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Sample records for subjective career success

  1. The Effects of Objective Career Success on Subsequent Subjective Career Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Stephen A.; Tymon, Walter G., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    We use a sample of working adults (N = 638) to explore the effects of past objective career success (mobility, promotions, and salary change) on current subjective success (human capital assessments by one's managers, core self evaluations, satisfaction with one's career) by gender, across an economic cycle (2004-2011), controlling for career…

  2. Family and Career Path Characteristics as Predictors of Women's Objective and Subjective Career Success: Integrating Traditional and Protean Career Explanations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcour, Monique; Ladge, Jamie J.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effects of family and career path characteristics on objective and subjective career success among 916 employed mothers. Among family variables, age at first childbirth was positively related and career priority favoring the husband was negatively related to both income and subjective career success; number of children was…

  3. Career success in a boundaryless career world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arthur, Michael B.; Khapova, S.N.; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper compares contemporary career theory with the theory applied in recent career success research. The research makes inconsistent use of career theory, and in particular neglects the interdependence of the objective and subjective careers, and boundaryless career issues of

  4. Relationship between the nurses’ subjective and objective career success and extraversion and introversion personality types

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reza Najjari; Behnaz Kermani; Hossein Farzad

    2014-01-01

    .... Thus, the aim of present study was to determine the relationship between extraversion and introversion personality types and subjective and objective career success among nurses of selected private hospitals in Tehran. Methods...

  5. The Predictors of Subjective Career Success: An Empirical Study of Employee Development in a Korean Financial Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yongho

    2010-01-01

    Subjective career success has recently been discussed widely in the academic field of career development. The purpose of this study was to investigate the predictors of subjective career success. It examined the effects of the calling work orientation, the individual's career-enhancing strategy and the organizational learning climate on the…

  6. Relationship between the nurses’ subjective and objective career success and extraversion and introversion personality types

    OpenAIRE

    Reza Najjari; Behnaz Kermani; Hossein Farzad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Career success is an evaluating and relational concept between someone's current progress and his/her future ideals of occupation. Researchers have shown personality characteristics are one of the main predictors of success and favorable job performance. Thus, the aim of present study was to determine the relationship between extraversion and introversion personality types and subjective and objective career success among nurses of selected private hospitals in Tehran. Methods...

  7. Relationship between the nurses’ subjective and objective career success and extraversion and introversion personality types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Najjari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Career success is an evaluating and relational concept between someone's current progress and his/her future ideals of occupation. Researchers have shown personality characteristics are one of the main predictors of success and favorable job performance. Thus, the aim of present study was to determine the relationship between extraversion and introversion personality types and subjective and objective career success among nurses of selected private hospitals in Tehran. Methods: This research was a descriptive correlational study in which 230 nurses were selected from five private hospitals in Tehran as the study sample through Cochran sampling technique. Proportional to the number of nurses at each hospital, samples were selected via convenient random sampling. Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, Golparvar and Ghazavi career success scale and personal information form were utilized to collect the data. The collected data wereanalyzed by SPSS-19 software using Pearson correlation coefficient and regression analysis. Results: The results indicated a significant relationship between personality type and subjective and objective career success of the nurses. Further, there was a negatively significant relationship between subjective and objective career success and introversion personality type (sig=0/004, r=-0.391 and sig=0.001, r=-0.415, respectively. However, there was a positively significant relationship between subjective and objective career success and extraversion personality type (sig=0.001, r=0.473 and sig=0.001, r=0.545, respectively. Conclusion: It is essential to take into account the relationship between career success and related factors such as personality in the planning, decisions and technical choices. Besides, favorable environmental factors and effective factors such as knowledge, attitudes and cognitive, emotional and behavioral skills, activity level and the situation of the organization should also be taken into

  8. Career adaptability predicts subjective career success above and beyond personality traits and core self-evaluations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zacher, Hannes

    The Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS) measures career adaptability, as a higher-order construct that integrates four psychosocial resources of employees for managing their career development: concern, control, curiosity, and confidence. The goal of the present study was to investigate the validity

  9. Goodbye Career, Hello Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komisar, Randy

    2000-01-01

    Success in today's economy means throwing out the old career rules. The "noncareer" career is driven by passion for the work and has the fluidity and flexibility needed in the contemporary workplace. (JOW)

  10. Psychological career resources and subjective work experiences of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    success. Key words: career drivers; career harmonisers; career preferences; happiness; job/career satisfaction; life satisfaction; psychological career resources; subjective work experiences. Prof. M. Coetzee and Mr Z.C. Bergh are in the Department of Industrial and Organisational Psychology, University of South Africa.

  11. Crafting your Career: How Career Competencies Relate to Career Success via Job Crafting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkermans, J.; Tims, M.

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether career competencies could enhance an employee's subjective career success in terms of perceived employability and work-home balance via job crafting behaviors. Based on Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) Theory, we examined a potential motivational process in which

  12. Human capital and career success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Anders; Kato, Takao

    formal schooling and subsequent human capital obtained informally on the job are found to be complements in the production of career success. Fourth, though there is a large body of the literature on the relationship between firm-specific human capital and wages, the relative value of firm-specific human...

  13. Gender and physical therapy career success factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozier, C K; Raymond, M J; Goldstein, M S; Hamilton, B L

    1998-07-01

    Gender and profession are thought to affect how career success is perceived as well as how it is achieved. This study investigated items considered important in defining career success for male and female physical therapists. The study also explored the relationship among gender, beliefs about career success, and career experiences. Data were obtained through an investigator-developed survey. The self-report questionnaire consisted of 78 items in 4 areas: descriptive information, items important in characterizing career success, items perceived to enhance or inhibit career success, and items assessing self-esteem. Questionnaires were mailed to a random sample of active physical therapist members of the American Physical Therapy Association (N = 5,000). The response rate was 38.1% (n = 1,906). Both men and women selected indicators such as practicing ethically, improving patient health, and feeling satisfied over high income or status when describing career success. All respondents agreed that clinical competency and motivation are key factors related to achieving career success. Family issues, full-time employment, and flexibility of practice conditions emerged as primary gender differences. A unique set of indicators describe physical therapy career success. Gender differences in its description and factors that influence its achievement are related primarily to family issues. Career success for women depends to a greater degree on the ability to manage family responsibilities in conjunction with employment opportunities.

  14. The influence of career orientations on subjective work experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinde Coetzee

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: In an increasingly turbulent business context in which people are less dependent on organisational career arrangements and have greater agency in career decisions, organisations have come to pay increasing attention to retaining valuable talented managerial potential.Research purpose: The study empirically assessed the causal influence of individuals’ career orientations on their perceived life satisfaction, job or career satisfaction, sense of happiness and their perceptions of work as a valuable activity as aspects of their subjective work experiences.Motivation for study: From an organisational perspective, research on individuals’ inner definitions of career success and satisfaction is needed to guide current selection, placement, development, reward and retention practices.Research design, approach and method: A quantitative survey was conducted on a random sample of 2997 participants at predominantly managerial and supervisory level in the service industry. The measuring instruments consisted of an adapted five-factor career orientations model of the Career Orientations Inventory and a 4-item global subjective work experiences scale. Structural equation modelling (SEM was conducted to achieve the aim of the study.Main findings/results: Statistically significant causal relationships were observed between the career orientations and subjective work experiences variables.Practical implications: Individuals’ career orientations influence their general sense of life and job or career satisfaction, happiness and perceptions of work as a valuable activity. Organisations concerned with the retention of staff need to find a way of aligning individuals’ career needs and motives with the goals and aspirations of the organisation.Contribution/value-add: The research confirms the need for assessing the inner career orientations of employees as these provide valuable information regarding the motives and values driving individuals

  15. Mediating Role of Career Commitment in the Relationship of Promotional Opportunities, Rewards and Career Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Tisman Pasha

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to investigate the mediating role of career commitment between career development practices and career success of employee in insurance sector of Pakistan. Survey method was adopted to collect the data form 374 employees working in insurance sector systematic sampling. PLS-SEM technique was used using Smart PLS 2.0 to analyze the data. Findings of the study suggests that employees’ career development practices have positive relationship with career commitment and career success. Career commitment also have a positive relation with career success. Finally, career commitment mediates the positive role between career development practices and career of insurance sector employees. The effect of career development practices on career commitment and effect of career development practices on career success has been checked in past studies but the mediating role of career commitment particularly for the employees of insurance sector has not been checked before.

  16. Psychological Mobility and Career Success in the "New" Career Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbruggen, Marijke

    2012-01-01

    We examined the influence of two types of psychological mobility, i.e. boundaryless mindset and organizational mobility preference, on career success. We hypothesized that this relationship would be partially mediated by physical mobility. In addition, we expected the direction of the influence to depend on the type of psychological mobility. We…

  17. Subjective performance evaluations and employee careers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Anders; Lange, Fabian; Kriechell, Ben

    Firms commonly use supervisor evaluations to assess the performance of employees who work in complex environments. Doubts persist whether their subjective nature invalidates using these performance measures to learn about careers of individuals and to inform theory in personnel economics. We...... examine personnel data from six large companies and establish how subjective ratings, interpreted as ordinal rankings of employee performances within narrowly defined peer-groups, correlate with objective career outcomes. We find many similarities across firms in how subjective ratings correlate with base...

  18. Does Happiness Promote Career Success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Julia K.; Lyubomirsky, Sonja

    2008-01-01

    Past research has demonstrated a relationship between happiness and workplace success. For example, compared with their less happy peers, happy people earn more money, display superior performance, and perform more helpful acts. Researchers have often assumed that an employee is happy and satisfied because he or she is successful. In this article,…

  19. Groundbreakers: Successful Careers of Indian Women Today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Nicole

    2002-01-01

    Three successful American Indian women--film maker and businesswoman Valerie Red-Horse, Cherokee law professor and appeals court justice Stacey Leeds, and prolific artist Virginia Stroud--discuss their careers, emphasizing the importance of retaining cultural values, the struggles of being a racial and gender pioneer in their field, and the…

  20. Research on the evaluation indicators of skilled employees’ career success based on grounded theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulei Chu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: summarized and sorted career success evaluation indicators of skilled employees Design/methodology/approach: Based on Grounded Theory, through interviews and questionnaires to railway skilled employees Findings and Originality/value: the study shows that “subjective career success”, including work-family balance, life satisfaction, career satisfaction, perception of career success, “objective career success”, including level of total revenue venue, growth rate of wage and times of promotion, “knowledge and skills career success” including upgrade of knowledge and skills, classification of skills, external competitiveness and job autonomy, are three important career success evaluation indicators of skilled employees. Originality/value: The results show that different age groups, different titles and different positions of skilled employees, there is a significant difference in the choice of career success evaluation indicators. It provides a useful reference to establish a career development system for the skilled employees.

  1. Career-success scale - a new instrument to assess young physicians' academic career steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Stamm, Martina; Buddeberg, Claus; Klaghofer, Richard

    2008-06-02

    Within the framework of a prospective cohort study of Swiss medical school graduates, a Career-Success Scale (CSS) was constructed in a sample of young physicians choosing different career paths in medicine. Furthermore the influence of personality factors, the participants' personal situation, and career related factors on their career success was investigated. 406 residents were assessed in terms of career aspired to, and their career progress. The Career-Success Scale, consisting of 7 items, was developed and validated, addressing objective criteria of academic career advancement. The influence of gender and career aspiration was investigated by a two-factorial analysis of variance, the relationships between personality factors, personal situation, career related factors and the Career-Success Scale by a multivariate linear regression analysis. The unidimensional Career-Success Scale has an internal consistency of 0.76. It is significantly correlated at the bivariate level with gender, instrumentality, and all career related factors, particularly with academic career and received mentoring. In multiple regression, only gender, academic career, surgery as chosen specialty, and received mentoring are significant predictors. The highest values were observed in participants aspiring to an academic career, followed by those pursuing a hospital career and those wanting to run a private practice. Independent of the career aspired to, female residents have lower scores than their male colleagues. The Career-Success Scale proved to be a short, reliable and valid instrument to measure career achievements. As mentoring is an independent predictor of career success, mentoring programs could be an important instrument to specifically enhance careers of female physicians in academia.

  2. A narrative investigation into the meaning and experience of career success: Perspectives from women participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willie T. Chinyamurindi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: In South Africa opportunities are being created that encourage more women to enter the workforce. Understanding how women conceptualise and experience career success affects not only their individual career development but also their general outlook in life.Research purpose: To investigate how a sample of previously disadvantaged women distance learners conceptualise and experience the notion of career success.Motivation for the study: Calls have been made for research incorporating a subjective understanding regarding career success, especially amongst minority groups.Research approach, design and method: An interpretive approach was employed aimed at understanding individual experience and the interpretation of it. Unstructured interviews were conducted shaped by the objectives of the study amongst a sample of women (n = 25.Main findings: Through narratives and stories, findings revealed career success to be conceptualised and experienced as (1 a means of professional attainment and recognition, (2 a contribution to society and (3 evident in material and non-material artefacts. Further, from the sample of women used in this research, the experience of career success considered not only socio-historical issues and community but also the cultural milieu. Education emerged as an enabler of individual pursuit and goals leading to career success.Practical/managerial implications: An understanding of how career success is conceptualised and experienced by previously disadvantaged women can serve as a forerunner to individual specific career development interventions. The results of the study are therefore useful to both academics and practitioners in their formulation of interventions that enable individual career development.Contribution: The experience of career success as found in this study through participant narratives and stories gave a picture of career development processes amongst previously disadvantaged groups in South

  3. Career Decidedness as a Predictor of Subjective Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthayakumar, Ramya; Schimmack, Ulrich; Hartung, Paul J.; Rogers, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Forming, pursing, and achieving life tasks constitute important determinants of subjective well-being (SWB). A principal life task for emerging adults involves deciding about career goals. Prior research indicates that depression predicts SWB and may be linked to lower levels of career decidedness. We tested whether or not career decidedness…

  4. International careers and career success of Indian women in science & technology : The importance of career capital and organizational capital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, R.; van der Velde, E.G.; van Engen, Marloes

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a study on international careers and career success of Indian women in Science & Technology (S&T). We conducted interviews with 30 (upper) middle class Indian women in New Delhi and Bangalore (India) who pursued careers abroad as self-initiated expatriates (SIEs). Important

  5. Beyond Career Collection Development: Academic Libraries Collaborating with Career Center for Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Raymond; Kubo, Hiromi

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores a case study at Fresno State and how the library partners with the career center to support student success in career placement and advancement. The article will share opportunities and challenges in forming and maintaining such partnership and offer some best practices to deliver career research workshops collaboratively.

  6. What Is Career Success for Academic Hospitalists? A Qualitative Analysis of Early-Career Faculty Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbler, Ethan; Yirdaw, Essey; Kneeland, Patrick; Pierce, Read; Rendon, Patrick; Herzke, Carrie; Jones, Christine D

    2018-01-19

    Understanding the concept of career success is critical for hospital medicine groups seeking to create sustainably rewarding faculty positions. Conceptual models of career success describe both extrinsic (compensation and advancement) and intrinsic (career satisfaction and job satisfaction) domains. How hospitalists define career success for themselves is not well understood. In this study, we qualitatively explore perspectives on how early-career clinician-educators define career success. We developed a semistructured interview tool of open-ended questions validated by using cognitive interviewing. Transcribed interviews were conducted with 17 early-career academic hospitalists from 3 medical centers to thematic saturation. A mixed deductiveinductive, qualitative, analytic approach was used to code and map themes to the theoretical framework. The single most dominant theme participants described was "excitement about daily work," which mapped to the job satisfaction organizing theme. Participants frequently expressed the importance of "being respected and recognized" and "dissemination of work," which were within the career satisfaction organizing theme. The extrinsic organizing themes of advancement and compensation were described as less important contributors to an individual's sense of career success. Ambivalence toward the "academic value of clinical work," "scholarship," and especially "promotion" represented unexpected themes. The future of academic hospital medicine is predicated upon faculty finding career success. Clinician-educator hospitalists view some traditional markers of career advancement as relevant to success. However, early-career faculty question the importance of some traditional external markers to their personal definitions of success. This work suggests that the selfconcept of career success is complex and may not be captured by traditional academic metrics and milestones.

  7. Conscientiousness, career success, and longevity: a lifespan analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Margaret L; Friedman, Howard S; Martin, Leslie R; Reynolds, Chandra A; Luong, Gloria

    2009-04-01

    Markers of executive functioning, such as prudent planning for the future and impulse control, are related to conscientiousness and may be central to both occupational success and health outcomes. The aim of the study was to examine relations among conscientiousness, career success, and mortality risk across a 65-year period. Using data derived from 693 male participants in the Terman Life Cycle Study, we examined associations among childhood personality, midlife objective career success, and lifelong mortality risk through 2006. Conscientiousness and career success each predicted lower mortality risk (N = 693, relative hazard (rh) = 0.82 [95% confidence interval = 0.74, 0.91] and rh = 0.80 [0.71, 0.91], respectively), with both shared and unique variance. Importantly, childhood personality moderated the success-longevity link; conscientiousness was most relevant for least successful individuals. Conscientiousness and career success predicted longevity, but not in a straightforward manner. Findings highlight the importance of lifespan processes.

  8. Career Mapping for Professional Development and Succession Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Tammy; Diamond-Wells, Tammy; Jeffs, Debra

    Career mapping facilitates professional development of nurses by education specialists and nurse managers. On the basis of national Nursing Professional Development Scope and Standards, our education and professional development framework supports the organization's professional practice model and provides a foundation for the professional career map. This article describes development, implementation, and evaluation of the professional career map for nurses at a large children's hospital to support achievement of the nursing strategic goals for succession planning and professional development.

  9. Psychological career resources and subjective work experiences of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between the psychological career resources (as measured by the. Psychological Career Resources Inventory) and the subjective work experiences of a sample of working adults (as measured by a fouritem global work experiences scale). The research also aimed ...

  10. Research success and structured support: Developing early career ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Entry into a successful academic career is often an arduous process. From career preparation through to doctoral studies and beyond, the journey can be fraught with trials. Why do many academics find difficulty in completing their studies in the minimum time and publishing afterwards? As the University of the ...

  11. Managerial orientation and career success of physicians in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Antonio; Hucke, Desdemona

    2009-01-01

    This article aims to investigate the impact of managerial orientation on the career success of physicians employed in hospitals. The authors collected data between August and October 2006 using a written questionnaire that was sent to all 278 physicians employed in two German hospitals. The data was analyzed using a multinomial logistic regression. The data indicate that a pronounced managerial orientation has indeed a positive impact on the career success of physicians in hospitals. But the results vary with respect to the different dimensions of managerial orientation. Some aspects of managerial orientation are more compatible with physicians' professional values and, consequently, more relevant for career success than others. The acquisition and improvement of management skills seems to be a crucial factor. The impact of managerial orientation on the career success of physicians has been unclear so far. Physicians are trained and socialized according to professional values and norms that are considered to be the antithesis of a managerial orientation. Furthermore, the typical career paths of professionals are different from careers of other occupational groups. However, this paper shows that physicians employed in hospitals need a certain degree of managerial orientation to have a successful and satisfying professional career.

  12. Personality, social background, and occupational career success

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelissen, John; Graaf, Paul M. de

    2006-01-01

    Pooled cross-sectional and life-history data from the Dutch Family Survey 1998 and 2000 (N = 4000) were used to investigate whether personality was directly related to income attainment and occupational career transitions after controlling for human capital indicators, working hours, and parental

  13. Boundaryless career and career success: the impact of emotional and social competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerli, Fabrizio; Bonesso, Sara; Pizzi, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Even though, over the last two decades, the boundaryless career concept has stimulated a wide theoretical debate, scholars have recently claimed that research on the competencies that are necessary for managing a cross-boundary career is still incomplete. Similarly, the literature on emotional and social competencies has demonstrated how they predict work performance across industries and jobs but has neglected their influence in explaining the individual's mobility across boundaries and their impact on career success. This study aims to fill these gaps by examining the effects of emotional and social competencies on boundaryless career and on objective career success. By analyzing a sample of 142 managers over a period of 8 years, we found evidence that emotional competencies positively influence the propensity of an individual to undertake physical career mobility and that career advancements are related to the possession of social competencies and depend on the adoption of boundaryless career paths. This study also provides a contribution in terms of the evaluation of the emotional and social competencies demonstrated by an individual and of the operationalization of the measurement of boundaryless career paths, considering three facets of the physical mobility construct (organizational, industrial, and geographical boundaries).

  14. Boundaryless career and career success: the impact of emotional and social competencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio eGerli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Even though, over the last two decades, the boundaryless career concept has stimulated a wide theoretical debate, scholars have recently claimed that research on the competencies that are necessary for managing a cross-boundary career is still incomplete. Similarly, the literature on emotional and social competencies has demonstrated how they predict work performance across industries and jobs but has neglected their influence in explaining the individual’s mobility across boundaries and their impact on career success.This study aims to fill these gaps by examining the effects of emotional and social competencies on boundaryless career and on objective career success. By analyzing a sample of 142 managers over a period of eight years, we found evidence that emotional competencies positively influence the propensity of an individual to undertake physical career mobility and that career advancements are related to the possession of social competencies and depend on the adoption of boundaryless career paths. This study also provides a contribution in terms of the evaluation of the emotional and social competencies demonstrated by an individual and of the operationalization of the measurement of boundaryless career paths, considering three facets of the physical mobility construct (organizational, industrial and geographical boundaries.

  15. Stresses associated with career success for women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, M D

    1978-02-01

    In recent years, more women have pursued careers in business and the traditionally male professions. Those that have succeeded live with a high degree of environmental stress. Since some of them are now consulting psychiatrists it is important that the psychiatrist be able to differentiate difficulties which have a cultural basis from those stemming from individual psychodynamics. Cultural stresses have been reviewed under three headings: inaccurate stereotypes; inadequate cultural supports; and role overload. It has been suggested that contact with her peer group is extremely important for this type of woman patient. The peer group provides both support and a frame of reference within which individual problems may be understood.

  16. The Meaning of Career Success among Job-Hopper in The Boundaryless Career (Phenomenological Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcham Darokah

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This phenomenology qualitative research was conducted in order to examine the dynamics of career success among job hopper and how did job hoppers interpret the meaning career success in boundaryless career. This research used in-depth interview for collecting the data and supported by the data from the documents. The respondents involved in this research were fours job hoppers in the level of manager, five significant others, such as family, workmate, and a steady career. The findings revealed that: the job-hoppers individuals who frequently movement of job from one place to another place because of intrinsic factors (financial, interpersonal conflict, alternative employment opportunities, etc., extrinsic factors (challenges, willing to learn, personal characteristics, family, etc., proponent factors (networking, family support, and media. The meanings of career success among job-hopper in the boundaryless career namely; self-fulfillment (job satisfaction, life satisfaction, meeting personal goals, adding value to others, and work/life balance (family satisfaction and quality time with family. This study showed that being a job-hopper was a tool for pursuing the meaning of career success

  17. "Effects of networking on career success: A longitudinal study": Correction to Wolff and Moser (2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Reports an error in "Effects of networking on career success: A longitudinal study" by Hans-Georg Wolff and Klaus Moser (Journal of Applied Psychology, 2009[Jan], Vol 94[1], 196-206). In the article, results from a confirmatory factor analysis on subjective career success in the Measures section contained an error in the reported Chi-square (i.e., χ² (5, N = 257) = 9.17). This error does not alter any conclusions or substantive statements in the original article. The correct fit indices are " χ²(5, N = 257) 9.67, p = .08, RMSEA = 0.059, CFI = 1.00." (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2009-00697-007.) Previous research has reported effects of networking, defined as building, maintaining, and using relationships, on career success. However, empirical studies have relied exclusively on concurrent or retrospective designs that rest upon strong assumptions about the causal direction of this relation and depict a static snapshot of the relation at a given point in time. This study provides a dynamic perspective on the effects of networking on career success and reports results of a longitudinal study. Networking was assessed with 6 subscales that resulted from combining measures of the facets of (a) internal versus external networking and (b) building versus maintaining versus using contacts. Objective (salary) and subjective (career satisfaction) measures of career success were obtained for 3 consecutive years. Multilevel analyses showed that networking is related to concurrent salary and that it is related to the growth rate of salary over time. Networking is also related to concurrent career satisfaction. As satisfaction remained stable over time, no effects of networking on the growth of career satisfaction were found. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Subjective performance evaluations and employee careers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Anders; Lange, Fabian; Kriechel, Ben

    Firms commonly use supervisor ratings to evaluate employees when objective performance measures are unavailable. Supervisor ratings are subjective and data containing supervisor ratings typically stem from individual firm level data sets. For both these reasons, doubts persist on how useful...... such data are for evaluating theories in personnel economics and whether findings from such data generalize to the labor force at large. In this paper, we examine personnel data from six large companies and establish how subjective ratings, interpreted as ordinal rankings of employees within narrowly...

  19. Personality and Career Success: Concurrent and Longitudinal Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutin, Angelina R; Costa, Paul T; Miech, Richard; Eaton, William W

    2009-03-01

    The present research addresses the dynamic transaction between extrinsic (occupational prestige, income) and intrinsic (job satisfaction) career success and the Five-Factor Model of personality. Participants (N = 731) completed a comprehensive measure of personality and reported their job title, annual income, and job satisfaction; a subset of these participants (n = 302) provided the same information approximately 10 years later. Measured concurrently, emotionally stable and conscientious participants reported higher incomes and job satisfaction. Longitudinal analyses revealed that, among younger participants, higher income at baseline predicted decreases in Neuroticism and baseline Extraversion predicted increases in income across the 10 years. Results suggest that the mutual influence of career success and personality is limited to income and occurs early in the career.

  20. A Model of Career Success: A Longitudinal Study of Emergency Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachulicz, Sarah; Schmitt, Neal; Kuljanin, Goran

    2008-01-01

    Objective and subjective career success were hypothesized to mediate the relationships between sociodemographic variables, human capital indices, individual difference variables, and organizational sponsorship as inputs and a retirement decision and intentions to leave either the specialty of emergency medicine (EM) or medicine as output…

  1. Networking and Managers' Career Success in the Malaysian Public Sector: The Moderating Effect of Managerial Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasdi, Roziah Mohd; Garavan, Thomas N.; Ismail, Maimunah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate how managerial level moderates the relationships between networking behaviours and career success (objective and subjective) in the context of a public sector organisation in Malaysia. Design/methodology/approach: The study utilised a cross-sectional design and investigated these relationships…

  2. Perceived organizational support and intention to remain: The mediating roles of career success and self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingying; Liu, Yan-Hui

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationships among perceived organizational support, career success, self-esteem and intention to remain. A cross-sectional study was designed, and subjects were recruited from six nonprofit organizations in China in spring 2015. A convenience sample of 610 nurses answered a survey with questions related to their ideas about their work. Structural equation modelling analyses were conducted. The results revealed that perceived organizational support was positively associated with intention to remain and career success, which, in turn, mediated the relationship between perceived organizational support and intention to remain. We also found that self-esteem mediated the relationships between perceived organizational support and career success and between career success and intention to remain. Higher perceived organizational support, career success and self-esteem can increase intention to remain in Chinese nurses. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. A Career Success Model for Academics at Malaysian Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Said, Al-Mansor; Mohd Rasdi, Roziah; Abu Samah, Bahaman; Silong, Abu Daud; Sulaiman, Suzaimah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop a career success model for academics at the Malaysian research universities. Design/methodology/approach: Self-administered and online surveys were used for data collection among 325 academics from Malaysian research universities. Findings: Based on the analysis of structural equation modeling, the…

  4. Controlling Your Environment and Yourself: Implications for Career Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Converse, Patrick D.; Pathak, Jaya; DePaul-Haddock, Anne Marie; Gotlib, Tomer; Merbedone, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Given the complex and rapidly changing nature of the current work environment, individuals' capabilities to effectively influence their environment and regulate their behavior may be critical to career success. Drawing from the model of emergent interactive agency (Bandura, 1989), the current research examines this perspective, focusing on…

  5. Age effects on the employability–career success relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Beatrice; de Lange, Annet H.; Demerouti, Evangelia; van der Heijde, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the similarity of the factor structure for self-reported versus supervisor-rated employability for two age groups of workers, and then validated a career success enhancing model of employability across the two age groups. The results confirmed a two-factor model including

  6. THE MEANING OF CAREER SUCCESS AMONG JOB-HOPPER IN THE BOUNDARYLESS CAREER (Phenomenological Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcham Darokah Danita Irianti Malute

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This  phenomenology  qualitative  research  was  conducted  in  order  to  know  the dynamics of career success among job hopper and how did job hoppers interpret the  meaning  career  success  in  boundaryless  career. This  research  used  in-depth interview  for  collecting  the  data  and  supported  by the  data  from  the  documents. The  respondents  involved in  this  research  were  fours job  hoppers in  the level  of manager,  five  significant  others,  such  as  family,  workmate,  and  a  steady  career. The findings revealed that: the job-hoppers individuals who frequently movement of  job  from  one  place  to  another  place  because  of  intrinsic  factors  (financial, interpersonal  conflict,  alternative  employment  opportunities,  etc.,  extrinsic factors  (challenges,  willing  to  learn,  personal  characteristics,  family,  etc., proponent  factors  (networking,  family  support,  and media.  The  meanings  of career  success  among  job-hopper  in  the  boundaryless  career  namely;  self-fulfillment (job satisfaction, life satisfaction, meeting personal goals, adding value to  others,  and  work/life  balance  (family  satisfaction  and  quality  time  with family.  This  study  showed  that  being  a  job-hopper was  a  tool  for  pursuing  the meaning of career success. Keywords: Job-hopper, career success, boundaryless career, qualitative.

  7. Long term impact of emotional, social and cognitive intelligence competencies and GMAT on career and life satisfaction and career success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amdurer, Emily; Boyatzis, Richard E; Saatcioglu, Argun; Smith, Melvin L; Taylor, Scott N

    2014-01-01

    Career scholars have called for a broader definition of career success by inviting greater exploration of its antecedents. While success in various jobs has been predicted by intelligence and in other studies by competencies, especially in management, long term impact of having intelligence and using competencies has not been examined. Even in collegiate outcome studies, few have examined the longer term impact on graduates' careers or lives. This study assesses the impact of demonstrated emotional, social, and cognitive intelligence competencies assessed at graduation and g measured through GMAT at entry from an MBA program on career and life satisfaction, and career success assessed 5 to 19 years after graduation. Using behavioral measures of competencies (i.e., as assessed by others), we found that emotional intelligence competencies predict career satisfaction and success. Adaptability had a positive impact, but influence had the opposite effect on these career measures and life satisfaction. Life satisfaction was negatively affected by achievement orientation and positively affected by teamwork. Current salary, length of marriage, and being younger at time of graduation positively affect all three measures of life and career satisfaction and career success. GMAT (as a measure of g) predicted life satisfaction and career success to a slight but significant degree in the final model analyzed. Meanwhile, being female and number of children positively affected life satisfaction but cognitive intelligence competencies negatively affected it, and in particular demonstrated systems thinking was negative.

  8. Long term impact of emotional, social and cognitive intelligence competencies and GMAT on career and life satisfaction and career success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amdurer, Emily; Boyatzis, Richard E.; Saatcioglu, Argun; Smith, Melvin L.; Taylor, Scott N.

    2014-01-01

    Career scholars have called for a broader definition of career success by inviting greater exploration of its antecedents. While success in various jobs has been predicted by intelligence and in other studies by competencies, especially in management, long term impact of having intelligence and using competencies has not been examined. Even in collegiate outcome studies, few have examined the longer term impact on graduates' careers or lives. This study assesses the impact of demonstrated emotional, social, and cognitive intelligence competencies assessed at graduation and g measured through GMAT at entry from an MBA program on career and life satisfaction, and career success assessed 5 to 19 years after graduation. Using behavioral measures of competencies (i.e., as assessed by others), we found that emotional intelligence competencies predict career satisfaction and success. Adaptability had a positive impact, but influence had the opposite effect on these career measures and life satisfaction. Life satisfaction was negatively affected by achievement orientation and positively affected by teamwork. Current salary, length of marriage, and being younger at time of graduation positively affect all three measures of life and career satisfaction and career success. GMAT (as a measure of g) predicted life satisfaction and career success to a slight but significant degree in the final model analyzed. Meanwhile, being female and number of children positively affected life satisfaction but cognitive intelligence competencies negatively affected it, and in particular demonstrated systems thinking was negative. PMID:25566128

  9. Fear of Success, Sex Role Attitudes, and Career Salience and Anxiety Levels of College Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illfelder, Joyce K.

    1980-01-01

    Examines for female undergraduate students the relationship between fear of success, sex role attitudes, and career salience, and the relationship between fear of success, career salience, and trait anxiety. Results indicated that fear of success and sex-role attitudes, in combination, significantly predicted the level of career salience. (Author)

  10. Long term impact of emotional, social and cognitive intelligence competencies and GMAT on career and life satisfaction and career success

    OpenAIRE

    Amdurer, Emily; Boyatzis, Richard E.; Saatcioglu, Argun; Smith, Melvin L.; Taylor, Scott N.

    2014-01-01

    Career scholars have called for a broader definition of career success by inviting greater exploration of its antecedents. While success in various jobs has been predicted by intelligence and in other studies by competencies, especially in management, long term impact of having intelligence and using competencies has not been examined. Even in collegiate outcome studies, few have examined the longer term impact on graduates' careers or lives. This study assesses the impact of demonstrated emo...

  11. Long Term Impact of Emotional, Social and Cognitive Intelligence Competencies and GMAT on Career and Life Satisfaction and Career Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily eAmdurer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTCareer scholars have called for a broader definition of career success by inviting greater exploration of its antecedents. While success in various jobs has been predicted by intelligence and in other studies by competencies, especially in management, long term impact of having intelligence and using competencies has not been examined. Even in collegiate outcome studies, few have examined the longer term impact on graduates’ careers or lives. This study assesses the impact of demonstrated emotional, social, and cognitive intelligence competencies assessed at graduation and g measured through GMAT at entry from an MBA program on career and life satisfaction, and career success assessed 5 to 19 years after graduation. Using behavioral measures of competencies (i.e., as assessed by others, we found that emotional intelligence competencies predict career satisfaction and success. Adaptability had a positive impact, but influence had the opposite effect on these career measures and life satisfaction. Life satisfaction was negatively affected by achievement orientation and positively affected by teamwork. Current salary, length of marriage, and being younger at time of graduation positively affect all three measures of life and career satisfaction and career success. GMAT (as a measure of g predicted life satisfaction and career success to a slight but significant degree in the final model analyzed. Meanwhile, being female and number of children positively affected life satisfaction but cognitive intelligence competencies negatively affected it, and in particular demonstrated systems thinking was negative.

  12. Mentoring, Leadership Behaviors, and Career Success, of African American Female Faculty and Administrators in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedokun, Aderemi D.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study is to examine the relationship between the variables of career mentoring, leadership behaviors, and career success of African American female faculty and administrators in higher education positions. The aim is to determine whether mentoring is related to leadership behavior and career success of African…

  13. Understanding Career Success and Its Contributing Factors for Clinical and Translational Investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Georgeanna F W B; Schwartz, Lisa S; DiMeglio, Linda A; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S; Gabrilove, Janice L

    2016-04-01

    To understand the factors that facilitate career success for career development awardees in clinical and translational science and reconceptualize understand ing of career success for this population. In 2013-2014, the authors conducted semistructured interviews with former NIH KL2 or K12 scholars from nine Clinical and Translational Science Award-funded institutions. Participants either had or had not secured independent funding at least two years after the end of their last K award. Questions covered the factors that facilitate or hinder junior investigators' transition to independent funding. Interviews were recorded and transcribed, and the transcripts were analyzed thematically. Forty individuals participated, with equal representation by men and women and by independently and not independently funded investigators. Personal factors that facilitated success included networks, persistence and resilience, initiative, autonomy, and personal and professional balance. Organizational factors included appropriate mentorship, protected research time, and institutional resources and support.Even independently funded participants described challenges regarding career direction. Five participants without independent funding modeled a broad spectrum of successful career paths, having assumed leadership positions not reliant on grant funding. Alternative definitions of career success included improving public health, enjoying work, seeing mentees succeed, and receiving external acknowledgment of successes. Awareness of the factors that facilitate or hinder career success can help junior faculty, mentors, and institutional leaders support career development in clinical and translational science. New definitions of career success are needed, as are career paths for faculty who want to engage in research in roles other than principal investigator.

  14. Long term impact of emotional, social and cognitive intelligence competencies and GMAT on career and life satisfaction and career success

    OpenAIRE

    Amdurer, Emily; Boyatzis, Richard E.; Saatcioglu, Argun; Smith, Melvin L.; Taylor, Scott N.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACTCareer scholars have called for a broader definition of career success by inviting greater exploration of its antecedents. While success in various jobs has been predicted by intelligence and in other studies by competencies, especially in management, long term impact of having intelligence and using competencies has not been examined. Even in collegiate outcome studies, few have examined the longer term impact on graduates’ careers or lives. This study assesses the impact of demonstr...

  15. Long Term Impact of Emotional, Social and Cognitive Intelligence Competencies and GMAT on Career and Life Satisfaction and Career Success

    OpenAIRE

    Emily eAmdurer; Richard Eleftherios Boyatzis; Argun eSaatcioglu; Melvin eSmith; Taylor, Scott N.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACTCareer scholars have called for a broader definition of career success by inviting greater exploration of its antecedents. While success in various jobs has been predicted by intelligence and in other studies by competencies, especially in management, long term impact of having intelligence and using competencies has not been examined. Even in collegiate outcome studies, few have examined the longer term impact on graduates’ careers or lives. This study assesses the impact of demonstr...

  16. Work-family interface in the context of career success: a qualitative inquiry

    OpenAIRE

    Beigi, Mina; Wang, Jia; Arthur, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Work–family researchers are increasingly recognizing the need to expand their focus to advance the field. One population largely neglected by work–family researchers is individuals who have been extremely successful in their careers. In addition, organizational career scholars have largely neglected the interplay between employees’ work and family lives. This study contributes to the work–family literature by studying work–family interface (WFI) in the context of career success. We sought to ...

  17. Linking Extroversion and Proactive Personality to Career Success: The Role of Mentoring Received and Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turban, Daniel B.; Moake, Timothy R.; Wu, Sharon Yu-Hsien; Cheung, Yu Ha

    2017-01-01

    Although extroversion and proactive personality are related to career success, the mechanisms through which the relationships occur are unclear. Based on the contest- and sponsored-mobility processes, we examine a model linking extroversion and proactive personality to career success through the mediating effects of mentoring received and…

  18. Examining the Relationship between Social Capital and Career Success among Welfare to Work Participants in Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Green, Dionne Marie

    2012-01-01

    The study examined the relationship between social capital and career success among welfare to work participants in a Louisiana program from 2007 to 2009. Based on the high percentage who do not complete the Louisiana STEP program, outcomes from 2007 to 2009 suggest current STEP work activities may not prepare participants for career success and…

  19. Factors Contributing to the Fear of Success in Women's Career Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rountree-Wyly, Jeanie; And Others

    Fear of success in women is a pervasive phenomenon affecting women's career development. Women affected by this phenomenon are often unaware that they are afraid of succeeding. Identification of the factors that contribute to the fear of success in women's career development is important for educators and counselors wanting to assist women in…

  20. Addressing Career Success Issues of African Americans in the Workplace: An Undergraduate Business Program Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Belinda Johnson

    2009-01-01

    Career success as measured by the objective, traditional criteria of the composite of high number of promotions, high annual compensation, and high organizational level in corporate America has eluded the majority of African Americans. This article describes an undergraduate business program career success intervention designed to assist African…

  1. Predicting STEM Career Success by STI Knowledge Utilization Patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozeman, B.; Youtie, J.; Bretschneider, S.

    2016-07-01

    As a part of discussion on knowledge utilization on science and technology, the mixed of papers presented in the panel discussion is designed to illustrate the patterns of collaboration, mobility, and diffusion of knowledge as well as those of labor force. In particular, the first two papers presented in the panel explore the potential of STEM career success through cosmopolitan collaboration and international community collaboration (focused on the relationships between China and Russia) in nanotechnology, which would provide implications on national and international benchmarking of innovation. For policy implications on graduate education and innovation, mobility pattern of non-U.S. Ph.D. degree holders is examined, and impact of a policy report on the target academic communities is investigated through development of credibility map. This panel is designed to highlight a recent effort of understanding geographical, cognitive or social spaces that are present in the scientific and technological activity as well as in doctoral education. The papers presented in this panel, therefore, will provide a rich set of significant and relevant insights drawn from examining STI knowledge utilization patterns to the STI-ENID community. The anticipated length of the event may be 90 minutes and there is no preferred number of attendees in particular although it is expected to be in between 35 and 60 at the minimum. (Author)

  2. Early career choices and successful career progression in surgery in the UK: prospective cohort studies

    OpenAIRE

    Richards Jennifer MJ; Harrison Ewen M; Laxton Louise; Goldacre Michael J; Lambert Trevor W; Parks Rowan W

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Changes to the structure of medical training worldwide require doctors to decide on their career specialty at an increasingly early stage after graduation. We studied trends in career choices for surgery, and the eventual career destinations, of UK graduates who declared an early preference for surgery. Methods Postal questionnaires were sent, at regular time intervals after qualification, to all medical qualifiers from all UK medical schools in selected qualification year...

  3. Elements of Success in Chicago Botanic Garden’s Science Career Continuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Johnson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Science Career Continuum at the Chicago Botanic Garden is a model program for successfully encouraging youth from diverse backgrounds into STEM careers. This program has shown that when students are given an opportunity to participate in real scientific research under the mentorship of a caring professional over multiple years, they are more likely to go to college and pursue STEM careers than their peers. 

  4. Success attitudes of young ophthalmologists in the first decade of their career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Fernando Rodrigo Pedreira; Arieta, Carlos Eduardo Leite; Nascimento, Maurício Abujamra; Carvalho, Keila Miriam Monteiro de; Lira, Rodrigo Pessoa Cavalcanti

    2012-01-01

    To describe the main success attitudes of young ophthalmologists in the first decade of their career. This descriptive study comprised subjects selected from a sample of ophthalmologists who were participating in a congress, using a semi-structured questionnaire. The inclusion criteria were as follows: ophthalmologists under the age of 40 years, within 5-10 years from ophthalmology residency conclusion. The subjects were asked about the three main success attitudes in their personal experience during the first years of ophthalmology practice. After the initial results, the 10 most frequently mentioned attitudes were listed and volunteers were again interviewed to choose, within the latter list, the three main attitudes. Forty-eight ophthalmologists were interviewed, 24 (50%) were male; the mean age was 37 years (SD: 2 years, range: 33-40 years) and the mean time from ophthalmology residency conclusion was 8 years (SD: 1 year, range: 5-10 years). The frequency of such mentioned success attitudes were as follows: to invest in professional updating (22.9%), to have a good relationship with patients and professional partners (18.8%), to prioritize individual and family happiness (12.5%), initially to work in an established group (11.1%), to work in public service (9.7%), to have their own business with a homogeneous group (7.6%), to save money (7.6%), to be ready to resume work (4.2%), to get business administration skills (4.2%), and to have professional insurance (0.7%). The three main success attitudes consisted in investing in professional updating (22.9%), maintaining a good relationship with patients and professional partners (18.8%), and prioritizing individual and family happiness (12.5%). Although these results should not be generalized, they are helpful not only for those ophthalmologists at the beginning of a career but also those who want to reflect on what to prioritize in their professional practice.

  5. Success attitudes of young ophthalmologists in the first decade of their career

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Rodrigo Pedreira Chaves

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To describe the main success attitudes of young ophthalmologists in the first decade of their career. METHODS: This descriptive study comprised subjects selected from a sample of ophthalmologists who were participating in a congress, using a semi-structured questionnaire. The inclusion criteria were as follows: ophthalmologists under the age of 40 years, within 5-10 years from ophthalmology residency conclusion. The subjects were asked about the three main success attitudes in their personal experience during the first years of ophthalmology practice. After the initial results, the 10 most frequently mentioned attitudes were listed and volunteers were again interviewed to choose, within the latter list, the three main attitudes. RESULTS: Forty-eight ophthalmologists were interviewed, 24 (50% were male; the mean age was 37 years (SD: 2 years, range: 33-40 years and the mean time from ophthalmology residency conclusion was 8 years (SD: 1 year, range: 5-10 years. The frequency of such mentioned success attitudes were as follows: to invest in professional updating (22.9%, to have a good relationship with patients and professional partners (18.8%, to prioritize individual and family happiness (12.5%, initially to work in an established group (11.1%, to work in public service (9.7%, to have their own business with a homogeneous group (7.6%, to save money (7.6%, to be ready to resume work (4.2%, to get business administration skills (4.2%, and to have professional insurance (0.7%. CONCLUSIONS: The three main success attitudes consisted in investing in professional updating (22.9%, maintaining a good relationship with patients and professional partners (18.8%, and prioritizing individual and family happiness (12.5%. Although these results should not be generalized, they are helpful not only for those ophthalmologists at the beginning of a career but also those who want to reflect on what to prioritize in their professional practice.

  6. What Success Really Looks Like: Bright Spots and Blots Define a Career Trajectory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The image of success not being a straight, upward arrow but a big, messy scribbled blob defines the career trajectory of the author perfectly. Her work has moved forward, pushed upward, and stretched further, but it has not been a smooth and easy path. In this article, an education consultant reflects on her career highs and lows as she shifts…

  7. Fear of Success, Self-Concept, and Career Choice of Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Wanda; Fasko, Daniel, Jr.; Grubb, Deborah

    One of the largest problems facing rural school counselors is confronting the low career expectations that many rural students have by the time they reach high school. To clarify this problem, the relationships among career choice, self-concept, and fear of success in rural students is explored here. The study critiques earlier studies of…

  8. Boundaryless career and career success: the impact of emotional and social competencies

    OpenAIRE

    Fabrizio eGerli; Sara eBonesso; Claudio ePizzi

    2015-01-01

    Even though, over the last two decades, the boundaryless career concept has stimulated a wide theoretical debate, scholars have recently claimed that research on the competencies that are necessary for managing a cross-boundary career is still incomplete. Similarly, the literature on emotional and social competencies has demonstrated how they predict work performance across industries and jobs but has neglected their influence in explaining the individual’s mobility across boundaries and thei...

  9. Early career choices and successful career progression in surgery in the UK: prospective cohort studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richards Jennifer MJ

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes to the structure of medical training worldwide require doctors to decide on their career specialty at an increasingly early stage after graduation. We studied trends in career choices for surgery, and the eventual career destinations, of UK graduates who declared an early preference for surgery. Methods Postal questionnaires were sent, at regular time intervals after qualification, to all medical qualifiers from all UK medical schools in selected qualification years between 1974 and 2005. They were sent in the first year after qualification, at year three and five years after qualification, and at longer time intervals thereafter. Results Responses were received from 27 749 of 38 280 doctors (73% at year one, 23 468 of 33151 (71% at year three, and 17 689 of 24 870 (71% at year five. Early career preferences showed that surgery has become more popular over the past two decades. Looking forward from early career choice, 60% of respondents (64% of men, 48% of women with a first preference for a surgical specialty at year one eventually worked in surgery (p Conclusions Surgery is a popular specialty choice in the UK. The great majority of doctors who progressed in a surgical career made an early and definitive decision to do so.

  10. Career inflection points of women who successfully achieved the hospital CEO position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Donald W; Lemak, Christy Harris; Wainio, Joyce Anne

    2014-01-01

    Women are significantly underrepresented in hospital CEO positions, and this gender disparity has changed little over the past few decades. The purpose of this study was to analyze the career trajectories of successful female healthcare executives to determine factors that generated inflections in their careers. Using qualitative research methodology, we studied the career trajectories of 20 women who successfully ascended into a hospital CEO position. Our findings revealed 25 inflection points related to education and training, experience, career management, family, networking, and mentorship and sponsorship. We found substantial differences in the career inflection points by functional background. Inflections were more pronounced early in the careers of women in healthcare management, while clinical and administrative support executives experienced more inflections later as they took on responsibilities outside of their professional roles. Only two inflections were common among all the executives: completing a graduate degree and obtaining experience as a chief operating officer. More importantly, our findings show that organizational support factors are critical for the career advancement of women. We conclude with recommendations for individuals in an effort to enhance their career trajectories. We also provide recommended activities for organizations to support the careers of women in healthcare leadership.

  11. Networking: A Key to Career Communication and Management Consulting Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Now that job security with one organization is a relic of the past and companies are outsourcing training and other "nonessential" functions, the author suggests in his career communication classes that students develop the same inventive strategies to plan their employment futures that management consultants use to market themselves in the 21st…

  12. Your Career as a Successful Independent TESL Professional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Sarah Elaine

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to present information on how to develop one's career as an independent TESOL professional (e.g. adjunct instructor, freelancer, contractor or consultant). The methodology used to present this information is active practitioner reflection. The discussion includes topics such as various types independent…

  13. Accounting Students' Perceptions of Important Skills for Career Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usoff, Catherine; Feldmann, Dorothy

    1998-01-01

    Undergraduate (n=227) and graduate (n=45) students rated the importance of technical accounting and nontechnical (leadership, interpersonal, and communication) skills for their careers. Undergraduates appeared to need greater awareness of nontechnical skills and women appeared to lack awareness of leadership skills. (SK)

  14. THE EFFECTS OF INGRATIATION AND SELF-PROMOTION TACTICS ON EMPLOYEE CAREER SUCCESS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Orpen, Christopher

    1996-01-01

    To examine the relations between political influence behavior and career success, 137 managers completed measures of ingratiation and self-promotion, the two most widely used types of such behaviors...

  15. Exploring Career-Life Success and Family Social Support of Successful Women in Canada, Argentina and Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lirio, Pamela; Lituchy, Terri R.; Monserrat, Silvia Ines; Olivas-Lujan, Miguel R.; Duffy, Jo Ann; Fox, Suzy; Gregory, Ann; Punnett, B. J.; Santos, Neusa

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine career-life issues of successful women in the Americas. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 30 interviews were conducted with successful women in Canada, Argentina and Mexico. Themes were pulled from the interview transcripts for each country, analyzed and then compared across countries, looking…

  16. Academic career in medicine: requirements and conditions for successful advancement in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Stamm, Martina; Buddeberg, Claus

    2009-04-29

    Within the framework of a prospective cohort study of Swiss medical school graduates a sample of young physicians aspiring to an academic career were surveyed on their career support and barriers experienced up to their sixth year of postgraduate training. Thirty-one junior academics took part in semi-structured telephone interviews in 2007. The interview guideline focused on career paths to date, career support and barriers experienced, and recommendations for junior and senior academics. The qualitatively assessed data were evaluated according to Mayring's content analysis. Furthermore, quantitatively gained data from the total cohort sample on person- and career-related characteristics were analyzed in regard to differences between the junior academics and cohort doctors who aspire to another career in medicine. Junior academics differ in terms of instrumentality as a person-related factor, and in terms of intrinsic career motivation and mentoring as career-related factors from cohort doctors who follow other career paths in medicine; they also show higher scores in the Career-Success Scale. Four types of career path could be identified in junior academics: (1) focus on basic sciences, (2) strong focus on research (PhD programs) followed by clinical training, (3) one to two years in research followed by clinical training, (4) clinical training and research in parallel. The interview material revealed the following categories of career-supporting experience: making oneself out as a proactive junior physician, research resources provided by superior staff, and social network; statements concerning career barriers encompassed interference between clinical training and research activities, insufficient research coaching, and personality related barriers. Recommendations for junior academics focused on mentoring and professional networking, for senior academics on interest in human resource development and being role models. The conditions for an academic career in

  17. Academic career in medicine – requirements and conditions for successful advancement in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamm Martina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the framework of a prospective cohort study of Swiss medical school graduates a sample of young physicians aspiring to an academic career were surveyed on their career support and barriers experienced up to their sixth year of postgraduate training. Methods Thirty-one junior academics took part in semi-structured telephone interviews in 2007. The interview guideline focused on career paths to date, career support and barriers experienced, and recommendations for junior and senior academics. The qualitatively assessed data were evaluated according to Mayring's content analysis. Furthermore, quantitatively gained data from the total cohort sample on person- and career-related characteristics were analyzed in regard to differences between the junior academics and cohort doctors who aspire to another career in medicine. Results Junior academics differ in terms of instrumentality as a person-related factor, and in terms of intrinsic career motivation and mentoring as career-related factors from cohort doctors who follow other career paths in medicine; they also show higher scores in the Career-Success Scale. Four types of career path could be identified in junior academics: (1 focus on basic sciences, (2 strong focus on research (PhD programs followed by clinical training, (3 one to two years in research followed by clinical training, (4 clinical training and research in parallel. The interview material revealed the following categories of career-supporting experience: making oneself out as a proactive junior physician, research resources provided by superior staff, and social network; statements concerning career barriers encompassed interference between clinical training and research activities, insufficient research coaching, and personality related barriers. Recommendations for junior academics focused on mentoring and professional networking, for senior academics on interest in human resource development and being role

  18. An Examination of the Effects of Career Development Courses on Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy, Adjustment to College, Learning Integration, and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Michele J.; Pedersen, Joan S.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of career development courses on career decision-making self-efficacy (CDMSE), college adjustment, learning integration, academic achievement, and retention among undecided undergraduates. It also investigated the effects of course format on career decision-making abilities and academic success outcomes and…

  19. A Career Success of the Distributors in Multi-Level Marketing (MLM) Company

    OpenAIRE

    Siahaan, Elisabet; Lumbanraja, Prihatin; Muchtar, Yasmin Chairunisa

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, MLM Company around the world are highly developed, and companies especially in Indonesia have been using a system of direct sales to the consumers. The career structure in MLM Company has been very much acknowledged. However, not all MLM distributors are able to achieve the line of succession. The purpose of this research is to analyse the main causes of career success in MLM Company. This study uses both quantitative and qualitative methods. The selection of samples is carried out ...

  20. Time is on my side: time, general mental ability, human capital, and extrinsic career success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Timothy A; Klinger, Ryan L; Simon, Lauren S

    2010-01-01

    The present study linked general mental ability (GMA) to extrinsic career success using a multilevel framework that included time and 3 possible time-based mediators of the GMA-career success relationship. Results, based on a large national sample, revealed that over a 28-year period, GMA affected growth in 2 indicators of extrinsic career success (income and occupational prestige), such that the careers of high-GMA individuals ascended more steeply over time than those of low-GMA individuals. Part of the reason high-GMA individuals had steeper growth in extrinsic success over time was because they attained more education, completed more job training, and gravitated toward more complex jobs. GMA also moderated the degree to which within-individual variation in the mediating variables affected within-individual variation in extrinsic career success over time: Education, training, and job complexity were much more likely to translate into career success for more intelligent individuals. Copyright 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  1. Global career mobility, repatriation and career success of Dutch and Indian professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, Reimara

    2016-01-01

    This PhD research explores global career mobility of Dutch and Indian professionals categorized in three groups: 1) Company-Assigned Expatriates (CAEs);2) Independent Internationally Mobile Professionals (IIMPs) / Self-Initiated Expatriates (SIEs); 3) Repatriates.The purpose was to:- explore the

  2. Effective communication: the key to career success and great leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelman, Bonnie

    2009-01-01

    Good communication is the key to educating, creating, and negotiating with others, and is especially important for security professionals whose jobs involve dealing with an employee having problems, negotiating with another department to get something we need, educating our bosses about hardening our targets or trying to de-escalate a family or patient who is upset or out of control, the author points out. Developing your own communication style, based on your understanding of what is involved in effective communications, will stand you in good stead in succeeding as a leader and advancing your career, she says.

  3. Pathways to success for psychologists in academic health centers: from early career to emeritus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Kathryn A; Breland-Noble, Alfiee M; King, Cheryl A; Cubic, Barbara A

    2010-12-01

    Careers in academic health centers (AHCs) come with a unique set of challenges and rewards. Building a stable and rewarding career as a psychologist in an AHC requires the efforts of a whole team of players and coaches. This paper outlines the characteristics of AHCs and the general skills psychologists need to thrive in this type of setting. Advice specific to each stage of career development (early, mid, and late) is offered, highlighting the themes of coaching and teamwork that are critical to success in an AHC.

  4. Human Capital and Career Success: Evidence from Linked Employer-Employee Data

    OpenAIRE

    Frederiksen, Anders; Kato, Takao

    2011-01-01

    Denmark's registry data provide accurate and complete career history data along with detailed personal characteristics (e.g., education, gender, work experience, tenure and others) for the population of Danish workers longitudinally. By using such data from 1992 to 2002, we provide rigorous evidence for the first time for the population of workers in an entire economy (as opposed to case study evidence) on the effects of the nature and scope of human capital on career success (measured by app...

  5. Fear of Career Development Success among Women: Implications for Community College Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rountree, Jeanie; Frusher, Susan

    1991-01-01

    Categorizes and discusses the factors associated with fear of success in women in terms of familial socialization, psychological influences, and cultural norms. Indicates that any one or combination of these factors can precipitate fear of success manifested in defeatist behaviors, which in turn undermine career development. (DMM)

  6. Operational Forces soldiers’ perceptions of attributes and skills for career success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishreen Rawoot

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: A career within the South African Operational Forces is physically, mentally and emotionally challenging. It is a diverse working environment with its own organisational culture and unique challenges.Research purpose: The aim of the study was to explore the perceptions of Operational Forces soldiers regarding the unique requirements that facilitated their career success.Motivation for the study: A low percentage of candidates successfully complete the Operational Forces training. The financial implications of training candidates make it important to be able to identify candidates who have the potential to be successful, early on in the process.Research design, approach and method: Data were collected through a self-administered qualitative survey (n = 98. All participants were permanent Operational Forces soldiers with varying ranks and years of experience. The data were thematically analysed in order to identify themes and specific attributes and skills associated with a successful career in the Operational Forces.Main findings: A number of themes emerged from the data, each of which contributed to our understanding of the research question. The themes included self-concept, personality, interests, cognitive and physical factors.Practical and managerial implications: The research findings may help to inform decisions about approaches, practices and methodologies of the South African Operational Forces recruitment and selection process. Results also provide military organisations with the key characteristics to consider when identifying candidates with the highest potential for successful careers.Contribution and value-add: The study extends previous career success research by contributing an additional base of information regarding career success and factors that are perceived to influence it.

  7. Challenges, success factors and strategies for women’s career development in the Australian construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin E. Rosa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Construction is traditionally a male industry. Women have long had difficulties entering or advancing their career in construction. Evidence shows that a diversified workforce with gender balance will bring about higher levels of productivity. Despite the importance of this issue, there have been limited studies on women’s career development in construction. This study aims to investigate women’s career development in the Australian construction industry, with objectives to evaluate the challenges and success factors of women’s career development in the construction industry and provide strategies for narrowing the gender imbalance. A mixed approach of questionnaire survey and interview were conducted with female practitioners in the construction industry. Forty-three completed questionnaires were received and 10 interviews were conducted. Stress, family-work balance, and negative perception towards women in construction were the top three challenges identified. Dedication, determination, and independence were the top three success factors of women in construction. This study recommends construction employers consider providing personal development programs and flexible working arrangement for their female employees. Significance of this study lies on contributing to understanding women’s career development in construction. Findings will be useful for government and professional institutions to promulgate strategies for advancing women’s career development in construction.

  8. An explorative study on factors influencing the career success of management employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Koekemoer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: South African organisations are increasingly recognising the importance of attracting, developing and retaining top talent, especially management employees.Research purpose: In an attempt to help organisations with retaining talent, this study focused on career success and identified specific factors that influence the career success of managers in the South African work environment.Motivation for the study: Organisations need to establish favourable organisational conditions and human resource practices to retain their management employees. By identifying influential factors for the career success of managers, this research may help organisations to focus more accurately on their retention strategies for management employees.Research approach, design and method: The present study used a qualitative research design that followed an exploratory approach. A non-probability purposive sample of 24 senior management employees was selected from two financial institutions in South Africa. Qualitative data was collected by means of semi-structured interviews and the verbatim transcriptions were analysed by content analysis.Main findings: Managers identified various factors that impact on their career success. One can distinguish ‘external’ factors (e.g. political and economic climate and business environment from ‘internal’ factors (e.g. individuals’ personal attributes, skills and education.Practical/managerial implications: Individuals should focus on the internal contributing factors, whilst organisations should manage the external contributing factors more effectively.Contribution/value-add: Specific South African factors that influence the career success of managers should be included in future retention strategies. From the findings it is suggested that both the individuals and organisations can implement strategies to ensure career success and thereby help retain the top talent in organisations.

  9. The Role of Job Performance on Career Success and Self-esteem of Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadra Ansaripour

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Human resources are the most valuable assets to any organisation, identifying factors that affect job performance of these resources has become increasingly important. Aim: To determine the relationship between self-esteem and success with job performance in the staff of the Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences (SKUMS Headquarters, Shahrekord, Iran. Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytical (correlational study, based on structural equation modeling, was conducted in 2015. The study population included 240 of the staff of SKUMS Headquarters, Shahrekord, Iran. From these people, 86 were selected by simple random sampling. A questionnaire of demographic characteristics, Paterson job performance, Radsyp career success and Eysenck selfesteem questionnaire were used to evaluate the concepts of job performance, success and self-esteem. The data were analysed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 23.0. Results: A total of 86 out of which 49 were female (57% and 37 (43% male, with a mean age of 39.85±7.6 (range 24-55 years. There was no significant relationship between demographic characteristics and job performance, career success and selfesteem. Self-esteem could be predicted positively and career success could be predicted negatively. Job performance and selfesteem had a significant positive correlation relationship (p<0.05. Conclusion: According to the direct relationship between job performance and self-esteem in this study, officials can improve job performance of staff through supporting them and reinforcing their self-esteem and thus providing career success.

  10. An Empirical Research on the Correlation between Human Capital and Career Success of Knowledge Workers in Enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenchen; Xiao, Hongjun; Yang, Xi

    Human capital plays an important part in employability of knowledge workers, also it is the important intangible assets of company. This paper explores the correlation between human capital and career success of knowledge workers. Based on literature retrieval, we identified measuring tool of career success and modified further; measuring human capital with self-developed scale of high reliability and validity. After exploratory factor analysis, we suggest that human capital contents four dimensions, including education, work experience, learning ability and training; career success contents three dimensions, including perceived internal competitiveness of organization, perceived external competitiveness of organization and career satisfaction. The result of empirical analysis indicates that there is a positive correlation between human capital and career success, and human capital is an excellent predictor of career success beyond demographics variables.

  11. GENDERED CAREER PRODUCTIVITY AND SUCCESS IN ACADEMIA IN INDONESIA’S ISLAMIC HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Kholis

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Career advancement in Indonesian academia is nationally regulated. It, theoretically, provides equal opportunities for men and women to be productive and successful. The purpose of this study is to analyze gender effects on academic career productivity and success. Seven-hundred and fifty questionnaires were distributed randomly to eight Islamic Higher Education Institutions in seven provinces, from which 220 (Men = 57.7%, and Women = 42.3% respondents returned the questionnaires with an analyzable quality. Descriptive and multivariate analyses are employed for analyzing and presenting the results. The paper argues that women in Islamic Higher Education Institutions are less productive in terms of publications, hold lower academic rank and leadership positions, and earn significantly less than men. It further argues that Islamic Higher Education Institutions should provide specific empowerment for women by, for example, providing support for their continuing education, professional development, and career opportunities.

  12. Assessing the "Good Life" in a Military Context: How Does Life and Work-Satisfaction Relate to Orientations to Happiness and Career-Success among Swiss Professional Officers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proyer, Rene T.; Annen, Hubert; Eggimann, Nadine; Schneider, Andrea; Ruch, Willibald

    2012-01-01

    The study examines work- and life satisfaction along with orientation to happiness, and their relation to subjective but also objective career success, among Swiss military professional officers. They frequently report worsening of their working conditions due to two reforms that have recently been conducted. A total of N = 221 Swiss career…

  13. Investigating the Role of Psychological Contract Breach on Career Success: Convergent Evidence from Two Longitudinal Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restubog, Simon Lloyd D.; Bordia, Prashant; Bordia, Sarbari

    2011-01-01

    The current study extends past research by examining leader-member exchange as a mediator of the relationship between employee reports of psychological contract breach and career success. In addition, we tested a competing perspective in which we proposed that performance mediators (i.e., in-role performance and organizational citizenship…

  14. Influences on Perceived Career Success: Findings from US Graduate Business Degree Alumni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocchiara, Faye K.; Kwesiga, Eileen; Bell, Myrtle P.; Baruch, Yehuda

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceptions of US MBA and specialist master's degree alumni to determine the influence that their degree program experiences had on subsequent perceptions of career success. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected from 318 alumni MBA and specialist master's degree recipients from a…

  15. Exploring Predictors of Graduate School and Career Success: A Case Study in Sport Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeCrom, Carrie; Rufer, Lisa; Slavich, Mark; Dwyer, Brendan; Greenhalgh, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The following case study attempted to assess what factors contribute to graduate school and early-career success among sport management graduate students. As faculty members charged with admitting the next generation of leaders in the sport industry, how should admissions decisions be made and what factors should be considered? The authors…

  16. Psychological factors determining success in a medical career: a 10-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartas, Malgorzata; Walkiewicz, Maciej; Majkowicz, Mikolaj; Budzinski, Waldemar

    2011-01-01

    Systemic review of predictors of success in medical career is an important tool to recognize the indicators of proper training. To determine psychological factors that predict success in a medical career. The success is defined as professional competence, satisfaction with medicine as a career, occupational stress and burnout and quality of life (QOF). Part I (1999-2005), medical students were examined each subsequent year, beginning with admission. Assessment included academic achievement (high school final examination results, entrance exam results, academic results during medical school) and psychological characteristics (sense of coherence (SOC), depression, anxiety, coping styles, value system and need for social approval). Part II (2008-2009), the same participants completed an Internet survey 4 years after graduation. Results of the postgraduate medical exam were taken under consideration. Academic achievement predicts only professional competence. Coping styles are significant indicators of satisfaction with medicine as a career. SOC, while assessed with anxiety and depression during studies, enabled us to recognize future QOF of medical graduates. Professional stress is not predictable to such an extent as other success indicators. There are significant psychological qualities useful to draw the outline of the future job and life performance of medical graduates.

  17. Keeping Them on the Bus: Retaining Early Career Teachers in a Successful Urban School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ado, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses teacher retention in a successful, new, small urban school. As a longitudinal study, it focuses on the intersections between individual teachers' expectations about teaching, contextual factors, and experiences at the school site and teachers' future career plans. The experiences and perspectives of three representative case…

  18. Mentoring Provided: Relation to Mentor's Career Success, Personality, and Mentoring Received

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozionelos, Nikos

    2004-01-01

    The relationship of a mentor's perceptions of his/her career success, mentoring he/she received, personality, and the amount of mentoring he/she provided was investigated in a sample of 176 administrators. Results indicated that the amount of mentoring respondents reported they had provided was positively associated with their objective and their…

  19. Unite the tribes ending turf wars for career and business success

    CERN Document Server

    Duncan, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Founder of Practical Strategy Consulting, Christopher Duncan is the bestselling author of Unite the Tribes and The Career Programmer. He's been a frequent guest on radio shows across the country, his monthly columns have been read by hundreds of thousands worldwide, and he is widely acclaimed for his immensely practical approach to success in the real world where self interest and office politics are often more prevalent than common sense. This keen insight does not come by accident. Christopher has an unusually diverse background which includes a career in sales consulting, life as a professi

  20. Relation of success and nontraditional career choice to selection for dating and friendship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Usha; Pfost, Karen S; House, Alvin E; Pierson, Eric

    2010-08-01

    Women who succeed in traditionally male-dominated fields have previously been found to experience lower social acceptance, both from men in romantic contexts and from women in platonic contexts. The present study examined whether such preferences continue to exist. Participants were 256 university students (110 men, 146 women) with an average age of 21.4 yr. (SD = 3.6). They answered the Bem Sex Role Inventory and the Modern Sexism Scale and also responded to four descriptions of stimulus persons which represented the variables of traditional versus nontraditional field and successful versus nondescribed academic performance. Results indicated that men preferred to date women in traditional careers (independent of their success). This finding was unrelated to men's scores on sex role orientation or egalitarianism and sexism. However, in platonic relationships, women favored women in nontraditional careers as friends.

  1. Influence of Organizational Justice and Career Success to The Organizational Commitment

    OpenAIRE

    Marcham Darokah Nining Kunwantari

    2013-01-01

    This  research  aims  to  observe  the  organizational  justice  and  career  success  as predictors  of  organizational  commitment  are  made  on  the  Civil  Service.  The members measure in Organizational Commitment Scale, Organizational Justice Scale and Career Success Scale. The 96 respondents are civil servants working at  the  health  centre  in  Kulon  Progo  District  Health  Office.  The  data  obtained was processed by Structural  Equation Model (SEM). Based on the  hypothesis, it...

  2. Subjective well-being and career indecision : a cross-cultural comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Sovet, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Subjective well-being may be defined as a hedonic approach of happiness referring to an overall evaluation of individual’s life integrating both cognitive and affective components. Although that concept has been the focus of a considerable scientific literature, few research explored explicitly its relationships with career decision-making process. Our literature review highlighted the opposition between bottom-up and top-down approaches in the study of the relationships between these two var...

  3. Supporting Geoscience Students at Two-Year Colleges: Career Preparation and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaris, J. R.; Kirk, K. B.; Layou, K.; Macdonald, H.; Baer, E. M.; Blodgett, R. H.; Hodder, J.

    2013-12-01

    Two-year colleges play an important role in developing a competent and creative geoscience workforce, teaching science to pre-service K-12 teachers, producing earth-science literate citizens, and providing a foundation for broadening participation in the geosciences. The Supporting and Advancing Geoscience Education in Two-Year Colleges (SAGE 2YC) project has developed web resources for geoscience faculty on the preparation and support of students in two-year colleges (2YCs). Online resources developed from two topical workshops and several national, regional, and local workshops around the country focus on two main categories: Career Preparation and Workforce Development, and Supporting Student Success in Geoscience at Two-year Colleges. The Career Preparation and Workforce Development resources were developed to help faculty make the case that careers in the geosciences provide a range of possibilities for students and to support preparation for the geoscience workforce and for transfer to four-year programs as geoscience majors. Many two-year college students are unaware of geoscience career opportunities and these materials help illuminate possible futures for them. Resources include an overview of what geoscientists do; profiles of possible careers along with the preparation necessary to qualify for them; geoscience employer perspectives about jobs and the knowledge, skills, abilities and attitudes they are looking for in their employees; employment trends in sectors of the economy that employ geoscience professionals; examples of geotechnician workforce programs (e.g. Advanced Technological Education Centers, environmental technology programs, marine technician programs); and career resources available from professional societies. The website also provides information to support student recruitment into the geosciences and facilitate student transfer to geoscience programs at four- year colleges and universities, including sections on advising support before

  4. The interplay of parental and career counsellors’ influences in shaping immigrant children’s subject choices and career pathway decisions in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    SARIKA CHANDRU KEWALRAMANI

    2017-01-01

    Using Vygotsky’s (1978) sociocultural mediation theory, this study investigated the role of immigrant parents, and their children’s school Career and Pathway Transition (CPT) leaders’ perceptions of how cultural tools such as parents’ beliefs, values, expectations and acculturation experiences influence children’s subject and career pathway decisions in secondary schools in Australia. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 parents, their 11 children and three CPT leaders. Findings ...

  5. Defining Advancement Career Paths and Succession Plans: Critical Human Capital Retention Strategies for High-Performing Advancement Divisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, Jon Derek; Wolk, Holly Gordon

    2010-01-01

    There are many factors that can influence whether a highly talented staff member will build a career within an institution or use it as a stepping stone. This article defines and explores the notions of developing career paths and succession planning and why they are critical human capital investment strategies in retaining the highest performers…

  6. Motivation for choosing teaching as a career - the perspective of pre-service teachers, novices and experienced subject teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simić Nataša

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since motivation for choosing the teaching profession figures as one of the most important determinants of the successfulness of teachers and even their students, this paper is aimed at investigating the factors of choosing teaching as a career. For that purpose, semi-structured interviews were conducted with the students of “teacher training” faculties, novices and subject teachers with more than five years of work experience (N=76. Thematic analysis was used to identify nine categories of motivational factors: Working with young people (the desire to have a dynamic and creative job in the surroundings of young people, Influence on students (the motivation to exert influence on students’ socio-emotional development, values and education, Dealing with the subject (the motivation for dealing with the science that the person studied, Class teacher/Teacher/Parents as a role model (the motivation stemming from the influence of significant others, Lecturing (the desire to “transfer knowledge”, Lifelong learning (the desire for permanent learning in different fields, Working hours and holidays (the motivation due to working hours and holidays, Fit with the abilities (the desire to realise the “naturally given” abilities and Reputation (the desire to be appreciated in the society. In keeping with the results of other studies, it has been found that altruistic motivation for the choice of teaching as a career is dominant, while extrinsic motivation is least present. The findings are interpreted in the light of the current models of motivation for choosing teaching as a career and the characteristics of teachers’ education and status in Serbia. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179018: Identifikacija, merenje i razvoj kognitivnih i emocionalnih kompetencija važnih društvu orijentisanom na evropske integracije

  7. Tips for charting the course of a successful health research career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Morfaw, Frederick; Kunda, John-Eudes L; Mukonzo, Jackson K; Kastner, Jasmine; Zhang, Shiyuan; Kokolo, Madzouka; Thabane, Lehana

    2013-01-01

    Young health researchers all over the world often encounter difficulties in the early stages of their careers. Formal acquisition of research skills in academic settings does not always offer sufficient guidance to overcome these challenges. Based on the collective experiences of some young researchers and research mentors, we describe some tips for a successful health career and offer some useful resources. These tips include: institutional affiliation, early manuscript writing, early manuscript reviewing, finding a mentor, collaboration and networking, identifying sources of funding, establishing research interests, investing in research methods training, developing interpersonal and personal skills, providing mentorship, and balancing work with everyday life. The rationale behind these tips and how to achieve them is provided.

  8. Stressing Success: Examining Hmong Student Success in Career and Technical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen M. Iannarelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines factors affecting the academic performance of Hmong students at Chippewa Valley Technical College in Eau Claire, WI. Factors specifically analyzed for their impact upon student success are socioeconomic status, family support, the use of academic support programs, and the influence of agents of socialization. Through the use of archival institutional data, Hmong students were compared to white students at CVTC in terms of their relative grade point averages, course completion rates, and retention rates. Data revealed significant disparities in grade point average performance between Hmong and white students. The data also showed that eligibility for financial aid was significantly higher among Hmong students, and that this difference was commensurate with educational performance gaps between the two groups. Additionally, online surveys were used to assess family support while attending CVTC, the role of academic support programs, and influential agents of socialization. Gender differences in grade point average performance and socialization also were analyzed. Implications of the study’s findings are discussed and recommendations for improving the performance of Hmong students are provided.

  9. Success factors in top career : Towards a life-cycle model on careers of women and men, inside and outside the hospitality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sok, J.; Blomme, R.J.; Tromp, D.M.; Muijen, van J.J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to identify success factors in the careers of top women in the hospitality industry. We started out by interviewing five women who are currently working in a high management position in the hospitality industry, about their experiences on their way to the

  10. Long term impact of emotional, social and cognitive intelligence competencies and GMAT on career and life satisfaction and career success

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amdurer, Emily; Boyatzis, Richard E; Saatcioglu, Argun; Smith, Melvin L; Taylor, Scott N

    2014-01-01

    .... This study assesses the impact of demonstrated emotional, social, and cognitive intelligence competencies assessed at graduation and g measured through GMAT at entry from an MBA program on career...

  11. Streamlining Appointment, Promotion, and Tenure Procedures to Promote Early-Career Faculty Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Shannon B; Hollerbach, Ann; Donato, Annemarie Sipkes; Edlund, Barbara J; Atz, Teresa; Kelechi, Teresa J

    2016-01-01

    A critical component of the progression of a successful academic career is being promoted in rank. Early-career faculty are required to have an understanding of appointment, promotion, and tenure (APT) guidelines, but many factors often impede this understanding, thwarting a smooth and planned promotion pathway for professional advancement. This article outlines the steps taken by an APT committee to improve the promotion process from instructor to assistant professor. Six sigma's DMAIC improvement model was selected as the guiding operational framework to remove variation in the promotion process. After faculty handbook revisions were made, several checklists developed, and a process review rubric was implemented; recently promoted faculty were surveyed on satisfaction with the process. Faculty opinions captured in the survey suggest increased transparency in the process and perceived support offered by the APT committee. Positive outcomes include a strengthened faculty support framework, streamlined promotion processes, and improved faculty satisfaction. Changes to the APT processes resulted in an unambiguous and standardized pathway for successful promotion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Data Science Careers: A Sampling of Successful Strategies, Pitfalls, and Persistent Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, K. I.; Duerr, R.; Wyborn, L. A.; Yarmey, L.

    2015-12-01

    Data Scientists do not have a single career trajectory or preparatory pathway. Successful data scientists have come from domain sciences, computer science, library science, and other diverse fields. They have worked up from entry-level staff positions, have started as academics with doctoral degrees, and have established themselves as management professionals. They have positions in government, industry, academia, and NGO's, and their responsibilities range from highly specialized, to generalists, to high-level leadership. This presents a potentially confusing landscape for students interested in the field: how to decide among the varied options to have the best chance at fulfilling employment? What are the mistakes to avoid? Many established data scientist, both old-timers and early career professionals, expressed interest in presenting in this session but were unable to justify using their one AGU abstract for something other than their funded projects. As the session chairs we interviewed them, plus our extended network of colleagues, to ask for their best advice on what was most critical to their success in their current position, what pitfalls to avoid, what ongoing challenges they see, and what advice they would give themselves, if they could do it all over again starting now. Here we consolidate those interviews with our own perspectives to present some of the common themes and standout advice.

  13. Why some make it and others do not: Identifying psychological factors that predict career success in professional adult soccer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Yperen, Nico W.

    This prospective study was designed to identify psychological factors that predict career success in professional adult soccer. Post hoc, two groups were distinguished: (1) Male soccer players who Successfully progressed into professional adult soccer (n = 18) and (2) Male soccer players who did not

  14. Tips for charting the course of a successful health research career

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbuagbaw L

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Lawrence Mbuagbaw,1–3 Frederick Morfaw,4 John-Eudes L Kunda,5 Jackson K Mukonzo,6 Jasmine Kastner,7 Shiyuan Zhang,2,3 Madzouka Kokolo,8 Lehana Thabane1,3,9–11 1Centre for Development of Best Practices in Health, Yaounde Central Hospital, Yaounde, Cameroon; 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, 3Biostatistics Unit, Father Sean O'Sullivan Research Centre, St Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, ON, Canada; 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicines and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaounde 1, Yaounde, Cameroon; 5Community Information and Epidemiological Technologies, Lusaka, Zambia; 6School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Makerere, Kampala, Uganda; 7Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, BC, Canada; 8Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 9Departments of Pediatrics and Anaesthesia, McMaster University, 10Centre for Evaluation of Medicine, St Joseph's Healthcare, 11Population Health Research Institute, Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, ON, Canada Abstract: Young health researchers all over the world often encounter difficulties in the early stages of their careers. Formal acquisition of research skills in academic settings does not always offer sufficient guidance to overcome these challenges. Based on the collective experiences of some young researchers and research mentors, we describe some tips for a successful health career and offer some useful resources. These tips include: institutional affiliation, early manuscript writing, early manuscript reviewing, finding a mentor, collaboration and networking, identifying sources of funding, establishing research interests, investing in research methods training, developing interpersonal and personal skills, providing mentorship, and balancing work with everyday life. The rationale behind these tips and how to achieve them is provided. Keywords: health research career, young researcher

  15. Key Decision Points in the Careers of Geoscientists: The Role of the YES Network in Facilitating Successful Career Transitions for Early Career Geoscientists (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venus, J. H.; Gonzales, L. M.; Yes Network

    2010-12-01

    The external influences on the decisions that geoscientists make pertaining to their careers are often assumed but not quantified. The YES Network is conducting an international study to determine the Key Decision points in the career pathways of early career geoscientists. The study aims to identify factors contributing to individual career decisions and to monitor these over a ten year period. The Initial phase of the study is now underway enabling preliminary conclusions to be drawn and will identify a group of individuals that will be tracked over the 10 year programme. The Survey will highlight reoccurring areas where Early Career Geoscientists are experiencing progression difficulties and, importantly, provide respondents with an opportunity to suggest solutions whilst also allowing general resource needs to be identified from the results as a whole. Early results show an overwhelming majority expressing job satisfaction most or all of the time (only 2 candidates reporting none). Respondents rate job satisfaction and respect highly, returning more responses than good salaries. A general frustration with administration, paper work and bureaucracy is particularly evident in those employed by government organisations. Early Career geoscientists express a frustration concerning a lack of involvement in decision making processes; interestingly several later career respondents also acknowledge a need to properly train, nurture and encourage new recruits to retain good graduates who may otherwise become disillusioned and leave the profession. The role of family in career choices has been highlighted both in survey and general feedback responses particularly by female geoscientists and those working in jobs with high levels of fieldwork; we aim to determine, to some extent, to what point these decisions are controlled by family as opposed to normal career progression. Flexible working conditions and agreed time away from field duty have been independently suggested

  16. Support of marginalized students in science: An examination of successful lesbian individuals in science career paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Judith C.

    The initiative to increase highly qualified college STEM graduates coupled with the phrase "science for all" pushed by standards-based reform has opened an avenue for science education research. How can we increase students' interests in science careers? Specifically, do marginalized groups require differing instructional approaches to increase science interests? By closely examining individuals from marginalized groups that have been successful in following a science career path, we may understand how to further help these groups. Gloria Ladson-Billings' work on culturally relevant teaching was utilized as a guide to help understand potential responses about science experiences in the classroom. This study specifically examined six lesbian individuals' experiences with science while in high school and college. The information was collected via semi-structured, open-ended interviews and was analyzed for reoccurring themes. Most of the participants did not have access to lesbian science mentors/role models even though prior research has shown the importance of such. The participants also recommended identifying mentors/role models for potential future lesbians interested in science.

  17. Dual Career Faculty Appointments: A Successful Model from ADVANCE-Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, M.; Advance-Nebraska Evaluation Team

    2011-12-01

    At the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL), 20% of short list candidates for faculty openings in science, engineering and mathematics (STEM) brought an academic partner into the hiring picture between 2008 and 2010, with a peak of 38% in 2010. Having a process in place to address dual career opportunities is a key component in an overall strategy to increase the number of women STEM faculty: 83% of academic scientist women's partners are also academics in STEM, according to a 2009 Stanford report, and 54% of academic scientist men's are. Offering two positions to qualified couples benefits the institution by increasing the chances of recruitment and retention of both candidates. UNL's ADVANCE program, ADVANCE-Nebraska, developed a process to take advantage of dual career opportunities. Nine dual career couples have been hired in the last three years; we expected to hire eight during the five-year life of the grant. We increased the proportion of women in the Engineering College by twenty percent (from n=10 to n=12). The success of the program arises from four key components: early notification to short-list candidates of the dual career program, a point person to coordinate dual career requests across the campus, flexible faculty appointments that provide a variety of opportunities for the partner, and a funding stream to support the partner hire. The point person, the ADVANCE Program Director, was created by the provost through the ADVANCE program. The Director communicates with every short list candidate for each open faculty position and with department and search committee chairs across STEM colleges as soon as the candidate is selected. When there is an eligible partner of the candidate who receives the job offer, if there is approval from the Office of Academic Affairs, the Dean of the target college, and the chair and faculty of the partner's target department, the partner is brought to UNL to interview, and the faculty of the partner's target department

  18. Dynamics of the teaching and learning of vocational subjects Technology Career in Business Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Javier Villamar-Alvarado

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The challenges we have to overcome are many companies to satisfy its internal, external, existing and potential customers, so it is necessary to develop profiles to identify factors affecting the current and future demand in the labor and business market. These requirements pose challenges to institutions of higher education in their conception of professional training, which must find more effective ways and teaching methods to ensure that professionals are prepared to work in the dynamic contemporary business world. To contribute to this endeavor a didactic conception of the dynamics of the teaching and learning of vocational subjects Career Technology Management Company, which is based on a training model of business administration become simulation method, is proposed.

  19. PREDICTING A FAST-TRACK MARITIME CAREER: CHARACTERISTICS OF SUCCESSFUL OFFICERS DURING TEENAGE YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Joaquín Fernández González

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Fast-track maritime career is a topical question worldwide due to the shortage of seafarers in maritime industry. Assuming that the fast-track career officers’ relevant common characteristics in adolescence could predict future maritime career speed, the research questions of this research are: What were the common characteristics of fast-track career officers when they were 16-18? Were there any statistically significant differences between the fast-track career groups and the officers with a slower career at that age? A questionnaire survey involving 175 maritime officers was conducted in Latvia in January – October 2016, regarding officers’ family context, school achievement, involvement in sports, and personality traits when they were 16-18. Fast-track career officers perceived themselves as more conscientious, calm and more leadership oriented than the whole group in adolescence. Statistically significant differences among career-speed groups were found regarding family socioeconomic status, family atmosphere and family career support at that age. Based on those communalities among maritime officers with a fast-track carrier when they were 16-18, maritime education and training institutions could better find and give appropriate career guidance to prospective maritime officers. Even if maritime career speed is a very individualized phenomenon, family characteristics could be studied further as a potential good predictor of fast-track maritime career.

  20. Batswana female managers’ career experiences and perspectives on corporate mobility and success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpho M. Pheko

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Corporate mobility remains elusive for female managers.Research purpose: To investigate Batswana female managers’ strategies for entering and succeeding in managerial positions, the challenges they face and the consequences of success.Motivation for the study: There is a lack of research into the way Batswana female managers obtain management positions, as well as their experiences as female managers.Research approach, design and method: An interpretive approach using a case study strategy was employed. Semi-structured interviews were conducted which were shaped by the objectives of the study. A sample of female employees (n = 10, representing different organisations and professions, was obtained from various organisations in Botswana.Main findings: Findings revealed that female managers do experience a number of challenges. Various factors were identified that accounted for their career advancement as well as the consequences of success. The consequences of success were identified as being both positive and negative.Practical/managerial implications: The current study is important as the strategies for success that were identified can be used to assist interested women to obtain management-level positions. Furthermore, the challenges identified may assist both researchers and practitioners to design interventions that help to mitigate the challenges, in turn enabling the inclusion and advancement of women in leadership or managerial positions.Contributions: The current study may contribute new knowledge as past research conducted in Botswana seems to have focused mainly on the impact of regulatory and legislative challenges on women’s advancement. Such a focus ignores the other aspects of female managers’ experiences, which are addressed by the current study.

  1. Family Background, Students' Academic Self-Efficacy, and Students' Career and Life Success Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mihyeon

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of family background on students' academic self-efficacy and the impact of students' self-efficacy on their career and life success expectations. The study used the national dataset of the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS: 2002), funded by the U.S. Department of Education. Based on a path…

  2. Employability and Job Performance as Links in the Relationship Between Mentoring Receipt and Career Success: A Study in SMEs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bozionelos, Nikos; Kostopoulos, Konstantinos; van der Heijden, Beatrice; Rousseau, Denise M.; Bozionelos, Giorgos; Hoyland, Thomas; Miao, Rentao; Marzec, Izabela; Jedrzejowicz, Piotr; Epitropaki, Olga; Mikkelsen, Aslaug; Scholarios, Dora; Heijde, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    This study developed and tested a model that posited employability and job performance as intervening variables in the relationship between receipt of mentoring and career success. Participants were 207 information technology (IT) professionals employed in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs)

  3. Relationship between Early Familial Influences and Personality Traits in Relation to Career Success Outcomes of African American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Keeba G.

    2010-01-01

    This study will examine the relationship between career success outcomes of African American women and early familial factors, as well as personality traits. Using a cross-sectional case-control design. the study will use participants who self-identified as African American with two African American parents. They will be randomly selected from a…

  4. How Providing Mentoring Relates to Career Success and Organizational Commitment: A Study in the General Managerial Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozionelos, Nikos; Bozionelos, Giorgos; Kostopoulos, Konstantinos; Polychroniou, Panagiotis

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate the relationship of mentoring provided with career success and organizational commitment in the general managerial population. Design/methodology/approach: Participants were 194 native British who were employed in a variety of jobs, professions and industries in the United Kingdom. Findings: Mentoring…

  5. The coping strategies during medical education predict style of success in medical career: a 10-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartas, Małgorzata; Walkiewicz, Maciej; Budziński, Waldemar; Majkowicz, Mikołaj; Wójcikiewicz, Krzysztof; Zdun-Ryżewska, Agata

    2016-07-22

    The stress associated with the physician's work is generally acknowledged and is related to well-being and life satisfaction. The presented study was designed to extract the role of coping strategies in identifying differentiated styles of success in a medical career during medical education. The participants were examined when they applied to medical school and each subsequent academic year. The final study took place four years after graduation. The baseline questionnaire measured coping strategies. The follow-up questionnaire consisted of measures of: quality of life, work stress and burnout, satisfaction with medicine as a career, and professional competency. Based on coping strategies assessed during admission and preclinical years of medical study, some aspects of success in the participants' future medical career can be predicted. Students who take action and deal directly with a problem, neither accept resignation, nor reduce tension by expressing feelings would most probably resist future burnout. However, despite the fact that they obtain the highest quality of life or earn the highest income they would be, at the same time, the least satisfied with chosen career, as well as being more likely to be characterised by a low level of competence. Assessment of coping strategies at the beginning of medical education could be taken into consideration as an instrument to diagnose a specific trend in physicians' career development.

  6. No Effects of Successful Bidirectional SMR Feedback Training on Objective and Subjective Sleep in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binsch, Olaf; Wilschut, Ellen S; Arns, Martijn; Bottenheft, Charelle; Valk, Pierre J L; Vermetten, Eric H G J M

    2017-10-31

    There is a growing interest in the application of psychophysiological signals in more applied settings. Unidirectional sensory motor rhythm-training (SMR) has demonstrated consistent effects on sleep. In this study the main aim was to analyze to what extent participants could gain voluntary control over sleep-related parameters and secondarily to assess possible influences of this training on sleep metrics. Bidirectional training of SMR as well as heart rate variability (HRV) was used to assess the feasibility of training these parameters as possible brain computer interfaces (BCI) signals, and assess effects normally associated with unidirectional SMR training such as the influence on objective and subjective sleep parameters. Participants (n = 26) received between 11 and 21 training sessions during 7 weeks in which they received feedback on their personalized threshold for either SMR or HRV activity, for both up- and down regulation. During a pre- and post-test a sleep log was kept and participants used a wrist actigraph. Participants were asked to take an afternoon nap on the first day at the testing facility. During napping, sleep spindles were assessed as well as self-reported sleep measures of the nap. Although the training demonstrated successful learning to increase and decrease SMR and HRV activity, no effects were found of bidirectional training on sleep spindles, actigraphy, sleep diaries, and self-reported sleep quality. As such it is concluded that bidirectional SMR and HRV training can be safely used as a BCI and participants were able to improve their control over physiological signals with bidirectional training, whereas the application of bidirectional SMR and HRV training did not lead to significant changes of sleep quality in this healthy population.

  7. Variations on an old theme: maternity for women with a very successful professional career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Coutinho, Maria Lúcia

    2008-05-01

    In this study, relationships of middle-class women from Rio de Janeiro with their family and work are presented. A series of events during the 20th century have changed woman's identity, previously centered on the roles of mother and wife, so that, there are now other options for women. Carioca girls are currently educated to compete, seek greater professional growth, and value their independence. However, some social discourses still reinforce women's former role the in the family. The notion that the mother-child unit is basic, universal, and, psychologically, the most appropriate, both for the child's healthy development and the mother's wholeness, is still firmly rooted. Motherhood is therefore one of the most complex and problematic matters for modern Carioca woman. Fifteen women with successful professional careers, residents of the city of Rio de Janeiro, varying in age from 30 to 40, and with children from 6 months to 3 years of age, were interviewed. The interviews had an invisible structure, were recorded and transcribed. The discourse of the resultant texts was analyzed, using the categories I established. In this project, I focus on the results of the analysis of the category "View of Maternity" of the interviewed women.

  8. Flexible work: Ambitious parents' recipe for career success in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, J.S.E.; van Engen, M.L.; Vinkenburg, C.J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study sets out to examine how gender and ambition are related to work hours and the utilization of other flexible work-home arrangements, and how this use is - in turn - associated with career-related outcomes (i.e. job level, and career satisfaction). Design/methodology/approach: In

  9. The Importance of "Wasta" in the Career Success of Middle Eastern Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlaiss, Hayfaa; Kauser, Saleema

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Frequently used in fostering the career progression of individuals this paper aims to explore the concept of "wasta" and its significance in the career advancement of individuals in the Middle Eastern region. The paper also seeks to compare "wasta" with networking and mentoring. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  10. Learning the Art of Networking: A Critical Skill for Enhancing Social Capital and Career Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Janasz, Suzanne C.; Forret, Monica L.

    2008-01-01

    In this era of boundaryless careers, with individuals making frequent career moves and needing to get up-to-speed quickly, networking is seen as a critical competency. Developing and maintaining relationships with others for the purpose of mutual benefit can help individuals search for and secure employment opportunities, gain access to needed…

  11. A new multidimensional measure of personal resilience and its use: Chinese nurse resilience, organizational socialization and career success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Taormina, Robert J

    2014-12-01

    This study refined the concept of resilience and developed four valid and reliable subscales to measure resilience, namely, Determination, Endurance, Adaptability and Recuperability. The study also assessed their hypothesized relationships with six antecedent variables (worry, physiological needs satisfaction, organizational socialization, conscientiousness, future orientation and Chinese values) and with one outcome variable (nurses' career success). The four new 10-item subscale measures of personal resilience were constructed based on their operational definitions and tested for their validity and reliability. All items were included in a questionnaire completed by 244 full-time nurses at two hospitals in China. All four measures demonstrated concurrent validity and had high reliabilities (from 0.74 to 0.78). The hypothesized correlations with the personality and organizational variables were statistically significant and in the predicted directions. Regression analyses confirmed these relationships, which explained 25-32% of the variance for the four resilience facets and 27% of the variance for the nurses' career success. The results provided strong evidence that organizational socialization facilitates resilience, that resilience engenders career success and that identifying the four resilience facets permits a more complete understanding of personal resilience, which could benefit nurses, help nurse administrators with their work and also help in treating patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Critical Success Factors to Improve Perception of Information Technology Careers: A Specific Case in a Mexican Higher Education Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Aldrette-Malacara

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available It is a fact that fashion plays an important role to select a career, new options of careers from engineering are preferred by students instead of traditional options; for example, Mechatronics, Aeronautics, Automotive specializations, Bionics, Biomedical and others are so popular. Every day, new necessities are required in the world and it is necessary to find the way to solve them, for that reason these new majors are good options to students, however traditional areas are important too. Information Technology is not the exception because every enterprise, school, association and organization needs computers with systems that help to solve specific situations or to manage resources. In Mexico, Information Technology careers are been affected for low enrollment of students, of course private universities have suffered more this situation than public schools [1]. In this research work are shown the most important factors that have a real incidence to choose an Information Technology career. The methodology consisted in the design of a survey using seven points Likert´s scale where potential students could express more about their expectative, preferences and required abilities to study these majors. The mentioned survey had three versions and each one was validated through Cronbach’s Alpha. Data collected were analyzed using statistical software SPSS to obtain the critical success factors.

  13. An exploration of the factors that contribute to the success of African American professionals in STEM-related careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander Nealy, Yolande Kristine

    This study examined factors that contribute to the success of African American professionals in STEM careers. Data were collected through a survey from 40 participants and in-depth interviews with eight of them. The survey was used to explore the participants' educational experiences from elementary school through college and on their STEM-related careers, whereas the individual interviews were used to gain insights into their perspectives as STEM professionals. The results of this study indicate that most of these African American STEM professionals attributed their choice of a STEM career to early exposure to and positive experiences in science and mathematics mediated by teachers and/or parents. Furthermore, the positive experiences and success in science and mathematics continued in high school and college, further solidifying their choice of a STEM career. However, for almost half of the participants, attending a HBCU seems to have played an important role in their enjoyment of and success in a STEM major. HBCUs provided them with role models and the necessary support and encouragement to succeed in their pursuit of a STEM degree. The results of this study illustrate the various factors that play a role in preventing leakage in the minority STEM pipeline: K-12 experiences mediated by parents and teachers; support systems in college and the workplace mediated by counselors, professors, peers, and administrators; and policies that facilitate integration and the development of such support systems. This study contributes to the current body of knowledge on minorities in STEM by focusing on what works, instead of focusing on the deficit model and what does not work. It is hoped that these results help validate the efforts of those who work towards a more equitable representation of the STEM fields.

  14. Career development and personal success profile of students - followers and students - potential future leaders: The case of RIT Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasminka Samardžija

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the differences among students in terms of self-reported leadership characteristics. It was conducted among all three programs and four generations of undergraduates at RIT Croatia. The goal of this study is to determine the differences among students who report being more and less leadership prone (Potential Future Leaders and Followers, respectively with regard to demographic characteristics, reported self reliance socialization pattern, college level and program choice, career focus attainment and development, and reported attitudes regarding the importance of specific personality traits in leadership, the importance of specific career development factors and success indicators. Research showed that generation and college program are not related to student reported leadership proneness, suggesting that college education’s impact on leadership traits is not significant. Only one socio-demographic factor considered was significantly different between clusters; namely, the respondents who had moved once were significantly more represented in the Potential Future Leaders cluster, suggesting that study-abroad programs might play a role in leadership development. In terms of ranking career development factors, success indicators, the importance of emotional stability and openness to experience as a specific leadership trait, Potential Future Leaders reported higher scores in comparison with Followers cluster, potentially resulting from their forwardlooking, goal-oriented attitude.

  15. Academic success and early career outcomes : Can honors alumni be distinguished from non-honors alumni?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, A.; Mainhard, M. T.; Brekelmans, M.; van Beukelen, P.; Jaarsma, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    This study compared Dutch alumni who previously participated in an honors program (n=72) to non-honors alumni who entered university as high-achieving high school students (n=72) with regard to (1) final university grade point average (GPA) and (2) early career outcomes. Final grades were drawn from

  16. Career and Technical Education Teacher Shortage: A Successful Model for Recruitment and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkin, Thomas; Nwoke, Godfrey I.

    2011-01-01

    The role of Career and Technical Education (CTE) as a major source of skilled workers for the American economy and a vital component of American education is well established. Several recent studies show that when CTE programs combine rigorous academic standards and industry-based technical content, the result is higher academic achievement and…

  17. Lessons Learned through the Piedmont Futures Program: Why Career Education Is Important to Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughey-Commers, Erin

    2011-01-01

    Hands-on learning with business professionals is at the heart of the educators' approach with the Piedmont Futures program at Piedmont Virginia Community College. Too often educators provide the answers before students have asked the questions; they create career pathways without providing students with sufficient opportunities to explore which…

  18. Academic success and early career outcomes : Can honors alumni be distinguished from non-honors alumni?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, A.; Mainhard, M. T.; Jaarsma, A. D C; Brekelmans, M.; van Beukelen, P.

    2016-01-01

    This study compared Dutch alumni who previously participated in an honors program (n = 72) to non-honors alumni who entered university as high-achieving high school students (n = 72) with regard to (1) final university grade point average (GPA) and (2) early career outcomes. Final grades were drawn

  19. Career Focus: Culinary Arts--Education for a Taste of Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Career and technical education is serving up great opportunities for students in culinary arts programs across the country. According to the National Restaurant Association (NRA), it is estimated that a total of 13.5 million workers will be needed for the rapidly growing restaurant and food-service industry by the year 2014. This article provides…

  20. Support of Marginalized Students in Science: An Examination of Successful Lesbian Individuals in Science Career Paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Judith C.

    2009-01-01

    The initiative to increase highly qualified college STEM graduates coupled with the phrase "science for all" pushed by standards-based reform has opened an avenue for science education research. How can we increase students' interests in science careers? Specifically, do marginalized groups require differing instructional approaches to increase…

  1. Beyond the Rose-Colored Binoculars: How to Launch a Successful Physics Career in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Crystal

    Physics degree holders are among the most employable in the world, often doing everything from managing a research lab at a multi-million dollar corporation, to developing solutions to global problems in their own small startups. Employers know that with a physics training, a potential hire has acquired a broad problem-solving skill set that translates to almost any environment, as well as an ability to be self- guided and -motivated so that they can learn whatever skills are needed to successfully achieve their goals. Therefore it's no surprise that the majority of physics graduates find employment in private sector, industrial settings. Yet at the same time, only about 25 graduating PhDs will take a permanent faculty position- yet academic careers are usually the only track to which students are exposed while earning their degrees. In this talk, I will explore less-familiar (but more common!) career paths for physics graduates, and provide resources to help faculty mentors give their students better information and training for a broader scope of career possibilities.

  2. Needs of students seeking careers in communication sciences and disorders and barriers to their success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuse, Akiko

    2018-02-14

    The purpose of this study was to identify the needs for and barriers to success of underrepresented students in the Communication Sciences and Disorders field and to determine factors linked to student persistence and academic achievement. An online survey was completed by 126 undergraduates pursuing graduate studies in Communication Sciences and Disorders. Data were subjected to Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis H tests. Survey responses indicated that financial matters exerted the most influence on students' preparation for and number of choices for graduate-school applications. However, socioeconomic status was associated with needed financial support for paying tuition and completing the admission process. In addition, students at lower socioeconomic status reported spending fewer hours studying for tests and earned lower grade-point averages than peers who self-identified with a relatively high socioeconomic status. The findings also show a relationship between students' grade-point averages and family members' levels of education. The majority reported that mothers had earned the highest degree in their household, followed by siblings, themselves, and fathers. The findings suggest that students of low socioeconomic status were less academically prepared than those self-reporting a higher status. Moreover, the presence of a role model, such as a college-educated family member, may affect academic performance. Therefore, interventions for students at risk of not gaining admissions to graduate school include financial assistance and mentoring and advising programs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Secrets to success: the definitive career development guide for new and first generation professionals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coleman, Al, Jr

    2011-01-01

    The Secrets to Success is required reading for any young or first generation professional in business, law, medicine, government, science or technology, who wants personal, professional and financial...

  4. Career Performance Trajectories in Track and Field Jumping Events from Youth to Senior Success: The Importance of Learning and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Gennaro; Moisè, Paolo; Franceschi, Alberto; Trova, Francesco; Panero, Davide; La Torre, Antonio; Rainoldi, Alberto; Schena, Federico; Cardinale, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The idea that early sport success can be detrimental for long-term sport performance is still under debate. Therefore, the aims of this study were to examine the career trajectories of Italian high and long jumpers to provide a better understanding of performance development in jumping events. The official long-jump and high-jump rankings of the Italian Track and Field Federation were collected from the age of 12 to career termination, for both genders from the year 1994 to 2014. Top-level athletes were identified as those with a percentile of their personal best performance between 97 and 100. The age of entering competitions of top-level athletes was not different than the rest of the athletic population, whereas top-level athletes performed their personal best later than the rest of the athletes. Top-level athletes showed an overall higher rate of improvement in performance from the age of 13 to the age of 18 years when compared to all other individuals. Only 10-25% of the top-level adult athletes were top-level at the age of 16. Around 60% of the top-level young at the age of 16 did not maintain the same level of performance in adulthood. Female high-jump represented an exception from this trend since in this group most top-level young become top-level adult athletes. These findings suggest that performance before the age of 16 is not a good predictor of adult performance in long and high jump. The annual rate of improvements from 13 to 18 years should be included as a predictor of success rather than performance per se. Coaches should be careful about predicting future success based on performances obtained during youth in jumping events.

  5. Career Performance Trajectories in Track and Field Jumping Events from Youth to Senior Success: The Importance of Learning and Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennaro Boccia

    Full Text Available The idea that early sport success can be detrimental for long-term sport performance is still under debate. Therefore, the aims of this study were to examine the career trajectories of Italian high and long jumpers to provide a better understanding of performance development in jumping events.The official long-jump and high-jump rankings of the Italian Track and Field Federation were collected from the age of 12 to career termination, for both genders from the year 1994 to 2014. Top-level athletes were identified as those with a percentile of their personal best performance between 97 and 100.The age of entering competitions of top-level athletes was not different than the rest of the athletic population, whereas top-level athletes performed their personal best later than the rest of the athletes. Top-level athletes showed an overall higher rate of improvement in performance from the age of 13 to the age of 18 years when compared to all other individuals. Only 10-25% of the top-level adult athletes were top-level at the age of 16. Around 60% of the top-level young at the age of 16 did not maintain the same level of performance in adulthood. Female high-jump represented an exception from this trend since in this group most top-level young become top-level adult athletes.These findings suggest that performance before the age of 16 is not a good predictor of adult performance in long and high jump. The annual rate of improvements from 13 to 18 years should be included as a predictor of success rather than performance per se. Coaches should be careful about predicting future success based on performances obtained during youth in jumping events.

  6. How Followers Differing in Career Motivation Gain Career Profits from Transformational Leaders: A Longitudinal Moderated Mediation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baethge, Anja; Rigotti, Thomas; Vincent-Hoeper, Sylvie

    2017-01-01

    Although, transformational leadership is among the most thoroughly examined leadership theories, knowledge regarding its association with followers' career outcomes is still limited. Furthermore, the underlying mechanisms explaining how transformational leaders affect their employees' career success are yet not well-understood. Based on theoretical assumptions about the processes involved in setting the goal of “making a career,” we propose an indirect effect of transformational leadership on subjective and objective career success via development opportunities that depends on the level of career motivation of employees. We conducted a longitudinal study with two measurement occasions separated by 13 months with 320 employees of a large IT company. Respondents provided ratings online on their direct supervisor's transformational leadership, their own development opportunities, and career motivation at T1; subjective career success was rated at both time points, whereas objective indicators of career transitions were rated at T2 retrospectively. Using structural equation modeling, we tested the proposed moderated mediation model. The results indicated that transformational leadership increased subordinates' subjective career success via development opportunities. In addition, and contrary to theoretical reasoning, the indirect effect was not significant for employees with high career motivation. Thus, employees high in career motivation appeared not to benefit from the development opportunities offered by transformational leaders. The results are discussed in light of tailored leadership that takes the aspirations, and needs of followers into account. PMID:28932204

  7. How Followers Differing in Career Motivation Gain Career Profits from Transformational Leaders: A Longitudinal Moderated Mediation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Baethge

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Although, transformational leadership is among the most thoroughly examined leadership theories, knowledge regarding its association with followers' career outcomes is still limited. Furthermore, the underlying mechanisms explaining how transformational leaders affect their employees' career success are yet not well-understood. Based on theoretical assumptions about the processes involved in setting the goal of “making a career,” we propose an indirect effect of transformational leadership on subjective and objective career success via development opportunities that depends on the level of career motivation of employees. We conducted a longitudinal study with two measurement occasions separated by 13 months with 320 employees of a large IT company. Respondents provided ratings online on their direct supervisor's transformational leadership, their own development opportunities, and career motivation at T1; subjective career success was rated at both time points, whereas objective indicators of career transitions were rated at T2 retrospectively. Using structural equation modeling, we tested the proposed moderated mediation model. The results indicated that transformational leadership increased subordinates' subjective career success via development opportunities. In addition, and contrary to theoretical reasoning, the indirect effect was not significant for employees with high career motivation. Thus, employees high in career motivation appeared not to benefit from the development opportunities offered by transformational leaders. The results are discussed in light of tailored leadership that takes the aspirations, and needs of followers into account.

  8. How Followers Differing in Career Motivation Gain Career Profits from Transformational Leaders: A Longitudinal Moderated Mediation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baethge, Anja; Rigotti, Thomas; Vincent-Hoeper, Sylvie

    2017-01-01

    Although, transformational leadership is among the most thoroughly examined leadership theories, knowledge regarding its association with followers' career outcomes is still limited. Furthermore, the underlying mechanisms explaining how transformational leaders affect their employees' career success are yet not well-understood. Based on theoretical assumptions about the processes involved in setting the goal of "making a career," we propose an indirect effect of transformational leadership on subjective and objective career success via development opportunities that depends on the level of career motivation of employees. We conducted a longitudinal study with two measurement occasions separated by 13 months with 320 employees of a large IT company. Respondents provided ratings online on their direct supervisor's transformational leadership, their own development opportunities, and career motivation at T1; subjective career success was rated at both time points, whereas objective indicators of career transitions were rated at T2 retrospectively. Using structural equation modeling, we tested the proposed moderated mediation model. The results indicated that transformational leadership increased subordinates' subjective career success via development opportunities. In addition, and contrary to theoretical reasoning, the indirect effect was not significant for employees with high career motivation. Thus, employees high in career motivation appeared not to benefit from the development opportunities offered by transformational leaders. The results are discussed in light of tailored leadership that takes the aspirations, and needs of followers into account.

  9. New Careers in Nursing: Optimizing Diversity and Student Success for the Future of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitty, Vernell P; Huerta, Carolina G; Downing, Christine A

    2016-01-01

    In 2008, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation collaborated with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing to create the New Careers in Nursing (NCIN) scholarship program. Two goals of the program were to alleviate the nursing shortage and to increase diversity of the workforce. During this 7-year program (i.e., seven funding cycles), 130 schools of nursing in 41 states and the District of Columbia were selected as grantees, and they awarded 3,517 scholarships to second-degree accelerated nursing students who were members of groups underrepresented in nursing or who were economically disadvantaged. This article describes the demographic characteristics of the NCIN students, degree of satisfaction with their learning environment, perceptions of their mentoring experiences, and self-identified facilitators and barriers to program completion. Data sources for this article resulted from three surveys completed by scholars during their academic programs: the beginning, the midpoint, and within 6 months postgraduate. Results of analysis indicated that NCIN scholars are significantly more diverse compared with the national nurse population, and they reported high levels of satisfaction with their learning environments. Student relationships with peers and faculty improved during the period of program enrollment. Faculty support was the greatest facilitator for program completion, and competing priorities of finances and family responsibilities were the greatest challenges. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Experiences and Perceptions of STEM Subjects, Careers, and Engagement in STEM Activities among Middle School Students in the Maritime Provinces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz-Odendaal, Tamara A.; Blotnicky, Karen; French, Frederick; Joy, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    To enhance understanding of factors that might improve STEM career participation, we assessed students' self-perceptions of competency and interest in science/math, engagement in STEM activities outside of school, and knowledge of STEM career requirements. We show that the primary positive influencer directing students to a STEM career is high…

  11. Trajectory of Life Satisfaction and Its Relationship with Subjective Economic Status and Successful Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hui-Chuan

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between subjective economic status and indicators of successful aging to life satisfaction trajectories among the elderly in Taiwan. Data were from the four waves of "Survey of Health and Living Status of the Elderly in Taiwan". Hierarchical linear modeling was conducted. Subjective…

  12. The Impact of Cooperative, Competitive, and Individualistic Experiences on Minority Individuals’ Educational and Career Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-16

    34 providing assistance and feedback whenever it is needed, and expressing pride and gratitude for the students’ successes, students will persist in their...1976). The effects of cooperative vs. individualized instruction on student prosocial behavior, attitudes toward learning, and achievement. Journal

  13. Senior Leaders' Views on Leadership Preparation and Succession Strategies in New Zealand: Time for a Career-Related Professionalization Policy and Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, Reynold

    2014-01-01

    This research note reports the views of members of a branch of a professional association about their career paths and the appropriateness of preparatory and succession strategies for leaders in New Zealand schools. This sample of 12 "seniors" was unusual for its relative professional seniority, span of responsibilities and postgraduate…

  14. Excellence and Success through Career Understanding and Enriched Language Activities (Project ESCUELA). Community School District 14, Brooklyn. Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OER Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Joanne

    This report presents an evaluation of the Excellence and Success through Career Understanding and Enriched Language Activities (Project ESCUELA), an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title VII-funded project in its second year of operation at five schools in Brooklyn, New York. The project served 415 Spanish-speaking and 178 Yiddish-speaking…

  15. Senior Female Academics in the UK Academy: Theoretical Perspectives for Understanding the Impact of Education and Familial Influences on Career Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, Kate

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the theoretical perspectives I utilised in my doctoral research to uncover the role of class and gender in my respondents' stories and experiences of their career success. I argue that adopting an economic model for conceptualising the influence of social class and gender in the respondents' stories and experiences of their…

  16. Effects of a Recruitment Workshop on Selected Urban High School Students' Self-Efficacy and Attitudes toward Agriculture as a Subject, College Major, and Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraze, Lacee Brianne; Wingenbach, Gary; Rutherford, Tracy; Wolfskill, Lawrence A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if selected high school students' participation in a summer agricultural communications workshop affected their self-efficacy and attitudes toward agriculture as a subject, college major, and/or as a career. Data were gathered from an accessible population (N = 145), from which a purposive sample (n = 94)…

  17. Social Cognitive Career Theory and the Goal of Becoming a Certified Public Accountant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Jerry; Segal, Gerry; Borgia, Dan

    2017-01-01

    A primary goal for professors in academia is to facilitate the career success of their students by providing them with the necessary subject knowledge, skills, experience, and confidence. In this paper, we propose the Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT) model as a useful tool to explain how accounting students' career interests, goals, and…

  18. A mini-midwifery business institute in a midwifery professional roles course: an innovative teaching strategy for successful career planning and business management of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, D Elizabeth; Dewees, Connie; McDowell, William C

    2015-01-01

    It is essential to include teaching strategies in midwifery education that address career planning and the business aspects of practice. This article presents the Mini-Midwifery Business Institute (M-MBI), an innovative teaching strategy for midwives that can also be applied to other advanced practice professions. The M-MBI can be integrated into a professional roles course. Before and after graduation, midwifery students and other advanced practice professionals can use the information to gain confidence and skills for successful career planning and the business management of practice. © 2014 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  19. A Comparative Study of the Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Successful Men and Women in Mathematics, Science, and Technology Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeldin, Amy L.; Britner, Shari L.; Pajares, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the personal stories of men who selected careers in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) to better understand the ways in which their self-efficacy beliefs were created and subsequently influenced their academic and career choices. Analysis of 10 narratives revealed that mastery…

  20. Subjective memory complaints are associated with brain activation supporting successful memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Jessica M; Tang, Lingfei; Viviano, Raymond P; van Rooden, Sanneke; Ofen, Noa; Damoiseaux, Jessica S

    2017-12-01

    Subjective memory complaints, the perceived decline in cognitive abilities in the absence of clinical deficits, may precede Alzheimer's disease. Individuals with subjective memory complaints show differential brain activation during memory encoding; however, whether such differences contribute to successful memory formation remains unclear. Here, we investigated how subsequent memory effects, activation which is greater for hits than misses during an encoding task, differed between healthy older adults aged 50 to 85 years with (n = 23) and without (n = 41) memory complaints. Older adults with memory complaints, compared to those without, showed lower subsequent memory effects in the occipital lobe, superior parietal lobe, and posterior cingulate cortex. In addition, older adults with more memory complaints showed a more negative subsequent memory effects in areas of the default mode network, including the posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Our findings suggest that for successful memory formation, older adults with subjective memory complaints rely on distinct neural mechanisms which may reflect an overall decreased task-directed attention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. MS PHD'S: Bridging the Gap of Academic and Career Success Through Educational and Professional Development for Minorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D.; Vargas, W.; Padilla, E.; Strickland, J.; Echols, E.; Johnson, A.; Williamson Whitney, V.; Ithier-Guzman, W.; Ricciardi, L.; Johnson, A.; Braxton, L.

    2011-12-01

    Historically, there has been a lack of ethnic and gender diversity in the geo-sciences. The Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science (MS PHD'S) Professional Development Program provides a bridge to young scientists of diverse backgrounds who in turn will impact many. In a process of 3 phases, the program introduces the students to the scientific community through participation in professional and society meetings and networking with scientists and personnel within federal agencies, academic institutions and STEM-based industries. The program builds confidence, offers role models for professional development and provides students support during their education. Upon completion, students achieve a high level of self-actualization and self-esteem combined with individual growth. They become part of a community that continuously provides support and security to each other. This support is tangible through the mentor/mentee relationships which will help with individual growth throughout the mentoring cycle. Having role models and familiar faces to whom mentees can relate to will encourage our students to succeed in the STEM's field. To date, 159 students have participated in the program: 26 have successfully completed their PhD and 56 are currently enrolled in the PhD programs nationwide. The MS PHD'S Program creates a forum of diverse peoples by diverse peoples with diverse interest and strength, where the ongoing goal is to continually raise the bar for each individual. MS PHD'S establishes a nurturing goal-oriented environment for the geo scientist of the future who in turn will make profound contributions on a local, national and global scale. To conclude, MSPHD'S not only bridges the gap of unrepresented minorities in STEM careers, but also generates educational approaches to make the earth system sciences available to more, impacting all.

  2. Project Career: An individualized postsecondary approach to promoting independence, functioning, and employment success among students with traumatic brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, Deborah; Elias, Eileen; Rumrill, Phillip; Hendricks, Deborah J; Jacobs, Karen; Leopold, Anne; Nardone, Amanda; Sampson, Elaine; Scherer, Marcia; Gee Cormier, Aundrea; Taylor, Aiyana; DeLatte, Caitlin

    2017-09-14

    Project Career is a five-year interdisciplinary demonstration project funded by NIDILRR. It provides technology-driven supports, merging Cognitive Support Technology (CST) evidence-based practices and rehabilitation counseling, to improve postsecondary and employment outcomes for veteran and civilian undergraduate students with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Provide a technology-driven individualized support program to improve career and employment outcomes for students with TBI. Project staff provide assessments of students' needs relative to assistive technology, academic achievement, and career preparation; provide CST training to 150 students; match students with mentors; provide vocational case management; deliver job development and placement assistance; and maintain an electronic portal regarding accommodation and career resources. Participating students receive cognitive support technology training, academic enrichment, and career preparatory assistance from trained professionals at three implementation sites. Staff address cognitive challenges using the 'Matching Person with Technology' assessment to accommodate CST use (iPad and selected applications (apps)). JBS International (JBS) provides the project's evaluation. To date, 117 students participate with 63% report improved life quality and 75% report improved academic performance. Project Career provides a national model based on best practices for enabling postsecondary students with TBI to attain academic, employment, and career goals.

  3. The effect of video interviews with STEM professionals on STEM-subject attitude and STEM-career interest of middle school students in conservative Protestant Christian schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsup, Philip R.

    Inspiring learners toward career options available in STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) is important not only for economic development but also for maintaining creative thinking and innovation. Limited amounts of research in STEM education have focused on the population of students enrolled in religious and parochial schools, and given the historic conflict between religion and science, this sector of American education is worthy of examination. The purpose of this quantitative study is to extend Gottfredson's (1981) Theory of Circumscription and Compromise as it relates to occupational aspirations. Bem's (1981) Gender Schema Theory is examined as it relates to the role of gender in career expectations, and Crenshaw's (1989) Intersectionality Theory is included as it pertains to religion as a group identifier. Six professionals in STEM career fields were video recorded while being interviewed about their skills and education as well as positive and negative aspects of their jobs. The interviews were compiled into a 25-minute video for the purpose of increasing understanding of STEM careers among middle school viewers. The research questions asked whether middle school students from conservative, Protestant Christian schools in a Midwest region increased in STEM-subject attitude and STEM-career interest as a result of viewing the video and whether gender interacted with exposure to the video. A quasi-experimental, nonequivalent control groups, pretest/posttest factorial design was employed to evaluate data collected from the STEM Semantic Survey. A Two-Way ANCOVA revealed no significant differences in dependent variables from pretest to posttest. Implications of the findings are examined and recommendations for future research are made. Descriptors: STEM career interest, STEM attitude, STEM gender disparity, Occupational aspirations, Conservative Protestant education.

  4. Career Counseling as a Tool for Successful Implementation of Managerial Competencies of Secondary School Graduates in the Slovak Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Droppa Milan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The object of this paper is the issue of career counseling for secondary school students using the "Model career counseling" (hereinafter MCC. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the contribution of the MCC for students while deciding about the choice of their further education and career choices with the implementation of abilities, interests and personal abilities of the student. The method is an analysis of personality preconditions, general, specific abilities and interests of students by using standardized tests and non-standardized author's questionnaires. Consequently, comparison is realized of the collected data about students with graduate profiles in the study program. Based on the observed results, the focus of their further study is recommended to the students.

  5. The association of 2-year-old training milestones with career length and racing success in a sample of Thoroughbred horses in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, J C; Rogers, C W; Firth, E C

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that exercise early in life has a positive effect on musculoskeletal health. At present, there is little whole population research investigating the effect of racing as 2-year-olds on future racing career. To investigate the association between attaining training milestones as 2-year-olds with length of career and racing success in Thoroughbred horses in New Zealand. Retrospective data were obtained of the 2001/02-born Thoroughbred foal crop. The 3 training milestones were: registered with a trainer, trialled and raced. The association of the training milestones with career length was measured using the outcomes: number of race starts and number of years raced, in a Cox regression model. Logistic regression models analysed the association of the training milestones with the outcomes: won or placed in a race. Linear regression was performed to assess the association of training milestones with total career earnings. Of 4683 horses in the population; 3152 horses were registered with a trainer, 2661 horses trialled and 2109 horses raced. Horses that raced as 2-year-olds had significantly (Prace starts than those first raced as 3-year-olds or older, this was also true when the 2-year-old year data were omitted. Horses that raced as 2-year-olds had significantly (Pracing. Horses registered with a trainer, trialled or raced as 2-year-olds were more likely to have won or been placed in a race than those that achieved the milestones as 3-year-olds or older. Horses that first trialled and raced as 2-year-olds had greater total earnings than those that first trialled or raced at a later age. Two-year-old training milestones had a strong association with positive racing career outcomes. Horses in training or racing as 2-year-olds may have better musculoskeletal health throughout life than horses that are first in training or racing at a later age. © 2012 EVJ Ltd.

  6. Community College Partnerships for Student and Career Success: Program Profile of "Carreras en Salud." Fact Sheet #C397

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrici, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Postsecondary students with children often need an array of supports to succeed in their studies, which can require significant coordination among new and existing services (Conway, Blair, and Helmer 2012; Henrici n.d.; Miller, Gault, and Thorman 2011). Such supports might include financial aid, academic and career counseling, job placement…

  7. Development and psychometric testing of the Attitudes, Subjective Norms, Perceived Behavioural Control, and Intention to Pursue a Career in Mental Health Nursing scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbourn, Mark; Salamonson, Yenna; Ramjan, Lucie; Chang, Sungwon

    2017-01-19

    The aim of the present study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of the Attitudes, Subjective Norms, Perceived Behavioural Control, and Intention to Pursue a Career in Mental Health Nursing (ASPIRE) scale, an instrument to assess nursing students' intention to work in mental health nursing. Understanding the factors influencing undergraduate nursing students' career intentions might lead to improved recruitment strategies. However, there are no standardized tools to measure and assess students' intention to pursue a career in mental health nursing. The present study used a cross-sectional survey design undertaken at a large tertiary institution in Western Sydney (Australia) between May and August 2013. It comprised three distinct and sequential phases: (i) items were generated representing the four dimensions of the theory of planned behaviour; (ii) face and content validity were tested by a representative reference group and panel of experts; and (iii) survey data from 1109 first- and second-year and 619 third-year students were used in exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses to test the factorial validity of the scale. Internal consistency was measured using Cronbach's alpha. Items generated for the ASPIRE scale were subject to face and content validity testing. Results showed good factorial validity and reliability for the final 14-item scale. Principal axis factoring revealed a one-factor solution, the hypothesized model being supported by confirmatory factor analysis. The ASPIRE scale is a valid and reliable instrument for measuring intention to pursue a career in mental health nursing among Bachelor of Nursing students. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  8. Do Predictors of Career Success Differ between Swedish Women and Men? Data from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Anna; Johansson, Gunn

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to explore predictors of objective career success among Swedish women and men, focussing on gender differences. Data were drawn from the 2008 and 2010 waves of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) with a total of 3670 female and 2773 male participants. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for job promotion and an above-average salary increase between 2008 and 2010 were obtained through binary logistic regression analyses. Individual and organisational factors measured in 2008 were used as predictors in analyses stratified by sex. Mutual adjustment was performed for these variables, as well as for labour market sector and staff category at baseline. In both sexes, younger age predicted both job promotion and an above-average salary increase. Job promotion was also in both sexes predicted by being part of decision-making processes, having conflicts with superiors, and being eager to advance. Furthermore, promotion was predicted by, among men, being educated to post-graduate level and having an open coping strategy and, among women, working >60 hours/week. An above-average salary increase was predicted in both sexes by having a university education. Postgraduate education, having children living at home, and being very motivated to advance predicted an above-average salary increase among women, as did working 51–60 hours/week and being part of decision-making processes in men. Gender differences were seen in several predictors. In conclusion, the results support previous findings of gender differences in predictors of career success. A high level of education, motivation to advance, and procedural justice appear to be more important predictors of career success among women, while open coping was a more important predictor among men. PMID:26501351

  9. Do Predictors of Career Success Differ between Swedish Women and Men? Data from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Anna; Magnusson Hanson, Linda L; Leineweber, Constanze; Johansson, Gunn

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to explore predictors of objective career success among Swedish women and men, focussing on gender differences. Data were drawn from the 2008 and 2010 waves of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) with a total of 3670 female and 2773 male participants. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for job promotion and an above-average salary increase between 2008 and 2010 were obtained through binary logistic regression analyses. Individual and organisational factors measured in 2008 were used as predictors in analyses stratified by sex. Mutual adjustment was performed for these variables, as well as for labour market sector and staff category at baseline. In both sexes, younger age predicted both job promotion and an above-average salary increase. Job promotion was also in both sexes predicted by being part of decision-making processes, having conflicts with superiors, and being eager to advance. Furthermore, promotion was predicted by, among men, being educated to post-graduate level and having an open coping strategy and, among women, working >60 hours/week. An above-average salary increase was predicted in both sexes by having a university education. Postgraduate education, having children living at home, and being very motivated to advance predicted an above-average salary increase among women, as did working 51-60 hours/week and being part of decision-making processes in men. Gender differences were seen in several predictors. In conclusion, the results support previous findings of gender differences in predictors of career success. A high level of education, motivation to advance, and procedural justice appear to be more important predictors of career success among women, while open coping was a more important predictor among men.

  10. Do Predictors of Career Success Differ between Swedish Women and Men? Data from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Nyberg

    Full Text Available The aim of this prospective study was to explore predictors of objective career success among Swedish women and men, focussing on gender differences. Data were drawn from the 2008 and 2010 waves of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH with a total of 3670 female and 2773 male participants. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for job promotion and an above-average salary increase between 2008 and 2010 were obtained through binary logistic regression analyses. Individual and organisational factors measured in 2008 were used as predictors in analyses stratified by sex. Mutual adjustment was performed for these variables, as well as for labour market sector and staff category at baseline. In both sexes, younger age predicted both job promotion and an above-average salary increase. Job promotion was also in both sexes predicted by being part of decision-making processes, having conflicts with superiors, and being eager to advance. Furthermore, promotion was predicted by, among men, being educated to post-graduate level and having an open coping strategy and, among women, working >60 hours/week. An above-average salary increase was predicted in both sexes by having a university education. Postgraduate education, having children living at home, and being very motivated to advance predicted an above-average salary increase among women, as did working 51-60 hours/week and being part of decision-making processes in men. Gender differences were seen in several predictors. In conclusion, the results support previous findings of gender differences in predictors of career success. A high level of education, motivation to advance, and procedural justice appear to be more important predictors of career success among women, while open coping was a more important predictor among men.

  11. Subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Vega Encabo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I claim that subjectivity is a way of being that is constituted through a set of practices in which the self is subject to the dangers of fictionalizing and plotting her life and self-image. I examine some ways of becoming subject through narratives and through theatrical performance before others. Through these practices, a real and active subjectivity is revealed, capable of self-knowledge and self-transformation. 

  12. Success as a Springboard for Novice Physical Education Teachers in Their Efforts to Develop a Professional Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zach, Sima; Stein, Hanan; Nabel-Heller, Noa

    2015-01-01

    This article explored how 45 novice physical education teachers perceived success, and how success affected their motivation to continue teaching. Self-determination theory (SDT) was used to interpret the teachers' written reports, and focus group discussions were held concerning their success. Satisfaction with the competence, relatedness, and…

  13. Successful recruiting strategies for geoscience degrees and careers at the two-year college: An example from Metropolitan Community College - Kansas City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, B.

    2012-12-01

    The overwhelming majority of students at 2-year colleges take geoscience courses (e.g. physical geology or physical geography) to fulfill part of the general education requirements of the Associates in Arts degree or General Education certificates for transfer to a 4-year school. It is common in community college earth science programs to have a relatively small number of students continuing on to major in geoscience programs at their transfer 4-year institution. To increase interest and retention in geosciences courses, we have developed a two prong approach - one aimed at students looking to transfer to a 4-year institution and the other aimed at students in the often overlooked career and technical education (CTE) programs. In the case of transfer students, we employ a "high touch" approach in introductory Physical Geology courses. This includes raising awareness of geoscience related careers combined with faculty mentor and advisor activities for students who express interest in science on their admission forms or in discussions of potential careers in science in first-year experience courses. Faculty mentorships have been very effective, not only in recruiting students to consider careers in geology, but also in advising a curriculum for students necessary to be successful upon transfer to a 4-year institution (such as completing college level chemistry, physics, and calculus courses prior to transfer). The second approach focuses on students pursuing certificates and degrees in CTE energy-related programs (such as HVAC, industrial engineering technology, electrician, and utility linemen). To increase awareness of vocational related geoscience careers, many of which require a good foundation in the vocational training students are currently pursing, we developed a foundation energy course - Energy and the Environment - which fulfills both the science general education component of the AA degree for students looking to transfer as well as CTE students. The

  14. Increasing Diversity in Science and Health Professions: A 21-Year Longitudinal Study Documenting College and Career Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkleby, Marilyn A.; Ned, Judith; Ahn, David; Koehler, Alana; Kennedy, Jeanne D.

    2009-12-01

    Despite decades of precollege science education programs, African Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans remain critically underrepresented in science and health professions. This report describes college and career outcomes among graduates of the Stanford Medical Youth Science Program (SMYSP), a 5-week summer residential program for low-income high school students among whom 97% have been followed for up to 21 years. Approximately 24 students are selected annually, with participation limited to low-income students who have faced substantial personal hardships. Undergraduate and medical students provide key program leadership and training. The curriculum is based on science inquiry education and includes hospital internships, anatomy practicums, research projects, faculty lectures, college admissions/standardized test preparation, and long-term college and career guidance. A total of 476 high school students participated between 1988 and 2008, with 61% from underrepresented ethnic minority groups. Overall, 78% of African American, 81% of Latino, and 82% of Native American participants have earned a 4-year college degree (among those admitted to college, and excluding those currently attending college). In contrast, among 25-34-year old California adults, 16% of African Americans, 8% of Latinos, and 10% of Native Americans earn a 4-year college degree. Among SMYSP's 4-year college graduates, 47% are attending or have completed medical or graduate school, and 43% are working as or training to become health professionals. SMYSP offers a model that expands inquiry-based science education beyond the classroom, and recognizes the role of universities as "high school interventionists" to help diversify health professions.

  15. Explaining participation differentials in Dutch higher education : the impact of subjective success probabilities on level choice and field choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolsma, J.; Need, A.; Jong, U. de

    2010-01-01

    In this article we examine whether subjective estimates of success probabilities explain the effect of social origin, sex, and ethnicity on students’ choices between different school tracks in Dutch higher education. The educational options analysed differ in level (i.e. university versus

  16. The Effect of Internet-Based Education on Student Success in Teaching of 8th Grade Triangles Subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Deniz; Kesan, Cenk; Izgiol, Dilek

    2013-01-01

    In the study, it was researched the effect of internet-based application on student success. Internet-based application was used at the teaching of triangles subject which is included in 8th grade units of triangles and algebra. The study was carried out over the internet with a computer software program: Vitamin Program. The study was carried out…

  17. Objective support for subjective reports of successful inner speech in two people with aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, William; Snider, Sarah F; Luta, George; Friedman, Rhonda B; Turkeltaub, Peter E

    2016-01-01

    People with aphasia frequently report being able to say a word correctly in their heads, even if they are unable to say that word aloud. It is difficult to know what is meant by these reports of "successful inner speech". We probe the experience of successful inner speech in two people with aphasia. We show that these reports are associated with correct overt speech and phonologically related nonword errors, that they relate to word characteristics associated with ease of lexical access but not ease of production, and that they predict whether or not individual words are relearned during anomia treatment. These findings suggest that reports of successful inner speech are meaningful and may be useful to study self-monitoring in aphasia, to better understand anomia, and to predict treatment outcomes. Ultimately, the study of inner speech in people with aphasia could provide critical insights that inform our understanding of normal language.

  18. Predictors of Student Success in Online Courses: Quantitative versus Qualitative Subject Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidry, Krisandra

    2013-01-01

    This study seeks to examine whether the predictors of success for students in an online quantitative course are different than those for an online qualitative course. Data were collected from students taking online courses offered by an AACSB accredited College of Business at a medium sized state university (total student population 7,000) in…

  19. An Inner Barrier to Career Development: Preconditions of the Impostor Phenomenon and Consequences for Career Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neureiter, Mirjam; Traut-Mattausch, Eva

    2016-01-01

    .... We investigated in what way impostor feelings are related to the fear of failure, fear of success, self-esteem, and the career-development aspects career planning, career striving, and the motivation to lead...

  20. Survey data on entrepreneurs׳ subjective plan and perceptions of the likelihood of success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Quan Hoang

    2016-03-01

    Entrepreneurship is an important economic process in both developed and developing worlds. Nonetheless, many of its concepts appear to be difficult to 'operationalize' due to lack of empirical data; and this is particularly true with emerging economy. The data set described in this paper is available in Mendeley Data׳s "Vietnamese entrepreneurs' decisiveness and perceptions of the likelihood of success/continuity, Vuong (2015) [1]" http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/kbrtrf6hh4.2; and can enable the modeling after useful discrete data models such as BCL.

  1. Survey data on entrepreneurs׳ subjective plan and perceptions of the likelihood of success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Hoang Vuong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurship is an important economic process in both developed and developing worlds. Nonetheless, many of its concepts appear to be difficult to ‘operationalize’ due to lack of empirical data; and this is particularly true with emerging economy. The data set described in this paper is available in Mendeley Data׳s “Vietnamese entrepreneurs’ decisiveness and perceptions of the likelihood of success/continuity, Vuong (2015 [1]” http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/kbrtrf6hh4.2; and can enable the modeling after useful discrete data models such as BCL.

  2. The Dreyfus Model of Skill Acquisition: A Career Development Framework for Succession Planning and Management in Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall-Ellis, Sylvia D.; Grealy, Deborah S.

    2013-01-01

    Succession planning and management are critical parts of strategic planning for libraries in the twenty-first century. Making certain that the right people are in place with the prerequisite training and experience to assume leadership positions is a vital part of strategic planning and talent management in libraries that rely on teams of people…

  3. Successful maintenance of body weight reduction after individualized dietary counseling in obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmach-Mardas, Marta; Mardas, Marcin; Warchoł, Wojciech; Jamka, Małgorzata; Walkowiak, Jarosław

    2014-10-14

    The aim of this study was to describe the effectiveness of individualized dietary counseling in obese subjects based on narrative interview technique on the maintenance of body weight reduction, changes in dietary behaviors, including type of cooking and physical activity. One-hundred subjects out of four-hundred patients met the inclusion criteria. Individually, 45-minute educational program with motivation counseling was performed in 0, 6 and 12 weeks of the study. Patients were advised to follow individually well-balanced diet for 12 weeks. The individuals were asked about the changes in their dietary habits (Food Frequency Questionnaire). The mean percentage of body weight changes from the baseline were as follows: in 6th week- 5.9%, in 12th week - 10.9% and in 52th week - 9.7% (P body weight in 12th and 52th week. The maintenance of body weight reduction was connected with the dietary habits changes, mainly the type of cooking and increased consumption of vegetable oils. In conclusion, individualized dietary counseling, based on narrative interview technique is an effective intervention for obesity treatment that may help maintain body weight reduction and adapt the pro-healthy changes in type of cooking and sources of dietary fat.

  4. Career Adaptability as a Strategic Competence for Career Development: An Exploratory Study of Its Key Predictors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocciardi, Federica; Caputo, Andrea; Fregonese, Chiara; Langher, Viviana; Sartori, Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: In the current labour market, the competence to adapt is becoming significantly relevant for career development and career success. The construct of career adaptability, i.e. the capability to adapt to changing career-related circumstances and predict advancement in career development, seems to provide a fruitful scientific base for…

  5. Career Choice Status among Undergraduates and the Influence of Career Management Competencies and Perceived Employability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Denise; Wilton, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the influence of career management competencies and perceived employability on career choice status (CCS) among undergraduates. Making informed and appropriate career choices is positively linked with well-being, work performance and academic and career success. Early career decision-making is now critical if students wish to…

  6. Postmortem succession of gut microbial communities in deceased human subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. DeBruyn

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The human microbiome has demonstrated an importance for the health and functioning in living individuals. However, the fate of the microbiome after death is less understood. In addition to a better understanding of microbe-mediated decomposition processes, postmortem succession of human-associated microbial communities has been suggested as a possible forensic tool for estimating time since death, or postmortem interval (PMI. The objective of our study was to document postmortem changes in human gut bacterial communities. Gut microflora were repeatedly sampled from the caeca of cadavers as they decayed under natural environmental conditions. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing revealed that over time, bacterial richness significantly increased (rs = 0.449 while diversity decreased (rs =  − 0.701. The composition of gut bacterial communities changed in a similar manner over time towards a common decay community. OTUs belonging to Bacteroidales (Bacteroides, Parabacteroides significantly declined while Clostridiales (Clostridium, Anaerosphaera and the fly-associated Gammaproteobacteria Ignatzschineria and Wohlfahrtiimonas increased. Our examination of human caeca microflora in decomposing cadavers adds to the growing literature on postmortem microbial communities, which will ultimately contribute to a better understanding of decomposition processes.

  7. Career-Tech Time Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monberg, Greg; Bannourah, Riyad

    2011-01-01

    In the 1940s, 50s, and 60s, the skills needed to have a successful career were very different than they are today. This case study of the Hammond Area Career Center's Multimedia Broadcast Academy shows how one Rust Belt community has revamped its approach to career and technical education and is preparing students for jobs in the new economy. This…

  8. How academic career and habits related to the school environment influence on academic performance in the physical education subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vizuete Carrizosa, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to analyze the degree of influence of some school habits and scholar trayectory on academic achievement in physical education (PE students in secondary education (ESO in the city of Badajoz. A total sample of 1197 students in compulsory secondary education 49.9% men, and 50.1% women, participated in the study. They spent a questionnaire filled out by the river questions about major school habits, of which eight variables were analyzed also included the final course in the subject of EF as a variable for analysis of academic performance. Through statistical analysis with ANOVA, Mann-Whitney U, and Kruskal Wallis H, there are significant differences in PE scores in all variables analyzed (p d».001, among which being repetitive, being truant, the time to read and study daily. In the variable environment perceived in class, there is a degree of significance (p d».05. Pupils who were repeaters, missing more classes or were delayed more times than read and studied less and earned a worse environment in their classes, are those who obtained poorer performance on EF.

  9. Psychological career resources as predictors of working adults’ career anchors: An exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinde Coetzee

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the relationship between the psychological career resources and career anchors of a sample of 2 997 working adults at predominantly managerial and supervisory levels in the service industry. The Psychological Career Resources Inventory and the Career Orientations Inventory were applied. Stepwise regression analyses indicated dimensions of psychological career resources as significant predictors of  participants’ career anchors. The findings add valuable new knowledge that can be used to inform organisational career development support practices as well as career counselling and guidance services concerned with promoting individuals’ employability and experiences of intrinsic career success.

  10. Career Development and Emerging Managerial Career Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzeda, Maurice

    1999-01-01

    Career-motivation theory provides a new framework for managerial careers in the context of contemporary career patterns. The framework includes the concepts of career resilience, career insight, and career identity. (SK)

  11. Career adaptability and career entrenchment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zacher, Hannes; Ambiel, Rodolfo A.M.; Noronha, Ana Paula Porto

    2015-01-01

    Career adaptability constitutes a resource that can help employees to effectively manage career changes and challenges. The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between the two higher-order constructs of career adaptability and career entrenchment (i.e., the perceived inability

  12. THE EFFECT OF INTERNET-BASED EDUCATION ON STUDENT SUCCESS IN TEACHING OF 8TH GRADE TRIANGLES SUBJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz KAYA, Ministry of Education, TURKEY

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the study, it was researched the effect of internet-based application on student success. Internet-based application was used at the teaching of triangles subject which is included in 8th grade units of triangles and algebra. The study was carried out over the internet with a computer software program: Vitamin Program. The study was carried out with total 37 8th grade students in two separate classes in a study centre in 2011-2012 school years. It was carried out internet-based teaching material on the experiment group and also conventional teaching method and materials on the control group. In the research, “the achievement test consisting of triangles subject” was carried out as a data collection tool in pre-test and post-test both groups. As a result of the research, success grade of experiment group which was carried out internet-based application applied with Vitamin Program is higher than success grade of control group in which was used conventional teaching method. In consequence of the study, it was suggested that internet-based teaching programs, which call and attract students’ attention must be used in a more frequent way.

  13. Successful isolation of infectious and high titer human monocyte-derived HIV-1 from two subjects with discontinued therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tong; Xu, Younong; Zhu, Haiying; Andrus, Thomas; Ivanov, Sergei B; Pan, Charlotte; Dolores, Jazel; Dann, Gregory C; Zhou, Michael; Forte, Dominic; Yang, Zihuan; Holte, Sarah; Corey, Lawrence; Zhu, Tuofu

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 DNA in blood monocytes is considered a viral source of various HIV-1 infected tissue macrophages, which is also known as "Trojan horse" hypothesis. However, whether these DNA can produce virions has been an open question for years, due to the inability of isolating high titer and infectious HIV-1 directly from monocytes. In this study, we demonstrated successful isolation of two strains of M-HIV-1 (1690 M and 1175 M) from two out of four study subjects, together with their in vivo controls, HIV-1 isolated from CD4+ T-cells (T-HIV-1), 1690 T and 1175 T. All M- and T- HIV-1 isolates were detected CCR5-tropic. Both M- HIV-1 exhibited higher levels of replication in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) than the two T- HIV-1. Consistent with our previous reports on the subject 1175 with late infection, compartmentalized env C2-V3-C3 sequences were identified between 1175 M and 1175 T. In contrast, 1690 M and 1690 T, which were isolated from subject 1690 with relatively earlier infection, showed homogenous env C2-V3-C3 sequences. However, multiple reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor resistance-associated variations were detected in the Gag-Pol region of 1690 M, but not of 1690 T. By further measuring HIV DNA intracellular copy numbers post-MDM infection, 1690 M was found to have significantly higher DNA synthesis efficiency than 1690 T in macrophages, indicating a higher RT activity, which was confirmed by AZT inhibitory assays. These results suggested that the M- and T- HIV-1 are compartmentalized in the two study subjects, respectively. Therefore, we demonstrated that under in vitro conditions, HIV-1 infected human monocytes can productively release live viruses while differentiating into macrophages.

  14. Human Capital and Career Success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Anders; Kato, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Using Danish registry data covering the population of Danish workers, we provide new and robust evidence with external validity on the importance of the breadth of human capital for top management appointments, and support/enrich the human capital theory of corporate leadership by Gibbons and Wal...

  15. Successes, Challenges and Lessons Learned for Recruiting, Engaging and Preparing a Diverse Student Population for 21st Century Careers in Ocean Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkston, B. E.; Garza, C.

    2015-12-01

    Diversity within the Ocean Sciences workforce is still underperforming relative to other scientific disciplines, a problem that will be only be solved by recruiting, engaging and retaining a more diverse student population. The Monterey Bay Regional Ocean Science Research Experiences for Undergraduates program is housed at California State University, Monterey Bay (CSUMB), an HSI with strong connections to multiple regional community colleges and other Predominantly Undergraduate Institutions (PUIs) in the CSU system. From this unique position, 11 sophomore and junior-level undergraduate students are recruited per year from academic institutions where research opportunities in STEM are limited and from groups historically underrepresented in the Ocean Sciences, including women, underrepresented minorities, persons with disabilities, and veterans. During the program, students engage in a 10-week original research project guided by a faculty research mentor in one of four themes: Oceanography, Marine Biology and Ecology, Ocean Engineering, and Marine Geology. In addition to research, students engage in rigorous weekly professional development workshops in which they practice critical thinking, ethical decision-making, peer review, writing and oral communication skills. These workshops include tangible products such as an NSF-style proposal paper, Statement of Purpose and CV modelled for the SACNAS Travel Award Application, research abstract, scientific report and oral presentation. To help retain students in Ocean Sciences, students build community during the REU by living together in the CSUMB dormitories; post-REU, students stay connected through an online facebook group, LinkedIn page and group webinars. To date, the REU has supported 22 students in two cohorts (2014, 2015) and here we present successes, challenges and lessons learned for a program designed to prepare students for 21st century Ocean Science careers.

  16. Learning style versus time spent studying and career choice: Which is associated with success in a combined undergraduate anatomy and physiology course?

    OpenAIRE

    Farkas, Gary J.; Mazurek, Ewa; Marone, Jane R.

    2015-01-01

    The VARK learning style is a pedagogical focus in health care education. This study examines relationships of course performance vs. VARK learning preference, study time, and career plan among students enrolled in an undergraduate anatomy and physiology course at a large urban university. Students (n = 492) from the fall semester course completed a survey consisting of the VARK questionnaire, gender, academic year, career plans, and estimated hours spent per week in combined classroom and stu...

  17. Testing Relations of Crystallized and Fluid Intelligence and the Incremental Predictive Validity of Conscientiousness and Its Facets on Career Success in a Small Sample of German and Swiss Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Hagmann-von Arx, Priska; Gygi, Jasmin T.; Weidmann, Rebekka; Grob, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relation of fluid and crystallized intelligence with extrinsic (occupational skill level, income) and intrinsic (job satisfaction) career success as well as the incremental predictive validity of conscientiousness and its facets. Participants (N = 121) completed the Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales (RIAS), the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R), and reported their occupational skill level, income, and job satisfaction. Results revealed that crystallize...

  18. Testing Relations of Crystallized and Fluid Intelligence and the Incremental Predictive Validity of Conscientiousness and Its Facets on Career Success in a Small Sample of German and Swiss Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann-von Arx, Priska; Gygi, Jasmin T; Weidmann, Rebekka; Grob, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relation of fluid and crystallized intelligence with extrinsic (occupational skill level, income) and intrinsic (job satisfaction) career success as well as the incremental predictive validity of conscientiousness and its facets. Participants (N = 121) completed the Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales (RIAS), the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R), and reported their occupational skill level, income, and job satisfaction. Results revealed that crystallized intelligence was positively related to occupational skill level, but not to income. The association of crystallized intelligence and job satisfaction was negative and stronger for the lowest occupational skill level, whereas it was non-significant for higher levels. Fluid intelligence showed no association with career success. Beyond intelligence, conscientiousness and its facet self-discipline were associated with income, whereas conscientiousness and its facets competence and achievement striving were associated with job satisfaction. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for the assessment process as well as for future research to adequately predict career success.

  19. Testing relations of crystallized and fluid intelligence and the incremental predictive validity of conscientiousness and its facets on career success in a small sample of German and Swiss workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priska eHagmann-von Arx

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relation of fluid and crystallized intelligence with extrinsic (occupational skill level, income and intrinsic (job satisfaction career success as well as the incremental predictive validity of conscientiousness and its facets. Participants (N = 121 completed the Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales (RIAS, the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R and reported their occupational skill level, income and job satisfaction. Results revealed that crystallized intelligence was positively related to occupational skill level, but not to income. The association of crystallized intelligence and job satisfaction was negative and stronger for the lowest occupational skill level, whereas it was non-significant for higher levels. Fluid intelligence showed no association with career success. Beyond intelligence, conscientiousness and its facet self-discipline were associated with income, whereas conscientiousness and its facets competence and achievement striving were associated with job satisfaction. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for the assessment process as well as for future research to adequately predict career success.

  20. Testing Relations of Crystallized and Fluid Intelligence and the Incremental Predictive Validity of Conscientiousness and Its Facets on Career Success in a Small Sample of German and Swiss Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann-von Arx, Priska; Gygi, Jasmin T.; Weidmann, Rebekka; Grob, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relation of fluid and crystallized intelligence with extrinsic (occupational skill level, income) and intrinsic (job satisfaction) career success as well as the incremental predictive validity of conscientiousness and its facets. Participants (N = 121) completed the Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales (RIAS), the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R), and reported their occupational skill level, income, and job satisfaction. Results revealed that crystallized intelligence was positively related to occupational skill level, but not to income. The association of crystallized intelligence and job satisfaction was negative and stronger for the lowest occupational skill level, whereas it was non-significant for higher levels. Fluid intelligence showed no association with career success. Beyond intelligence, conscientiousness and its facet self-discipline were associated with income, whereas conscientiousness and its facets competence and achievement striving were associated with job satisfaction. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for the assessment process as well as for future research to adequately predict career success. PMID:27148112

  1. A Career in Statistics Beyond the Numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, Gerald J

    2012-01-01

    A valuable guide to a successful career as a statistician A Career in Statistics: Beyond the Numbers prepares readers for careers in statistics by emphasizing essential concepts and practices beyond the technical tools provided in standard courses and texts. This insider's guide from internationally recognized applied statisticians helps readers decide whether a career in statistics is right for them, provides hands-on guidance on how to prepare for such a career, and shows how to succeed on the job. The book provides non-technical guidance for a successful career. The authors' extensive indu

  2. A Comparison between the SDS and the Career Key among Career Undecided College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lawrence K.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Compared the Career Key (CK) with the Self-Directed Search (SDS) career interest inventories using 68 college students as subjects. Found students rated the CK more positively than the SDS because they felt it organized their thoughts about interests and careers, clarified their interests, and taught how to research careers further. (ABL)

  3. Success Rate and Technical Quality of Home Polysomnography with Self-Applicable Electrode Set in Subjects with Possible Sleep Bruxism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, Tomi; Myllymaa, Katja; Westeren-Punnonen, Susanna; Ahlberg, Jari; Hukkanen, Taina; Toyras, Juha; Lappalainen, Reijo; Mervaala, Esa; Sipila, Kirsi; Myllymaa, Sami

    2017-08-18

    Using sleep laboratory polysomnography (PSG) is restricted for the diagnosis of only the most severe sleep disorders due to its low availability and high cost. Home PSG is more affordable, but applying conventional electroencephalography (EEG) electrodes increases its overall complexity and lowers the availability. Simple, self-administered single-channel EEG monitors on the other hand suffer from poor reliability. In this study, we aimed to quantify the reliability of self-administrated home PSG recordings conducted with a newly designed ambulatory electrode set (AES) that enables multi-channel EEG, electrooculography, electromyography and electrocardiography recordings. We assessed the sleep study success rate and technical quality of the recordings performed in subjects with possible sleep bruxism (SB). Thirty-two females and five males aged 39.6±11.6 years (mean±SD) with self-reported SB were recruited in the study. Self-administrated home PSG recordings with two AES designs were conducted (n=19 and 21). The technical quality of the recordings was graded based on the proportion of interpretable data. Technical failure rate for AES (both designs) was 5% and SB was scorable for 96.9% of all recorded data. Only one recording failed due to mistakes in self-applying the AES. We found that the proportion of good quality self-administrated EEG recordings is significantly higher when multiple channels are used compared to using a single channel. Sleep study success rates and proportion of recordings with high quality interpretable data from EEG channels of AES were comparable to that of conventional home PSG. Self-applicable AES has potential to become a reliable tool for widely available home PSG.

  4. Incorporating the Narrative in Career Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Torben K.; Johnston, Joseph A.

    2003-01-01

    Career narratives can help counselors understand clients' work experience and future plans. They include the landscape of action (actual events) and consciousness (perceptions). Clients' subjective understanding of their career story is a pivotal consideration. (SK)

  5. Insights on STEM Careers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendelberger, Joanne Roth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-11-05

    This presentation will provide career advice for individuals seeking to go beyond just having a job to building a successful career in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Careful planning can be used to turn a job into a springboard for professional advancement and personal satisfaction. Topics to be addressed include setting priorities, understanding career ladders, making tough choices, overcoming stereotypes and assumptions by others, networking, developing a professional identify, and balancing a career with family and other personal responsibilities. Insights on the transition from individual technical work to leadership will also be provided. The author will draw upon experiences gained in academic, industrial, and government laboratory settings, as well as extensive professional service and community involvement.

  6. Manual Arts to Technology Education: Are We Ripe for Infusing Aspects of a Green Technology into Career and Technical Education Constituent Subjects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asunda, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a conceptual essay that reviews industrial and economic changes that have shaped vocational education to present day Career and Technical Education (CTE) curriculum, and specifically the role of technology education in meeting societal needs. An argument is presented that CTE is ripe to integrate aspects of green technology and…

  7. Learning Style versus Time Spent Studying and Career Choice: Which Is Associated with Success in a Combined Undergraduate Anatomy and Physiology Course?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Gary J.; Mazurek, Ewa; Marone, Jane R.

    2016-01-01

    The VARK learning style is a pedagogical focus in health care education. This study examines relationships of course performance vs. VARK learning preference, study time, and career plan among students enrolled in an undergraduate anatomy and physiology course at a large urban university. Students (n?=?492) from the fall semester course completed…

  8. Personality predictors of successful development: toddler temperament and adolescent personality traits predict well-being and career stability in middle adulthood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Blatný

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to predict both adaptive psychological functioning (well-being and adaptive social functioning (career stability in middle adulthood based on behaviors observed in toddlerhood and personality traits measured in adolescence. 83 people participated in an ongoing longitudinal study started in 1961 (58% women. Based on children's behavior in toddlerhood, three temperamental dimensions were identified - positive affectivity, negative affectivity and disinhibition. In adolescence, extraversion and neuroticism were measured at the age of 16 years. Various aspects of well-being were used as indicators of adaptive psychological functioning in adulthood: life satisfaction, self-esteem and self-efficacy. Career stability was used as an indicator of adaptive social functioning. Job careers of respondents were characterized as stable, unstable or changeable. Extraversion measured at the age of 16 proved to be the best predictor of well-being indicators; in case of self-efficacy it was also childhood disinhibition. Extraversion in adolescence, childhood disinhibition and negative affectivity predicted career stability. Findings are discussed in the context of a theoretical framework of higher order factors of the Big Five personality constructs, stability and plasticity.

  9. Personality Predictors of Successful Development: Toddler Temperament and Adolescent Personality Traits Predict Well-Being and Career Stability in Middle Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to predict both adaptive psychological functioning (well-being) and adaptive social functioning (career stability) in middle adulthood based on behaviors observed in toddlerhood and personality traits measured in adolescence. 83 people participated in an ongoing longitudinal study started in 1961 (58% women). Based on children’s behavior in toddlerhood, three temperamental dimensions were identified – positive affectivity, negative affectivity and disinhibition. In adolescence, extraversion and neuroticism were measured at the age of 16 years. Various aspects of well-being were used as indicators of adaptive psychological functioning in adulthood: life satisfaction, self-esteem and self-efficacy. Career stability was used as an indicator of adaptive social functioning. Job careers of respondents were characterized as stable, unstable or changeable. Extraversion measured at the age of 16 proved to be the best predictor of well-being indicators; in case of self-efficacy it was also childhood disinhibition. Extraversion in adolescence, childhood disinhibition and negative affectivity predicted career stability. Findings are discussed in the context of a theoretical framework of higher order factors of the Big Five personality constructs, stability and plasticity. PMID:25919394

  10. University Students’ Future Career Opportunities: Career Maturity, Career Decision Making Self Efficacy & Socio-economic Status

    OpenAIRE

    Eroğlu, Susran Erkan

    2017-01-01

    Science is expressed as a requirement to improvethe life quality in general definition. As a 21st century industrial revolutionrapidly developing career maturity and career paths has the potential to affectevery aspect of university students. The most important subject in this contextshould be engaging in a democratic and knowledge-based society. It needs university students topursue careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) andin other fields. THEREFORE, a shiftto in...

  11. Career Perceptions of Managerial and Professional Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsett, Laurence; Rodgers, Frank P.

    1980-01-01

    Stages of career development consistent with age were found in a group of managers, who tended to attribute career success to inherent abilities, education, and developmental work experiences. Trends among three age groups were similar in regard to factors perceived as enhancing or adversely affecting career development. (Author)

  12. Careers: Homecoming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, Joetta L.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the professional career of former big-time football coach George Chaump, who is now a high school football coach whose career has come the full circle and has taught him that it is the job, not the glamour, that matters. The article discusses what high school coaching has taught him and what he can offer to high school students. (SM)

  13. Learning style versus time spent studying and career choice: Which is associated with success in a combined undergraduate anatomy and physiology course?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Gary J; Mazurek, Ewa; Marone, Jane R

    2016-01-01

    The VARK learning style is a pedagogical focus in health care education. This study examines relationships of course performance vs. VARK learning preference, study time, and career plan among students enrolled in an undergraduate anatomy and physiology course at a large urban university. Students (n = 492) from the fall semester course completed a survey consisting of the VARK questionnaire, gender, academic year, career plans, and estimated hours spent per week in combined classroom and study time. Seventy-eight percent of students reported spending 15 or fewer hours per week studying. Study time and overall course score correlated significantly for the class as a whole (r = 0.111, P = 0.013), which was mainly due to lecture (r = 0.118, P = 0.009) performance. No significant differences were found among students grouped by learning styles. When corrected for academic year, overall course scores (mean ± SEM) for students planning to enter dentistry, medicine, optometry or pharmacy (79.89 ± 0.88%) were significantly higher than those of students planning to enter physical or occupational therapies (74.53 ± 1.15%; P = 0.033), as well as nurse/physician assistant programs (73.60 ± 1.3%; P = 0.040). Time spent studying was not significantly associated with either learning style or career choice. Our findings suggest that specific career goals and study time, not learning preferences, are associated with better performance among a diverse group of students in an undergraduate anatomy and physiology course. However, the extent to which prior academic preparation, cultural norms, and socioeconomic factors influenced these results requires further investigation. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  14. Learning style versus time spent studying and career choice: Which is associated with success in a combined undergraduate anatomy and physiology course?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Gary J.; Mazurek, Ewa; Marone, Jane R.

    2016-01-01

    The VARK learning style is a pedagogical focus in health care education. This study examines relationships of course performance vs. VARK learning preference, study time, and career plan among students enrolled in an undergraduate anatomy and physiology course at a large urban university. Students (n = 492) from the fall semester course completed a survey consisting of the VARK questionnaire, gender, academic year, career plans, and estimated hours spent per week in combined classroom and study time. Seventy-eight percent of students reported spending 15 or fewer hours per week studying. Study time and overall course score correlated significantly for the class as a whole (r = 0.111, P = 0.013), which was mainly due to lecture (r = 0.118, P = 0.009) performance. No significant differences were found among students grouped by learning styles. When corrected for academic year, overall course scores (mean ± SEM) for students planning to enter “medicines” (79.89 ± 0.88%) were significantly higher than those of students planning to enter physical/occupational therapies (74.53 ± 1.15%; P = 0.033), as well as nurse/physician assistant programs (73.60 ± 1.3%; P = 0.040). Time spent studying was not significantly associated with either learning style or career choice. Our findings suggest that specific career goals and study time, not learning preferences, are associated with better performance among a diverse group of students in an undergraduate anatomy/physiology course. However, the extent to which prior academic preparation, cultural norms, and socioeconomic factors influenced these results requires further investigation. PMID:26301828

  15. Existential Considerations for Contemporary Career Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglio, Asa-Sophia T.; Butterfield, Lee D.; Borgen, William A.

    2005-01-01

    This article was written to remind career counselors of the potential depth and subjective impact of both unemployment and employment transitions. An existential framework is used in discussing today's world of work, previous and contemporary career counseling models, existential theory in career counseling, and existential considerations for…

  16. Expectancy of Success, Subjective Task-Value, and Message Frame in the Appraisal of Value-Promoting Messages Made Prior to a High-Stakes Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putwain, David W.; Symes, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has examined how subjective task-value and expectancy of success influence the appraisal of value-promoting messages used by teachers prior to high-stakes examinations. The aim of this study was to examine whether message-frame (gain or loss-framed messages) also influences the appraisal of value-promoting messages. Two hundred…

  17. Teaching Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Fred; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes four different types of music education careers: elementary or secondary teacher, college/university teacher, studio/private teacher, and museum music instructor. The educational background, job availability, and advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed. (AM)

  18. Capitalizing on the success of romantic partners : A laboratory investigation on subjective, facial, and physiological emotional processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montfort, S.S.; Kaczmarek, L.D.; Kashdan, T.B.; Drążkowski, D.; Kosakowski, M.; Guzik, P.; Krauze, T.; Gracanin, A.

    2014-01-01

    Receiving a constructive, supportive response from romantic partners after sharing good news has been shown to magnify the positivity of events and predict healthy relationship outcomes. We conducted a laboratory social interaction to determine whether supportive responses to success led to changes

  19. Statistical laws for career longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Alexander; Jung, Woo-Sung; Yang, Jae-Suk; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2009-03-01

    Career length distinguishes successful long tenures from unsuccessful short stints, and partially reflects the contributions of an employee to the goals of the employer. In some professions, there are well-defined metrics that quantify career longevity, prowess, and productivity, which together contribute to the overall success rating for an individual employee. In this talk, I motivate a stochastic model for career development that relies on two key ingredients, random progress within the career and random stopping times terminating the career. This model is exactly solvable, predicting the probability density function (pdf) of career longevity, characterized by two parameters, α and xc. The parameter α quantifies the power-law scaling of the pdf, which is terminated by an exponential cutoff after a crossover value xc, representing the mean career lifetime. We test the model with the large quantity of empirical data available for several professional sports leagues, American baseball, Korean baseball, American basketball, and English soccer, finding excellent agreement with the model's predictions. In all, the generality of the model suggests that there may be common stochastic forces that underly progress, success, and longevity in various professions.

  20. A Meta-Analysis of Single-Subject Research on Behavioral Momentum to Enhance Success in Students with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Richard J.; Abel, Leah; Candel, Lindsay

    2017-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of single-subject research studies investigating the effectiveness of antecedent strategies grounded in behavioral momentum for improving compliance and on-task performance for students with autism. First, we assessed the research rigor of those studies meeting our inclusionary criteria. Next, in order to apply a…

  1. What are the career planning and development practices for nurses in hospitals? Is there a difference between private and public hospitals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, Betul; Yildirim, Aytolan

    2009-12-01

    The aim was to determine the opinions of nurse managers about career planning and development for nurses in hospitals. Career planning and development are defined as an important and necessary tool in the development of nurses as professionals and in retaining nurses in a facility. A descriptive survey. The research population comprised nurse managers in 200+ bed hospitals on the European side of Istanbul province (n = 668). The entire population was targeted and 373 nurse managers were included in the study (55.8% return rate). Data were collected with a 32-item survey form that had three sections to determine the nurse managers' demographic characteristics, the career development practices at the facility where they worked, the nurse managers' responsibilities for career development and their expected competencies and recommendations. The findings of this study suggest that the most common technique used for nurses for career development was education programs, the career development practices of private hospitals were more developed than public hospitals and the nurse managers' perceptions about career development were different according to their management level, age group and educational level (p career development practices identified and the nurse managers did not have agreement on the subject of career development. Hospitals which provide opportunity for horizontal and vertical promotion and have clear development policies will be successful hospitals which are preferred by high quality nurses. This study draws attention to the importance of career planning in nursing and the need for nurse managers to take an active role in career planning and development.

  2. Successful Use of Early Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheotomy and the No Sedation Concept in Respiratory Failure in Critically Ill Obese Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaese, Sven; Zander, Marie Christine; Lebiedz, Pia

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of obesity in developed countries is rising. Currently, Europe has a prevalence of 9-30% with significant impact on public health systems. Obese patients in ICUs require special management and treatment. Altered anatomy in obese patients complicates procedures such as mechanical ventilation. Obesity affects cardiopulmonary physiology and requires elevated ventilation pressures. In our retrospective study, we determined the effect of early percutaneous dilatational tracheotomy (PDT) and cessation of sedation on respiratory parameters in severely obese subjects. From June 2010 to July 2014, we included all subjects with a body weight of >130 kg (body mass index >35 kg/m(2)) and respiratory failure who were admitted to the medical ICU of the University Hospital of Münster. All subjects were treated with early PDT and immediate cessation of sedative drugs. We compared ventilator parameters and blood gas analysis before and after PDT. Parameters were recorded on days 0, 1, 3, and 5. Day 0 represents values during ventilation via an endotracheal tube, and days 1, 3, 5 represent values during ventilation via a tracheotomy tube. PDT was performed on day 0 after recording values during ventilation via an endotracheal tube. We included 23 subjects with a mean body mass index of 53.1 kg/m(2) and respiratory failure. After PDT and cessation of sedation, the required ventilation pressures and FIO2 could be rapidly reduced (P tracheotomy with reduction of dead-space ventilation and airway resistance as well as cessation of sedation to enable spontaneous breathing might be a key factor in the therapy of respiratory failure. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  3. A career roles model of career development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Hans A.

    Career development is described as the interactive progression of internal career identity formation and the growth of external career significance. Argued is the need for a content model of career development where the field is dominated by process theories. A theory is put forward of career

  4. It's Always a Pleasure: Exploring Productivity and Pleasure in a Writing Group for Early Career Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Angela; Lewis, Bridget; McDonald, Fiona; Burns, Marcelle

    2012-01-01

    The professional development needs of early career academics (ECAs) are increasingly subject to scrutiny. The literature notes writing groups can be successful in increasing research outputs and improving research track records--a core concern for ECAs. However, the pressure on ECAs to publish takes the pleasure out of writing for many. We argue…

  5. Comparing success rates of anesthesia providers versus trauma surgeons in their use of palpation to identify the cricothyroid membrane in female subjects: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Kenneth N; Karni, Ron J; Cai, Chunyun; Holcomb, John B; Hagberg, Carin A

    2016-07-01

    The primary aim of this study was to compare the success rates of anesthesia providers vs trauma surgeons in their use of palpation to identify the cricothyroid membrane (CTM). The secondary aim was to explore whether prior training and experience performing surgical airways affected the success rates for identifying the CTM. Four female adults participated in this prospective observational study. The participants had varying measurements of neck anatomy that were known or theorized to affect the accuracy of identifying the CTM location. For test purposes, the subjects were positioned with optimal neck extension via placement of a shoulder roll. Anesthesia providers (n = 57) and surgeons (n = 14) of various training levels and clinical experience marked the presumed CTM location on each subject. These palpation markings were then referenced against the ultrasound-confirmed CTM location, and the success rates for identifying the CTM were compared between groups. The overall success rate using palpation to identify the CTM was ≤ 50%, and there were no differences in success rates between the anesthesia providers and trauma surgeons (16% vs 26%, respectively; absolute difference, -10%; 95% confidence interval, -23 to 3; P = 0.15). Furthermore, there were no significant differences in the success rates for identifying the CTM based on either clinical experience or emergency surgical airway experience. The success rates for identifying the CTM using palpation were low and not significantly different for anesthesia providers and surgeons, collectively, as well as for the various levels of training. Anesthesiologists' ability to mark the CTM location correctly did not improve with years of experience.

  6. Perioperative careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicker, Paul

    2012-05-01

    When I look back at how my career started, I think to myself, what if I had undertaken the BA in Business Studies which I had been accepted for, instead of the BSc in Nursing for which I was still waiting to hear the results of my interview? Well, probably I would have spent four years studying business, followed by 40 years sitting in an office somewhere; Tesco, Sainsbury's or Marks and Spencer probably. I was lucky though, my father phoned up every couple of weeks (I was only 17 and didn't really have a clue what I wanted to do) and eventually they said 'yes' and I started my nursing career. Perhaps this is the first bit of advice for anybody thinking of a career in health:

  7. Inked Careers: Tattooing Professional Paths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela DeLuca

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of career has an interdisciplinary and historical constitution, which includes persons, groups, organizations and society. Given that, we aim to deepen the interactionist notion of career from the understanding of a deviant path, supported by a theory and a method appropriated to the cited call for interdisciplinary approaches. Dilemmas (Hughes, 1958 and conflicts (Hughes, 1937 emerged as important analytical categories. Although necessary, these two concepts were not sufficient to contemplate analyses in their entirety. For this reason we conceptualized a third possibility of controversy during a career: the inquiries. The study followed the Narrative method to analyze objective and subjective changes during a tattoo artist’s career through interviews and informal conversations carried out over 22 months. The discussion presents three main contributions. Theoretically, a new understanding of the concept of careers, linking past, present and future and the idea of non-linearity of experienced and envisioned careers. Methodologically, suggesting orientations for future career studies such as the use of turning points as a methodological tool and the investigation of deviant fields. Finally, our defense of the interactionist perspective as suitable for career studies, since it allows the investigation of deviant elements.

  8. Differentiating the contribution of pharmacological from alcohol expectancy effects to changes in subjective response and priming over successive drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Abigail K; Hobbs, Malcolm; Drummond, Colin

    2013-04-01

    Alcohol consumption can prime motivation to continue drinking and may contribute to excessive drinking. Most alcohol administration research assesses the effect of a single alcohol dose on outcome measures; however, this differs from typical drinking occasions in which several drinks are consumed over time. This research tracks priming measures (alcohol urge, latency to first sip, and consumption time) and subjective effects (intoxication, stimulation, and sedation) across consumption of 5 drinks, over a period of 2.5 hours. Alcohol, placebo, and no-alcohol (i.e., soft drink) conditions are compared with isolate the effects of alcohol expectancies and differentiate these from alcohol's pharmacological effects. Alcohol urge and subjective state were measured before and after an initial drink was consumed (preload: alcohol, placebo, or no-alcohol). Four additional drinking phases followed whereby participants had access to 2 drinks (alcohol/no-alcohol, or placebo/no-alcohol). Experimental priming (urge, latency to first sip, consumption time) and subjective effect (intoxication, stimulation, and sedation) outcomes were recorded after each drink. The pattern of alcohol urge following placebo drinks differed compared with alcohol and no-alcohol consumption, Fs(1, 90) > 4.10, ps alcohol condition, while in the alcohol condition urge increased after the first few drinks before decreasing. Urge ratings showed the opposite pattern in the placebo condition (a decrease followed by an increase). Alcohol produced the highest ratings of lightheadedness, F(5, 440) = 2.8, p alcohol and placebo produced increased sedated feelings, Fs ≥ 19.05, ps ≤ 0.001. After placebo, urge was positively related to liking and enjoying the "alcoholic" drinks and feeling more stimulated (rs ≥ 0.31, ps ≤ 0.01). In social drinkers, different factors may affect priming during different stages of a drinking episode. For example, the pharmacological effects of alcohol appear

  9. NASA Early Career Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Early Career Fellowship program was established in 2005 to facilitate the integration of outstanding early career planetary science researchers into established research funding programs by providing tools and experience useful to maintain a successful research program. Executing a successful research program requires a few key elements such as: successful proposal writing; adequate (paid) research time; management of a laboratory; collaboration and networking; frequent and high-quality publications; and adequate start-up equipment funds. These elements may be particularly critical for early career researchers searching for a tenure- track or equivalent position. The Early Career Fellowship program recognizes the importance of these skills and provides extra funding and resources to begin a successful research program. For consideration into The Early Career Fellowship program, the candidate needs to be the P. I. or Science P.I. of a funded research proposal from one of the participating R&A program areas, be within 7 years of earning a PhD, hold a non-tenure track position, and indicate the early career candidacy when submitting the research proposal. If the research proposal is funded and the discipline scientist nominates the candidate as an early career fellow, the candidate is then considered a Fellow and eligible to propose for Step 2. Upon obtaining a tenure-track equivalent position the Fellow submits a Step 2 proposal for up to one hundred thousand dollars in start-up funds. Start-up funds may be used for salary; undergraduate and/or graduate research assistants; supplies and instrument upgrades; travel to conferences, meetings, and advisory groups; time and travel for learning new skills; publication page charges; books and journal subscriptions; computer time and/or specialized software; and other justified research-specific needs. The early career fellowship program provides resources that a more established scientist would have acquired allowing

  10. The career distress scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Creed, Peter; Hood, Michelle; Praskova, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Career distress is a common and painful outcome of many negative career experiences, such as career indecision, career compromise, and discovering career barriers. However, there are very few scales devised to assess career distress, and the two existing scales identified have psychometric weakne...

  11. From Dink to Alphabet Soup and Back: The Ebb and Flow of Career Choice between Partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelardin, Sally; Hochman, Alex

    Achieving both career development and a successful relationship requires a give and take in career choice between partners throughout the stages of a relationship. Whose career takes precedence at different stages of the relationship? How are spousal career decisions today made differently than in the past? How can partners' career decisions be…

  12. A lifestyle intervention program for successfully addressing major cardiometabolic risks in persons with SCI: a three-subject case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigford, Gregory E; Mendez, Armando J; Betancourt, Luisa; Burns-Drecq, Patricia; Backus, Deborah; Nash, Mark S

    2017-01-01

    This study is a prospective case series analyzing the effects of a comprehensive lifestyle intervention program in three patients with chronic paraplegia having major risks for the cardiometabolic syndrome (CMS). Individuals underwent an intense 6-month program of circuit resistance exercise, nutrition using a Mediterranean diet and behavioral support, followed by a 6-month extension (maintenance) phase involving minimal support. The primary goal was a 7% reduction of body mass. Other outcomes analyzed insulin resistance using the HOMA-IR model, and plasma levels of fasting triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. All participants achieved the goal for 7% reduction of body mass and maintained the loss after the MP. Improvements were observed in 2/3 subjects for HOMA-IR and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. All participants improved their risk for plasma triglycerides. We conclude, in a three-person case series of persons with chronic paraplegia, a lifestyle intervention program involving circuit resistance training, a calorie-restrictive Mediterranean-style diet and behavioral support, results in clinically significant loss of body mass and effectively reduced component risks for CMS and diabetes. These results were for the most part maintained after a 6-month MP involving minimal supervision.

  13. 100 years of applied psychology research on individual careers: From career management to retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mo; Wanberg, Connie R

    2017-03-01

    This article surveys 100 years of research on career management and retirement, with a primary focus on work published in the Journal of Applied Psychology. Research on career management took off in the 1920s, with most attention devoted to the development and validation of career interest inventories. Over time, research expanded to attend to broader issues such as the predictors and outcomes of career interests and choice; the nature of career success and who achieves it; career transitions and adaptability to change; retirement decision making and adjustment; and bridge employment. In this article, we provide a timeline for the evolution of the career management and retirement literature, review major theoretical perspectives and findings on career management and retirement, and discuss important future research directions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Career cartography: a conceptualization of career development to advance health and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feetham, Suzanne; Doering, Jennifer J

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to propose a conceptualization of career development that emphasizes the interdependence between research, practice, and policy. Career cartography applies three decades of career development experience to lay out a systematic, comprehensive, and iterative approach for planning and communicating the outcomes of science at any career stage. To inform practice and policy, nurse researchers must be clear on the intended destination and trajectory of the science, and be skilled in communicating that science and vision to diverse stakeholders. Career cartography builds on the science of cartography, is developed within the context of public and health policy, and is composed of several components, including a destination statement, career mapping, a supportive career cartography team, and use of communication and dissemination strategies. The successful utilization of career cartography may accelerate advancement of individual careers, scientific impact, and the discipline as a whole by guiding nurse researchers to be deliberative in career planning and to communicate successfully the outcomes of research across a wide variety of stakeholders. Career cartography provides a framework for planning a nurse researcher's program of research and scholarship to advance science, policy, and health of the public. Career cartography guides nurse researchers to realize their full potential to advance the health of the public and inform public and health policy in academic and practice environments. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  15. Personality Predictors of Successful Development: Toddler Temperament and Adolescent Personality Traits Predict Well-Being and Career Stability in Middle Adulthood

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blatný, Marek; Millová, Katarína; Jelínek, Martin; Osecká, Terezie

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 4 (2015), s. 1-21 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP407/10/2410 Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : personality * temperament * well - being * social functioning * prediction * longitudinal study * life-span psychology * childhood * adolescence * adulthood Subject RIV: AN - Psychology Impact factor: 3.057, year: 2015

  16. Criminal careers and "career criminals."

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blumstein, Alfred

    1986-01-01

    ... A. Visher, editors Panel on Research on Criminal Careers Committee on Research on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1986 i Copyrighttrue Please breaks inserted. are Page files. accidentally typesetting been have ma...

  17. Criminal Careers and "Career Criminals"

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blumstein, Alfred; Cohen, Jacqueline; Roth, Jeffrey A; Visher, Christy A

    1986-01-01

    ..., and Christy A. Visher, editors Panel on Research on Criminal Careers Committee on Research on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education National Research Council National Academy Press Washington, D.C.1986 i Copyrighttrue Please breaks inserted. are Page files. accidentally typesetting be...

  18. Training Efficiency and Transfer Success in an Extended Real-Time Functional MRI Neurofeedback Training of the Somatomotor Cortex of Healthy Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Tibor; Schweizer, Renate; Frahm, Jens

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the level of self-regulation of the somatomotor cortices (SMCs) attained by an extended functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) neurofeedback training. Sixteen healthy subjects performed 12 real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging neurofeedback training sessions within 4 weeks, involving motor imagery of the dominant right as well as the non-dominant left hand. Target regions of interests in the SMC were individually localized prior to the training by overt finger movements. The feedback signal (FS) was defined as the difference between fMRI activation in the contra- and ipsilateral SMC and visually presented to the subjects. Training efficiency was determined by an off-line general linear model analysis determining the fMRI percent signal changes in the SMC target areas accomplished during the neurofeedback training. Transfer success was assessed by comparing the pre- and post-training transfer task, i.e., the neurofeedback paradigm without the presentation of the FS. Group results show a distinct increase in feedback performance (FP) in the transfer task for the trained group compared to a matched untrained control group, as well as an increase in the time course of the training, indicating an efficient training and a successful transfer. Individual analysis revealed that the training efficiency was not only highly correlated to the transfer success but also predictive. Trainings with at least 12 efficient training runs were associated with a successful transfer outcome. A group analysis of the hemispheric contributions to the FP showed that it is mainly driven by increased fMRI activation in the contralateral SMC, although some individuals relied on ipsilateral deactivation. Training and transfer results showed no difference between left- and right-hand imagery, with a slight indication of more ipsilateral deactivation in the early right-hand trainings. PMID:26500521

  19. Training efficiency and transfer success in an extended real-time functional MRI neurofeedback training of the somato-motor cortex of healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor eAuer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the level of self-regulation of the somato-motor cortices (SMC attained by an extended functional MRI (fMRI neurofeedback training. Sixteen healthy subjects performed 12 real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI neurofeedback training sessions within 4 weeks, involving motor imagery of the dominant right as well as the non-dominant left hand. Target regions of interests in the SMC were individually localized prior to the training by overt finger movements. The feedback signal was defined as the difference between fMRI activation in the contra- and ipsilateral SMC and visually presented to the subjects. Training efficiency was determined by an off-line GLM analysis determining the fMRI percent signal changes in the somato-motor cortex (SMC target areas accomplished during the neurofeedback training. Transfer success was assessed by comparing the pre- and post-training transfer task, i.e. the neurofeedback paradigm without the presentation of the feedback signal. Group results show a distinct increase in feedback performance in the transfer task for the trained group compared to a matched untrained control group, as well as an increase in the time course of the training, indicating an efficient training and a successful transfer. Individual analysis revealed that the training efficiency was not only highly correlated to the transfer success but also predictive. Trainings with at least 12 efficient training runs were associated with a successful transfer outcome. A group analysis of the hemispheric contributions to the feedback performance showed that it is mainly driven by increased fMRI activation in the contralateral SMC, although some individuals relied on ipsilateral deactivation. Training and transfer results showed no difference between left and right hand imagery, with a slight indication of more ipsilateral deactivation in the early right hand trainings.

  20. Novice Career Changers Weather the Classroom Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, James; Snyder, Mary Grace; Cuddapah, Jennifer Locraft

    2013-01-01

    A close look at one professional's career change into teaching illustrates unique challenges and qualities, showing in stark relief what makes the induction smoother and the experience more successful. This article presents the story of a novice career changer teacher that illustrates their unique problems and dispositions, as well as…

  1. Dual-Career Couples: The Juggling Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neault, Roberta A.; Pickerell, Deirdre A.

    2005-01-01

    For couples with two professional careers, juggling work and home responsibilities has never been easy. However, in today's global economy, where local job opportunities may be harder to find, new challenges are emerging. Is it possible to have a successful career without sacrificing personal satisfaction, life balance, or relationships? A…

  2. An inner barrier to career development: Preconditions of the impostor phenomenon and consequences for career development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam eNeureiter

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The impostor phenomenon is increasingly recognized as an important psychological construct for career development, yet empirical research on how it functions in this domain is sparse. We investigated in what way impostor feelings are related to the fear of failure, fear of success, self-esteem, and the career-development aspects career planning, career striving, and the motivation to lead. We conducted two studies with independent samples of university students (N = 212 in a laboratory study and working professionals (N = 110 in an online study. In both samples, impostor feelings were fostered by fear of failure, fear of success, and self-esteem and they decreased career planning, career striving, and motivation to lead. A path analysis showed that impostor feelings had the most negative effects on career planning and career striving in students and on the motivation to lead in working professionals. The results suggest that the impostor phenomenon is relevant to career development in different ways at different career stages. Practical implications and interventions to reduce the negative effects of impostor feelings on career development are discussed.

  3. An Inner Barrier to Career Development: Preconditions of the Impostor Phenomenon and Consequences for Career Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neureiter, Mirjam; Traut-Mattausch, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The impostor phenomenon (IP) is increasingly recognized as an important psychological construct for career development, yet empirical research on how it functions in this domain is sparse. We investigated in what way impostor feelings are related to the fear of failure, fear of success, self-esteem, and the career-development aspects career planning, career striving, and the motivation to lead. We conducted two studies with independent samples of university students (N = 212) in a laboratory study and working professionals (N = 110) in an online study. In both samples, impostor feelings were fostered by fear of failure, fear of success, and low self-esteem and they decreased career planning, career striving, and the motivation to lead. A path analysis showed that impostor feelings had the most negative effects on career planning and career striving in students and on the motivation to lead in working professionals. The results suggest that the IP is relevant to career development in different ways at different career stages. Practical implications and interventions to reduce the negative effects of impostor feelings on career development are discussed. PMID:26869957

  4. Cinematic Careers in and of Shadows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathieu, Chris; Stjerne, Iben Sandal

    This chapter analyzes subjective and objective dimensions of developing a career to a large extent based on one or several strong dyadic relationships to directors who invariably overshadow editors and cinematographers, and the personal and professional advantages (maybe even necessity) and dilem...... subjective experience of one’s career (i.e. meaningfulness, quality of working life, ambitions, and accomplishments), as well as its more objective trajectories.......This chapter analyzes subjective and objective dimensions of developing a career to a large extent based on one or several strong dyadic relationships to directors who invariably overshadow editors and cinematographers, and the personal and professional advantages (maybe even necessity...

  5. Career Guidance in Five English Independent Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Jo

    2018-01-01

    English independent schools are not required to follow government statutory guidance in a number of aspects including career education and guidance, and yet many are actively engaged in careers work and this has caught the attention of policymakers. State schools are subject to statutory guidance but, according to Ofsted and other authorities, the…

  6. Understanding the Career Development of Underprepared College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Amber N.; Gibbons, Melinda M.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the career development of underprepared college students using relational career theory. Specifically, the constructs of family influence, locus of control, and career decision-making self-efficacy were explored as they relate to perceived success in college. Significant correlations between external locus…

  7. Women's Career Investment and the Returns: Career Benefits and Barriers in the 21st Century Green Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Philomena M.

    2010-01-01

    The key to building successful strategies as a higher education practitioner promoting 21st century green economy career awareness for women attending urban universities, demands advocating for benefits, and subverting potential barriers, to positively influence career choices. Women's career investment and returns increase when proper strategies…

  8. Construct validity of the career myths scale among South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Career beliefs can limit individuals' abilities to make effective career decisions and hence it is important to identify such beliefs during counselling. Two hundred and sixty grade 8 to 11 high school learners completed the Career Myths Scale, which is a measure of dysfunctional beliefs. The data were subjected to a ...

  9. Research on a Career Workshop to Reduce Sexism with Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, James M.; And Others

    A four-week career workshop was designed to provide college women on a large midwestern campus with information about sexism, sex roles, career planning, and career resources in an effort to sensitize them to past sex role biases. Portions of a 28-minute color video tape (not included in this document) were presented to the subjects and discussed…

  10. Career Maturity Aspects of the Kuder Occupational Interest Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigington, John H.

    1982-01-01

    Determined if selected scores from the Kuder Occupational Interest Survey (KOIS) could be indicative of client career maturity. The data for each subject included three scores from the KOIS and one measure of career maturity. Significant correlations were found between the KOIS scores and career maturity. (Author)

  11. Career competencies for the modern career

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, Marinka; Scheerens, Jaap

    2006-01-01

    Career development gains new meaning in the context of employability demands in a knowledge economy. In this context, increased mobility, a dynamic work environment, and an increased level of career support from employers are seen as characteristics of a modern career. All of these characteristics

  12. Airport Careers. Aviation Careers Series. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines the variety of careers available in airports. The first part of the booklet provides general information about careers at airports, while the main part of the booklet outlines the following nine job categories: airport director, assistant airport director, engineers, support personnel,…

  13. Airline Careers. Aviation Careers Series. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines the variety of careers available in airlines. The first part of the booklet provides general information about careers in the airline industry, including salaries, working conditions, job requirements, and projected job opportunities. In the main part of the booklet, the following 22 job…

  14. Career progression in older managers : motivational and gender differences

    OpenAIRE

    Bown-Wilson, Dianne

    2011-01-01

    This study explores what UK managers aged 50 and over perceive as career progression at a time in life when opportunities for further promotion may have ceased. It examines motivational drivers and subjectively significant personal and organizational influences on career progression. It also investigates whether motivation for career progression is perceived to have changed over the career and the extent to which it may differ between male and female older managers. The research adopted a ...

  15. Internal Labour Market as Factor in the Career Success Perceived by an EngineerMercado Interno de Trabalho como Fator de Sucesso na Carreira Percebido pelo EngenheiroMercado Interno de Trabajo como Factor de Éxito en la Carrera Percibido por Ingeniero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HEREDIA, Alberto Ismael Bejarano

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe phenomenon of the global crisis in both the financial energy sectors as well as the emergence of new technologies companies consider their success or failure depending on the ability to respond quickly to opportunities in their competitive environment. This competitiveness is found especially in the capacity of their technical professionals. On the other hand career is characterized as protean, boundaryless and directed mainly by the individual. Given this scenario, organizations should organize an internal labor market to attract, develop and retain talent. The purpose of this research is to study the impact of internal labour market and subjective career success perceived by engineers in organizations. For the study a survey was conducted via email to 1135 graduates with a response rate of 89.07%. Structural equations were then applied to identify relationships. The results show a positive relationship between internal labour market and subjective career success perceived by engineers working in the organization. The conclusions of the study can help engineers and companies to drive the careers of these knowledge workers as a way to help them to be happier and help their companies to have more dynamic and proactive engineers. At the same time, educational institutions with engineering programs will gain a better understanding of an engineer’s career, and will be able to use this knowledge to review the effectiveness of their educational programs.RESUMOPelo fenômeno da crise global nos setores financeiro e de energia, e pelo surgimento de novas tecnologias, as empresas consideram que seu sucesso ou fracasso depende da capacidade de responder rapidamente às oportunidades em seu ambiente competitivo. Esta competitividade é encontrada principalmente na capacidade de seus profissionais técnicos. Por outro lado, a carreira é caracterizada como protéana, sem fronteiras e dirigida principalmente pelo indivíduo. Diante desse cen

  16. Student Success Through Leadership Self-efficacy: A Comparison of International and Domestic Students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David H K Nguyen

    2016-01-01

    .... Leadership capacity and efficacy are important indicators of success in higher education and are linked to important academic, career, and life benefits, such as career and leadership aspirations...

  17. Analysis of medical students' needs for development of a career guidance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hyejin; Kim, Eunjeong; Hwang, Jinyoung; Lee, Seunghee

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide basic data for the development of a career guidance program through a demand survey. For this purpose, three study topics were examined: Is there a difference between the satisfaction and importance of a career program? Is there a difference between the satisfaction and importance of a career program by gender, grade level? and What type of mentor and the mentoring way of medical students demanded? The subjects were 380 students at Seoul National University College of Medicine. The data were analyzed by frequency analysis, paired t-test, and Borich's formula. By t-test with matched samples for satisfaction-importance, We noted statistically significant differences in all domains. In particular, the difference was greater in the second year. According to the needs analysis, the most urgent program is meeting with seniors in various career areas. Also, medical students hope for mentor from clinical professors of the university and successful medical practitioners, and personal counseling. These results show that medical students need a career guidance program. The findings of the study can be used to guide the development of career education programs and curriculum for medicine students.

  18. Career Pathways in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaskey, Steve; Johnson, Tricia

    2010-01-01

    The revisions to the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 require that career and technical education (CTE) programs provide students with a clear pathway from secondary to postsecondary education, and into high-wage, high-skill and high-demand careers. States nationwide are developing programs, called career pathways, to…

  19. Vocopher: The Career Collaboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, Kevin W.; Savickas, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    Vocopher: The Career Collaboratory is an Internet-based website (http://www.vocopher.com) that contains free career instruments and educational materials intended for practitioners, researchers, and teachers of career development. The instruments include inventories and tests designed to measure the processes that shape career development and work…

  20. Being Unemployed in the Boundaryless Career Era: Does Psychological Mobility Pay off?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vansteenkiste, Sarah; Verbruggen, Marijke; Sels, Luc

    2013-01-01

    In the notions of the boundaryless and self-directed careers, being able to adjust swiftly to different work and career circumstances is deemed to be an imperative component of career success. Also for unemployed individuals psychological mobility, i.e. the extent to which people can envision a variety of career options as viable opportunities for…

  1. Good Looks and Good Practice: The Attitudes of Career Practitioners to Attractiveness and Appearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Julia; Hooley, Tristram; Bagri, Kiren Kaur

    2017-01-01

    Empirical evidence attests the impact that career image has on objective career success, yet little is known of how career practitioners conceptualise and operationalise this information. This article presents the quantitative findings of an online survey of career practitioners (n = 399, 74% female, 89% white and 75% from the U.K.) exploring…

  2. TSA Prepares Students for Career Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pratyusha

    2012-01-01

    So often, people assume that TSA is only the Transportation Security Administration, but another very important TSA is the Technology Student Association, an extracurricular organization that uses competitive events and leadership to help develop science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) skills and knowledge in its membership. In this…

  3. The Career Conversation: Training Parents to Help Their Children Make Career Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osguthorpe, Russell T.; And Others

    Described is a pilot test of a project whose prime objective is to improve parent/child interaction concerning career choice. The subjects (N=30) were ninth and tenth grade students and their parents. Parents were grouped and introduced to the Career Conversation Manual, and challenged to hold at least one planned conversation before the next…

  4. [Postdoctoral lecturer thesis in medicine: academic competence or career booster?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorg, H; Betzler, C; Grieswald, C; Schwab, C G G; Tilkorn, D J; Hauser, J

    2016-06-01

    The postdoctoral lecturer thesis in medicine represents an essential success factor for the career of a physician; however, there is controversial discussion on whether this reflects academic competence or is more a career booster. In this context we conducted a survey among postdoctoral medical lecturers with the aim to evaluate the significance of this qualification. The online survey was performed using a questionnaire requesting biographical parameters and subjective ratings of topics concerning the postdoctoral lecturer thesis. Overall 628 questionnaires were included in the study. The significance of the postdoctoral qualification was rated high in 68.6 % and was seen to be necessary for professional advancement in 71.0 %. The chances of obtaining a full professorship after achieving a postdoctoral qualification were rated moderate to low (68.1 %); nevertheless, 92.3 % would do it again and 86.5 % would recommend it to colleagues. Accordingly, 78.8 % were against its abolishment. Wishes for reforms included standardized federal regulations, reduced dependency on professors and more transparency. The postdoctoral lecturer qualification in medicine is highly valued and the majority of responders did not want it to be abolished. Although the chances for a full professorship were only rated low, successful graduation seems to be beneficial for the career; however, there is a need for substantial structural and international changes.

  5. Subjective perception of radioactivity. No change post successful treatment with radioiodine; Strahlen bleiben boese. Keine Aenderung der subjektiven Konzepte von Radioaktivitaet nach erfolgreicher Radioiodtherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freudenberg, L.S.; Mueller, S.P.; Beyer, T.; Bockisch, A. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2009-07-01

    We assess the attitude of patients with thyroid disease towards radiation and radioactivity before and after radioiodine therapy by means of a cultural-anthropological approach. We evaluate in patient interviews how their subjective attitude towards radioactivity as an abstract term and towards radioactivity in the medical context on the basis of their personal experiences with radionuclide therapy. 29 patients with autonomously functioning thyroid lesions (17 women, 12 men, 35-79 years) were included in this study. All patients were interviewed prior to and 22-27 month post radioiodine therapy in an open dialogue with the principal investigator. Patients were asked to describe their attitude towards radioactivity in general and towards radioiodine therapy in particular. Patients were asked to use a scoring system (1: positive, 5: negative) to quantify their perception of radioactivity. The personal perception of radioactivity as an abstract term does not change significantly (p = 0.15) before and after radioiodine therapy. This perception is linked to mostly negative impressions of radiactivity. However, patients become more positive when assessing the value of radioactivity as part of their therapy regimen. Thus, we observe a significant increase in percepted value of radioactivity post radioiodine therapy (p = 0.03). Patients continue to view radioactivity as something negative despite treatment success following radioiodine therapy. Our results provide useful information for patient information by the nuclear medicine physician prior to a radioiodine therapy. (orig.)

  6. Research on a Workshop to Reduce the Effects of Sexism and Sex Role Socialization on Women's Career Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, James M.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Treatment subjects spent more time thinking about their career planning and reported investigative, social, and enterprising careers as being more appropriate career choices than control group subjects. The workshop expanded women's masculine sex role self-concepts and changed their attitudes about the appropriateness of career areas. (Author)

  7. Complementary Person-Culture Values Fit and Hierarchical Career Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtschlag, Claudia; Morales, Carlos E.; Masuda, Aline D.; Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Although career success is an issue of global concern, few studies have examined the antecedents of career success across cultures. In this study we test whether the relationship between individuals' self-enhancement values (achievement and power) and hierarchical status differs across 29 countries and whether this variation depends on countries'…

  8. How To Stay Stuck in the Wrong Career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Herminia

    2002-01-01

    An effective midlife career change is challenging to bring about successfully. Identity and its relationship to work are key factors. A three-point plan to a successful career change includes the following: know thyself, consult trusted advisors, and think big. (JOW)

  9. The effect of career planning education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Turnšek Mikačič

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Research Question (RQ: We employed a qualitative approach to study the effects of career planning education, perceiving it as an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of introductorily-organised career education. Purpose: We researched important areas to formulate a questionnaire for quantitative analysis. Method: We used a qualitative research approach in order to develop a theoretical framework for the exploration, interpretation and identification of the impact of education on career plans, on the changing attitudes towards careers, the raising of self-esteem and perception of personal growth. We used Neuro-linguistic programming as a tool to develop and achieve personal excellence within the career planning. Results: We constructed a paradigmatic model and developed the final theory. By means of qualitative analysis, we identified the elements of design criteria for the construction of the questionnaire; we measured the effects of education on career plans. Organization: The findings of the research will prove useful in personal management and career management in the process of planning and organizing the promotion of individuals within the organizations in accordance with the needs of those organizations. Originality: A career plan as a building block of personal growth, based on the model of career education with the in-built elements and tools of NLP, has been confirmed by the most recent studies in neuroscience. This represents a novelty, and, therefore, this study offers a genuine contribution, and is an indicator of contemporary knowledge, based on the results of the research. Limitations/Future Research: The model of career education and the results of this study open new directions for further research of the influence of career planning on the organisation of companies and their success, which is the phase of the study which was not carried out.

  10. Career drop outs of young elite athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Fišer

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The main problem of the study was to examine the characteristics of sports career drop outs of young elite sportswomen and their adaptation to the post-sport life. The sample included 20 ex-young elite sportswomen, who had brought their successful sport careers to an end before the age of 19. We used a modified interview about sports career termination (Cecić Erpič, 1998 for the investigation of the characteristics of their sports careers. To examine the caracteristics of sport careers we used frequency analysis and cluster analysis. The results showed that the participants mostly stated more than one reason for the termination of their career. The most common reasons for career termination were: lack of motivation, bad relations with trainers or co-competitors and dedication to school or education. After the end of a sports career most of the young sportswomen stayed actively in touch with sport, either as trainers, judges, or they remained engaged in sports for recreation.

  11. Research Funding Opportunities for Early Career Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Richard

    2009-10-01

    This talk will describe opportunities for early career faculty members in the physical sciences to obtain funding for scientific research and educational projects. I will discuss programs offered by Research Corporation for Science Advancement, a private nonprofit foundation, which include opportunities for scientists at primarily undergraduate institutions and at research universities. I will emphasize strategies for successful grant writing. The target audience is early career academic scientists in Astronomy, Physics, and related fields, as well as graduate students and postdoctoral researchers considering careers in these academic disciplines.

  12. On the Horizon: Important Future Directions for Career Development: ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebert, Bryan; Bezanson, M. Lynne

    Career development in Canada has been gaining prominence over the past decade. This digest outlines the principles on which career development must remain focused. First, the meaning of "career success" needs to be reconceptualized. With companies downsizing, people need to be able to view themselves as successful, despite changing…

  13. Undergraduate Breakfast, Career Workshop, and Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate students can enjoy a hearty breakfast and learn about how to prepare for a wide variety of careers in physics outside of academia. Topics of this interactive workshop will include planning and self-assessment, inventorying transferable skills, finding out more about career opportunities, and successfully applying for jobs. Immediately following the workshop, top presenters from the Undergraduate Research/SPS sessions will be recognized. All presenters in the undergraduate sessions will receive certificates acknowledging their scientific accomplishments.

  14. Dentistry: Careers in Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Dentistry e-mail Print Share Careers in Dentistry A dental education opens up a world of ... accredited training programs in your area . Careers in Dentistry Be a Dentist General Dentistry Dental Specialties Dental ...

  15. CareerConnector

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — CareerConnector is USAID's premiere recruiting tool. It is powered by Monster and integrated with www.usajobs.gov. CareerConnector tracks the progression of a...

  16. Gender Differences, Career Aspirations and Career Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study therefore is to explore gender differences in adolescents' career aspirations and career development barriers among secondary school students in Kisumu municipality, Kenya. The study was conducted on 348 form four secondary school students. The major findings of this study show that there ...

  17. The Dual Career Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurtin, Lee

    1980-01-01

    The dual career couple is forced to make a series of choices and compromises that impact the realms of marriage and career. The dilemmas that confront dual career marriages can be overcome only by compromise, accommodation, and mutual understanding on the part of the individuals involved. A revamping of human resources and recruitment programs is…

  18. Die Verschränkung von Arbeitskultur, beruflichem Erfolg und Geschlecht in technik- und naturwissenschaftlichen Berufen The Entanglement of Work Culture, Career Success, and Gender in Technical and Natural Scientific Professions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inken Lind

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In dem Band geht die Autorin Dr. Yvonne Haffner, Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin am Institut für Soziologie der Universität Darmstadt, den strukturellen Barrieren für eine gleichberechtigte Karriere von Frauen und Männern im Beruf nach. Dabei werden vor allem gängige Leistungskriterien in den Blick genommen und die verbreitete Vorstellung von der auf individuellen Leistungen beruhenden Karriere hinterfragt. Die Ergebnisse verdeutlichen, dass karriererelevante Anforderungen nur in relativ geringem Maße an objektivierbare Leistungskriterien gebunden sind und impliziten, wenig objektivierbaren Kriterien eine besondere Bedeutung für den Karriereverlauf zukommt. Diese impliziten Kriterien beziehen sich auf die moderne Arbeitskultur mit ihrem hohen Verfügbarkeitsanspruch, der sich wiederum geschlechtsspezifisch unterschiedlich auswirkt.This author of this book, Dr. Yvonne Haffner, research assistant at the Institute for Sociology at the University of Darmstadt, inspects the structural barriers for equal career opportunities for women and men in the work force. She examines the general criteria for achievement as well as the widespread idea that careers are dependant on individual performance. The results merely underscore the fact that demands relevant to the career are rarely bound to objective performance criteria. Conversely, implied criteria, which are rarely objective, have taken on important meaning for career paths. These implied criteria are often related to modern working cultures with high demands in terms of availability. This has a varied gender-specific effect.

  19. Building Blocks, Learning Goals, and Success Criteria: Planning Instruction and Formative Assessment for K-8 Math Standards. From the College and Career Ready Standards to Teaching and Learning in the Classroom: A Series of Resources for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiason, Glory; Chang, Sandy; Heritage, Margaret; Jones, Barbara; Herman, Joan

    2014-01-01

    This resource is part of a series produced by the Center for Standards and Assessment Implementation (CSAI) to assist teachers and those who support teachers to plan teaching and learning from College and Career Ready Standards (CCRS) for all students, including students with disabilities, English learners, academically at-risk students, students…

  20. Career Profiles of Generation Y and Their Potential Influencers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Talita Dante Cordeiro

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify the predominant career profiles among Generation Y in Brazil and investigate the influence of demographic and professional characteristics in these profiles. Career profiles are defined as combinations of the presence of Boundaryless and Protean career attitudes. This study is descriptive, the sample is non-probabilistic and intentional and consists of 2,376 people. Cluster Analysis and Chi-square tests were used. The results show that people from Generation Y have a high presence of attitudes related to new careers and that these new careers are associated with high education and high income, mainly the Boundaryless career. However, there is a small portion of the sample that doesn’t present new career attitudes, indicating that this is just a movement and cannot be considered a reality for all studied subjects.

  1. Promoting sustainable excellence through diversity in research careers

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Dr. Vinkenburg, Claartje; Guinot, Genevieve

    2015-01-01

    Excellence is a non-negotiable in science, a necessary condition for a successful careers as well as the funding of research projects. Scientific excellence is the sole criterion used by the European Research Council (ERC) to award frontier research grants. However, statistics show that there are still persistent inequalities between men and women scientists in ERC funding success as well as other career outcomes. Dr. Claartje Vinkenburg, of the VU University of Amsterdam, will illustrate two projects commissioned by the ERC Gender Balance Working Group to uncover and address this phenomenon. The first project [ERCAREER (Vinkenburg PI, 2012-2014)] is about unconventional careers and career breaks, and studies the gendered nature of career paths of ERC applicants. Findings show that “conventional careers” in science are inextricably tied to normative beliefs about the ideal academic, mobility, independence, and excellence. Allowing unconventional careers to address the issue results in ir...

  2. Ensuring Students' Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblinger, James L.

    2006-01-01

    James L. Oblinger, Chancellor of North Carolina State University, argues that higher education must continually evolve new methods of teaching and learning to support students' lifelong skills and impending careers. Part of ensuring students' success lies in finding alternative learning models, such as the Student-Centered Activities for Large…

  3. Kids into health careers: a rural initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauver, Lori S; Swan, Beth Ann; West, Margaret Mary; Zukowsky, Ksenia; Powell, Mary; Frisby, Tony; Neyhard, Sue; Marsella, Alexis

    2011-01-01

    To describe a project that introduces middle school and high school students living in Pennsylvania's rural geographic regions to nursing careers through outreach extended to students regardless of gender, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status. The authors employed many strategies to inform students about careers in nursing. The methods included: working with guidance counselors, participating in community health fairs, taking part in school health career fairs, collaborating with Area Health Education Centers, serving on volunteer local education advisory boards, developing a health careers resource guide, and establishing a rural health advisory board. Developing developmentally appropriate programs may have the potential to pique interest in nursing careers in children of all ages, preschool through high school. Publicity is needed to alert the community of kids into health care career programs. Timing is essential when planning visits to discuss health care professions opportunities with middle and high school students. It is important to increase the number of high school student contacts during the fall months. Targeting high school seniors is particularly important as they begin the college applications process and determine which school will best meet their educational goals. Outcome measures to determine the success of health career programs for students in preschool through high school are needed. Evaluation methods will be continued over the coming years to assess effectiveness. © 2010 National Rural Health Association.

  4. Helping early career research scientists ascend the professional ladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Laina

    2013-08-01

    The Keystone Symposia Early Career Investigator Travel Award initiative is a unique successful research mentoring program tailored for 'end of the pipeline' life and biomedical scientists from academia and industry. Using targeted educational, mentoring, and networking activities, the program benefits early career scientists in solving a specific laboratory-based research question that is limiting their evolving research and could increase their ability to obtain new grants and improve their career progression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [The Influence of Subjective Health Status, Post-Traumatic Growth, and Social Support on Successful Aging in Middle-Aged Women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hee; Jang, Hyung Suk; Yang, Young Hee

    2016-10-01

    This study was done to investigate factors influencing successful aging in middle-aged women. A convenience sample of 103 middle-aged women was selected from the community. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire and analyzed using descriptive statistics, two-sample t-test, one-way ANOVA, Kruskal Wallis test, Pearson correlations, Spearman correlations and multiple regression analysis with the SPSS/WIN 22.0 program. Results of regression analysis showed that significant factors influencing successful aging were post-traumatic growth and social support. This regression model explained 48% of the variance in successful aging. Findings show that the concept 'post-traumatic growth' is an important factor influencing successful aging in middle-aged women. In addition, social support from friends/co-workers had greater influence on successful aging than social support from family. Thus, we need to consider the positive impact of post-traumatic growth and increase the chances of social participation in a successful aging program for middle-aged women.

  6. Navigating the Path to a Biomedical Science Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Andrea McNeely

    The number of biomedical PhD scientists being trained and graduated far exceeds the number of academic faculty positions and academic research jobs. If this trend is compelling biomedical PhD scientists to increasingly seek career paths outside of academia, then more should be known about their intentions, desires, training experiences, and career path navigation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to understand the process through which biomedical PhD scientists are trained and supported for navigating future career paths. In addition, the study sought to determine whether career development support efforts and opportunities should be redesigned to account for the proportion of PhD scientists following non-academic career pathways. Guided by the social cognitive career theory (SCCT) framework this study sought to answer the following central research question: How does a southeastern tier 1 research university train and support its biomedical PhD scientists for navigating their career paths? Key findings are: Many factors influence PhD scientists' career sector preference and job search process, but the most influential were relationships with faculty, particularly the mentor advisor; Planned activities are a significant aspect of the training process and provide skills for career success; and Planned activities provided skills necessary for a career, but influential factors directed the career path navigated. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.

  7. The physics of an academic career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Merry L; de Castro Brás, Lisandra E

    2017-12-01

    We adopted well-known physics equations to illustrate concepts for developing a successful academic career plan. Formulas for distance, force, momentum, and power are used to explain how to define goals and set a pace that maximizes success potential. Formulas for synergy, balance, and stress are used to highlight common obstacles encountered by both junior (untenured and early career) and established faculty and provide ways to circumvent or limit damage from setbacks. Combined, these formulas provide tips for thriving in an academic environment.

  8. Fundamentos Basicos de Career Education. Monografia en Career Education. [Basic Fundamentals of Career Education. Monograph in Career Education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    This document is the Spanish translation of ED 145 222, A Primer for Career Education. In this monograph, a view of the basic nature of the career education effort is discussed under the following topics: the basis of need for career education; the meaning and goals of career education; the difference between career education and vocational…

  9. Building careers, managing capitals

    OpenAIRE

    Flynn, Emma

    2015-01-01

    I sought to find out whether this was a tension between artistic and commercial in the career of visual artists, and if so, how this tension was managed. In attempting to uncover information which could address the research question I undertook in-depth career history interviews with artists which covered their time at art school through to their current practice. The career history method was deliberately chosen in order to address the research question at a tangent as both th...

  10. Special Issue: Building Your Career Development e-Business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Career Planning and Adult Development Journal, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Nine articles in this issue discuss how to develop a career development e-business, how e-business has expanded, creating a successful Web presence, doing business on the Internet, and how to take control of your career and future. (JOW)

  11. Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of North Dakota's Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper captures the progress made by North Dakota in adopting both the common core state standards, subsequent work in ensuring those standards are accompanied by college- and career-ready assessments, and the potential benefits of preparing all students for success in college and a career. (Contains 11 endnotes.)

  12. Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of Nebraska's Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper captures the progress made by Nebraska in adopting both the common core state standards, subsequent work in ensuring those standards are accompanied by college- and career-ready assessments, and the potential benefits of preparing all students for success in college and a career. (Contains 11 endnotes.)

  13. Narrative Career Counselling for People with Refugee Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkhezr, Peyman; McMahon, Mary

    2017-01-01

    For people with refugee backgrounds, pursuing a meaningful career in their country of resettlement is important for their successful integration. However, for many, achieving this is a challenging process. Career counsellors may have a role to play in facilitating the transition and integration of people with refugee backgrounds, and narrative…

  14. Gender and medical careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riska, Elianne

    2011-03-01

    The concerns about physicians' career advancement tend to be raised in gender terms, because women presently constitute close to and will soon form a majority of the medical students in most western societies. The question is to what extent female and male medical students and residents today make similar or different career and lifestyle choices? Two major mechanisms have been referred to as the reason for gender differences in career paths for physicians. The major theoretical framework tends to be the socialization or sex-role theory and later versions of this explanatory framework. The other mechanism referred to is structural and points to the barriers or the concrete support that women and men experience in making their career decisions. Studies of medical students in the UK and US have shown that women students expected family demands to hamper career plans, while male students were less influenced by family concerns. The importance of role models and mentors in setting the career goals of medical students and residents has recently confirmed early studies of the topic. A number of studies have documented that early negative experiences or lack of encouragement in medical school deter women from choosing surgery as a career. Recent studies suggest that lifestyle choices rather than merely career advancement influence both female and male surgeons' career plans. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Career guidance in communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rie

    from a critical psychological standpoint the paper introduces a social practice theory of career guidance. The social practice theory of career guidance argues that career guidance can be seen as a collective practice in which people can join forces with career guidance practitioners to analyse...... their situation and based on these insights create new opportunities in relation to their future educational or vocational participation in society (Thomsen 2012). From this idea, the second part of the paper the paper moves on to consider the practical implications of taking the collective as the starting point...

  16. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and Career Obstacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Charles C.; Woodward, Geoffrey A.

    1998-01-01

    Relationships between clients' Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) scores and their career obstacles were investigated. Uses of MBTI are presented briefly. Subjects (N=118) were seeking career counseling; counselors administering the tests and rating clients were blind to the hypothesis. Results of a regression analysis are presented and discussed.…

  17. A second career in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, D E

    1984-03-01

    Career changes in all vocations are relatively common in the forties age group due to a variety of factors which include a crisis period caused by polarities of Generativity versus Stagnation as conceptualized by Erik H. Erikson. Generativity is served not only by procreativity but also by guiding the next generation through teaching. The result can be the strength of Care. Stagnation can result in unhappiness, irrational and destructive behavior, or withdrawal. Concepts of young, old and mortality also come into focus. A successful career change from private practice to academic medicine depends upon a combination of power, opportunity, and character. To be successful, the change should be made for positive reasons and be based upon youthful concepts in the cold reality of the financial and intellectual challenges of a new and competitive career. If properly done, both the personal rewards and the contribution to future medical care can be quite positive.

  18. Successful scientist: What's the winning formula?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, April J; Ciappio, Eric D

    2014-11-01

    What does it take to become a successful scientist? This question is usually asked or thought about at some point in a young scientist's career. The early stages of a scientific career are fraught with many hardships, and achieving success can seem impossible and daunting. After encountering many obstacles, it becomes easy to focus on failures and lose sight of career goals. The journey to success can seem so simple when looked upon from the outside, but even the best scientists have endured many hardships, which are often not communicated. This educational symposium featured a diverse panel of 5 accomplished scientists representing different work environments, such as government, industry, and academia. They discussed tips on how to have a successful career journey and the key qualities of a successful scientist. Also, they revealed the secret to what's in the winning formula for success. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  19. Today's Physicians Seek Career Direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Haker, Veronica R.

    1998-01-01

    Changes in the role of the physician in today's society have made their career choices risky. Career specialists have an opportunity to assist those who do not normally seek career advice outside their own profession. (JOW)

  20. Perspectives of unlicensed assistive personnel on career development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaragian, Salpy; Crooks, Heidi; Pieters, Huibrie C

    2013-09-01

    An equivalency program, Method 3, is a viable but underused option for unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) who pursue licensure. This study describes the perceptions of UAP on opportunities for career development. Eighteen UAP participated in three focus groups. Thematic analysis was conducted with verbatim transcription. Three major themes represented the lively discussions that occurred: core driving forces, processes of career development, and anticipated and desirable outcomes. Various subthemes described these major themes. Method 3 provides a realistic approach to help UAP persevere with career development. Collaboration with management and peers, encouragement, and effective communication contributed to the success of participants, despite obstacles and challenges. Camaraderie and flexible scheduling were critical elements in participants' pursuit of first licensure. Taking small steps was described as an effective approach for UAP to persevere with career development. Support for informal career development is essential. Nursing leaders should consider an equivalency approach to accommodate individual preferences and learning needs for career development. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Construct Interdisciplinary Curriculum by Career Interest Code Within Major for Multiple Career Paths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Fei Huang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this research were 1 to explore both teachers’ and students’ points of view of what courses students should take with regard to future occupation, 2 to investigate “Career Interest Code within Major”, and 3 to establish a more comprehensive curriculum path. For data collection, a curriculum- occupation questionnaire was designed and administered to 13 faculties, the career interest inventory was administered to 162 students, and two focus group interviews were held with 14 student participants. The results showed that 1 teachers emphasized the importance of basic professional, while students wished for a more diversified curriculum to enrich their career visions. 2 Gender difference was found in Holland Codes (RIASEC by Career Interest Inventory (CII. Students scored highest in Investigative (I, second highest code in Artistic (A, and the third highest in Social (S. Male’s Holland code was significantly higher than female’s in Realistic (R and Investigative (I types, while the female’s Holland code was significantly higher than male’s in the Artist (A type. There were also significant differences between grades by ANOVA in Investigative (I, Enterprising (E, and Conventional (C types. The results showed that the freshman’s Holland codes were most congruent with the department codes. The senior students showed the most career interest differentiation. And 3 all Holland codes among sampled subjects have scattered around Holland’s Hexagon Codes-RIASEC; therefore, the “Career Interest Code within Major” model is well supported. According to the findings above, a more comprehensive curriculum following four pathways is recommended: 1 theoretic bio-science career path, 2 applying bio-science career path, 3 interdisciplinary career path, and 4 transformation career path.

  2. A Phenomenological Exploration of the Experiences of Dual-Career Lesbian and Gay Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Ryan, Leslie W.; McFarland, William P.

    2010-01-01

    Dual-career lesbian and gay couples face unique struggles as they encounter relational and workplace discrimination. This phenomenological study explored how relationship and career intersect for lesbian and gay couples. Three themes emerged that described how couples successfully blended relationship and career: planfulness, creating positive…

  3. Empowering High-Risk Clients to Attain a Better Quality of Life: A Career Resiliency Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickwood, Rory R.; Roberts, Jillian; Batten, Suzanne; Marshall, Anne; Massie, Kendra

    2004-01-01

    Career counselors frequently encounter clients who are at high risk for career and life development difficulties. Research suggests there is a connection between resiliency and successful career development in high-risk clients. Many high-risk individuals have poor decision-making skills and lack motivation to succeed in life and career…

  4. Job performance ratings : The relative importance of mental ability, conscientiousness, and career adaptability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohme, Melanie; Zacher, Hannes

    According to career construction theory, continuous adaptation to the work environment is crucial to achieve work and career success. In this study, we examined the relative importance of career adaptability for job performance ratings using an experimental policy-capturing design. Employees (N =

  5. Testing Times: Careers Market Policies and Practices in England and the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Deirdre; Meijers, Frans; Kuijpers, Marinka

    2015-01-01

    Careers work is a very political business. Since the early 1990s, successive governments in England and the Netherlands have persistently challenged those working in the careers sector to demonstrate the educational, social and economic value and impact of their work. In this context, the marketisation of career guidance policies and practices has…

  6. Developing Career Management Competencies among Undergraduates and the Role of Work-Integrated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Denise; Wilton, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores undergraduate capabilities in career self-management and the influence of work-integrated learning (WIL). Career management competencies are an important aspect of individual employability and impact on wellbeing, graduate job attainment and long-term career success. Enhanced competencies among graduates can assist Faculty in…

  7. The Civil Servants Career Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Comãnescu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The current economic and financial context, influenced by the crisis, as well as the need of meeting the European Union standards, make the permanent restructuring of the workforce, combined with career staff development an extremely important line of action. Career consists of succession of positions in a hierarchy, resulting from a series of experiences, correlated with each other, through which any person pass along life. Career or professional development is a process more complex than training, aimed at acquiring useful knowledge, both in relation to the current and future positions, along the life span and development of a person. In the Romanian labour market conditions, organizations need to find the most appropriate way to identify, attract and maintain, with maximum efficiency, performant human resources with exceptional skills and/or professional experience. The choice of specialization has become a component of education. A well-determined vocational guidance system may allow for that choice of specialization which directly answers to the market requirements.

  8. THE IMPORTANCE OF SERVICE PLACEMENT AND CHANNELLINGTO PREPARE HUMAN RESOURCES FOR STUDENTS TO MEET THE CAREERS OF THE FUTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Mariana

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Placement and distribution Service aimed at helping put and passing students in accordance with the potential, interests, and talents. Placement and distribution services, namely continuous process to facilitate learners achieve success the process and results of the study as well as optimal development in order to achieve the goals of national education. Guidance and counselling Services in the form of peminatan provide ample opportunity for learners to channel and put yourself on the path to a more appropriate in the framework of the completion of the studies are focused, successful, educated and clear in next. The purpose of the service placement and channelling instill interest subjects, confirming the interest of subjects, as well as select and establish an interest group of subjects, the cross-subjects and study subjects who followed in the education unit, which was being pursued, career choice and/or advanced course options up to the College

  9. Real Estate Career Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Robert; Gardner, Gene

    Designed to provide basic information on the major entry-level career fields in real estate, this document can be used as a reference manual for counselors and instructors. The manual contains general information about the following real estate careers: salesperson, sales manager, broker, land developer, property manager, appraiser, mortgage loan…

  10. Health Inequality and Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Structural explanations of career choice and development are well established. Socioeconomic inequality represents a powerful factor shaping career trajectories and economic outcomes achieved by individuals. However, a robust and growing body of evidence demonstrates a strong link between socioeconomic inequality and health outcomes. Work is a key…

  11. Careers in Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Mort; And Others

    1977-01-01

    A career in the broadcasting, recording, or film industries is attractive to many people, partly because of the glamour that tends to be identified with these fields. Several of the best known careers, completely behind the scenes or only partly in the spotlight but also interesting and challenging, are described. (Editor/RK)

  12. Security careers skills, compensation, and career paths

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    The third edition of Security Careers is the authoritative reference for current job descriptions and pay practices of security, compliance, ethics, environmental, health and safety occupations. The job descriptions and compensation ranges in this report are drawn from research from the Foushée Group, which has been conducting this research since 1980. Security Careers includes more than 75 job descriptions for security-related positions, which range from the entry-level security guard to the top global corporate executive. It also provides four years of compensation trend data to give a th

  13. Effects of Gender on Engineering Career Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Anne M.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the effects of gender on career commitment, success, satisfaction, and involvement in engineering, and the effects of personality and work environment on these variables. Uses statistical and descriptive methods to determine the relationship among these variables. (Contains 34 references.) (Author/YDS)

  14. Career Advising in a VUCA Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Leigh S.; Zalewski, Jacqueline M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in the knowledge-driven, postindustrial economy have radically affected college students' prospects for entering and completing successful careers. In this volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous (VUCA) environment, fewer organizations find profitability in hiring, training, and retaining workers. Over the last 20 years,…

  15. Athletes’ careers across cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryba, Tatiana; Stambulova, Natalia

    This symposium will introduce a project developed under the auspices of the International Society of Sport Psychology (ISSP) in an effort to inspire and support the development of culturally sensitive theoretical frameworks and research methodologies in career studies and career assistance services...... in this symposium continue the initiated dialogue of the relevance of culture and cultural issues in their analyses of how social and cultural discourses shape career development and career transitions of athletes in different countries. Opening the foundations of sport psychological knowledge to culturally diverse...... and, perhaps, unfamiliar intellectual traditions, perspectives and concerns, the symposium will demonstrate how local knowledge of problems enables researchers and practitioners to better understand the dynamics of cultural diversity within the topic of athlete career development and assistance....

  16. Career Path Descriptions

    CERN Document Server

    Charkiewicz, A

    2000-01-01

    Before the Career Path system, jobs were classified according to grades with general statutory definitions, guided by the "Job Catalogue" which defined 6 evaluation criteria with example illustrations in the form of "typical" job descriptions. Career Paths were given concise statutory definitions necessitating a method of description and evaluation adapted to their new wider-band salary concept. Evaluations were derived from the same 6 criteria but the typical descriptions became unusable. In 1999, a sub-group of the Standing Concertation Committee proposed a new guide for describing Career Paths, adapted to their wider career concept by expanding the 6 evaluation criteria into 9. For each criterion several levels were established tracing the expected evolution of job level profiles and personal competencies over their longer salary ranges. While providing more transparency to supervisors and staff, the Guide's official use would be by services responsible for vacancy notices, Career Path evaluations and rela...

  17. Gender Issues: Analysis of Promotion and Career Opportunities Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    .... For example, an Army report on sexual harassment stated that about half of the Army women surveyed thought that men have an advantage over women when it comes to having a successful military career...

  18. Turnover Analysis and Prediction from a Career Developmental Point of View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krau, Edgar

    1981-01-01

    Demographic and psychological characteristics of 479 job leavers from two plants were processed, and work stability of 110 previously tested subjects was followed up for up to eight years. Results revealed that quitting a job is a career decision that depends on career type, career stage, and characteristics of the organization. (Author)

  19. Parental Attitudes toward Preschoolers' Career Education: A Mixed-Method Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Dan, Orly

    2010-01-01

    This mixed-method study examined a neglected area in career education: parents' attitudes toward the relevance of early career development, parents' attitudes toward the implementation of career education in preschools (including preferred subjects to be included in curricula), and the contribution of gender, socioeconomic status (SES), and…

  20. Career development after cartel prosecution: cartel versus non-cartel managers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenboom, N.S.R.

    2012-01-01

    I examine the career development of managers after they have been subjected to cartel prosecution by the Netherlands Competition Authority (NMa). A representative function is used as an indicator for a career outcome after prosecution. I compare the career development of Dutch managers involved in a

  1. Tackling Inhibitions to Careers in Science and Technology through Differentiated Mentoring Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwosu, Stella N.; Etiubon, Rebecca U.; Udofia, Theresa M.

    2014-01-01

    Encouraging women to go into Science and Technology (S&T) careers should start with the young girls. In developing countries, such as Nigeria, girls experience challenges in studying science and technological subjects and pursuing careers in these professions. The study identifies factors that inhibit Nigerian girls from undertaking careers in…

  2. VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND CAREER IN THE APPLIED SOCIAL-PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara V. Hovorun

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical and empirical advances in the major vocational and career development studies have been reviewed. The main ideas and important implications for helping young people make correspondent choices and address problems in satisfaction after occupational entry. There are ongoing concerns about real and potentional gender differences in career development. Individual differences measures are central in the field of vocational psychology and can be used to predict job performance, career choice and intrinsic and extrinsic career success.

  3. The Value of a Well-Being Improvement Strategy: Longitudinal Success across Subjective and Objective Measures Observed in a Firm Adopting a Consumer-Driven Health Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaobo; Coberley, Carter; Pope, James E; Wells, Aaron

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate effectiveness of a firm's 5-year strategy toward improving well-being while lowering health care costs amidst adoption of a Consumer-Driven Health Plan. Repeated measures statistical models were employed to test and quantify association between key demographic factors, employment type, year, individual well-being, and outcomes of health care costs, obesity, smoking, absence, and performance. Average individual well-being trended upward by 13.5% over 5 years, monthly allowed amount health care costs declined 5.2% on average per person per year, and obesity and smoking rates declined by 4.8 and 9.7%, respectively, on average each year. The results show that individual well-being was significantly associated with each outcome and in the expected direction. The firm's strategy was successful in driving statistically significant, longitudinal well-being, biometric and productivity improvements, and health care cost reduction.

  4. Project manager insights: An analysis of career progression

    OpenAIRE

    Marion, James W; Tracey M. Richardson; Matthew P. Earnhardt

    2014-01-01

    The project manager is key to the success of any project.  But the path to becoming a successful project manager is ill defined.  In this study, the authors analyzed interview results of 87 project managers’ responses to questions associated with entry into the field, career progression, and advice for the new project manager, seeking to better understand practicing project manager career progression.  Qualitative analysis techniques were used to identify recurring themes from the interview s...

  5. A Career Ladder's Effect on Teacher Career and Work Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Ann Weaver

    1987-01-01

    A career ladder affecting the work structure and career opportunities of teachers was studied to determine effects on teacher attitudes. Responses of 389 elementary through high school teachers to career ladder work efforts, work of schools, peer supervision, and career growth opportunities and stability were affected by the design. (TJH)

  6. Social Cognitive Career Theory and Middle School Student Career Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickinger, Pamela H.

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of social cognitive career theory, social cognitive career variables, demographic variables, and the contextual variable, parent support, were examined to determine their predictive value for eighth-grade students' career exploration behavior. Results suggest that the social cognitive career variable, intentions/goals,…

  7. Gender and stereotypes in motivation to study computer programming for careers in multimedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubé, Wendy; Lang, Catherine

    2012-03-01

    A multimedia university programme with relatively equal numbers of male and female students in elective programming subjects provided a rare opportunity to investigate female motivation to study and pursue computer programming in a career. The MSLQ was used to survey 85 participants. In common with research into deterrence of females from STEM domains, females displayed significantly lower self-efficacy and expectancy for success. In contrast to research into deterrence of females from STEM domains, both genders placed similar high values on computer programming and shared high extrinsic and intrinsic goal orientation. The authors propose that the stereotype associated with a creative multimedia career could attract female participation in computer programming whereas the stereotype associated with computer science could be a deterrent.

  8. Career Exploration among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Nadya A.; Ghosh, Arpita; Chang, Wen-hsin; Figueiredo, Catia; Bachhuber, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    College is a significant time for undergraduates to declare majors and choose career paths. For many undergraduates, choosing both a major and a career path is challenging. Research shows that many universities deliver career interventions through dedicated career decision-making courses (Mead & Korschgen, 1994). However, there has been…

  9. Exploring Writing Careers in Journalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cincinnati Public Schools, OH.

    The career exploration program for grades 9 through 10, as part of a comprehensive K through 10 career development program, attempts to develop an awareness of and appreciation for work, extend knowledge of the variety of career opportunities, and provide experiences in career areas of individual interest. The document, a collection of materials…

  10. Strategic career planning for physician-scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimaoka, Motomu

    2015-05-01

    Building a successful professional career in the physician-scientist realm is rewarding but challenging, especially in the dynamic and competitive environment of today's modern society. This educational review aims to provide readers with five important career development lessons drawn from the business and social science literatures. Lessons 1-3 describe career strategy, with a focus on promoting one's strengths while minimizing fixing one's weaknesses (Lesson 1); effective time management in the pursuit of long-term goals (Lesson 2); and the intellectual flexibility to abandon/modify previously made decisions while embracing emerging opportunities (Lesson 3). Lesson 4 explains how to maximize the alternative benefits of English-language fluency (i.e., functions such as signaling and cognition-enhancing capabilities). Finally, Lesson 5 discusses how to enjoy happiness and stay motivated in a harsh, zero-sum game society.

  11. A smashing career choice

    CERN Document Server

    Battersby, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    "There's more diversity in physics careers than you might think. Stephen Battersby talks to three very different phsicists, all doing their bit to help us learn more about the world we live in." (2 pages)

  12. Clinical careers film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Those interested in developing clinical academic careers might be interested in a short animated film by Health Education England (HEE) and the National Institute for Health Research. The three-minute film, a frame from which is shown below, describes the sort of opportunities that are on offer to all professionals as part of the HEE's clinical academic careers framework. You can view the film on YouTube at tinyurl.com/pelb95c.

  13. [Career counselling and choice of speciality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillevang, G.; Ringsted, C.

    2008-01-01

    Career counselling is meant to support and ensure an early and relevant choice of specialty. Self-awareness regarding personality, life goals, wishes for family life, and lifestyle is of help in narrowing down the number of specialties to those that fit personal attitudes and preferences. The cou......Career counselling is meant to support and ensure an early and relevant choice of specialty. Self-awareness regarding personality, life goals, wishes for family life, and lifestyle is of help in narrowing down the number of specialties to those that fit personal attitudes and preferences....... The counsellor must be aware that the trainees' subjective opinions about the specialties may not be in line with the actual conditions. Hence, career counselling should provide factual knowledge about the specialties including information on the working conditions and defining characteristics of the specialties...

  14. Carolinas Energy Career Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Classens, Anver; Hooper, Dick; Johnson, Bruce

    2013-03-31

    Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC), located in Charlotte, North Carolina, established the Carolinas Energy Career Center (Center) - a comprehensive training entity to meet the dynamic needs of the Charlotte region's energy workforce. The Center provides training for high-demand careers in both conventional energy (fossil) and renewable energy (nuclear and solar technologies/energy efficiency). CPCC completed four tasks that will position the Center as a leading resource for energy career training in the Southeast: • Development and Pilot of a New Advanced Welding Curriculum, • Program Enhancement of Non-Destructive Examination (NDE) Technology, • Student Support through implementation of a model targeted toward Energy and STEM Careers to support student learning, • Project Management and Reporting. As a result of DOE funding support, CPCC achieved the following outcomes: • Increased capacity to serve and train students in emerging energy industry careers; • Developed new courses and curricula to support emerging energy industry careers; • Established new training/laboratory resources; • Generated a pool of highly qualified, technically skilled workers to support the growing energy industry sector.

  15. Career practitioners' conceptions of social media in career services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettunen, Jaana; Vuorinen, Raimo; Sampson, James P

    2013-06-01

    This article reports the outcomes of a study, undertaken from a phenomenographic perspective, of career practitioners' conceptions of social media usage in career services. Fifteen Finnish career practitioners - representing comprehensive, secondary and higher education as well as public employment services - were interviewed in focus groups. The analysis of the interview data revealed five distinct descriptive categories reflecting the career practitioners' conceptions of social media's use in career services. Social media in career services was conceived as (1) unnecessary, (2) dispensable, (3) a possibility, (4) desirable and (5) indispensable. The results indicated associations between career practitioners' conceptions and their practice. Moreover, the critical aspects identified in this study can be used to support the career practitioners' understanding of new technologies in career services.

  16. Is there a time for everything? Attitudes related to women's sequencing of career and family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, S E

    1992-03-01

    Attitudes affecting career and family choices are examined in a sample of 203 US university business students, both male and female. 4 sequencing patterns were examined: the timing of marriage and career, simultaneously balancing career and family, the timing of career and children, and the choice of career with no children. Opinions were sought about women's careers before marriage, careers before children, the ability to balance children and career, and no children with a career. The results of the intercorrelation matrix analysis showed that age, marital status, and number of children were significantly correlated at a low level. Age and race were related to the belief that women should have careers before marriage. Gender is related to the beliefs about women's career before children, no children with a career, and the ability to balance a career and children. Multiple regression resulted in gender differences: women were significantly less likely to believe in no children with a career (t = 4.40, p 0.001). Women were also more likely to believe that career comes before having children (t = 2.15, p .05) and that women can successfully balance a career and children (t = 3.27, p .001). Race and attitudes were also significantly related to sequencing career and marriage (t = 2.64, p .01). The belief that women should establish their careers before marriage was more likely to occur among minorities, which was an unexpected finding. The implication is that men are more traditional in their beliefs about working women and marriage. Additional research is suggested on the examination of the relationship between race, nationality, and attitudes about the sequencing of career and marriage. An instrument that measures women's development and the factors influencing sequencing decisions at different career stages is needed. Questions remain unanswered about whether women desiring children choose less demanding careers, whether women's choice of career or employer is

  17. Sex Role Attitudes and Fear of Success as Correlates of Sex Role Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Dana; King, Michael

    1976-01-01

    Relationships of sex role attitudes and fear of success with college women's grade point average, academic major, and future career and marriage plans are examined. Sex role attitudes were related to major, career and marriage plans. Fear of success was not related to grade point average, major, career or marriage plans. (Author)

  18. Use of the COPSystem in Career Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp-Lee, Lisa J.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the revision of three measures: Career Occupational Preference System Interest Inventory, the Career Orientation Placement and Evaluation Survey, and the Career Ability Placement Survey. (SK)

  19. Career Interventions and the Career Thoughts of Pacific Island College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrift, Meagan Minvielle; Ulloa-Heath, Julie; Reardon, Robert C.; Peterson, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    Students enrolled in a college success course were assigned to (a) a cognitive intervention using the Career Thoughts Inventory (CTI) workbook (Sampson, Peterson, Lenz, Reardon, & Saunders, 1996b), (b) an occupational research project involving an oral report, and (c) a control condition. The workbook condition had a significant effect on the…

  20. Working on a Dream: Careers of Pop Musicians in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    The studies presented in this dissertation are concerned with the question why a musician’s career can become a failure or a success. The central research question within this thesis is: What are the determinants of career success for Dutch pop musicians? The first study presents findings from a

  1. AIP's Career Pathways Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Jose

    2014-03-01

    The American Institute of Physics (AIP) Career Pathways Project, funded by the National Science Foundation, aims to increase the number of undergraduates going into STEM careers. The main purposes of this project are to show students the professional opportunities for a STEM career, understand what departments can do to better prepare physics bachelor's degree recipients to enter the workforce, understand what students can do to better prepare themselves, and develop resources based on these findings. I was chosen by the Society of Physics Students (SPS) to be the 2013 summer intern of the AIP's Career Pathways Project. In this talk I will discuss several resources I worked on with the Statistical Research Center of the American Institute of Physics and SPS. These resources include how to write a resume and cover letter, how to perform an informational interview, common job titles for physics bachelors, how to find career information in physics and STEM, how to search and use job postings, and how to network.

  2. The Impact of First Careers on "Second Career" Academic Reference Librarians: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitten, Penelope A.; Nozero, Victoria A.

    1997-01-01

    A pilot survey of academic reference librarians in Nevada determined that 74% of those identified as second-career librarians cited prior work experience as influencing their present approach to work. Effects noted were service orientation, subject expertise, teaching skills, "information provider" philosophy, empathy, and interviewing…

  3. Organizational Careers: A forward theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barney G. Glaser, Ph.D., Hon. Ph.D.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In general, organizations obtain work from people by offering them some kind of career within their structures. The operation of organizations, therefore, depends on people’s assuming a career orientation toward them. To generate this orientation, organizations distribute rewards, working conditions, and prestige to their members according to career level; thus these benefits are properties of the organizational career. To advance in this career is to receive more or better of all or some of these benefits. Generally speaking, therefore, people work to advance their organizational careers. But also, generally speaking, people do not like to talk about their careers or to be asked about them in everyday conversations with many or unknown people. In this sense, a person’s own organizational career is a sensitive or “taboo topic.” Discussions with others about one’s career occur only under the most private, discreet conditions. As a result, while people may talk abstractly and generally about careers, these discussions are typically based on a combination of the little they know of their own career and much speculation. They often have very little particular or general knowledge based on actual careers. These observations apply also to a large sector or the sociological community, as indicated by a brief perusal of the table of contents of sociological monographs and readers on organizations. The topic of careers is seldom discussed and almost never concertedly focused upon.

  4. Entrepreneurship, Professionalism, Leadership: A Framework and Measure for Understanding Boundaryless Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kim Yin; Ho, Moon-ho R.; Chernyshenko, Oleksandr S.; Bedford, Olwen; Uy, Marilyn A.; Gomulya, David; Sam, Y. L.; Phan, Wei Ming J.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a person-centered framework for conceptualizing subjective careers in an increasingly boundaryless work context. Specifically, we argue that entrepreneurship, professionalism, and leadership (EPL) can serve as three key dimensions of subjective career space. We relate this framework to earlier macro-level national and organizational…

  5. Education and Career Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Brečko

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The author has been represented four basic domains, which we should include in the career development of new employers; individual, people/employees, organisation and work task. Each of these domains includes three subordinate or learning tasks, which are very important for balancing the educational plan of new employees. The author warns about the most important role of the work organisation. Twelve learning tasks, suggested in the system of the new employee career development bring new challenges for educational organisations but also limits. The author is also quite sure career development programs must become part of the regular school curriculum especially at the end of schooling and before entry into the work organisation.

  6. Career Commitment as a Mediator between Organization-Related Variables and Motivation for Training and Turnover Intentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hayeon; Kang, Dae-seok; Lee, Sang-won; McLean, Gary

    2016-01-01

    This study examined how the perception of a linkage between organizational ethical behavior and career success, representing ethical orientation of the organization, influences employees' perceptions of organizational politics and their subsequent career motivation, that is, career commitment, motivation to participate in training, and turnover…

  7. Development of a Career Interest Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Hollie B.

    1974-01-01

    The educational significance of the present study lies in the potential use of the Career Interest by career educators needing to identify students with interests in particular career areas and to counselors placing students into various career courses. (BP)

  8. Career learning and career learning environment in Dutch higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, Frans; Kuijpers, Marinka

    2018-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to focus on the effects of career development and guidance among students (age 17-23) enrolled in higher education in The Netherlands. First the paper explores whether the development of career competencies contribute to career identity, learning motivation,

  9. Effects of Career Choice Intervention on Components of Career Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Petri; Vinokur, Amiram D.; Vuori, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    This randomized experimental study (N = 1,034) examines both the direct and the indirect effects of the Towards Working Life intervention on 2 components of adolescents' career preparation: preparedness for career choice and attitude toward career planning. The intervention comprised a 1-week workshop program, the proximal goals of which were to…

  10. Career learning and career learning environment in Dutch higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinka Kuijpers; dr. Frans Meijers

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to focus on the effects of career development and guidance among students (age 17-23) enrolled in higher education in The Netherlands. First the paper explores whether the development of career competencies contribute to career identity, learning motivation,

  11. Career Education and Organized Labor. Monographs on Career Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Kenneth B.; And Others

    The three papers compiled here provide educators and others involved in career education with some information regarding the relationship of career education and organized labor. The first paper, a conference speech by Peter A. Bommarito, President of the United Rubber Workers, presents an official policy statement on career education from the…

  12. Career Practitioners' Conceptions of Social Media in Career Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettunen, Jaana; Vuorinen, Raimo; Sampson, James P., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the outcomes of a study, undertaken from a phenomenographic perspective, of career practitioners' conceptions of social media usage in career services. Fifteen Finnish career practitioners--representing comprehensive, secondary and higher education as well as public employment services--were interviewed in focus groups. The…

  13. Wind Power Career Chat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. Flowers

    2011-01-01

    This document will teach students about careers in the wind energy industry. Wind energy, both land-based and offshore, is expected to provide thousands of new jobs in the next several decades. Wind energy companies are growing rapidly to meet America's demand for clean, renewable, and domestic energy. These companies need skilled professionals. Wind power careers will require educated people from a variety of areas. Trained and qualified workers manufacture, construct, operate, and manage wind energy facilities. The nation will also need skilled researchers, scientists, and engineers to plan and develop the next generation of wind energy technologies.

  14. Association of Polar Early Career Scientists Promotes Professional Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Allen; Fugmann, Gerlis; Kruse, Frigga

    2014-06-01

    As a partner organization of AGU, the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS; http://www.apecs.is) fully supports the views expressed in Wendy Gordon's Forum article "Developing Scientists' `Soft' Skills" (Eos, 95(6), 55, doi:10.1002/2014EO060003). Her recognition that beyond research skills, people skills and professional training are crucial to the success of any early-career scientist is encouraging.

  15. Career Options in Colon and Rectal Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Karim; Madoff, Robert D.; Rothenberger, David A.

    2011-01-01

    As Colon and Rectal Surgery has grown and diversified, the practice opportunities available have greatly expanded. The wealth of choices, may be daunting and even paralyzing for the new graduate or practitioner looking for a career change. Prior to making a decision, candidates must first make an honest assessment of their goals, abilities, and priorities. In this article, the authors briefly outline some of these challenges and help lay the groundwork for a successful decision process. PMID:22654567

  16. Leaning in: lessons for leadership career development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirey, Maria R

    2013-11-01

    This department highlights change management strategies that may be successful in strategically planning and executing organizational change initiatives. With the goal of presenting practical approaches helpful to nurse leaders advancing organizational change, content includes evidence-based projects, tools, and resources that mobilize and sustain organizational change initiatives. In this article, the author introduces the book Lean In and presents applicable lessons for nursing leadership career development.

  17. A career path in clinical pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, K A

    1998-03-01

    Much like the development of a clinical path, the creation of a career path requires knowledge of patterns of behavior, needs for standardized education and skill development, along with variance analysis and individualized care. This nationally known nursing entrepreneur tells the story of her involvement in the development of case management and clinical pathways and how she turned that into a successful business that has changed how patient care is managed nationally and internationally.

  18. Social cognitive model of career self-management: toward a unifying view of adaptive career behavior across the life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lent, Robert W; Brown, Steven D

    2013-10-01

    Social cognitive career theory (SCCT) currently consists of 4 overlapping, segmental models aimed at understanding educational and occupational interest development, choice-making, performance and persistence, and satisfaction/well-being. To this point, the theory has emphasized content aspects of career behavior, for instance, prediction of the types of activities, school subjects, or career fields that form the basis for people's educational/vocational interests and choice paths. However, SCCT may also lend itself to study of many process aspects of career behavior, including such issues as how people manage normative tasks and cope with the myriad challenges involved in career preparation, entry, adjustment, and change, regardless of the specific educational and occupational fields they inhabit. Such a process focus can augment and considerably expand the range of the dependent variables for which SCCT was initially designed. Building on SCCT's existing models, we present a social cognitive model of career self-management and offer examples of the adaptive, process behaviors to which it can be applied (e.g., career decision making/exploration, job searching, career advancement, negotiation of work transitions and multiple roles).

  19. The relationship between cognitive ability, emotional intelligence and negative career thoughts: A study of career-exploring adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Dahl

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Career exploration can be a stressful experience, often manifested by negative career thoughts. In this article, the factors which influence the ability to cope with negative thinking are investigated.Research purpose: This study investigated the relationship between cognitive ability, emotional intelligence and negative thoughts pertaining to career in a sample of unemployed, non-student adults.Motivation for study: There is a need for research which investigates the psychological factors that contribute to successful career exploration and decision-making. Cognitive ability is one such factor, whilst emotional intelligence is another whose validity is not yet well established.Research design, approach and method: A survey design and quantitative procedures were used in gathering and analysing data gathered from 193 non-student, middle-aged adults attending a community-based career exploration programme in British Columbia, Canada. Cognitive ability, emotional intelligence and negative career thoughts before and after a career exploration programme were measured.Main findings: Neither cognitive ability nor any aspect of emotional intelligence predicted negative career thinking change. Cognitive ability predicted overall negative career thoughts as well as decision-making confusion, but only after the programme. The ability to manage emotions, however, predicted negative career thoughts both before and after the career decision-making programme.Practical/managerial implications: The managing emotions component of emotional intelligence is significantly associated with negative career thoughts. These findings suggest that career counselling requires that the role of emotions and their influence on behaviours must be given more consideration. Industrial and organisational (IO psychologists would benefit from engaging in programmes that train them to assist clients in becoming more aware of, and increasing, their own emotional

  20. Pharmacy students' perceptions of natural science and mathematics subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Julie; Wilson, Sarah Ellen; Wan, Kai-Wai

    2014-08-15

    To determine the level of importance pharmacy students placed on science and mathematics subjects for pursuing a career in pharmacy. Two hundred fifty-four students completed a survey instrument developed to investigate students' perceptions of the relevance of science and mathematics subjects to a career in pharmacy. Pharmacy students in all 4 years of a master of pharmacy (MPharm) degree program were invited to complete the survey instrument. Students viewed chemistry-based and biology-based subjects as relevant to a pharmacy career, whereas mathematics subjects such as physics, logarithms, statistics, and algebra were not viewed important to a career in pharmacy. Students' experience in pharmacy and year of study influenced their perceptions of subjects relevant to a pharmacy career. Pharmacy educators need to consider how they can help students recognize the importance of scientific knowledge earlier in the pharmacy curriculum.

  1. Effective Career Exploration Programs Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, James D.

    1987-01-01

    Replicated findings of Wiggins and Moody (1981). Evaluated four types of high school career exploration programs: cluster (N=53), Career Maturity Inventory (N=52), Career Survey (N=57), and Self-Directed Search/Vocational Preference Inventory (N=55). Results favored latter three programs which allowed students to pursue their own interests instead…

  2. Career Development: Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissida, Michael R.; Nazzaro, Joseph P.

    1980-01-01

    Career development programs are one way of responding to declining enrollments and rising costs while helping students with career and educational plans. A psychology elective at County College of Morris includes exploration of factors affecting career choice, self-assessment and a job-search practicum. (JAC)

  3. Vocation Units. Career Development Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Elizabeth

    The units contain suggestions for various approaches to the study of specific careers and career clusters at the junior high school level, and provide 13 lessons covering the areas of: obtaining career information, creative writing, journalism, health, environmental control, personal services and government, job application techniques, writing…

  4. Classifying Korean Adolescents' Career Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, In Heok; Rojewski, Jay W.; Hill, Roger B.

    2013-01-01

    Latent class analysis was used to examine the career preparation of 5,227 11th-grade Korean adolescents taken from the Korean Education Longitudinal Study of 2005 (KELS:2005). Three career preparedness groups were identified, to reflecting Skorikov's ("J Vocat Behav" 70:8-24, 2007) conceptualization of career preparedness: prepared,…

  5. A Newspaper Career and You.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newspaper Fund, Inc., Princeton, NJ.

    This pamphlet is designed to introduce high school students to a career in journalism and suggests college courses to consider in planning such a career. Contents include "When Students Ask for Career Guidance,""J-Schools in the Newsroom? Who's Going to Take the Time to Teach You?""An Editor's View: What It Takes to Get a Newspaper Job,""How to…

  6. Training Career Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Spencer G.; Engels, Dennis; Lenz, Janet

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes 8 presentations from Group 8 on the theme "Training of Researchers and Practitioners," which were part of the 2007 joint symposium of the International Association for Educational and Vocational Guidance, Society for Vocational Psychology, and National Career Development Association held in Padua, Italy. Three…

  7. Career Guidance Ideabook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Candace; Collarini, Cheryl

    The Society of Women Engineers (SWE) is a nationally based, non-profit organization dedicated to encouraging women to pursue careers in the field of engineering. The specific objectives include informing young women of the achievements, qualifications and opportunities open to them; assisting women engineers in returning to active employment after…

  8. Expanding career options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rineke Smilde

    2009-01-01

    The musical landscape in Europe shows a complex picture. Societal change leads to change in the careers of artists. We see an increasing number of unstable jobs in the music profession. It no longer offers many opportunities for full-time, long-term contract work, but is often more project-based,

  9. My Career: Composer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganelli, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about his career as a composer and offers some advice for aspiring composers. The author works as a composer in the movie industry, creating music that supports a film's story. Other composers work on television shows, and some do both television and film. The composer uses music to tell the audience what kind of…

  10. Tennessee Teacher Career Ladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, Beecher

    Tennessee's Better Schools Program includes a Master Teacher Program that has three components: teacher education, clinical supervision of beginning teachers, and a career ladder based on performance. In conjunction with the establishment of the Master Teacher Program, 23 master teacher competencies for teacher evaluation have been defined.…

  11. Individuals and Careers,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Haccoby, 1976; Zaleznik et al., 1970). The more one seeks autonomy, the more one has to sacrifice security and stability; the more one seeks general... Zaleznik , A., G.W. Dalton, L.B. Barnes, P. Laurin. Orientation and Conflict In Career. Boston, MA.: Harvard University, Graduate School of Business

  12. Careers in Journalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huskisson, Greg

    1990-01-01

    Aspiring black journalists have some reasons for optimism, because there are job opportunities in journalism for minorities, with the greatest number of jobs in the newspaper industry. Internships and nonpaying experience can be stepping stones to an eventual career in journalism. Some resources for the would-be journalist are listed. (SLD)

  13. A career in mathematics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lawrence

    A career in mathematics. Mangala Narlikar. 61. Ican only describe myself as a part-time scientist, if a pure mathematician can be called a scientist at all. I decided to write about my experiences because they perhaps represent those of a section of women of my era. In school and college I was considered a bright student and.

  14. Clifford Geertz: A career

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bošković Aleksandar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some concepts of the recently deceased American anthropologist Clifford Geertz, putting them into the specific context of his rich and interesting career, influences that he had, as well as some reactions to his ideas. A particular attention is placed upon the concept of culture, as the key concept in the 20th century American anthropology.

  15. Editorial and Broadcasting Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broido, Arnold; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes the jobs of the music publisher and editor, music magazine and book editor, film music editor, and music critic. Educational requirements, job availability, and the advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed. A tear-out chart of ten music career areas, listing salaries and personal and educational qualifications, is included. (AM)

  16. Career choices among medical students in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM Moslehuddin Ahmed

    2011-02-01

    to specialize in established clinical specialties and subsequently practice in major cities, and more than half wanted to immigrate to other countries. Basic medical subjects and service-oriented (lifestyle-related and preventive/social medical specialties were found to be less attractive. If this pattern continues, Bangladesh will suffer a chronic shortage of health personnel in certain specialties and in rural areas.Conclusions: Reorientation of health care and medical education is needed along with policy settings to attract doctors to the scarcity and high-priority disciplines so that imbalances encountered would be minimal in future.Keywords: career choices, medical students, Bangladesh 

  17. Career Education Infusion Strategies for the Social Studies Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrodi, Tom

    1974-01-01

    A two-week simulation developed by a world history teacher illustrates how career education does not demand that a subject such as social studies be subordinated but is rather reinforced by making the subject matter more relevant to students. (Author/KM)

  18. Modular training for career counsellors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruša Goršak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Exactly ten years have passed since first attempts were made in Slovenia to establish a comprehensive and formalized educational program for counsellors working in the field of lifelong career guidance. In the past, organizations providing (career guidance services have established their own non-formal employee trainings. A step forward has been made under the framework of the project “National coordination point for lifelong career guidance”, which enabled the implementation of the first joint training for (career guidance counsellors, called Modular training of career counsellors.

  19. Career Guidance Lesson Plans for Grades K-12. Developed as Part of New Jersey Comprehensive Career Development Guidelines Program in Neptune Township Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neptune Township Public Schools, NJ.

    This document contains the career development scope and sequence and 39 lesson plans for career guidance activities, for grades K-5, 6-8, and 9-12, developed for use in the Neptune Township Public Schools (New Jersey). Each one-to-two-page lesson plan includes information on subject area, competency, indicators, lesson objectives, resources, time…

  20. Idade subjetiva e suas relações com o envelhecimento bem-sucedido Edad subjetiva y sus relaciones con el envejecimiento exitoso Subjective age and its relationship with the successful aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samila Sathler Tavares Batistoni

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available O artigo traz uma revisão teórica a respeito do conceito “idade subjetiva” a partir de evidências da literatura internacional sobre suas relações com indicadores de envelhecimento bem-sucedido. A partir de estudos derivados da perspectiva life span e life course em Psicologia e Sociologia, os estudos sobre idade subjetiva revelam associações significativas desta com medidas de bem-estar físico e subjetivo, o que pode ser considerado uma variável importante na pesquisa e um potencial indicador clínico.El artículo presenta una revisión teórica sobre el concepto "edad subjetiva" y pruebas de la literatura internacional sobre las relaciones con los indicadores del envejecimiento exitoso. De los estudios derivados de la perspectiva life span y life course en psicología y sociología, edad subjetiva mostró asociaciones significativas con las medidas de bienestar físico y subjetivo y puede considerarse una variable importante en la investigación clínica y como un potencial indicador clínico.The article presents a theoretical review on the concept "subjective age" and evidences from the international literature on its relationship with indicators of successful aging. From the studies derived from the life span and life course perspectives in psychology and sociology, subjective age showed significant associations with measures of physical well-being and subjective, which can be considered an important variable in clinical research and a potential clinical indicator.

  1. Project manager insights: An analysis of career progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W Marion

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The project manager is key to the success of any project.  But the path to becoming a successful project manager is ill defined.  In this study, the authors analyzed interview results of 87 project managers’ responses to questions associated with entry into the field, career progression, and advice for the new project manager, seeking to better understand practicing project manager career progression.  Qualitative analysis techniques were used to identify recurring themes from the interview summaries. The themes and the resulting conceptual framework provide evidence that supports the development of successful project manager career path. Further, the results suggest individual project management competencies in soft skills as a key enabler of project execution.

  2. THE IMPACT OF PARENTS CAREERS ON THE ADOLESCENT CAREER ORIENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Valentina OPRIŞOR

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article refers to some ideas about the impact of parents on the career adolescents' orientation through studying the informational resources, professional options types, theoretical models of career choice and career development, the role and importance of family in career orientation. The current study contributes to the explanation of the phenomenon of career orientation among adolescents, particularly through the parents' roles and the impact of factors and career conditions of young orientation, as well as the encounter of social environment. The theoretical signiicance resides in determining the categories of actions that come in the decision’s making process of adolescents; it was ind the factors and the conditions of adolescents career orientation, the impact of social environment, the role of referent adult on adolescents career orientation, as well as the informational network, the professional options types and the theoretical models of career chose and development. The applicative value ofpaperwork consists in determination of relation between the considered profession of young as a reference profession in the family’s context and the professional road, the relation between the adolescent career perceptions of parents profession.

  3. Career anchors and values from different career management perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Cunha da Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – To analyze the relationships between career anchors and young Generation Y professionals’ values, from the career concept perspective. Design/methodology/approach – Research concerning the proposed objective was carried out through quantitative research involving 189 Business Administration majors from a Catholic university in São Paulo, Brazil. We used two instruments to identify the career anchors and values of respondents: Schein (1990 and Schwartz (1994, respectively. We used statistical techniques to explore the relationships between career anchors and values. Findings – Among the results, mention should be made to the statistical relationships found between analyzed career anchors and values. It is also important to stress that, although the Lifestyle career anchor was predominantly present in the conglomerate division, this anchor was the predominant characteristic in the differentiation of the smaller group of respondents, the new career group. The General Management Career Anchor, which presents a lower incidence, is the predominant characteristic of the larger group, referring to organizational careers. As well as the Lifestyle career anchor, the Hedonism value was predominant among respondents. Originality/value – The need to consider the following was found: Generation Y presents generational characteristics that drive people management to propose work structures that offer activities to generate learning, pleasure, self-fulfillment and conciliation between work and personal life.

  4. CAREER MANAGEMENT IN HOSPITALITY: THE CASE OF FOUR AND FIVE STAR HOTELS IN ISTANBUL

    OpenAIRE

    ÇETİN, Gürel; İSTANBULLU DİNÇER, Füsun; UYSAL, Sinem; ŞAHİN, Kenan

    2015-01-01

    In order to provide survive in increasing competitive environment, managing human resources effectively is one of the most important factors for organizational success. The fact that human is the most important factor affecting organizational productivity, increases the importance of career management, career commitment and career satisfaction. In the meantime, defining the relationship between these concepts will also help design more effective organizational policies. The scarcity of both n...

  5. Influences on Women’s Choices of Careers in Construction: A South African Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kolosa Madikizela; Theo Haupt

    2010-01-01

     This paper analyses the factors influencing the choices of careers in construction by South African women. The literature on challenges which influence women‟s choices of careers in construction was reviewed and questionnaires were conducted with multiple samples, including construction organisations, construction students and professional women working in construction. The study found that women have a role to play in the construction industry and that they can build successful careers...

  6. Cannabis careers revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Järvinen, Margaretha; Ravn, Signe

    2014-01-01

    A considerable part of today's sociological research on recreational drug use is (explicitly or implicitly) inspired by Howard Becker's classical model of deviant careers. The aim of the present paper is to directly apply Becker's theory to empirical data on present-day cannabis use and to suggest...... in treatment for cannabis problems in Copenhagen, Denmark. We suggest a revision of Becker's career model in relation to four aspects: initiation of cannabis use, differentiation between socially integrated and individualised, disintegrated use, social control from non-users, and the users' moral stance...... on cannabis. A central point of the paper is that social interaction may both motivate cannabis use, as Becker proposed, and serve as a protective factor against extensive, problematic use....

  7. Effects of Discipline-based Career Course on Nursing Students' Career Search Self-efficacy, Career Preparation Behavior, and Perceptions of Career Barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Soonjoo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a discipline-based career course on perceptions of career barriers, career search self-efficacy, and career preparation behavior of nursing students. Differences in career search self-efficacy and career preparation behavior by the students' levels of career barriers were also examined. Methods: The study used a modified one-group, pretest–posttest design. The convenience sample consisted of 154 undergraduate nursin...

  8. Careers in Culinary Arts

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, James Peter

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation was to give individuals interested in pursuing a career in culinary arts the advice and access to education surrounding this field. Culinary arts covers the multidisciplinary field and areas of practice and study which includes culinary performing arts (cooking), gastronomy (food studies), bakery and pastry arts, food and beverage studies (bar, restaurant, barista), wine studies , food product development and health, hygiene and nutrition. So many individuals ...

  9. Careers and people

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    Young scientists fly high Teenagers from Poland, Slovakia and the UK won first prizes at the annual European Union (EU) Contest for Young Scientists. Magdalena Bojarska's study of Hamiltonian cycles in generalized Halin graphs, Martin Tkác's insights on tilting bulk materials in railway cargo and Elisabeth Muller's project on lunar meteorites each garnered awards worth €7000 from the EU's Science in Society programme, which aims to encourage young people to pursue scientific careers.

  10. Altruism and Career Concerns

    OpenAIRE

    Shchetinin, Oleg

    2009-01-01

    The paper studies the impact of altruism on Agent’s motivation in the career concerns model. The paper shows the new channel of interaction between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. The common point in the literature is that intrinsic motivation can be crowded out by the extrinsic incentives. My paper shows that crowding effect can go in the opposite direction: extrinsic incentives can be lessened for the intrinsically motivated agent. The analysis shows that altruism can decrea...

  11. Career support in medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Buddeberg-Fischer, B; Vetsch, E.; Mattanza, G

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Until now, mentoring has hardly been used by the medical profession in German-speaking countries as a means of supporting junior physicians in their careers. The aim of the mentoring project described here was to obtain information for promoting and developing future mentoring programs at a university hospital. Method: A new integrated mentoring model was developed and implemented over a 12-month period. Peer groups were advised on the mentoring process by mentors and program manager...

  12. Alternative Careers for Physicists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stith, James H.

    2005-04-01

    It is well known that roughly 50% of the students who earn a bachelor's in physics go directly to graduate school and that the other half goes directly into the work force. Of those who go to graduate school, roughly half enter physics or astronomy departments and the rest enter other science, engineering or other fields. Of those who persist to the PhD in physics, less that half are employed in academic or other traditional physics positions. Hence, the majority of those who earn a bachelors degree in physics are employed in non-physics related fields. How should the undergraduate physics curriculum reflect this reality? Should the undergraduate experience do a better job of highlighting what we like to call alternative pathways but which is in fact, the dominant pathway? While the undergraduate physics education provides a solid background for a wide range of careers, too often students do not know it. More importantly, too often physics faculty is unable to provide career advice on other than academic careers. This paper will provide the author's view of possible approaches to this dilemma.

  13. Career anchors of dentist leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuononen, Tiina; Lammintakanen, Johanna; Suominen, Anna Liisa

    2016-08-01

    The work of a health care leader is demanding; in order to cope, leaders need motivation and support. The occurrence of intrinsic factors called career anchors (combination of one's competence, motives and values) could be a contributing factor in dentist leaders' career decisions. The aim of our study was to identify dentist leaders' career anchors and their association to dentist leaders' retention or turnover of the leadership position. Materials were gathered in 2014 via an electronic questionnaire from 156 current (Leaders) or former (Leavers) Finnish dentist leaders. Career anchor evaluation was conducted by the questionnaire and scoring-table taken from Edgar Schein's Career Anchors Self-Assessment. Both the most and the least important career anchors were detected by the highest and lowest scores and their occurrence reported as percentages. Associations between career anchor scores and tendency to stay were analyzed with logistic regression. 'Technical/Functional Competence' and 'Lifestyle' were most frequently reported as the most important and 'Entrepreneurial Creativity' and 'General Managerial Competence' as the least important career anchors. However, a higher level of 'General Managerial Competence' anchor was most significantly associated with staying in a leadership position. Instead, 'Pure Challenge' and 'Lifestyle' decreased the odds to stay. The knowledge of the important and essential career anchors of dentist leaders' and individuals' could perform crucial part in career choices and also in planning education, work opportunities and human resource policies promoting retention of dentist leaders and probably also other health care leaders.

  14. Parent Power: Build the Bridge to Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    President Obama has a cradle-to-career plan to reform the nation's schools. He also is calling on parents to take responsibility for their child's success. His vision includes the belief that all children can and will succeed, and that parents are the bridge to this success. Parents, guardians and caregivers can help children by connecting with…

  15. The Roles of Negative Career Thinking and Career Problem-Solving Self-Efficacy in Career Exploratory Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock-Yowell, Emily; Katz, Sheba P.; Reardon, Robert C.; Peterson, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    The respective roles of social cognitive career theory and cognitive information processing in career exploratory behavior were analyzed. A verified path model shows cognitive information processing theory's negative career thoughts inversely predict social cognitive career theory's career problem-solving self-efficacy, which predicts career…

  16. Foundation doctors career choice and factors influencing career choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener-Ogilvie, Sharon; Begg, Drummond; Dixon, Guy

    2015-11-01

    This study is seeking to establish the factors influencing foundation doctors' decision-making when applying for speciality training. A questionnaire was sent to all foundation doctors in Scotland (n = 1602, response rate 34%) asking them about their career intention in relation to General Practice, whether they received career advice and the extent to which certain factors influenced their career choice. For the majority of trainees, General Practice was not their first choice but just under half were considering it as a career. There were significant differences in career choices between the four Scottish regions and between the medical schools, with a greater proportion of those who studied in Aberdeen and Dundee Medical Schools opting for a career in General Practice. Undergraduate GP placement was reported as the strongest influence in favour of a career in General Practice followed by discussion with family and friends and discussion with speciality trainees. There were differences between medical schools in the way hospital placements, General Practice placements and role models influenced career choices. Career advice on General Practice was reported to be less available and more difficult to find.

  17. CAREER GUIDANCE EXPERIENCE ABROAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey N. Tolstoguzov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to describe the experience of careeroriented activities carried out with students of schools in developed and developing countries. Career Guidance in Russia, despite the vast experience of its implementation, is experiencing serious difficulties. In this regard, it is important to take into account the international experience career-oriented activities, such as in the developed countries of North America and the European Union as well as in several Asian countries with rapidly growing economies and a large demographic potential, taking into account the best variants for the Russian education system. Methods. The experience of career-oriented work undertaken with pupils of the USA, Canada, Israel, France, UK, Germany, Denmark, Sweden, Japan, Singapore, China and India is shown on the basis of the comparative analysis of different publications and information sources. The author has made an attempt to generalize the principles of psycho-pedagogical and administrative assistance in professional self-determination of senior pupils abroad. Scientific novelty. The approaches to career-oriented activities in countries with different levels of economic development are compared for the first time. Some principles are revealed. Firstly, the higher the income level per capita in the country, the greater attention is given to vocational guidance. The politics in the developed countries is based on interests of the individual: children’s acquaintance with the world of professions begins already at younger school and the moment of definitive selfdetermination is postponed till the end of their senior stage of education; the possibility of direction change of professional preparation in case of detection of discrepancy of qualities of the pupil to originally selected profile is provided. Career-oriented activity in developing countries, on the contrary, is rigidly coordinated to requirements of economy and a labour market

  18. Rigor and academic achievement: Career academies versus traditional class structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyees, Linda L.

    The purpose of this study was to determine if students who attended high school Career Academy classes, as part of Career and Technical Education, showed greater academic achievement than students who attended traditional high school classes. While all participants attended schools in the same school district, and were seeking the same goal of graduation with a standard diploma, the Career Academy students had the benefit of all classes being directed by a team of teachers who helped them connect their learning to their desired career through collaborative learning projects and assignments. The traditional high school classes taught each subject independent of other subjects and did not have specific connections to desired career goals of the students. The study used a causal-comparative research design and the participants included 1,142 students from 11th and 12th grades who attended 9 high schools in a diversely populated area of central Florida with 571 enrolled in the Career Academies and 571 enrolled in traditional classes. The 10th-grade FCAT scores served as the dependent variable. All students attended similar classes with similar content, making the primary variable the difference in academic gains between students participating in the Career Academy design and the traditional design classes. Using the Man-Whitney U Test resulted in the Career Academy group achieving the higher scores overall. This resulted in rejection of the first null-hypothesis. Further examination determined that the 10th-grade FCAT scores were greater for the average students group, which comprised the largest portion of the participant group, also resulted in rejection of the second null-hypothesis. The gifted and at-risk student group scores resulted in failure to reject the third and fourth null-hypotheses.

  19. Borders of the "Boundaryless Career"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommerlund, Julie; Boutaiba, Sami

    2007-01-01

    of the notion of the boundaryless career, namely that modern careers amount to a higher level of personal freedom. This empirical study will serve to illustrate the co-constitutive nature of different career stories. Research limitations/implications - The research is qualitative and thereby limited......: a theoretical argument, and a qualitative ethnographic study, involving observations and interviews. Findings - The theoretical argument questions the underlying premise and promise of the notion of the boundaryless career, namely that modern careers amount to a higher level of personal freedom. This empirical...... study will serve to illustrate the co-constitutive nature of different career stories. Research limitations/implications - The research is qualitative and thereby limited in the following way: it serves to give a deep understanding of the phenomena at hand, but is not easily generalizable. However...

  20. A Comparison Study of the Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Single Subject Mathematics Credential Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierra, Vicki Ann

    2011-01-01

    This descriptive study compares the entry-level pedagogical content knowledge of single subject mathematics credential candidates based on career status and undergraduate majors. Career changers from science, technology, engineering or math (STEM) fields are compared to first career candidates to see if they bring different skills and knowledge to…

  1. Expanding the Focus of Career Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Jared D.; Hogan, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Issues affecting career assessment include change in the focus and definition of career, emphasis on quality of work life, expansion of career paths, increased amount of career information available on the Internet, and questionable quality of online assessment. An expanded model of career assessment now includes technical fit, personal fit,…

  2. Career Readiness: Has Its Time Finally Come?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE) released a "What Is Career Ready?" definition. As the career-readiness definition explains, there is much overlap between "college readiness" and "career readiness," but academic preparedness for college alone is not enough to be truly career-ready.…

  3. Section 1. Career Transition for Attorneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Mark; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This section on career transition for attorneys discusses career choice and satisfaction; lawyers as outplacement clients; lawyers' career concerns; Myers-Briggs type preference of lawyers and career counselors; career assessment tools and resources; lawyers and contract work; and helping lawyers change their jobs without changing employers. (JOW)

  4. Factors Influencing High School Students' Career Aspirations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mei; Pan, Wei; Newmeyer, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the factors influencing high school students' career aspirations with a study analyzing 141 high school students. The Social Cognitive Career Development Model was utilized to examine the interactive relationships among learning experiences, career self-efficacy, outcome expectations, career interests, and career choices. The…

  5. Banking, Technology Workers and Their Career Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Lesley; West, Jim

    2001-01-01

    An Australian bank developed a four-stage career development strategy for information technology workers: (1) career coaching sessions with executives; (2) career coaching seminars for line managers and team leaders; (3) staff career planning workshops; and (4) online career development support. The program resulted in increased satisfaction,…

  6. Career anchors of dentist leaders

    OpenAIRE

    Tuononen Tiina; Lammintakanen Johanna; Suominen Anna Liisa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The work of a health care leader is demanding; in order to cope, leaders need motivation and support. The occurrence of intrinsic factors called career anchors (combination of one’s competence, motives and values) could be a contributing factor in dentist leaders’ career decisions. The aim of our study was to identify dentist leaders’ career anchors and their association to dentist leaders’ retention or turnover of the leadership position. Material and methods: Materials were g...

  7. Human Resource Careers of Baby Boomers: An Inquiry of Perceptions of Competent Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, MeLisa J.

    2012-01-01

    An extended career or working through planned retirement may assist baby boomers in recapturing financial losses experienced from the U.S. retirement market between 2007 and 2008. Job security, enhanced by adding value to an organization through competent performance, is an important link to the success of an extended career. Hence, baby boomers…

  8. The Development of the Teachers' Attitudes toward Career Learning Index (TACLI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Vanessa; Hooley, Tristram

    2018-01-01

    Teachers play an important role supporting young people to form their career identities and to make successful transitions into further learning and work. In England, there has been limited research that has looked specifically at the role of teachers and none of which has tried to establish a measure of teacher attitude toward careers work. This…

  9. CAREER MANAGEMENT IN HOSPITALITY: THE CASE OF FOUR AND FIVE STAR HOTELS IN ISTANBUL

    OpenAIRE

    UYSAL, Sinem; ŞAHİN, Kenan; ÇETİN, Gürel; İSTANBULLU DİNÇER, Füsun

    2015-01-01

    In order to provide survive in increasing competitive environment, managing human resourceseffectively is one of the most important factors for organizational success. The fact that human is the mostimportant factor affecting organizational productivity, increases the importance of career management, careercommitment and career satisfaction. In the meantime, defining the relationship between these concepts willalso help design more effective organizational policies. The scarcity of both natio...

  10. Testing times: careers market policies and practices in England and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hughes, Deirdre; Meijers, Frans; Kuijpers, Marinka

    2018-01-01

    Careers work is a very political business. Since the early 1990s, successive governments in England and the Netherlands have persistently challenged those working in the careers sector to demonstrate the educational, social and economic value and impact of their work. In this context, the

  11. Testing times : careers market policies and practices in England and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinka Kuijpers; dr. Frans Meijers; Deirdre Hughes

    2015-01-01

    Careers work is a very political business. Since the early 1990s, successive governments in England and the Netherlands have persistently challenged those working in the careers sector to demonstrate the educational, social and economic value and impact of their work. In this context, the

  12. Implementing College and Career Readiness: Critical Dimensions for Youth with Severe Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morningstar, Mary E.; Zagona, Alison L.; Uyanik, Hatice; Xie, Jingrong; Mahal, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Focused attention to the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and college and career readiness (CCR) has been attributed to increased secondary school reform efforts directed at ensuring all students graduate high school prepared for adulthood. To successfully experience college and careers, students must have the knowledge, skills, and experiences…

  13. Career guidance on the move

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rie

    2013-01-01

    This article is about how the notion of place can be used in an analysis of career guidance practices and their development. It is about how a focus on the context of career guidance can develop an awareness of the place where guidance is practiced and support the development of career guidance...... in new places. In this article I introduce an analytical perspective on place; I give the example of the guidance café a practice development that took place into serious consideration because it was an attempt to develop career guidance practice through relocating it....

  14. The Influence of Teachers' Career Guidance Profiles on Students' Career Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittendorff, Kariene; Beijaard, Douwe; den Brok, Perry; Koopman, Maaike

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we examine the relationship between different career guidance styles of vocational education teachers and vocational education students' career competencies (i.e. career reflection, career exploration and networking). Questionnaires on students' perceptions of the career guidance of their teachers during career conversations, and…

  15. Career Counselling Development: A Case Study of an Innovative Career Counselling Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakota, Aikaterini

    2016-01-01

    Promoting the use of new technologies in the career counselling process, the Career Services Office of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki has developed an easy-to-use career counselling guide containing multimedia applications. The purpose of this career guide, called "Career Counseling@Career Office of Aristotle University of…

  16. Elements of Successful Mentoring of a Female School Leader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, April

    2010-01-01

    This case study examines the successful mentoring relationship between an early-career principal and her mentor as they participated in an Entry Year Program for early-career school administrators as a component of an Administrative Leadership Academy (ALA). Using a feminist poststructuralist framework, the findings show that contrary to…

  17. Academic career selection in American emergency medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, John; Kowalenko, Terry; Meurer, William

    2011-10-01

    The future of academic emergency medicine (EM) is based on the continued successful recruitment and cultivation of new faculty from EM residents. Little data exist as to the current rate of residents initially choosing an academic career path or which residency programs are best situated to result in new faculty. Our study was designed to initially describe the current career demographics of graduating residents and then through statistical analysis investigate likely programmatic factors that affect academic career selection. Data were collected via an online survey sent to EM residency program directors. Responders were asked to describe their graduates and their program characteristics over the past 5 years. A total of 103 survey responses, with complete data from 65 (76 responses contained enough data for national career selection rates), were received. Relevant covariates were tested for association with academic career entry using t-tests or analysis of variance. An adjusted multivariable linear regression analysis model was then fitted. Survey responses indicated that 26.1% of residents chose an academic career (community 57.1%, fellowship 13.5%, military/Veteran's Administration [VA] 2.6%, other 0.6%) with an approximately normal distribution. There were no significant differences found between programs when presence of mentorship programs, career track programs, or city size were analyzed. Multivariable linear regression analysis demonstrated significantly greater academic career choice among programs located in the Northeast/Mid-Atlantic and the Midwest, larger programs (>12 residents/year), and programs with increased resident academic productivity (presentations given, non-peer-reviewed publications), but did not demonstrate a difference between 3- and 4-year programs. Overall, the model fitted using the above variables accounted for approximately 30% of the variation seen between programs (adjusted R(2)=0.295). Our data indicate that program region

  18. Career Satisfaction and Willingness to Contribute to Malaysian Economy: Skilled Migrants in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuie-Hong TAN

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the effects of immigrants’ perceptions of their contribution to the host country, access to equal opportunities and government support on their career satisfaction. Results suggested that expatriates’ willingness to contribute to the host country have a significant positive association with their career satisfaction. Expatriates’ positive perceptions on equal opportunities to be successful are also significantly related directly to their career satisfaction. Results support the view that the expatriates’ optimistic perceptions towards the host country will enhance the quality of their career undertakings. Government should adopt a light touch towards the problem, by providing entry relaxation for them and promoting Malaysia as an attractive working and living environment.

  19. The Influence of Racism and Sexism in the Career Development of African American Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Kathy M.; Herr, Edwin L.

    1991-01-01

    Combined effects of racism and sexism in the workplace subject African-American woman to more discrimination than either Black men or White women. Examines racism and sexism in employment practices and in the career development and aspirations of African-American women. Identifies coping system of African-American women who avoid career fields in…

  20. Teacher Effectiveness. Race to the Top: Accelerating College and Career Readiness in States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, Bryan C.; Hassel, Emily Ayscue

    2010-01-01

    To make dramatic improvements in all students' preparation for college and careers, states need thoughtful, intentional human capital strategies that get the right teachers in the right places in the right subjects. The need is especially acute in states that have or plan to adopt college- and career-ready academic standards and graduation…

  1. Academic Career Development Stress and Mental Health of Higher Secondary Students--An Indian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Anjali; Halder, Santoshi; Goswami, Nibedita

    2012-01-01

    The authors explored the mental health of students with their academic career-related stressors collecting data from 400 students of different schools of Eastern part of India by using; namely General Information Schedule (GIS), the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), and the Academic Career Development Stress Scale. The data was subjected to t…

  2. In pursuit of balance: Why your career path is unique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbloom, N. A.; Phillips, A. S.; Hannay, C.

    2012-12-01

    When NASA's Curiosity rover landed on Mars in August 2012, the room at JPL erupted in applause. Among the onlookers were highly trained scientists, engineers, programmers, and technicians with a wide range of career paths. The individuals remain anonymous, but each had a key role in the success of the mission. Behind every successful scientific project are the individuals who support the mission with their knowledge, commitment and curiosity. Whether by preference, personality, or ambition, many highly trained and qualified scientists choose to support science from behind-the-scenes. For these scientists, a supporting role in research remains a satisfying career choice. Other scientists attempt to race up the position ladder, eagerly taking leadership and/or more public roles. How do you decide which role is right for you, and how do you find balance in your chosen career path?

  3. College knowledge: a critical component of college and career readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Sarah; Brand, Betsy

    2010-01-01

    Policy has traditionally emphasized the completion of academic requirements as the gateway to postsecondary education. There is, however, growing understanding that youth need to develop a wide range of knowledge, skills, abilities, and personal resources for career success, civic engagement, and lifelong learning. It also is necessary to address the social, informational, and financial barriers to college that many first-generation and low-income youth come up against. Allowing youth to participate in programs that provide access to college campuses and classes, through dual or concurrent enrollment, early college models, or expanded learning opportunities, is an effective way to help students gain college knowledge and see themselves as college students. This article offers an expanded definition of college and career readiness and profiles three programs drawn from a larger review of twenty-three programs designed to support college and career success for students from underrepresented groups.

  4. Expanding career options

    OpenAIRE

    Smilde, Rineke

    2009-01-01

    The musical landscape in Europe shows a complex picture. Societal change leads to change in the careers of artists. We see an increasing number of unstable jobs in the music profession. It no longer offers many opportunities for full-time, long-term contract work, but is often more project-based, calling on musicians to contribute on a sporadic basis or for specific activities. Many graduates employ themselves as freelance artists. Rarely employed in one job for life, the musician is increasi...

  5. The career ladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    With the addition of the proposed Certificate of Continuing Professional Studies (CCPS) which has not yet been implemented, the Society will have developed an open-ended career ladder for medical laboratory technologists. Moving from one step to the next may entail a return to school; it will certainly entail hard work and commitment. There are no barriers to prevent a motivated individual from progressing up the ladder. The ladder is illustrated in diagrammatic form below. The shaded areas represent the elements that are not yet in place.

  6. Choosing the right career: What approach? Implications for career ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Without knowledge of self and occupations, the chances of making an effective career choice are terribly reduced. Therefore, the choice of a right career is a major developmental task that must be accomplished by every secondary school student. The Nigerian Journal of Guidance and Counselling Vol. 8 (1) 2002: pp. 29-46 ...

  7. Researching careers, learning and identities: Career attachments as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... counselling in supporting the career transition and development of adults in England. They have been chosen because they illuminate different patterns of responses associated with career change. In particular, they demonstrate the value of education-based or work-based learning in helping individuals not only update ...

  8. Career Engagement: Bridging Career Counseling and Employee Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neault, Roberta A.; Pickerell, Deirdre A.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a model of career engagement that helps bridge the gap between career counselors' focus on supporting individuals to find meaningful work and employers' desire for an engaged, productive, and committed workforce. They briefly review highlights of the employee engagement literature, introduce the Career…

  9. Career Development and Career Choice in Pioneer and Traditional Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Jim D.

    1978-01-01

    Two groups of college seniors (N=106) were compared on factors affecting feminine career choice and career development. Three factors pertained to feminine role perception. The remaining four were concerned with sex-role stereotyping and various aspects of family background. (Author)

  10. Typical career dilemmas of academic staff during the early career ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    Job satisfaction is of great importance for any organization, including higher education insti- tutions, as it impacts ... support regarding research and teaching; discrimination; and certain management matters. Introduction. It is well .... typical career dilemmas of academic staff in the early career phase within a changing South.

  11. Special Issue--Using Career Assessment Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, Laurie; And Others, Eds.

    1991-01-01

    This special issue includes the following: "Introduction"; "Interest Inventories: Which One, Why, and for Whom?"; "Recent Reports from the Committee to Screen Career Guidance Instruments"; "Assessment of Career Specialty Interests in Business and Medicine"; "Using Career Interest Inventories with…

  12. The Crescendo Effect in Career Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Albert S.

    1997-01-01

    Presents a strategic model for career motivation based on component dimensions of self-identity, self-insight, and career resilience. Identifies these elements as part of the greater construct of career commitment. (SK)

  13. CAREER opportunities at the Condensed Matter Physics Program, NSF/DMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durakiewicz, Tomasz

    The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is a Foundation-wide activity, offering prestigious awards in support of junior faculty. Awards are expected to build the careers of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research. Condensed Matter Physics Program receives between 35 and 45 CAREER proposals each year, in areas related to fundamental research of phenomena exhibited by condensed matter systems. Proposal processing, merit review process, funding levels and success rates will be discussed in the presentation. NSF encourages submission of CAREER proposals from junior faculty members from CAREER-eligible organizations and encourages women, members of underrepresented minority groups, and persons with disabilities to apply. NSF/DMR/CMP homepage: https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5666

  14. The effect of a career choice guidance on self-reported psychological problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunnen, E S

    2014-01-01

    Late adolescents with career choice problems often have psychological problems as well. The starting point of this study was the question of career choice counselors whether potential clients with career choice problems and psychological problems could be accepted in career choice intervention, or whether it was better to advise them to seek help for their psychological problems. We investigated whether a successful career choice intervention reduced psychological problems, and whether this program was equally effective in participants with low and with high levels of psychological problems. Participants were 45 Dutch students (age 17-24) with career choice problems. They had above average levels of self-reported psychological problems before the start of the intervention. These problems decreased significantly following the intervention. With regard to vocational commitment development, the intervention was equally effective for participants with low or average and with (very) high levels of psychological problems before the start of the intervention.

  15. The Ingredients for Corporate Success?

    OpenAIRE

    Dickmann, Michael; Hughes, Heather

    2017-01-01

    The search for excitement, adventure, cross-cultural learning and the avoidance of problems at home are amongst key drivers to seek an international assignment (Hippler, 2009; Doherty et al., 2011). Global careers and talent management are amongst the crucial ingredients for corporate success (Scullion and Collings, 2011) and understanding individual drivers and designing matching and motivating Global Mobility (GM) approaches is at the heart of high performance GM work (Dickmann et al., 2008...

  16. Factors affecting the career development of male nurses: a structural equation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jiunn-Horng; Yu, Hsing-Yi; Chen, Sheng-Hwang

    2010-04-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to test a theory of the relations of emotional labour and professional empowerment to nursing career development. Nurses are required to show high emotional labour, but this can bring about excessive pressure and emotional exhaustion. Male nurses usually perceive societal expectations in line with a more traditionally masculine role. Greater professional empowerment might assist them in attaining promotion and career success. The study had a cross-sectional correlational design. Data were collected in 2007 using a mailed questionnaire. We used a database published by the National Union of Nurses' Associations, Republic of China, to find medical care institutions at which male nurses were working. A convenience sample of male nurses (308) working at clinical nursing centres completed the mailed questionnaires. Emotional labour was not statistically significantly related to nursing career development, but was statistically significantly related to professional empowerment. Professional empowerment was statistically significantly related to nursing career development. Professional empowerment a mediating factor in the influence of emotional labour on nursing career development. We found that 75% of the variance in nursing career development could be explained by emotional labour and professional empowerment. The expected result, that emotional labour has a direct effect on nursing career development, was not supported by the analyses. Emotional labour has only an indirect effect on nursing career development. Professional empowerment was directly linked to nursing career development. Male nurses who perceived higher professional empowerment had better career development.

  17. Career exploration behavior of Korean medical students

    OpenAIRE

    An, Hyejin; Lee, Seung-Hee

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study is to analyze the effects of medical students’ social support and career barriers on career exploration behavior mediated by career decision-making self-efficacy. Methods We applied the t-test to investigate the difference among the variables based on gender and admission types. Also, we performed path analysis to verify the effect of perceived career barriers and social support on career exploration behavior with career decision efficacy as a mediator. Results First, we no...

  18. Qualifying for Career Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Kovač

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available The need for education in various spheres of life, which allows a person to fully develop his/her personality, is more and more presen t also in our society. The discussed educational programme Discovering Vocational Goals and Forming Strategies· to Realize them qualifies people for autonomous career planning by offer­ ing them one of the possible ways of making decisions in relation to profession and job. In the course of the realization of the programme the participants are given the chance to think about the kind of work that would suit their interests, capabilities and individual characteristics as weel as the needs in certain environments (possible employers. They are encouraged to make an actual plan, stating how and when the desired objective will be reached. In 1995 the pro­ gramme was being carried out within nine semi­ nars organized at the Employment Offices in Maribor and Ptuj. During that time the pro­ gramme has also been evaluated by Doba - Education Office, which was funded by the Ministry of Work, Family and Social Matters. The paper includes the content of the programme as well as the assessments of the research project. The presented data show that the participants learned the method of career planning and acqu­ired greater self-confidence and motivation to solve their job problem actively.

  19. Organizational Downsizing and Career Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozionelos, Nikos

    2001-01-01

    A study of 123 "survivors" of corporate downsizing and 13 senior managers indicated that the organization lacked a coherent career development plan and the performance management/appraisal process was inadequate. Managers perceived lateral transfers as effective; some employees felt they undermined career progression. Employees thought…

  20. Widening opportunities for career guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Bo Klindt; Skovhus, Randi Boelskifte; Thomsen, Rie

    2017-01-01

    of career education in Danish schools. Based on a research and development project on career education, case analysis is used to explore research circles as a means for collaboration between researchers and practitioners. This analysis shows that research circles provide teachers with a space to reflect...

  1. Interdisciplinary approaches in career studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khapova, S.N.; Arthur, M.B.

    2011-01-01

    This is the opening article in a Human Relations special issue on 'Interdisciplinary approaches to contemporary career studies'. After introducing a story of an 'exceptional - but real' career, we argue for an urgent shift toward greater interdisciplinary inquiry. We reflect on the story to describe

  2. Youth Joblessness and Career Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passmore, David L.

    1981-01-01

    Data presented and research reviewed here describe the scope of youth joblessness for policy analysis and consideration in career education. Necessary next steps are (1) clarification of career education's view of youth joblessness; (2) determination of the barriers to youth employment; and (3) consideration of the consequences of youth…

  3. Student Career Decision and Employability

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethiopia

    The purpose of this research was examining the state of TVET students' choice of occupation as potential factors of their ... decisions. Key Words: career decision, employability, occupational choice, self-employment, counseling. BACKGROUND .... to investigate the state of career decision as a potential factor influencing.

  4. Scientific careers and gender differences. A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Gouthier

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In Europe, much effort has been devoted to explore the causes of the decline in number of university matriculations of science students and to identify gender differences in career choice. Yet, the problem extends to the fulfillment of career plans: given their professional expectations and their attitudes when choosing a career, girls are much less likely to pursue scientific careers such as engineering or physics. Evidence of this is provided by the social research carried out within the framework of the GAPP project (Gender Awareness Participation Process. The Gapp project is intended to investigate differences between girls and boys in their perception of science careers and to propose a range of innovative and concrete participatory activities involving scientists, engineers and professionals from the public and private S&T sectors. In this letter, we report a synthesis of the results of the social research conducted as first step of the project: exploring how the perceptions of science professions affect interest, motivation and subject choice at school, at the university and consequently in their career.

  5. Parenting and Career Development. ERIC Digest No. 214.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerka, Sandra

    Research indicates that parenting styles, family functioning, and parent-child interaction influence career development. The authoritative parenting style is associated with self-confidence, persistence, social competence, academic success, and psychosocial development; parents provide a warm family climate, set standards, and promote independence…

  6. Leaving Education: The Agony and the Ecstasy of Changing Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Christopher I.

    A description is given of a workshop format that is being successfully used to motivate and guide teachers who are changing careers. Reasons cited for teachers leaving the profession include a heavily supplied market with reduced demand, economic stagnation and noncompetitive salaries, and job burnout. The workshop is designed to promote the…

  7. 212 Emotional Intelligence and Self Efficacy as Correlates of Career ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    2011-01-18

    Jan 18, 2011 ... express their concern for the organization and its continued success and well being. Career commitment is very crucial in any organization and no doubt ... poor working condition, low status, lack of motivation and for (Fagebo, ... operating in stressful situations and under unfavourable conditions of service.

  8. Best Practices in School-to-Careers: The Automotive Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Employer Leadership Council, Washington, DC.

    This document highlights the school-to-careers (STC) partnerships connecting workplace experiences to classroom learning to prepare students for successful employment in the automotive industry. First, the current state of the automotive industry is reviewed and the role of STC in addressing automotive service needs is explained. Next, the…

  9. The determinants of academic career advancement: Evidence from Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abramo, Giovanni; D’Angelo, Ciriaco Andrea; Rosati, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the determinants of professors’ career advancement in Italian universities. From the analyses, it emerges that the fundamental determinant of an academic candidate’s success is not scientific merit, but rather the number of years that the candidate has belonged to the same...

  10. Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of Arizona's Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Arizona is in the process of transitioning to new English language arts and mathematics standards that will better prepare students to be successful in college and their careers. Time, effort, and resources must be dedicated to effective implementation in order to realize the promise of these new common core state standards. This paper captures…

  11. Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of Alabama's Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Alabama is in the process of transitioning to new English language arts and mathematics standards that will better prepare students to be successful in college and their careers. Time, effort, and resources must be dedicated to effective implementation in order to realize the promise of these new common core state standards. This paper captures…

  12. Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of Florida's Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Florida is in the process of transitioning to new English language arts and mathematics standards that will better prepare students to be successful in college and their careers. Time, effort, and resources must be dedicated to effective implementation in order to realize the promise of these new common core state standards. This paper captures…

  13. Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of Delaware's Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Delaware is in the process of transitioning to new English language arts and mathematics standards that will better prepare students to be successful in college and their careers. Time, effort, and resources must be dedicated to effective implementation in order to realize the promise of these new common core state standards. This paper captures…

  14. Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of Indiana's Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Indiana is in the process of transitioning to new English language arts and mathematics standards that will better prepare students to be successful in college and their careers. Time, effort, and resources must be dedicated to effective implementation in order to realize the promise of these new common core state standards. This paper captures…

  15. Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of Iowa's Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Iowa is in the process of transitioning to new English language arts and mathematics standards that will better prepare students to be successful in college and their careers. Time, effort, and resources must be dedicated to effective implementation in order to realize the promise of these new common core state standards. This paper captures the…

  16. Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of Georgia's Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Georgia is in the process of transitioning to new English language arts and mathematics standards that will better prepare students to be successful in college and their careers. Time, effort, and resources must be dedicated to effective implementation in order to realize the promise of these new common core state standards. This paper captures…

  17. Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of Hawaii's Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Hawaii is in the process of transitioning to new English language arts and mathematics standards that will better prepare students to be successful in college and their careers. Time, effort, and resources must be dedicated to effective implementation in order to realize the promise of these new common core state standards. This paper captures the…

  18. Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of Arkansas' Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Arkansas is in the process of transitioning to new English language arts and mathematics standards that will better prepare students to be successful in college and their careers. Time, effort, and resources must be dedicated to effective implementation in order to realize the promise of these new common core state standards. This paper captures…

  19. Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of Connecticut's Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Connecticut is in the process of transitioning to new English language arts and mathematics standards that will better prepare students to be successful in college and their careers. Time, effort, and resources must be dedicated to effective implementation in order to realize the promise of these new common core state standards. This paper…

  20. Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of Idaho's Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Idaho is in the process of transitioning to new English language arts and mathematics standards that will better prepare students to be successful in college and their careers. Time, effort, and resources must be dedicated to effective implementation in order to realize the promise of these new common core state standards. This paper captures the…

  1. Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of California's Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    California is in the process of transitioning to new English language arts and mathematics standards that will better prepare students to be successful in college and their careers. Time, effort, and resources must be dedicated to effective implementation in order to realize the promise of these new common core state standards. This paper captures…

  2. Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of Colorado's Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Colorado is in the process of transitioning to new English language arts and mathematics standards that will better prepare students to be successful in college and their careers. Time, effort, and resources must be dedicated to effective implementation in order to realize the promise of these new common core state standards. This paper captures…

  3. Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of Illinois' Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Illinois is in the process of transitioning to new English language arts and mathematics standards that will better prepare students to be successful in college and their careers. Time, effort, and resources must be dedicated to effective implementation in order to realize the promise of these new common core state standards. This paper captures…

  4. Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of Alaska's Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Alaska is in the process of transitioning to new English language arts and mathematics standards that will better prepare students to be successful in college and their careers. Time, effort, and resources must be dedicated to effective implementation in order to realize the promise of these new common core state standards. This paper captures the…

  5. A Lifeline to Science Careers for African-American Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenika-Morrow, T. Jean

    1996-01-01

    Two reasons African American females do not pursue science careers are the need for immediate employment and lack of tools to negotiate the racism and sexism that undermine their aspirations for success. This article describes intervention strategies in an Afrocentric school and a medical magnet school that encourage African American girls to…

  6. College Knowledge: A Critical Component of College and Career Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Sarah; Brand, Betsy

    2010-01-01

    Policy has traditionally emphasized the completion of academic requirements as the gateway to postsecondary education. There is, however, growing understanding that youth need to develop a wide range of knowledge, skills, abilities, and personal resources for career success, civic engagement, and lifelong learning. It also is necessary to address…

  7. Career management: a competitive advantage in today's health care marketplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbeau, J

    2001-01-01

    A valuable new tool to attract and retain new employees is being used by some of the most progressive companies in Michigan. It is called career management, and it is being used with great success by businesses of all types to give themselves a competitive advantage.

  8. Applying the Happenstance Learning Theory to Involuntary Career Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumboltz, John D.; Foley, Pamela F.; Cotter, Elizabeth W.

    2013-01-01

    The happenstance learning theory (HLT) proposes a model of career counseling that helps clients to build more satisfying personal and work lives. Although reflective listening remains an essential part of the process, HLT is an action-oriented approach to helping clients to both create and benefit from unplanned events. Success is measured not by…

  9. Graduate students in oceanography: Recruitment, success, and career prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Arthur R. M.; Hollister, Charles D.

    Graduate education, student quality, stipend support, and subsequent employment form a triad of concern to many oceanographers. While the number of graduate degree programs in oceanography in the U.S. exceeds 50, remarkably few data are available on numbers of student applications, student survival rates, the quality of the applicants and accepted students, and their subsequent employment.Consequently, most discussions within an institution are based on data from a single school, while most statements made to federal government program managers by scientists are based on personal perceptions and feelings. With the emerging global initiatives, which are very labor intensive, it appears appropriate to ask, “Is there an impending crisis in graduate education in oceanography?” Widespread concern about availability of new talent, the quality of incoming students, and the overall national crisis in science and engineering student recruitment has led many scientists to state that oceanography has widespread problems in terms of student numbers and, more importantly, quality. Often, when a scientist does not find a student in the spring application rites, the scientist declares there is a national shortage of well-qualified students. Moreover, in certain subdisciplines of the field (e.g., physical oceanography) the crisis is perceived as severe and immediate, though as we shall see, physical oceanography is in an improving mode and is also experiencing an interesting increase in the numbers of well-qualified women applicants.

  10. Pathways to Success: Professional Development throughout the Career Span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillman, Abigail

    This paper addresses the relationship between the counseling supervisee and supervisor. Included are suggestions for better communication and ideas to foster the supervisees individual and professional growth. (GCP)

  11. Meaning and determinants of career success: A Malaysian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June M. L. Poon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio exploratorio cualitativo busca descubrir y explorar los significados del éxito en la carrera profesional y las influencias que aprecian en el mismo los trabajadores adultos malayos. Se entrevistó a 18 personas de las profesiones de enfermería, obreros y del mundo empresarial. De los datos surgieron tres significados objetivos y cinco subjetivos acerca del éxito en la carrera profesional y se apreciaron seis factores internos (sobre todo rasgos individuales y tres externos. La investigación indica que cuando se encuentran en las primeras fases de su carrera profesional, a las personas las mueve un mayor afán instrumental al definir el éxito profesional, mientras que en fases más avanzadas de su carrera profesional se centran en una mayor variedad de características y resultados de la misma. Igualmente la investigación apunta que los trabajadores adultos no deberían estereotiparse en el sentido de contentarse con los resultados colectivos, dado que muchos se centran también en logros individuales.

  12. Perceived obstacles to career success for women in academic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colletti, L M; Mulholland, M W; Sonnad, S S

    2000-08-01

    We conducted this study to determine whether concerns expressed by male and female surgeons at 1 academic center are generally reflective of broader concerns for academic surgery and academic medicine. We reviewed published studies concerning women in academic surgery within the context of reporting the results of a survey of both male and female surgeons at 1 academic center. We developed a survey that included demographic information, work experience, and social issues. The survey was distributed to the entire faculty. For key questions, we compared answers between male and female faculty. Additional data came from the published literature. We reviewed all available studies identified by a MEDLINE search with key words women and academic and medicine or physician. Included studies contained either data collection or editorial comment concerning women in academic medicine. Data and opinions from all included studies paralleling survey questions were extracted from each article. Male and female faculty members reported different experiences and perceptions, specifically relating to relationships between family and professional life and perceptions of subtle sex-related biases. Both men and women reported insufficient mentoring and difficulties in balancing personal and professional responsibilities. Attitudes, behaviors, and traditions surrounding how we structure work and evaluate participation in academic surgery are more difficult to change than just addressing obvious inequities in support for female surgeons. However, attempting the deeper changes is worthwhile, because addressing obstacles faced by female faculty, many of which also affect men, will allow progress toward environments that attract and retain the best physicians, regardless of sex.

  13. Revisiting the Relationship between Marketing Education and Marketing Career Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Donald R.

    2017-01-01

    In a replication of a classic article by Hunt, Chonko, and Wood, regression analysis was conducted using data from a sample of 864 marketing professionals. In contrast to Hunt, Chonko, and Wood, an undergraduate degree in marketing was positively related to income in marketing jobs, but surprisingly, respondents with some nonmarketing majors…

  14. Generational Approach to Factors Influencing Career Choice in Accounting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jony Hsiao

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This research aims to grasp which factors influence the generation Y to choose accounting as its career. A significant decline in the number of candidates willing to pursue a career as accountant has been observed abroad - USA, Australia, and Japan. However, in other countries - Brazil, Singapore, and Hong Kong - the opposite has been observed. Another issue is the decline in educational qualification of those pursuing an accounting career, contributing in a way that many talented students change their career choice. This may be explained by the fact that people tend to believe accounting is an exact science, full of calculations, boring, and not very creative, bringing an unbalance between the traits an individual should have according to the job market and those perceived by society. In order to give a contribution to literature concerning the factors that influence the generation Y in its career choice, a goal of this research was conducting an exploratory study where some hypotheses were formulated to support the discussion. We used Mannheim's Generational Theory and the literature on career choice. Data collection was carried out using a questionnaire, based on Schwartz's Portrait Value Questionnaire and Germeijs and Verschueren's Student Choice Task Inventory, adapted through focus group interview. Data were fully collected online and the sample consisted of 665 subjects. The results showed that people who chose accounting as their career were influenced by factors such as creativity, independence, challenging and dynamic environment, job security, money-making, job availability, and other significant people - friends and teachers. The subjects were not influenced by social factors, such as working with people and making contributions to society and family. They wish for more autonomy, creativity, and flexibility at work, and people still care about job security and money-making.

  15. Motivation toward a Graduate Career in the Physical Sciences: Gender Differences and the Impact on Science Career Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazari, Zahra; Potvin, Geoff; Tai, Robert H.; Almarode, John T.

    2012-01-01

    What motivates individuals to embark on graduate careers in physics and chemistry and how could these motivations impact future productivity? This study examines gender differences in such motivations and their ability to predict select future success outcomes (publications and grant funding) for physical scientists. The data were obtained as part…

  16. Events Leading to One Person's Career in Forest Entomology

    Science.gov (United States)

    John C. Moser

    2000-01-01

    Today, I'm going to discuss the subject that I know most about--the important events and the many mentors leading to my career in Forest Entomology at the Southern Research Station, as well as my past and present cooperators. This includes my views on the present state of SPB Research, as well as my future plans for the next 40 years.

  17. Math and Careers. Module 1. MATHCO Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardeman, Carole Hall; Laquer, Barbara T.

    MATHCO is a motivating series of audiovisual and print materials designed to overcome the negative effects of sex bias and stereotyping on the attitudes, interests, and aspirations of girls toward mathematics and mathematics-related careers. The materials teach mathematics skills, demonstrate relationships between mathematics and other subjects,…

  18. Termination of sporting careers among South African sportswomen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results indicated that five of the most important reasons for sportswomen terminating their sporting careers are decreased motivation and interest in sport, coaching problems, academic pressure, injuries and politics in sport. A significant number of the subjects agreed that gender stereotyping in sport does exist and that the ...

  19. Students' Choice of Careers in Professional Areas in Delta State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated final year students of Faculty of Education and third year students of Faculty of Health Sciences choice of career in 2004/2005 academic session in Delta State University Abraka. The instrument used for data collection was a self designed questionnaire administered on 240 students, 120 subjects ...

  20. Value Orientation And Career Aspiration Patterns Among Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was also to find out the effects of sex differences and rural-urban dwelling on choice of career. One hundred and ten male and sixty female SSS Two students with age range 14-18 years from 10 randomly selected secondary schools in Ogun State were the subjects of study. Results show a significant difference ...

  1. Effects of Guidance Techniques and Initial/Entry Career Maturity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    while the fourth group was exposed to a non-specific treatment (drug abuse). The design is a 4 x 2 factorial with fixed effect consisting of initial/entry career behaviour (high & low) and treatment/control groups. Data d erived from the post treatment were subjected to 2-way analysis of variance. The results of the study show ...

  2. Relationships among Career and Life Stress, Negative Career thoughts, and Career Decision State: A Cognitive Information Processing Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock-Yowell, Emily; Peterson, Gary W.; Reardon, Robert C.; Leierer, Stephen J.; Reed, Corey A.

    2011-01-01

    According to cognitive information processing theory, career thoughts mediate the relationship between career and life stress and the ensuing career decision state. Using a sample of 232 college students and structural equation modeling, this study found that an increase in career and life stress was associated with an increase in negative career…

  3. Preparing Scientists for Scientific Careers: Broader Impacts from an NSF CAREER Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Alfred

    2008-03-01

    The scientific focus of my NSF CAREER Award is the impact of patterns, topographical and surface chemical in design, on the adhesion of soft polymer interfaces. Although this topic has provided a strong foundation for the mentoring and training of graduate students, the primary broader impacts of my award have focused on the development of ``soft'' skills in graduate and post-doctoral researchers in STEM disciplines. I have developed a course on ``Scientific and Engineering Management,'' which provides an open forum for students to explore the skills that, in many ways, define successful careers for many scientists. Topics include: leadership, proposal writing, group management, communication in diverse environments, and ethics. In this presentation, I highlight the primary phases of this program, how it meshes with scientific goals, and general statements about the mission of education outreach within STEM disciplines.

  4. Careers in conditions of instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hohlova Valentina Vasil'evna

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is the research of the social-economic phenomenon of a career as a result of conscious human position and behaviour in the field of employment, which is connected with job and professional growth, as a chain of events which are components of life, the sequence of professional activities and other biographical roles, which all together express the commitment of a person’s activity according to his generalized model of self-development. On the basis of the theoretical analysis the dependence of making a career in the condition of instability and indefiniteness on job market flexibility, erosion and even the destruction of the usual way of life and labor relations. The career concepts under the conditions of flexible capitalism and of career policy as the typology of empiric differences of job biographic models are considered. The peculiarity of the proposed career policy concept is that its individual alternatives of career making oppose to organization management and personal demands: the difference between a professional’s wishes and a specific strategy of the development phases are quite noticeable. According to the results of empiric research carried out through the methods of interview, polling, expert assessment, the analysis of the received results, the mathematical data processing the basic types of the career policy and its connection with the organization’s personal development are revealed.

  5. On career longevity distributions in professional sports and a stochastic mechanism underlying their empirical power-law behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, Alexander; Yang, Jae-Suk; Stanley, H Eugene

    2008-01-01

    We provide a simple and intuitive stochastic process that accounts for the observed probability density functions governing career longevity in several professional sports leagues in various countries. Our mechanism characterizes the probability density functions governing career longevity with two parameters, \\alpha and \\tau . The exponent \\alpha < 1 characterizes the scaling in the power-law regime, which is followed by an exponential cutoff after a critical value \\tau, representing the mean lifetime in each sport. In addition, we also show that the probability density functions of career statistical metrics within each sport follow directly from the density functions of career longevity. Thus, our process is a universal mechanism describing longevity in a competitive environment, with the exponent \\alpha representing the role of experience and reputation in career development. Because net career tallies of in-game success ultimately serve as a metric for classifying careers, our findings provide a robus...

  6. Career-related correlates of self-discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBrin, A J

    2001-08-01

    An investigation was made of the relationship between scores on the Self-discipline Questionnaire and self-ratings on four career-related variables among a sample of 325 working adults. The Self-discipline Questionnaire was previously published in a trade book and is based on characteristics of self-disciplined people culled from the literature. Scores for self-discipline were significantly correlated with years of formal education, salary, and self-perceptions of career success and frequency of goal accomplishment.

  7. Social Technologies to Jump Start Geoscience Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Christopher; Martinez, Cynthia; Gonzales, Leila

    2010-05-01

    early career geoscientists to tune in what's going on in the geoscience community, to meet geoscience professionals, and to find innovative career ideas. Early analysis of the page's participants indicates that the network is reaching its intended audience, with more than two-thirds of "fans" participating in the page falling in the 18-34 age range. Twenty-seven percent of these are college-aged, or 18-24 years old. An additional 20% of the page's fans are over age 45, providing students with access to seasoned geoscientists working in a variety of professions. GeoConnection's YouTube Channel includes video resources for students on educational pathways and career choices. Videos on the channel have received more than 100,000 views collectively. In addition, the AGI Workforce program has been an active participant in the YES network, and facilitated the virtual participation of both speakers and attendees for the first YES Congress, held in October 2009 in Beijing. By integrating webinar technologies and other social media, the breadth of attendees and speakers at the Congress was greatly expanded. Challenges with technology represented the minor problem for this effort, but rather human factors required the greatest focus to ensure success. Likewise, the challenge for the GeoConnection Network is not so much technology implementation, but rather remaining responsive and relevant with the ever-changing landscape of online communications. Reports show that participation in social-networking media among young people ages 16-24 has dropped (eg. Istrategy Labs, 2009, Ofcom, 2009) however, internet use among younger generations is high. Geoscience organizations must identify and participate in new online communications trends in order to continue to reach students and young professionals, but also, these individuals must also communicate with geosciences organizations so that the appropriate technologies and venues can be provided to strengthen the interconnect between

  8. NEW CONCEPTS AND CHALLENGES FOR TEACHER EDUCATION FOR TVET – WORK INTEGRATED LEARNING THROUGH THE CAREER CHANGE PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rod Moore

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effectiveness and outcomes of an innovative teacher education for ‘beginning’ teachers with full careers in other professions and industries. Data were gathered over 3 years to study the experience of these teachers who undertake their initial teacher education and enter the profession simultaneously.  This work is a benchmark practice of Victoria University (VU commitment to enhancing educational access, participation and success for young people in the region. VU has formed a partnership with secondary schools delivering VET and the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development to address teacher shortages in secondary schools.  The Career Change Program (CCP has been developed to address this shortage by attracting qualified professionals with industry experience to teach in teacher-short-supplied subject areas. Praxis Inquiry (PI model of teacher education is developed and applied by focusing on teacher learning in school settings. The program aims to set in place practices and procedures in partnership with key stakeholders that provide a framework for sustainable recruitment, selection and education of Career Change Teachers in Vocational Education.  This framework will develop an international best practice of teacher education constructed as a partnership between schools, communities and university.

  9. The measurement and enhancement of employability and career success: over different life and career stages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijde, C.M.

    2016-01-01

    The employability of workers enables organizations to cope with their fluctuating demand for numerical and functional flexibility. Clear definitions and instruments are needed to facilitate this process. For individual workers, professional expertise and employability are needed to deliver high

  10. Girls and science: A qualitative study on factors related to success and failure in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Paula Denise

    This qualitative study sought to determine how girls perceived factors that contribute to their success in science programs designed to maximize their achievement. The sample consisted of 20 students in 9th and 12th grades attending a school of choice. Respondents were interviewed using a structured interview protocol. The National Council for Research on Women study (Thom, 2001) found that girls are more successful in math and science programs that incorporate a cooperative, hands-on approach than in programs that stress competition and individual learning. This finding was supported by this study among 20 high school girls in a school whose mission is to improve the access of girls who study and choose careers in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) disciplines. Related studies on the subject of the underrepresentation of girls and women in science and related disciplines raise the question why so few girls choose STEM careers. Qualitative inductive analysis was used to discover critical themes that emerged from the data. The initial results were presented within the context of the following five themes: (1) learning styles, (2) long-term goals, (3) subject matter, (4) classroom climate/environment, and (5) evaluation. After further analysis, the researcher found that factors cited by the girls as contributing to their success in science programs specifically designed to maximize their achievement were: (a) cooperative learning, (b) a custom-tailored curriculum, and (c) positive influences of mentors.

  11. Borders of "the boundarlyless career"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boutaiba, Sami Stephan; Sommerlund, Julie

    2007-01-01

    : a theoretical argument, and a qualitative ethnographic study, involving observations and interviews. Findings – The theoretical argument questions the underlying premise and promise of the notion of the boundaryless career, namely that modern careers amount to a higher level of personal freedom. This empirical...... study will serve to illustrate the co-constitutive nature of different career stories. Research limitations/implications – The research is qualitative and thereby limited in the following way: it serves to give a deep understanding of the phenomena at hand, but is not easily generalizable. However...

  12. Graduates beliefs about career management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babić Lepa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Career management is increasingly becoming an individuals' matter, despite the various activities organized by the different institutions to support career development and planning. An exploratory survey was conducted to determine what kind of beliefs graduates have about career management. Results indicate that graduates are aware of the importance of university knowledge for getting a job, the importance of knowledge and investment in education for positioning in the labor market, so they give priority to development opportunities that business brings opposed to the material rewards.

  13. The Help-Seeking in Career Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabio, Annamaria; Bernaud, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    This study examined help-seeking in career counseling by investigating factors that influence students' intention to consult a career counseling center. Nine hundred and eighteen participants were given the Attitudes toward Career Counseling Scale (ATCCS), an information brochure about the career counseling center; the Intention to Consult a…

  14. The Role of Anxiety in Career Indecisiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, David M.; Brown, Duane

    1987-01-01

    Administered Career Decision Scale and Self-Evaluation Questionnaire to college students to examine role of anxiety as antecedent or consequence in career indecisiveness. Investigated two theories of career indecisiveness and found both to have merit. Suggests there may be two types of career indecisive individuals. (NB)

  15. Managing a mid-career crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, M A

    1994-09-01

    Recognizing career and life stages can enable individuals to ensure a smooth mid-career transition. Working together, nurses and the organization identify individual needs and potential causes of mid-career crisis as a self-managed career concept is formed.

  16. Creating Career Awareness Among Secondary School Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discussed the need for creating career awareness among Secondary School Students through career fair Career selection is a critical issue for secondary school students who may not be aware of the existing occupations in the labour market. It is important that career information be made available to students ...

  17. The Career Counseling with Underserved Populations Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Providing effective career counseling to culturally diverse individuals is not the same as helping those from majority cultures. The Career Counseling With Underserved Populations model aids career counselors in supporting underserved populations as they strive to address their important career counseling issues.

  18. Constructing Careers: Actor, Agent, and Author

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savickas, Mark L.

    2011-01-01

    When individuals seek career counseling, they have stories to tell about their working lives. The aim of career construction theory is to be comprehensive in encouraging employment counselors to listen for a client's career story from the perspectives of actor, agent, and author. Taking multiple perspectives on career stories enables counselors to…

  19. A Study of Career Planning Assessments

    OpenAIRE

    Firkola, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of career planning assessments. Background on key career concepts is first introduced. A number of career planning assessments are then examined. These assessments included reviewing ones personal history, interest inventories, values assessments, personality assessments, and aptitude tests. The importance and limitations of these career assessments is then discussed.

  20. Why do medical graduates choose rural careers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, John A; Edwards, Brian J; Crotty, Brendan

    2009-01-01

    This study is based on the metaphor of the 'rural pipeline' into medical practice. The four stages of the rural pipeline are: (1) contact between rural secondary schools and the medical profession; (2) selection of rural students into medical programs; (3) rural exposure during medical training; and (4) measures to address retention of the rural medical workforce. Using the rural pipeline template we conducted a literature review, analysed the selection methods of Australian graduate entry medical schools and interviewed 17 interns about their medical career aspirations. The literature was reviewed to assess the effectiveness of selection practices to predict successful gradation and the impact of rural pipeline components on eventual rural practice. Undergraduate academic performance is the strongest predictor of medical course academic performance. The predictive power of interviews is modest. There are limited data on the predictive power of other measures of non-cognitive performance or the content of the undergraduate degree. Prior rural residence is the strongest predictor of choice of a rural career but extended rural exposure during medical training also has a significant impact. The most significant influencing factors are: professional support at national, state and local levels; career pathway opportunities; contentedness of the practitioner's spouse in rural communities; preparedness to adopt a rural lifestyle; educational opportunities for children; and proximity to extended family and social circle. Analysis of selection methods: Staff involved in student selection into 9 Australian graduate entry medical schools were interviewed. Four themes were identified: (1) rurality as a factor in student selection; (2) rurality as a factor in student selection interviews; (3) rural representation on student selection interview panels; (4) rural experience during the medical course. Interns' career intentions: Three themes were identified: (1) the efficacy of