [University of Minnesota, Zeenat Qureshi Stroke Research Center, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Cassarly, Christy; Hebert Martin, Renee [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Public Health Sciences, Charleston, SC (United States); Goldstein, Joshua N. [Harvard Medical School, Division of Neurocritical Care and Emergency Neurology, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, J. P. Kistler Stroke Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Collaboration: ATACH-II and NETT Investigators

    2017-09-15

    The CT angiography (CTA) spot sign is a strong predictor of hematoma expansion in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, CTA parameters vary widely across centers and may negatively impact spot sign accuracy in predicting ICH expansion. We developed a CT iodine calibration phantom that was scanned at different institutions in a large multicenter ICH clinical trial to determine the effect of image standardization on spot sign detection and performance. A custom phantom containing known concentrations of iodine was designed and scanned using the stroke CT protocol at each institution. Custom software was developed to read the CT volume datasets and calculate the Hounsfield unit as a function of iodine concentration for each phantom scan. CTA images obtained within 8 h from symptom onset were analyzed by two trained readers comparing the calibrated vs. uncalibrated density cutoffs for spot sign identification. ICH expansion was defined as hematoma volume growth >33%. A total of 90 subjects qualified for the study, of whom 17/83 (20.5%) experienced ICH expansion. The number of spot sign positive scans was higher in the calibrated analysis (67.8 vs 38.9% p < 0.001). All spot signs identified in the non-calibrated analysis remained positive after calibration. Calibrated CTA images had higher sensitivity for ICH expansion (76 vs 52%) but inferior specificity (35 vs 63%) compared with uncalibrated images. Normalization of CTA images using phantom data is a feasible strategy to obtain consistent image quantification for spot sign analysis across different sites and may improve sensitivity for identification of ICH expansion. (orig.)

  19. Phantom-based standardization of CT angiography images for spot sign detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morotti, Andrea; Romero, Javier M; Jessel, Michael J; Hernandez, Andrew M; Vashkevich, Anastasia; Schwab, Kristin; Burns, Joseph D; Shah, Qaisar A; Bergman, Thomas A; Suri, M Fareed K; Ezzeddine, Mustapha; Kirmani, Jawad F; Agarwal, Sachin; Shapshak, Angela Hays; Messe, Steven R; Venkatasubramanian, Chitra; Palmieri, Katherine; Lewandowski, Christopher; Chang, Tiffany R; Chang, Ira; Rose, David Z; Smith, Wade; Hsu, Chung Y; Liu, Chun-Lin; Lien, Li-Ming; Hsiao, Chen-Yu; Iwama, Toru; Afzal, Mohammad Rauf; Cassarly, Christy; Greenberg, Steven M; Martin, Renee' Hebert; Qureshi, Adnan I; Rosand, Jonathan; Boone, John M; Goldstein, Joshua N

    2017-09-01

    The CT angiography (CTA) spot sign is a strong predictor of hematoma expansion in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, CTA parameters vary widely across centers and may negatively impact spot sign accuracy in predicting ICH expansion. We developed a CT iodine calibration phantom that was scanned at different institutions in a large multicenter ICH clinical trial to determine the effect of image standardization on spot sign detection and performance. A custom phantom containing known concentrations of iodine was designed and scanned using the stroke CT protocol at each institution. Custom software was developed to read the CT volume datasets and calculate the Hounsfield unit as a function of iodine concentration for each phantom scan. CTA images obtained within 8 h from symptom onset were analyzed by two trained readers comparing the calibrated vs. uncalibrated density cutoffs for spot sign identification. ICH expansion was defined as hematoma volume growth >33%. A total of 90 subjects qualified for the study, of whom 17/83 (20.5%) experienced ICH expansion. The number of spot sign positive scans was higher in the calibrated analysis (67.8 vs 38.9% p signs identified in the non-calibrated analysis remained positive after calibration. Calibrated CTA images had higher sensitivity for ICH expansion (76 vs 52%) but inferior specificity (35 vs 63%) compared with uncalibrated images. Normalization of CTA images using phantom data is a feasible strategy to obtain consistent image quantification for spot sign analysis across different sites and may improve sensitivity for identification of ICH expansion.

  20. Early clinical development of artemether-lumefantrine dispersible tablet: palatability of three flavours and bioavailability in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla Salim

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efforts to ease administration and enhance acceptability of the oral anti-malarial artemether-lumefantrine (A-L crushed tablet to infants and children triggered the development of a novel dispersible tablet of A-L. During early development of this new formulation, two studies were performed in healthy subjects, one to evaluate the palatability of three flavours of A-L, and a second one to compare the bioavailability of active principles between the dispersible tablet and the tablet (administered crushed and intact. Methods Study 1 was performed in 48 healthy schoolchildren in Tanzania. Within 1 day, all subjects tasted a strawberry-, orange- and cherry-flavoured oral A-L suspension for 10 seconds (without swallowing in a randomized, single-blind, crossover fashion. The palatability of each formulation was rated using a visual analogue scale (VAS. Study 2 was an open, randomized crossover trial in 48 healthy adults given single doses of A-L (80 mg artemether + 480 mg lumefantrine with food. The objectives were to compare the bioavailability of artemether, dihydroartemisinin (DHA and lumefantrine between the dispersible tablet and the tablet administered crushed (primary objective and intact (secondary objective. Results Study 1 showed no statistically significant difference in VAS scores between the three flavours but cherry had the highest score in several ratings (particularly for overall liking. Study 2 demonstrated that the dispersible and crushed tablets delivered bioequivalent artemether, DHA and lumefantrine systemic exposure (area under the curve [AUC]; mean ± SD AUC0-tlast were 208 ± 113 vs 195 ± 93 h.ng/ml for artemether, 206 ± 81 vs 199 ± 84 h.ng/ml for DHA and 262 ± 107 vs 291 ± 106 h.μg/ml for lumefantrine. Bioequivalence was also shown for peak plasma concentrations (Cmax of DHA and lumefantrine. Compared with the intact tablet, the dispersible tablet resulted in bioequivalent lumefantrine exposure, but

  1. Influence of gravity upon some facial signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flament, F; Bazin, R; Piot, B

    2015-06-01

    Facial clinical signs and their integration are the basis of perception than others could have from ourselves, noticeably the age they imagine we are. Facial modifications in motion and their objective measurements before and after application of skin regimen are essential to go further in evaluation capacities to describe efficacy in facial dynamics. Quantification of facial modifications vis à vis gravity will allow us to answer about 'control' of facial shape in daily activities. Standardized photographs of the faces of 30 Caucasian female subjects of various ages (24-73 year) were successively taken at upright and supine positions within a short time interval. All these pictures were therefore reframed - any bias due to facial features was avoided when evaluating one single sign - for clinical quotation by trained experts of several facial signs regarding published standardized photographic scales. For all subjects, the supine position increased facial width but not height, giving a more fuller appearance to the face. More importantly, the supine position changed the severity of facial ageing features (e.g. wrinkles) compared to an upright position and whether these features were attenuated or exacerbated depended on their facial location. Supine station mostly modifies signs of the lower half of the face whereas those of the upper half appear unchanged or slightly accentuated. These changes appear much more marked in the older groups, where some deep labial folds almost vanish. These alterations decreased the perceived ages of the subjects by an average of 3.8 years. Although preliminary, this study suggests that a 90° rotation of the facial skin vis à vis gravity induces rapid rearrangements among which changes in tensional forces within and across the face, motility of interstitial free water among underlying skin tissue and/or alterations of facial Langer lines, likely play a significant role. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Fran

  2. The clothes maketh the sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Bryan; Chan, Victoria O; Mitchell, David P; McDermott, Shaunagh; Eisenberg, Ron L; Heffernan, Eric J; Ridge, Carole A

    2016-08-01

    Pattern recognition is a key tool that enables radiologists to evoke certain diagnoses based on a radiologic appearance. In Shakespeare's Hamlet, Polonius tells his son Laertes to dress well because "apparel oft proclaims the man"; this phrase is now expressed in modern parlance as "the clothes maketh the man". Similarly in radiology, appearances are everything, and in the case of radiologic signs, occasionally "the clothes maketh the sign". The radiologic signs described in this pictorial review resemble items of clothing, fabric types, headwear, or accessories and are found in the musculoskeletal, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary systems. These "clothing signs" serve as a useful visual trigger to help radiologists to identify particular disease entities. • Pattern recognition enables radiologists to evoke a diagnosis based on radiologic appearance. • The radiologic signs described in this review resemble clothing, fabric, or accessories. • These "clothing signs" serve as visual triggers that evoke particular disease entities.

  3. Subjective need for psychological support (PsySupp) in parents of children and adolescents with disorders of sex development (dsd).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennecke, Elena; Werner-Rosen, Knut; Thyen, Ute; Kleinemeier, Eva; Lux, Anke; Jürgensen, Martina; Grüters, Annette; Köhler, Birgit

    2015-10-01

    Disorders/diversity of sex development (dsd) is an umbrella term for congenital conditions often diagnosed within childhood. As most parents are unprepared for this situation, psychological support (PsySupp) is recommended. The aim of this study was to analyse the extent to which parents express a need for PsySupp. Three hundred twenty-nine parents of children with dsd were included; 40.4 % of the parents indicated to have a need for PsySupp, only 50 % of this group received it adequately. The diagnoses partial gonadal dysgenesis, partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (pAIS) and disorders of androgen synthesis are associated with a high need for PsySupp in parents (54, 65, and 50 %). Sex assignment surgery neither reduced nor increased the need for PsySupp. Taking a picture, radiography, laparoscopy, gonadal biopsy, gonadectomy and hormonal puberty induction are associated with a high need for PsySupp. There was no association between the need for PsySupp and the parents' perception of the appearance of the genitalia. Having a child with dsd is associated with a high need for PsySupp in parents. In particular, parents of children with XY-dsd with androgen effects other than hypospadias expressed a high need of PsySupp. PsySupp for parents should be an obligatory part of interdisciplinary care to reduce fears and concerns. What is known • In parents, having a child with dsd provokes insecurities and fears. Hence, psychological support is recommended as part of the interdisciplinary care. What is new • This is the first study investigating the subjective need for psychological support in a large sample of parents of children with dsd in Germany. We present data on the subjective need for psychological support of the parents, related diagnoses and factors, which should be considered in psychological counselling.

  4. [Development and evaluation of ExSel Test to screen for excess salt intake in hypertensive subjects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girerd, X; Villeneuve, F; Deleste, F; Giral, P; Rosenbaum, D

    2015-06-01

    Development of a test to screen excess salt intake (ESI) in hypertensive patients. Hypertensive subjects living in Paris area have been included. A 24-hour urinary sodium collection has been performed the day before the visit for a day hospital. A food diary was completed on the day of the urine collection and validated after an interview with a dietetician. An ESI was defined by a urinary sodium ≥ 200mmol/d. Clinical or food characteristics associated to an ESI were retained for the ExSel Test variables. A ROC curve was performed to determine the optimal score for the ExSel Test in detection of ESI in hypertensive patients. One hundred and forty-eight hypertensive patients have been included living in the Île-de-France area. ESI was observed in 19% with a higher frequency in men. Seven major determinants of ESI have been identified and are the questions that constitute the ExSel Test. A positive response assigns points: man (1); BMI > 30 (2); bread 4 or 5 pieces per day (1) or more than 6 pieces; cheese at least 1 time per day (2); charcuterie at least 2 times per week (2); use of processed broth or pilaf (1); food rich in hidden salt (pizza, cheeseburger, quiche, shrimp, potato chips, smoked fish, olive) at least 2 times per week (1). The ROC curve analysis shows that a score of 5 or more has the best Youden index with a sensitivity of 0.63, specificity of 0.95, PPV of 0.75, NPV of 0.92. In hypertensive subjects, an excessive salt intake can be detected by the realization of the ExSel Test based only on a simple food-questionnaire and some clinical parameters. For a clinical use of the ExSel Test, an electronic version is available on http://www.comitehta.org. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. [Development of a Japanese version of the Subjective Happiness Scale (SHS), and examination of its validity and reliability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimai, Satoshi; Otake, Keiko; Utsuki, Narisuke; Ikemi, Akira; Lyubomirsky, Sonja

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a Japanese version of the Subjective Happiness Scale (SHS) and to examine its validity and reliability. The four items of the English SHS were translated into Japanese. These Japanese items were back-translated into English, and verified by one of the developers of the original SHS. The participants were 364 Japanese undergraduate students (158 males and 206 females). They were asked to answer the questionnaire including the Japanese SHS, five items concerning positive health and self-esteem, and the Japanese General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). The stability of the Japanese SHS was examined over a five-week time period. It was shown that the Japanese SHS was highly internal consistent with alphas of .80 for males and .84 for females. As for the test-rest reliability, a high correlation (r = .86) was found after five-week. One factor structure and factor loadings emerged clearly from factor analysis. The scores of the Japanese SHS correlated positively with positive health and self-esteem. Furthermore, they were significantly greater in the healthy group than in the unhealthy one, from the GHQ scores, especially for depression. These findings suggest that the Japanese version of SHS has internal consistency, test-retest reliability, convergent validity, and discriminant validity.

  6. Thin-film photovoltaic partnership -- Apollo{reg{underscore}sign} thin film process development: Phase 1 Technical Report, May 1998--April 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, D.W.; Skinner, D.E.

    1999-10-26

    The objective of this Phase 1 subcontract was to establish an efficient production plating system capable of depositing thin-film CdTe and CdS on substrates up to 0.55 m{sup 2}. This baseline would then be used to build on and extend deposition areas to 0.94 m{sup 2} in the next two phases. The following achievements have been demonstrated: {sm{underscore}bullet} Chemical-bath deposition of CdS and electrochemical deposition of CdTe was demonstrated on 0.55 m{sup 2} substrates. The films were characterized using optical and electrical techniques, to increase the understanding of the materials and aid in loss analysis. {sm{underscore}bullet} A stand-alone, prototype CdTe reaction tank was built and commissioned, allowing the BP Solar team to perform full-scale trials as part of this subcontract. {sm{underscore}bullet} BP Solar installed two outdoor systems for reliability and performance testing. {sm{underscore}bullet} The 2-kW, ground-mounted, grid-connected system contains seventy-two 0.43-m{sup 2} Apollo{reg{underscore}sign} module interconnects. {sm{underscore}bullet} Two modules have been supplied to NREL for evaluation on their Performance and Energy Rating Test bed (PERT) for kWh evaluation. {sm{underscore}bullet} BP Solar further characterized the process waste stream with the aim to close-loop the system. Currently, various pieces of equipment are being investigated for suitability of particle and total organic compound removal.

  7. HIV-1 transmission by dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) is regulated by determinants in the carbohydrate recognition domain that are absent in liver/lymph node-SIGN (L-SIGN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Nancy P Y; Breun, Sabine K J; Bashirova, Arman; Baumann, Joerg G; Martin, Thomas D; Karamchandani, Jaideep M; Rausch, Jason W; Le Grice, Stuart F J; Wu, Li; Carrington, Mary; Kewalramani, Vineet N

    2010-01-15

    In this study, we identify determinants in dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) necessary for human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1), transmission. Although human B cell lines expressing DC-SIGN efficiently capture and transmit HIV-1 to susceptible target cells, cells expressing the related molecule liver/lymph node-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (L-SIGN) do not. To understand the differences between DC-SIGN and L-SIGN that affect HIV-1 interactions, we developed Raji B cell lines expressing different DC-SIGN/L-SIGN chimeras. Testing of the chimeras demonstrated that replacement of the DC-SIGN carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) with that of L-SIGN was sufficient to impair virus binding and prevent transmission. Conversely, the ability to bind and transmit HIV-1 was conferred to L-SIGN chimeras containing the DC-SIGN CRD. We identified Trp-258 in the DC-SIGN CRD to be essential for HIV-1 transmission. Although introduction of a K270W mutation at the same position in L-SIGN was insufficient for HIV-1 binding, an L-SIGN mutant molecule with K270W and a C-terminal DC-SIGN CRD subdomain transmitted HIV-1. These data suggest that DC-SIGN structural elements distinct from the oligosaccharide-binding site are required for HIV-1 glycoprotein selectivity.

  8. Sharma′s python sign: A New tubal sign in female genital tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai Bhagwan Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Female genital tuberculosis (FGTB is an important cause of infertility in developing countries. Various type of TB salpingitis can be endosalpingitis, exosalpingitis, interstitial TB salpingitis, and salpingitis isthmica nodosa. The fallopian tubes are thickened enlarged and tortuous. Unilateral or bilateral hydrosalpinx or pyosalpinx may be formed. A new sign python sign is presented in which fallopian tube looks like a blue python on dye testing in FGTB.

  9. Sharma's Python Sign: A New Tubal Sign in Female Genital Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jai Bhagwan Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Female genital tuberculosis (FGTB) is an important cause of infertility in developing countries. Various type of TB salpingitis can be endosalpingitis, exosalpingitis, interstitial TB salpingitis, and salpingitis isthmica nodosa. The fallopian tubes are thickened enlarged and tortuous. Unilateral or bilateral hydrosalpinx or pyosalpinx may be formed. A new sign python sign is presented in which fallopian tube looks like a blue python on dye testing in FGTB.

  10. Sharma's Python Sign: A New Tubal Sign in Female Genital Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Jai Bhagwan

    2016-01-01

    Female genital tuberculosis (FGTB) is an important cause of infertility in developing countries. Various type of TB salpingitis can be endosalpingitis, exosalpingitis, interstitial TB salpingitis, and salpingitis isthmica nodosa. The fallopian tubes are thickened enlarged and tortuous. Unilateral or bilateral hydrosalpinx or pyosalpinx may be formed. A new sign python sign is presented in which fallopian tube looks like a blue python on dye testing in FGTB.

  11. Sign Languages of the World

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This handbook provides information on some 38 sign languages, including basic facts about each of the languages, structural aspects, history and culture of the Deaf communities, and history of research. The papers are all original, and each has been specifically written for the volume by an expert...... or team of experts in the particular sign language, at the invitation of the editors. Thirty-eight different deaf sign languages and alternate sign languages from every continent are represented, and over seventy international deaf and hearing scholars have contributed to the volume....

  12. FAST DRAWING OF TRAFFIC SIGN USING MOBILE MAPPING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Yao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Traffic sign provides road users with the specified instruction and information to enhance traffic safety. Automatic detection of traffic sign is important for navigation, autonomous driving, transportation asset management, etc. With the advance of laser and imaging sensors, Mobile Mapping System (MMS becomes widely used in transportation agencies to map the transportation infrastructure. Although many algorithms of traffic sign detection are developed in the literature, they are still a tradeoff between the detection speed and accuracy, especially for the large-scale mobile mapping of both the rural and urban roads. This paper is motivated to efficiently survey traffic signs while mapping the road network and the roadside landscape. Inspired by the manual delineation of traffic sign, a drawing strategy is proposed to quickly approximate the boundary of traffic sign. Both the shape and color prior of the traffic sign are simultaneously involved during the drawing process. The most common speed-limit sign circle and the statistic color model of traffic sign are studied in this paper. Anchor points of traffic sign edge are located with the local maxima of color and gradient difference. Starting with the anchor points, contour of traffic sign is drawn smartly along the most significant direction of color and intensity consistency. The drawing process is also constrained by the curvature feature of the traffic sign circle. The drawing of linear growth is discarded immediately if it fails to form an arc over some steps. The Kalman filter principle is adopted to predict the temporal context of traffic sign. Based on the estimated point,we can predict and double check the traffic sign in consecutive frames.The event probability of having a traffic sign over the consecutive observations is compared with the null hypothesis of no perceptible traffic sign. The temporally salient traffic sign is then detected statistically and automatically as the rare

  13. Fast Drawing of Traffic Sign Using Mobile Mapping System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Q.; Tan, B.; Huang, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Traffic sign provides road users with the specified instruction and information to enhance traffic safety. Automatic detection of traffic sign is important for navigation, autonomous driving, transportation asset management, etc. With the advance of laser and imaging sensors, Mobile Mapping System (MMS) becomes widely used in transportation agencies to map the transportation infrastructure. Although many algorithms of traffic sign detection are developed in the literature, they are still a tradeoff between the detection speed and accuracy, especially for the large-scale mobile mapping of both the rural and urban roads. This paper is motivated to efficiently survey traffic signs while mapping the road network and the roadside landscape. Inspired by the manual delineation of traffic sign, a drawing strategy is proposed to quickly approximate the boundary of traffic sign. Both the shape and color prior of the traffic sign are simultaneously involved during the drawing process. The most common speed-limit sign circle and the statistic color model of traffic sign are studied in this paper. Anchor points of traffic sign edge are located with the local maxima of color and gradient difference. Starting with the anchor points, contour of traffic sign is drawn smartly along the most significant direction of color and intensity consistency. The drawing process is also constrained by the curvature feature of the traffic sign circle. The drawing of linear growth is discarded immediately if it fails to form an arc over some steps. The Kalman filter principle is adopted to predict the temporal context of traffic sign. Based on the estimated point,we can predict and double check the traffic sign in consecutive frames.The event probability of having a traffic sign over the consecutive observations is compared with the null hypothesis of no perceptible traffic sign. The temporally salient traffic sign is then detected statistically and automatically as the rare event of having a

  14. Automatic sign language recognition inspired by human sign perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Holt, G.A.

    2010-01-01

    Automatic sign language recognition is a relatively new field of research (since ca. 1990). Its objectives are to automatically analyze sign language utterances. There are several issues within the research area that merit investigation: how to capture the utterances (cameras, magnetic sensors,

  15. Inuit Sign Language: a contribution to sign language typology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuit, J.; Baker, A.; Pfau, R.

    2011-01-01

    Sign language typology is a fairly new research field and typological classifications have yet to be established. For spoken languages, these classifications are generally based on typological parameters; it would thus be desirable to establish these for sign languages. In this paper, different

  16. Planning Sign Languages: Promoting Hearing Hegemony? Conceptualizing Sign Language Standardization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmann, Hanna

    2009-01-01

    In light of the absence of a codified standard variety in British Sign Language and German Sign Language ("Deutsche Gebardensprache") there have been repeated calls for the standardization of both languages primarily from outside the Deaf community. The paper is based on a recent grounded theory study which explored perspectives on sign…

  17. The NeckPix(©): development of an evaluation tool for assessing kinesiophobia in subjects with chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monticone, Marco; Vernon, Howard; Brunati, Roberto; Rocca, Barbara; Ferrante, Simona

    2015-01-01

    To develop and validate NeckPix(©), a multi-image instrument for assessing daily activities in the context of pain-related fear, in order to allow its use in patients with chronic neck pain (NP). The measure was developed by means of item generation followed by reduction/selection. The psychometric testing included exploratory factor analysis; content validity by investigating clarity, specificity, appropriateness for the target population, relevance and completeness; reliability by internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) and test-retest stability (intra-class coefficient correlation, ICC); and construct validity by comparing NeckPix with the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK), the Pain Catastrophising Scale (PCS), the Neck Disability Index (NDI) and a Numerical Rating Scale of pain intensity (NRS) (Pearson's correlation). The measure, which includes ten images used to assess everyday activities in the context of pain-related fear, was administered to 118 subjects with chronic non-specific NP, and proved to be acceptable and feasible. Factor analysis revealed a one-factor solution (which explained 71.12 % of variance). The content of the images was considered adequate, appropriate for the target population, comprehensive, and relevant for evaluating activity-related kinesiophobia. The instrument's internal consistency was good (α = 0.954), as was its test-retest stability (ICC 0.979). Construct validity demonstrated a close correlation with the TSK (r = 0.759), and moderate correlations with the PCS (r = 0.583), the NDI (r = 0.520), and a NRS (r = 0.455). NeckPix(©), which was successfully developed following international recommendations, proved to have a good factorial structure and satisfactory psychometric properties. Its use is recommended for research purposes.

  18. Validity of the American Sign Language Discrimination Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochner, Joseph H.; Samar, Vincent J.; Hauser, Peter C.; Garrison, Wayne M.; Searls, J. Matt; Sanders, Cynthia A.

    2016-01-01

    American Sign Language (ASL) is one of the most commonly taught languages in North America. Yet, few assessment instruments for ASL proficiency have been developed, none of which have adequately demonstrated validity. We propose that the American Sign Language Discrimination Test (ASL-DT), a recently developed measure of learners' ability to…

  19. Signs of learning in kinaesthetic science activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Johannsen, Bjørn Friis

    The study addresses how students use communicative signs (e.g., speech and gesture) to shape and develop cognitive schemas during a bodily exploration of force and motion in a physics teaching-learning activity. We see ‘the experiential gestalt of causation’ as a cognitive element that may be used...... to couple an embodied experience of physics with the language of physics through dialogue. We propose that kinaesthetic learning is a way of integrating a bodily experience into a formal system of signs, in this case, force and motion in physics, but ask: to a teacher or researcher, what signs exist...... that students use bodily explorations to construct meaning and understanding from kinaesthetic learning that is relevant to school physics? To answer the question, we employ a semiotics perspective to analyse data from a 1-hour lesson for 8-9th graders which introduced students to kinaesthetic activities, where...

  20. ACTIVITY APPROACH AND FORMATION OF PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCIES IN SUBJECT TEACHERS IN THE COURSE OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S E Mansurova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Activity approach, differently refracted at different levels of education, has put many new challenges for teachers. The competence approach acts as the methodological basis of the state educational standard of higher professional education, additional professional education; the system-activity approach acts as the methodological basis of the standards of General education. With regard to teachers of General education, the main task is to overcome the contradiction between the real level of their qualifications and new high requirements for them. These requirements are outlined in the leading normative documents of the educational standards, Professional standard “Teacher”. For the system of teacher professional development the authors of this article propose an integrated approach that combines competence-based and system-activity approaches. The integrated approach differs substantially for teachers who teach subjects of Humanities and science profiles. The paper presents the examples of tasks for various categories of teachers, the specifics of the project and research activities, as well as the characteristics of the process of problematization in the classroom and in extracurricular activities of the teachers. The universal educational actions are differenciated from the position of the variable component. At the same time the authors understand the necessity of taking into account the invariant component in the teaching of humanitarian and natural science disciplines. This thesis is a reflection of the general trend towards integration and interdisciplinarity.

  1. Pattern of follicular development in sheep subjected to ovarian superstimulation after follicular ablation by laparoscopic ovum pick-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renan Denadai

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine the pattern of follicular development in ewes following ablation of all follicles associated with ovarian superstimulatory treatment. After confirmation of reproductive cyclicity using ultrasonography and progesterone levels, five adult ewes of undetermined breed received a vaginal pessary containing 60mg of medroxyprogesterone, maintained for 10 days, with the application of 100μg cloprostenol on the fourth day. On the tenth day, 300UI equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG was applied together with 80mg FSH, and all visible follicles were aspirated by laparoscopic ovum pick-up (LOPU. Following LOPU, ovarian structures were assessed using sonography every 8 hours for a period of 64 hours, and the number and diameter of small (4.5mm follicles were recorded. The average diameter of small follicles reduced from 5.6±1.5mm initially to 0.8±1.3mm by 56 hours. Population size of the medium-sized follicles during the observation period followed a parabolic distribution wherein the theoretical maximum size emerged at 34.6 hours with no difference at (P>0.05 24 (4.6±1.5 and 48 hours (4.8±2.3. It was concluded that in ewes subjected to ovarian superstimulation immediately following LOPU, follicular development is characterized by a new wave of follicle growth with a predominance of medium-sized follicles (2.5-4.5mm between 24 and 48 hours, and a theoretical population maximum occured at 34.6 hours.

  2. Sign-Lingo : Feasibility of a Serious Game for Involving Parents in the Language Development of their Deaf or Hearing Impaired Child

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalk, I van der; Spruit, M.

    2017-01-01

    Family involvement plays a critical factor in the language development of a deaf or hearing impaired child. Hearing parents often have major difficulties in communicating with their child when it is deaf or hearing impaired. These difficulties often lead to issues in the language development of the

  3. Physiological Responses and Ovarian Development of Female Chinese Mitten Crab Eriocheir sinensis Subjected to Different Salinity Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowen Long

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Salinity plays a key role affecting ovarian development, osmoregulation and metabolism of female Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis during reproductive migration. In this study, female E. sinensis after their puberty molt were subjected to four salinities of 0, 6, 12, and 18‰ for 40 days to investigate the salinity effects on their ovarian development as well as a range of important physiological parameters. Elevated salinity accelerated the ovarian development with ovigerous crabs found at salinity treatments of 12 and 18‰ despite no copulation had occurred. Meanwhile the survival rate of female crabs showed a decreasing trend with increasing salinity. Higher salinity also led to increased hemolymph Na+, K+, Ca2+, Cl−, and Mg2+ concentrations. The 6‰ treatment had the highest contents of hemolymph total and major free amino acids while the Na+/K+ -ATPase activity in the posterior gills was the lowest among treatments. Total n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (∑n-3PUFA and n-3/n-6 PUFA ratio in the anterior gills showed a decreasing trend with salinity while 18‰ had the highest ∑PUFA and ∑n-6PUFA. The ∑n-3PUFA content and n-3/n-6 PUFA ratio of the posterior gills showed a fluctuating pattern and the highest value was detected at 0‰, while an increasing trend was found for the ∑n-6PUFA with increasing salinity. The hemolymph glucose showed a decreasing trend with increasing salinity and the highest total cholesterol in hemolymph was detected at 12‰. The 18‰ treatment had the highest levels of hemolymph γ-glutamyltransferase, alkaline phosphatase and acid phosphatase, as well as glucose, urea and acid phosphatase in hepatopancreas while the highest hemolymph superoxide dismutase and malondialdehyde were detected at 0‰. Overall, the results showed that salinity increase from freshwater to brackish conditions led to lower metabolism, accelerated ovarian development, and the appearance of ovigerous crabs without

  4. Learning to Detect Traffic Signs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelmose, Andreas; Trivedi, Mohan M.; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the performance of sign detection based on synthetic training data to the performance of detection based on real-world training images. Viola-Jones detectors are created for 4 different traffic signs with both synthetic and real data, and varying numbers of training samples...

  5. Sign Facilitation in Word Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauters, Loes N.; Knoors, Harry E. T.; Vervloed, Mathijs P. J.; Aarnoutse, Cor A. J.

    2001-01-01

    This study examined whether use of sign language would facilitate reading word recognition by 16 deaf children (6- to 1 years-old) in the Netherlands. Results indicated that if words were learned through speech, accompanied by the relevant sign, accuracy of word recognition was greater than if words were learned solely through speech. (Contains…

  6. Concise Lexicon for Sign Linguistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Jan Nijen Twilhaar; Dr. Beppie van den Bogaerde

    2016-01-01

    This extensive, well-researched and clearly formatted lexicon of a wide variety of linguistic terms is a long overdue. It is an extremely welcome addition to the bookshelves of sign language teachers, interpreters, linguists, learners and other sign language users, and of course of the Deaf

  7. Activation Cascading in Sign Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Eduardo; Peressotti, Francesca; Lerose, Luigi; Miozzo, Michele

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how activation unfolds in sign production by examining whether signs that are not produced have their representations activated by semantics (cascading of activation). Deaf signers were tested with a picture-picture interference task. Participants were presented with pairs of overlapping pictures and named the green…

  8. Indoor navigation by people with visual impairment using a digital sign system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon E Legge

    Full Text Available There is a need for adaptive technology to enhance indoor wayfinding by visually-impaired people. To address this need, we have developed and tested a Digital Sign System. The hardware and software consist of digitally-encoded signs widely distributed throughout a building, a handheld sign-reader based on an infrared camera, image-processing software, and a talking digital map running on a mobile device. Four groups of subjects-blind, low vision, blindfolded sighted, and normally sighted controls-were evaluated on three navigation tasks. The results demonstrate that the technology can be used reliably in retrieving information from the signs during active mobility, in finding nearby points of interest, and following routes in a building from a starting location to a destination. The visually impaired subjects accurately and independently completed the navigation tasks, but took substantially longer than normally sighted controls. This fully functional prototype system demonstrates the feasibility of technology enabling independent indoor navigation by people with visual impairment.

  9. Effects of glycemic load on metabolic risk markers in subjects at increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrolix, Ruth; Mensink, Ronald P

    2010-08-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that diets with a low glycemic index (GI) or glycemic load (GL) are associated with a decreased risk of developing metabolic syndrome. Intervention studies are inconsistent, however, possibly due to differences in macronutrient and fiber compositions of the experimental diets. We tested side-by-side test foods with similar macronutrient and fiber compositions but with different sucrose-flour ratios or carbohydrate source to determine the effects of different GIs and GLs on metabolic risk markers in overweight subjects. Overweight men (n = 9) and women (n = 6) received in random order for 11 wk 4 test foods with an increased GI or a decreased GI (69 compared with 40, 86 compared with 48, 63 compared with 37, and 51 compared with 20, respectively). There was a GL difference of 32 units between the 2 interventions. At the end of the 11-wk intervention periods, the decreased GL test foods did not change fasting plasma glucose (mean +/- SD: 5.83 +/- 0.6 compared with 5.94 +/- 0.6 mmol/L) or insulin (8.3 +/- 2.8 compared with 9.8 +/- 5.1 mU/L) concentrations compared with increased GL test foods. Serum total cholesterol (5.56 +/- 0.90 compared with 5.76 +/- 1.04 mmol/L), LDL-cholesterol (3.57 +/- 0.72 compared with 3.68 +/- 0.80 mmol/L), HDL-cholesterol (1.21 +/- 0.38 compared with 1.24 +/- 0.37 mmol/L), and triacylglycerol (1.61 +/- 0.77 compared with 1.78 +/- 1.04 mmol/L) concentrations were also not significantly different for decreased and increased GL test foods, respectively. Finally, proinflammatory (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1) and prothrombotic (plasminogen activator inhibitor 1) markers were not affected. Glucose and lipids were also analyzed after 1 and 5 wk of intervention and were not affected by the intervention. When incorporated into a habitual diet, consumption of test foods with a decreased GL does not ameliorate metabolic risk markers

  10. A system for teaching sign language using live gesture feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Daniel; McDonald, John; Markham, Charles

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a computer vision based virtual learning environment for teaching communicative hand gestures used in Sign Language. A virtual learning environment was developed to demonstrate signs to the user. The system then gives real time feedback to the user on their performance of the demonstrated sign. Gesture features are extracted from a standard web-cam video stream and shape and trajectory matching techniques are applied to these features to determine the feedback given to the...

  11. Subjective and objective traumatic death: distinct roles in developing complicated grief and depression among older adults in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Suqin; Chow, Amy Y M

    2017-03-01

    Symptoms of complicated grief are associated with a traumatic death. However, the subjective experience of whether or not the death was considered traumatic has not been substantially explored. This study first examined the difference between objective and subjective traumatic death, and then investigated their respective impacts on complicated grief and depressive symptoms following bereavement among older adults in Hong Kong. Participants were 187 Hong Kong adults aged 65 years or above who had lost a family member within the past five years. Demographic information, the Inventory of Complicated Grief (ICG), the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), and the anxiety subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were utilized. The subjective traumatic level of the death did not differ between the objective traumatic and non-traumatic death as defined by nature of death (t = -1.554, p = 0.122). Higher subjective traumatic levels and younger age of the deceased, were positively related to complicated grief symptoms, F (10, 161) = 14.222, p subjective traumatic levels and older age of the bereaved were positively associated with symptoms of depression, F (10, 160) = 2.855, p = 0.003, R 2 = 0.151. However, objective traumatic death was found to have no relation to either complicated grief or depressive symptoms. Subjective and objective traumatic death may be two distinct concepts, and the subjective experience of the death as a trauma may be a more important factor that contributes to complicated grief and depressive symptoms.

  12. Design of a model for a professional development programme for a multidisciplinary science subject in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Talitha Christine; Coenders, Ferdinand G.M.; Terlouw, C.; Pieters, Julius Marie

    2012-01-01

    Schools are increasingly integrating multidisciplinary education into their programmes. The Minister of Education, Culture and Science has introduced a new, integrated science subject in secondary education in the Netherlands, called Nature, Life and Technology (NLT). This research note describes

  13. O professor intérprete de língua de sinais em sala de aula: ponto de partida para se repensar a relação ensino, sujeito e linguagem/The sign language teacher/interpreter in the classroom: the starting point for a re-evaluation of teaching, subject and language relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Maria de Souza

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho discute a necessária participação educativa do intérprete de língua de sinais em sala de aula. A partir da teoria do Acontecimento Didático sobre o ensino e das idéias de Derrida sobre o ato interpretativo, defende a tese de que tentar estabelecer limites para a atuação do intérprete educacional - na tentativa de fazer com que não se confunda com a figura do/a professor/a em sala de aula - é submeter-se a uma formação discursiva de ensino que o reduz ou ao currículo, ou ao método (técnicas ou a intervenções que consideram tão somente a “capacidade” cognitiva do sujeito. The present paper discusses the necessary educational participation by the sign language interpreter in the classroom. Based on the Didactic Event teaching theory and Derrida´s ideas on the interpretive act, we argue that by setting limits for the educational interpreter’s performance – in an attempt to prevent him/her from being mistaken for a teacher in the classroom –, a discursive position about teaching is adopted, which restricts him/her to the curriculum, to the (technical method or to the interventions that take into account only the cognitive “capacity” of the subject.

  14. Sodium content and sodium efflux of mononuclear leucocytes from young subjects at increased risk of developing essential hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, K E; Nielsen, J R; Klitgaard, N A

    1990-01-01

    , and to analyze whether any such changes were associated with borderline hypertension and/or heredity. Four groups of subjects were evaluated: 28 normotensive (NTO) and 20 borderline hypertensive (BHO) offspring of hypertensives, 12 borderline hypertensives with normotensive parents (BH) and 28 normotensive...... subjects with normotensive parents (NT). The cellular sodium/potassium contents of the four groups were not discernibly different. Ouabain insensitive sodium efflux rate constant and corresponding absolute efflux were significantly increased in offspring of hypertensives. Ouabain sensitive absolute sodium...

  15. Sign Inference for Dynamic Signed Networks via Dictionary Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Cen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile online social network (mOSN is a burgeoning research area. However, most existing works referring to mOSNs deal with static network structures and simply encode whether relationships among entities exist or not. In contrast, relationships in signed mOSNs can be positive or negative and may be changed with time and locations. Applying certain global characteristics of social balance, in this paper, we aim to infer the unknown relationships in dynamic signed mOSNs and formulate this sign inference problem as a low-rank matrix estimation problem. Specifically, motivated by the Singular Value Thresholding (SVT algorithm, a compact dictionary is selected from the observed dataset. Based on this compact dictionary, the relationships in the dynamic signed mOSNs are estimated via solving the formulated problem. Furthermore, the estimation accuracy is improved by employing a dictionary self-updating mechanism.

  16. What Patterns or Anomalies Develop among the Institutional Characteristics of Colleges and Universities That Have Signed a Title IX Sexual Assault and Harassment Resolution Agreement with the OCR?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayman, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The Office for Civil Rights for the Department of Education received 9,989 complaints in 2014. 5,845 of those cases were Title IX complaints, 854 pertaining to sexual harassment or assault (United States Department of Education, 2015). This dissertation answers the question, "What patterns or anomalies develop among the institutional…

  17. Individual differences in sign language abilities in deaf children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meronen, Auli; Ahonen, Timo

    2008-01-01

    The study attempted to identify characteristics of individual differences in sign language abilities among deaf children. Connections between sign language skills and rapid serial naming, hand motor skills, and early fluency were investigated. The sample consisted of 85 Finnish deaf children. Their first language was sign language. Simple correlations and multiple linear-regression analysis demonstrated the effect of early language development and serial hand movements on sign language abilities. Other significant factors were serial fingertapping and serial naming. Heterogeneity in poor sign language users was noted. Although identifying learning disorders in deaf children is complicated, developmental difficulties can be discovered by appropriate measurements. The study confirmed the results of earlier research demonstrating that the features of deaf and hearing children's learning resemble each other. Disorders in signed and spoken languages may have similar bases despite their different modalities.

  18. Sanal Lidzhiev, Signs and Omens

    OpenAIRE

    Gedeeva, Darina; Ubushieva, Bamba

    2017-01-01

    Seeing a hare is a good sign, because your plans will materialize. It is a bad sign to see a fox or a corsac on the road. It is also a bad sign when children snort. It is forbidden for pregnant women to eat long intestines or mildly cooked meat with blood. Only one person can eat a cooked sheep's head. If two people eat the same head, they will quarrel. A sheep's head that people present to each other at weddings should be burnt on a fire. If someone brings meat, show it to all who are pres...

  19. MOLAR TOOTH SIGN - JOUBERT SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušica Ranđelović

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The molar tooth sign is seen in very few conditions and is a very rare pediatric central nervous system congenital anomaly. Molar tooth sign is the result of cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, thick and maloriented superior cerebellar peduncles, and an abnormally deep interpeduncular fossa. In Joubert syndrome, this is seen in about 85% of patients. We present a case of a two-year old girl with flaccid paraparesis, regression of milestones and developmental delay. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed the characteristic molar tooth sign with apposition of cerebellar hemispheres, batwing-shaped fourth ventricle, cerebellar vermis agenesis and deep interpeduncular fossa consistent with the diagnosis of Joubert syndrome.

  20. Development of a coal-fueled Internal Manifold Heat Exchanger (IMHEX{reg_sign}) molten carbonate fuel cell. Volumes 1--6, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    The design of a CGMCFC electric generation plant that will provide a cost of eletricity (COE) which is lower than that of current electric generation technologies and which is competitive with other long-range electric generating systems is presented. This effort is based upon the Internal Manifold Heat Exchanger (IMHEX) technology as developed by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT). The project was executed by selecting economic and performance objectives for alternative plant arrangements while considering process constraints identified during IMHEX fuel cell development activities at ICT. The four major subsystems of a coal-based MCFC power plant are coal gasification, gas purification, fuel cell power generation and the bottoming cycle. The design and method of operation of each subsystem can be varied, and, depending upon design choices, can have major impact on both the design of other subsystems and the resulting cost of electricity. The challenge of this project was to select, from a range of design parameters, those operating conditions that result in a preferred plant design. Computer modelling was thus used to perform sensitivity analyses of as many system variables as program resources and schedules would permit. In any systems analysis, it is imperative that the evaluation methodology be verifiable and comparable. The TAG Class I develops comparable (if imprecise) data on performance and costs for the alternative cases being studied. It identifies, from a range of options, those which merit more exacting scrutiny to be undertaken at the second level, TAG class II analysis.

  1. So Much to Learn, so Little Time...: Pre-Service Physical Education Teachers' Interpretations and Development of Subject Knowledge as They Learn to Teach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Frank Andreas; Waring, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the development of pre-service teachers during a one-year programme of initial teacher training and education (ITTE) of secondary physical education (PE) in England. It concentrates in particular on the interpretation and development of different dimensions of subject knowledge during different phases of their ITTE programme.…

  2. Association of endodontic signs and symptoms with root canal pathogens: A clinical comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    R V Vineet; Moksha Nayak; Subbannayya Kotigadde

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of the common root canal pathogens namely; Streptococcus mitis and Enterococcus faecalis with specific endodontic signs and symptoms. Materials and Methods: Sixty subjects scheduled for endodontic treatment were divided into two groups comprising of 30 subjects with primary endodontic infections and 30 subjects with failed endodontic treatment. The endodontic signs and symptoms of the subjects were assessed using clinical an...

  3. 31 March 2016 - Qatar Foundation Research and Development Executive Vice President H. Al-Ibrahim signing a Cooperation Agreement with CERN Director-General F. Gianotti.

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2016-01-01

    Dr Hamad Al-Ibrahim Executive Vice President, Qatar Foundation Research and Development. Were present: CERN International Relations Unit, Adviser for Qatar P. Fassnacht; CERN Director for Research and Computing E. Elsen; Texas A&M Professor of Physics A. Safonov ; CERN Director for International Relations C. Warakaulle; Professor of Physics, Qatar University I.Al-Qaradawi; Executive Vice President H. Al-Ibrahim; CERN Director-General F. Gianotti; Ambassador Faisal Bin Abdulla Al-Henzab to the UNOG; Director of Research Computing, Texas A&M, Qatar O. Bouhali; Vice Dean, Texas A&M, Qatar E. Massad; Executive Director, Research Coordination & Special Initiatives, Qatar Foundation R&D D. Khoury.

  4. Signs of segmentation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilsøe, Anna

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses the contribution of decentralized collective bargaining to the development of different forms of flexicurity for different groups of employees on the Danish labour market. Based on five case studies of company-level bargaining on flexible working hours in Danish industry...... the text of the agreements. On the other hand, less flexible employees often face difficulties in meeting the demands of the agreements and may ultimately be forced to leave the company and rely on unemployment benefits and active labour market policies. In a flexicurity perspective, this development seems...

  5. Development of an integrated in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for Task {number_sign}3.2 entitled, ``Modeling and iron dechlorination studies`` (September 26, 1994--August 31, 1997)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, A.P.; Sivavec, T.M.; Principe, J.M. [General Electric Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Contamination in low-permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, and pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low-permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil, and electro-osmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is complete. The present Topical Report for Task {number_sign}3.2 summarizes the modeling and dechlorination research conducted by General Electric Research and Development.

  6. Prevalence and risk indicators of temporomandibular disorder signs and symptoms in a pediatric population with spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miamoto, C B; Pereira, L J; Paiva, S M; Pordeus, I A; Ramos-Jorge, M L; Marques, L S

    2011-01-01

    To determine risk indicators for signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in children with cerebral palsy (n = 60) and control subjects (n = 60). The subjects were assessed by means of questionnaire and clinical exam: 1) signs and symptoms of TMD; 2) malocclusions [Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI)]; 3) harmful habits; and 4) bio-psychosocial characteristics. Statistical analysis involved the chi-square, Fisher's exact tests (p symptoms of TMD and applied as co-variables in the multivariate analysis. The prevalence of at least one sign and/or symptom of TMD in the present sample was 1.7% (n = 1) among the individuals in the control group and 13.3% (n = 8) among the individuals with cerebral palsy. The presence of cerebral palsy (Odds Ratio: 9.08; p = 0.041), male gender (OR: 6.21; p = 0.027), severity of the malocclusion (OR: 4.75; p = 0.031), mouth breathing (OR: 5.40; p = 0.022) and mixed dentition (OR: 4.73; p = 0.035) were identified as risk indicators for signs and symptoms of TMD. It was concluded that children with cerebral palsy had a significantly greater chance of developing signs and symptoms of TMD.

  7. DC-SIGN (CD209) Promoter −336 A/G (rs4804803) Polymorphism Associated with Susceptibility of Kawasaki Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong-Ren; Chang, Wei-Pin; Wang, Lin; Lin, Ying-Jui; Liang, Chi-Di; Yang, Kuender D.; Kuo, Chiu-Ming; Huang, Yi-Chuan; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Kuo, Ho-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is characterized by systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology. High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is the most effective therapy for KD to reduce the prevalence of coronary artery lesion (CAL) formation. Recently, the α2, 6 sialylated IgG was reported to interact with a lectin receptor, specific intracellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing nonintegrin homolog-related 1 (SIGN-R1) in mice and dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) in human, and to trigger an anti-inflammatory cascade. This study was conducted to investigate whether the polymorphism of DC-SIGN (CD209) promoter −336 A/G (rs4804803) is responsible for susceptibility and CAL formation in KD patients using Custom TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assays. A total of 521 subjects (278 KD patients and 243 controls) were investigated to identify an SNP of rs4804803, and they were studied and showed a significant association between the genotypes and allele frequency of rs4804803 in control subjects and KD patients (P = 0.004 under the dominant model). However, the promoter variant of DC-SIGN gene was not associated with the occurrence of IVIG resistance, CAL formation in KD. The G allele of DC-SIGN promoter −336 (rs4804803) is a risk allele in the development of KD. PMID:22629172

  8. DC-SIGN (CD209) promoter -336 A/G (rs4804803) polymorphism associated with susceptibility of Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong-Ren; Chang, Wei-Pin; Wang, Lin; Lin, Ying-Jui; Liang, Chi-Di; Yang, Kuender D; Kuo, Chiu-Ming; Huang, Yi-Chuan; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Kuo, Ho-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is characterized by systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology. High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is the most effective therapy for KD to reduce the prevalence of coronary artery lesion (CAL) formation. Recently, the α2, 6 sialylated IgG was reported to interact with a lectin receptor, specific intracellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing nonintegrin homolog-related 1 (SIGN-R1) in mice and dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) in human, and to trigger an anti-inflammatory cascade. This study was conducted to investigate whether the polymorphism of DC-SIGN (CD209) promoter -336 A/G (rs4804803) is responsible for susceptibility and CAL formation in KD patients using Custom TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assays. A total of 521 subjects (278 KD patients and 243 controls) were investigated to identify an SNP of rs4804803, and they were studied and showed a significant association between the genotypes and allele frequency of rs4804803 in control subjects and KD patients (P = 0.004 under the dominant model). However, the promoter variant of DC-SIGN gene was not associated with the occurrence of IVIG resistance, CAL formation in KD. The G allele of DC-SIGN promoter -336 (rs4804803) is a risk allele in the development of KD.

  9. Recognition of sign language gestures using neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Vamplew

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the structure and performance of the SLARTI sign language recognition system developed at the University of Tasmania. SLARTI uses a modular architecture consisting of multiple feature-recognition neural networks and a nearest-neighbour classifier to recognise Australian sign language (Auslan hand gestures.

  10. The Distribution of the Sum of Signed Ranks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Brian

    2012-01-01

    We describe the calculation of the distribution of the sum of signed ranks and develop an exact recursive algorithm for the distribution as well as an approximation of the distribution using the normal. The results have applications to the non-parametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test.

  11. An Intelligent Computer-Based System for Sign Language Tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchings, Tim; Khadragi, Ahmed; Saeb, Magdy

    2012-01-01

    A computer-based system for sign language tutoring has been developed using a low-cost data glove and a software application that processes the movement signals for signs in real-time and uses Pattern Matching techniques to decide if a trainee has closely replicated a teacher's recorded movements. The data glove provides 17 movement signals from…

  12. Reading and American Sign Language: Strategies for Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, Kim

    1999-01-01

    A hearing teacher for whom American Sign Language is a second language identifies nine strategies developed for reading and telling stories to deaf children. These include: ask obvious questions related to the story, portray written dialog as conversation, emphasize points by saying the same thing with different signs, and adapt the story to…

  13. Aging changes in vital signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004019.htm Aging changes in vital signs To use the sharing ... Normal body temperature does not change much with aging. But as you get older, it becomes harder ...

  14. Diagnosing Dementia—Positive Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Diagnosing Dementia—Positive Signs Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of ... easy, affordable blood test that could accurately diagnose Alzheimer's disease (AD)—even before symptoms began to show? Researchers ...

  15. Quantifiers in Russian Sign Language

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimmelman, V.; Paperno, D.; Keenan, E.L.

    2017-01-01

    After presenting some basic genetic, historical and typological information about Russian Sign Language, this chapter outlines the quantification patterns it expresses. It illustrates various semantic types of quantifiers, such as generalized existential, generalized universal, proportional,

  16. 23 CFR 750.710 - Landmark signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Landmark signs. 750.710 Section 750.710 Highways FEDERAL... Outdoor Advertising Control § 750.710 Landmark signs. (a) 23 U.S.C. 131(c) permits the existence of signs... Secretary, to be landmark signs, including signs on farm structures or natural surfaces, of historic or...

  17. Sign Language in Astronomy and Space Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cova, J.; Movilio, V.; Gómez, Y.; Gutiérrez, F.; García, R.; Moreno, H.; González, F.; Díaz, J.; Villarroel, C.; Abreu, E.; Aparicio, D.; Cárdenas, J.; Casneiro, L.; Castillo, N.; Contreras, D.; La Verde, N.; Maita, M.; Martínez, A.; Villahermosa, J.; Quintero, A.

    2009-05-01

    Teaching science to school children with hearing deficiency and impairment can be a rewarding and valuable experience for both teacher and student, and necessary to society as a whole in order to reduce the discriminative policies in the formal educational system. The one most important obstacle to the teaching of science to students with hearing deficiency and impairments is the lack of vocabulary in sign language to express the precise concepts encountered in scientific endeavor. In a collaborative project between Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomía ``Francisco J. Duarte'' (CIDA), Universidad Pedagógica Experimental Libertador-Instituto Pedagógico de Maturín (UPEL-IPM) and Unidad Educativa Especial Bolivariana de Maturín (UEEBM) initiated in 2006, we have attempted to fill this gap by developing signs for astronomy and space sciences terminology. During two three-day workshops carried out at CIDA in Mérida in July 2006 and UPEL-IPM in Maturín in March 2007 a total of 112 concepts of astronomy and space sciences were coined in sign language using an interactive method which we describe in the text. The immediate goal of the project is to incorporate these terms into Venezuelan Sign Language (LSV).

  18. Neural networks for sign language translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Beth J.; Anspach, Gretel

    1993-09-01

    A neural network is used to extract relevant features of sign language from video images of a person communicating in American Sign Language or Signed English. The key features are hand motion, hand location with respect to the body, and handshape. A modular hybrid design is under way to apply various techniques, including neural networks, in the development of a translation system that will facilitate communication between deaf and hearing people. One of the neural networks described here is used to classify video images of handshapes into their linguistic counterpart in American Sign Language. The video image is preprocessed to yield Fourier descriptors that encode the shape of the hand silhouette. These descriptors are then used as inputs to a neural network that classifies their shapes. The network is trained with various examples from different signers and is tested with new images from new signers. The results have shown that for coarse handshape classes, the network is invariant to the type of camera used to film the various signers and to the segmentation technique.

  19. Examination of Sign Language Education According to the Opinions of Members from a Basic Sign Language Certification Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akmese, Pelin Pistav

    2016-01-01

    Being hearing impaired limits one's ability to communicate in that it affects all areas of development, particularly speech. One of the methods the hearing impaired use to communicate is sign language. This study, a descriptive study, intends to examine the opinions of individuals who had enrolled in a sign language certification program by using…

  20. Generation of Signs within Semantic and Phonological Categories: Data from Deaf Adults and Children Who Use American Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal-Alvarez, Jennifer S.; Figueroa, Daileen M.

    2017-01-01

    Two key areas of language development include semantic and phonological knowledge. Semantic knowledge relates to word and concept knowledge. Phonological knowledge relates to how language parameters combine to create meaning. We investigated signing deaf adults' and children's semantic and phonological sign generation via one-minute tasks,…

  1. DIFFERENCES BETWEEN AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE (ASL AND BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE (BSL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zora JACHOVA

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In the communication of deaf people between them­selves and hearing people there are three ba­sic as­pects of interaction: gesture, finger signs and writing. The gesture is a conditionally agreed manner of communication with the help of the hands followed by face and body mimic. The ges­ture and the move­ments pre-exist the speech and they had the purpose to mark something, and later to emphasize the speech expression.Stokoe was the first linguist that realised that the signs are not a whole that can not be analysed. He analysed signs in insignificant parts that he called “chemeres”, and many linguists today call them pho­nemes. He created three main phoneme catego­ries: hand position, location and movement.Sign languages as spoken languages have back­ground from the distant past. They developed par­allel with the development of spoken language and undertook many historical changes. Therefore, to­day they do not represent a replacement of the spoken language, but are languages themselves in the real sense of the word.Although the structures of the English language used in USA and in Great Britain is the same, still their sign languages-ASL and BSL are different.

  2. The expressions of spatial relations during interaction in american sign language, croatian sign language, and turkish sign language

    OpenAIRE

    Arık, Engin

    2012-01-01

    Signers use their body and the space in front of them iconically. Does iconicity lead to the same mapping strategies in construing space during interaction across sign languages? The present study addressed this question by conducting an experimental study on basic static and motion event descriptions during interaction (describer input and addressee re-signing/retelling) in American Sign Language, Croatian Sign Language, and Turkish Sign Language. I found that the three sign languages are si...

  3. Impact of lack of breast feeding during neonatal age on the development of clinical signs of pneumonia and hypoxemia in young infants with diarrhea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammod J Chisti

    Full Text Available Hypoxemia is a grave sequel of pneumonia, and an important predictor of a fatal outcome. Pneumonia in the neonatal period is often associated with lack of breast feeding. However, there is no published report on the impact of the cessation of breast feeding in the neonatal period on the development of pneumonia and hypoxemia. The purpose of our study was to assess the impact of non-breast feeding or stopping breast feeding during the neonatal period (henceforth to be referred to as non-breast fed on clinical features of pneumonia and hypoxemia in 0-6-month-old infants with diarrhea admitted to an urban hospital in Bangladesh.We prospectively enrolled all infants (n = 107 aged 0 to 6 months who were admitted to the Special Care Ward (SCW of the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research Bangladesh (ICDDR,B with diarrhea and pneumonia from September 2007 through December 2007.We compared the clinical features of pneumonia and hypoxemia of breast fed infants (n = 34 with those who were non-breast fed (n = 73.The median (inter-quartile range duration of hypoxemia (hours in non-breast-feds was longer than breast-fed infants [0.0 (0.0, 12.0 vs. 12.0 (0.0, 21.75; p = 0.021]. After adjusting for potential confounders such as inability to drink, fever, head nodding, cyanosis, grunting respiration, and lower chest wall in drawing, the non-breast-fed infants with pneumonia along with diarrhea had a higher probability of cough (OR 9.09; CI 1.34-61.71; p = 0.024, hypoxemia (OR 3.32; CI 1.23-8.93; p = 0.017, and severe undernutrition (OR 3.42; CI 1.29-9.12; p = 0.014.Non-breast feeding or cessation of breast feeding during the neonatal period may substantially increase the incidence of severe malnutrition, incidence of cough, and both the incidence and duration of hypoxemia in young infants presenting with pneumonia and diarrhea. The findings emphasize the paramount importance of the continuation of

  4. [Neurological soft signs in schizophrenia: correlations with age, sex, educational status and psychopathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotidis, P; Kaprinis, G; Iacovides, A; Fountoulakis, K

    2013-01-01

    Though the pathobiology of schizophrenia can be examined in multiple levels, the organic notion of brain disease suggests that neurological features will be present. One straightforward, inexpensive method of investigating brain dysfunction in schizophrenia is thought the bedside assessment of neurological abnormalities with a standard neurological examination. Neurological abnormalities are traditionally classified as "hard signs" (impairments in basic motor, sensory, and reflex behaviors, which do not appear to be affected in schizophrenia) and "soft signs", which refer to more complex phenomena such as abnormalities in motor control, integrative sensory function, sensorimotor integration, and cerebral laterality. Additionally, neurological soft signs (NSS) are minor motor and sensory abnormalities that are considered to be normal in the course of early development but abnormal when elicited in later life or persist beyond childhood. Soft signs also, have no definitive localizing significance but are indicative of subtle brain dysfunction. Most authors believe that they are a reflection not only of deficient integration between the sensory and motor systems, but also of dysfunctional neuronal circuits linking subcortical brain structures such as the basal ganglia, the brain stem, and the limbic system. Throughout the last four decades, studies have consistently shown that NSS are more frequently present in patients with schizophrenia than in normal subjects and non-psychotic psychiatric patients. However, the functional relevance of NSS remains unclear and their specificity has often been challenged, even though there is indication for a relative specificity with regard to diagnosis, or symptomatology. Many studies have considered soft signs as categorical variables thus hampering the evaluation of fluctuation with symptomatology and/or treatment, whereas other studies included insufficient number of assessed signs, or lacked a comprehensive assessment of

  5. Sign Language Recognition using Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabaheta Djogic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available – Sign language plays a great role as communication media for people with hearing difficulties.In developed countries, systems are made for overcoming a problem in communication with deaf people. This encouraged us to develop a system for the Bosnian sign language since there is a need for such system. The work is done with the use of digital image processing methods providing a system that teaches a multilayer neural network using a back propagation algorithm. Images are processed by feature extraction methods, and by masking method the data set has been created. Training is done using cross validation method for better performance thus; an accuracy of 84% is achieved.

  6. Saudi Arabia and CERN sign protocol

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    On 9 May 2008, Mohammed I. Al Suwaiyel, President of the King Abdulaziz City of Science and Technology, representing the Government of Saudi Arabia, and CERN Director-General, Robert Aymar, signed a protocol to the 2006 cooperation agreement between CERN and Saudi Arabia. Members of the Saudi Arabian Government visit ATLAS.The purpose of the protocol is to define the operational framework needed to carry out various specific tasks provided for in the cooperation agreement in order to promote the development of a high energy particle physics community in Saudi Arabia and its ultimate visible participation as a member of the global CERN community. Signing the protocol, Mohammed I. Al-Suwaiyel said: "The Saudi Arabian Government has taken a number of initiatives to promote R&D in the interests of our country’s development and the advancement of science. Thanks to this protocol, Saudi scientists will be able to work towards this go...

  7. Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge : Sign Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge Sign Plan explains how signs are used on the Refuge to help guide and educate visitors. An inventory of current signs is...

  8. Learning Sign Language: A Whole Language Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Daniel D.; Teller, Henry

    1996-01-01

    Applies principles of whole-language instruction to the teaching of sign language skills. Emphasis is on the holistic use of sign language in natural communicative situations. Some materials for this approach to sign language instruction are suggested. (DB)

  9. High dietary phosphorus density is a risk factor for incident chronic kidney disease development in diabetic subjects: a community-based prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Chang-Yun; Park, Jung Tak; Jhee, Jong Hyun; Noh, Juhwan; Kee, Youn Kyung; Seo, Changhwan; Lee, Misol; Cha, Min-Uk; Kim, Hyoungnae; Park, Seohyun; Yun, Hae-Ryong; Jung, Su-Young; Han, Seung Hyeok; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Kang, Shin-Wook

    2017-07-01

    Background: High serum phosphorus concentrations are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the relation between dietary phosphorus intake and CKD development has not been well evaluated.Objective: In this study, we investigated the impact of dietary phosphorus density on the development of incident CKD in a cohort of subjects with normal renal function.Design: Data were retrieved from the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study, a prospective community-based cohort study. The study cohort consisted of subjects aged 40-69 y, who were followed up biennially from 2001 to 2014. A total of 873 subjects with diabetes mellitus (DM) and 5846 subjects without DM (non-DM) were included in the final analysis. The primary endpoint was incident CKD, defined as a composite of estimated glomerular filtration rate phosphorus density, defined as the ratio of a single-day dietary phosphorus amount to the total daily calorie intake, were 0.51 ± 0.08 mg/kcal in the DM group and 0.51 ± 0.07 mg/kcal in the non-DM group. During the follow-up, CKD newly developed in 283 (32.4%) and 792 subjects (13.5%) in the DM and non-DM groups, respectively. When the subjects were divided into quartiles according to the dietary phosphorus density in each group, the highest quartile was significantly associated with the development of incident CKD by multiple Cox proportional hazard analysis in the DM group (P = 0.02) but not in the non-DM group (P = 0.72).Conclusions: High dietary phosphorus density is associated with an increased risk of CKD development in DM patients with normal renal function. The causality in this association needs to be tested in a randomized controlled trial. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  10. Personality predictors of the development of elementary school children's intentions to drink alcohol: the mediating effects of attitudes and subjective norms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Sarah E; Andrews, Judy A; Barckley, Maureen; Severson, Herbert H

    2006-09-01

    The authors tested a mediation model in which childhood hostility and sociability were expected to influence the development of intentions to use alcohol in the future through the mediating mechanisms of developing attitudes and norms. Children in 1st through 5th grades (N=1,049) from a western Oregon community participated in a longitudinal study involving 4 annual assessments. Hostility and sociability were assessed by teachers' ratings at the 1st assessment, and attitudes, subjective norms, and intentions were assessed by self-report at all 4 assessments. For both genders, latent growth modeling demonstrated that sociability predicted an increase in intentions to use alcohol over time, whereas hostility predicted initial levels of these intentions. These personality effects were mediated by the development of attitudes and subjective norms, supporting a model wherein childhood personality traits exert their influence on the development of intentions to use alcohol through the development of these more proximal cognitions. ((c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Shadows Between the Signs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard David Brian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The following experimental text is drawn from my most recent research project War Machines: Utopia and Allegorical Poetics in the Twenty-First Century. The project is an adaptation of the allegorical poetics developed by the French poet Charles Baudelaire in his scathing attacks on the sweeping transformation of Paris being conducted by Napoleon III’s right-hand man, Baron Haussmann. This small excerpt from my new book is a demonstration of my critical and poetical re-framing of Benjamin’s work that orients itself more towards the overlooked elements of Benjamin’s Marxism, as well as his “weak messianic” perspective, in order to re-assert a more radical orientation of his poetics and critical method with the utopian perspectives found in the work of that other great Marxist outlier of the twentieth century, Ernst Bloch, especially as outlined in his book, The Principle of Hope. Thus, unlike the postmodern appropriation of Baudelaire and Benjamin, I want to propose the possibility of bridging the gap between allegorical poetics, Marxism, and utopianism once again as a rigorous, critical option in the twenty-first century.

  12. The Relationship Between Depression And Positive Signs In Chronic Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahaoddini S S

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The results of studies about relationship between depression and positive signs in schizophrenia are controversial and clarifying the nature of this association may be difficult. The aim of present study is to investigate relationship between depressive symptoms and positive signs, in acute phase of patients with chronic schizophrenia, who have been admitted in Roozbeh Hospital. Materials and Methods: Assessments were performed using the Beck depression Inventory for depression (subjectively and positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS for psychotic symptoms. Results: The results demonstrated a significant correlation between depressive symptoms and positive signs in these patients. Also, a significant correlation existed between depression and these items: delusions, hallucinatory behavior, excitement, hostility. Conclusion: depressive symptoms and positive signs in schizophrenia may have a common underlying pathophysiological origin.

  13. Signing for Success: Using American Sign Language to Learn Sight Vocabulary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Many school systems mandate sight word mastery by their students, and this can be challenging for certain student populations. With a Professional Development School, college interns conducted an inquiry project with struggling first graders to learn required sight vocabulary. The inquiry project explored the use of American Sign Language to…

  14. American Sign Language Comprehension Test: A Tool for Sign Language Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Peter C.; Paludneviciene, Raylene; Riddle, Wanda; Kurz, Kim B.; Emmorey, Karen; Contreras, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    The American Sign Language Comprehension Test (ASL-CT) is a 30-item multiple-choice test that measures ASL receptive skills and is administered through a website. This article describes the development and psychometric properties of the test based on a sample of 80 college students including deaf native signers, hearing native signers, deaf…

  15. Electronic traffic signs: The interplay between hybrid and full matrix e-signs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas-Alba, A.; Hernando Mazon, A.; Blanch Mico, A.M.; Gutierrez Perez, D.; Echeverria Villaspi, J.I.; Landa Tejero-Garces, N.

    2016-07-01

    Road signs constitute a complex and growing communication system where different elements (pictograms, shapes, texts, etc.) are combined following different strategies. In this paper we have confronted drivers with a number of messages (congestion or road works, before, between, after location/s) developed as an adaptation of Advance Location Signs (class G, 1c in the 1968 Convention) to electronic displays. We manipulate two main factors a) the reading strategy (top-down vs. bottom-up) and the type of matrix display (hybrid, dissociating pictogram and text, vs. full matrix), in a repeated measures experimental design. The time taken to answer and the response given (correct, incorrect) was measured for each of the 24 message-blocks. Results show that the organization of the elements displayed is a key determinant for driver comprehension. Further thoughts on the need to understand the interplay between the formats adopted by static vs electronic message signs are provided. (Author)

  16. CERN Single Sign On Solution

    CERN Document Server

    Ormancey, Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    The need for Single Sign On has always been restricted by the absence of cross platform solutions: a single sign on working only on one platform or technology is nearly useless. The recent improvements in Web Services Federation (WS-Federation) standard enabling federation of identity, attribute, authentication and authorization information can now provide real extended Single Sign On solutions. Various solutions have been investigated at CERN and now, a Web SSO solution using some parts of WS-Federation technology is available. Using the Shibboleth Service Provider module for Apache hosted web sites and Microsoft ADFS as the identity provider linked to Active Directory user, users can now authenticate on any web application using a single authentication platform, providing identity, user information (building, phone...) as well as group membership enabling authorization possibilities. A typical scenario: a CERN user can now authenticate on a Linux/Apache website using Windows Integrated credentials, and his ...

  17. Improvement of the performance of animal crossing warning signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilikhah, Majid; Heaslip, Kevin

    2017-09-01

    Animal-vehicle collisions (AVCs) can result in serious injury and death to drivers, animals' death, and significant economic costs. However, the cost effectiveness of the majority of AVC mitigation measures is a significant issue. A mobile-based data collection effort was deployed to measure signs under the Utah Department of Transportation's (UDOT) jurisdiction. The crash data were obtained from the UDOT risk management database. ArcGIS was employed to link these two data sets and extract animal-related crashes and signs. An algorithm was developed to process the data and identify AVCs that occurred within sign recognition distance. Kernel density estimation (KDE) technique was applied to identify potential crash hotspots. Only 2% of AVCs occurred within the recognition distance of animal crossing signs. Almost 58% of animal-related crashes took place on the Interstate and U.S. highways, wherein only 30% of animal crossing signs were installed. State routes with a higher average number of signs experienced a lower number of AVCs per mile. The differences between AVCs that occurred within versus outside of sign recognition distance were not statistically significant regarding crash severity, time of crash, weather condition, driver age, vehicle speed, and type of animal. It is more likely that drivers become accustomed to deer crossing signs than cow signs. Based on the historical crash data and landscape structure, with attention given to the low cost safety improvement methods, a combination of different types of AVC mitigation measures can be developed to reduce the number of animal-related crashes. After an in-depth analysis of AVC data, warning traffic signs, coupled with other low cost mitigation countermeasures can be successfully placed in areas with higher priority or in critical areas. Practical applications: The findings of this study assist transportation agencies in developing more efficient mitigation measures against AVCs. Copyright © 2017 National

  18. Development of Meta-Subject Competencies of the 7-9 Grades Basic School Students through the Implementation of Interdisciplinary Mathematical Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorev, Pavel M.; Masalimova, Alfiya R.

    2017-01-01

    The article is aimed at describing one of the possible interdisciplinary courses for students of the 7-9 classes of the basic school connecting mathematics with natural sciences and the study of such courses role in the formation and development of meta-subject competencies of students. The leading method for this is the modeling of…

  19. An IoT Project for Vital Signs Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felician ALECU

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the Internet of Things (IoT projects are very popular and they are developed for numerous fields. In order to detect various medical problems on time, it is required to monitor the subjects either human or non-human. This could be used on regular or specific activities, like sport or work. It is necessary to determine the factors that could lead to medical problems. Another important aspect is to quantify the factors, to monitor them, to collect data and to make the proper interpretation. This could be achieved using dedicated sensors, controlled by an application embedded on a development board. When a dangerous value is reached, the system has to inform the subject (if human or someone else (if non-human. This paper presents an Arduino based IoT project used for monitoring the vital signs for human and non-human and the results based on its usage. The paper details the hardware and software components of this project.

  20. Malaysian sign language dataset for automatic sign language ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hearing impaired individuals have issues to communicate with normal people. They have their own language called Sign Language (SL) to express their feeling or to communicate with others. As communication is an essential part of normal everyday life, it is particularly important for deaf people to communicate as ...

  1. SIGNS Molar tooth sign − looking beyond the obvious

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The molar tooth sign refers to the characteristic appearance on axial CT or MRI of enlarged and horizontally directed columnar structures on each side of the midline flanking a deep interpeduncular fossa.[1] This appearance is a result of absence or hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis, lack of normal dorsal decussation and ...

  2. Increased Risk of Diabetes Development in Subjects with the Hypertriglyceridemic Waist Phenotype: A 4-Year Longitudinal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Joong Han

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe hypertriglyceridemic waist (HTGW phenotype is a simple and inexpensive screening parameter to identify people at increased risk of cardiovascular disease. We evaluated whether the HTGW phenotype predicts diabetes in urban Korean adults.MethodsA total of 2,900 nondiabetic subjects (mean age 44.3 years, comprising 2,078 males (71.7% and 822 females (28.3% who underwent annual medical check-ups at our center between January 2005 and December 2009, were recruited. The subjects were divided into four groups according to baseline serum triglyceride (TG level and waist circumference (WC: normal WC-normal TG (NWNT level, normal WC-high TG level, enlarged WC-normal TG level, and enlarged WC-high TG (EWHT level. High serum TG level was defined as ≥150 mg/dL and enlarged WC was defined as ≥90 cm for men and ≥85 cm for women. New cases of diabetes were determined according to questionnaires filled in by participants and the diagnostic criteria of the American Diabetes Association. Cox proportional hazards model analysis was used to assess the association of HTGW phenotype with the incidence of diabetes.ResultsA total of 101 (3.5% new diabetes cases were diagnosed during the study period. The EWHT group had a higher incidence of diabetes (8.3% compared with the NWNT group (2.2%. The adjusted hazard ratio for diabetes for subjects with the EWHT phenotype at baseline was 4.113 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.397 to 7.059 after adjustment for age, and 2.429 (95% CI, 1.370 to 4.307 after adjustment for age, sex, total cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, and alcohol drinking history. It was attenuated by inclusion of baseline fasting glucose level in the model.ConclusionSubjects with the HTGW phenotype showed the highest risk of incident diabetes. This tool could be useful for identifying individuals at high risk of diabetes.

  3. Louisiana traffic sign inventory and management system : LTRC technical summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    This project initiated the development of such a comprehensive asset management system in Louisiana, starting with traffic sign inventory in a single parish. The projects primary goal was to undertake a pilot field inventory of sign attribute data...

  4. A Preparatory Study of Producing a CD-ROM of American Signs for Deaf Students to Learn English in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Matsufuji, Midori; Otsuka, Kazuhiko; Arai, Tatsuya

    2003-01-01

    English is a very important subject at schools in Japan. The primary intent of teaching English is to foster communicative competence and international understanding. For deaf students, learning signs to communicate with deaf people in the world is practical and valuable along with learning written English. We are trying to develop a material for deaf students who learn English using one of the textbooks authorized by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology, which are ...

  5. Signs, dispositions, and semiotic scaffolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Eliseo

    2015-12-01

    In theoretical work we distinguish living beings from inanimate objects on the basis of some paramount attributes, such as agency and autonomy. These abstract features are not directly accessible to our scrutiny, but we surmise their nature through observation of the purpose-oriented behavior of organisms. I intend to show that organismal purposefulness springs from the intrinsic, constitutive kind of finality that is the hallmark of all semiotic transactions. To this aim I develop a dispositionalist account of organismal causation based on a distinction between two kinds of causal dispositions: fixed (efficient) dispositions and traveling dispositions. Fixed dispositions are rigidly attached to physical structures and processes; these are the dispositions regularly invoked in current discussions of causal explanation. Traveling dispositions are able to move freely from one location to another by becoming embodied into suitable supporting media. I introduce these notions to articulate a view of semiosis I deem best suited to the life sciences, and contend that sign tokens are vehicles of traveling dispositions. This account places the origin of purposive behavior at the interaction of physical and semiotic causation. To properly motivate the discussion I briefly review some recent developments in the philosophy of science concerning various forms of causation invoked by scientists across disciplines to frame explanations and make predictions. The ensuing discussion gives particular prominence to mechanistic (as distinct from mechanicist) explanatory accounts of biological phenomena. This review is followed by a brief characterization of a "nomological machine," a comprehensive schema introduced and developed by Nancy Cartwright with the goal of explaining causal mechanisms in a general setting. By capitalizing on this model's heuristic virtues I seek to formulate a compelling view of the interactions between physical and semiotic causation at play in semiotic

  6. CONTEMPOPARY VIEWS TO SIGN LANGUAGE OF HEARING IMPAIRED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojka TATAREVA

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The place of the sign language in education of hearing impaired children in Denmark, USA and Sweden.Hearing impaired people ought to have a possibility of access to vital information, so they can move step by step, to live as useful members of society.Sign language is nonverbal communication which appears as a kind of compensation of the language lack, a means of development of that activity an opinion of unlimited human communicative nature.Mimic sign language in the system of education of hearing impaired children in Denmark, USA and Sweden take a primary place. The school with Hearing impaired children are bilingual. In the schools sign language is taken as a training language and it is available to every child.Contemporary views and practice tell us that teaching of hearing impaired children with sign language is more effective and more available.

  7. Migraine Warning Signs May Differ in Kids, Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166388.html Migraine Warning Signs May Differ in Kids, Adults Treating ... most common symptoms that occur before children develop migraines, a new study finds. These symptoms were seen ...

  8. Fatigue risks in the connections of sign support structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    This research effort develops a reliability-based approach for prescribing inspection intervals for mast-arm sign support : structures corresponding to user-specified levels of fatigue-induced fracture risk. The resulting level of risk for a : partic...

  9. SUBJECT INDEX

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subject Index. Variation of surface electric field during geomagnetic disturbed period at Maitri, Antarctica. 1721. Geomorphology. A simple depression-filling method for raster and irregular elevation datasets. 1653. Decision Support System integrated with Geographic. Information System to target restoration actions in water-.

  10. Impact of clinical signs and genetic diagnosis of familial hypercholesterolaemia on the prevalence of coronary artery disease in patients with severe hypercholesterolaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Hayato; Kawashiri, Masa-Aki; Nohara, Atsushi; Inazu, Akihiro; Mabuchi, Hiroshi; Yamagishi, Masakazu

    2017-05-21

    The impact of positive clinical signs (xanthoma and/or family history) and positive familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) mutation status on risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) over and above that predicted by low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level alone has not been fully determined. We assessed whether positive clinical signs and genetic FH diagnosis affected CAD risk among subjects with significantly elevated LDL cholesterol levels (≥180 mg/dL, or ≥140 mg/dL in subjects signs (xanthoma and/or family history) were assessed. CAD prevalence was compared between four subject groups categorized based on these parameters. Compared with the reference group without FH mutations or clinical signs of FH, subjects with clinical signs of FH or FH mutations had three- to four-fold higher odds of developing CAD (odds ratio [OR], 4.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5-14.5; P = 0.0011 and OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.0-10.9; P = 0.0047, respectively), whereas those with clinical signs of FH and FH mutation(s) had >11-fold higher odds of developing CAD (OR, 11.6; 95% CI, 4.4-30.2; P = 1.1 × 10-5) after adjusting for known risk factors including LDL cholesterol. Our findings revealed an additive effect of positive clinical signs of FH and positive FH mutation status to CAD risk among patients with significantly elevated LDL cholesterol.

  11. Assessing birth asphyxia using strictly observational signs, the ARC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Apgar Scoring system is the sole assessment tool for newborn asphyxia,but the Apgar scoring system has many limitations as it does not assess conditions before and after delivery, that might trigger asphyxia. Moreover, the score combine subjective and objective signs as well as observations and measurements which ...

  12. The specificity of neurological signs in schizophrenia : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, S; Knegtering, R; van den Bosch, RJ

    2000-01-01

    This review examines the extent to which neurological signs are more prevalent in schizophrenia patients, compared to mood-disorder patients and healthy subjects, and whether there is a pattern in any of the differences that may be found. We included 17 studies and calculated the weighted mean

  13. Observations on Word Order in Saudi Arabian Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Kristen; Mathur, Gaurav

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the syntactic level of the grammar of Saudi Arabian Sign Language by exploring some word orders that occur in personal narratives in the language. Word order is one of the main ways in which languages indicate the main syntactic roles of subjects, verbs, and objects; others are verbal agreement and nominal case morphology.…

  14. Augmented Reality Sign Language Teaching Model for Deaf Children

    OpenAIRE

    Angélica GONZÁLEZ ARRIETA; Cadeñanes Garnica, Jorge J.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a Sign Language Teaching Model (SLTM) designed to develop on deaf children different Communication Skills (CS) within a Collaborative Learning Environment with Mixed-Reality (CLEMR). A pilot lesson with the Fingerspelling Alphabet was conducted at the Association of Parents of Deaf Children of Salamanca to determine the Percentage of Development of the Sign Language Communication Skill (SLCS) and others by using a kit of Pedagogical Materials as complementary teaching r...

  15. The structural changes of upper airway and newly developed sleep breathing disorders after surgical treatment in class III malocclusion subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ui Lyong; Oh, Hoon; Min, Sang Ki; Shin, Ji Ho; Kang, Yong Seok; Lee, Won Wook; Han, Young Eun; Choi, Young Jun; Kim, Hyun Jik

    2017-06-01

    Bimaxillary surgery is the traditional treatment of choice for correcting class III malocclusion which is reported to cause an alteration of oropharyngeal structures and upper airway narrowing that might be a predisposing factor for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This study aimed to analyze sleep parameters in class III malocclusion subjects and ascertain the prevalence of snoring or OSA following bimaxillary surgery.A total of 22 patients with Le Fort I osteotomy and mandibular setback for class III malocclusion were prospectively enrolled. All patients received endoscopic examination, cephalometry, 3-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT), and sleep study twice at 1 month before and 3 months after surgery.The patient population consisted of 5 males and 17 females with a mean body mass index of 22.5 kg/m and mean age of 22.1 years. No patients complained of sleep-related symptoms, and the results of sleep study showed normal values before surgery. Three patients (13%) were newly diagnosed with mild or moderate OSA and 6 patients (27%) showed increased loudness of snoring (over 40 dB) after bimaxillary surgery. According to cephalometric analysis and 3D-CT results, the retropalatal and retroglossal areas were significantly narrowed in class III malocclusion patients, showing snoring and sleep apnea after surgery. In addition, the total volume of the upper airway was considerably reduced following surgery in the same patients.Postoperative narrowing of the upper airway and a reduction of total upper airway volume can be induced, and causes snoring and OSA in class III malocclusion subjects following bimaxillary surgery.

  16. Finding consistent strain distributions in the glenohumeral capsule between two subjects: implications for development of physical examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Nicholas J; Ellis, Benjamin J; Weiss, Jeffrey A; McMahon, Patrick J; Debski, Richard E

    2011-02-24

    The anterior-inferior glenohumeral capsule is the primary passive stabilizer to the glenohumeral joint during anterior dislocation. Physical examinations following dislocation are crucial for proper diagnosis of capsule pathology; however, they are not standardized for joint position which may lead to misdiagnoses and poor outcomes. To suggest joint positions for physical examinations where the stability provided by the capsule may be consistent among patients, the objective of this study was to evaluate the distribution of maximum principal strain on the anterior-inferior capsule using two validated subject-specific finite element models of the glenohumeral joint at clinically relevant joint positions. The joint positions with 25 N anterior load applied at 60° of glenohumeral abduction and 10°, 20°, 30° and 40° of external rotation resulted in distributions of strain that were similar between shoulders (r² ≥ 0.7). Furthermore, those positions with 20-40° of external rotation resulted in capsule strains on the glenoid side of the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament that were significantly greater than in all other capsule regions. These findings suggest that anterior stability provided by the anterior-inferior capsule may be consistent among subjects at joint positions with 60° of glenohumeral abduction and a mid-range (20-40°) of external rotation, and that the glenoid side has the greatest contribution to stability at these joint positions. Therefore, it may be possible to establish standard joint positions for physical examinations that clinicians can use to effectively diagnose pathology in the anterior-inferior capsule following dislocation and lead to improved outcomes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Know the Signs of Concussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if they don't play contact sports. A concussion is a mild traumatic brain injury -- or mTBI -- caused by a blow or ... to the head or body that causes the brain to shake, according to the Children's ... to get a concussion, it's important to know the signs of injury. ...

  18. Grammaticalization in American Sign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, A. L.

    1999-01-01

    A study examined the process of grammaticalization in American Sign Language, examining basic principles and patterns and drawing parallels with oral language. More advanced stages of grammaticalization (involving fusion and affecting syntax) are examined in depth, leading to proposal of a temporal-ordering analysis to explain sequencing of verbal…

  19. Lexical Frequency in Sign Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Measures of lexical frequency presuppose the existence of corpora, but true machine-readable corpora of sign languages (SLs) are only now being created. Lexical frequency ratings for SLs are needed because there has been a heavy reliance on the interpretation of results of psycholinguistic and neurolinguistic experiments in the SL research…

  20. Compiling a Sign Language Dictionary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jette Hedegaard; Troelsgård, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    As we began working on the Danish Sign Language (DTS) Dictionary, we soon realised the truth in the statement that a lexicographer has to deal with problems within almost any linguistic discipline. Most of these problems come down to establishing simple rules, rules that can easily be applied eve...

  1. CDC Vital Signs: Trucker Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Controls Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC CDC A-Z Index MENU CDC A-Z SEARCH A B C D E ... Controls Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Vital Signs Note: Javascript is disabled or is ...

  2. CDC Vital Signs: Hispanic Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Controls Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC CDC A-Z Index MENU CDC A-Z SEARCH A B C D E ... Controls Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Vital Signs Note: Javascript is disabled or is ...

  3. CDC Vital Signs: Child Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Controls Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC CDC A-Z Index MENU CDC A-Z SEARCH A B C D E ... Controls Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Vital Signs Note: Javascript is disabled or is ...

  4. 49 CFR 195.434 - Signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Signs. 195.434 Section 195.434 Transportation... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.434 Signs. Each operator must maintain signs visible to the public around each pumping station and breakout tank area. Each sign must contain the name of the operator and a...

  5. 36 CFR 1001.10 - Symbolic signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Symbolic signs. 1001.10... signs. (a) The signs pictured in 36 CFR 1.10 provide general information and regulatory guidance in the area administered by the Presidio Trust. Certain of the signs designate activities that are either...

  6. 47 CFR 2.302 - Call signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Call signs. 2.302 Section 2.302... RULES AND REGULATIONS Call Signs and Other Forms of Identifying Radio Transmissions § 2.302 Call signs. The table which follows indicates the composition and blocks of international call signs available for...

  7. 36 CFR 1.10 - Symbolic signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Symbolic signs. 1.10 Section... PROVISIONS § 1.10 Symbolic signs. (a) The signs pictured below provide general information and regulatory guidance in park areas. Certain of the signs designate activities that are either allowed or prohibited...

  8. 49 CFR 193.2917 - Warning signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Warning signs. 193.2917 Section 193.2917...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2917 Warning signs. (a) Warning signs must be conspicuously placed along each protective enclosure at intervals so that at least one sign is recognizable at night from a...

  9. Numeral Incorporation in Japanese Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ktejik, Mish

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the morphological process of numeral incorporation in Japanese Sign Language. Numeral incorporation is defined and the available research on numeral incorporation in signed language is discussed. The numeral signs in Japanese Sign Language are then introduced and followed by an explanation of the numeral morphemes which are…

  10. Eye Gaze in Creative Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Michiko; Mesch, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the role of eye gaze in creative sign language. Because eye gaze conveys various types of linguistic and poetic information, it is an intrinsic part of sign language linguistics in general and of creative signing in particular. We discuss various functions of eye gaze in poetic signing and propose a classification of gaze…

  11. Development of Robust Behaviour Recognition for an at-Home Biomonitoring Robot with Assistance of Subject Localization and Enhanced Visual Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevrez Imamoglu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Our research is focused on the development of an at-home health care biomonitoring mobile robot for the people in demand. Main task of the robot is to detect and track a designated subject while recognizing his/her activity for analysis and to provide warning in an emergency. In order to push forward the system towards its real application, in this study, we tested the robustness of the robot system with several major environment changes, control parameter changes, and subject variation. First, an improved color tracker was analyzed to find out the limitations and constraints of the robot visual tracking considering the suitable illumination values and tracking distance intervals. Then, regarding subject safety and continuous robot based subject tracking, various control parameters were tested on different layouts in a room. Finally, the main objective of the system is to find out walking activities for different patterns for further analysis. Therefore, we proposed a fast, simple, and person specific new activity recognition model by making full use of localization information, which is robust to partial occlusion. The proposed activity recognition algorithm was tested on different walking patterns with different subjects, and the results showed high recognition accuracy.

  12. Objective and subjective socioeconomic status and susceptibility to the common cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Sheldon; Alper, Cuneyt M; Doyle, William J; Adler, Nancy; Treanor, John J; Turner, Ronald B

    2008-03-01

    We ask whether subjective socioeconomic status (SES) predicts who develops a common cold when exposed to a cold virus. 193 healthy men and women ages 21-55 years were assessed for subjective (perceived rank) and objective SES, cognitive, affective and social dispositions, and health practices. Subsequently, they were exposed by nasal drops to a rhinovirus or influenza virus and monitored in quarantine for objective signs of illness and self-reported symptoms. Infection, signs and symptoms of the common cold, and clinical illness (infection and significant objective signs of illness). Increased subjective SES was associated with decreased risk for developing a cold for both viruses. This association was independent of objective SES and of cognitive, affective and social disposition that might provide alternative spurious (third factor) explanations for the association. Poorer sleep among those with lesser subjective SES may partly mediate the association between subjective SES and colds. Increased Subjective SES is associated with less susceptibility to upper respiratory infection, and this association is independent of objective SES, suggesting the importance of perceived relative rank to health. Copyright (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. Design semiotica: the sign as event

    OpenAIRE

    Waller, Christopher Leonard

    2017-01-01

    Designers rely on the consistent interpretation of visual signs to achieve stable, effective communication. When signs produce unpredictable, ambiguous, or non-sensical interpretations, they are usually disregarded as signifying errors. However, anomalous signs actually reveal insights into the dynamic nature of graphic semiosis. What is the significance of signs that unexpectedly change their identity? How can communication designers interpret phenomena produced by the actions of signs? What...

  14. Effects of sugar-sweetened beverage intake on the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance: the Mihama diabetes prevention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teshima, Nobuko; Shimo, Miho; Miyazawa, Kae; Konegawa, Sachi; Matsumoto, Aki; Onishi, Yuki; Sasaki, Ryoma; Suzuki, Toshinari; Yano, Yutaka; Matsumoto, Kazutaka; Yamada, Tomomi; Gabazza, Esteban Cesar; Takei, Yoshiyuki; Sumida, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    In Japan, the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is increasing for several reasons, including increased consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). However, whether SSBs cause T2DM by excess of energy production resulting in obesity remains unclear. Therefore, the present study was designed to evaluate the effects of SSB intake on the development of T2DM in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Ninety-three subjects (30 males and 63 females) with IGT aged 40-69 y and residing in the Mihama district (southern Mie Prefecture, Japan) were included in the study. The mean observational period was 3.6 y. All subjects underwent the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and completed a lifestyle questionnaire survey related to SSB intake. OGTT results and SSB intake were evaluated before and after the observational period. In addition, the correlation between SSB intake and development of T2DM was investigated. Of the 93 subjects, 20 (21.5%) developed T2DM (T2DM group) and demonstrated a significantly high SSB intake compared with the group that did not develop the disease (non-T2DM group). The odds ratio for the incidence of T2DM based on SSB intake was 3.26 (95% confidence interval, 1.17-9.06). The body mass index (BMI; kg/m(2)) and the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-R) values was significantly higher in the T2DM group than in the non-T2DM group, while the insulinogenic indices were significantly lower in the former than in the latter group. The sum of insulin secretion levels during OGTT was not significantly different between groups. SSB intake correlated with the predisposition for developing T2DM, possibly by influencing body weight, insulin resistance, and the ability of the pancreatic beta cells to effectively compensate for the insulin resistance.

  15. Pearl necklace sign in diabetic macular edema: Evaluation and significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kshirasagar Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: (1 The purpose of this study was to describe significance and prevalence of the newly reported pearl necklace spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT sign, in diabetic macular edema (DMO, (2 to track the course of this sign over a period of at least 10 months. Materials and Methods: The pearl necklace SDOCT sign refers to hyperreflective dots in a contiguous ring around the inner wall of cystoid spaces in the retina, recently described for the first time in 21 eyes with chronic exudative maculopathy. A retrospective analysis was performed of SDOCT images of all patients presenting to the DMO referral clinic of a tertiary eye care center, over a period of 24 months. Images of patients displaying this sign were sequentially analyzed for at least 10 months to track the course of the sign. Results: Thirty-five eyes of 267 patients (13.1% were found to display the pearl necklace sign. Twenty-eight eyes responded to intravitreal ranibizumab treatment with resolution of edema. In 21 eyes, the dots coalesced to form a clump, visible in the infrared fundus photograph as hard exudates; in seven eyes, dots disappeared without leaving visible exudates. In three eyes, the sign was seen in subfoveal cystoid spaces, with subsequent development of hard exudates, and drop in visual acuity of 20 letters or more. Conclusion: Pearl necklace SDOCT sign is not infrequent in DMO. This sign is a precursor to hard exudates in the majority of cases. If this sign is seen subfoveally, drop in visual acuity can be expected, despite treatment.

  16. Subjective meaning: an introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijnbergen-Huitink, Janneke; van Wijbergen-Huitink, Janneke; Meier, Cécile

    This introductory chapter traces some of the considerations on the basis of which relativistic approaches to subjective meaning became en vogue. In doing so, the chapter provides an overview of the relevant linguistic and philosophical issues when developing a treatment of subjectivity. In addition,

  17. Old Signs, New Signs, Whose Signs? Sociolinguistic Variation in the NZSL Lexicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Rachel; McKee, David

    2011-01-01

    Lexicographers, teachers and interpreters of New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL) are challenged by the degree of lexical variation that exists in this young language. For instance, most numerals between one and twenty have two or more variants in common use (McKee, McKee, and Major 2008), a situation that contrasts with most established spoken…

  18. "Can you see me now?" An objective metric for predicting intelligibility of compressed American Sign Language video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaramello, Francis M.; Hemami, Sheila S.

    2007-02-01

    For members of the Deaf Community in the United States, current communication tools include TTY/TTD services, video relay services, and text-based communication. With the growth of cellular technology, mobile sign language conversations are becoming a possibility. Proper coding techniques must be employed to compress American Sign Language (ASL) video for low-rate transmission while maintaining the quality of the conversation. In order to evaluate these techniques, an appropriate quality metric is needed. This paper demonstrates that traditional video quality metrics, such as PSNR, fail to predict subjective intelligibility scores. By considering the unique structure of ASL video, an appropriate objective metric is developed. Face and hand segmentation is performed using skin-color detection techniques. The distortions in the face and hand regions are optimally weighted and pooled across all frames to create an objective intelligibility score for a distorted sequence. The objective intelligibility metric performs significantly better than PSNR in terms of correlation with subjective responses.

  19. Magnetic field control of 90 Degree-Sign , 180 Degree-Sign , and 360 Degree-Sign domain wall resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majidi, Roya, E-mail: royamajidi@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Lavizan, 16788-15811 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-10-01

    In the present work, we have compared the resistance of the 90 Degree-Sign , 180 Degree-Sign , and 360 Degree-Sign domain walls in the presence of external magnetic field. The calculations are based on the Boltzmann transport equation within the relaxation time approximation. One-dimensional Neel-type domain walls between two domains whose magnetization differs by angle of 90 Degree-Sign , 180 Degree-Sign , and 360 Degree-Sign are considered. The results indicate that the resistance of the 360 Degree-Sign DW is more considerable than that of the 90 Degree-Sign and 180 Degree-Sign DWs. It is also found that the domain wall resistance can be controlled by applying transverse magnetic field. Increasing the strength of the external magnetic field enhances the domain wall resistance. In providing spintronic devices based on magnetic nanomaterials, considering and controlling the effect of domain wall on resistivity are essential.

  20. Ethics in science education: responsabilities and commitments with the child's moral development in the discussion of controversial subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio César Castilho Razera

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of recent research outcomes presents in a sample of Science Education journals, shows that ethics and moral development issues have been neglected in the Science Education research. Based in theoretical referential directed toward this theme, and in a research carried out on controversial issues in the Science Teaching, such as those related to the debate creationism versus evolutionism, this paper tries to show the necessity and possibilities to take into consideration questions of this nature in classroom, in order to help developing the moral in students.

  1. Direct implication of carbon monoxide in the development of heart failure in rats with cardiac hypertrophy subjected to air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Alexandre; Bonnet, Pierre; Eder, Veronique; Antier, Daniel; Obert, Philippe; Fauchier, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    Pollution is known to particularly affect patients with respiratory insufficiency and right ventricle abnormalities. We therefore hypothesized that carbon monoxide (CO) at low dose could be involved in cardiovascular disorders in patients with chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension secondary to chronic hypoxia. Ten-week-old male and female healthy Dark Agouti rats were randomly divided into two series--untrained (U) and trained (T)--of four groups of 18 animals each. Both U and T series were continuously exposed to ambient air (U(AIR), and T(AIR); n = 16) or air plus 50 ppm CO (U(AIR+CO) and T(AIR+CO); n = 18). Similarly, rats initially subjected to right ventricle hypertrophy secondary to chronic hypoxia (H) were continuously exposed to ambient air (TH(AIR), and UH(AIR); n = 18) or air plus 50 ppm CO (UH(AIR+CO), and TH(AIR+CO); n = 18). Doppler-echocardiography and hemodynamic studies performed at rest both indi-cated that CO had no significant effect on cardiac morphology or functions in control rats (U(AIR+CO) vs U(AIR)). In contrast, cardiac dilation and large decreases in left ventricular ejection fraction, mitral early diastolic rapid inflow (E) deceleration, E/atrial contraction filling (A) ratio, +dP/dt, and -dP/dt were found in TH(AIR+CO) compared with TH(AIR). After exposure, heart rate variability was unaffected in U(AIR+CO), whereas total power spectra were markedly decreased and low frequency/high frequency power ratio was increased in TH(AIR+CO) rats. CO pollution could be directly involved in cardiac disorders of patients with pre-existent hypertrophic cardiomyopathies.

  2. The development of subjective quality of life over the first 2 years in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melle, Ingrid; Røssberg, Jan Ivar; Joa, Inge

    2010-01-01

    of variance were done to evaluate the development over time, and multiple linear regression analyses to evaluate predictors of change. These patients with a first-episode psychosis showed a significant improvement in general s-QoL during the first 2 years of treatment. Improvements in general s-QoL were...

  3. Cognitive and oculomotor performance in subjects with low and high schizotypy: implications for translational drug development studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koychev, I; Joyce, D; Barkus, E; Ettinger, U; Schmechtig, A; Dourish, C T; Dawson, G R; Craig, K J; Deakin, J F W

    2016-05-17

    The development of drugs to improve cognition in patients with schizophrenia is a major unmet clinical need. A number of promising compounds failed in recent clinical trials, a pattern linked to poor translation between preclinical and clinical stages of drug development. Seeking proof of efficacy in early Phase 1 studies in surrogate patient populations (for example, high schizotypy individuals where subtle cognitive impairment is present) has been suggested as a strategy to reduce attrition in the later stages of drug development. However, there is little agreement regarding the pattern of distribution of schizotypal features in the general population, creating uncertainty regarding the optimal control group that should be included in prospective trials. We aimed to address this question by comparing the performance of groups derived from the general population with low, average and high schizotypy scores over a range of cognitive and oculomotor tasks. We found that tasks dependent on frontal inhibitory mechanisms (N-Back working memory and anti-saccade oculomotor tasks), as well as a smooth-pursuit oculomotor task were sensitive to differences in the schizotypy phenotype. In these tasks the cognitive performance of 'low schizotypes' was significantly different from 'high schizotypes' with 'average schizotypes' having an intermediate performance. These results indicate that for evaluating putative cognition enhancers for treating schizophrenia in early-drug development studies the maximum schizotypy effect would be achieved using a design that compares low and high schizotypes.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF RESEARCH COMPETENCE OF STUDENTS OF HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS ON THE BASIS OF INTER-SUBJECT APPROACH TO TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel E. Shenderey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern researches show that intersubject communications atinitial stages of their inclusion in cognitive activity of studentsplay a role of the situational starting, inducing incentive. The knowledge gained by students as a result of the previousexperience of assimilation of intersubject communicationsbecomes regulators of its informa-tive activity at any stage ofinclusion of intersubject communications in cognitive activityand developments of research competence.

  5. Development of a minimum protocol for assessment in the paediatric voice clinic. Part 2: subjective measurement of symptoms of voice disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Wendy; Wardrop, Amanda; Wynne, David McGregor; Kubba, Haytham; McCartney, Elspeth

    2012-04-01

    The European Laryngological Society (ELS) recommend that functional assessment of voice disorder in adults requires evaluation of a number of different parameters. These include perceptual evaluation of voice, videostroboscopic imaging of vocal fold movement, acoustic analysis of specific voicing aspects, aerodynamic support for voicing, and a subjective rating of voice impact. No specific guidelines are available for children, but a similar range of parameters is needed to guide intervention and measure outcomes. The development of subjective voice measures for adults and their adaptations for the paediatric population are reviewed and compared to the research comparing these to evaluation of vocal function. The need for further refinement of child assessment measures, and a proposal of how these might be developed, is discussed.

  6. Training-induced changes in muscle CSA, muscle strength, EMG, and rate of force development in elderly subjects after long-term unilateral disuse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suetta, Charlotte; Aagaard, Per; Rosted, Anna

    2004-01-01

    The ability to develop muscle force rapidly may be a very important factor to prevent a fall and to perform other tasks of daily life. However, information is still lacking on the range of training-induced neuromuscular adaptations in elderly humans recovering from a period of disuse. Therefore......, the present study examined the effect of three types of training regimes after unilateral prolonged disuse and subsequent hip-replacement surgery on maximal muscle strength, rapid muscle force [rate of force development (RFD)], muscle activation, and muscle size. Thirty-six subjects (60-86 yr) were randomized...... to a 12-wk rehabilitation program consisting of either 1) strength training (3 times/wk for 12 wk), 2) electrical muscle stimulation (1 h/day for 12 wk), or 3) standard rehabilitation (1 h/day for 12 wk). The nonoperated side did not receive any intervention and thereby served as a within-subject control...

  7. Tension pneumocephalus: Mount Fuji sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pulastya Sanyal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 13-year-old male was operated for a space occupying lesion in the brain. A noncontrast computed tomography scan done in the late postoperative period showed massive subdural air collection causing compression of bilateral frontal lobes with widening of interhemispheric fissure and the frontal lobes acquiring a peak like configuration - causing tension pneumocephalus-"Mount Fuji sign." Tension pneumocephalus occurs when air enters the extradural or intradural spaces in sufficient volume to exert a mass or pressure effect on the brain, leading to brain herniation. Tension pneumocephalus is a surgical emergency, which needs immediate intervention in the form of decompression of the cranial cavity by a burr hole or needle aspiration. The Mount Fuji sign differentiates tension pneumocephalus from pneumocephalus.

  8. Signing Earth Science: Accommodations for Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing and Whose First Language Is Sign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesel, J.; Hurdich, J.

    2014-12-01

    TERC and Vcom3D used the SigningAvatar® accessibility software to research and develop a Signing Earth Science Dictionary (SESD) of approximately 750 standards-based Earth science terms for high school students who are deaf and hard of hearing and whose first language is sign. The partners also evaluated the extent to which use of the SESD furthers understanding of Earth science content, command of the language of Earth science, and the ability to study Earth science independently. Disseminated as a Web-based version and App, the SESD is intended to serve the ~36,000 grade 9-12 students who are deaf or hard of hearing and whose first language is sign, the majority of whom leave high school reading at the fifth grade or below. It is also intended for teachers and interpreters who interact with members of this population and professionals working with Earth science education programs during field trips, internships etc. The signed SESD terms have been incorporated into a Mobile Communication App (MCA). This App for Androids is intended to facilitate communication between English speakers and persons who communicate in American Sign Language (ASL) or Signed English. It can translate words, phrases, or whole sentences from written or spoken English to animated signing. It can also fingerspell proper names and other words for which there are no signs. For our presentation, we will demonstrate the interactive features of the SigningAvatar® accessibility software that support the three principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and have been incorporated into the SESD and MCA. Results from national field-tests will provide insight into the SESD's and MCA's potential applicability beyond grade 12 as accommodations that can be used for accessing the vocabulary deaf and hard of hearing students need for study of the geosciences and for facilitating communication about content. This work was funded in part by grants from NSF and the U.S. Department of Education.

  9. From objects to research subjects: contributions of childhood sociology to the development of an ethnography of indigenous peoples’ children education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Elisa Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An ethnographic research with children requires the precision of the thick description of facts observed, such as those involving other social groups. Researches with children, however, are recent, especially considering the use of the preposition with, which means recognizing them as social actors and including them as active participants in the research process, possibilities opened up by the Childhood Sociology. Adopting this perspective, one seeks to develop a differentiated position in the research area, the atypical adult one (CORSARO, 1990; 2002; 2005; FERREIRA, 2008, in order to deepen the cultures of children, as the meanings closest to their worldview are investigated. The theoretic-methodological concepts developed by the studies on Childhood Sociology, their relations to the studies on Anthropology, and the ethnographic research with indigenous people’s children constitute the basis of this paper, whose aim is to reflect on the entry in the area and the adult’s position in researches with children.

  10. Vital Signs - Child Passenger Safety

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-04

    This podcast is based on the February 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Over the past 10 years, more than 9,000 children 12 and under died in motor vehicle crashes, and a third who died in 2011 weren't buckled up. Buckling up is the best way to reduce injuries and save lives.  Created: 2/4/2014 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 2/4/2014.

  11. Deaf children learning to sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Kyle

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available It used to be thought that deaf children had a language difficulty. Research we have carried out on deaf children in deaf families from the age of three months, indicates that deaf children learn sign language as effectively as hearing children learn to speak. In contrast, deaf children from hearing homes, even in signing programmes at school lag behind in the acquisition of sign language even up to the age of 11 years. Some initial intervention work has been carried out with families to introduce sign language earlier and several possible means of improving the language environment of deaf children are explored in this paper. Costumava-se pensar que as crianças surdas tinham dificuldade de linguagem. Uma pesquisa que realizamos com crianças surdas, de famílias surdas, a partir de 3 meses de idade, indica que crianças surdas aprendem a língua de sinais tão eficazmente quanto crianças ouvintes aprendem a falar. Em contraste, crianças surdas, de lares ouvintes, mesmo estando em programas para o aprendizado de sinais na escola, ficam atrás na aquisição da língua de sinais até a idade de 11 anos de idade. Alguns trabalhos iniciais de intervenção, que têm sido realizados com as famílias para introduzir a língua de sinais mais cedo, bem como vários meios possíveis de enriquecer o meio lingüístico de crianças surdas são explorados nesse artigo.

  12. Vital Signs-Secondhand Smoke

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-02-03

    This podcast is based on the February 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Secondhand smoke kills more than 400 infants and 41,000 adult nonsmokers every year. Learn what can be done to prevent secondhand smoke exposure.  Created: 2/3/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 2/3/2015.

  13. Culture-based Screening of Aerobic Microbiome in Diabetic Foot Subjects and Developing Non-Healing Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Noor

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried on diabetic foot patients to deduce clinical attributes, the occurrence of the range of aerobic microbial flora and to assess their comparative in vitro susceptibility to the customarily used antimicrobials. We also studied the potential risk factors involved in the development of non-healing ulcers. A total of 87 organisms were isolated from 70 specimens, including Escherichia coli (19.5% among the Gram-negative and Staphylococcus aureus (18.4% among the Gram-positive as the predominant aerobes explored. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli were predominant isolates of non-healing ulcers. The antimicrobial sensitivity pattern revealed that vancomycin (100% and amikacin (90.4% exhibited highest sensitivity to Gram-positive cocci, while all strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were sensitive towards imipenem (100%. The prevalent uncontrolled glycemic status, altered lipid spectra, the existence of neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease, suggested predisposition towards the development of non-healing lesions. The study has underlined the need for continuous surveillance of bacteria and their antimicrobial sensitivity blueprints to provide the basis for empirical therapy and to minimize the risk of complications. Further, stringent clinical evaluation and medical history will help in revealing the risk of developing non-healing status in diabetic foot ulcers.

  14. Culture-Based Screening of Aerobic Microbiome in Diabetic Foot Subjects and Developing Non-healing Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Saba; Ahmad, Jamal; Parwez, Iqbal; Ozair, Maaz

    2016-01-01

    The study was carried on diabetic foot patients to deduce clinical attributes, the occurrence of the range of aerobic microbial flora and to assess their comparative in vitro susceptibility to the customarily used antimicrobials. We also studied the potential risk factors involved in the development of non-healing ulcers. A total of 87 organisms were isolated from 70 specimens, including Escherichia coli (19.5%) among the Gram-negative and Staphylococcus aureus (18.4%) among the Gram-positive as the predominant aerobes explored. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and E. coli were predominant isolates of non-healing ulcers. The antimicrobial sensitivity pattern revealed that vancomycin (100%) and amikacin (90.4%) exhibited highest sensitivity to Gram-positive cocci, while all strains of P. aeruginosa were sensitive toward imipenem (100%). The prevalent uncontrolled glycemic status, altered lipid spectra, the existence of neuropathy, and peripheral vascular disease, suggested predisposition toward the development of non-healing lesions. The study has underlined the need for continuous surveillance of bacteria and their antimicrobial sensitivity blueprints to provide the basis for empirical therapy and to minimize the risk of complications. Further, stringent clinical evaluation, and medical history will help in revealing the risk of developing non-healing status in diabetic foot ulcers.

  15. Developing a Methodology for Eliciting Subjective Probability Estimates During Expert Evaluations of Safety Interventions: Application for Bayesian Belief Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegmann, Douglas A.a

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Aviation Safety Program (AvSP) has defined several products that will potentially modify airline and/or ATC operations, enhance aircraft systems, and improve the identification of potential hazardous situations within the National Airspace System (NAS). Consequently, there is a need to develop methods for evaluating the potential safety benefit of each of these intervention products so that resources can be effectively invested to produce the judgments to develop Bayesian Belief Networks (BBN's) that model the potential impact that specific interventions may have. Specifically, the present report summarizes methodologies for improving the elicitation of probability estimates during expert evaluations of AvSP products for use in BBN's. The work involved joint efforts between Professor James Luxhoj from Rutgers University and researchers at the University of Illinois. The Rutgers' project to develop BBN's received funding by NASA entitled "Probabilistic Decision Support for Evaluating Technology Insertion and Assessing Aviation Safety System Risk." The proposed project was funded separately but supported the existing Rutgers' program.

  16. Medical Signbank as a Model for Sign Language Planning? A Review of Community Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napier, Jemina; Major, George; Ferrara, Lindsay; Johnston, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews a sign language planning project conducted in Australia with deaf Auslan users. The Medical Signbank project utilised a cooperative language planning process to engage with the Deaf community and sign language interpreters to develop an online interactive resource of health-related signs, in order to address a gap in the health…

  17. The Role of Sign Phonology and Iconicity During Sign Processing: The Case of Deaf Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormel, E.A.; Hermans, D.; Knoors, H.E.T.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the influence of sign phonology and iconicity during sign processing in deaf children, the roles of these sign features were examined using an experimental sign-picture verification paradigm. Participants had to make decisions about sign-picture pairs, manipulated according to

  18. The association between underweight and the development of albuminuria is different between sexes in relatively healthy Korean subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Cheol Min; Hyun, Young Youl; Lee, Kyu Beck; Kim, Hyang

    2014-11-01

    There are limited data on the association between underweight and albuminuria. The aim of this study is to verify the effect of underweight on the development of albuminuria. Participants who underwent two health check-ups with a 2-year interval at a tertiary hospital in Korea between 2002 and 2009 were studied. After exclusion of participants with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) albuminuria ≥1+ at the first check-up, 53 876 participants were enrolled. We measured the incidence of albuminuria at the second check-up and calculated the odds ratio (OR) for the development of albuminuria according to body mass index (BMI). After 2 years, 746 cases of incident albuminuria were observed among 53 876 participants. The effect of BMI on the development of albuminuria was modified by sex in a multivariate logistic model with adjustment for age, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, uric acid, eGFR, current smoking status and alcohol intake (P-value for interaction albuminuria were 1.93 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.35-2.76; P ≤ 0.001], 1.19 (0.84-1.67; P = 0.329) and 0.71 (0.43-1.17; P = 0.177) in underweight (BMI, albuminuria after 2 years in relatively healthy Korean females, but this relationship was not significant in males. This study suggests the need for more studies on the role of underweight in renal injury in men and women. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  19. Vascoda and the Subject-based Gateways - the German Answer to Visibility and Accessibility in Collection Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Kempf

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The „classic tasks“ of academic libraries comprise acquisition, cataloguing, reader services and preservation of literature or, more generally speaking, information resources. This has not changed radically in the digital age. What has changed, though, is the way the tasks are related to each other, perhaps also their respective importance (depending on the library type; but particularly the accentuation of certain aspects of the tasks mentioned above. Visibility and accessibility would hardly have been associated with collection development in the past. Holdings were entered in the catalogue and thus made ‘visible’. Accessibility was taken care of in the reader services department. This has changed significantly in the digital age. The reasons for that are manifold: · With the emergence of the so called ‘hybrid library’ the respective tasks of the central library functions have somewhat shifted and the previously rather clear-cut separations between them have become less rigid. · The innate ‘immateriality’ of digital resources requires a different approach to the topic of visibility and accessibility as early as the actual point of acquisition and in the presentation and ‘documentation’ of collection development. · Last but not least digital access points, next to the catalogue or OPAC including a large variety of different options (e.g. websites, have led to a much quicker and easier way of making holdings and particularly new acquisitions visible than would have been possible in the days of paper or card catalogues. But there are more basic reasons for the new way of dealing with visibility and accessibility. This is certainly due to the characteristics of collection development in the digital age which require us ‘acquisitions people’ to look at the question of visibility and accessibility from a different perspective and regard these as key aspects of the work we do.

  20. Non-Contact Sensor for Long-Term Continuous Vital Signs Monitoring: A Review on Intelligent Phased-Array Doppler Sensor Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Travis; Lie, Donald Y C; Nguyen, Tam Q; Mayeda, Jill C; Lie, Paul E; Lopez, Jerry; Banister, Ron E

    2017-11-15

    It has been the dream of many scientists and engineers to realize a non-contact remote sensing system that can perform continuous, accurate and long-term monitoring of human vital signs as we have seen in many Sci-Fi movies. Having an intelligible sensor system that can measure and record key vital signs (such as heart rates and respiration rates) remotely and continuously without touching the patients, for example, can be an invaluable tool for physicians who need to make rapid life-and-death decisions. Such a sensor system can also effectively help physicians and patients making better informed decisions when patients' long-term vital signs data is available. Therefore, there has been a lot of research activities on developing a non-contact sensor system that can monitor a patient's vital signs and quickly transmit the information to healthcare professionals. Doppler-based radio-frequency (RF) non-contact vital signs (NCVS) monitoring system are particularly attractive for long term vital signs monitoring because there are no wires, electrodes, wearable devices, nor any contact-based sensors involved so the subjects may not be even aware of the ubiquitous monitoring. In this paper, we will provide a brief review on some latest development on NCVS sensors and compare them against a few novel and intelligent phased-array Doppler-based RF NCVS biosensors we have built in our labs. Some of our NCVS sensor tests were performed within a clutter-free anechoic chamber to mitigate the environmental clutters, while most tests were conducted within the typical Herman-Miller type office cubicle setting to mimic a more practical monitoring environment. Additionally, we will show the measurement data to demonstrate the feasibility of long-term NCVS monitoring. The measured data strongly suggests that our latest phased array NCVS system should be able to perform long-term vital signs monitoring intelligently and robustly, especially for situations where the subject is sleeping

  1. Development and Initial Validation of a Multidimensional Scale Assessing Subjective Well-Being: The Well-Being Scale (WeBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, P Priscilla; Fernando, Gaithri A

    2017-01-01

    Numerous scales currently exist that assess well-being, but research on measures of well-being is still advancing. Conceptualization and measurement of subjective well-being have emphasized intrapsychic over psychosocial domains of optimal functioning, and disparate research on hedonic, eudaimonic, and psychological well-being lacks a unifying theoretical model. Lack of systematic investigations on the impact of culture on subjective well-being has also limited advancement of this field. The goals of this investigation were to (1) develop and validate a self-report measure, the Well-Being Scale (WeBS), that simultaneously assesses overall well-being and physical, financial, social, hedonic, and eudaimonic domains of this construct; (2) evaluate factor structures that underlie subjective well-being; and (3) examine the measure's psychometric properties. Three empirical studies were conducted to develop and validate the 29-item scale. The WeBS demonstrated an adequate five-factor structure in an exploratory structural equation model in Study 1. Confirmatory factor analyses showed that a bifactor structure best fit the WeBS data in Study 2 and Study 3. Overall WeBS scores and five domain-specific subscale scores demonstrated adequate to excellent internal consistency reliability and construct validity. Mean differences in overall well-being and its five subdomains are presented for different ethnic groups. The WeBS is a reliable and valid measure of multiple aspects of well-being that are considered important to different ethnocultural groups.

  2. Long-term patency of on- and off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting with bilateral internal thoracic arteries: the significance of late string sign development in the off-pump technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yasunari; Maekawa, Atsuo; Sawaki, Sadanari; Tokoro, Masayoshi; Yanagisawa, Junji; Ozeki, Takahiro; Usui, Akihiko; Ito, Toshiaki

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in patients who underwent revascularization with bilateral internal thoracic arteries (ITAs). Between January 2000 and December 2014, 499 patients underwent isolated CABG with bilateral ITAs for complete revascularization of the left coronary system at our institution. On-pump CABG was performed in 137 patients, and off-pump CABG was performed in 362 patients. We retrospectively compared the clinical outcomes and patency of the ITAs. The off-pump group showed less respiratory failure and required a shorter postoperative stay than the on-pump group. The survival probability, freedom from cardiac events and early graft patency were similar in both groups. Five-year patency of the ITA anastomosed to the left anterior descending artery was significantly greater in the on-pump group than in the off-pump group (98.8% vs 91.2%, P = 0.010). The incidence of string change in the off-pump group was higher than that in the on-pump group (P = 0.017). There was no significant difference between the groups in the 5-year patency of the ITA anastomosed to the left circumflex artery (on-pump group: 93.8%, off-pump group: 91.8%; P = 0.46). The early graft patency and the late patency of the ITA anastomosed to the left circumflex artery between the groups were similar, implying an equivalent quality of anastomoses. However, the patency of the ITA anastomosed to the left anterior descending artery in the off-pump group showed late deterioration, mainly because of string sign development.

  3. Development of new diabetes risk scores on the basis of the current definition of diabetes in Japanese subjects [Rapid Communication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakoshi, Takahiro; Oka, Rie; Nakasone, Yasuto; Sato, Yuka; Yamauchi, Keishi; Hashikura, Rie; Takayama, Masayuki; Hirayama, Yudai; Hirabayashi, Kazuko; Koike, Hideo; Aizawa, Toru

    2016-09-30

    To develop diabetes risk score (RS) based on the current definition of diabetes, we retrospectively analyzed consecutive 4,159 health examinees who were non-diabetic at baseline. Diabetes, diagnosed by fasting plasma glucose (FPG) ≥7.0 mmol/L, 2hPG ≥11.1 mmol/L and/or HbA1c ≥6.5% (48 mmol/mol), developed in 279 of them during the mean period of 4.9 years. A full RS (RS Full ), a RS without 2hPG (RS -2hPG ) and a non-invasive RS (RS NI ) were created on the basis of multivariate Cox proportional model by weighted grading based on hazard ratio in half the persons assigned. The RSs were verified in the remaining half of the participants. Positive family history (FH), male sex, smoking and higher age, systolic blood pressure (SBP), FPG, 2hPG and HbA1c were independent predictors for RS Full . For RS -2hPG , 7 independent predictors, exclusive of 2hPG and smoking but inclusive of elevated triglycerides (TG) comparing to RS Full , were selected. FH, male sex, and higher age, SBP and HbA1c were independent predictors in RS NI . In the validation cohort, C-statistic (95%CI) of RS Full , RS -2hPG and RS NI were 0.80 (0.76-0.84), 0.75 (0.70-0.78) and 0.68 (0.63-0.72), respectively, which were significantly different from each other (P <0.01). Absolute percentage difference between predicted probability and observed diabetes were 1.9%, 0.7% and 0.9%, by the three scores, respectively, and not significantly different from each other. In conclusion, diabetes defined by the current criteria was predicted by the new diabetes risk scores with reasonable accuracy. Nonetheless, RS Full with a postchallenge glucose value performed superior to RS -2hPG and RS NI .

  4. Early Sign Language Exposure and Cochlear Implantation Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geers, Ann E; Mitchell, Christine M; Warner-Czyz, Andrea; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Eisenberg, Laurie S

    2017-07-01

    Most children with hearing loss who receive cochlear implants (CI) learn spoken language, and parents must choose early on whether to use sign language to accompany speech at home. We address whether parents' use of sign language before and after CI positively influences auditory-only speech recognition, speech intelligibility, spoken language, and reading outcomes. Three groups of children with CIs from a nationwide database who differed in the duration of early sign language exposure provided in their homes were compared in their progress through elementary grades. The groups did not differ in demographic, auditory, or linguistic characteristics before implantation. Children without early sign language exposure achieved better speech recognition skills over the first 3 years postimplant and exhibited a statistically significant advantage in spoken language and reading near the end of elementary grades over children exposed to sign language. Over 70% of children without sign language exposure achieved age-appropriate spoken language compared with only 39% of those exposed for 3 or more years. Early speech perception predicted speech intelligibility in middle elementary grades. Children without sign language exposure produced speech that was more intelligible (mean = 70%) than those exposed to sign language (mean = 51%). This study provides the most compelling support yet available in CI literature for the benefits of spoken language input for promoting verbal development in children implanted by 3 years of age. Contrary to earlier published assertions, there was no advantage to parents' use of sign language either before or after CI. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. Biomonitoring of coastal marine waters subject to anthropogenic use: development and application of the biosensor Mosselmonitor®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barile Nadia B.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The overall objective of this study was to develop a biological early warning system (Mosselmonitor® on offshore platform to detect critical environmental situations. The experiment was conducted on oil off-shore platform called Rospo Mare B. This structure is located in the area in front of Molise coast line (Italy, Adriatic Sea, characterized by a depth of about 77 m and a bathymetry between 65 and 80 m. The Mosselmonitor® works with eight mussels connected via specific sensors to PC for recording opening values of valves. A probe was installed inside the instrument to daily control of water pH, dissolved oxygen, salinity and temperature. Water samples are weekly analyzed for heavy metals, organochlorine pesticide and suspended matter. During the entire observation period, closure alarms were predominantly detected (99.9% and a decrease of 65% in alarms maximum duration was recorded from the fifth week. During the first month, none changes in water physico-chemical parameters were observed so that affect the bivalves behavior. The only chemical parameter steadily detected in water was copper; its average concentrations were of 10 ppb. Detected alarms were not comparable to those recorded in the first month: this observation could be explained considering that mussels will be adapted to copper constant presence.

  6. Development and validation of a numerical model of the swine head subjected to open-field blasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, A.; Zhu, F.; Feng, K.; Saif, T.; Kallakuri, S.; Jin, X.; Yang, K.; King, A.

    2017-11-01

    A finite element model of the head of a 55-kg Yucatan pig was developed to calculate the incident pressure and corresponding intracranial pressure due to the explosion of 8 lb (3.63 kg) of C4 at three different distances. The results from the model were validated by comparing findings with experimentally obtained data from five pigs at three different blast overpressure levels: low (150 kPa), medium (275 kPa), and high (400 kPa). The peak values of intracranial pressures from numerical model at different locations of the brain such as the frontal, central, left temporal, right temporal, parietal, and occipital regions were compared with experimental values. The model was able to predict the peak pressure with reasonable percentage differences. The differences for peak incident and intracranial pressure values between the simulation results and the experimental values were found to be less than 2.2 and 29.3%, respectively, at all locations other than the frontal region. Additionally, a series of parametric studies shows that the intracranial pressure was very sensitive to sensor locations, the presence of air bubbles, and reflections experienced during the experiments. Further efforts will be undertaken to correlate the different biomechanical response parameters, such as the intracranial pressure gradient, stress, and strain results obtained from the validated model with injured brain locations once the histology data become available.

  7. Severe signs of hyponatremia secondary to desmopressin treatment for enuresis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchini, Barbara; Simonetti, Giacomo D; Ceschi, Alessandro; Lava, Sebastiano A G; Faré, Pietro B; Bianchetti, Mario G

    2013-12-01

    Dilutional hyponatremia is a serious adverse effect of desmopressin, a vasopressin analog that is widely prescribed to manage monosymptomatic enuresis. The presentation of hyponatremia, largely related to cerebral dysfunction, can include severe signs like altered mental status and seizures. We reviewed the literature dealing with altered mental status or seizures in enuretic subjects on desmopressin. The retained publications included patients who were described individually, revealing data on mode of administration, further identifiable factors predisposing to hyponatremia, presentation and clinical course. We found 54 cases of hyponatremia secondary to desmopressin treatment presenting with altered mental status or seizures. In most cases the complication developed 14 days or less after starting desmopressin. An intranasal formulation had been used in 47 patients. Excess fluid intake was documented as a contributing factor in at least 22 cases. In 6 cases severe signs of hyponatremia developed in the context of intercurrent illnesses. Altered mental status or seizures are very rare but recognized complications of desmopressin in enuresis. This complication mostly develops in subjects managed with the intranasal formulation 14 days or less after starting the medication, following excess fluid intake and during intercurrent illnesses. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Exploring the Ancestral Roots of American Sign Language: Lexical Borrowing from Cistercian Sign Language and French Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagle, Keith Martin

    2010-01-01

    American Sign Language (ASL) is the natural and preferred language of the Deaf community in both the United States and Canada. Woodward (1978) estimated that approximately 60% of the ASL lexicon is derived from early 19th century French Sign Language, which is known as "langue des signes francaise" (LSF). The lexicon of LSF and ASL may…

  9. Vital Signs-Trucker Safety

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-03-03

    This podcast is based on the March 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. In 2012 in the United States, about 317,000 motor vehicle crashes involved a large truck. Twenty-six thousand truck drivers and their passengers were injured in these crashes, and about 700 died. Learn what can be done to help truck drivers stay safe.  Created: 3/3/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/3/2015.

  10. Signs and Symptoms of Mood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Announcements Partnering with DBSA Signs and Symptoms of Mood Disorders Depression and bipolar disorder (also known as manic ... learn more about the signs and symptoms of mood disorders so that you can get the help you ...

  11. CDC Vital Signs: Prescription Painkiller Overdoses (Opioids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tests for people using prescription painkillers long term. Teaching patients how to safely use, store, and dispose ... 0:60 seconds] Vital Signs – Prescription Painkiller Overdoses [SPANISH PODCAST – 1:30 minutes] Vital Signs: Prescription Painkiller ...

  12. Signs and Symptoms of Untreated Lyme Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lyme disease FAQ Health care providers Educational materials Signs and Symptoms of Untreated Lyme Disease Recommend on ... to an area where Lyme disease occurs . Early Signs and Symptoms (3 to 30 days after tick ...

  13. Derivative Sign Patterns in Two Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Given a function defined on a subset of the plane whose partial derivatives never change sign, the signs of the partial derivatives form a two-dimensional pattern. We explore what patterns are possible for various planar domains.

  14. 23 CFR 750.707 - Nonconforming signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... permitted by State law and reerected in kind, exception may be made for signs destroyed due to vandalism and... percentage of its replacement cost may be considered destroyed. (ii) Where an existing nonconforming sign...

  15. Monitoring of clinical signs in goats with transmissible spongiform encephalopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldmann Wilfred

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As there is limited information about the clinical signs of BSE and scrapie in goats, studies were conducted to describe the clinical progression of scrapie and BSE in goats and to evaluate a short clinical protocol for its use in detecting scrapie-affected goats in two herds with previously confirmed scrapie cases. Clinical assessments were carried out in five goats intracerebrally infected with the BSE agent as well as five reported scrapie suspects and 346 goats subject to cull from the two herds, 24 of which were retained for further monitoring. The brain and selected lymphoid tissue were examined by postmortem tests for disease confirmation. Results The sensitivity and specificity of the short clinical protocol in detecting a scrapie case in the scrapie-affected herds was 3.9% and 99.6%, respectively, based on the presence of tremor, positive scratch test, extensive hair loss, ataxia and absent menace response. All BSE- and scrapie-affected goats displayed abnormalities in sensation (over-reactivity to external stimuli, startle responses, pruritus, absent menace response and movement (ataxia, tremor, postural deficits at an advanced clinical stage but the first detectable sign associated with scrapie or BSE could vary between animals. Signs of pruritus were not always present despite similar prion protein genotypes. Clinical signs of scrapie were also displayed by two scrapie cases that presented with detectable disease-associated prion protein only in lymphoid tissues. Conclusions BSE and scrapie may present as pruritic and non-pruritic forms in goats. Signs assessed for the clinical diagnosis of scrapie or BSE in goats should include postural and gait abnormalities, pruritus and visual impairment. However, many scrapie cases will be missed if detection is solely based on the display of clinical signs. PrPd accumulation in the brain appeared to be related to the severity of clinical disease but not to the display of

  16. 12 CFR 328.1 - Official sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Official sign. 328.1 Section 328.1 Banks and... OF MEMBERSHIP § 328.1 Official sign. (a) The official sign referred to in this part shall be 7″ by 3... “symbol” of the Corporation, as used in this part, shall be that portion of the official sign consisting...

  17. [Danger signs in the malaria patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobón, Alberto

    2009-06-01

    Danger signs are clinical indicators of severity and are useful to predict complications or death. In the malaria patient, clinical or parasitological signs can be easily be recognized during the acute phase of the illness that indicate serious complications. Danger signs include neurological change, abnormal breathing pattern, persistent vomiting and diarrhea, jaundice, bleeding, dark urine, delayed capillary refill, intense pallor, hyperpyrexia, hyperparasitemia and schizontemia. Timely recognition of these signs can lead to a decrease in cases with complications and deaths.

  18. Usefulness of the R-Wave Sign as a Predictor for Ventricular Tachyarrhythmia in Patients With Brugada Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragab, Ahmed A Y; Houck, Charlotte A; van der Does, Lisette J M E; Lanters, Eva A H; Burghouwt, Danielle E; Muskens, Agnes J Q M; de Groot, Natasja M S

    2017-08-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is an autosomal dominant channelopathy which is responsible for a large number of sudden cardiac deaths in young subjects without structural abnormalities. The most challenging step in management of patients with BrS is identifying who is at risk for developing malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmia (VTA). In patients with BrS, conduction delay in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) causes a prominent R wave in lead aVR. This electrocardiographic parameter can be useful to detect these high-risk patients. The goal of this study was to test the significance of R-wave elevation in lead aVR as a predictor for VTA in patients with BrS. In this retrospective study, we included 132 patients with BrS (47 ± 15 years, 65% men) who visited the outpatient clinic for cardiogenetic screening. Patients' medical records were examined for the presence of a positive R-wave sign in lead aVR and VTA. A positive R-wave sign in lead aVR was observed in 41 patients (31%). This sign was more frequently observed in patients who experienced VTA (n = 24) before the initial diagnosis, during electrophysiological studies, or during follow-up (p sign occurred more frequently in symptomatic patients with a history of an out of hospital cardiac arrest, VTA, or syncope than asymptomatic patients (60% vs 26%; p = 0.002). During the follow-up period, this sign was more frequently detected in patients who developed either de novo (50%) or recurrent VTA (80%) (p = 0.017). Multivariable regression analysis showed that R-wave sign is an independent predictor for VTA development (odds ratio 4.8, 95% confidence interval 1.79 to 13.27). The presence of a positive R-wave sign in lead aVR is associated with the development of VTA. In conclusion, positive R-wave sign in lead aVR can be used to identify patients with BrS at risk for malignant VTA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Brain correlates of constituent structure in sign language comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Antonio; Limousin, Fanny; Dehaene, Stanislas; Pallier, Christophe

    2017-11-21

    During sentence processing, areas of the left superior temporal sulcus, inferior frontal gyrus and left basal ganglia exhibit a systematic increase in brain activity as a function of constituent size, suggesting their involvement in the computation of syntactic and semantic structures. Here, we asked whether these areas play a universal role in language and therefore contribute to the processing of non-spoken sign language. Congenitally deaf adults who acquired French sign language as a first language and written French as a second language were scanned while watching sequences of signs in which the size of syntactic constituents was manipulated. An effect of constituent size was found in the basal ganglia, including the head of the caudate and the putamen. A smaller effect was also detected in temporal and frontal regions previously shown to be sensitive to constituent size in written language in hearing French subjects (Pallier et al., 2011). When the deaf participants read sentences versus word lists, the same network of language areas was observed. While reading and sign language processing yielded identical effects of linguistic structure in the basal ganglia, the effect of structure was stronger in all cortical language areas for written language relative to sign language. Furthermore, cortical activity was partially modulated by age of acquisition and reading proficiency. Our results stress the important role of the basal ganglia, within the language network, in the representation of the constituent structure of language, regardless of the input modality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Sign Language Conversational Interaction between Chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouts, Roger S.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Systematic sampling was done of signing between five home-reared chimpanzees who had had 4-7 years of complete immersion in integrating their signing interaction into their nonverbal communication. Eight-eight percent of all signs reported fell into the social categories of reassurance, social interaction, and play. (SL)