WorldWideScience

Sample records for subjective bulimic episodes

  1. An experimental test of the effects of dieting on bulimic symptoms: the impact of eating episode frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groesz, Lisa M; Stice, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Prospective studies suggest dieting increases bulimic symptoms, but experiments suggest that dieting decreases bulimic symptoms. One possible explanation for the conflicting findings is that real world dieting involves less healthy dieting techniques, such as meal skipping, than prescribed diets. We tested whether the manipulation of eating episode frequency during dieting impacted bulimic symptoms. We expected that people on a diet involving fewer eating episodes would exhibit greater increases in bulimic symptoms than people on a diet involving more frequent eating episodes or waitlist controls. Participants on both 6-week diets lost more weight than controls, confirming dieting was manipulated, and showed greater reductions in bulimic symptoms than controls; however, the dieting conditions did not differ on either outcome. Results provide further experimental evidence that dieting does not increase bulimic symptoms, but suggests that eating episode frequency has little impact on this outcome.

  2. Psychopathology of Eating Disorders: A Controlled Comparison of Bulimic, Obese, and Normal Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Donald A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, the Symptom Checklist-90, the Beck Depression Inventory, and a body image assessment were administered to 15 bulimic, 15 normal, and 15 obese women. Results showed that bulimics evidenced significantly more psychopathology than did normal and obese subjects; bulimics were more depressed, anxious,…

  3. The emotional regulatory features of bulimic episodes and compulsive exercise in muscle dysmorphia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Stuart B; Maguire, Sarah; Russell, Janice; Touyz, Stephen W

    2012-01-01

    Muscle dysmorphia is a recently identified psychiatric condition, whose relationship to the eating disorders remains unclear. This case describes an adolescent male who met diagnostic criteria for both an eating disorder not otherwise specified and muscle dysmorphia, allowing the first examination of read muscle dysmorphia presentations. This case suggests that muscle dysmorphia may present inclusive of episodes of binge eating and purging in addition to compulsive exercise, which may serve an emotional regulation function. We suggest that the assessment of muscle dysmorphia include a comprehensive assessment of all eating disorder features including bulimic symptoms, and that treatment address these features. Clinical implications for the conceptualization of muscle dysmorphia are discussed. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  4. Association between objective and subjective binge eating and psychopathology during a psychological treatment trial for bulimic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldschmidt, Andrea B; Accurso, Erin C; Crosby, Ross D; Cao, Li; Ellison, Jo; Smith, Tracey L; Klein, Marjorie H; Mitchell, James E; Crow, Scott J; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Peterson, Carol B

    2016-12-01

    Although loss of control (LOC) while eating is a core construct of bulimia nervosa (BN), questions remain regarding its validity and prognostic significance independent of overeating. We examined trajectories of objective and subjective binge eating (OBE and SBE, respectively; i.e., LOC eating episodes involving an objectively or subjectively large amount of food) among adults participating in psychological treatments for BN-spectrum disorders (n = 80). We also explored whether changes in the frequency of these eating episodes differentially predicted changes in eating-related and general psychopathology and, conversely, whether changes in eating-related and general psychopathology predicted differential changes in the frequency of these eating episodes. Linear mixed models with repeated measures revealed that OBE decreased twice as rapidly as SBE throughout treatment and 4-month follow-up. Generalized linear models revealed that baseline to end-of-treatment reductions in SBE frequency predicted baseline to 4-month follow-up changes in eating-related psychopathology, depression, and anxiety, while changes in OBE frequency were not predictive of psychopathology at 4-month follow-up. Zero-inflation models indicated that baseline to end-of-treatment changes in eating-related psychopathology and depression symptoms predicted baseline to 4-month follow-up changes in OBE frequency, while changes in anxiety and self-esteem did not. Baseline to end-of-treatment changes in eating-related psychopathology, self-esteem, and anxiety predicted baseline to 4-month follow-up changes in SBE frequency, while baseline to end-of-treatment changes in depression did not. Based on these findings, LOC accompanied by objective overeating may reflect distress at having consumed an objectively large amount of food, whereas LOC accompanied by subjective overeating may reflect more generalized distress related to one's eating- and mood-related psychopathology. BN treatments should

  5. Real vs. Ideal Self Discrepancy in Bulimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosak, Karen

    Bulimia is an eating disorder prevalent among young women, characterized by binge eating episodes followed by purging with subsequent depressive moods and self-deprecating thoughts. To determine whether bulimic women exhibit a greater discrepancy between their perceived and ideal selves than do nonbulimics, three samples of women were assessed.…

  6. Rorschach Evaluation of Adolescent Bulimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jane E.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Used Rorschach Test to contrast 12 diagnosed female adolescent bulimics with 12 female adolescent controls. Bulimics averaged greater number of aggression responses. Data suggest that adolescent bulimics are more depressed, self-punitive, and negativistic than peers and that they have more disordered thoughts, inaccurate perceptions, and impaired…

  7. Objective and subjective binge eating in underweight eating disorders: associated features and treatment outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalle Grave, Riccardo; Calugi, Simona; Marchesini, Giulio

    2012-04-01

    To define the utility of the DSM-IV-TR definition of binge eating, as it applies to anorexia nervosa (AN) and underweight eating disorder not otherwise specified (ED-NOS). We investigated the psychopathological features associated with bulimic episodes in 105 underweight individuals with eating disorders who reported regular objective bulimic episodes with or without subjective bulimic episodes (OBE group, n = 33), regular subjective bulimic episodes only (SBE group, n = 36) and neither objective nor subjective bulimic episodes (n = 36, no-RBE group). The Eating Disorder Examination (EDE), anxiety, depression, and personality tests were administered before and upon completion of inpatient cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) treatment 6 months later. Compared with the SBE group, OBE subjects had higher body mass index, and more frequent self-induced vomiting, while both OBE and SBE groups had more severe eating disorder psychopathology and lower self-directness than the no-RBE group. Dropout rates and outcomes in response to inpatient CBT were similar in the three groups. Despite a few significant differences at baseline, the similar outcome in response to CBT indicates that categorizing patients with underweight eating disorder on the basis of the type or frequency of bulimic episodes is of limited clinical utility. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Subjective Experience of Episodic Memory and Metacognition: A Neurodevelopmental Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celine eSouchay

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Episodic retrieval is characterized by the subjective experience of remembering. This experience enables the co-ordination of memory retrieval processes and can be acted on metacognitively. In successful retrieval, the feeling of remembering may be accompanied by recall of important contextual information. On the other hand, when people fail (or struggle to retrieve information, other feelings, thoughts and information may come to mind. In this review, we examine the subjective and metacognitive basis of episodic memory function from a neurodevelopmental perspective, looking at recollection paradigms (such as source memory, and the report of recollective experience and metacognitive paradigms such as the feeling of knowing. We start by considering healthy development, and provide a brief review of the development of episodic memory, with a particular focus on the ability of children to report first-person experiences of remembering. We then consider neurodevelopmental disorders such as amnesia acquired in infancy, autism, Williams syndrome, Down syndrome or 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. This review shows that different episodic processes develop at different rates, and that across a broad set of different neurodevelopmental disorders there are various types of episodic memory impairment, each with possibly a different character. This literature is in agreement with the idea that episodic memory is a multifaceted process.

  9. Detecting individual sites subject to episodic diversifying selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Murrell

    Full Text Available The imprint of natural selection on protein coding genes is often difficult to identify because selection is frequently transient or episodic, i.e. it affects only a subset of lineages. Existing computational techniques, which are designed to identify sites subject to pervasive selection, may fail to recognize sites where selection is episodic: a large proportion of positively selected sites. We present a mixed effects model of evolution (MEME that is capable of identifying instances of both episodic and pervasive positive selection at the level of an individual site. Using empirical and simulated data, we demonstrate the superior performance of MEME over older models under a broad range of scenarios. We find that episodic selection is widespread and conclude that the number of sites experiencing positive selection may have been vastly underestimated.

  10. Subjective quality of life in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardsjord, Erlend Strand; Romm, Kristin Lie; Friis, Svein

    2016-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Subjective quality of life (S-QoL) is an important outcome measure in first episode psychosis (FEP). The aims of this study were to describe S-QoL-development the first 10-years in FEP patients and to identify predictors of this development. METHODS: A representative sample of 272...... patients with a first episode psychotic disorder was included from 1997 through 2000. At 10year follow-up 186 patients participated. QoL was measured by the Lehman's Quality of Life Interview. Linear mixed model analyses were performed to investigate longitudinal effects of baseline psychiatric symptoms...... and socio-economic variables and the effects of changes in the same variables on S-QoL-development. RESULTS: S-QoL improved significantly over the follow-up period. More contact with family and a better financial situation at baseline had a positive and longstanding effect on S-QoL-development, but changes...

  11. Parotid gland flow activity and inorganic composition in purging bulimic patients treated with fluoxetine.

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    Paszynska, Elzbieta; Linden, Roger W A; Slopien, Agnieszka; Rajewski, Andrzej

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish whether vomiting bulimic and/or non-bulimic depressive patients, both treated with the serotonin reuptake inhibitor SI-5-HT (fluoxetine), have differing proportions of inorganic components (specifically, sodium, potassium and calcium) in their parotid salivary gland secretions, than in the average population. A controlled clinical trial was designed for three age-matched female groups: bulimic patients receiving fluoxetine 40 mg/day (n = 33), non-bulimic patients diagnosed with bipolar affective disorder (fluoxetine 20 mg/day, n = 25) and healthy controls (n = 51). Parotid saliva was collected using a Lashley cap while the subjects were at rest. Stimulation was obtained chemically using a 3% citric acid solution, and physically by instructing the subjects to chew on wax pellets. The concentrations of sodium, potassium and calcium ions were measured using the colorimetric photometry method. The bulimic patients had a reduction in flow and sodium and potassium ions in the parotid saliva and non-bulimic patients had a reduction in flow. Deficits in certain components of saliva were shown to be directly related to salivary flow rate. The data suggest that detection of inorganic deficits in parotid saliva might serve as a reliable confirmation of reduction in flow amongst purging bulimic patients treated with fluoxetine.

  12. Speed of Eating as a Determinant of the Bulimic Desire to Vomit

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    Azrin, Nathan H.; Brooks, Jeannie; Kellen, Michael J.; Ehle, Chris; Vinas, Veronica

    2008-01-01

    A single-case controlled study found that a bulimic's desire to vomit was virtually eliminated by slowed eating, but not by rapid eating. The present study attempted to determine whether this same relation was exhibited by a larger number (N = 6) of bulimics who were instructed to eat at a fast or a slow rate in a between-subjects reversal design.…

  13. Status update: maladaptive Facebook usage predicts increases in body dissatisfaction and bulimic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, April R; Hames, Jennifer L; Joiner, Thomas E

    2013-07-01

    The current study examined the effects of online social evaluations and comparisons on body dissatisfaction and bulimic symptoms. We tested the effects of maladaptive Facebook usage (defined as the tendency to seek negative social evaluations and/or engage in social comparisons via Facebook) on body dissatisfaction and bulimic symptoms in a sample of 232 college females followed for approximately 4 weeks. Results provided evidence that maladaptive Facebook usage significantly predicted increases in bulimic symptoms and episodes of over-eating approximately four weeks later. Body dissatisfaction was found to fully mediate the relationship between maladaptive Facebook usage and increases in over-eating episodes, whereas body dissatisfaction partially mediated the relationship between maladaptive Facebook usage and increases in bulimic symptoms more broadly. Limitations include the use of a novel measure of maladaptive Facebook usage due to the absence of an existing measure and a non-clinical sample. The results of this study suggest that reducing maladaptive Facebook usage may be a fruitful target for interventions aimed at reducing body dissatisfaction and symptoms of eating pathology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A Pilot Comparison of Purging and Non-Purging Bulimics.

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    Grace, Pamela S.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Compared purging bulimics (N=26), non-purging bulimics (N=24), and controls with no apparent eating problems, on personality and demographic variables. Results linked bulimics with low self-esteem, high anxiety, external locus of control, and high incidence of maternal and family obesity. No significant differences were found between purgers and…

  15. Online cognitive-behavioural treatment of bulimic symptoms: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruwaard, Jeroen; Lange, Alfred; Broeksteeg, Janneke; Renteria-Agirre, Aitziber; Schrieken, Bart; Dolan, Conor V; Emmelkamp, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Manualized cognitive-behavioural treatment (CBT) is underutilized in the treatment of bulimic symptoms. Internet-delivered treatment may reduce current barriers. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a new online CBT of bulimic symptoms. Participants with bulimic symptoms (n = 105) were randomly allocated to online CBT, bibliotherapy or waiting list/delayed treatment condition. Data were gathered at pre-treatment, post-treatment and 1-year follow-up. The primary outcome measures were the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) and the frequency of binge eating and purging episodes. The secondary outcome measure was the Body Attitude Test. Dropout from Internet treatment was 26%. Intention-to-treat ANCOVAs of post-test data revealed that the EDE-Q scores and the frequency of binging and purging reduced more in the online CBT group compared with the bibliotherapy and waiting list groups (pooled between-group effect size: d = 0.9). At 1-year follow-up, improvements in the online CBT group had sustained. This study identifies online CBT as a viable alternative in the treatment of bulimic symptoms. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Influence of outcome valence in the subjective experience of episodic past, future, and counterfactual thinking.

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    De Brigard, Felipe; Giovanello, Kelly S

    2012-09-01

    Recent findings suggest that our capacity to imagine the future depends on our capacity to remember the past. However, the extent to which episodic memory is involved in our capacity to think about what could have happened in our past, yet did not occur (i.e., episodic counterfactual thinking), remains largely unexplored. The current experiments investigate the phenomenological characteristics and the influence of outcome valence on the experience of past, future and counterfactual thoughts. Participants were asked to mentally simulate past, future, and counterfactual events with positive or negative outcomes. Features of their subjective experiences during each type of simulation were measured using questionnaires and autobiographical interviews. The results suggest that clarity and vividness were higher for past than future and counterfactual simulations. Additionally, emotional intensity was lower for counterfactual simulations than past and future simulations. Finally, outcome valence influenced participants' judgment of probability for future and counterfactual simulations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The subjective consequences of suffering a first episode psychosis: trauma and suicide behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrier, Nicholas; Khan, Sobia; Cater, Joanne; Picken, Alicia

    2007-01-01

    The subjective impact of a psychotic breakdown can be profound, potentially resulting in loss of social roles, hopes and aspirations and leading to stigmatisation, trauma and elevated suicide risk. This study aimed to assess the subjective effect and consequences of suffering a first episode of psychosis. It was hypothesised that suicide behaviour would be associated with the negative consequences of psychosis and co-morbid symptomatic-PTSD. Patients were assessed by means of a semi-structured interview on their reactions and experience of their psychotic episode and its treatment and by means of standardised methods for psychotic (PANSS) and trauma-related (CAPS) symptoms. A total of 35 patients suffering their first episode of psychosis were interviewed. As a result of the onset of their illness, 77% indicated they had suffered loss or disruption to their life, 60% had thwarted future aspirations, 38% had suffered violence or harassment, 53% had suffered stigma and 50% social exclusion. Totally, 80% felt they had been traumatised by their treatment and 38% were cases for symptomatic-PTSD. Symptomatic-PTSD was significantly associated with involuntary hospitalisation but not psychotic symptoms. Positive psychotic symptoms were associated with harassment, stigma and social exclusion. Suicidal ideation was reported by 40% and 31% reported attempting suicide. Suicidal behaviour was greater in those suffering symptomatic-PTSD but this was not significant, suicidal behaviour was significantly associated with the experience of trauma, but not the severity of that trauma, prior to the onset of their psychosis. The negative consequences of a psychotic episode are significant. The potential iatrogenic effect of psychiatric care needs to be considered. Interventions need to be developed to reduce traumatisation and suicide risk.

  18. Distinguishing prodromal from first-episode psychosis using neuroanatomical single-subject pattern recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgwardt, Stefan; Koutsouleris, Nikolaos; Aston, Jacqueline; Studerus, Erich; Smieskova, Renata; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Meisenzahl, Eva M

    2013-09-01

    The at-risk mental state for psychosis (ARMS) and the first episode of psychosis have been associated with structural brain abnormalities that could aid in the individualized early recognition of psychosis. However, it is unknown whether the development of these brain alterations predates the clinical deterioration of at-risk individuals, or alternatively, whether it parallels the transition to psychosis at the single-subject level. We evaluated the performance of an magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based classification system in classifying disease stages from at-risk individuals with subsequent transition to psychosis (ARMS-T) and patients with first-episode psychosis (FE). Pairwise and multigroup biomarkers were constructed using the structural MRI data of 22 healthy controls (HC), 16 ARMS-T and 23 FE subjects. The performance of these biomarkers was measured in unseen test cases using repeated nested cross-validation. The classification accuracies in the HC vs FE, HC vs ARMS-T, and ARMS-T vs FE analyses were 86.7%, 80.7%, and 80.0%, respectively. The neuroanatomical decision functions underlying these discriminative results particularly involved the frontotemporal, cingulate, cerebellar, and subcortical brain structures. Our findings suggest that structural brain alterations accumulate at the onset of psychosis and occur even before transition to psychosis allowing for the single-subject differentiation of the prodromal and first-episode stages of the disease. Pattern regression techniques facilitate an accurate prediction of these structural brain dynamics at the early stage of psychosis, potentially allowing for the early recognition of individuals at risk of developing psychosis.

  19. The weeping behavior in anorexic and bulimic females

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mangweth, B.; Kemmler, G.; Ehner, C.; de Col, C.; Kinzl, J.; Biebl, W.; Vingerhoets, A.J.J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to examine the proneness, the functions and triggering situations of weeping in anorexic and bulimic women. Methods: Participants were 36 anorexic and 31 bulimic female patients and 56 age-matched female controls. All women completed the Questionnaire on Adult

  20. Cannabis-related episodic memory deficits and hippocampal morphological differences in healthy individuals and schizophrenia subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew J; Cobia, Derin J; Reilly, James L; Gilman, Jodi M; Roberts, Andrea G; Alpert, Kathryn I; Wang, Lei; Breiter, Hans C; Csernansky, John G

    2015-09-01

    Cannabis use has been associated with episodic memory (EM) impairments and abnormal hippocampus morphology among both healthy individuals and schizophrenia subjects. Considering the hippocampus' role in EM, research is needed to evaluate the relationship between cannabis-related hippocampal morphology and EM among healthy and clinical groups. We examined differences in hippocampus morphology between control and schizophrenia subjects with and without a past (not current) cannabis use disorder (CUD). Subjects group-matched on demographics included 44 healthy controls (CON), 10 subjects with a CUD history (CON-CUD), 28 schizophrenia subjects with no history of substance use disorders (SCZ), and 15 schizophrenia subjects with a CUD history (SCZ-CUD). Large-deformation, high-dimensional brain mapping with MRI produced surface-based representations of the hippocampus that were compared across all four groups and correlated with EM and CUD history. Surface maps of the hippocampus were generated to visualize morphological differences. CON-CUD and SCZ-CUD were characterized by distinct cannabis-related hippocampal shape differences and parametric deficits in EM performance. Shape differences observed in CON-CUD were associated with poorer EM performance, while shape differences observed in SCZ-CUD were associated with a longer duration of CUD and shorter duration of CUD remission. A past history of CUD may be associated with notable differences in hippocampal morphology and EM impairments among adults with and without schizophrenia. Although the results may be compatible with a causal hypothesis, we must consider that the observed cannabis-related shape differences in the hippocampus could also be explained as biomarkers of a neurobiological susceptibility to poor memory or the effects of cannabis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Chronological and subjective age differences in flourishing mental health and major depressive episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Corey L M; Westerhof, Gerben J

    2012-01-01

    Mental health is more than the absence of psychopathology, but few studies use positive mental health along with a measure of past year major depressive episode (MDE). This study addresses this gap by investigating the association of MDE and flourishing mental health (FMH) with chronological age and subjective (felt and ideal) age. Data are from the Midlife in the United States random digit dialing sample of adults ages 25 to 74, collected in 1995 (n = 3032). Rates of MDE were lowest, and FMH highest, among the three oldest age cohorts (45-54, 55-64, 65-74 years). Subjective age was linked with chronological age; with age, adults tend to feel younger, and want to be an age that is younger, than their actual age. As predicted by the model of subjective age as an adaptive strategy, feeling younger was related to a lower risk of MDE and a higher risk of FMH. However, wanting to be younger was related to a lower risk of FMH and unrelated to MDE.

  2. "To Sleep, Perchance to Dream": The Role of Sleep Disturbance in the Multidimensional Treatment of a Male Bulimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Daniel J.; Levitt, John

    Eating disorders within males are relatively uncommon, with estimates suggesting incidence rates of only five percent of the sample. This single-subject, reversal design case study examines the etiological variables of a 22-year-old male bulimic patient. Consultation for treatment was made by the patient's parents. Family assessment made in the…

  3. Subjective experiences of illness recovery in individuals treated for first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windell, Deborah L; Norman, Ross; Lal, Shalini; Malla, Ashok

    2015-07-01

    Individuals with psychotic disorders identify several parallel dimensions of recovery as being important, including illness related, personal and social domains. Learning how patients deal with the experience of psychosis and recovery early in the course of illness may provide insights for improvement of early intervention services. The primary aim of the present research is to explore experiences related to recovery for individuals receiving services following a first episode of psychosis (FEP) in a specialized early intervention (SEI) program and to examine key turning points that shape such recovery. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 30 individuals in early recovery following an FEP. Interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) was used to examine the subjectively identified important processes and turning points in relation to the illness domain of recovery. Participants described several early recovery processes including symptom recovery; reconciling the meaning of the illness experience; regaining control over the experience; and negotiation and acceptance of treatment. Of particular relevance were the various turning points associated with the recovery processes that were described. Differences in illness acceptance trajectories and the turning points within such trajectories have important implications for understanding psychological adjustment to the experience of psychosis, its diagnosis and treatment. These findings underline the importance of assisting individuals with the construction of meaning following the initial illness experience.

  4. Linguistic characteristics of patients with bulimic symptomatology in an online post-treatment program: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezei, Ágnes; Gulec, Hayriye; Czeglédi, Edit; Fritz, Adorján; Túry, Ferenc

    2015-03-01

    No former investigation has been performed related to the linguistic characteristics of patients with eating disorders using online synchronous communication mediums like chats. The purpose of this study was to investigate the linguistic predictors of improvement in eating disorder-related attitudes, behaviours and emotional distress of patients with eating disorders. Thirty-nine women, who had received treatment for bulimia nervosa or related eating disorders not otherwise specified, utilized the moderated therapeutic group chats of an Internet-based program for 4 months. The main themes of 134 session transcripts were created using a general inductive approach. The frequency of dictionary words in the text corpus was processed by the NooJ linguistic software. Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire and Depression Anxiety Stress Scale were administered at the beginning and at the end of 4 months. No valid questionnaire data could be obtained from 11 participants, so the statistical analyses were performed in a sample of 28 subjects. According to the results of multiple linear regression analyses, higher ratio of words related to "family of origin" was associated with improvements in eating disorder-related attitudes, emotional distress, and reduction in the frequency of binge eating episodes (β = 0.73, p linguistic predictor of improvement during group chat communication of patients with bulimic symptomatology. The results show the importance of family issues in enhancing the treatment outcome and provide preliminary evidence to address this topic during online chat moderation.

  5. Chronological and subjective age differences in flourishing mental health and major depressive episode.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keyes, C.L.M.; Westerhof, Gerben Johan

    2012-01-01

    Mental health is more than the absence of psychopathology, but few studies use positive mental health along with a measure of past year major depressive episode (MDE). This study addresses this gap by investigating the association of MDE and flourishing mental health (FMH) with chronological age and

  6. Online cognitive-behavioural treatment of bulimic symptoms : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruwaard, Jeroen; Lange, Alfred; Broeksteeg, Janneke; Renteria-Agirre, Aitziber; Schrieken, Bart; Dolan, Conor V; Emmelkamp, Paul

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Manualized cognitive-behavioural treatment (CBT) is underutilized in the treatment of bulimic symptoms. Internet-delivered treatment may reduce current barriers. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a new online CBT of bulimic symptoms. METHOD: Participants with bulimic

  7. Online cognitive-behavioral treatment of bulimic symptoms: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruwaard, J.; Lange, A.; Broeksteeg, J.; Renteria Agirre, A.; Schrieken, B.; Dolan, C.V.; Emmelkamp, P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Manualized cognitive-behavioural treatment (CBT) is underutilized in the treatment of bulimic symptoms. Internet-delivered treatment may reduce current barriers. Objective: This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a new online CBT of bulimic symptoms. Method: Participants with bulimic

  8. Variables that Discriminate Bulimic from Nonbulimic Adolescent Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, G.; Crowther, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    A discriminant function analysis identified variables that significantly differentiated bulimic (N=71) from nonbulimic (N=71) adolescent females within a high school setting. These variables included disturbed eating attitudes, negative perception of weight and body image, depressive symptomatology, and alcohol use. Implications for the etiology…

  9. Reproductive and Appetite Hormones and Bulimic Symptoms during Midlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jessica H; Peterson, Claire M; Thornton, Laura M; Brownley, Kimberly A; Bulik, Cynthia M; Girdler, Susan S; Marcus, Marsha D; Bromberger, Joyce T

    2017-05-01

    Eating disorders and related symptoms occur during midlife; however, little is known about their aetiology. It has been hypothesised that perimenopause represents a window of vulnerability for the development or exacerbation of eating disorder symptomatology because, like puberty, perimenopause is a period of reproductive hormone change. We compared symptoms of bulimia nervosa (bulimic symptomatology) assessed via mean scores on a self-report questionnaire in premenopausal and perimenopausal women. We also examined the association between hormone concentrations (reproductive/appetite) and bulimic symptomatology. No mean differences in bulimic symptomatology were observed between premenopause and perimenopause. However, there was a significant positive association between leptin and binge eating. Although no significant associations between reproductive hormones and bulimic symptomatology were observed, additional research is needed to provide definitive information. It is essential to learn more about the aetiology of eating disorders and related symptomatology across the lifespan in order to develop age-relevant treatment and prevention programs. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  10. Oxidative stress parameters in unmedicated and treated bipolar subjects during initial manic episode: a possible role for lithium antioxidant effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Andreazza, Ana Cristina; Viale, Carlos Ivan; Zanatto, Vanessa; Cereser, Victor; da Silva Vargas, Rafael; Kapczinski, Flávio; Portela, Luiz V; Souza, Diogo O; Salvador, Mirian; Gentil, Valentim

    2007-06-21

    Studies have proposed the involvement of oxidative stress and neuronal energy dysfunctions in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD). This study evaluates plasma levels of the oxidative/energy metabolism markers, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) during initial episodes of mania compared to controls in 75 subjects. Two groups of manic subjects (unmedicated n=30, and lithium-treated n=15) were age/gender matched with healthy controls (n=30). TBARS and antioxidant enzymes activity (SOD and CAT) were increased in unmedicated manic patients compared to controls. Conversely, plasma NSE levels were lower during mania than in the controls. In contrast, acute treatment with lithium showed a significant reduction in both SOD/CAT ratio and TBARS levels. These results suggest that initial manic episodes are associated with both increased oxidative stress parameters and activated antioxidant defenses, which may be related to dysfunctions on energy metabolism and neuroplasticity pathways. Antioxidant effects using lithium in mania were shown, and further studies are necessary to evaluate the potential role of these effects in the pathophysiology and therapeutics of BD.

  11. Upper cervical mobility, posture and myofascial trigger points in subjects with episodic migraine: Case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tali, Danit; Menahem, Itay; Vered, Elisha; Kalichman, Leonid

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the association between episodic migraines and the prevalence of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in the sternocleidomastoid and upper trapezius, forward head posture (FHP), neck range of motion (ROM) and cervical facet joint stiffness. 20 physiotherapy students with episodic migraines and 20 age- and sex matched healthy controls were included in this observational case-control study. Demographics and headache status were evaluated through questionnaires. Active neck ROM, presence of MTrPs, and cervical facet joint mobility were assessed by physical examination. FHP was measured using a lateral digital photograph taken in a sitting position. No significant differences were found in neck ROM measurements and FHP between the migraine and control groups. Significant differences were found in the prevalence of cervical facet joints stiffness in Occiput-C1 (χ(2) = 4.444, p = 0.035) and C1-C2 (χ(2) = 10.157, p = 0.001), but not in other segments. Significant differences were found in the prevalence of active and latent MTrPs between the migraine and control subjects in the right trapezius (χ(2) = 11.649, p = 0.003) and right sternocleidomastoid (χ(2) = 8.485, p = 0.014). Our findings support the hypothesis that the prevalence of MTrPs in neck muscles and hypomobility in the upper cervical facet joints are associated with migraines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Anomalous single-subject based morphological cortical networks in drug-naive, first-episode major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Taolin; Kendrick, Keith M; Wang, Jinhui; Wu, Min; Li, Kaiming; Huang, Xiaoqi; Luo, Yuejia; Lui, Su; Sweeney, John A; Gong, Qiyong

    2017-05-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) has been associated with disruptions in the topological organization of brain morphological networks in group-level data. Such disruptions have not yet been identified in single-patients, which is needed to show relations with symptom severity and to evaluate their potential as biomarkers for illness. To address this issue, we conducted a cross-sectional structural brain network study of 33 treatment-naive, first-episode MDD patients and 33 age-, gender-, and education-matched healthy controls (HCs). Weighted graph-theory based network models were used to characterize the topological organization of brain networks between the two groups. Compared with HCs, MDD patients exhibited lower normalized global efficiency and higher modularity in their whole-brain morphological networks, suggesting impaired integration and increased segregation of morphological brain networks in the patients. Locally, MDD patients exhibited lower efficiency in anatomic organization for transferring information predominantly in default-mode regions including the hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, precuneus and superior parietal lobule, and higher efficiency in the insula, calcarine and posterior cingulate cortex, and in the cerebellum. Morphological connectivity comparisons revealed two subnetworks that exhibited higher connectivity strength in MDD mainly involving neocortex-striatum-thalamus-cerebellum and thalamo-hippocampal circuitry. MDD-related alterations correlated with symptom severity and differentiated individuals with MDD from HCs with a sensitivity of 87.9% and specificity of 81.8%. Our findings indicate that single subject grey matter morphological networks are often disrupted in clinically relevant ways in treatment-naive, first episode MDD patients. Circuit-specific changes in brain anatomic network organization suggest alterations in the efficiency of information transfer within particular brain networks in MDD. Hum Brain Mapp 38

  13. Clinical and treatment-related determinants of subjective quality of life in patients with first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Vivian Wing Yan; Chang, Wing Chung; Chan, Gloria Hoi Kei; Jim, Olivia Tsz Ting; Lau, Emily Sin Kei; Hui, Christy Lai Ming; Chan, Sherry Kit Wa; Lee, Edwin Ho Ming; Chen, Eric Yu Hai

    2017-03-01

    Subjective quality of life (SQoL) has been increasingly studied in first-episode psychosis (FEP). Prior research primarily examined the impact of psychiatric symptoms on SQoL. Relationship between treatment-related factors and SQoL is under-studied. In this study, 159 Chinese patients who had completed 2-year treatment from early intervention service in Hong Kong were recruited. Assessments on premorbid adjustment, clinical profiles including social anxiety measure, functioning, antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal side-effects and attitude toward medication treatment were conducted. SQoL was evaluated by Chinese version SF36 which generated mental and physical component summary (MCS and PCS) scores for analysis. Our results showed that more severe positive symptoms, higher level of depression, greater social anxiety, more negative attitude toward antipsychotic medications and greater degree of akathisia independently predicted lower MCS score. Higher social anxiety level and poorer functioning predicted lower PCS score. Our results indicate that affective and positive symptoms, functioning, and treatment-related variables are critical determinants of SQoL in FEP patients. These identified factors thus represent potentially malleable therapeutic targets for early detection and prompt intervention to promote enhancement of SQoL in the early stage of illness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Perfectionism, weight and shape concerns, and low self-esteem: Testing a model to predict bulimic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Mela, Carmelo; Maglietta, Marzio; Caini, Saverio; Casu, Giuliano P; Lucarelli, Stefano; Mori, Sara; Ruggiero, Giovanni Maria

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have tested multivariate models of bulimia pathology development, documenting that a confluence of perfectionism, body dissatisfaction, and low self-esteem is predictive of disordered eating. However, attempts to replicate these results have yielded controversial findings. The objective of the present study was to test an interactive model of perfectionism, weight and shape concerns, and self-esteem in a sample of patients affected by Eating Disorder (ED). One-hundred-sixty-seven ED patients received the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I (SCID-I), and they completed the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), and the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (MPS-F). Several mediation analysis models were fit to test whether causal effects of concern over weight and shape on the frequency of bulimic episodes were mediated by perfectionism and moderated by low levels of self-esteem. Contrary to our hypotheses, we found no evidence that the causal relationship investigated was mediated by any of the dimensions of perfectionism. As a secondary finding, the dimensions of perfectionism, perceived criticism and parental expectations, were significantly correlated with the presence of bulimic symptoms. The validity of the interactive model remains controversial, and may be limited by an inadequate conceptualization of the perfectionism construct.

  15. Personality and Physical Correlates of Bulimic Symptomatology among Mexican American Female College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Regan; Petrie, Trent A.

    1995-01-01

    Examined the relationship of personality and physical variables to bulimic symptoms. Hierarchical regression analysis of a sample of Mexican American female students revealed that body mass and endorsement of United States societal values concerning attractiveness were related positively to bulimic symptomatology; age, body satisfaction, and…

  16. Perceived Physical Appearance Mediates the Rumination and Bulimic Symptom Link in Adolescent Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm-Denoma, Jill M.; Hankin, Benjamin L.

    2010-01-01

    The prospective relationship between initial rumination and subsequent bulimic symptoms, and vice versa, was examined, and possible mediators were tested in a community sample of 191 adolescent girls (M age = 14.5) at 3 different assessment time points. Path analyses indicated that Time 1 rumination predicted Time 3 bulimic symptoms, and vice…

  17. Emotion Regulation Factors as Mediators between Body Dissatisfaction and Bulimic Symptoms in Early Adolescent Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Leslie; Zeman, Janice

    2005-01-01

    Research suggests that negative affect is an important mediator in the relationship between body dissatisfaction and bulimic symptoms. This study examines the mediational role of specific emotion regulation processes (i.e., negative emotionality, poor awareness of emotion, nonconstructive coping with negative emotion) in bulimic symptoms. In…

  18. Sorority Membership, Campus Pressures, and Bulimic Symptomatology in College Women: A Preliminary Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashubeck, Susan; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Examines bulimic symptomatology in 478 female college students who lived either on or off campus and who were sorority members or nonmembers. Results indicate that sorority women had greater bulimic symptomatology than nonsorority women. Perceptions of pressure to be thin and knowing women who binged and purged predicted greater bulimic…

  19. Examining impulsivity as a moderator of the relationship between body shame and bulimic symptoms in Black and White young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, M K; Lin, Stacy L; Alvarez, Alexandra; Bardone-Cone, Anna M

    2015-06-01

    Impulsivity has been linked to bulimic symptomatology in a number of studies; however, few have examined this relationship among Black women. We investigated the correlations between impulsivity and bulimic symptoms, and tested impulsivity as a moderator of the body shame/bulimic symptoms relationship among a sample of female undergraduates (N=276; 97 Blacks, 179 Whites). These participants provided data on body shame, impulsivity, and bulimic symptoms (EDE-Q binge eating frequency, BULIT-R, EDI-Bulimia). Among Blacks, impulsivity was significantly positively associated with all bulimic symptoms measures; among Whites, impulsivity was only positively correlated with binge eating frequency. Furthermore, among Blacks, the combination of high body shame and high impulsivity was associated with the highest levels of bulimic symptoms; these findings were not observed among Whites. This study highlights the importance of impulsivity and body shame in identifying bulimic symptomatology among Black women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Bulimic behaviours and psychopathology in obese adolescents and in their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isnard, Pascale; Quantin, Laure; Cortese, Samuele; Falissard, Bruno; Musher-Eizenman, Dara; Guedeney, Antoine; Frelut, Marie-Laure; Mouren, Marie-Christine

    2010-12-01

    To help identify and advance the understanding of the potential mechanisms underlying the association between parents' and adolescents' psychological maladjustment in obesity, we evaluated bulimic behaviours and psychopathology in a clinical sample of obese adolescents and in their parents. This is a cross-sectional cohort study including 115 severely obese, treatment-seeking adolescents aged 12-17 years (mean age: 14.2; mean body mass index z-score: 4.32), and their parents (115 mothers and 96 fathers). Adolescents filled out the Bulimic Investigatory Test, Edinburgh (BITE), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAIC). Their parents completed the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) and the BITE. A child psychiatrist filled out the Montgomery and Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and the Brief Scale for Anxiety (BSA) for the adolescents. Obese adolescents demonstrated significant correlations between the severity of bulimic symptoms and the degree of emotional symptomatology, such as depression and anxiety, but not with the severity of obesity. Psychopathological maladjustment and bulimic symptoms in obese adolescents were significantly associated with the maternal psychopathological disturbances, especially anxiety and somatisation in mother. In fact, maternal psychopathology, not maternal bulimic symptoms, was the factor most strongly associated with bulimic behaviours in obese adolescents. These results highlight the importance of including an adolescent and parental psychiatric assessment (bulimic, depressive and anxiety symptoms), particularly maternal psychopathology in the treatment of severely obese adolescents.

  1. The development of subjective quality of life over the first 2 years in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melle, Ingrid; Røssberg, Jan Ivar; Joa, Inge

    2010-01-01

    of variance were done to evaluate the development over time, and multiple linear regression analyses to evaluate predictors of change. These patients with a first-episode psychosis showed a significant improvement in general s-QoL during the first 2 years of treatment. Improvements in general s-QoL were...

  2. Negative affect, negative urgency, thought suppression, and bulimic symptoms: a moderated mediation analysis in a sample at-risk for bulimic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Jason M; Green, Daniel; Anestis, Michael D; Tull, Matthew T; Gratz, Kim L

    2015-05-01

    Research suggests that negative affect, negative urgency, and thought suppression are related to bulimic symptoms, either directly or indirectly. This study examined associations between these constructs in a sample at-risk for bulimic symptoms. Participants (N = 80) recruited from a residential substance abuse treatment facility completed self-report questionnaires. A regression-based bootstrapping approach was used to examine the indirect effect of negative affect on bulimic symptoms through negative urgency and the moderating role of thought suppression in the association between negative affect and negative urgency. Results revealed a significant indirect effect, significant moderation, and a significant moderated mediation effect, with an indirect effect of negative affect on bulimic symptoms through negative urgency, conditional upon low to moderate (but not high) levels of thought suppression. These findings suggest that negative affect may promote rash actions, particularly in the context of low to moderate thought suppression, leading to increased risk of bulimic symptoms. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  3. Family Relations and Psychopathology: Examining Depressive and Bulimic Symptomatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluck, Annette S; Dallesasse, Starla; English, Erin M

    2017-10-01

    Despite early theories suggesting that family dysfunction (FD) may cause disordered eating, FD has been linked with other disorders and is a non-specific risk factor for disordered eating. We examined one potential model of the way FD relates to disordered eating, drawing on research that identified depression as a risk factor for bulimia. We examined whether depression symptoms (DEPs) partially mediated the relationship between family cohesion (as a measure of FD) and bulimic symptoms (BNs) using a sample of 215 never-married college women under age 20. Perceptions that one's family was less cohesive (or more disengaged) was associated with increased DEPs and BNs. Moreover, DEPs partially mediated the influence of cohesion on BNs through a significant indirect effect. Both family systems in general and treatment of mood difficulties may be important considerations in the prevention of disordered eating, and prevention efforts that include family relationships should be experimentally explored.

  4. An investigation of objective and subjective types of binge eating episodes in a clinical sample of people with co-morbid obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palavras, Marly Amorim; Morgan, Christina Marcondes; Borges, Ferrari Maria Beatriz; Claudino, Angélica Medeiros; Hay, Phillipa J

    2013-01-01

    Objective binge eating episodes (OBEs) refer to binge eating on an unusually large amount of food and are the core symptom in current definitions of bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED). Subjective binge eating episodes (SBEs) refer to eating on a small or moderate amount of food (that is perceived as large) and like OBEs are associated with loss of control (LOC). Reaching consensus on what is considered a large amount of food can however be problematic and it remains unclear if the size of a binge is an essential component for defining a binge eating episode. The aim of this study was to compare the eating disorder features and general psychopathology of subjects reporting OBEs with those reporting only SBEs. This is a retrospective secondary analysis of data from 70 obese participants at the recruitment phase of a multicentre trial for BED. Individuals who answered positively to the presence of binge eating and LOC over eating had their binge eating episodes further explored by interview and self-report. Two groups, those who reported current OBEs (with or without SBEs) and those who reported current SBEs only were compared for age, gender, marital status, body mass index (BMI), indicators of LOC over eating, severity of binge-eating and associated psychopathology. The majority of participants in both the OBE and SBE groups endorsed the experience of at least four indicators of LOC. There were no significant differences between the groups. Both groups had high levels of binge-eating severity, moderate severity of associated depressive symptoms and frequent psychiatric co-morbidity. Treatment seeking participants with obesity who reported SBEs alone were similar to those who reported OBEs in terms of eating disorder features and general psychopathology. These findings suggest that classificatory systems of mental illnesses should consider introducing SBEs as a feature of the diagnostic criteria for binge eating and, thus, facilitate the inclusion

  5. Experimental investigation of the effects of naturalistic dieting on bulimic symptoms: moderating effects of depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presnell, Katherine; Stice, Eric; Tristan, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Prospective studies suggest that dieting increases risk for bulimic symptoms, but experimental trials indicate dieting reduces bulimic symptoms. However, these experiments may be unrepresentative of real-world weight loss dieting. In addition, the fact that most dieters do not develop eating disorders suggests moderating factors may be important. Accordingly, we randomly assigned 157 female intermittent dieters to either diet as they usually do for weight loss or eat as they normally do when not dieting for 4 weeks. Naturalistic dieting halted the weight gain shown by controls, but did not result in significant weight loss. Although there was no main effect of the dieting manipulation on bulimic symptoms, moderation analyses indicated that naturalistic dieting decreased bulimic symptoms among participants with initially low depressive symptoms. Results suggest that self-initiated weight loss dieting is not particularly effective, which appears to explain several discrepancies in the literature. Additionally, depressive symptoms may be an important determinant of bulimic symptoms that eclipses the effects of naturalistic dieting on this outcome.

  6. Perfectionism, low self-esteem, and family factors as predictors of bulimic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Emily A; Clopton, James R; Bleckley, M Kathryn

    2004-11-01

    A previous study found that self-reported body dissatisfaction, depression, and peer pressure to maintain a thin body shape were significant predictors of bulimic behavior in college women, but that family functioning was not a significant predictor [Eat. Behav. 2 (2001) 323]. The current study examined whether perfectionism, low self-esteem, and a more specific family variable--perceived pressure from the family to be thin--predicted any additional variance in eating-disordered behavior after significant variables from the previous study had been taken into account. As in the previous study, self-reported body dissatisfaction, depression, and peer pressure to maintain a thin body shape were significant predictors of bulimic behavior. Perceived weight-related pressure from the family was also a significant predictor. In contrast, high parental expectations were found to predict lower levels of bulimic behavior and to moderate the effects of peer influence on bulimic behavior. The variables found in this study to be related to bulimic behavior may be useful targets for clinical intervention for women with disturbed eating patterns.

  7. β-Amyloid binding in elderly subjects with declining or stable episodic memory function measured with PET and [{sup 11}C]AZD2184

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattsson, Patrik [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Stockholm (Sweden); Forsberg, Anton; Halldin, Christer [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Persson, Jonas; Nilsson, Lars-Goeran [Karolinska Institute and Stockholm University, Aging Research Center (ARC), Stockholm (Sweden); Nyberg, Lars [Umeaa University, Department of Radiation Sciences (Diagnostic Radiology), Umeaa (Sweden); Farde, Lars [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); AstraZeneca Translational Science Center at Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-09-15

    Cognitive decline has been suggested as an early marker for later onset of Alzheimer's disease. We therefore explored the relationship between decline in episodic memory and β-amyloid using positron emission tomography (PET) and [{sup 11}C]AZD2184, a radioligand with potential to detect low levels of amyloid deposits. Healthy elderly subjects with declining (n = 10) or stable (n = 10) episodic memory over 15 years were recruited from the population-based Betula study and examined with PET. Brain radioactivity was measured after intravenous administration of [{sup 11}C]AZD2184. The binding potential BP{sub ND} was calculated using linear graphical analysis with the cerebellum as reference region. The binding of [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 in total grey matter was generally low in the declining group, whereas some binding could be observed in the stable group. Mean BP{sub ND} was significantly higher in the stable group compared to the declining group (p = 0.019). An observation was that the three subjects with the highest BP{sub ND} were ApoE ε4 allele carriers. We conclude that cognitive decline in the general population does not seem to stand by itself as an early predictor for amyloid deposits. (orig.)

  8. Perfectionism and Bulimic Symptoms in African American College Women: Dimensions of Perfectionism and Their Interactions with Perceived Weight Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardone-Cone, Anna M.; Weishuhn, Amanda S.; Boyd, Clarissa A.

    2009-01-01

    This study had 2 primary aims: (a) to examine the unique relations between maladaptive and adaptive dimensions of perfectionism and bulimic symptoms and (b) to test an interactive model of perfectionism and perceived weight status for bulimic symptoms in a sample of African American female undergraduates. The sample consisted of 97 women at Time 1…

  9. The Role of Body Image in the Relationship Between Internet Use and Bulimic Symptoms: Three Theoretical Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melioli, Tiffany; Rodgers, Rachel F; Rodrigues, Marie; Chabrol, Henri

    2015-11-01

    Exposure to traditional media has been associated with bulimic symptoms. However, to date, little is known regarding the effects of Internet exposure. The aim of this study was to explore the relationships between Internet use and bulimic symptoms within the competing frameworks of sociocultural, impression management, and self-objectification theory. A sample of 289 French women aged 18-25 years completed an online questionnaire assessing bulimic symptoms, body dissatisfaction, body image avoidance, self-surveillance, body shame, and weekly Internet use. Bootstrapping analyses revealed that body shame and body image avoidance mediated the effect of weekly Internet use on bulimic symptoms. Furthermore, when entered into a multiple mediation analysis, these two variables provided independent mediation pathways of equal magnitude. The findings support the usefulness of both the self-objectification and impression management frameworks for investigating the relationship between Internet use and bulimic symptoms. Longitudinal research would help to clarify these pathways further.

  10. El "presente cíclico" de las crisis bulímicas The 'cyclical present' of bulimic crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Federico Del Cioppo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available La incidencia poblacional y el crecimiento progresivo de los denominados "Trastornos de la conducta alimentaria", muestran un papel cada vez mas destacado de la bulimia nerviosa y más específicamente, una cada vez mayor frecuencia de síntomas bulímicos. Analizando las crisis bulímicas, y buscando articular la modalidad subjetiva y trascendental de la temporalidad, se puede señalar una estructura temporal de características restrictivas a la que se denominará "presente cíclico". Con esta noción, se busca dar razón no sólo del"circulo vicioso" o ciclo "atracón-culpa-purga...", sino también esa modalidad de ser propia que gira alrededor de la circularidad. No sólo se trata del ciclo "me atracovoy a engordar-siento culpa-vomito", del fenómeno puntual de la crisis, sino también de un "presente viviente"que se halla constantemente "atracado".The incidence of population and the progressive growth of the "eating conduct disorders" show an increasing and outstanding role of bulimia nervosa and, more specifically, more frequent bulimic symptoms. When analyzing bulimic crisis, and searching the articulation of the subjective and transcendental modality of temporality, it can be found a temporal structure of restrictive characteristics that will be called 'cyclical present'. The purpose of this concept is to give grounds not only to the 'vicious cycle' or 'binge-eating/guilt/purge' cycle, but to that own modality of being that goes around circularity. It is not only the cycle 'I over eat-I'm going to put on weight- I feel guilty - I vomit' of the punctual crisis phenomenon but a 'living present' that is continuously'binge-eaten'.

  11. The effects of social support and stress perception on bulimic behaviors and unhealthy food consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Mun Yee; Gordon, Kathryn H

    2016-08-01

    Two studies tested a model where perceived stress was the proposed mediator for the relationship between perceived social support and bulimic behaviors, and between perceived social support and unhealthy food consumption among undergraduate students. Study 1 was a longitudinal, online study in which undergraduate students completed the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support and the Bulimia Test-Revised at the Time 1 assessment, and the Perceived Stress Scale and the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire at the Time 2 assessment, approximately four weeks later. Study 2 was an experimental study in which female participants were randomly assigned into a group with or without social support. Stress was induced with a speech task, followed by a bogus taste task paradigm designed to assess unhealthy food consumption. Bootstrap analyses revealed an indirect effect of perceived social support on bulimic behaviors and unhealthy food consumption through perceived stress. Perceived social support was associated with lower perceived stress in both studies. Lower perceived stress was associated with less self-reported bulimic behaviors in Study 1 and greater consumption of unhealthy foods in Study 2. The negative association between perceived stress and calorie consumption in Study 2 was moderated by dietary restraint. Findings suggest that stress perception helps to explain the relationship between perceived social support and bulimic behaviors, and between perceived social support and calorie consumption. Stress perception may be an important treatment target for eating disorder symptoms among undergraduate students. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Incidence and Correlates of Bulimic Behavior in a Female High School Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This investigation surveyed 1268 high school females to identify and compare students for bulimic behavior. Approximately five percent of the students met rigorous criteria for the diagnosis of bulimia. Between-group comparisons indicated that body dissatifaction, drive for thinness, and chronicity of dieting differentiated the two groups.…

  13. Using the PRECEDE Model for Causal Analysis of Bulimic Tendencies among Elite Women Swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, RoseAnn; Taub, Diane E.

    1993-01-01

    Describes a study of weight control techniques and bulimic tendencies among elite female participants in an Olympic Swimming Selection Meet. Results showed concern with thinness, body dissatisfaction, and unhealthy eating, dieting, and weight loss patterns among participants. Discusses the explanatory power of the PRECEDE model. (SM)

  14. Women with Bulimic Eating Disorders: When Do They Receive Treatment for an Eating Problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mond, J. M.; Hay, P. J.; Darby, A.; Paxton, S. J.; Quirk, F.; Buttner, P.; Owen, C.; Rodgers, B.

    2009-01-01

    Variables associated with the use of health services were examined in a prospective, community-based study of women with bulimic-type eating disorders who did (n = 33) or did not (n = 58) receive treatment for an eating problem during a 12-month follow-up period. Participants who received treatment for an eating problem differed from those who did…

  15. Longitudinal Predictors of Restrictive Eating and Bulimic Tendencies in Three Different Age Groups of Adolescent Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertheim, Eleanor H.; Koerner, Jody; Paxton, Susan J.

    2001-01-01

    Examined longitudinal predictors of future eating problems in 435 female adolescents in grades 7, 8, and 10 who were tested at 2 time points 8 months apart. Restrictive eating and bulimic tendencies were found to be relatively stable over time, especially at older grade levels. A predictive role was found for body dissatisfaction, depression, and…

  16. Bulimics with and without Prior Anorexia Nervosa: A Comparison of Personality Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzman, Melanie A.; Wolchik, Sharlene A.

    A controversial issue in the literature on eating disorders is whether or not bulimia is a disorder distinct from anorexia nervosa. To compare the personality and behavioral characteristics of bulimic women with and without prior anorexia nervosa, 14 female college students (mean age 19.6 years, 86 percent white) were divided into two groups…

  17. The Role of Attachment and Maladaptive Emotion Regulation Strategies in the Development of Bulimic Symptoms in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Durme, Kim; Goossens, Lien; Bosmans, Guy; Braet, Caroline

    2017-07-29

    Following the theoretical propositions of the Emotion Regulation model of attachment, the current study investigated whether attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance might play a differential contributing role in the development of bulimic symptoms, through assumed differences in adopting specific maladaptive emotion regulation strategies in a sample of adolescents. Developmentally appropriate self-report questionnaires were administered to a community sample of 397 adolescents (Mean age: 14.02; 62.7% female) and this at 2 time points with a 1-year time lag. Results provided longitudinal evidence for the Emotion Regulation model of attachment in confirming the differential contributing role of the attachment dimensions on the development of bulimic symptoms in a sample of adolescents. More specifically, attachment anxiety seemed to be related to bulimic symptoms through rumination, while attachment avoidance through emotional control. These results may have clinical implications for assessment and treatment of bulimic symptoms in adolescents.

  18. Subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Vega Encabo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I claim that subjectivity is a way of being that is constituted through a set of practices in which the self is subject to the dangers of fictionalizing and plotting her life and self-image. I examine some ways of becoming subject through narratives and through theatrical performance before others. Through these practices, a real and active subjectivity is revealed, capable of self-knowledge and self-transformation. 

  19. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for bulimia nervosa and atypical bulimic nervosa: effectiveness in clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Glenn; Gray, Emma; Hinrichsen, Hendrik; Mountford, Victoria; Lawson, Rachel; Patient, Eloise

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for bulimic disorders has been established in research trials. This study examined whether that efficacy can be translated into effectiveness in routine clinical practice. Seventy-eight adult women with bulimic disorders (bulimia nervosa and atypical bulimia nervosa) undertook individual CBT, with few exclusion criteria and a treatment protocol based on evidence-based approaches, utilizing individualized formulations. Patients completed measures of eating behaviors, eating attitudes, and depression pre- and post-treatment. Eight patients dropped out. The mean number of sessions attended was 19.2. No pretreatment features predicted drop-out. Treatment outcome was similar whether using treatment completer or intent to treat analyses. Approximately 50% of patients were in remission by the end of treatment. There were significant improvements in mood, eating attitudes, and eating behaviors. Reductions in bingeing and vomiting were comparable to efficacy trials. The improvements in this "real-world" trial of CBT for adults with bulimic disorders mirrored those from large, funded research trials, though the conclusions that can be reached are inevitably limited by the nature of the trial (e.g., lack of control group and therapy validation). Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Perspectives on Episodic-like and Episodic Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina M Pause

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Episodic memory refers to the conscious recollection of a personal experience that contains information on what has happened and also where and when it happened. Recollection from episodic memory also implies a kind of first-person subjectivity that has been termed autonoetic consciousness. Episodic memory is extremely sensitive to cerebral aging and neurodegenerative diseases. In Alzheimer’s disease deficits in episodic memory function are among the first cognitive symptoms observed. Furthermore, impaired episodic memory function is also observed in a variety of other neuropsychiatric diseases including dissociative disorders, schizophrenia and Parkinson disease. Unfortunately, it is quite difficult to induce and measure episodic memories in the laboratory and it is even more difficult to measure it in clinical populations. Presently, the tests used to assess episodic memory function do not comply with even down-sized definitions of episodic-like memory as a memory for what happened, where and when. They also require sophisticated verbal competences and are difficult to apply to patient populations. In this review, we will summarize the progress made in defining behavioral criteria of episodic-like memory in animals (and humans as well as the perspectives in developing novel tests of human episodic memory which can also account for phenomenological aspects of episodic memory such as autonoetic awareness. We will also define basic behavioral, procedural and phenomenological criteria which might be helpful for the development of a valid and reliable clinical test of human episodic memory.

  1. Perspectives on episodic-like and episodic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pause, Bettina M; Zlomuzica, Armin; Kinugawa, Kiyoka; Mariani, Jean; Pietrowsky, Reinhard; Dere, Ekrem

    2013-01-01

    Episodic memory refers to the conscious recollection of a personal experience that contains information on what has happened and also where and when it happened. Recollection from episodic memory also implies a kind of first-person subjectivity that has been termed autonoetic consciousness. Episodic memory is extremely sensitive to cerebral aging and neurodegenerative diseases. In Alzheimer's disease deficits in episodic memory function are among the first cognitive symptoms observed. Furthermore, impaired episodic memory function is also observed in a variety of other neuropsychiatric diseases including dissociative disorders, schizophrenia, and Parkinson disease. Unfortunately, it is quite difficult to induce and measure episodic memories in the laboratory and it is even more difficult to measure it in clinical populations. Presently, the tests used to assess episodic memory function do not comply with even down-sized definitions of episodic-like memory as a memory for what happened, where, and when. They also require sophisticated verbal competences and are difficult to apply to patient populations. In this review, we will summarize the progress made in defining behavioral criteria of episodic-like memory in animals (and humans) as well as the perspectives in developing novel tests of human episodic memory which can also account for phenomenological aspects of episodic memory such as autonoetic awareness. We will also define basic behavioral, procedural, and phenomenological criteria which might be helpful for the development of a valid and reliable clinical test of human episodic memory.

  2. Psychodynamic-oriented psychological assessment predicts evolution to schizophrenia at 8-year follow-up in adolescents hospitalized for a manic/mixed episode: interest of an overall subjective rating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louët, Estelle; Consoli, Angèle; Lucanto, Raffaella; Duplant, Nicole; Bailly-Salin, Marie-José; Lemoigne, Annie; Martin, Michèle; Mayer, Charlotte; Thompson, Caroline; Gollier-Briant, Fanny; Laurent, Claudine; Brunelle, Julie; Bodeau, Nicolas; Cohen, David

    2010-11-01

    Little is known concerning the prognostic significance of manic/mixed episodes in adolescents. In particular, whether the use of psychodynamic-oriented projective psychological testing predicts evolution to schizophrenia at follow-up has not been established. Eighty subjects, aged 12-20years old, consecutively hospitalized for a manic or mixed episode between 1994 and 2003 were recruited. All patients were contacted in 2005-2006 for a follow-up assessment. For the subgroup of adolescents (N=40) who had psychodynamic-oriented psychological testing (Rorschach and TAT), two scores regarding psychosocial risk and schizophrenia risk were computed using the clinical global impression (CGI) assessment based on an overall subjective rating given by a panel of expert psychologists who reviewed all protocols. At follow-up (average 8years), 25 (62.5%) patients, 16 females and nine males, were assessed: 14 still had a diagnosis of bipolar disorder; eight changed to schizo-affective disorder and three to schizophrenia. Inter-rater reliability of both CGI-risk scores (psychosocial risk and schizophrenia risk) showed good clinical consensus with intraclass correlation and Kappa scores ranging from 0.53 to 0.75. Univariate analysis showed that CGI-psychosocial risk score (p=0.017), type of index episode (p=0.049) and CGI-schizophrenia risk score (p=0.09) were associated with transition to schizophrenia spectrum disorder at follow-up. Age, sex, socioeconomic status, duration of stay and the presence of psychotic features at index episode were not associated with the transition. We conclude that the CGI assessment appears to be valid to score risk of poor outcome using psychodynamic-oriented psychological testing and that these scores may predict, in part, the transition to schizophrenia in adolescents with a history of manic/mixed episode. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Low episodic memory performance in cognitively normal elderly subjects is associated with increased posterior cingulate gray matter N-acetylaspartate: a1H MRSI study at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Simon J; Kirchner, Thomas; Wyss, Michael; Van Bergen, Jiri M G; Quevenco, Frances C; Steininger, Stefanie C; Griffith, Erica Y; Meier, Irene; Michels, Lars; Gietl, Anton F; Leh, Sandra E; Brickman, Adam M; Hock, Christoph; Nitsch, Roger M; Pruessmann, Klaas P; Henning, Anke; Unschuld, Paul G

    2016-12-01

    Low episodic memory performance characterizes elderly subjects at increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may reflect neuronal dysfunction within the posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus (PCP) region. To investigate a potential association between cerebral neurometabolism and low episodic memory in the absence of cognitive impairment, tissue-specific magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging at ultrahigh field strength of 7 Tesla was used to investigate the PCP region in a healthy elderly study population (n = 30, age 70 ± 5.7 years, Mini-Mental State Examination 29.4 ± 4.1). The Verbal Learning and Memory Test (VLMT) was administered as part of a neuropsychological battery for assessment of episodic memory performance. Significant differences between PCP gray and white matter could be observed for glutamate-glutamine (p = 0.001), choline (p = 0.01), and myo-inositol (p = 0.02). Low Verbal Learning and Memory Test performance was associated with high N-acetylaspartate in PCP gray matter (p = 0.01) but not in PCP white matter. Our data suggest that subtle decreases in episodic memory performance in the elderly may be associated with increased levels of N-acetylaspartate as a reflection of increased mitochondrial energy capacity in PCP gray matter. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Rumination and self-control interact to predict bulimic symptomatology in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breithaupt, Lauren; Rallis, Bethany; Mehlenbeck, Robyn; Kleiman, Evan

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that a ruminative response style may contribute to the development and maintenance of Bulimia nervosa. However it is not clear what factors may contribute to the relationship between rumination and BN. One factor may be self-control, as studies suggest that BN symptomatology relates to deficits in self-control. In the present study, we hypothesized that the association between rumination and BN symptomatology would be the strongest among individuals with lower self-control relative to those with higher self-control. Participants were 353 students at a large university. Participants completed measures of self-control, rumination, and eating disorder symptomology as part of an online study. A hierarchical regression supported an interaction between rumination and self-control predicting bulimic symptomatology, controlling for BMI. Individuals with higher levels of rumination presented more bulimic symptoms if they also had lower levels of self-control, supporting our hypothesis. Based on these findings, assessing rumination in conjunction with self-control among individuals who present with eating concerns may help to direct treatment. Additionally, clinical interventions increasing self-control may also alleviate some BN symptoms in ruminators. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Poor self-recognition of disordered eating among girls with bulimic-type eating disorders: cause for concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratwick-Sarll, Kassandra; Bentley, Caroline; Harrison, Carmel; Mond, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    Bulimic-type eating disorders are common among young women and associated with high levels of distress and disability and low uptake of mental health care. We examined self-recognition of disordered eating and factors associated with this among female adolescents with bulimic-type eating disorders (n = 139) recruited from a large, population-based sample. A vignette of a fictional character with bulimia nervosa was presented, followed by a series of questions addressing the nature and treatment of the problem described. One of these questions required participants to indicate whether they currently had a problem such as the one described. Self-report measures of eating disorder symptoms, general psychological distress and quality of life were also completed. More than half of participants (58%) did not believe that they currently had a problem with their eating. In multivariable analysis, impairment in emotional well-being and self-induced vomiting were the only variables independently associated with self-recognition. Participants who recognized a problem with their eating were more likely to have sought treatment for an eating problem than those who did not. Recognition of disordered eating among adolescents with bulimic-type eating disorders may be poor and this may be a factor in low uptake of mental health care. Health promotion efforts may need to address the misconception that only bulimic-type disorders involving self-induced vomiting are pathological. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. The Role of Depression and Dissociation in the Relationship between Childhood Trauma and Bulimic Symptoms among Ethnically Diverse Female Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, Clarice K.; Mazzeo, Suzanne E.; Kliewer, Wendy

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The goals of this study were to examine the role of dissociation and depression as possible mediators of the relationship between several forms of childhood trauma and bulimic symptomatology and to explore potential ethnic differences in these relationships. Method: Four hundred seventeen female undergraduates participated in this…

  7. [Amnestic episodes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedmann, G; Lindner, M; Barolin, G S

    1988-12-31

    Amnesic episodes, by no means infrequent occurrences, are likely to trigger off anxiety in the patient and to evade adequate diagnostic interpretation. They consist of an isolated disturbance of short-term memory, manifesting itself as a permanent memory gap. The clinical features may vary from a conspicuous behaviour with stereotype repetition of questions to a completely inconspicuous picture with flawless execution of even highly differentiated behaviour patterns. The vegetative state may either be completely undisturbed or vary from mild impairment with nausea and vertigo to marked vegetative disorder. We are advocating a classification in 3 groups: a) "Genuine" amnesic states as symptoms of impaired blood flow in the basilar system in the absence of other etiological clues. b) "Symptomatic" amnesic episodes with tangible pathogenic factors, such as injury of the head and cervical spine, epilepsy, intoxication with various agents. The "genuine" amnesic states can also be regarded as transitory ischemic attacks of the basilar system. They show the following criteria: preponderance in females beyond middle age, duration of several hours, relatively high frequency of vascular risk factors and degenerative changes in the cervical spine, often triggered off by stress on the cervical spine, low tendency towards recurrence, general clinical benignity. In consequence, we stress the importance of etiological clarification before the onset of therapy. After the diagnosis of "genuine" amnesic state has been established, treatment has to be in accordance with the principles of basilar stroke therapy with subsequent vascular prophylaxis. Nevertheless, because of possible therapeutic or forensic consequences, the "symptomatic" states have to be kept in mind.

  8. Prevalência de comportamento bulímico e fatores associados em universitárias Prevalence of bulimic behavior and associated factors in undergraduate female students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monalisa Cenci

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: A bulimia nervosa caracteriza-se por episódios repetidos de compulsões alimentares seguidos de comportamentos compensatórios inadequados. A prevalência entre mulheres adolescentes e adultas jovens é de aproximadamente 1% a 3%. OBJETIVO: Estimar a prevalência de comportamento bulímico e os fatores associados em universitárias ingressantes. MÉTODOS: Foi examinada uma amostra aleatória sistemática (n = 220 de universitárias a respeito da presença de comportamento bulímico, identificado de acordo com a pontuação obtida no teste de investigação bulímica de Edimburgo (BITE. Investigou-se, entre outros aspectos, a satisfação com a imagem corporal e o estado nutricional. Os fatores associados ao comportamento bulímico (BITE > 15 foram analisados a partir de regressão logística múltipla não condicional. RESULTADOS: A taxa de resposta foi igual a 98,7%. A prevalência de sintomas de bulimia nervosa foi de 3,6% (IC 95% 1,1; 6,1 e a de insatisfação com a imagem corporal foi igual a 20% (IC 95% 14,7; 25,3. As universitárias que apresentaram insatisfação com a imagem corporal demonstraram 15,4 vezes a chance de desenvolver comportamento bulímico quando comparadas àquelas satisfeitas com a própria imagem, independentemente das outras variáveis analisadas. CONCLUSÃO: A insatisfação com a imagem corporal revelou-se como o mais importante fator associado com a presença de comportamento bulímico na população estudada.CONTEXT: Bulimia nervosa is characterized by repetitive binge eating episodes followed by inadequate compensatory behaviors. Prevalence in teenager girls and young women is about 1% to 3%. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of bulimic behavior and associated factors for first year undergraduate women. METHODS: A systematic random sample (n = 220 was analyzed and the bulimic investigatory test Edinburgh (BITE criteria was used to evaluate bulimia nervosa behaviors. Satisfaction with body image and

  9. Subjective binge eating with compensatory behaviors: a variant presentation of bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Hunna J; Fursland, Anthea; Bulik, Cynthia M; Nathan, Paula

    2013-03-01

    To determine whether a variant bulimic-type presentation, whereby one meets criteria for bulimia nervosa (BN) except that binge eating episodes are not objectively large (i.e., "subjective bulimia nervosa," SBN), has comparable clinical severity to established eating disorders, particularly BN. Treatment-seeking adults with BN (N = 112), SBN (N = 28), anorexia nervosa restricting type (AN-R) (N = 45), and AN-binge/purge type (AN-B/P) (N = 24) were compared. Overall, SBN could not be meaningfully distinguished from BN. SBN and BN had equivalent eating pathology, depression and anxiety symptoms, low quality of life, impulsivity, Axis I comorbidity, and lifetime psychiatric history, and comparable clinical severity to AN-R and AN-B/P. Individuals with SBN, differing from BN only by the smaller size of their binge eating episodes, had a form of eating disorder comparable in clinical severity to threshold AN and BN and warranting clinical attention. Health professionals and the community require greater awareness of this variant to optimize detection, treatment-seeking, and outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. No increased risk of hypoglycaemic episodes during 48 h of subcutaneous glucagon-like-peptide-1 administration in fasting healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Susanne; Soendergaard, Liselotte; Rungby, Joergen

    2008-01-01

    glucose tolerance test (OGTT). GLP-1(7-36 amide) or placebo was continuously infused subcutaneously and titrated to a dose of 4.8 pmol/kg per min. RESULTS: Two subjects in the GLP-1 group and one subject in the placebo group were withdrawn due to protocol specified plasma glucose (PG) ... of insulin and C-peptide were higher with GLP-1 infusion. However, PG was similar during GLP-1 vs. placebo infusions. GLP-1 infusion increased norepinephrine and cortisol levels during OGTT. CONCLUSION: The counter-regulatory response during 48 h of subcutaneous GLP-1 infusion was preserved despite long...

  11. A prospective test of the dual-pathway model of bulimic pathology: mediating effects of dieting and negative affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, E

    2001-02-01

    Because there have been few longitudinal investigations of integrative etiological theories of bulimia nervosa, this study prospectively tested the dual-pathway model using random regression growth curve models and data from a 3-wave community sample of adolescent girls (N = 231). Initial pressure to be thin and thin-ideal internalization predicted subsequent growth in body dissatisfaction, initial body dissatisfaction predicted growth in dieting and negative affect, and initial dieting and negative affect predicted growth in bulimic symptoms. There was prospective evidence for most of the hypothesized mediational effects. Results are consistent with the assertion that pressure to be thin, thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction, dieting, and negative affect are risk factors for bulimic pathology and provide support for the dual-pathway model.

  12. Psychosocial correlates of bulimic symptoms among NCAA division-I female collegiate gymnasts and swimmers/divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carlin M; Petrie, Trent A; Neumann, Craig S

    2011-08-01

    In this study, we tested Petrie and Greenleaf's (2007) model of bulimic symptoms in two independent samples of female collegiate swimmers/divers and gymnasts. Structural equation modeling revealed support for the model, although it also suggested additional pathways. Specifically, general societal pressures regarding weight and body were related to the internalization of those ideals and, subsequently, to increases in body dissatisfaction. Pressures from the sport environment regarding weight and appearance were associated with more body dissatisfaction and more restrictive eating. Body dissatisfaction was related to more feelings of sadness, anger, and fear among the athletes. Negative affect, body dissatisfaction, and dietary restraint were related directly to bulimic symptoms, accounting for 55-58% of its variance. These results suggest that general sociocultural pressures are influential, but weight and appearance pressures in the sport environment may be even more pervasive and negative for female athletes.

  13. Posttraumatic stress disorder as a moderator of the association between negative affect and bulimic symptoms: an ecological momentary assessment study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, Trisha M; Crosby, Ross D; Cao, Li; Engel, Scott G; Mitchell, James E; Simonich, Heather; Wonderlich, Stephen A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the potential moderating effect of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on the emotion-behavior relationship in individuals with bulimia nervosa (BN). A total of 119 women with BN were involved in the study. Participants were divided into 2 groups: those with BN and PTSD (n = 20) and those with BN only (n = 99). Ecological momentary assessment procedures were used for the examination of affect, frequency of bulimic behaviors, and the relationship of affect and bulimic behavior over time. The Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Axis I Disorders was conducted for the diagnosis of BN, PTSD, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and substance use disorders. Mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and substance use disorders functioned as covariates in all analyses. Statistical models showed that those in the PTSD group reported a greater daily mean level of negative affect (NA) and a greater daily frequency of bulimic behaviors than those in the BN-only group. Moderation was found for the association between NA and time in that the PTSD group showed a faster acceleration in NA before purging and faster deceleration in NA after purging. The association between positive affect and time was also moderated by group, indicating that the PTSD group had a faster acceleration in positive affect after purging than the BN-only group. These findings highlight the importance of recognizing PTSD when interpreting the emotion-behavior relationship in individuals with BN. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Neural signature of food reward processing in bulimic-type eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Joe J; Skunde, Mandy; Walther, Stephan; Bendszus, Martin; Herzog, Wolfgang; Friederich, Hans-Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Clinical observations and similarities to addiction suggest heightened reward sensitivity to food in patients with bulimic-type eating (BTE) disorders. Therefore, we investigated the expectation and receipt of food reward compared with monetary reward in patients with BTE. Fifty-six patients with BTE (27 patients with binge eating disorder and 29 with bulimia nervosa) and 55 matched healthy control participants underwent event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing both food and monetary incentive delay tasks. BTE patients exhibited reduced brain activation in the posterior cingulate cortex during the expectation of food and increased activity in the medial orbitofrontal cortex, anterior medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex during the receipt of food reward. These findings were relevant to food because we found no significant group differences related to monetary reward. In the patients, higher brain activity in the medial orbitofrontal cortex during the receipt of food reward was related to higher levels of trait food craving and external eating. BTE patients exhibited increased hedonic processing during the receipt of food reward. These findings corroborate the notion that an altered responsiveness of the reward network to food stimuli is associated with BTE. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. State and trait food craving in people with bulimic eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Eynde, Frederique; Koskina, Antonia; Syrad, Hayley; Guillaume, Sébastien; Broadbent, Hannah; Campbell, Iain C; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2012-12-01

    In two studies, we examined trait and state food craving levels in people with a bulimic disorder (BD) (bulimia nervosa and related disorders) and healthy controls (HC) using multidimensional self-report assessments. In study 1, trait food craving was assessed in 70 people with a BD and 69 HC using the Food Craving Questionnaire-Trait. Participants also completed the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire (EDE-Q). In study 2, 45 people with a BD and 29 HC completed the Food Craving Questionnaire-State and the EDE-Q following exposure to visual and real high-caloric food cues. The results showed that both trait and state food cravings were significantly higher in people with a BD, compared to HC. Trait food craving was associated with eating disorder symptomatology in both the HC and BD groups. State food craving was associated with eating disorder psychopathology, but only in the BD group. This research underscores the importance of food craving in the study and conceptualization of BD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Influence of Personality Traits on Emotion Expression in Bulimic Spectrum Disorders: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giner-Bartolomé, Cristina; Steward, Trevor; Wolz, Ines; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Granero, Roser; Tárrega, Salomé; Fernández-Formoso, José Antonio; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Menchón, José M; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    Facial expressions are critical in forming social bonds and in signalling one's emotional state to others. In eating disorder patients, impairments in facial emotion recognition have been associated with eating psychopathology severity. Little research however has been carried out on how bulimic spectrum disorder (BSD) patients spontaneously express emotions. Our aim was to investigate emotion expression in BSD patients and to explore the influence of personality traits. Our study comprised 28 BSD women and 15 healthy controls. Facial expressions were recorded while participants played a serious video game. Expressions of anger and joy were used as outcome measures. Overall, BSD participants displayed less facial expressiveness than controls. Among BSD women, expressions of joy were positively associated with reward dependence, novelty seeking and self-directedness, whereas expressions of anger were associated with lower self-directedness. Our findings suggest that specific personality traits are associated with altered emotion facial expression in patients with BSD. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  17. [A new assessment for episodic memory. Episodic memory test and caregiver's episodic memory test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojea Ortega, T; González Álvarez de Sotomayor, M M; Pérez González, O; Fernández Fernández, O

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the episodic memory test and the caregiver's episodic memory test is to evaluate episodic memory according to its definition in a way that is feasible for families and achieves high degrees of sensitivity and specificity. We administered a test consisting of 10 questions about episodic events to 332 subjects, of whom 65 had Alzheimer's disease (AD), 115 had amnestic MCI (aMCI) and 152 showed no cognitive impairment according to Reisberg's global deterioration scale (GDS). We calculated the test's sensitivity and specificity to distinguish AD from episodic aMCI and from normal ageing. The area under the ROC curve for the diagnosis of aMCI was 0.94 and the best cut-off value was 20; for that value, sensitivity was 89% and specificity was 82%. For a diagnosis of AD, the area under the ROC curve was 0.99 and the best cut-off point was 17, with a sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 91%. A subsequent study using similar methodology yielded similar results when the test was administered directly by the caregiver. The episodic memory test and the caregiver's episodic memory test are useful as brief screening tools for identifying patients with early-stage AD. It is suitable for use by primary care medical staff and in the home, since it can be administered by a caregiver. The test's limitations are that it must be administered by a reliable caregiver and the fact that it measures episodic memory only. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Factorial structure and measurement invariance of the Bulimic Investigatory Test, Edinburgh across gender and age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Fonseca-Pedrero

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio instrumental fue examinar la estructura factorial y la invarianza de medición a través del sexo y la edad del Bulimic Investigatory Test, Edinburgh (BITE en una muestra comunitaria de adolescentes no clínicos. La muestra la formaron 1.794 adolescentes (50,2% varones, con una edad medida de 14,7 años (DT = 1,72. Los resultados mostraron que el BITE es un instrumento de medida que presenta adecuadas propiedades psicométricas. El nivel de consistencia interna para la subescala Síntomas fue 0,95, mientras que para la subescala de Gravedad fue de 0,70. El estudio de la dimensionalidad del BITE mediante análisis factorial exploratorio mostró una solución esencialmente unidimensional. Los índices de bondad de ajuste para el modelo unidimensional sometido a prueba en el análisis factorial confirmatorio fueron adecuados. Más aún, esta estructura dimensional del BITE se mostró invariante en función del género y la edad. Se encontraron diferencias estadísticamente significativas en función del género y la edad cuando se compararon las medias latentes. Futuros estudios deberían incorporar los avances relacionados con la evaluación psicológica y educativa como la construcción de tests adaptativos computerizados, así como examinar la invarianza de medición de la sintomatología bulímica a través de las culturas.

  19. High Prevalence of Normal Tests Assessing Hypercortisolism in Subjects with Mild and Episodic Cushing’s Syndrome Suggests that the Paradigm for Diagnosis and Exclusion of Cushing’s Syndrome Requires Multiple Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, T. C.; Ghods, D. E.; Shahinian, H. K.; Zachery, L.; Shayesteh, N.; Seasholtz, S.; Zuckerbraun, E.; Lee, M. L.; McCutcheon, I. E.

    2010-01-01

    Many Endocrinologists believe that a single determination of eucortisolism or a single demonstration of appropriate suppression to dexamethasone excluded Cushing’s syndrome, except in what was previously thought to be the rare patient with episodic or periodic Cushing’s syndrome. We hypothesize that episodic Cushing’s syndrome is relatively common and a single test assessing hypercortisolism may not be sufficient to accurately rule out or diagnose Cushing’s syndrome and retrospectively examin...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: episodic ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Episodic ataxia Episodic ataxia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Episodic ataxia is a group of related conditions that affect ...

  1. Perinatal psychiatric episodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Olsen, Trine; Maegbaek, M L; Johannsen, B M

    2016-01-01

    and childbirth, which suggests differences in the underlying etiology. We further speculate varying treatment incidence and prevalence in pregnancy vs postpartum may indicate that the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5 peripartum specifier not adequately describes at-risk periods......Perinatal psychiatric episodes comprise various disorders and symptom severity, which are diagnosed and treated in multiple treatment settings. To date, no studies have quantified the incidence and prevalence of perinatal psychiatric episodes treated in primary and secondary care, which we aimed...... psychiatric facilities, 2.5 births were followed by an episode treated at outpatient psychiatric facility and 12 births by GP-provided pharmacological treatment. We interpret our results the following way: treated severe and moderate psychiatric disorders have different risk patterns in relation to pregnancy...

  2. Episodic foresight and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Amanda D; Henry, Julie D; Rendell, Peter G; Robinson, Gail; Suddendorf, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    People with schizophrenia have difficulty engaging in specific future-directed thoughts and behaviours, such as generating phenomenological characteristics of future events (a component of episodic foresight), and executing directed preparatory behaviours (a component of prospective memory). However, it remains unclear whether they also exhibit difficulties using episodic foresight to appropriately guide future-directed behaviours. People with schizophrenia and non-clinical controls were administered a behavioural measure that met strict criteria for assessing episodic foresight. In keeping with our focus on the functional application of foresight, this measure required participants to identify a problem, self-generate a resolution, and execute the appropriate future-directed intention. Relative to controls, people with schizophrenia were less likely to spontaneously acquire items that would later allow a problem to be solved, and were also less likely to subsequently use these items to solve the problems. There was no interaction between group and task, indicating that these two components of foresight were disrupted to an equivalent degree. In the clinical (but not the control) group, item acquisition and item use were correlated with general cognitive capacity. No significant associations with clinical variables emerged. The capacity to apply episodic foresight in a functionally adaptive way is disrupted in schizophrenia and may at least partially reflect broader cognitive dysfunction. Future work is now needed to clarify the implications of these difficulties in everyday life, as well as how these difficulties might be remediated. People with schizophrenia have known difficulties with episodic foresight, and it now appears that those difficulties extend to the performance of foresightful preparatory behaviours. Because preparatory behaviours are central to routine and adaptive planning, difficulties with episodic foresight may contribute to or be a result of

  3. Episodes, events, and models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeet eKhemlani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe a novel computational theory of how individuals segment perceptual information into representations of events. The theory is inspired by recent findings in the cognitive science and cognitive neuroscience of event segmentation. In line with recent theories, it holds that online event segmentation is automatic, and that event segmentation yields mental simulations of events. But it posits two novel principles as well: first, discrete episodic markers track perceptual and conceptual changes, and can be retrieved to construct event models. Second, the process of retrieving and reconstructing those episodic markers is constrained and prioritized. We describe a computational implementation of the theory, as well as a robotic extension of the theory that demonstrates the processes of online event segmentation and event model construction. The theory is the first unified computational account of event segmentation and temporal inference. We conclude by demonstrating now neuroimaging data can constrain and inspire the construction of process-level theories of human reasoning.

  4. The Role of Episodic and Semantic Memory in Episodic Foresight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Ordas, Gema; Atance, Cristina M.; Louw, Alyssa

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe a special form of future thinking, termed "episodic foresight" and its relation with episodic and semantic memory. We outline the methodologies that have largely been developed in the last five years to assess this capacity in young children and non-human animals. Drawing on Tulving's definition of episodic and semantic…

  5. Testing the cognitive-behavioural maintenance models across DSM-5 bulimic-type eating disorder diagnostic groups: a multi-centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakanalis, Antonios; Carrà, Giuseppe; Calogero, Rachel; Zanetti, Maria Assunta; Gaudio, Santino; Caccialanza, Riccardo; Riva, Giuseppe; Clerici, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    The original cognitive-behavioural (CB) model of bulimia nervosa, which provided the basis for the widely used CB therapy, proposed that specific dysfunctional cognitions and behaviours maintain the disorder. However, amongst treatment completers, only 40-50 % have a full and lasting response. The enhanced CB model (CB-E), upon which the enhanced version of the CB treatment was based, extended the original approach by including four additional maintenance factors. This study evaluated and compared both CB models in a large clinical treatment seeking sample (N = 679), applying both DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria for bulimic-type eating disorders. Application of the DSM-5 criteria reduced the number of cases of DSM-IV bulimic-type eating disorders not otherwise specified to 29.6 %. Structural equation modelling analysis indicated that (a) although both models provided a good fit to the data, the CB-E model accounted for a greater proportion of variance in eating-disordered behaviours than the original one, (b) interpersonal problems, clinical perfectionism and low self-esteem were indirectly associated with dietary restraint through over-evaluation of shape and weight, (c) interpersonal problems and mood intolerance were directly linked to binge eating, whereas restraint only indirectly affected binge eating through mood intolerance, suggesting that factors other than restraint may play a more critical role in the maintenance of binge eating. In terms of strength of the associations, differences across DSM-5 bulimic-type eating disorder diagnostic groups were not observed. The results are discussed with reference to theory and research, including neurobiological findings and recent hypotheses.

  6. A Bilingual Advantage for Episodic Memory in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Scott R; Marian, Viorica

    2012-08-01

    The ability to remember events - referred to as episodic memory - is typically subject to decline in older adulthood. Episodic memory decline has been attributed in part to less successful executive functioning, which may hinder an older adult's ability to implement controlled encoding and retrieval processes. Since bilingual older adults often show more successful executive functioning than monolinguals, they may be better able to maintain episodic memory. To examine this hypothesis, we compared bilingual and monolingual older adults on a picture scene recall task (assessing episodic memory) and a Simon task (assessing executive functioning). Bilinguals exhibited better episodic memory than their monolingual peers, recalling significantly more items overall. Within the bilingual group, earlier second language acquisition and more years speaking two languages were associated with better recall. Bilinguals also demonstrated higher executive functioning, and there was evidence that level of executive functioning was related to memory performance. Results indicate that extensive practice controlling two languages may benefit episodic memory in older adults.

  7. Depression and quality of life in first-episode psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Renwick, Laoise

    2012-07-01

    Quality of life (QOL) has gained recognition as a valid measure of outcome in first-episode psychosis (FEP). This study aimed to determine the influence of specific groups of depressive symptoms on separate domains of subjectively appraised QOL.

  8. Risk Factors for a Second Episode of Hemoptysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhiko Seki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Hemoptysis is an alarming symptom of underlying lung disease. Clinicians are often unsure how to deal with and follow up patients who have had a single episode of hemoptysis, especially if the cause remains unknown despite thorough examination, because a second, more severe episode of hemoptysis might occur despite an apparently stable condition. Investigations were done, using multivariate analyses, to see whether several clinical factors present during an initial episode of hemoptysis could be used to predict a second episode. Subjects and Methods Eighty patients with an initial episode of hemoptysis who underwent both computed tomographic and bronchoscopic examinations from 2003 through 2005 were reviewed. Results The isolation of bacteria from bronchial lavage fluid (odds ratio 13.5, P = 0.001 and the failure to determine the cause of the initial episode of hemoptysis (odds ratio 7.0, P = 0.014 were significant independent predictors of a second episode of hemoptysis. Subset analysis showed that isolation of either Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Haemophilus influenzae increased the likelihood of a second episode of hemoptysis (P = 0.077, even if colonization, representing host-bacterial equilibrium, had occurred. Furthermore, the failure to determine the etiology of an initial episode of hemoptysis was associated with an increased risk of a massive second episode (P = 0.042, regardless of the volume of the initial episode. Conclusions In patients with bacterial colonization of the respiratory tract or an initial episode of hemoptysis of unknown etiology, there is an increased possibility of a second episode of hemoptysis.

  9. Prolonged Eyelid Closure Episodes during Sleep Deprivation in Professional Drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvaro, Pasquale K; Jackson, Melinda L; Berlowitz, David J; Swann, Philip; Howard, Mark E

    2016-08-15

    Real life ocular measures of drowsiness use average blink duration, amplitude and velocity of eyelid movements to reflect drowsiness in drivers. However, averaged data may conceal the variability in duration of eyelid closure episodes, and more prolonged episodes that indicate higher levels of drowsiness. The current study aimed to describe the frequency and duration of prolonged eyelid closure episodes during acute sleep deprivation. Twenty male professional drivers (mean age ± standard deviation = 41.9 ± 8.3 years) were recruited from the Transport Workers Union newsletter and newspaper advertisements in Melbourne, Australia. Each participant underwent 24 hours of sleep deprivation and completed a simulated driving task (AusEd), the Psychomotor Vigilance Task, and the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale. Eyelid closure episodes during the driving task were recorded and analyzed manually from digital video recordings. Eyelid closure episodes increased in frequency and duration with a median of zero s/h of eyelid closure after 3 h increasing to 34 s/h after 23 h awake. Eyelid closure episodes were short and infrequent from 3 to 14 h of wakefulness. After 17 h of sleep deprivation, longer and more frequent eyelid closure episodes began to occur. Episodes lasting from 7 seconds up to 18 seconds developed after 20 h of wakefulness. Length of eyelid closure episodes was moderately to highly correlated with the standard deviation of lateral lane position, braking reaction time, crashes, impaired vigilance, and subjective sleepiness. The frequency and duration of episodes of prolonged eyelid closure increases during acute sleep deprivation, with very prolonged episodes after 17 hours awake. Automated devices that assess drowsiness using averaged measures of eyelid closure episodes need to be able to detect prolonged eyelid closure episodes that occur during more severe sleep deprivation. © 2016 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  10. Behavioral responses to catecholamine depletion in unmedicated, remitted subjects with bulimia nervosa and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, Simona; Stern, Jair; Gamper, Lara; Moergeli, Hanspeter; Milos, Gabriella; Schnyder, Ulrich; Hasler, Gregor

    2015-04-01

    Bulimia nervosa (BN) has been associated with dysregulation of the central catecholaminergic system. An instructive way to investigate the relationship between catecholaminergic function and psychiatric disorder has involved behavioral responses to experimental catecholamine depletion (CD). The purpose of this study was to examine a possible catecholaminergic dysfunction in the pathogenesis of bulimia nervosa. CD was achieved by oral administration of alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine (AMPT) in 18 remitted female subjects with BN (rBN) and 31 healthy female control subjects. The study design consisted of a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled crossover, single-site experimental trial. The main outcome measures were bulimic symptoms assessed by the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire. Measures were assessed before and 26, 30, 54, 78, 102 hours after the first AMPT or placebo administration. In the experimental environment (controlled environment with a low level of food cues) rBN subjects had a greater increase in eating disorder symptoms during CD compared with healthy control subjects (condition × diagnosis interaction, p < .05). In the experimental environment, rBN subjects experienced fewer bulimic symptoms than in the natural environment (uncontrolled environment concerning food cues) 36 hours after the first AMPT intake (environment × diagnosis interaction, p < .05). Serum prolactin levels increased significantly, and to a comparable degree across groups, after AMPT administration. This study suggests that rBN is associated with vulnerability for developing eating disorder symptoms in response to reduced catecholamine neurotransmission after CD. The findings support the notion of catecholaminergic dysfunction as a possible trait abnormality in BN. © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry Published by Society of Biological Psychiatry All rights reserved.

  11. Course and moderators of emotional eating in anorectic and bulimic patients: a follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioravanti, Giulia; Castellini, Giovanni; Lo Sauro, Carolina; Ianni, Sirio; Montanelli, Luca; Rotella, Francesco; Faravelli, Carlo; Ricca, Valdo

    2014-04-01

    Emotion dysregulation has been found to be associated with specific eating attitudes and behavior in Eating Disorder (ED) patients. The present study evaluated whether emotional eating profile of ED patients changes over time and the possible effects of a psychotherapeutic intervention on the emotional eating dimension. One hundred and two ED patients (28 with Anorexia Nervosa restricting type [AN-R], 35 with Anorexia Nervosa binge/purging subtype [AN-B/P] and 39 with Bulimia Nervosa [BN]) were evaluated at baseline, at the end of a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, at 3 and 6 year follow-up. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM IV Axis I Disorders, the Emotional Eating Scale (EES) and several self-reported questionnaires for eating specific and general psychopathology were applied. A control group of 86 healthy subjects was also studied, in order to compare psychopathological variables at baseline. A significant EES total score reduction was observed among AN-B/P and BN patients, whereas no significant change was found in the AN-R group. Mixed Models analyses showed that a significant effect on EES total score variation was found for cocaine or amphetamine abuse (b = .25; p mood modulatory mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. First-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    that two-thirds of the patients had a comorbid personality disorder at two-year follow-up, and schizoid, paranoid and avoidant personality disorder were the most frequent. Schizotypal traits were less prevalent, which in relation to the late follow-up is attributed to uncertainty in differentiating....... Patients with first-episode psychosis had significantly high NEO-PI-R scores for neuroticism and agreeableness, and lower scores for conscientiousness and extroversion. The median time for remission in the total sample was three months. Female gender and better premorbid functioning were predictive of less...... negative symptoms and shorter duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) was predictive for shorter time to remission, stable remission, less severe positive psychotic symptoms, and better social functioning. Female gender, better premorbid social functioning and more education also contributed to a better...

  13. Moral judgment in episodic amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, Carl F; Keven, Nazim; Kwan, Donna; Kurczek, Jake; Duff, Melissa C; Rosenbaum, R Shayna

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the role of episodic thought about the past and future in moral judgment, we administered a well-established moral judgment battery to individuals with hippocampal damage and deficits in episodic thought (insert Greene et al. 2001). Healthy controls select deontological answers in high-conflict moral scenarios more frequently when they vividly imagine themselves in the scenarios than when they imagine scenarios abstractly, at some personal remove. If this bias is mediated by episodic thought, individuals with deficits in episodic thought should not exhibit this effect. We report that individuals with deficits in episodic memory and future thought make moral judgments and exhibit the biasing effect of vivid, personal imaginings on moral judgment. These results strongly suggest that the biasing effect of vivid personal imagining on moral judgment is not due to episodic thought about the past and future. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The evolution of episodic memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Timothy A.; Fortin, Norbert J.

    2013-01-01

    One prominent view holds that episodic memory emerged recently in humans and lacks a “(neo)Darwinian evolution” [Tulving E (2002) Annu Rev Psychol 53:1–25]. Here, we review evidence supporting the alternative perspective that episodic memory has a long evolutionary history. We show that fundamental features of episodic memory capacity are present in mammals and birds and that the major brain regions responsible for episodic memory in humans have anatomical and functional homologs in other species. We propose that episodic memory capacity depends on a fundamental neural circuit that is similar across mammalian and avian species, suggesting that protoepisodic memory systems exist across amniotes and, possibly, all vertebrates. The implication is that episodic memory in diverse species may primarily be due to a shared underlying neural ancestry, rather than the result of evolutionary convergence. We also discuss potential advantages that episodic memory may offer, as well as species-specific divergences that have developed on top of the fundamental episodic memory architecture. We conclude by identifying possible time points for the emergence of episodic memory in evolution, to help guide further research in this area. PMID:23754432

  15. Associação entre comportamento alimentar, consumo de cigarro, drogas e episódios depressivos em adolescentes Association between eating behavior and smoking, use of illicit drugs and depressive episodes in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliany Piazzon Gomes

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo Identificar a prevalência de sintomas de transtornos alimentares em estudantes do sexo feminino matriculadas no ensino fundamental da rede estadual do município de Toledo (PR, bem como relacionar esses sintomas com o hábito de fumar, o uso de drogas e episódios depressivos. Métodos Foram utilizados os instrumentos Teste de Investigação Bulímica de Edimburgo, com escala de sintoma e gravidade, e o Eating Attitudes Test-26, acrescido de perguntas sobre tabagismo, uso de drogas e episódios depressivos. A amostra constituiu-se de cerca de 300 estudantes do sexo feminino, na faixa etária entre 10 e 15 anos. Resultados Os resultados demonstraram que as estudantes apresentaram prevalências de sintomas de transtornos alimentares na ordem de 4,2% para a escala Teste de Investigação Bulímica de Edimburgo e 3,6% para o Eating Attitudes Test-26. A prevalência de consumo de cigarro foi de 4,2%, do uso de drogas, 4,9% e de episódios depressivos, 10,7%. Observaram-se associações significativas entre episódios depressivos e os seguintes parâmetros: Teste de Investigação Bulímica de Edimburgo - escala de sintomas (p=0,04 e Teste de Investigação Bulímica de Edimburgo - escala de gravidade (p=0,02. Os hábitos de fumar (p=0,01 e de usar drogas (p=0,04 também apresentaram associação com Teste de Investigação Bulímica de Edimburgo - escala de sintomas. Conclusão Verificou-se nas estudantes deste estudo elevada probabilidade de desenvolver comportamentos de risco, tais como transtornos alimentares e episódios depressivos.Objective The goal of this study was to identify the prevalence of symptoms of eating disorders in female students enrolled in state elementary schools and investigate a possible association between these eating disorders and smoking, illicit drug use and depressive episodes. Methods The Bulimic Investigatory Test of Edinburgh with symptom and severity scales and the Eating Attitudes Test - 26 with

  16. The Episodic Nature of Episodic-Like Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, Alexander; Webster, Lisa A. D.; Eacott, Madeline J.

    2012-01-01

    Studying episodic memory in nonhuman animals has proved difficult because definitions in humans require conscious recollection. Here, we assessed humans' experience of episodic-like recognition memory tasks that have been used with animals. It was found that tasks using contextual information to discriminate events could only be accurately…

  17. Episodic Alcohol Consumption by Youths

    OpenAIRE

    Pereverzev, Vladimir Alexeevich

    2015-01-01

    AbstractThis paper presents evidence that even rare episodic alcohol consumption by young people is not harmless. Unsafe rare episodic alcohol consumption by youths (students) was reflected in the reduced attention concentration and lower academic buoyancy, compared to those who completely abstain from alcohol. Key Words: Alcohol, youth, students, attention concentration, academic buoyancy 

  18. Episodic Alcohol Consumption by Youths

    OpenAIRE

    Pereverzev, Vladimir Alexeevich

    2014-01-01

    AbstractThis paper presents evidence that even rare episodic alcohol consumption by young people is not harmless. Unsafe rare episodic alcohol consumption by youths (students) was reflected in the reduced attention concentration and lower academic buoyancy, compared to those who completely abstain from alcohol. Key Words: Alcohol, youth, students, attention concentration, academic buoyancy 

  19. A human experimental model of episodic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrini, Laura; Hennings, Kristian; Li, Xi

    2014-01-01

    were subjected to 45 min of intense painful cutaneous electrical stimulation (episodic pain session), using a stimulus paradigm that in animals has been shown to induce long-term potentiation. These electrical stimulations produced a verbal pain rating of approximately 85 on a 0-100 verbal rating scale......An experimental model of daily episodic pain was developed to investigate peripheral sensitization and cortical reorganization in healthy individuals. Two experiments (A and B) were conducted. Experiments A and B consisted of one and five consecutive days, respectively, in which the participants...... (VRS). Physiological (blood flow and axon flare reflex), psychophysical (perception threshold and verbal pain ratings) and electrophysiological (128 channels recorded somatosensory evoked potential (SEP)) measurements were recorded. The stimulation evoked a visible axon flare reflex and caused...

  20. Key features of human episodic recollection in the cross-episode retrieval of rat hippocampus representations of space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Kelemen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Neurophysiological studies focus on memory retrieval as a reproduction of what was experienced and have established that neural discharge is replayed to express memory. However, cognitive psychology has established that recollection is not a verbatim replay of stored information. Recollection is constructive, the product of memory retrieval cues, the information stored in memory, and the subject's state of mind. We discovered key features of constructive recollection embedded in the rat CA1 ensemble discharge during an active avoidance task. Rats learned two task variants, one with the arena stable, the other with it rotating; each variant defined a distinct behavioral episode. During the rotating episode, the ensemble discharge of CA1 principal neurons was dynamically organized to concurrently represent space in two distinct codes. The code for spatial reference frame switched rapidly between representing the rat's current location in either the stationary spatial frame of the room or the rotating frame of the arena. The code for task variant switched less frequently between a representation of the current rotating episode and the stable episode from the rat's past. The characteristics and interplay of these two hippocampal codes revealed three key properties of constructive recollection. (1 Although the ensemble representations of the stable and rotating episodes were distinct, ensemble discharge during rotation occasionally resembled the stable condition, demonstrating cross-episode retrieval of the representation of the remote, stable episode. (2 This cross-episode retrieval at the level of the code for task variant was more likely when the rotating arena was about to match its orientation in the stable episode. (3 The likelihood of cross-episode retrieval was influenced by preretrieval information that was signaled at the level of the code for spatial reference frame. Thus key features of episodic recollection manifest in rat hippocampal

  1. Imagining the personal past: Episodic counterfactuals compared to episodic memories and episodic future projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özbek, Müge; Bohn, Annette; Berntsen, Dorthe

    2017-04-01

    Episodic counterfactuals are imagined events that could have happened, but did not happen, in a person's past. Such imagined past events are important aspects of mental life, affecting emotions, decisions, and behaviors. However, studies examining their phenomenological characteristics and content have been few. Here we introduced a new method to systematically compare self-generated episodic counterfactuals to self-generated episodic memories and future projections with regard to their phenomenological characteristics (e.g., imagery, emotional valence, and rehearsal) and content (e.g., reference to a cultural life script), and how these were affected by temporal distance (1 month, 1 year, 5+ years). The findings showed that the three types of events differed phenomenologically. First, episodic memories were remembered more easily, with more sensory details, and from a dominantly field perspective, as compared to both future projections and episodic counterfactuals. Second, episodic future projections were more positive, more voluntarily rehearsed, and more central to life story and identity than were both episodic memories and episodic counterfactuals. Third, episodic counterfactuals differed from both episodic memories and future projections by neither having the positivity bias of the future events nor the enhanced sensory details of the past events. Across all three event types, sensory details decreased, whereas importance, reference to a cultural life script, and centrality increased with increasing temporal distance. The findings show that imagined events are phenomenologically different from memories of experienced events, consistent with reality-monitoring theory, and that imagined future events are different from both actual and imagined past events, consistent with some theories of motivation.

  2. Investigating Direct Links between Depression, Emotional Control, and Physical Punishment with Adolescent Drive for Thinness and Bulimic Behaviors, Including Possible Moderation by the Serotonin Transporter 5-HTTLPR Polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanja Rozenblat

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To examine the relationship between psychological and social factors (depression, emotional control, sexual abuse, and parental physical punishment and adolescent drive for Thinness and Bulimic behaviors in a large community sample, and to investigate possible genetic moderation.Method: Data were drawn from the Australian Temperament Project (ATP, a population-based cohort study that has followed a representative sample of 2443 participants from infancy to adulthood across 16 waves since 1983. A subsample of 650 participants (50.2% female of Caucasian descent who provided DNA were genotyped for a serotonin transporter promoter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR. Adolescent disordered eating attitudes and behaviors were assessed using the Bulimia and Drive for Thinness scales of the Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (15–16 years. Depression and emotional control were examined at the same age using the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire, and an ATP-devised measure of emotional control. History of sexual abuse and physical punishment were assessed retrospectively (23–24 years in a subsample of 467 of those providing DNA.Results: EDI-2 scores were associated with depression, emotional control, and retrospectively reported parental physical punishment. Although there was statistically significant moderation of the relationship between parental physical punishment and bulimic behaviors by 5-HTTLPR (p = 0.0048, genotypes in this subsample were not in Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium. No other G×E interactions were significant. Conclusion: Findings from this study affirm the central importance of psychosocial processes in disordered eating patterns in adolescence. Evidence of moderation by 5-HTTLPR was not conclusive; however, genetic moderation observed in a subsample not in Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium warrants further investigation.

  3. Investigating Direct Links between Depression, Emotional Control, and Physical Punishment with Adolescent Drive for Thinness and Bulimic Behaviors, Including Possible Moderation by the Serotonin Transporter5-HTTLPRPolymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenblat, Vanja; Ryan, Joanne; Wertheim, Eleanor H; King, Ross; Olsson, Craig A; Krug, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the relationship between psychological and social factors (depression, emotional control, sexual abuse, and parental physical punishment) and adolescent drive for Thinness and Bulimic behaviors in a large community sample, and to investigate possible genetic moderation. Method: Data were drawn from the Australian Temperament Project (ATP), a population-based cohort study that has followed a representative sample of 2443 participants from infancy to adulthood across 16 waves since 1983. A subsample of 650 participants (50.2% female) of Caucasian descent who provided DNA were genotyped for a serotonin transporter promoter polymorphism ( 5-HTTLPR ). Adolescent disordered eating attitudes and behaviors were assessed using the Bulimia and Drive for Thinness scales of the Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (15-16 years). Depression and emotional control were examined at the same age using the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire, and an ATP-devised measure of emotional control. History of sexual abuse and physical punishment were assessed retrospectively (23-24 years) in a subsample of 467 of those providing DNA. Results: EDI-2 scores were associated with depression, emotional control, and retrospectively reported parental physical punishment. Although there was statistically significant moderation of the relationship between parental physical punishment and bulimic behaviors by 5-HTTLPR ( p = 0.0048), genotypes in this subsample were not in Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium. No other G×E interactions were significant. Conclusion: Findings from this study affirm the central importance of psychosocial processes in disordered eating patterns in adolescence. Evidence of moderation by 5-HTTLPR was not conclusive; however, genetic moderation observed in a subsample not in Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium warrants further investigation.

  4. Factitious psychogenic nonepileptic paroxysmal episodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alissa Romano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mistaking psychogenic nonepileptic paroxysmal episodes (PNEPEs for epileptic seizures (ES is potentially dangerous, and certain features should alert physicians to a possible PNEPE diagnosis. Psychogenic nonepileptic paroxysmal episodes due to factitious seizures carry particularly high risks of morbidity or mortality from nonindicated emergency treatment and, often, high costs in wasted medical treatment expenditures. We report a case of a 28-year-old man with PNEPEs that were misdiagnosed as ES. The patient had been on four antiseizure medications (ASMs with therapeutic serum levels and had had multiple intubations in the past for uncontrolled episodes. He had no episodes for two days of continuous video-EEG monitoring. He then disconnected his EEG cables and had an episode of generalized stiffening and cyanosis, followed by jerking and profuse bleeding from the mouth. The manifestations were unusually similar to those of ES, except that he was clearly startled by spraying water on his face, while he was stiff in all extremities and unresponsive. There were indications that he had sucked blood from his central venous catheter to expel through his mouth during his PNEPEs while consciously holding his breath. Normal video-EEG monitoring; the patient's volitional and deceptive acts to fabricate the appearance of illness, despite pain and personal endangerment; and the absence of reward other than remaining in a sick role were all consistent with a diagnosis of factitious disorder.

  5. Avaliação laríngea e vocal de pacientes com bulimia Laryngeal and vocal analysis in bulimic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia P. Ferreira

    2010-08-01

    % as significance level. RESULTS: The bulimic group presented a higher prevalence of laryngeal abnormalities compared to the control group (p=0.000. The group with bulimia had higher GRBSI values (p=0.000 and A (p=0.022 of the GRBASI scale. The results of vocal acoustics analysis of the jitter, shimmer, PPQ and APQ were higher in the bulimic group (p=0.033. No statistical significance difference in the fundamental frequency and NHR were found between both groups. CONCLUSION: the bulimic patients in this study presented more laryngeal, acoustics and perception evaluation disorders when compared to a control group.

  6. Apathy in first episode psychosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evensen, Julie; Røssberg, Jan Ivar; Barder, Helene

    2012-01-01

    Apathy is a common symptom in first episode psychosis (FEP), and is associated with poor functioning. Prevalence and correlates of apathy 10 years after the first psychotic episode remain unexplored.......Apathy is a common symptom in first episode psychosis (FEP), and is associated with poor functioning. Prevalence and correlates of apathy 10 years after the first psychotic episode remain unexplored....

  7. Interidentity amnesia for neutral, episodic information in dissociative identity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntjens, Rafaële J C; Postma, Albert; Peters, Madelon L; Woertman, Liesbeth; van der Hart, Onno

    2003-05-01

    Interidentity amnesia is considered a hallmark of dissociative identity disorder (DID) in clinical practice. In this study, objective methods of testing episodic memory transfer between identities were used. Tests of both recall (interference paradigm) and recognition were used. A sample of 31 DID patients was included. Additionally, 50 control subjects participated, half functioning as normal controls and the other half simulating interidentity amnesia. Twenty-one patients subjectively reported complete one-way amnesia for the learning episode. However, objectively, neither recall nor recognition scores of patients were different from those of normal controls. It is suggested that clinical models of amnesia in DID may be specified to exclude episodic memory impairments for emotionally neutral material.

  8. Imagining the personal past: Episodic counterfactuals compared to episodic memories and episodic future projections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özbek, Müge; Bohn, Annette; Berntsen, Dorthe

    2017-01-01

    Episodic counterfactuals are imagined events that could have happened, but did not happen, in a person’s past. Such imagined past events are important aspects of mental life, affecting emotions, decisions, and behaviors. However, studies examining their phenomenological characteristics and content...... are few. Here we introduced a new method to systematically compare self-generated episodic counterfactuals to self-generated episodic memories and future projections with regard to their phenomenological characteristics (e.g., imagery, emotional valence, rehearsal) and content (e.g., reference to cultural...... distance. The findings show that imagined events are phenomenologically different from memories of experienced events, consistent with reality monitoring theory, and that imagined future events are different from both actual and imagined past events, consistent with some theories of motivation....

  9. Modeling HIV-1 drug resistance as episodic directional selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Murrell

    Full Text Available The evolution of substitutions conferring drug resistance to HIV-1 is both episodic, occurring when patients are on antiretroviral therapy, and strongly directional, with site-specific resistant residues increasing in frequency over time. While methods exist to detect episodic diversifying selection and continuous directional selection, no evolutionary model combining these two properties has been proposed. We present two models of episodic directional selection (MEDS and EDEPS which allow the a priori specification of lineages expected to have undergone directional selection. The models infer the sites and target residues that were likely subject to directional selection, using either codon or protein sequences. Compared to its null model of episodic diversifying selection, MEDS provides a superior fit to most sites known to be involved in drug resistance, and neither one test for episodic diversifying selection nor another for constant directional selection are able to detect as many true positives as MEDS and EDEPS while maintaining acceptable levels of false positives. This suggests that episodic directional selection is a better description of the process driving the evolution of drug resistance.

  10. Modeling HIV-1 drug resistance as episodic directional selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrell, Ben; de Oliveira, Tulio; Seebregts, Chris; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L; Scheffler, Konrad

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of substitutions conferring drug resistance to HIV-1 is both episodic, occurring when patients are on antiretroviral therapy, and strongly directional, with site-specific resistant residues increasing in frequency over time. While methods exist to detect episodic diversifying selection and continuous directional selection, no evolutionary model combining these two properties has been proposed. We present two models of episodic directional selection (MEDS and EDEPS) which allow the a priori specification of lineages expected to have undergone directional selection. The models infer the sites and target residues that were likely subject to directional selection, using either codon or protein sequences. Compared to its null model of episodic diversifying selection, MEDS provides a superior fit to most sites known to be involved in drug resistance, and neither one test for episodic diversifying selection nor another for constant directional selection are able to detect as many true positives as MEDS and EDEPS while maintaining acceptable levels of false positives. This suggests that episodic directional selection is a better description of the process driving the evolution of drug resistance.

  11. Episodic fieldwork, updating, and sociability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whyte, M.

    2013-01-01

    on these relationships. I draw on Simmel's concept of sociability to explore the significance of the recurring updates that are so much a part of long-term and thus episodic fieldwork. Updating suggests participation, positionality, and transformation-as well as play and familiarity. The presumption of familiarity...

  12. First-episode psychosis: An update | Chiliza | South African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interest in the subject of first-episode psychosis has increased considerably in the last two decades. At present, a number of centres around the world focus on early identification and intervention in people with psychotic disorders. Researchers have focused particularly on people who are possibly experiencing the ...

  13. Relationship between substance abuse and first-episode psychosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine the effect of substance abuse on psychosis in terms of onset, duration, severity of symptoms, use of medication ... Subjects in the first-episode psychosis group were more likely to choose cannabis as their substance of abuse than controls. They also started abusing substances at a younger age than controls.

  14. Increased affective empathy in bipolar patients during a manic episode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bodnar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess both cognitive and affective empathy in patients with bipolar disorder (BD during an acute manic or depressive episode. Methods: The study included 25 patients with BD (aged 35±14 years during an acute manic episode, 25 bipolar patients (aged 41±14 years during a depressive episode, and 25 healthy control subjects (aged 36±11 years. Cognitive and affective empathy were assessed using the Multifaceted Empathy Test. Results: In both manic and depressive patients, a significant deficit in cognitive empathy was demonstrated. However, indices of affective empathy were significantly higher in the manic group than in depressed and control subjects. In the depressed patients, indices did not differ from those of healthy controls. For affective empathy, a significant positive correlation was found with intensity of manic symptoms and a negative correlation was found with intensity of depressive symptoms. No such correlations were observed with cognitive empathy. Conclusion: We found evidence of increased affective empathy (overempathizing during a manic episode in bipolar patients. This phenomenon may be connected with disturbances in emotion inhibition related to anastrophic thinking and associated with increased activity of mirror neurons, all of which occur during a manic episode.

  15. Imagining the personal past: Episodic counterfactuals compared to episodic memories and episodic future projections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özbek, Müge; Bohn, Annette; Berntsen, Dorthe

    2017-01-01

    Episodic counterfactuals are imagined events that could have happened, but did not happen, in a person’s past. Such imagined past events are important aspects of mental life, affecting emotions, decisions, and behaviors. However, studies examining their phenomenological characteristics and content...

  16. [Early episodic memory impairments in Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergis, A-M; Eusop-Roussel, E

    2008-05-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) show early episodic memory impairments. Such deficits reflect specific impairments affecting one or several stages of encoding, storage and retrieval processes. However, AD patients not only have great difficulty retrieving memories and information but also suffer from distortions of memory, as intrusions and false recognitions. Intrusions can be defined as the unintentional recall of inappropriate information in a laboratory-learning tasks such as word-list recall and story recall. False recognition refers to the erroneous recognition of information that was not previously presented. The first objective of this review is to present studies from the literature that allowed a better understanding of the nature of episodic memory deficits in AD, and to examine recent research on false memories. The second part of this review is aimed at presenting recent research conducted on prospective memory (PM) in Alzheimer's disease. Prospective memory situations involve forming intentions and then realizing those intentions at some appropriate time in the future. Everyday examples of prospective memory include remembering to buy bread on the way home from work, remembering to give friends a message upon next encountering them, and remembering to take medication. Patients suffering from AD show difficulties in performing prospective tasks in daily life, according to the complaints of their care givers, and these difficulties are massively present at the first stages of the disease. Nevertheless, very few studies have been dedicated to this subject, although the evaluation of PM could be helpful for the early diagnosis of AD.

  17. Motivation and episodic memory performance

    OpenAIRE

    Ngaosuvan, Leonard

    2004-01-01

    In everyday life, motivation and learning are connected like music and dancing. Many educators realize this and work hard to improve their students' motivation. A motivated student may repeat and self-rehearse the content of a chapter more often, which leads to better learning. However, from a cognitive psychology point of view, it is still uncertain if motivation without differences in repetition or attention, affects episodic memory performance. That is, would a motivated student perform be...

  18. Early detection of first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tor K; Melle, Ingrid; Auestad, Bjørn

    2006-01-01

    Early intervention is assumed to improve outcome in first-episode psychosis, but this has not been proven.......Early intervention is assumed to improve outcome in first-episode psychosis, but this has not been proven....

  19. Treating disturbances in the relationship between mothers with bulimic eating disorders and their infants: a randomized, controlled trial of video feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Alan; Woolley, Helen; Senior, Robert; Hertzmann, Leezah; Lovel, Mary; Lee, Joanna; Cooper, Sandra; Wheatcroft, Rebecca; Challacombe, Fiona; Patel, Priti; Nicol-Harper, Rosemary; Menzes, Pia; Schmidt, Anne; Juszczak, Edmund; Fairburn, Christopher G

    2006-05-01

    Maternal eating disorders interfere with parenting, adversely affecting mother-infant interaction and infant outcome. This trial tested whether video-feedback treatment specifically targeting mother-child interaction would be superior to counseling in improving mother-child interaction, especially mealtime conflict, and infant weight and autonomy. The participants were 80 mothers with bulimia nervosa or similar eating disorder who were attending routine baby clinics and whose infants were 4-6 months old. They were randomly assigned to video-feedback interactional treatment or supportive counseling. Both groups also received guided cognitive behavior self-help for their eating disorder. Each group received 13 sessions. The primary outcome measure was mealtime conflict; secondary outcome measures were infant weight, aspects of mother-infant interaction, and infant autonomy. Seventy-seven mothers were followed up when their infants were 13 months old. The video-feedback group exhibited significantly less mealtime conflict than the control subjects. Nine of 38 (23.7%) in the video-feedback group showed episodes of marked or severe conflict, compared with 21 of 39 (53.8%) control subjects (odds ratio=0.27, 95% confidence interval=0.10 to 0.73). Video feedback produced significant improvements in several other interaction measures and greater infant autonomy. Both groups maintained good infant weight, with no differences between groups. Maternal eating psychopathology was reduced across both groups. Video-feedback treatment focusing on mother-infant interaction produced improvements in interaction and infant autonomy, and both groups maintained adequate infant weight. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first controlled trial to show key improvements in interaction between mothers with postnatal psychiatric disorders and their infants.

  20. Retrospective study on structural neuroimaging in first-episode psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Coentre

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. No consensus between guidelines exists regarding neuroimaging in first-episode psychosis. The purpose of this study is to assess anomalies found in structural neuroimaging exams (brain computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in the initial medical work-up of patients presenting first-episode psychosis. Methods. The study subjects were 32 patients aged 18–48 years (mean age: 29.6 years, consecutively admitted with first-episode psychosis diagnosis. Socio-demographic and clinical data and neuroimaging exams (CT and MRI were retrospectively studied. Diagnostic assessments were made using the Operational Criteria Checklist +. Neuroimaging images (CT and MRI and respective reports were analysed by an experienced consultant psychiatrist. Results. None of the patients had abnormalities in neuroimaging exams responsible for psychotic symptoms. Thirty-seven percent of patients had incidental brain findings not causally related to the psychosis (brain atrophy, arachnoid cyst, asymmetric lateral ventricles, dilated lateral ventricles, plagiocephaly and falx cerebri calcification. No further medical referral was needed for any of these patients. No significant differences regarding gender, age, diagnosis, duration of untreated psychosis, in-stay and cannabis use were found between patients who had neuroimaging abnormalities versus those without. Discussion. This study suggests that structural neuroimaging exams reveal scarce abnormalities in young patients with first-episode psychosis. Structural neuroimaging is especially useful in first-episode psychosis patients with neurological symptoms, atypical clinical picture and old age.

  1. The effect of exercise episode duration on blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroll, B; Hill, D; White, G; Sharpe, N; Beaglehole, R

    1994-12-01

    To investigate the effect on blood pressure for 10-min compared with 40-min episodes of physical activity for 4 days. The design used a randomized crossover trial of two exercise episode durations, involving 17 subjects, which were performed in a university setting. The intervention was exercise on a stationary bicycle for four consecutive days, at 50% of maximal oxygen uptake (determined by heart rate), for episode durations of 10 or 40 min. A rest period of 10 days followed before exercise for the alternative duration was performed. The main outcome measure was blinded assessment of blood pressure 24 h after the last exercise episode. Significant reductions were found in systolic and diastolic blood pressure after 4 days of 40 min but not after 4 days of 10 min stationary cycling. The reduction in blood pressure was significant for both systolic and diastolic blood pressure for 4 days of 40 min of exercise episodes. Exercise of moderate intensity on a stationary bicycle for 10 min for 4 days is not effective in lowering blood pressure in comparison with the same exercise for 40 min for 4 days. The experimental design employed in the present study has potential for monitoring the effects of exercise on blood pressure.

  2. Factors associated with chronic depressive episodes: a preliminary report from the STAR-D project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmer, W S; Trivedi, M H; Rush, A J; Wisniewski, S R; Luther, J; Howland, R H; Yohanna, D; Khan, A; Alpert, J

    2005-12-01

    To identify baseline sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with a current chronic major depressive episode (MDE). Outpatients with major depressive disorder enrolled in 41 US primary or psychiatric care sites were divided into two groups based on self-report of current episode length ( or =24 months). Logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with chronicity of current depressive episode. About 21.2% of 1380 subjects were in current, chronic MDEs. Older age, less education, lower income, no private insurance, unemployment, greater general medical illness burden, lower physical quality of life, concurrent generalized anxiety disorder, fewer prior episodes, and history of prior suicide attempts were all associated with chronic episodes. Blacks, Hispanics, and patients receiving care in primary as opposed to psychiatric care settings exhibited greater chronicity. Chronic depressive episodes are common and are associated with greater illness burden, comorbidity, socioeconomic disadvantage, and racial/ethnic minority status.

  3. Episodic Excessive Blinking in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Yasmin Poustchi; Simon, John W; Chaudhri, Imran; Zobal-Ratner, Jitka; Barry, Gerard P

    2016-01-01

    Many children present with excessive blinking. Categorization, associated conditions, and prognosis are controversial. All children with excessive blinking were reviewed, excluding those with known uveitis, glaucoma, or obvious eyelid abnormalities. Parents were telephoned for follow-up. No ocular pathology was identified in 31 of 34 children with excessive blinking (91%). Parents were able to report a specific cause of blinking in 7 (21%). In 24 of 34 (71%), parents reported complete resolution of excessive blinking. No new ophthalmologic diagnoses were uncovered on follow-up. Episodes of excessive blinking rarely indicate neurologic disorders and frequently resolve spontaneously. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. BDNF gene polymorphism, cognition and symptom severity in a Brazilian population-based sample of first-episode psychosis subjects Polimorfismo do gene do BDNF, cognição e gravidade dos sintomas em uma amostra de base populacional brasileira de indivíduos apresentando o primeiro episódio psicótico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Martinho Jr

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF gene variations on cognitive performance and clinical symptomatology in first-episode psychosis (FEP. METHODS: We performed BDNF val66met variant genotyping, cognitive testing (verbal fluency and digit spans and assessments of symptom severity (as assessed with the PANSS in a population-based sample of FEP patients (77 with schizophreniform psychosis and 53 with affective psychoses and 191 neighboring healthy controls. RESULTS: There was no difference in the proportion of Met allele carriers between FEP patients and controls, and no significant influence of BDNF genotype on cognitive test scores in either of the psychosis groups. A decreased severity of negative symptoms was found in FEP subjects that carried a Met allele, and this finding reached significance for the subgroup with affective psychoses (p OBJETIVO: Investigar a influência da variação do gene do fator neurotrófico derivado do cérebro (BDNF no desempenho cognitivo e na sintomatologia clínica durante o primeiro episódio psicótico (PEP. MÉTODOS: Foram realizados a genotipificação das variantes Val66met do BDNF, o teste cognitivo (fluência verbal e repetição de dígitos e as avaliações da gravidade dos sintomas (conforme avaliado pela Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale [PANSS] em uma amostra de pacientes com PEP de base populacional (77 com psicose esquizofreniforme e 53 com psicose afetiva e 191 vizinhos controle saudáveis. RESULTADOS: Não houve diferença na proporção de portadores do alelo Met entre pacientes com PEP e o grupo controle. Não houve influência significativa do genótipo do BDNF sobre a pontuação de cada um dos grupos psicóticos. Foi encontrada uma diminuição da gravidade dos sintomas negativos em sujeitos com PEP portadores do alelo Met, e essa descoberta mostrou-se significativa para o subgrupo com psicose afetiva (p < 0,01, ANOVA. CONCLUSÕES: Os

  5. [Mixed episode: complex recognition and complicated treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargoloff, Pedro Rafael

    2003-01-01

    Mixed Episode is a complex syndrome with difficult in its recognition, the most prolonged duration of bipolar episodes, more frequent psychotic profile than Pure Manic Episode, with high suicidality and poor response to drugs. There are evidences of less efficacy with Lithium and Carbamazepine in Manic Episode than mixed states. Valproate improve both, manic and depressive symptoms, and it is proposed to be first choice. Olanzapine has been widely evaluated, showing robust response in acute Mania as well in depressive symptoms during Mixed episode. In the field of clinical practice, there are many patients receiving more than one drug, usually Valproate plus a second generation antipsychotic.

  6. Prefrontal activation deficits during episodic memory in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragland, John D; Laird, Angela R; Ranganath, Charan; Blumenfeld, Robert S; Gonzales, Sabina M; Glahn, David C

    2009-08-01

    Episodic memory impairments represent a core deficit in schizophrenia that severely limits patients' functional outcome. This quantitative meta-analysis of functional imaging studies of episodic encoding and retrieval tests the prediction that these deficits are most consistently associated with dysfunction in the prefrontal cortex. Activation likelihood estimation (ALE) was used to perform a quantitative meta-analysis of functional imaging studies that contrasted patients with schizophrenia and healthy volunteers during episodic encoding and retrieval. From a pool of 36 potential studies, 18 whole-brain studies in standard space that included a healthy comparison sample and low-level baseline contrast were selected. As predicted, patients showed less prefrontal activation than comparison subjects in the frontal pole, dorsolateral and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex during encoding, and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex during retrieval. The ventrolateral prefrontal cortex encoding deficits were not present in studies that provided patients with encoding strategies, but dorsolateral prefrontal cortex deficits remained and were not secondary to group performance differences. The only medial temporal lobe finding was relatively greater patient versus comparison subject activation in the parahippocampal gyrus during encoding and retrieval. The finding of prominent prefrontal dysfunction suggests that cognitive control deficits strongly contribute to episodic memory impairment in schizophrenia. Memory rehabilitation approaches developed for patients with frontal lobe lesions and pharmacotherapy approaches designed to improve prefrontal cortex function may therefore hold special promise for remediating memory deficits in patients with schizophrenia.

  7. Episodic memories in anxiety disorders: Clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin eZlomuzica

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to summarize research on the emerging role of episodic memories in the context of anxiety disorders (AD. The available literature on explicit-, autobiographical- and episodic memory function in AD including neuroimaging studies is critically discussed. We describe the methodological diversity of episodic memory research in AD and discuss the need for novel tests to measure episodic memory in a clinical setting. We argue that alterations in episodic memory functions might contribute to the etiology of AD. We further explain why future research on the interplay between episodic memory function and emotional disorders as well as its neuroanatomical foundations offers the promise to increase the effectiveness of modern psychological treatments. We conclude that one major task is to develop methods and training programs that might help patients suffering from AD to better understand, interpret and possibly actively use their episodic memories in a way that would support therapeutic interventions and counteract the occurrence of symptoms.

  8. Episodic Memories in Anxiety Disorders: Clinical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlomuzica, Armin; Dere, Dorothea; Machulska, Alla; Adolph, Dirk; Dere, Ekrem; Margraf, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize research on the emerging role of episodic memories in the context of anxiety disorders (AD). The available literature on explicit, autobiographical, and episodic memory function in AD including neuroimaging studies is critically discussed. We describe the methodological diversity of episodic memory research in AD and discuss the need for novel tests to measure episodic memory in a clinical setting. We argue that alterations in episodic memory functions might contribute to the etiology of AD. We further explain why future research on the interplay between episodic memory function and emotional disorders as well as its neuroanatomical foundations offers the promise to increase the effectiveness of modern psychological treatments. We conclude that one major task is to develop methods and training programs that might help patients suffering from AD to better understand, interpret, and possibly actively use their episodic memories in a way that would support therapeutic interventions and counteract the occurrence of symptoms. PMID:24795583

  9. [First-episode psychosis, cognitive difficulties and remediation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidailhet, P

    2013-09-01

    Cognitive difficulties are a core feature of schizophrenia. They are frequent, severe, and clearly associated with functional disabilities. They have been explored during different phases of the disease, but what we know essentially concerns the chronic period in middle-age patients. In this article we will specifically focus on cognition at the time of first episode. First episode is a key life period, occurring while social demands are increasing and more complex on the one hand, and while there are important changes in structural and functional cerebral anatomy on the other hand. Exploring cognitive difficulties at the time of first episode offers the opportunity to better know their time course, to avoid interpretative difficulties due to the chronicity of the disease and its treatments, and to develop early therapeutics in order to improve outcome. Cognitive difficulties are clearly present at the time of first episode; their nature and severity appear similar to those observed in more chronic patients. Therefore, they cannot be entirely explained by treatments, hospitalizations or chronicity, and appear more as an intrinsic feature of the disease. The course of their trajectory through the progression of the disease remains uncertain; while they are already present during childhood or adolescence in some subjects who will later declare schizophrenia, they seem to worsen during the period of early prodroms, that is years before psychotic symptoms emerge. Whether they aggravate again during the first episode process is still a matter of debate. While longer DUP is associated with a poor outcome, this does not seem to hold true for cognitive impairments. Cannabis or tobacco use are neither associated with worse cognitive abilities in first-episode patients; a reverse relationship even sometimes exists. Cognitive impairment appears as largely independent from other clinical dimensions, acknowledging its own physiopathology and requiring specific evaluation and

  10. Discrete-storm water-table fluctuation method to estimate episodic recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, John R; Horowitz, Charles; Mitchell, Lara

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a method to identify and quantify recharge episodes, along with their associated infiltration-related inputs, by a consistent, systematic procedure. Our algorithm partitions a time series of water levels into discrete recharge episodes and intervals of no episodic recharge. It correlates each recharge episode with a specific interval of rainfall, so storm characteristics such as intensity and duration can be associated with the amount of recharge that results. To be useful in humid climates, the algorithm evaluates the separability of events, so that those whose recharge cannot be associated with a single storm can be appropriately lumped together. Elements of this method that are subject to subjectivity in the application of hydrologic judgment are values of lag time, fluctuation tolerance, and master recession parameters. Because these are determined once for a given site, they do not contribute subjective influences affecting episode-to-episode comparisons. By centralizing the elements requiring scientific judgment, our method facilitates such comparisons by keeping the most subjective elements openly apparent, making it easy to maintain consistency. If applied to a period of data long enough to include recharge episodes with broadly diverse characteristics, the method has value for predicting how climatic alterations in the distribution of storm intensities and seasonal duration may affect recharge. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. The McLean-Harvard First-Episode Project: Early Course in 114 Cases of First-Episode Nonaffective Psychoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohen, Mauricio; Khalsa, Hari-Mandir K; Salvatore, Paola; Zarate, Carlos A; Strakowski, Stephen M; Sanchez-Toledo, Jesús Pérez; Baldessarini, Ross J

    2016-06-01

    Early course in contemporary, clinically treated, nonaffective psychotic disorders other than schizophrenia remains incompletely defined. We prospectively, repeatedly, and systematically assessed 114 patients hospitalized for a first episode of DSM-IV-TR nonaffective psychotic illness for ≥ 2 years (1989-1996) using structured (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R, Patient Edition; Clinical Global Impressions scale; Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms; Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms; and the expanded version of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale) and unstructured (best-estimate procedure, life charting) naturalistic follow-up procedures and survival analysis. Duration of untreated psychosis (22 ± 38 months) was longest with schizophrenia. Within 2 years, syndromal remission sustained for ≥ 8 weeks (recovery) was attained by 75 subjects (65.8%); median latency to syndromal recovery was 9.4 (95% CI, 5.7-13.3) weeks and was shorter with cycloid features, initial diagnosis of brief psychosis or schizophreniform disorder, and shorter initial hospitalization. Functional recovery within 2 years was achieved by 28 of 68 subjects (41.2%), more often without initial mood-psychomotor instability or homicidal ideation. New episodes occurred in 52 of 114 subjects (45.6%) and were more likely with less affective flattening, younger age, and white race. Median time to new episodes (43.7 [27.9-70.6] weeks) was earlier with initial first-rank auditory hallucinations, substance abuse, and functional nonrecovery. Diagnosis changed to other nonaffective, schizoaffective, or affective disorders within 2 years in 62 of 108 cases (57.4%). Three-quarters of patients presenting in first lifetime, nonaffective psychotic episodes achieved recovery within 2 years, but only 41% returned to baseline functioning, and nearly half experienced new episodes. Patients with schizophrenia had the longest duration of untreated psychosis. A majority changed diagnosis

  12. Episodic future thinking and episodic counterfactual thinking: intersections between memory and decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schacter, Daniel L; Benoit, Roland G; De Brigard, Felipe; Szpunar, Karl K

    2015-01-01

    This article considers two recent lines of research concerned with the construction of imagined or simulated events that can provide insight into the relationship between memory and decision making. One line of research concerns episodic future thinking, which involves simulating episodes that might occur in one's personal future, and the other concerns episodic counterfactual thinking, which involves simulating episodes that could have happened in one's personal past. We first review neuroimaging studies that have examined the neural underpinnings of episodic future thinking and episodic counterfactual thinking. We argue that these studies have revealed that the two forms of episodic simulation engage a common core network including medial parietal, prefrontal, and temporal regions that also supports episodic memory. We also note that neuroimaging studies have documented neural differences between episodic future thinking and episodic counterfactual thinking, including differences in hippocampal responses. We next consider behavioral studies that have delineated both similarities and differences between the two kinds of episodic simulation. The evidence indicates that episodic future and counterfactual thinking are characterized by similarly reduced levels of specific detail compared with episodic memory, but that the effects of repeatedly imagining a possible experience have sharply contrasting effects on the perceived plausibility of those events during episodic future thinking versus episodic counterfactual thinking. Finally, we conclude by discussing the functional consequences of future and counterfactual simulations for decisions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Episodic future thinking and episodic counterfactual thinking: Intersections between memory and decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schacter, Daniel L.; Benoit, Roland G.; De Brigard, Felipe; Szpunar, Karl K.

    2014-01-01

    This article considers two recent lines of research concerned with the construction of imagined or simulated events that can provide insight into the relationship between memory and decision making. One line of research concerns episodic future thinking, which involves simulating episodes that might occur in one’s personal future, and the other concerns episodic counterfactual thinking, which involves simulating episodes that could have happened in one’s personal past. We first review neuroimaging studies that have examined the neural underpinnings of episodic future thinking and episodic counterfactual thinking. We argue that these studies have revealed that the two forms of episodic simulation engage a common core network including medial parietal, prefrontal, and temporal regions that also supports episodic memory. We also note that neuroimaging studies have documented neural differences between episodic future thinking and episodic counterfactual thinking, including differences in hippocampal responses. We next consider behavioral studies that have delineated both similarities and differences between the two kinds of episodic simulation. The evidence indicates that episodic future and counterfactual thinking are characterized by similarly reduced levels of specific detail compared with episodic memory, but that the effects of repeatedly imagining a possible experience have sharply contrasting effects on the perceived plausibility of those events during episodic future thinking versus episodic counterfactual thinking. Finally, we conclude by discussing the functional consequences of future and counterfactual simulations for decisions. PMID:24373942

  14. Caregiver psychoeducation for first-episode psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McWilliams, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    International best-practice guidelines for the management of first-episode psychosis have recommended the provision of psychoeducation for multifamily groups. While there is ample evidence of their efficacy in multiepisode psychosis, there is a paucity of evidence supporting this approach specifically for first-episode psychosis. We sought to determine whether a six-week caregiver psychoeducation programme geared specifically at first-episode psychosis improves caregiver knowledge and attitudes.

  15. Impact of episodic thinking on altruism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Richard; Pickover, Alison; Stuppy-Sullivan, Allison M.; Baker, Sydney; Landes, Reid D.

    2016-01-01

    Episodic future thinking, which refers to the use of prospective imagery to concretely imagine oneself in future scenarios, has been shown to reduce delay discounting (enhance self-control). A parallel approach, in which prospective imagery is used to concretely imagine other’s scenarios, may similarly reduce social discounting (i.e., enhance altruism). In study 1, participants engaged in episodic thinking about the self or others, in a repeated-measures design, while completing a social discounting task. Reductions in social discounting were observed as a function of episodic thinking about others, though an interaction with order was also observed. Using an independent-measures design in study 2, the effect of episodic thinking about others was replicated. Study 3 addressed a limitation of studies 1 and 2, the possibility that simply thinking about others decreased social discounting. Capitalizing on Construal Level Theory, which specifies that social distance and time in the future are both dimensions of a common psychological distance, we hypothesized that episodic future thinking should also decrease social discounting. Participants engaged in episodic future thinking or episodic present thinking, in a repeated-measures design, while completing a social discounting task. The pattern of results was similar to study 1, providing support for the notion that episodic thinking about psychologically distant outcomes (for others or in the future) reduces social discounting. Application of similar episodic thinking approaches may enhance altruism. PMID:27821875

  16. Impact of episodic thinking on altruism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Richard; Pickover, Alison; Stuppy-Sullivan, Allison M; Baker, Sydney; Landes, Reid D

    2016-07-01

    Episodic future thinking, which refers to the use of prospective imagery to concretely imagine oneself in future scenarios, has been shown to reduce delay discounting (enhance self-control). A parallel approach, in which prospective imagery is used to concretely imagine other's scenarios, may similarly reduce social discounting (i.e., enhance altruism). In study 1, participants engaged in episodic thinking about the self or others, in a repeated-measures design, while completing a social discounting task. Reductions in social discounting were observed as a function of episodic thinking about others, though an interaction with order was also observed. Using an independent-measures design in study 2, the effect of episodic thinking about others was replicated. Study 3 addressed a limitation of studies 1 and 2, the possibility that simply thinking about others decreased social discounting. Capitalizing on Construal Level Theory, which specifies that social distance and time in the future are both dimensions of a common psychological distance, we hypothesized that episodic future thinking should also decrease social discounting. Participants engaged in episodic future thinking or episodic present thinking, in a repeated-measures design, while completing a social discounting task. The pattern of results was similar to study 1, providing support for the notion that episodic thinking about psychologically distant outcomes (for others or in the future) reduces social discounting. Application of similar episodic thinking approaches may enhance altruism.

  17. Social Media Use and Episodic Heavy Drinking Among Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunborg, Geir Scott; Andreas, Jasmina Burdzovic; Kvaavik, Elisabeth

    2017-06-01

    Objectives Little is known about the consequences of adolescent social media use. The current study estimated the association between the amount of time adolescents spend on social media and the risk of episodic heavy drinking. Methods A school-based self-report cross-sectional study including 851 Norwegian middle and high school students (46.1% boys). frequency and quantity of social media use. Frequency of drinking four or six (girls and boys, respectively) alcoholic drinks during a single day (episodic heavy drinking). The MacArthur Scale of Subjective Social Status, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale - Brief, the Brief Sensation Seeking Scale, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 items for Adolescents, the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire Peer Relationship problems scale, gender, and school grade. Results Greater amount of time spent on social media was associated with greater likelihood of episodic heavy drinking among adolescents ( OR = 1.12, 95% CI (1.05, 1.19), p = 0.001), even after adjusting for school grade, impulsivity, sensation seeking, symptoms of depression, and peer relationship problems. Conclusion The results from the current study indicate that more time spent on social media is related to greater likelihood of episodic heavy drinking among adolescents.

  18. Episodic plate tectonics on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Donald

    1992-01-01

    Studies of impact craters on Venus from the Magellan images have placed important constraints on surface volcanism. Some 840 impact craters have been identified with diameters ranging from 2 to 280 km. Correlations of this impact flux with craters on the Moon, Earth, and Mars indicate a mean surface age of 0.5 +/- 0.3 Ga. Another important observation is that 52 percent of the craters are slightly fractured and only 4.5 percent are embayed by lava flows. These observations led researchers to hypothesize that a pervasive resurfacing event occurred about 500 m.y. ago and that relatively little surface volcanism has occurred since. Other researchers have pointed out that a global resurfacing event that ceased about 500 MYBP is consistent with the results given by a recent study. These authors carried out a series of numerical calculations of mantle convection in Venus yielding thermal evolution results. Their model considered crustal recycling and gave rapid planetary cooling. They, in fact, suggested that prior to 500 MYBP plate tectonics was active in Venus and since 500 MYBP the lithosphere has stabilized and only hot-spot volcanism has reached the surface. We propose an alternative hypothesis for the inferred cessation of surface volcanism on Venus. We hypothesize that plate tectonics on Venus is episodic. Periods of rapid plate tectonics result in high rates of subduction that cool the interior resulting in more sluggish mantle convection.

  19. Perceptive biases in major depressive episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudin, Marine; Carl, Tatiana; Surguladze, Simon; Guillen, Catherine; Gaillard, Philippe; Belzung, Catherine; El-Hage, Wissam; Atanasova, Boriana

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in emotional processing occur during a major depressive episode (MDE), and olfaction and facial expressions have implications in emotional and social interactions. To gain a better understanding of these processes, we characterized the perceptive sensorial biases, potential links, and potential remission after antidepressant treatment of MDE. We recruited 22 patients with acute MDE, both before and after three months of antidepressant treatment, and 41 healthy volunteers matched by age and smoking status. The participants underwent a clinical assessment (Mini International Neuropsychiatry Interview, Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Physical and Social Anhedonia scales, Pleasure-Displeasure Scale), an olfactory evaluation (hedonic aspect, familiarity and emotional impact of odors), and a computerized Facial Affect Recognition task. MDE was associated with an olfactory bias concerning hedonic and emotional aspects, including negative olfactory alliesthesia (unpleasant odorants perceived as more unpleasant), facial emotion expression recognition (happy facial expressions), and in part olfactory anhedonia (pleasant odorants perceived as less pleasant). In addition, the results revealed that these impairments represent state markers of MDE, suggesting that the patients recovered the same sensory processing as healthy subjects after antidepressant treatment. This study demonstrated that MDE is associated with negative biases toward olfactory perception and the recognition of facial emotional expressions. The link between these two sensory parameters suggests common underlying processes.

  20. Perceptive biases in major depressive episode.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Naudin

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Alterations in emotional processing occur during a major depressive episode (MDE, and olfaction and facial expressions have implications in emotional and social interactions. To gain a better understanding of these processes, we characterized the perceptive sensorial biases, potential links, and potential remission after antidepressant treatment of MDE. METHODS: We recruited 22 patients with acute MDE, both before and after three months of antidepressant treatment, and 41 healthy volunteers matched by age and smoking status. The participants underwent a clinical assessment (Mini International Neuropsychiatry Interview, Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Physical and Social Anhedonia scales, Pleasure-Displeasure Scale, an olfactory evaluation (hedonic aspect, familiarity and emotional impact of odors, and a computerized Facial Affect Recognition task. RESULTS: MDE was associated with an olfactory bias concerning hedonic and emotional aspects, including negative olfactory alliesthesia (unpleasant odorants perceived as more unpleasant, facial emotion expression recognition (happy facial expressions, and in part olfactory anhedonia (pleasant odorants perceived as less pleasant. In addition, the results revealed that these impairments represent state markers of MDE, suggesting that the patients recovered the same sensory processing as healthy subjects after antidepressant treatment. DISCUSSION: This study demonstrated that MDE is associated with negative biases toward olfactory perception and the recognition of facial emotional expressions. The link between these two sensory parameters suggests common underlying processes.

  1. Episodic accretion on to strongly magnetic stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Angelo, C.R.; Spruit, H.C.

    2010-01-01

    Some accreting neutron stars and young stars show unexplained episodic flares in the form of quasi-periodic oscillations or recurrent outbursts. In a series of two papers, we present new work on an instability that can lead to episodic outbursts when the accretion disc is truncated by the star's

  2. Intrusions in Episodic Memory: Reconsolidation or Interference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingmüller, Angela; Caplan, Jeremy B.; Sommer, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    It would be profoundly important if reconsolidation research in animals and other memory domains generalized to human episodic memory. A 3-d-list-discrimination procedure, based on free recall of objects, with a contextual reminder cue (the testing room), has been thought to demonstrate reconsolidation of human episodic memory (as noted in a…

  3. Episodic memory and the witness trump card.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Jeremy; Craver, Carl

    2018-01-01

    We accept Mahr & Csibra's (M&C's) causal claim that episodic memory provides humans with the means for evaluating the veracity of reports about non-occurrent events. We reject their evolutionary argument that this is the proper function of episodic memory. We explore three intriguing implications of the causal claim, for cognitive neuropsychology, comparative psychology, and philosophy.

  4. Tracking the Construction of Episodic Future Thoughts

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Argembeau, Arnaud; Mathy, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    The ability to mentally simulate possible futures ("episodic future thinking") is of fundamental importance for various aspects of human cognition and behavior, but precisely how humans construct mental representations of future events is still essentially unknown. We suggest that episodic future thoughts consist of transitory patterns…

  5. Divergent thinking and constructing episodic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addis, Donna Rose; Pan, Ling; Musicaro, Regina; Schacter, Daniel L

    2016-01-01

    Divergent thinking likely plays an important role in simulating autobiographical events. We investigated whether divergent thinking is differentially associated with the ability to construct detailed imagined future and imagined past events as opposed to recalling past events. We also examined whether age differences in divergent thinking might underlie the reduced episodic detail generated by older adults. The richness of episodic detail comprising autobiographical events in young and older adults was assessed using the Autobiographical Interview. Divergent thinking abilities were measured using the Alternative Uses Task. Divergent thinking was significantly associated with the amount of episodic detail for imagined future events. Moreover, while age was significantly associated with imagined episodic detail, this effect was strongly related to age-related changes in episodic retrieval rather than divergent thinking.

  6. Recovery from episodic acidification delayed by drought and high sea salt deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Laudon

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available For the prediction of episodic acidification large uncertainties are connected to climatic variability and its effect on drought conditions and sea-salt episodes. In this study data on 342 hydrological episodes in 25 Swedish streams, sampled over 10 years, have been analyzed using a recently developed episode model. The results demonstrate that drought is the most important factor modulating the magnitude of the anthropogenic influence on pH and ANC during episodes. These modulating effects are especially pronounced in southern and central Sweden, where the historically high acid deposition has resulted in significant S pools in catchment soils. The results also suggest that the effects of episodic acidification are becoming less severe in many streams, but this amelioration is less clear in coastal streams subject to high levels of sea-salt deposition. Concurrently with the amelioration of the effects of episodic acidification, regional climate models predict that temperatures will increase in Sweden during the coming decades, accompanied by reductions in summer precipitation and more frequent storms during fall and winter in large areas of the country. If these predictions are realized delays in streams' recovery from episodic acidification events can be expected.

  7. Measuring quality of life in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melle, I; Friis, Svein; Haahr, U

    2005-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) measures are increasingly recognized as necessary parts of outcome assessments in psychosis. The present paper is a comprehensive study of patients with first-episode psychosis where QoL is measured by the commonly used Lehman Quality of Life Interview (L-QoLI). The aim...... is to examine if the L-QoLI maintain its original structure when used in a group of patients with first-episode psychosis, and to investigate what determines global subjective QoL with a specific emphasis on premorbid adjustment, duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) and clinical symptoms. The study indicates...... of compromised function at this stage produces poor satisfaction with life rather than a downward readjustment of expectations....

  8. Bulimic Beliefs: Food for Thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Barbara G.; Anderson, Wayne P.

    1989-01-01

    Contends that individuals suffering from bulimia nervosa share characteristic pattern of thinking which must be understood if effective treatment is to take place. Presents these beliefs, gathered by clinical experience and literature review, in format describing each belief, discussing common causes for its development, and suggesting therapeutic…

  9. Electroencephalographic slow waves prior to sleepwalking episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrault, Rosemarie; Carrier, Julie; Desautels, Alex; Montplaisir, Jacques; Zadra, Antonio

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the onset of sleepwalking episodes may be preceded by fluctuations in slow-wave sleep electroencephalographic characteristics. However, whether or not such fluctuations are specific to sleepwalking episodes or generalized to all sleep-wake transitions in sleepwalkers remains unknown. The goal of this study was to compare spectral power for delta (1-4 Hz) and slow delta (0.5-1 Hz) as well as slow oscillation density before the onset of somnambulistic episodes versus non-behavioral awakenings recorded from the same group of sleepwalkers. A secondary aim was to describe the time course of observed changes in slow-wave activity and slow oscillations during the 3 min immediately preceding the occurrence of somnambulistic episodes. Twelve adult sleepwalkers were investigated polysomnographically during the course of one night. Slow-wave activity and slow oscillation density were significantly greater prior to patients' somnambulistic episodes as compared with non-behavioral awakenings. However, there was no evidence for a gradual increase over the 3 min preceding the episodes. Increased slow-wave activity and slow oscillation density appear to be specific to sleepwalking episodes rather than generalized to all sleep-wake transitions in sleepwalkers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Autobiographical Memory and Episodic Future Thinking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Katrine; Berntsen, Dorthe

    the construction of specific events during episodic future thinking remain largely unexplored. In this study, we examined whether episodic future thoughts depend on executive processes and are affected by cue imageability to the same extent as autobiographical remembering of past events. Results showed...... that autobiographical memory and episodic future thinking were affected similarly by cue imageability, suggesting that retrieval strategy can be manipulated in similar ways for both temporal directions. Furthermore, executive control processes (as measured by verbal fluency) was correlated with fluency and number...... of details in both memories and future thoughts, indicating the involvement of some common component processes in autobiographical memory and future thinking....

  11. [Torsades de pointes: analysis of 105 episodes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, I G; Sá, R; Alves, P A; Ribeiro, J C; Fernandes, P H; Guarçoni, O; Bassan, R; Dohmann, H F

    1993-02-01

    To analyze episodes of Torsades de Pointes (TP), in search of its electrocardiographic characteristics. We analyzed 105 episodes of TP, in 4 patients using quinidine and diuretics, recorded by 24-hour Holter monitoring. The following parameters were studied; ventricular repolarization out of TP, rhythm disturbances before TP; ECG characteristics of the onset, the bouts and the end of the TP. Ventricular repolarization, out of the TP, was abnormal, with the presence of U-waves at the end of the T-waves, resulting in prolongation of the QT (QU) interval. The U-wave voltage was noted to be cycle-length dependent. Ventricular bigeminy preceded TP in 100 episodes (95%) and the mean interval between both parameters was 18 +/- 16 min. The onset of the TP episodes showed the "short/long/short cycle rule", hereby called "pre-pause cycle", "preparing cycle" and "trigger cycle" respectively. The rotatory QRS-T morphology around the baseline, was seen in 75% of episodes, at the beginning or throughout the bout. Monomorphic ventricular tachycardia pattern was seen in the other 25% of episodes. Termination of bouts was sudden in all cases, and persistent ventricular bigeminy led to another bout in 90 episodes (85%). In TP patients, there is enlargement of QT intervals mostly due to U-waves appearance. The U-waves seen in these cases, probably have an important role in the genesis of TP and are probably related to ventricular after-potentials (triggered activity). Ventricular bigeminy is a premonitory sign of TP in patients using class 1A antiarrhythmic drugs. Persistent ventricular bigeminy post-TP episodes is a strong indicator of another bout of TP. The onset of TP is more important than its morphology for the correct diagnosis of this arrhythmia.

  12. Clinical care management and workflow by episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, P L; Carpenter, P C; Chute, C G; Mohr, D N; Gibbons, P S

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of clinically defined episodes of care and the introduction of an episode-based summary list of patient problems across Mayo Clinic Rochester in 1996 and 1997. Although Mayo's traditional paper-based system has always relied on a type of 'episode of care' (called the "registration") for patient and history management, a new, more clinically relevant definition of episode of care was put into practice in November 1996. This was done to improve care management and operational processes and to provide a basic construct for the electronic medical record. Also since November 1996, a computer-generated summary list of patient problems, the "Master Sheet Summary Report," organized by episode, has been placed in all patient histories. In the third quarter of 1997, the ability to view the episode-based problem summary online was made available to the 3000+ EMR-capable workstations deployed across the Mayo Rochester campus. In addition, the clinically oriented problem summarization process produces an improved basic "package" of clinical information expected to lead to improved analytic decision support, outcomes analysis and epidemiological research.

  13. Elevated fingernail cortisol levels in major depressive episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herane-Vives, Andres; Fischer, Susanne; de Angel, Valeria; Wise, Toby; Cheung, Eric; Chua, Kia-Chong; Arnone, Danilo; Young, Allan H; Cleare, Anthony J

    2018-02-01

    The extent to which cortisol levels are elevated in major depressive episodes (MDE), and hence could act as a biomarker of illness, remains unclear. Although patient characteristics may explain some of this variation - for example elevated cortisol being more often found in patients with severe, psychotic or melancholic depression - problems with the methods used to measure cortisol may also have contributed to the inconsistent findings. Fingernails are a novel sample that can be used to assess aggregate cortisol concentrations over a 15-day period, and may provide a more accurate reflection of longer term cortisol level changes in MDE and help clarify this issue. This methodology has not yet been utilised in MDE. Cortisol levels reflecting a period of 15days were measured using fingernails in a group of 26 subjects experiencing a major depressive episode (MDE) and in an age and gender matched group of 45 healthy controls. Depressed subjects showed significantly higher mean cortisol levels measured in fingernails when compared with control subjects. Higher levels of cortisol were associated with higher depression severity scores, a diagnosis of non-reactive depression, and more prominent melancholic symptoms. Conversely, fatigue was negatively correlated with cortisol levels. There is elevated cortisol in MDE when assessed using an aggregate measure over two weeks.Alterations in fingernail cortisol correlate with key clinical symptoms and subtypes of depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Transcranial magnetic stimulation reveals cortical hyperexcitability in episodic cluster headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Guiseppe; Brighina, Filippo; Brancato, Sara; Valentino, Francesca; Indovino, Serena; Fierro, Brigida

    2015-01-01

    Evidence shows involvement of the cerebral cortex in the pathophysiology of cluster headache (CH). Here we investigated cortical excitability in episodic CH patients by using transcranial magnetic stimulation. In 25 patients with episodic CH and 13 healthy subjects we evaluated the motor cortical response to single-pulse (ie, motor threshold, input-output curves, cortical silent period) and paired-pulse (ie, intracortical facilitation, short intracortical inhibition) transcranial magnetic stimulation in both hemispheres. Thirteen patients were evaluated outside bout and the remaining 12 patients inside bout. Our results showed increased slope of the input-output curves after stimulation of both hemispheres in patients outside bout and in the hemisphere contralateral to the headache side in patients inside bout. Increased intracortical facilitation was observed in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the headache side in patients evaluated both outside and inside bout; reduced short intracortical inhibition was observed in patients inside bout ipsilateral to the side of pain. In conclusion, we provide evidence of increased cortical excitability in episodic CH both outside and inside bout, especially in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the side of headache attacks. Our results suggest that an abnormal regulation of cortical excitability could be involved in the pathophysiology of CH. We investigated cortical excitability in episodic cluster headache by using transcranial magnetic stimulation, providing evidence of cortical hyperexcitability in patients both inside and outside bout. We suggest that an abnormal state of cortical excitability could be involved in the pathophysiology of the disease. Copyright © 2015 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Expanding subjectivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda; Soldz, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A major theme in recent psychoanalytic thinking concerns the use of therapist subjectivity, especially “countertransference,” in understanding patients. This thinking converges with and expands developments in qualitative research regarding the use of researcher subjectivity as a tool to understa...

  16. Assessment of Behavioural Markers of Autonoetic Consciousness during Episodic Autobiographical Memory Retrieval: A Preliminary Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Irish

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There is ongoing theoretical debate regarding episodic memory and how it can be accurately measured, in particular if the focus should be content-based recall of episodic details or something more experiential involving the subjective capacity to mentally travel back in time and “re-live” aspects of the original event. The autonoetic subscale of the Episodic Autobiographical Memory Interview (EAMI is presented here as a new test instrument that attempts to redress theoretical and methodological shortcomings in autobiographical memory assessment. The EAMI merges a phenomenological detail-based approach with an assessment of autonoetic consciousness, departing considerably from traditional Remember/Know paradigms used within this field. We present findings from an initial pilot study investigating the potential markers of autonoetic consciousness that may accompany episodic retrieval. Key behavioural indices of autonoetic consciousness, notably those of viewer perspective, visual imagery, and emotional re-experiencing, emerged as being inextricably bound with the level of phenomenological detail recalled and the overall re-living judgment. The autonoetic subscale of the EAMI permits conceptually refined assessment of episodic personal memories and the accompanying subjective experience of mental re-living, characteristic of episodic memory.

  17. Relationship between substance abuse and first-episode psychosis - a South African perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Brink

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Co-morbidity between substance abuse and psy- chotic disorders is high. Few studies have examined therelationship between first-episode psychosis and substance abuse. Several questions emerge from this common relationship and many of them remain unanswered. Objectives. To determine the effect of substance abuse on psychosis in terms of onset, duration, severity of symptoms, use of medication and outcome. Method. Thirty - three subjects with first-episode psychosis, as well as primary caregivers, were interviewed re g a rding substance abuse and its relation to illness. Thirty-six control subjects were also interv i e w e d . Results. Twenty-seven per cent of subjects abused substances in the 3 months before onset of illness, and 77.8% of the abusers w e re male. Subjects in the first-episode psychosis group were m o re likely to choose cannabis as their substance of abuse than c o n t rols. They also started abusing substances at a younger age than controls. Subjects with first-episode psychosis who abused substances presented at an earlier age than non-abusers. Substances affected symptoms at baseline presentation . Conclusions. Substance abuse has a significant impact on first- onset psychosis as far as age of onset and symptom severity are c o n c e rned. Subjects with an underlying vulnerability to psychosis seem to start abusing substances at an earlier age than the general population. Males are more likely to abuse substances than females.

  18. Lack of association between prior depressive episodes and cerebral [(11)C]PiB binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, K; Hasselbalch, Bo Jacob; Frederiksen, K S

    2012-01-01

    of nondemented patients with prior depressive episodes. Twenty-eight elderly patients (mean age 61 years, range 51-75, 18 women) with onset of first depressive episode more than 6 years ago but now remitted from depression and 18 healthy subjects (mean age 61 years, range 50-76, 12 women) were included. All......Depressive symptoms are frequent in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but it is controversial whether depression is a risk factor for AD. This study measured for the first time cortical amyloid-ß (Aß) levels using [(11)C] Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) positron emission tomography (PET) in a group...... subjects were investigated with cognitive testing, 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and [(11)C]PiB high resolution research tomography (HRRT) positron emission tomography scan. There was no between-groups difference in [(11)C]PiB binding (p = 0.5) and no associations to number of depressive episodes...

  19. Severity of depressive episodes during the course of depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, L.V.

    2008-01-01

    contact. The prevalence of severe depressive episodes increased from 25.5% at the first episode to 50.0% at the 15th episode and the prevalence of psychotic episodes increased from 8.7% at the first episode to 25.0% at the 15th episode. The same pattern was found regardless of gender, age at first contact......Background It is not clear whether the severity of depressive episodes changes during the course of depressive disorder. Aims To investigate whether the severity of depressive episodes increases during the course of illness. Method Using a Danish nationwide case register, all psychiatric inpatients...... and out-patients with a main ICD-10 diagnosis of a single mild, moderate or severe depressive episode at the end of first contact were identified. Patients included in the study were from the period 1994-2003. Results A total of 19 392 patients received a diagnosis of a single depressive episode at first...

  20. SUBJECT INDEX

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subject Index. Variation of surface electric field during geomagnetic disturbed period at Maitri, Antarctica. 1721. Geomorphology. A simple depression-filling method for raster and irregular elevation datasets. 1653. Decision Support System integrated with Geographic. Information System to target restoration actions in water-.

  1. The duration of major depressive episodes in the Canadian general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, S C

    2001-01-01

    The National Population Health Survey (NPHS) has provided a wealth of new data concerning major depression in the Canadian general population. The NPHS included a brief predictor of major depression, and also two questions (only one of which was asked of each subject) concerned with the duration of episodes in the preceding year. A striking finding was that many of the episodes identified were very brief. In this paper the NPHS data were examined from a different perspective in order to derive a complementary perspective on the episode duration data. Data from the 1994/95 and 1996/97 cycles of the NPHS were used in the analysis. The longitudinal data were used to generate approximations of age and gender-specific incidence for members of the population over the age of 12 years. An estimate of prevalence was made from the 1996/97 cross-sectional file. A basic expression relating prevalence to incidence and mean duration of illness was then applied within age and gender categories. Taken together, the incidence and prevalence data from the NPHS suggest a longer duration than was indicated by the NPHS interview duration item. A probable explanation is that the NPHS duration question had an upper limit of 52 weeks, whereas some episodes of major depression last longer than this. Particularly long episodes could have a large impact on mean duration in the population. Nevertheless, these data confirm the heterogenous nature of this condition; many people with the syndrome of major depression may have quite brief episodes.

  2. Widespread Hypermetabolism in Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Episodes in Kleine-Levin Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Bayard, Sophie; Lopez, Régis; Comte, Frederic; Zanca, Michel; Peigneux, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Background No reliable biomarkers are identified in KLS. However, few functional neuroimaging studies suggested hypoactivity in thalamic and hypothalamic regions during symptomatic episodes. Here, we investigated relative changes in regional brain metabolism in Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS) during symptomatic episodes and asymptomatic periods, as compared to healthy controls. Methods Four drug-free male patients with typical KLS and 15 healthy controls were included. 18-F-fluorodeoxy glucose positron emission tomography (PET) was obtained in baseline condition in all participants, and during symptomatic episodes in KLS patients. All participants were asked to remain fully awake during the whole PET procedure. Results Between state-comparisons in KLS disclosed higher metabolism in paracentral, precentral, and postcentral areas, supplementary motor area, medial frontal gyrus, thalamus and putamen during symptomatic episodes, and decreased metabolism in occipital and temporal gyri. As compared to healthy control subjects, KLS patients in the asymptomatic phase consistently exhibited significant hypermetabolism in a wide cortical network including frontal and temporal cortices, posterior cingulate and precuneus, with no detected hypometabolism. In symptomatic KLS episodes, hypermetabolism was additionally found in orbital frontal and supplementary motor areas, insula and inferior parietal areas, and right caudate nucleus, and hypometabolism in the middle occipital gyrus and inferior parietal areas. Conclusion Our results demonstrated significant hypermetabolism and few hypometabolism in specific but widespread brain regions in drug-free KLS patients at baseline and during symptomatic episodes, highlighting the behavioral state-dependent nature of changes in regional brain activity in KLS. PMID:24699677

  3. Widespread hypermetabolism in symptomatic and asymptomatic episodes in Kleine-Levin syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Dauvilliers

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: No reliable biomarkers are identified in KLS. However, few functional neuroimaging studies suggested hypoactivity in thalamic and hypothalamic regions during symptomatic episodes. Here, we investigated relative changes in regional brain metabolism in Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS during symptomatic episodes and asymptomatic periods, as compared to healthy controls. METHODS: Four drug-free male patients with typical KLS and 15 healthy controls were included. 18-F-fluorodeoxy glucose positron emission tomography (PET was obtained in baseline condition in all participants, and during symptomatic episodes in KLS patients. All participants were asked to remain fully awake during the whole PET procedure. RESULTS: Between state-comparisons in KLS disclosed higher metabolism in paracentral, precentral, and postcentral areas, supplementary motor area, medial frontal gyrus, thalamus and putamen during symptomatic episodes, and decreased metabolism in occipital and temporal gyri. As compared to healthy control subjects, KLS patients in the asymptomatic phase consistently exhibited significant hypermetabolism in a wide cortical network including frontal and temporal cortices, posterior cingulate and precuneus, with no detected hypometabolism. In symptomatic KLS episodes, hypermetabolism was additionally found in orbital frontal and supplementary motor areas, insula and inferior parietal areas, and right caudate nucleus, and hypometabolism in the middle occipital gyrus and inferior parietal areas. CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrated significant hypermetabolism and few hypometabolism in specific but widespread brain regions in drug-free KLS patients at baseline and during symptomatic episodes, highlighting the behavioral state-dependent nature of changes in regional brain activity in KLS.

  4. Gender differences in first episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koster, A.; Lajer, M.; Lindhardt, A.

    2008-01-01

    In the description of 1 episode schizophrenia patients, female gender is associated with better social function and a higher degree of compliance, while males exhibit more negative symptoms and a higher degree of abuse. The question is raised whether gender specific differences exist which should...

  5. Mental health nursing and first episode psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dusseldorp, L. van; Goossens, P.J.J.; Achterberg, T. van

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to identify mental health nursing's contribution to the care and treatment of patients with a first episode of psychosis; A systematic literature review was undertaken, with 27 articles selected for study. Five domains were identified: development of

  6. Predictors of recovery in first episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austin, Stephen; Mors, Ole; Secher, Rikke Gry

    2013-01-01

    Recovery, the optimal goal in treatment, is the attainment of both symptomatic and functional remission over a sustained period of time. Identification of factors that promote recovery can help develop interventions that facilitate good outcomes for people with first episode psychosis....

  7. Attentional control and competition between episodic representations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akyürek, Elkan G.; Schubö, Anna; Hommel, Bernhard

    The relationship between attentional control and episodic representation was investigated in six experiments that employed a variant of the classic attentional blink paradigm. We introduced a task-irrelevant (unpredictive) color match between the first and second target stimulus in a three-stream

  8. How successful are first episode programs?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete; Rasmussen, Jesper Østrup; Melau, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: It has been hypothesized that the first 5 years after first episode of psychosis are a critical period with opportunities for ameliorating the course of illness. On the basis of this rationale, specialized assertive early intervention services were developed. We wanted to inves...

  9. A calendar savant with episodic memory impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Ingrid R; Berryhill, Marian E; Drowos, David B; Brown, Lawrence; Chatterjee, Anjan

    2010-06-01

    Patients with memory disorders have severely restricted learning and memory. For instance, patients with anterograde amnesia can learn motor procedures and retain some restricted ability to learn new words and factual information. However, such learning is inflexible and frequently inaccessible to conscious awareness. Here we present a case of patient AC596, a 25-year-old male with severe episodic memory impairments, presumably due to anoxia during a preterm birth. In contrast to his poor episodic memory, he exhibits savant-like memory for calendar information that can be flexibly accessed by day, month, and year cues. He also has the ability to recollect the exact date of a wide range of personal experiences over the past 20 years. The patient appears to supplement his generally poor episodic memory by using memorized calendar information as a retrieval cue for autobiographical events. These findings indicate that islands of preserved memory functioning, such as a highly developed semantic memory system, can exist in individuals with severely impaired episodic memory systems. In this particular case, our patient's memory for dates far outstripped that of normal individuals and served as a keen retrieval cue, allowing him to access information that was otherwise unavailable.

  10. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis presenting as depressive episode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnakumar, P.; Jayakrishnan, M. P.; Devarajan, E.

    2011-01-01

    A 9-year-old girl presented to the Child Guidance Clinic with clinical features suggestive of depressive episode of 1 week duration. There was history of short febrile illness 3 weeks prior to the onset of the depressive symptoms. MRI scan of brain showed features of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. PMID:22303048

  11. The hypothalamus in episodic brain disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overeem, Sebastiaan; van Vliet, Jorine A.; Lammers, Gert J.; Zitman, Frans G.; Swaab, Dick F.; Ferrari, Michel D.

    2002-01-01

    Episodic brain disorders (EBD) form an intriguing group of neurological diseases in which at least some of the symptoms occur in attacks. The hypothalamus integrates many brain functions, including endocrine and autonomic control, and governs various body rhythms. It seems a likely site in which the

  12. Autobiographical thinking interferes with episodic memory consolidation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Craig

    Full Text Available New episodic memories are retained better if learning is followed by a few minutes of wakeful rest than by the encoding of novel external information. Novel encoding is said to interfere with the consolidation of recently acquired episodic memories. Here we report four experiments in which we examined whether autobiographical thinking, i.e. an 'internal' memory activity, also interferes with episodic memory consolidation. Participants were presented with three wordlists consisting of common nouns; one list was followed by wakeful rest, one by novel picture encoding and one by autobiographical retrieval/future imagination, cued by concrete sounds. Both novel encoding and autobiographical retrieval/future imagination lowered wordlist retention significantly. Follow-up experiments demonstrated that the interference by our cued autobiographical retrieval/future imagination delay condition could not be accounted for by the sound cues alone or by executive retrieval processes. Moreover, our results demonstrated evidence of a temporal gradient of interference across experiments. Thus, we propose that rich autobiographical retrieval/future imagination hampers the consolidation of recently acquired episodic memories and that such interference is particularly likely in the presence of external concrete cues.

  13. Contribution of Prior Semantic Knowledge to New Episodic Learning in Amnesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Irene P.; Alexander, Michael P.; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated whether prior semantic knowledge would enhance episodic learning in amnesia. Subjects studied prices that are either congruent or incongruent with prior price knowledge for grocery and household items and then performed a forced-choice recognition test for the studied prices. Consistent with a previous report, healthy controls'…

  14. Generating life episodes for the purpose of testing of episodic memory models

    OpenAIRE

    Běhan, Zdeněk

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this work is to create a generator that provides a corpora of input episodes in the specified format, which can be used as an input to test episodic memory models. More specifically, the methods used should ensure the scope to be in years up to a possible lifetime of a typical human agent. It also attempts to verify this on an actual episodic memory model, and test if the generated data has high enough quality to be used for testing psychological paradigms on memory models.

  15. Cognitive Control Modulates Effects of Episodic Simulation on Delay Discounting in Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasse, Laura K; Peters, Jan; Brassen, Stefanie

    2017-01-01

    Enhancing prospective thinking by tagging the future with specific episodic events has been shown to reduce delay discounting in young age ("tag-effect"). So far, it is unclear whether such beneficial effect extends to old adulthood. Since the general ability of future thinking and cognitive control are crucial modulators of temporal discounting in young age, potential age-related decline in these functions might impact on the effect. We focused on this issue by combining functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with an established intertemporal choice task including episodic "tags" in healthy older participants. Future thinking ability was assessed using autobiographical interviews for future event simulations and a visual search task was applied to assess participants' cognitive control ability. In contrast to previous data in young adults, the group of older participants did not benefit from tagging the future with episodic events. Older participants' cognitive control function was directly associated with discounting rates in the episodic conditions: the less the older adults were able to focus their attention the less they benefited from the inclusion of episodic events. Consistent with this, imaging results revealed that: (a) subjective value (SV) signals in the hippocampus and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) as well as; (b) hippocampal-striatal coupling during the episodic condition were positively related to participants' control capacity. Our findings highlight the critical role of executive functioning for the simultaneous integration of episodic information with future value computation in aging. Boosting delay gratification by including episodic tags might hence be limited in older individuals with pronounced decline in distraction control.

  16. Capgras' syndrome in first-episode psychotic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore, Paola; Bhuvaneswar, Chaya; Tohen, Mauricio; Khalsa, Hari-Mandir K; Maggini, Carlo; Baldessarini, Ross J

    2014-01-01

    Misidentification phenomena, including the delusion of 'imposters' named after Joseph Capgras, occur in various major psychiatric and neurological disorders but have rarely been studied systematically in broad samples of modern patients. This study investigated the prevalence and correlated clinical factors of Capgras' phenomenon in a broad sample of patient-subjects with first-lifetime episodes of psychotic affective and nonaffective disorders. We evaluated 517 initially hospitalized, first-episode psychotic-disorder patients for the prevalence of Capgras' phenomenon and its association with DSM-IV-TR diagnoses including schizophreniform, brief psychotic, unspecified psychotic, delusional, and schizoaffective disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar-I disorder and major depression with psychotic features, and with characteristics of interest including antecedent psychiatric and neurological morbidity, onset type and presenting psychopathological phenomena, using standard bivariate and multivariate statistical methods. Capgras' syndrome was identified in 73/517 (14.1%) patients (8.2-50% across diagnoses). Risk was greatest with acute or brief psychotic disorders (schizophreniform psychoses 50%, brief psychoses 34.8%, or unspecified psychoses 23.9%), intermediate in major depression (15%), schizophrenia (11.4%) and delusional disorder (11.1%), and lowest in bipolar-I (10.3%) and schizoaffective disorders (8.2%). Associated were somatosensory, olfactory and tactile hallucinations, Schneiderian (especially delusional perception), and cycloid features including polymorphous psychotic phenomena, rapidly shifting psychomotor and affective symptoms, pananxiety, ecstasy, overconcern with death, and perplexity or confusion, as well as rapid onset, but not sex, age, abuse history, dissociative features, or indications of neurological disorders. Capgras' syndrome was prevalent across a broad spectrum of first-episode psychotic disorders, most often in acute psychoses of rapid onset.

  17. Capgras Syndrome in First-Episode Psychotic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore, Paola; Bhuvaneswar, Chaya; Tohen, Mauricio; Khalsa, Hari-Mandir K.; Maggini, Carlo; Baldessarini, Ross J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Misidentification phenomena, including the delusion of “imposters” named after Joseph Capgras, occur in various major psychiatric and neurological disorders but have rarely been studied systematically in broad samples of modern patients. This study investigated the prevalence and correlated clinical factors of Capgras phenomenon in a broad sample of patient-subjects with first-lifetime episodes of psychotic affective and non affective disorders. Methods We evaluated 517 initially hospitalized, first-episode psychotic-disorder patients for prevalence of Capgras phenomenon and its association with DSM-IV-TR diagnoses including schizophreniform, brief psychotic, unspecified psychotic, delusional, and schizoaffective disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar-I disorder and major depression with psychotic features, and with characteristics of interest including antecedent psychiatric and neurological morbidity, onset-type and presenting psychopathological phenomena, using standard bivariate and multivariate statistical methods. Results Capgras syndrome was identified in 73/517 (14.1%) patients (8.2%–50% across diagnoses). Risk was greatest with acute or brief psychotic disorders (schizophreniform [50%], brief [34.8%], or unspecified [23.9%] psychoses), intermediate in major depression (15%), schizophrenia (11.4%) and delusional disorder (11.1%), and lowest in bipolar-I (10.3%) and schizoaffective disorders (8.2%). Associated were somatosensory, olfactory and tactile hallucinations, Schneiderian (especially delusional perception), and cycloid features as described by Perris and Brockington including polymorphous psychotic phenomena, rapidly shifting psychomotor and affective symptoms, pan-anxiety, ecstasy, over-concern with death, and perplexity or confusion, as well as rapid-onset, but not sex, age, abuse-history, dissociative features, or indications of neurological disorders. Conclusions Capgras syndrome was prevalent across a broad spectrum of first-episode

  18. Aberrant topology of striatum's connectivity is associated with the number of episodes in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Chun; Brandl, Felix; Tahmasian, Masoud; Shao, Junming; Manoliu, Andrei; Scherr, Martin; Schwerthöffer, Dirk; Bäuml, Josef; Förstl, Hans; Zimmer, Claus; Wohlschläger, Afra M; Riedl, Valentin; Sorg, Christian

    2014-02-01

    In major depressive disorder, depressive episodes reoccur in ∼60% of cases; however, neural mechanisms of depressive relapse are poorly understood. Depressive episodes are characterized by aberrant topology of the brain's intrinsic functional connectivity network, and the number of episodes is one of the most important predictors for depressive relapse. In this study we hypothesized that specific changes of the topology of intrinsic connectivity interact with the course of episodes in recurrent depressive disorder. To address this hypothesis, we investigated which changes of connectivity topology are associated with the number of episodes in patients, independently of current symptoms and disease duration. Fifty subjects were recruited including 25 depressive patients (two to 10 episodes) and 25 gender- and age-matched control subjects. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, Harvard-Oxford brain atlas, wavelet-transformation of atlas-shaped regional time-series, and their pairwise Pearson's correlation were used to define individual connectivity matrices. Matrices were analysed by graph-based methods, resulting in outcome measures that were used as surrogates of intrinsic network topology. Topological scores were subsequently compared across groups, and, for patients only, related with the number of depressive episodes and current symptoms by partial correlation analysis. Concerning the whole brain connectivity network of patients, small-world topology was preserved but global efficiency was reduced and global betweenness-centrality increased. Aberrant nodal efficiency and centrality of regional connectivity was found in the dorsal striatum, inferior frontal and orbitofrontal cortex as well as in the occipital and somatosensory cortex. Inferior frontal changes were associated with current symptoms, whereas aberrant right putamen network topology was associated with the number of episodes. Results were controlled for effects of total grey matter

  19. Cognitive dissonance resolution is related to episodic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salti, Moti; El Karoui, Imen; Maillet, Mathurin; Naccache, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    The notion that our past choices affect our future behavior is certainly one of the most influential concepts of social psychology since its first experimental report in the 50 s, and its initial theorization by Festinger within the "cognitive dissonance" framework. Using the free choice paradigm (FCP), it was shown that choosing between two similarly rated items made subjects reevaluate the chosen items as more attractive and the rejected items as less attractive. However, in 2010 a major work by Chen and Risen revealed a severe statistical flaw casting doubt on most previous studies. Izuma and colleagues (2010) supplemented the traditional FCP with original control conditions and concluded that the effect observed could not be solely attributed to this methodological flaw. In the present work we aimed at establishing the existence of genuine choice-induced preference change and characterizing this effect. To do so, we replicated Izuma et al.' study and added a new important control condition which was absent from the original study. Moreover, we added a memory test in order to measure the possible relation between episodic memory of choices and observed behavioral effects. In two experiments we provide experimental evidence supporting genuine choice-induced preference change obtained with FCP. We also contribute to the understanding of the phenomenon by showing that choice-induced preference change effects are strongly correlated with episodic memory.

  20. Cognitive dissonance resolution is related to episodic memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moti Salti

    Full Text Available The notion that our past choices affect our future behavior is certainly one of the most influential concepts of social psychology since its first experimental report in the 50 s, and its initial theorization by Festinger within the "cognitive dissonance" framework. Using the free choice paradigm (FCP, it was shown that choosing between two similarly rated items made subjects reevaluate the chosen items as more attractive and the rejected items as less attractive. However, in 2010 a major work by Chen and Risen revealed a severe statistical flaw casting doubt on most previous studies. Izuma and colleagues (2010 supplemented the traditional FCP with original control conditions and concluded that the effect observed could not be solely attributed to this methodological flaw. In the present work we aimed at establishing the existence of genuine choice-induced preference change and characterizing this effect. To do so, we replicated Izuma et al.' study and added a new important control condition which was absent from the original study. Moreover, we added a memory test in order to measure the possible relation between episodic memory of choices and observed behavioral effects. In two experiments we provide experimental evidence supporting genuine choice-induced preference change obtained with FCP. We also contribute to the understanding of the phenomenon by showing that choice-induced preference change effects are strongly correlated with episodic memory.

  1. Prefrontal-hippocampal dynamics involved in learning regularities across episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doeller, Christian F; Opitz, Bertram; Krick, Christoph M; Mecklinger, Axel; Reith, Wolfgang

    2005-08-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, the neural correlates of context-specific memories and invariant memories about regularities across episodes were investigated. Volunteers had to learn conjunctions between objects and positions. In an invariant learning condition, positions were held constant, enabling subjects to learn regularities across trials. By contrast, in a context-specific condition object-position conjunctions were trial unique. Performance increase in the invariant learning condition was paralleled by a learning-related increase of inferior frontal gyrus activation and ventral striatal activation and a decrease of hippocampus activation. Conversely, in the context-specific condition hippocampal activation was constant across trials. We argue that the learning-related hippocampal activation pattern might be due to reduced relational binding requirements once regularities are extracted. Furthermore, we propose that the learning-related prefrontal modulation reflects the requirement to extract and maintain regularities across trials and the adjustment of object-position conjunctions on the basis of the extracted knowledge. Finally, our data suggest that the ventral striatum encodes the increased predictability of spatial features as a function of learning. Taken together, these results indicate a transition of the relative roles of distinct brain regions during learning regularities across multiple episodes: regularity learning is characterized by a shift from a hippocampal to a prefrontal-striatal brain system.

  2. Comparative validity of the chinese versions of the bulimic inventory test edinburgh and eating attitudes test for DSM-IV eating disorders among high school dance and nondance students in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Mei-Chih Meg; Fang, David; Lee, Ming-Been

    2014-01-01

    To compare the validity of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT) and the Bulimic Investigatory Test Edinburgh (BITE) as screening tools for eating disorders (EDs), and to identify a new threshold for each questionnaire to detect ED cases among dance and nondance students. Dance students enrolled in high schools with gifted dance programs and nondance students randomly chosen from the same or nearby schools were invited to participate in a 2-phase ED survey. Participants completed the EAT and BITE questionnaires in the first phase. All participants who screened positive and 10% of the participants who screened negative were interviewed blindly using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders Patient Edition. The BITE had better accuracy than the EAT in detecting ED in general among both dance and non-dance students. BITE scores of 19 and 16 were the optimal cutoff values for determining ED among dance and nondance students, respectively. The optimal cutoff value for the EAT to diagnose an ED was 19 for dance students and 12 for nondance students. Both questionnaires showed higher sensitivity and lower specificity in dance students than nondance students at the same cutoff points. The BITE had better diagnostic performance than the EAT in this nonclinical population, although its ability to detect restrictive behaviors is likely as limited as that of the EAT. Plausible explanations for these results and limitations of this study are discussed in the text. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Antipsychotic medication for early episode schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bola, John; Kao, Dennis; Soydan, Haluk; Adams, Clive E

    2014-01-01

    Background Long-term treatment with antipsychotic medications in early episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders is common, but both short and long-term effects on the illness are unclear. There have been numerous suggestions that people with early episodes of schizophrenia appear to respond differently than those with multiple prior episodes. The number of episodes may moderate response to drug treatment. Objectives To assess the effects of antipsychotic medication treatment on people with early episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group register (July 2007) as well as references of included studies. We contacted authors of studies for further data. Selection criteria Studies with a majority of first and second episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders comparing initial antipsychotic medication treatment with placebo, milieu, or psychosocial treatment. Data collection and analysis Working independently, we critically appraised records from 681 studies, of which five studies met inclusion criteria. We calculated risk ratios (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) where possible. For continuous data, we calculated mean difference (MD). We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. Main results Five studies (combined total n=998) met inclusion criteria. Four studies (n=724) provided leaving the study early data and results suggested that individuals treated with a typical antipsychotic medication are less likely to leave the study early than those treated with placebo (Chlorpromazine: 3 RCTs n=353, RR 0.4 CI 0.3 to 0.5, NNT 3.2, Fluphenaxine: 1 RCT n=240, RR 0.5 CI 0.3 to 0.8, NNT 5; Thioridazine: 1 RCT n=236, RR 0.44 CI 0.3 to 0.7, NNT 4.3, Trifulperazine: 1 RCT n=94, RR 0.96 CI 0.3 to 3.6). Two studies contributed data to assessment of adverse effects and present a general pattern of more frequent side effects among individuals treated with typical antipsychotic medications

  4. Executive function, episodic memory, and Medicare expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Alex C; Austin, Andrea M; Grodstein, Francine; Bynum, Julie P W

    2017-07-01

    We examined the relationship between health care expenditures and cognition, focusing on differences across cognitive systems defined by global cognition, executive function, or episodic memory. We used linear regression models to compare annual health expenditures by cognitive status in 8125 Nurses' Health Study participants who completed a cognitive battery and were enrolled in Medicare parts A and B. Adjusting for demographics and comorbidity, executive impairment was associated with higher total annual expenditures of $1488 per person (P memory impairment was found. Expenditures exhibited a linear relationship with executive function, but not episodic memory ($584 higher for every 1 standard deviation decrement in executive function; P losses in executive function may be effective in reducing costly services. Copyright © 2017 the Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Subjective cognition in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, S; Aubin, G; Stip, E

    2017-02-01

    . Visual learning performance was the most consistent predictor of most SSTICS subscores (e.g. episodic memory, attention, executive functioning, language and praxis). Modest associations were found between the PANSS cognitive factor and objective cognition (e.g. Stroop interference, visual learning, and working memory). Finally, the factor analysis revealed a 6-factor solution that echoes the classification of the items of the SSTICS based on the neuropsychological literature. Using a scale having good internal validity, as shown by the factor analysis, the current study highlighted modest associations between subjective and objective cognitive performance, which suggests that schizophrenia patients are only partially aware of their own cognitive deficits. The results also showed a lack of correspondence between the impaired cognitive domain and the domain of cognitive awareness. It should be noted that clinicians were not better than patients at evaluating their cognitive deficits. Future research will need to determine if the observations reported here are schizophrenia-specific or not. Copyright © 2016 L'Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Adult videogame consumption as individualised, episodic progress

    OpenAIRE

    Molesworth, Mike; Watkins, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Drawing from phenomenological interviews with 24 adult videogamers, we explore videogame consumption as a source of individualised, episodic progress. We first consider the relationship between play, progress, technology and the market. We then document adults’ accounts of progress through the acquisition of new consoles and software, in the accumulation of in-game resources, and in creative achievements within videogames. Alongside an understanding of technological improvements as representi...

  7. Paroxysmal movement disorders and episodic ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Alvarez, Emilio; Perez-Dueñas, Belén

    2013-01-01

    This chapter summarizes clinical symptoms of some paroxysmal dyskinesias (PDs) of infancy and childhood, as well as episodic ataxias. PDs refer to a complex group of disorders whose main feature is the occurrence of sudden, intermittent attacks of abnormal postures and involuntary movements. PDs can sometimes be symptomatic (secondary PDs), but usually an underlying cerebral lesion is not present (primary PDs). Some of the primary PDs are transient, such as benign paroxysmal torticollis of infancy. Chronic PDs are subdivided into nonkinesigenic (Mount and Reback type), kinesigenic (Kertesz type), and exercise-induced (Lance type) but cases that overlap with these types are on record. They are autosomal dominant inherited conditions. The myofibrillogenesis regulator-1 gene is responsible for nonkinesigenic PDs. To date, the genetic basis of kinesigenic PDs remains unknown. Several clinical entities associated epilepsy with PDs, such as infantile convulsions and choreoathetosis (ICCA). Exercise-induced PD type can be produced by mutations in the SLC2A1 gene that encodes Glut1 (glucose transporter type1). Episodic ataxias are inherited disorders of intermittent ataxia. The attacks are brief and triggered by abrupt exercise and emotional stimulus. Between attacks, palpebral and hand muscle myokymia is often seen in episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1). In episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) interictal nystagmus is usually present. Some of these latter patients develop progressive ataxia with vermian atrophy. This disorder is associated with mutations in the human Ca channel alfa 1 subunit CACN1A4 gene. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Right lateralized white matter abnormalities in first-episode, drug-naive paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenbin; Liu, Feng; Liu, Zhening; Gao, Keming; Xiao, Changqing; Chen, Huafu; Zhao, Jingping

    2012-11-30

    Numerous studies in first-episode schizophrenia suggest the involvement of white matter (WM) abnormalities in multiple regions underlying the pathogenesis of this condition. However, there has never been a neuroimaging study in patients with first-episode, drug-naive paranoid schizophrenia by using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) method. Here, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with TBSS method to investigate the brain WM integrity in patients with first-episode, drug-naive paranoid schizophrenia. Twenty patients with first-episode, drug-naive paranoid schizophrenia and 26 healthy subjects matched with age, gender, and education level were scanned with DTI. An automated TBSS approach was employed to analyze the data. Voxel-wise statistics revealed that patients with paranoid schizophrenia had decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) II, the right fornix, the right internal capsule, and the right external capsule compared to healthy subjects. Patients did not have increased FA values in any brain regions compared to healthy subjects. There was no correlation between the FA values in any brain regions and patient demographics and the severity of illness. Our findings suggest right-sided alterations of WM integrity in the WM tracts of cortical and subcortical regions may play an important role in the pathogenesis of paranoid schizophrenia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Patient satisfaction with treatment in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Ulrik; Simonsen, Erik; Røssberg, Jan Ivar

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine first-episode psychotic patients' satisfaction with elements of a comprehensive 2-year treatment program. Subjects and method: The TIPS (Early Treatment and Intervention in Psychosis) project provided a 2-year treatment program consisting of milieu therapy (inpatient......), individual psychotherapy, family intervention and medication. Of 140 patients at baseline, 112 were included at 2-year follow-up. Eighty-four participants were interviewed using a questionnaire eliciting levels of satisfaction with different treatment elements at two of the four sites. Results: Participants...... found, but continuously psychotic patients were the least satisfied with medication treatment. Discussion: As in most patient satisfaction studies within mental health treatment networks, there was high level of general satisfaction with the total package of treatment but considerable variation...

  10. Ten year neurocognitive trajectories in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik; Barder, Helene E.; Sundet, Kjetil

    2013-01-01

    Memory for patients with psychotic relapse in the first year[F-(4,F- (38)) = 5.8, p = 0.001, eta(2) = 0.40]. Conclusions: Main findings are long-term stability in neurocognitive functioning in FEP patients, with the exception of verbal memory in patients with psychotic relapse or non-remission early......Objective: Neurocognitive impairment is commonly reported at onset of psychotic disorders. However, the long-term neurocognitive course remains largely uninvestigated in first episode psychosis (FEP) and the relationship to clinically significant subgroups even more so. We report 10 year...... longitudinal neurocognitive development in a sample of FEP patients, and explore whether the trajectories of cognitive course are related to presence of relapse to psychosis, especially within the first year, with a focus on the course of verbal memory. Method: Forty-three FEP subjects (51% male, 28 +/- 9...

  11. Impact of daily number of urgency urinary incontinence episodes on overactive bladder patient reported outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, J C; Brenes, F J; Lizarraga, I; Rejas, J; Trillo, S; Ochayta, D; Arumi, D

    2016-04-01

    To explore the impact of urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) on well-being in non-institutionalized patients with overactive bladder (OAB) in a community sample. A cross-sectional web-based study was conducted in the general population, including males and females, >18 years of age. Patients with probable OAB were identified using a validated algorithm together with a score ≥8 on the OAB-V8 scale. Presence of coping behavior was considered determinant for the clinical diagnosis of OAB. Individual well-being was determined through a battery of patient-reported outcomes (PRO) measurements including assessment of health-related quality of life (EQ-5D), sleep disturbances (MOS Sleep), and life satisfaction (LISAT-8). Patients were grouped according to the number of daily UUI episodes (UUI severity): 0 (dry OAB),1, 2-3, or ≥4. Multivariate analysis to evaluate factors independently affecting quality of life was undertaken. A total of 396 patients (52.5% women, mean age: 55.3 [11.1] years, OAB-V8 mean score: 14.5 [7.9]) out of 2035 subjects participating from the general population met the criteria for OAB: 203 (51.3%) with 0episodes, 119 (30.1%) with 1, 52 (13.1%) with 2 or 3, and 22 (5.6%) with ≥4 episodes. A statistically significant linear adjusted association was found between number of UUI episodes and PRO scores. Participants with more episodes had poorer health profiles and self-evaluated quality of life, worse life satisfaction, and more sleep disturbances and fewer hours of sleep per night. Number of incontinence episodes was independent factor to affect quality of life using both LISAT-8 and MOS questionnaires. Severity of UUI was significantly associated with poorer individual well-being in subjects with OAB in a community sample in Spain. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Remembering what could have happened: Neural correlates of episodic counterfactual thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Brigard, F; Addis, D.R.; Ford, J.H.; Schacter, D.L.; Giovanello, K.S

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that our capacities to remember the past and to imagine what might happen in the future largely depend on the same core brain network that includes the middle temporal lobe, the posterior cingulate/retrosplenial cortex, the inferior parietal lobe, the medial prefrontal cortex, and the lateral temporal cortex. However, the extent to which regions of this core brain network are also responsible for our capacity to think about what could have happened in our past, yet did not occur (i.e., episodic counterfactual thinking), is still unknown. The present study examined this issue. Using a variation of the experimental recombination paradigm (Addis et al., 2009), participants were asked both to remember personal past events and to envision alternative outcomes to such events while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. Three sets of analyses were performed on the imaging data in order to investigate two related issues. First, a mean-centered spatiotemporal partial least square (PLS) analysis identified a pattern of brain activity across regions of the core network that was common to episodic memory and episodic counterfactual thinking. Second, a non-rotated PLS analysis identified two different patterns of brain activity for likely and unlikely episodic counterfactual thoughts, with the former showing significant overlap with the set of regions engaged during episodic recollection. Finally, a parametric modulation was conducted to explore the differential engagement of brain regions during counterfactual thinking, revealing that areas such as the parahippocampal gyrus and the right hippocampus were modulated by the subjective likelihood of counterfactual simulations. These results suggest that episodic counterfactual thinking engages regions that form the core brain network, and also that the subjective likelihood of our counterfactual thoughts modulates the engagement of different areas within this set of regions. PMID:23376052

  13. Visual Hallucinations in First-Episode Psychosis: Association with Childhood Trauma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Solesvik

    Full Text Available Hallucinations are a core diagnostic criterion for psychotic disorders and have been investigated with regard to its association with childhood trauma in first-episode psychosis samples. Research has largely focused on auditory hallucinations, while specific investigations of visual hallucinations in first-episode psychosis remain scarce.The aims of this study were to describe the prevalence of visual hallucinations, and to explore the association between visual hallucination and childhood trauma in a first-episode psychosis sample.Subjects were included from TIPS-2, a first episode psychosis study in south Rogaland, Norway. Based on the medical journal descriptions of the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS, a separate score for visual and auditory hallucinations was created (N = 204. Patients were grouped according to hallucination severity (none, mild, and psychotic hallucinations and multinomial logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with visual hallucination group.Visual hallucinations of a psychotic nature were reported by 26.5% of patients. The experience of childhood interpersonal trauma increased the likelihood of having psychotic visual hallucinations.Visual hallucinations are common in first-episode psychosis, and are related to childhood interpersonal trauma.

  14. The effects of age, glucose ingestion and gluco-regulatory control on episodic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, Leigh Martin; Meikle, Andrew; Glover, Cheryl

    2004-09-01

    Previous research has been inconclusive regarding the impact of glucose ingestion and gluco-regulatory control on cognitive performance in healthy older adults. The aim of this research was to determine whether glucose specifically enhanced episodic memory in an older population. In addition, the link between individual differences in glucose regulation and the magnitude of the enhancement effect was examined. A within subjects, counterbalanced, crossover design was used with 20 participants (60-80 year olds), each serving as his/her control. Episodic memory was tested by presenting unrelated paired associates followed by immediate and delayed cued recall, and delayed recognition, under single and dual task conditions. In addition, a battery of cognitive tests was administered, including tests of semantic memory, working memory and speed of processing. Glucose ingestion was found to largely facilitate performance of episodic memory. Furthermore, subsidiary analyses found that gluco-regulatory efficiency predicted episodic memory performance in both control and glucose conditions. A boost in performance after glucose ingestion was particularly seen in the episodic memory domain. Notably, strong evidence was provided for the utility of gluco-regulatory control measures as indicators of cognitive decline in the elderly.

  15. The Effects of Prenatal Alcohol Exposure on Episodic Memory Functioning: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plooy, Christopher P; Malcolm-Smith, Susan; Adnams, Colleen M; Stein, Dan J; Donald, Kirsten A

    2016-09-06

    This paper systematically reviews the literature on the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) on episodic memory. Specifically, the review focuses on recurring questions of whether memory deficits are consistent across memory domains, whether the impairments are consistent across the stages of episodic memory, and whether the impairments are primary episodic memory impairments or secondary to a global performance deficit or a higher order deficit. In total, 33 relevant studies were identified through searches on electronic databases. Journal articles were limited to those that included human subjects and that were published in English-language journals. The vast majority of reviewed studies examined memory in school-aged children and adolescents. Twenty-three studies examined verbal memory and 19 studies examined visual-spatial memory. Although all of the reviewed studies examined encoding of new material, only 10 studies examined retention of the learned material over time. Ten studies controlled for IQ, either statistically or with matched controls, when analyzing memory task performance. In general, studies show that PAE results in impaired verbal and visual-spatial episodic memory performance in affected individuals and these impairments are unlikely to be secondary to a global impairment. However, impairments on some memory tests are specific to the encoding stage, whereas retention is relatively spared; suggesting that the episodic memory deficit might be influenced, at least in part, by higher order cognitive processes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Determinants of persistence of major depressive episodes in the general population. Results from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study (NEMESIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spijker, Jan; de Graaf, Ron; Bijl, Rob V; Beekman, Aartjan T F; Ormel, Johan; Nolen, Willem A

    2004-09-01

    Data on determinants of persistence of major depressive episodes (MDE) are inconsistent due to methodological shortcomings of the studies involved. To examine determinants of persistence of MDE in subjects from the general population (N=250) with new episodes of DSM-III-R major depression. The Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study is a prospective epidemiologic survey in the adult population (N=7076), using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). A broad range of potential determinants was assessed. Determinants of persistence were severity of the index episode, longer duration of previous episodes, (chronic) physical illness and lack of social support. A recurrent episode predicted shorter duration. Follow-up was only 2 years and duration of episode was retrospectively assessed. Just as in clinical populations, illness-related factors seem to be the strongest predictors of persistence of MDE. A thorough assessment of each depressed patient on the predictors of persistence is advisable.

  17. Recovery from Multiple Episodes of Bipolar I Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, David A; Fiedorowicz, Jess G.; Leon, Andrew C.; Coryell, William; Endicott, Jean; Li, Chunshan; Boland, Robert J.; Keller, Martin B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To describe the duration of bipolar I major and minor depressive episodes and factors associated with time to recovery. Method 219 participants with bipolar I disorder based on Research Diagnostic Criteria analogs to DSM-IV-TR criteria were recruited from 1978–1981 and followed for up to 25 years. Psychopathology was assessed with the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation. The probability of recovery over time from multiple successive depressive episodes was examined with survival analytic techniques, including mixed-effects grouped-time survival models. Results The median duration of major depressive episodes was 14 weeks, and over 70% recovered within 12 months of onset of the episode. The median duration of minor depressive episodes was 8 weeks, and approximately 90% recovered within 6 months of onset of the episode. Aggregated data demonstrated similar durations of the first three major depressive episodes. However, for each participant with multiple episodes of major depression or minor depression, the duration of each episode was not consistent (intraclass correlation coefficient=0.07 and 0.25 for major and minor depression, respectively). The total number of years in episode over follow-up with major plus minor depression prior to onset of a major depressive episode was significantly associated with a decreased probability of recovery from that episode; with each additional year, the likelihood of recovery was reduced by 7% (hazard ratio: 0.93, 95% CI: 0.89–0.98, p=0.002). Conclusions Bipolar I major depression generally lasts longer than minor depression, and the duration of multiple episodes within an individual varies. However, the probability of recovery over time from an episode of major depression appears to decline with each successive episode. PMID:23561241

  18. Preserved episodic memory in subcortical band heterotopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Laura; Sherman, Elisabeth; Langfitt, John; Berg, Michel; Connolly, Mary

    2004-05-01

    Neuropsychological profiles of four patients with subcortical band heterotopia (SBH) are presented to delineate further the phenotype of this disorder. Standardized, norm-referenced measures of cognitive functioning, including intelligence, processing speed, attention, language, visuomotor skills, memory, and fine motor ability were administered to four patients with magnetic resonance imaging evidence of SBH. Despite intellectual impairment and other severe cognitive deficits, all four patients displayed relatively intact episodic memory. This selective sparing of memory functions has not been previously reported in individuals with SBH and suggests that doublecortin does not play a role in the development of memory systems in the mesial temporal region, which tend to be spared in SBH.

  19. Revisiting depressive-prone bipolar disorder: polarity of initial mood episode and disease course among bipolar I systematic treatment enhancement program for bipolar disorder participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlis, Roy H; Delbello, Melissa P; Miyahara, Sachiko; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Sachs, Gary S; Nierenberg, Andrew A

    2005-10-01

    We examined the hypothesis that a first depressive rather than manic episode in bipolar disorder might herald a subsequent course notable for greater burden of depressive symptoms. We analyzed retrospective data on the polarity of first mood episode obtained from 704 bipolar I subjects entering the multicenter Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder (STEP-BD) study. Subjects with an initial manic or depressive episode and those in whom both poles occurred within the same year were compared. Depressive-onset bipolar disorder was more common in women and those with earlier onset of illness. Adjusting for these differences, it was significantly associated with more lifetime depressive episodes and a greater proportion of time with depression and anxiety in the year prior to study entry. Polarity of first mood episode may be useful in distinguishing subsets of bipolar patients at risk for a more chronic course.

  20. Phenomenology of psychotic mood disorders: lifetime and major depressive episode features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souery, Daniel; Zaninotto, Leonardo; Calati, Raffaella; Linotte, Sylvie; Sentissi, Othman; Amital, Daniela; Moser, Ulrike; Kasper, Siegfried; Zohar, Joseph; Mendlewicz, Julien; Serretti, Alessandro

    2011-12-01

    The nosological and clinical implications of psychotic features in the course of mood disorders have been widely debated. Currently, no specification exists for defining a subgroup of lifetime Psychotic Mood Disorder (PMD) patients. A total of 2178 patients were examined, including subjects with Bipolar Disorder (BP) type I (n=519) and II (n=207) and Major Depressive Disorder (n=1452). Patients were divided between PMD (n=645) and non-psychotic Mood Disorders (MD) (n=1533) by the lifetime presence of at least one mood episode with psychotic features. Subjects having a depressive episode at the time of assessment were also examined: HAM-D and YMRS scores were compared between MD and PMD subjects, both with and without current psychotic features. A diagnosis of BP-I, a higher familial load for BP, a higher number of mood episodes lifetime, and a higher prevalence of OCD and somatic comorbidities were all associated to PMD. A diagnosis of BP (OR=4.48) was the only significant predictor for psychosis. PMD with non-psychotic depression were apparently less severe than MD patients and had a lower rate of "non-responders" to AD treatment. Sub-threshold manic symptoms and suicidal risk were also more pronounced among PMD. The lack of information about number and polarity of previous psychotic mood episodes may be the major limitations of our study. BP diagnosis is the most significant predictor for psychosis in mood disorders. Non-psychotic mood episodes in PMD patients may be characterized by a distinctive symptom profile and, possibly, a different response to treatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. On the Development of Episodic Memory: Two Basic Questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jonna Jelsbak; Sonne, Trine; Kingo, Osman Skjold

    2013-01-01

    In this focused review we present and discuss two basic questions related to the early development of episodic memory in children: (1) “What is an episode?”, and (2) “How do preverbal children recall a specific episode of a recurring event?” First, a brief introduction to episodic memory is outli...... and attempt to demonstrate, that pursuing answers to both questions is of crucial importance – both conceptually and methodologically - if we are ever to understand the early development of episodic memory. ......In this focused review we present and discuss two basic questions related to the early development of episodic memory in children: (1) “What is an episode?”, and (2) “How do preverbal children recall a specific episode of a recurring event?” First, a brief introduction to episodic memory...... is outlined. We argue in favor of employing a definition of episodic memory allowing us to investigate the development of episodic memory by purely behavioral measures. Second, research related to each of the two questions are presented and discussed, at first separately, and subsequently together. We argue...

  2. Lifespan trends of autobiographical remembering: episodicity and search for meaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermas, Tilmann; Diel, Verena; Welzer, Harald

    2013-09-01

    Autobiographical memories of older adults show fewer episodic and more non-episodic elements than those of younger adults. This semantization effect is attributed to a loss of episodic memory ability. However the alternative explanation by an increasing proclivity to search for meaning has not been ruled out to date. To test whether a decrease in episodicity and an increase in meaning-making in autobiographical narratives are related across the lifespan, we used different instructions, one focussing on specific episodes, the other on embedding events in life, in two lifespan samples. A continuous decrease of episodic quality of memory (memory specificity, narrative quality) was confirmed. An increase of search for meaning (interpretation, life story integration) was confirmed only up to middle adulthood. This non-inverse development of episodicity and searching for meaning in older age speaks for an autonomous semantization effect that is not merely due to an increase in interpretative preferences. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Correlation between Inter-Blink Interval and Episodic Encoding during Movie Watching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Young Seok; Chang, Won-du; Park, Jinsick; Im, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Sang In; Kim, In Young; Jang, Dong Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Human eye blinking is cognitively suppressed to minimize loss of visual information for important real-world events. Despite the relationship between eye blinking and cognitive state, the effect of eye blinks on cognition in real-world environments has received limited research attention. In this study, we focused on the temporal pattern of inter-eye blink interval (IEBI) during movie watching and investigated its relationship with episodic memory. As a control condition, 24 healthy subjects watched a nature documentary that lacked a specific story line while electroencephalography was performed. Immediately after viewing the movie, the subjects were asked to report its most memorable scene. Four weeks later, subjects were asked to score 32 randomly selected scenes from the movie, based on how much they were able to remember and describe. The results showed that the average IEBI was significantly longer during the movie than in the control condition. In addition, the significant increase in IEBI when watching a movie coincided with the most memorable scenes of the movie. The results suggested that the interesting episodic narrative of the movie attracted the subjects' visual attention relative to the documentary clip that did not have a story line. In the episodic memory test executed four weeks later, memory performance was significantly positively correlated with IEBI (p<0.001). In summary, IEBI may be a reliable bio-marker of the degree of concentration on naturalistic content that requires visual attention, such as a movie.

  4. [Brain imaging of first-episode psychosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardri, R

    2013-09-01

    In the last decades, schizophrenia has intensively been studied using various brain imaging techniques. However, several potential confounding factors limited their interpretation power (e.g. chronicity, the impact of antipsychotic medication). By considering psychosis as a continuum of changes starting from mild cognitive impairments to serious psychotic symptoms, it became possible to provide deeper insight in the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the onset of psychosis by focusing on at-risk individuals and first-episodes. Recent brain imaging meta-analyses of the first episode psychosis (FEP), noteworthy reported conjoint bilateral structural and functional differences at the level of the insula, the superior temporal gyrus and the medial frontal gyrus, encompassing the anterior cingulate cortex. In the present review, we thus provide an update of brain imaging studies of FEP with a particular emphasis on more recent anatomical, functional and molecular explorations. Specifically, we provide 1) a review of the common features observed in individuals with high risk for psychosis and changes characterizing the transition to psychosis, 2) a description of the environmental and drug factors influencing these abnormalities, 3) how these findings in FEP may differ from those observed in chronic individuals with schizophrenia, and 4) a short overview of new classification algorithms able to use MRI findings as valuable biomarkers to guide early detection in the prodromal phase of psychosis. Copyright © 2013 L’Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  5. Episodic Aging and End States of Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekanina, Zdenek

    2008-01-01

    It is known that comets are aging very rapidly on cosmic scales, because they rapidly shed mass. The processes involved are (i) normal activity - sublimation of ices and expulsion of dust from discrete emission sources on and/or below the surface of a comet's nucleus, and (ii) nuclear fragmentation. Both modes are episodic in nature, the latter includes major steps in the comet's life cycle. The role and history of dynamical techniques used are described and results on mass losses due to sublimation and dust expulsion are reviewed. Studies of split comets, Holmes-like exploding comets, and cataclysmically fragmenting comets show that masses of 10 to 100 million tons are involved in the fragmentation process. This and other information is used to investigate the nature of comets' episodic aging. Based on recent advances in understanding the surface morphology of cometary nuclei by close-up imaging, a possible mechanism for large-scale fragmentation events is proposed and shown to be consistent with evidence available from observations. Strongly flattened pancake-like shapes appear to be required for comet fragments by conceptual constraints. Possible end states are briefly examined.

  6. Erenumab (AMG 334) in episodic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, Messoud; Dodick, David; Goadsby, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess long-term safety and efficacy of anti-calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor erenumab in patients with episodic migraine (EM). Methods: Patients enrolled in a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial (NCT01952574) who continued in an open-label extension (OL...... reduces long-term MMD and improves headache-related disability and migraine-specific quality of life.......) study will receive erenumab 70 mg every 4 weeks for up to 5 years. This preplanned interim analysis, conducted after all participants had completed the 1-year open-label follow-up, evaluated changes in monthly migraine days (MMD), achievement of ≥50%, ≥75%, and 100% reductions, Headache Impact Test (HIT...... improvements and favorable safety and tolerability profiles, supports further investigation of erenumab as a preventive treatment in patients with EM. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01952574. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that for patients with episodic migraine, erenumab...

  7. Cabergoline-induced manic episode: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüksel, Rabia Nazik; Elyas Kaya, Zeynep; Dilbaz, Nesrin; Cingi Yirün, Merve

    2016-06-01

    Cabergoline is an orally administered synthetic dopamine agonist that is used for the treatment of hyperprolactinemia, Parkinson's disease and antipsychotic-induced prolactin elevation. One of the main characteristics of cabergoline is its long duration of effect. It is highly effective in suppressing prolactin levels up to 21 days after a single 1 mg oral dose. The prolonged elimination half-life offers an advantage of once-daily dosing, but it might be a handicap in terms of washout of adverse effects such as psychosis. Cabergoline has been associated with adverse reactions consistent with other dopaminergic agonists including cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and neuropsychiatric effects. It is known that dopaminergic treatment is a remarkable risk factor for psychosis. A number of reports implicate dopamine agonists in the development of psychosis, but there is no knowledge in the literature of dopamine agonist-induced mania. In this case, we report the first manic episode occurring after cabergoline use for hyperprolactinemia treatment. In susceptible individuals, cabergoline can cause manic episodes and cabergoline should be used more carefully considering the risk-benefit ratio.

  8. Course of insight in manic episode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Insight is an important factor associated with non compliance and poor outcome. Poor level of insight has been described as a characteristic in patients with acute bipolar disorder with more unawareness in social consequences with increasing severity in manic episode. Aim: Main aim of study was to see the baseline and longitudinal relationship between dimensions of insight with improvement in psychopathology. Setting and Design: Forty four patients diagnosed with mania, were selected from an inpatient setting at Institute of Mental Health and Hospital, Agra with mean age of 31.07(±9.00 years. They were assessed at base line and were followed up weekly or psychopathology and insight. Materials and Methods: The Young′s mania rating scale for psychopathology and insight was assessed on three dimensions of SUMD. Results: Twenty five patients eventually completed the study. There was a positive correlation with global insight and with psychopathology consistent in longitudinal follow-up (P<0.05, but not correlating for awareness for achieved effect of medication and social consequences. Linear regression showed a positive relationship at the first and second week of assessment of SUMD and YMRS scores (P=0.001; 0.019. Conclusion: Improvement in insight is graded in a manic episode as compared to psychopathology. There is slower improvement in awareness of social consequences of mental disorder. It means that improvement in psychopathology may not necessarily indicate remission and need further supervision to improve insight and hence monitoring.

  9. [Therapeutic strategies in the first psychotic episode].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douki, S; Taktak, M J; Ben Zineb, S; Cheour, M

    1999-11-01

    A first psychotic episode includes a wide range of disorders with different outcomes: schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, schizophreniform disorder, schizoaffective disorder, drug-induced psychosis, brief reactive psychosis, organic psychoses and delusional disorder. The course and outcome of a first psychotic episode is greatly dependent on its initial management. Major clinical, etiopathogenic and therapeutic advances have been achieved in this field and have allowed specific management strategies to be adopted. The primary task of therapists involved in the management of patients who have experienced a first episode of psychosis is promotion of recovery and prevention of secondary morbidity, relapse and persistent disability. The main guidelines of an early psychosis management are:--to keep in mind that early psychosis is not early schizophrenia. Thus, clinicians and therapists should avoid an early diagnosis of schizophrenia. Diagnosis in early psychosis can be highly unstable. A diagnosis of schizophrenia, with its implications of pessimism, relapse and disability, does not contribute anything positive in terms of guiding treatment. On the contrary, such a diagnosis may damage the patient and family by stigmatizing them and affecting the way they are viewed and managed by healthcare professionals.--To integrate biological, psychological and social interventions: effective medications is useful in reducing the risk of relapse, but is not a guarantee against it. Psychological and social interventions can greatly help promote recovery.--To tailor the various strategies to met the needs of an individual: as an example, it is important to formulate appropriate strategies for the different stages of the illness (prodromal phase, acute phase, early recovery phase and late recovery phase) because patients have different therapeutic needs at each stage.--In the acute treatment, not to concentrate on short-term goals in indicating antipsychotic treatment: prescribing

  10. Modeling Regional Pollution Episodes With The Ctm Mocage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, A.; Brocheton, F.; Amodei, M.; Peuch, V.-H.

    Several regional ozone pollution episodes have been studied in the context of two recent extensive field campaigns in France: ESQUIF, in the Paris region and ES- COMPTE, in the vicinity of Marseilles. MOCAGE is an off-line multi-scale Chem- istry and Transport Model (CTM), driven by the operational numerical weather pre- diction models of Météo-France, ARPEGE and ALADIN. It covers from the global to the regional scale, by means of up to four levels of nested domains, and extends up to the middle stratosphere; thus, there is no need for external boundary conditions, neither on the horizontal or on the vertical. These original features allows to cover with MOCAGE a wide range of scientific applications, from routine air-pollution fore- casts to long-term simulations related to climate issues. The present study focuses on the simulation of regional-scale photo-oxidant episodes and on the impact on larger scales of the transport of ozone, of precursors and of reservoir species. The first ex- ample concerns a polluted episode of the ESQUIF campaign (IOP6). In addition to ground measurements, 8 flights have documented the situation, showing a diversity of chemical regimes. This variability is quite satisfactorily reproduced by the model. A special attention was also paid to vertical and horizontal exchanges, particularly to interactions between the boundary layer and the free troposphere. An interesting case of an ill-represented residual nocturnal plume in the simulation of ESQUIF IOP5 will be presented: during this IOP, the vertical structure of the lower troposphere was well characterized by four flights. Free troposphere concentrations of ozone appear to be well reproduced by the model, except for the intensity and vertical extent of a residual plume, which are overestimated. For the day after, in addition to a direct impact on surface concentrations, the simulated development of the boundary layer is found to be too slow ; both errors contribute to an

  11. Episodic grammar: a computational model of the interaction between episodic and semantic memory in language processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borensztajn, G.; Zuidema, W.; Carlson, L.; Hoelscher, C.; Shipley, T.F.

    2011-01-01

    We present a model of the interaction of semantic and episodic memory in language processing. Our work shows how language processing can be understood in terms of memory retrieval. We point out that the perceived dichotomy between rule-based versus exemplar-based language modelling can be

  12. A magnetic resonance imaging study in first-episode disorganized-type patients with schizophrenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnuma, Tohru; Kimura, Michihiro; Takahashi, Tadashi; Iwamoto, Norihiko; Arai, Heii [Juntendo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1997-02-01

    Although a number of radiological studies have suggested that brains of patients suffering from schizophrenia have morphological abnormalities, the results are inconsistent. In the present study, in order to examine the brain, morphological features of homogeneous schizophrenics` brain magnetic resonance imagings (MRI) were taken, before neuroleptic treatment, from subjects suffering from disorganized-type schizophrenia, (DOS) during their first episodes. Results showed that DOS had significantly smaller indices for bilateral frontal gray matter (GM), left hippocampal formation (HF), left parahippocampal gray matter (PHGM) and left cingulate gyrus gray matter (CGM) than normal controls. These findings support the previous computed tomography (CT) and MRI studies on schizophrenic brains, although the subjects were not defined as disorganized-type, and may suggest the involvement of a neurocircuit between the bilateral frontal lobe and the left side of limbic system in the first-episode DOS group. (author). 54 refs.

  13. Dimensions of aggression: the perception of aggressive episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgas, J P; Brown, L B; Menyhart, J

    1980-09-01

    The perception of real-life aggressive episodes was studied, in order to (a) represent the cognitive dimensions used by judges to differentiate between such episodes, (b) to evaluate the perceived differences between different categories of episodes, and (c) to assess the effects of the judges' age, sex and attitudes on their cognitive representation of aggressive episodes. Judgements of 22 aggressive episodes selected from a free-response pilot study were analysed by Carroll & Chang's (1970) INDSCAL procedure, and differences between categories of episodes and groups of judges were evaluated by multiple discriminant analyses. Results indicated that (a) four cognitive dimensions, probability of occurrence, justifiability, emotional provocation, and control, defined the psychological map for aggressive episodes; (b) domestic against public, drunken and non-drunken, criminal against non-criminal episodes were significantly differentiated in this perceptual space; (c) the judges' age, sex and Machiavellism scores were related to their perception of such episodes. The results are discussed in terms of the importance of implicit perceptions of aggression and crime in the criminal justice system. Specifically, it is suggested that similar techniques could be used to (a) gauge popular perceptions of crime as an input to the legislative process, and (b) for the study of perceptions of aggressive episodes by such crucial groups in the criminal justice system as policemen, judges, jury members, victims and offenders.

  14. Episodic runoff generation at Central European headwater catchments studied using water isotope concentration signals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Votrubová, J.; Dohnal, M.; Vogel, T.; Šanda, M.; Tesař, Miroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 2 (2017), s. 114-122 ISSN 0042-790X Grant - others:Grantová agentura České republiky (GA ČR)(CZ) GC14-15201J Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : O isotope * headwater catchment runoff * subsurface runoff * tracer * rainfall-runoff episodes Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 1.654, year: 2016

  15. Depressive symptoms in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sönmez, Nasrettin; Røssberg, Jan Ivar; Evensen, Julie

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: The present study examined if any patient characteristics at baseline predicted depressive symptoms at 10 years and whether patients prone to depressive symptoms in the first year of treatment had a different prognosis in the following years. METHOD: A total of 299 first-episode psychosis...... (FEP) patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders were assessed for depressive symptoms with PANSS depression item (g6) at baseline, and 1, 2, 5 and 10 years of follow up. At 10 years, depressive symptoms were also assessed with Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS). A PANSS g6 ≥ 4......: Depressive symptoms are frequent among FEP patients at baseline but decrease after treatment because their general symptoms have been initiated. Patients with poor social functioning in childhood and alcohol use at baseline are more prone to have depressive symptoms at 10 years of follow up. Patients...

  16. Certain number-theoretic episodes in algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Sivaramakrishnan, R

    2006-01-01

    Many basic ideas of algebra and number theory intertwine, making it ideal to explore both at the same time. Certain Number-Theoretic Episodes in Algebra focuses on some important aspects of interconnections between number theory and commutative algebra. Using a pedagogical approach, the author presents the conceptual foundations of commutative algebra arising from number theory. Self-contained, the book examines situations where explicit algebraic analogues of theorems of number theory are available. Coverage is divided into four parts, beginning with elements of number theory and algebra such as theorems of Euler, Fermat, and Lagrange, Euclidean domains, and finite groups. In the second part, the book details ordered fields, fields with valuation, and other algebraic structures. This is followed by a review of fundamentals of algebraic number theory in the third part. The final part explores links with ring theory, finite dimensional algebras, and the Goldbach problem.

  17. Episodic acidification of Adirondack lakes during snowmelt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, D.A.; Driscoll, C.T.; Van Dreason, R.; Yatsko, C.P.

    1990-07-01

    Maximum values of acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in Adirondack, New York lake outlets generally occur during summer and autumn. During spring snowmelt, transport of acidic water through acid-sensitive watersheds causes depression of upper lake water ANC. In some systems lake outlet ANC reaches negative values. The authors examined outlet water chemistry from II Adirondack lakes during 1986 and 1987 snowmelts. In these lakes, SO concentrations were diluted during snowmelt and did not depress ANC. For lakes with high baseline ANC values, springtime ANC depressions were primarily accompanied by basic cation dilution. For lakes with low baseline ANC, No increases dominated ANC depressions. Lakes with intermediate baseline ANC were affected by both processes and exhibited larger ANC depressions. Ammonium dilution only affected wetland systems. A model predicting a linear relationship between outlet water ANC minima and autumn ANC was inappropriate. To assess watershed response to episodic acidification, hydrologic flow paths must be considered. (Copyright (c) 1990 by the American Geophysical Union.)

  18. Personality disorders in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik; Haahr, Ulrik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of personality disorders in the early course of fi rst-episode psychosis and their likely presence in the premorbid period. Fifty-fi ve patients were enrolled at baseline and premorbid function was evaluated by the Premorbid Adjustment Scale....... Thirty-three of these of the patients were assessed at two-year follow-up for comorbid personality disorders by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders and by the self-report instrument Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II. Half of the patients met the criteria of two...... or more personality disorders, while one-third of the patients did not fulfi l the criteria for any personality disorder. The schizoid and the avoidant were the most frequent per- sonality disorders and both were associated with social withdrawal during childhood and adolescence. The limitation...

  19. Personality disorders in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik; Haahr, Ulrik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of personality disorders in the early course of first-episode psychosis and their likely presence in the premorbid period. Fifty-five patients were enrolled at baseline and premorbid function was evaluated by the Premorbid Adjustment Scale....... Thirty-three of these of the patients were assessed at two-year follow-up for comorbid personality disorders by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders and by the self-report instrument Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II. Half of the patients met the criteria of two...... or more personality disorders, while one-third of the patients did not fulfil the criteria for any personality disorder. The schizoid and the avoidant were the most frequent personality disorders and both were associated with social withdrawal during childhood and adolescence. The limitation of the study...

  20. Emerging Directions in Emotional Episodic Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolcos, Florin; Katsumi, Yuta; Weymar, Mathias; Moore, Matthew; Tsukiura, Takashi; Dolcos, Sanda

    2017-01-01

    Building upon the existing literature on emotional memory, the present review examines emerging evidence from brain imaging investigations regarding four research directions: (1) Social Emotional Memory, (2) The Role of Emotion Regulation in the Impact of Emotion on Memory, (3) The Impact of Emotion on Associative or Relational Memory, and (4) The Role of Individual Differences in Emotional Memory. Across these four domains, available evidence demonstrates that emotion- and memory-related medial temporal lobe brain regions (amygdala and hippocampus, respectively), together with prefrontal cortical regions, play a pivotal role during both encoding and retrieval of emotional episodic memories. This evidence sheds light on the neural mechanisms of emotional memories in healthy functioning, and has important implications for understanding clinical conditions that are associated with negative affective biases in encoding and retrieving emotional memories. PMID:29255432

  1. Microbial Community Dynamics of a Simulated Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System Subjected to Episodes of Nitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial populations were examined in a simulated chloraminated drinking water distribution system (i.e. loop). The loop (BW-AB-I) received chlorinated municipal water (BW-C) amended with ammonia (2mg/L monochloramine). After six years of continuous operation, the operational ...

  2. Is verbal episodic memory in elderly with amyloid deposits preserved through altered neuronal function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Madison, Cindee; Oh, Hwamee; Wirth, Miranka; van Berckel, Bart N M; Jagust, William J

    2014-08-01

    A potential mechanism that enables intellectual preservation in cognitively normal elderly that harbor beta-amyloid (Aβ) pathology is heightened cerebral glucose metabolism. To investigate cross-sectional inter-relationships between Aβ, glucose metabolism, and cognition, 81 subjects (mean age: 75 ± 7 years) underwent [(11)C]Pittsburgh Compound-B and [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scans and neuropsychological testing. They were divided into low-Aβ (n = 53), intermediate-Aβ (n = 13) and high-Aβ (n = 15) groups as defined by their global cortical [(11)C]PIB retention. Glucose metabolism was assessed using a MetaROI mask that covers metabolically critical regions in Alzheimer's disease (AD) (i.e., posterior cingulate and bilateral angular and inferior temporal gyri). Previously validated factor scores for verbal and visual episodic memory, semantic memory, working memory, and executive functioning were used to evaluate cognitive performances. Greater Aβ deposition in the precuneus was associated with higher metabolic activity (at trend level) and lower visual episodic memory scores. Glucose metabolism did not correlate with cognition across all subjects. However, heightened metabolic activity was associated with better verbal episodic memory performance in subjects with elevated amyloid levels. This preliminary study suggests that neural compensation, as a manifestation of brain reserve, enables elderly supposedly on the path to AD, at least temporarily, to preserve cognitive function. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Muscles and their role in episodic tension-type headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, L; Ashina, S; Moore, K A

    2016-01-01

    recommendations for the treatment of episodic TTH based on these. RESULTS: Peripheral activation or sensitization of myofascial nociceptors is most probably involved in the development of muscle pain and the acute episode of TTH. Repetitive episodes of muscle pain may sensitize the central nervous system...... resulting in progression of TTH to the chronic form. Thus, muscular factors may be responsible not only for the acute headache episode but also for chronification of the disorder. Simple analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are the mainstays of management of individual headache episodes...... of peripheral nociception and how to avoid peripheral and central sensitization. There is a need for more effective, faster acting drugs for acute TTH. CONCLUSION: Muscular factors play an important role in episodic TTH. Ibuprofen 400 mg and aspirin 1000 mg are recommended as drugs of first choice....

  4. The use of virtual reality for episodic memory assessment: effects of active navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauzéon, Hélène; Arvind Pala, Prashant; Larrue, Florian; Wallet, Gregory; Déjos, Marie; Zheng, Xia; Guitton, Pascal; N'Kaoua, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Episodic memory was assessed using Virtual Reality (VR). Forty-four (44) subjects visualized a target virtual apartment containing specific objects in each room. Then they visualized a second virtual apartment comprised of specific objects and objects shared by the two apartments. Subjects navigated in the virtual apartments in one of the following two conditions: active and passive. Four main episodic memory components were scored from the VR exposures: (1) learning effect; (2) active forgetting effect; (3) strategies at encoding and at retrieval; and (4) false recognitions (FRs). The effect of navigation mode (active vs. passive) on each memory component was examined. Active subjects had better learning and retrieval (recognition hits) performances compared to passive subjects. A beneficial effect of active navigation was also observed on the source-based FR rates. Active subjects made fewer source-based FRs compared to passive subjects. These overall results for the effect of active navigation are discussed in terms of the distinction between item-specific and relational processing.

  5. Increased response time of primed associates following an "episodic" hypnotic amnesia suggestion: a case of unconscious volition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caleb Henry; Oakley, David A; Morton, John

    2013-12-01

    Following a hypnotic amnesia suggestion, highly hypnotically suggestible subjects may experience amnesia for events. Is there a failure to retrieve the material concerned from autobiographical (episodic) memory, or is it retrieved but blocked from consciousness? Highly hypnotically suggestible subjects produced free-associates to a list of concrete nouns. They were then given an amnesia suggestion for that episode followed by another free association list, which included 15 critical words that had been previously presented. If episodic retrieval for the first trial had been blocked, the responses on the second trial should still have been at least as fast as for the first trial. With semantic priming, they should be faster. In fact, they were on average half a second slower. This suggests that the material had been retrieved but blocked from consciousness. A goal-oriented information processing framework is outlined to interpret these and related data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The prevalence of mixed episodes during the course of illness in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2008-01-01

    episodes). For men, the prevalence of mixed episodes was constantly low. At all episodes, the presence of a current mixed episode increased the risk substantially of getting a future mixed episode. Conclusion: Clinicians should pay more attention to mixed episodes, especially among women, as they may...

  7. The prevalence of mixed episodes during the course of illness in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, L V

    2008-01-01

    and the prevalence of mixed, depressive and hypomanic/manic episodes were calculated at each episode. RESULTS: The prevalence of mixed episodes increased from the first episode to the tenth episode, however, only for women (6.7% of the first episodes leading to psychiatric care compared with 18.2% of the tenth...

  8. Time to treatment response in first episode schizophrenia: should acute treatment trials last several months?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Juan A.; Robinson, Delbert G.; Sevy, Serge M.; Napolitano, Barbara; McCormack, Joanne; Lesser, Martin L.; Kane, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Response patterns may differ between patients with first episode and multi-episode schizophrenia. This analysis explored trial duration with first episode patients and whether early limited improvement predicts ultimate lack of treatment response with first episode patients as it does with multi-episode patients. Methods 112 subjects (mean age=23.3 years [SD=5.1]) who presented between November 1998 and October 2004 with a first episode of psychosis and had a DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia, schizophreniform or schizoaffective disorder, were randomly assigned to treatment with olanzapine or risperidone for 16 weeks. Treatment response, the primary outcome measure, was defined as a rating of mild or better on all of the positive symptom items on the SADS-C + PD. Response rates were calculated for each study week. A logistic regression analysis examined the association between percent reduction in symptom severity scores from baseline values at weeks 2, 4 or 8 and response by week 16. Results The estimated cumulative response rate by week 8 was 39.59% (95% CI: 29.77% – 49.41%) and 65.19% (95% CI: 55.11% – 75.27%) by week 16. The confidence intervals for estimated response at weeks 10, 12, 14 and 16 were not distinct. Response rates increased approximately 5 to 6 percentage points each 2 week interval between week 10 and 16. Percent reduction in symptom severity score at week 4 (but not 2 or 8) was associated (Chi-square = 3.96; df = 1, p<0.05) with responder status at week 16 (odds ratio: 1.03; 95% CI: 1.00;1.05). However, receiver operating characteristic curves did not suggest any level of percent symptom reduction that would be clinically useful as a predictor of response by week 16. Conclusions Many first episode patients respond between weeks 8 and 16 of treatment with a single antipsychotic medication. Limited early symptom improvement does not identify with enough accuracy to be clinically useful those first episode patients who will not

  9. Intermittent inhaled corticosteroids in infants with episodic wheezing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Hermansen, Mette Northman; Loland, Lotte

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that asthma is preceded by a stage of recurrent episodes of wheezing during the first years of life and that inhaled corticosteroid therapy during symptomatic episodes in this early phase may delay progression to persistent wheezing. METHODS: We assigned one-month-old ...... not affected by treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Intermittent inhaled corticosteroid therapy had no effect on the progression from episodic to persistent wheezing and no short-term benefit during episodes of wheezing in the first three years of life. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00234390.)....

  10. Modeling HIV-1 drug resistance as episodic directional selection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murrell, Ben; de Oliveira, Tulio; Seebregts, Chris; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L; Scheffler, Konrad

    2012-01-01

    ... residues increasing in frequency over time. While methods exist to detect episodic diversifying selection and continuous directional selection, no evolutionary model combining these two properties has been proposed...

  11. Examining Duration of Binge Eating Episodes in Binge Eating Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber-Gregory, Deanna N.; Lavender, Jason M.; Engel, Scott G.; Wonderlich, Steve A.; Crosby, Ross D.; Peterson, Carol B.; Simonich, Heather; Crow, Scott; Durkin, Nora; Mitchell, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The primary goal of this paper is to examine and clarify characteristics of binge eating in individuals with binge eating disorder (BED), particularly the duration of binge eating episodes, as well as potential differences between individuals with shorter compared to longer binge eating episodes. Method Two studies exploring binge eating characteristics in BED were conducted. Study 1 examined differences in clinical variables among individuals (N = 139) with BED who reported a short (binge duration. Study 2 utilized an ecological momentary assessment (EMA) design to examine the duration and temporal pattern of binge eating episodes in the natural environment in a separate sample of nine women with BED. Results Participants in Study 1 who were classified as having long duration binge eating episodes displayed greater symptoms of depression and lower self-esteem, but did not differ on other measures of eating disorder symptoms, compared to those with short duration binge eating episodes. In Study 2, the average binge episode duration was approximately 42 minutes, and binge eating episodes were most common during the early afternoon and evening hours, as well as more common on weekdays versus weekends. Discussion Past research on binge episode characteristics, particularly duration, has been limited to studies of binge eating episodes in BN. This study contributes to the existing literature on characteristics of binge eating in BED. PMID:23881639

  12. Examining duration of binge eating episodes in binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber-Gregory, Deanna N; Lavender, Jason M; Engel, Scott G; Wonderlich, Steve A; Crosby, Ross D; Peterson, Carol B; Simonich, Heather; Crow, Scott; Durkin, Nora; Mitchell, James E

    2013-12-01

    The primary goal of this article is to examine and clarify characteristics of binge eating in individuals with binge eating disorder (BED), particularly the duration of binge eating episodes, as well as potential differences between individuals with shorter compared to longer binge eating episodes. Two studies exploring binge eating characteristics in BED were conducted. Study 1 examined differences in clinical variables among individuals (N = 139) with BED who reported a short (binge duration. Study 2 utilized an ecological momentary assessment design to examine the duration and temporal pattern of binge eating episodes in the natural environment in a separate sample of nine women with BED. Participants in Study 1 who were classified as having long duration binge eating episodes displayed greater symptoms of depression and lower self-esteem, but did not differ on other measures of eating disorder symptoms, compared to those with short duration binge eating episodes. In Study 2, the average binge episode duration was approximately 42 min, and binge eating episodes were most common during the early afternoon and evening hours, as well as more common on weekdays versus weekends. Past research on binge episode characteristics, particularly duration, has been limited to studies of binge eating episodes in bulimia nervosa. This study contributes to the existing literature on characteristics of binge eating in BED. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Factor structure of the Cannabis Experiences Questionnaire in a first-episode psychosis sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Michael L; Cleary, Sean D; Ramsay Wan, Claire; Pauselli, Luca; Compton, Michael T

    2017-10-20

    The Cannabis Experiences Questionnaire (CEQ) was developed to measure the subjective experiences of cannabis use both during and after intoxication. Despite the need to better understand the nature of the complex and significant relationship between cannabis use and early psychosis, this questionnaire has rarely been used in individuals with first-episode psychosis. We conducted a set of factor analyses using CEQ data from 194 first-episode psychosis patients who used cannabis in order to uncover the underlying factor structure of the questionnaire and thus the overarching types of psychological experiences during/after using cannabis in young people with psychotic disorders. Our exploratory factor analysis identified 4 subscales, including: Distortions of Reality and Self-Perception (Factor 1), Euphoria Effects (Factor 2), Slowing and Amotivational Effects (Factor 3), and Anxiety and Paranoia Effects (Factor 4). Elucidating the underlying factor structure of the CEQ in first-episode psychosis samples could help researchers move towards a deeper understanding of the types of experiences associated with cannabis intoxication among young adults with first-episode psychosis and could inform the development of programs designed to reduce use, improve the course of illness, and possibly delay or prevent the onset of psychotic symptoms in those at risk. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Decreased Resting-State Activity in the Precuneus Is Associated With Depressive Episodes in Recurrent Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Hong; Ma, Xin; Yuan, Zhen; Song, Lu-Ping; Jing, Bing; Lu, Hong-Yu; Tang, Li-Rong; Fan, Jin; Walter, Martin; Liu, Cun-Zhi; Wang, Lihong; Wang, Chuan-Yue

    2017-04-01

    To investigate alterations in resting-state spontaneous brain activity in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) experiencing multiple episodes. Between May 2007 and September 2014, 24 recurrent and 22 remitted patients diagnosed with MDD with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I), and 69 healthy controls matched for age, sex, and educational level participated in this study. Among them, 1 healthy control was excluded due to excessive head motion. The fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF) was assessed for all recruited subjects during the completion of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Relationships between fALFF and clinical measurements, including number of depressive episodes and illness duration, were examined. Compared to patients with remitted MDD and to healthy controls, patients with recurrent MDD exhibited decreased fALFF in the right posterior insula and right precuneus and increased fALFF in the left ventral anterior cingulate cortex. Decreased fALFF in the right precuneus and increased fALFF in the right middle insula were correlated with the number of depressive episodes in the recurrent MDD groups (r = -0.75, P recurrent MDD. Consistent with the emerging theory that altered DMN activity is a risk factor for depression relapses, the association between reduced fALFF in the right precuneus and number of depressive episodes supports the role of the DMN in the pathology of recurrent depression.

  15. Selective deficits in episodic feeling of knowing in ageing: a novel use of the general knowledge task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morson, Suzannah M; Moulin, Chris J A; Souchay, Céline

    2015-05-01

    Failure to recall an item from memory can be accompanied by the subjective experience that the item is known but currently unavailable for report. The feeling of knowing (FOK) task allows measurement of the predictive accuracy of this reflective judgement. Young and older adults were asked to provide answers to general knowledge questions both prior to and after learning, thus measuring both semantic and episodic memory for the items. FOK judgements were made at each stage for all unrecalled responses, providing a measure of predictive accuracy for semantic and episodic knowledge. Results demonstrated a selective effect of age on episodic FOK resolution, with older adults found to have impaired episodic FOK accuracy while semantic FOK accuracy remained intact. Although recall and recognition measures of episodic memory are equivalent between the two age groups, older adults may have been unable to access contextual details on which to base their FOK judgements. The results suggest that older adults are not able to accurately predict future recognition of unrecalled episodic information, and consequently may have difficulties in monitoring recently encoded memories. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Consolidation of strictly episodic memories mainly requires rapid eye movement sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauchs, Géraldine; Bertran, Françoise; Guillery-Girard, Bérengère; Desgranges, Béatrice; Kerrouche, Nacer; Denise, Pierre; Foret, Jean; Eustache, Francis

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effects of sleep deprivation during the first or second half of the night on episodic memory consolidation. Episodic memory is defined as memory for events located in time and space. It is also characterized by autonoetic consciousness, which gives a subject the conscious sensation of traveling back in time to relive the original event and forward into the future. Consolidation of episodic information was tested after 4-hour retention intervals, which followed learning and occurred during either the early or late half night, respectively dominated by slow wave sleep (SWS) or rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, or corresponding periods of wakefulness. Data collection occurred in the sleep laboratory. Forty-three young healthy subjects: 9 men and 34 women, age ranging from 18 to 26 years (mean 20.18 +/- 1.94 years) were included in this study. Waking after a 4-hour retention interval filled with early or late sleep, or 4-hour sleep deprivation, during early or late period of night. The cognitive task, named the What-Where-When test, was specially designed to assess factual, spatial, and temporal components of episodic memory. This task was associated with the Remember/Know paradigm to assess autonoetic consciousness. We measured performance on immediate free recall, delayed free recall (after a 4-hour interval of wakefulness or sleep), and delayed recognition. We also calculated a forgetting rate for each feature (factual, spatial, and temporal) and, for the recognition task, scores of autonoetic consciousness (R responses). REM-sleep deprivation was associated with significantly lower recall of spatial information compared to SWS deprivation (P sleep (P sleep deprivation was also associated with a higher forgetting rate of temporal information as compared to the early sleep condition (Psleep deprivation led subjects to give significantly fewer R responses, indicative of true memories, as compared to SWS deprivation (P sleep.

  17. Analyzing recurrent events when the history of previous episodes is unknown or not taken into account: proceed with caution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Navarro

    2017-05-01

    Conclusions: Common-baseline hazard models cannot be recommended when we analyse recurrent events in the presence of event dependence. It is important to have access to the history of prior-episodes per subject, it can permit to obtain better estimations of the effects of the exposures

  18. Anterograde episodic memory in Korsakoff syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fama, Rosemary; Pitel, Anne-Lise; Sullivan, Edith V

    2012-06-01

    A profound anterograde memory deficit for information, regardless of the nature of the material, is the hallmark of Korsakoff syndrome, an amnesic condition resulting from severe thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. Since the late nineteenth century when the Russian physician, S. S. Korsakoff, initially described this syndrome associated with "polyneuropathy," the observed global amnesia has been a primary focus of neuroscience and neuropsychology. In this review we highlight the historical studies that examined anterograde episodic memory processes in KS, present a timeline and evidence supporting the myriad theories proffered to account for this memory dysfunction, and summarize what is known about the neuroanatomical correlates and neural systems presumed affected in KS. Rigorous study of KS amnesia and associated memory disorders of other etiologies provide evidence for distinct mnemonic component processes and neural networks imperative for normal declarative and nondeclarative memory abilities and for mnemonic processes spared in KS, from whence emerged the appreciation that memory is not a unitary function. Debate continues regarding the qualitative and quantitative differences between KS and other amnesias and what brain regions and neural pathways are necessary and sufficient to produce KS amnesia.

  19. Gender differences in first episode psychotic mania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Sue M; Lambert, Martin; Berk, Michael; Schimmelmann, Benno G; Butselaar, Felicity J; McGorry, Patrick D; Conus, Philippe

    2013-03-13

    The aim of this paper was to delineate the impact of gender on premorbid history, onset, and 18 month outcomes of first episode psychotic mania (FEPM) patients. Medical file audit assessment of 118 (male = 71; female = 47) patients with FEPM aged 15 to 29 years was undertaken on clinical and functional measures. Males with FEPM had increased likelihood of substance use (OR = 13.41, p forensic issues (OR = 4.71, p = .008), whereas females were more likely to have history of sexual abuse trauma (OR = 7.12, p = .001). At service entry, males were more likely to be using substances, especially cannabis (OR = 2.15, p = .047), had more severe illness (OR = 1.72, p = .037), and poorer functioning (OR = 0.96, p = .045). During treatment males were more likely to decrease substance use (OR = 5.34, p = .008) and were more likely to be living with family (OR = 4.30, p = .009). There were no gender differences in age of onset, psychopathology or functioning at discharge. Clinically meaningful gender differences in FEPM were driven by risk factors possibly associated with poor outcome. For males, substance use might be associated with poorer clinical presentation and functioning. In females with FEPM, the impact of sexual trauma on illness course warrants further consideration.

  20. Haze episodes at Syowa Station, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichiro Hara

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available During our aerosol measurement program at Syowa Station, Antarctica in 2004-2007, some low visibility (haze phenomena were observed under conditions with weak wind and without drifting snow and fog in winter-spring. In the "Antarctic haze" phenomenon, the number concentration of aerosol particles and black carbon concentration increased by one-two orders higher relative to background conditions at Syowa Station, while surface O_3 concentration simultaneously dropped especially after polar sunrise. Major aerosol constituents in the haze phenomenon were sea-salts (e.g., Na^+ and Cl^-. From the trajectory analysis and NAAPS model, the plumes from biomass burning in South America and southern Africa were transported to Syowa Station, Antarctic coast, during eastward (occasionally westward approach of cyclones in the Southern Ocean. Thus, poleward flow of the plume from mid-latitudes and injection of sea-salt particles during the transport may lead to the Antarctic haze phenomenon at Syowa Station. The difference of O_3 concentration between the background and the haze conditions tended to be larger in spring (polar sunrise relative to that in winter. Because enhancement of sea-salt particles can play an important role as an additional source of reactive halogen species, the haze episodes might make a significant contribution to surface O_3 depletion during the polar sunrise on the Antarctic coast.

  1. What's new@CERN, episode 2

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video productions

    2011-01-01

    On Monday 7 November at 4pm in English and 4.20pm in French, watch "What's new@CERN" on webcast.cern.ch. In this second episode: LHC performance, a journey to the particle source and this past month's news.   var flash_video_player=get_video_player_path(); insert_player_for_external('Video/Public/Movies/2011/CERN-MOVIE-2011-164/CERN-MOVIE-2011-164-0753-kbps-640x360-25-fps-audio-64-kbps-44-kHz-stereo', 'mms://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Video/Public/Movies/2011/CERN-MOVIE-2011-164/CERN-MOVIE-2011-164-Multirate-200-to-753-kbps-640x360-25-fps.wmv', 'false', 480, 360, 'https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Video/Public/Movies/2011/CERN-MOVIE-2011-164/CERN-MOVIE-2011-164-posterframe-640x360-at-30-percent.jpg', '1394250', true, 'Video/Public/Movies/2011/CERN-MOVIE-2011-164/CERN-MOVIE-2011-164-0600-kbps-maxH-360-25-fps-audio-128-kbps-48-kHz-stereo.mp4');

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging brain activation in first-episode bipolar mania during a response inhibition task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strakowski, Stephen M; Adler, Caleb M; Cerullo, Michael A; Eliassen, James C; Lamy, Martine; Fleck, David E; Lee, Jing-Huei; DelBello, Melissa P

    2008-11-01

    Impulsivity is common in bipolar disorder, especially during mania. Understanding the functional neuroanatomy of response inhibition, one component of impulsivity, might clarify the neural substrate of bipolar disorder. Sixteen DSM-IV first-episode, manic bipolar patients and 16 matched healthy subjects were examined during a first manic episode using functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing a response inhibition task. All subjects were studied using a 4.0 Tesla Varian Unity INOVA Whole Body MRI/MRS system. The response inhibition task was presented using non-ferromagnetic goggles, and task performance was recorded during scan acquisition. Imaging data were analysed using analysis of functional neuroimages. Group contrasts were made for the specific response inhibition measure. The groups performed the task similarly, although both demonstrated relatively poor rates of target response, but high rates of successful 'stops'. Despite similar behavioural results, the groups showed significantly different patterns of functional magnetic resonance imaging brain activation. Specifically, during response inhibition, the healthy subjects exhibited significantly greater activation in anterior and posterior cingulate, medial dorsal thalamus, middle temporal gyrus, and precuneus. The bipolar patients exhibited prefrontal activation (BA 10) that was not observed in healthy subjects. Bipolar and healthy subjects exhibit different patterns of brain activation to response inhibition; these differences may reflect different functional neuroanatomic approaches to response inhibition between the two groups.

  3. Neurological soft signs discriminating mood disorders from first episode schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, MPM; Liddle, PF; Burgerhof, JGM; Knegtering, R; Bosch, RJ

    Objective: To investigate the specificity of neurological soft signs (NSS) for first episode schizophrenia compared with mood disorders. Method: We assessed NSS in a sample of 60 healthy controls, 191 first episode psychosis patients and 81 mood disorder patients. We used a principle component

  4. Hippocampal functional connectivity and episodic memory in early childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Riggins

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Episodic memory relies on a distributed network of brain regions, with the hippocampus playing a critical and irreplaceable role. Few studies have examined how changes in this network contribute to episodic memory development early in life. The present addressed this gap by examining relations between hippocampal functional connectivity and episodic memory in 4- and 6-year-old children (n = 40. Results revealed similar hippocampal functional connectivity between age groups, which included lateral temporal regions, precuneus, and multiple parietal and prefrontal regions, and functional specialization along the longitudinal axis. Despite these similarities, developmental differences were also observed. Specifically, 3 (of 4 regions within the hippocampal memory network were positively associated with episodic memory in 6-year-old children, but negatively associated with episodic memory in 4-year-old children. In contrast, all 3 regions outside the hippocampal memory network were negatively associated with episodic memory in older children, but positively associated with episodic memory in younger children. These interactions are interpreted within an interactive specialization framework and suggest the hippocampus becomes functionally integrated with cortical regions that are part of the hippocampal memory network in adults and functionally segregated from regions unrelated to memory in adults, both of which are associated with age-related improvements in episodic memory ability.

  5. Hippocampal functional connectivity and episodic memory in early childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggins, Tracy; Geng, Fengji; Blankenship, Sarah L.; Redcay, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Episodic memory relies on a distributed network of brain regions, with the hippocampus playing a critical and irreplaceable role. Few studies have examined how changes in this network contribute to episodic memory development early in life. The present addressed this gap by examining relations between hippocampal functional connectivity and episodic memory in 4-and 6-year-old children (n=40). Results revealed similar hippocampal functional connectivity between age groups, which included lateral temporal regions, precuneus, and multiple parietal and prefrontal regions, and functional specialization along the longitudinal axis. Despite these similarities, developmental differences were also observed. Specifically, 3 (of 4) regions within the hippocampal memory network were positively associated with episodic memory in 6-year-old children, but negatively associated with episodic memory in 4-year-old children. In contrast, all 3 regions outside the hippocampal memory network were negatively associated with episodic memory in older children, but positively associated with episodic memory in younger children. These interactions are interpreted within an interactive specialization framework and suggest the hippocampus becomes functionally integrated with cortical regions that are part of the hippocampal memory network in adults and functionally segregated from regions unrelated to memory in adults, both of which are associated with age-related improvements in episodic memory ability. PMID:26900967

  6. Prefrontal Cortex Contributions to Episodic Retrieval Monitoring and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruse, Damian; Wilding, Edward L.

    2009-01-01

    Although the prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays roles in episodic memory judgments, the specific processes it supports are not understood fully. Event-related potential (ERP) studies of episodic retrieval have revealed an electrophysiological modulation--the right-frontal ERP old/new effect--which is thought to reflect activity in PFC. The functional…

  7. Does the Inclusion of Virtual Reality Games within Conventional Rehabilitation Enhance Balance Retraining after a Recent Episode of Stroke?

    OpenAIRE

    Rajaratnam, B. S.; Gui KaiEn, J.; Lee JiaLin, K.; Kwek SweeSin; Sim FenRu, S.; Lee Enting; Ang YiHsia, E.; Ng KeatHwee; Su Yunfeng; W. Woo YingHowe; S. Teo SiaoTing

    2013-01-01

    This randomised controlled and double-blinded pilot study evaluated if interactive virtual reality balance related games integrated within conventional rehabilitation sessions resulted in more superior retraining of dynamic balance compared to CR after stroke. 19 subjects diagnosed with a recent episode of stroke were recruited from a local rehabilitation hospital and randomly assigned to either a control or an experimental group. Subjects in the control groups underwent 60 minutes of convent...

  8. Reducing the duration of untreated first-episode psychosis -- effects on baseline social functioning and quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melle, I; Haahr, U; Friis, Svein

    2005-01-01

    first-episode patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of non-organic, non-affective psychosis were included, 281 patients gave informed consent and 263 completed a full evaluation of QoL. RESULTS: There were no differences in subjective QoL between ED and No-ED groups attributable to reduction in DUP...... on functional loss in ED educational campaigns may identify risk subjects earlier in the course of the disorder....

  9. Salience of loss of control for pediatric binge episodes: does size really matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shomaker, Lauren B; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Elliott, Camden; Wolkoff, Laura E; Columbo, Kelli M; Ranzenhofer, Lisa M; Roza, Caroline A; Yanovski, Susan Z; Yanovski, Jack A

    2010-12-01

    The subjective experience of loss of control (LOC) during eating, independent of overeating, may be a salient marker of disordered eating and risk for overweight in youth. However, few studies have directly tested this notion in an adequately powered sample. Three-hundred-sixty-seven youth (M ± SD age = 12.7 ± 2.8 y) were categorized as reporting objective binge eating (OBE; 12.5%), subjective binge eating (SBE; 11.4%), objective overeating without LOC (OO; 18.5%), or no episodes (NE; 57.5%). Disordered eating attitudes, general psychopathology, and adiposity were assessed. Children with OBE and SBE generally did not differ in their disordered eating attitudes, emotional eating, eating in the absence of hunger, depressive and anxiety symptoms, or adiposity. However, both OBE and SBE youth had significantly greater disordered eating attitudes, emotional eating, eating in the absence of hunger, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and adiposity compared to those with OO or NE (ps < .05). For non-treatment-seeking youth, LOC during eating episodes, rather than episode size, appears to be the most salient marker of eating and weight problems. © 2009 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Hypertension induced by episodic reductions in uteroplacental blood flow in gravid rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reho, John J; Peck, Jennifer; Novak, Jacqueline; Ramirez, Rolando J

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of preeclampsia remains unclear. Animal modeling of preeclampsia has been useful; however, no model to date represents episodic changes in uteroplacental blood flow that may occur in preeclampsia. To develop a gravid rat model characterized by episodic reductions in uteroplacental blood flow. Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were used and subjected to SHAM, reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP), or aortic occlusion on gestational Day 14. Aortic occlusion surgery consisted of implantation of a silastic vascular occluder around the abdominal aorta and silver clips around the uterine-ovarian arteries. Aortic occlusion animals were subjected to five consecutive days of occlusion (40% reduction) each session lasting 1 h. On Day 21, maternal mean arterial pressure (MAP) and fetal morphology were assessed. For isolated blood vessels, resistance-sized mesenteric arteries were harvested and mounted on a pressure arteriograph. Occluder animals experienced a 10 mmHg rise in MAP as compared to SHAM (p reactivity of second-order mesenteric arteries increased in Occluder animals as compared to SHAM (p vascular reactivity seen in Occluder animals and may represent a new model to investigate the mechanisms associated with episodic reductions in uteroplacental blood flow in pathological pregnancies.

  11. Differential brain activation during facial emotion discrimination in first-episode schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reske, Martina; Habel, Ute; Kellermann, Thilo; Backes, Volker; Jon Shah, N; von Wilmsdorff, Martina; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Zilles, Karl; Schneider, Frank

    2009-03-01

    Aberrant brain activation during facial emotion discrimination has been described in chronic schizophrenia, while little is known about early stages of the illness. The aim of the current study was to investigate valence-specific brain activation of emotion discrimination in first-episode schizophrenia. These patients provide the advantage of lacking the effects of long-term medication and chronic illness course and can hence further enhance the understanding of underlying psychopathological mechanisms. Using event-related fMRI, we investigated 18 first-episode schizophrenia patients and 18 matched healthy subjects during an explicit emotion discrimination task presenting happy, sad and neutral monochromatic facial expressions. A repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) with the factors Group (patients, healthy subjects), Gender and Emotion (happy, sad, neutral) was performed on behavioural and functional data. Behavioural performance did not differ between groups. Valence-independent hypoactivations in patients were observed for the anterior cingulate and orbitofrontal cortex while hyperactivations emerged in the posterior cingulate and the precuneus. Emotion-specific group differences were revealed in inferior parietal and orbitofrontal brain areas and the hippocampus. First-episode schizophrenia already affects areas involved in processing of both, emotions and primary facial information. Our study underlines the role of dysfunctional neural networks as the basis of disturbed social interactions in early schizophrenia.

  12. The association of major depressive episode and personality traits in patients with fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danyella de Melo Santos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Personality traits have been associated with primary depression. However, it is not known whether this association takes place in the case of depression comorbid with fibromyalgia. OBJECTIVE: The authors investigated the association between a current major depressive episode and temperament traits (e.g., harm avoidance. METHOD: A sample of 69 adult female patients with fibromyalgia was assessed with the Temperament and Character Inventory. Psychiatric diagnoses were assessed with the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview severity of depressive symptomatology with the Beck Depression Inventory, and anxiety symptomatology with the IDATE-state and pain intensity with a visual analog scale. RESULTS: A current major depressive episode was diagnosed in 28 (40.5% of the patients. They presented higher levels of harm avoidance and lower levels of cooperativeness and self-directedness compared with non-depressed patients, which is consistent with the Temperament and Character Inventory profile of subjects with primary depression. However, in contrast to previous results in primary depression, no association between a major depressive episode and self-transcendence was found. CONCLUSIONS: The results highlight specific features of depression in fibromyalgia subjects and may prove important for enhancing the diagnosis and prognosis of depression in fibromyalgia patients.

  13. The association of major depressive episode and personality traits in patients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Danyella de Melo; Lage, Lais Verderame; Jabur, Eleonora Kehl; Kaziyama, Helena Hideko Seguchi; Iosifescu, Dan V; Lucia, Mara Cristina Souza de; Fraguas, Renerio

    2011-01-01

    Personality traits have been associated with primary depression. However, it is not known whether this association takes place in the case of depression comorbid with fibromyalgia. The authors investigated the association between a current major depressive episode and temperament traits (e.g., harm avoidance). A sample of 69 adult female patients with fibromyalgia was assessed with the Temperament and Character Inventory. Psychiatric diagnoses were assessed with the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview severity of depressive symptomatology with the Beck Depression Inventory, and anxiety symptomatology with the IDATE-state and pain intensity with a visual analog scale. A current major depressive episode was diagnosed in 28 (40.5%) of the patients. They presented higher levels of harm avoidance and lower levels of cooperativeness and self-directedness compared with non-depressed patients, which is consistent with the Temperament and Character Inventory profile of subjects with primary depression. However, in contrast to previous results in primary depression, no association between a major depressive episode and self-transcendence was found. The results highlight specific features of depression in fibromyalgia subjects and may prove important for enhancing the diagnosis and prognosis of depression in fibromyalgia patients.

  14. Use of electromyographic and electrocardiographic signals to detect sleep bruxism episodes in a natural environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castroflorio, Tommaso; Mesin, Luca; Tartaglia, Gianluca Martino; Sforza, Chiarella; Farina, Dario

    2013-11-01

    Diagnosis of bruxism is difficult since not all contractions of masticatory muscles during sleeping are bruxism episodes. In this paper, we propose the use of both EMG and ECG signals for the detection of sleep bruxism. Data have been acquired from 21 healthy volunteers and 21 sleep bruxers. The masseter surface EMGs were detected with bipolar concentric electrodes and the ECG with monopolar electrodes located on the clavicular regions. Recordings were made at the subjects' homes during sleeping. Bruxism episodes were automatically detected as characterized by masseter EMG amplitude greater than 10% of the maximum and heart rate increasing by more than 25% with respect to baseline within 1 s before the increase in EMG amplitude above the 10% threshold. Furthermore, the subjects were classified as bruxers and nonbruxers by a neural network. The number of bruxism episodes per night was 24.6 ± 8.4 for bruxers and 4.3 ± 4.5 for controls ( P bruxism.

  15. EEG Suppression Associated with Apneic Episodes in a Neonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evonne Low

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the EEG findings from an ex-preterm neonate at term equivalent age who presented with intermittent but prolonged apneic episodes which were presumed to be seizures. A total of 8 apneic episodes were captured (duration 23–376 seconds during EEG monitoring. The baseline EEG activity was appropriate for corrected gestational age and no electrographic seizure activity was recorded. The average baseline heart rate was 168 beats per minute (bpm and the baseline oxygen saturation level was in the mid-nineties. Periods of complete EEG suppression lasting 68 and 179 seconds, respectively, were recorded during 2 of these 8 apneic episodes. Both episodes were accompanied by bradycardia less than 70 bpm and oxygen saturation levels of less than 20%. Short but severe episodes of apnea can cause complete EEG suppression in the neonate.

  16. Changes in plasma methionine-enkephalin levels associated with a cluster headache episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosnaim, Aron D; Maturana, Patricio; Callaghan, Owen H; Wolf, Marion E

    2013-01-01

    Eighteen male cluster headache (CH) inpatients within a CH series participated in this research. Blood samples were drawn from patients at least 6-hour pain-free after the last acute CH episode and then shortly prior (SP), during, and soon after (SA) a new acute CH attack. Three healthy male, age-comparable drug-free volunteers served as controls; 5 samples were obtained from each of these individual over a 24-hour period. Individual patient's methionine-enkephalin (MET) plasma concentration showed significant changes, and in some subjects, dramatic changes, during the different phases of a single CH episode. Peptide levels followed a general pattern of higher plasma concentration SP to an acute CH attack, followed by decreased levels during the attack itself, and falling even further SA the acute episode. Consistently, 16 of the 18 patients tested showed pre-CH peptide levels significantly higher (arbitrarily the authors considered values 20% or more as "significant") than their own values obtained during the acute CH pain phase, with observed differences reaching 80% or more in 7 of these individuals. For about half of these patients, peptide concentration during the acute CH episode was significantly above the control's range (68.2-87.6 pg MET/mL; control's circulating MET concentration remaining essentially unchanged during a 24-hour period). MET levels were further decreased in essentially all of the post-CH samples, with values falling within (n = 6) or even further below than those in the control's range (n = 11). Neither age, time of CH occurrence, nor patient's use of a number of medications known for failing to influence plasma MET degradation kinetics seemed to significantly influence MET levels. These results might help in the biochemical characterization of the actual phases of a CH episode. Developing drugs modulating MET bioavailability could lead to novel antinociceptive agents useful for the treatment of CH's associated pain.

  17. Seasonal versus Episodic Performance Evaluation for an Eulerian Photochemical Air Quality Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Ling; Brown, Nancy J.; Harley, Robert A.; Bao, Jian-Wen; Michelson, Sara A; Wilczak, James M

    2010-04-16

    This study presents detailed evaluation of the seasonal and episodic performance of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system applied to simulate air quality at a fine grid spacing (4 km horizontal resolution) in central California, where ozone air pollution problems are severe. A rich aerometric database collected during the summer 2000 Central California Ozone Study (CCOS) is used to prepare model inputs and to evaluate meteorological simulations and chemical outputs. We examine both temporal and spatial behaviors of ozone predictions. We highlight synoptically driven high-ozone events (exemplified by the four intensive operating periods (IOPs)) for evaluating both meteorological inputs and chemical outputs (ozone and its precursors) and compare them to the summer average. For most of the summer days, cross-domain normalized gross errors are less than 25% for modeled hourly ozone, and normalized biases are between {+-}15% for both hourly and peak (1 h and 8 h) ozone. The domain-wide aggregated metrics indicate similar performance between the IOPs and the whole summer with respect to predicted ozone and its precursors. Episode-to-episode differences in ozone predictions are more pronounced at a subregional level. The model performs consistently better in the San Joaquin Valley than other air basins, and episodic ozone predictions there are similar to the summer average. Poorer model performance (normalized peak ozone biases <-15% or >15%) is found in the Sacramento Valley and the Bay Area and is most noticeable in episodes that are subject to the largest uncertainties in meteorological fields (wind directions in the Sacramento Valley and timing and strength of onshore flow in the Bay Area) within the boundary layer.

  18. Cognitive functions in first-episode depression and recurrent depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talarowska, Monika; Zajączkowska, Marlena; Gałecki, Piotr

    2015-03-01

    Cognitive deficits in the course of depressive disorders affect mainly memory, attention and the frontal functions. They are associated with both an earlier onset of symptoms and prolonged episodes. The main aim of the study was to verify the hypothesis of differences in the effectiveness of cognitive processes between patients with a first episode of depression (ED-I) and recurrent depressive disorders (rDD). The study comprised 210 subjects: patients with ED-I (n=60) and patients with rDD (n=150). The assessment of cognitive functions was based on performance of the Trail Making Test, the Stroop Test, the Verbal Fluency Test, the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) and the digit span from WAIS-R. There were no statistically significant differences between the analysed groups in the severity of depressive symptoms. The negative impact of depressive symptoms on the effectiveness of cognitive functions was observed. The ED-I group recorded better results compared to the rDD group in terms of the speed of information processing, visual-spatial and auditory-verbal memory and executive functions, auditory-verbal immediate and delayed memory, ability to learn and verbal fluency. The same differences were observed with respect to the patients from the ED-I group and the patients with the second episode of depression (ED-II) in the course of rDD. There are significant differences in cognitive functioning of patients with a depressive episode and recurrent depressive disorders. These differences are already visible from the second episode of a major depressive disorder. Memory, verbal fluency and frontal functions are reduced.

  19. Neuron-specific Sumo1-3 knockdown in mice impairs episodic and fear memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangli; Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Wetsel, William C; Sheng, Huaxin; Zhao, Shengli; Liu, Xiaozhi; Paschen, Wulf; Yang, Wei

    2014-07-01

    Growing evidence suggests that small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) conjugation plays a key role in brain plasticity by modulating activity-dependent synaptic transmission. However, these observations are based largely on cell culture experiments. We hypothesized that episodic and fear memories would be affected by silencing SUMO1-3 expression. To investigate the role of SUMO conjugation in neuronal functioning in vivo, we generated a novel Sumo transgenic mouse model in which a Thy1 promoter drives expression of 3 distinct microRNAs to silence Sumo1-3 expression, specifically in neurons. Wild-type and Sumo1-3 knockdown mice were subjected to a battery of behavioural tests to elucidate whether Sumoylation is involved in episodic and emotional memory. Expression of Sumo1-3 microRNAs and the corresponding silencing of Sumo expression were particularly pronounced in hippocampal, amygdala and layer V cerebral cortex neurons. The Sumo knockdown mice displayed anxiety-like responses and were impaired in episodic memory processes, contextual and cued fear conditioning and fear-potentiated startle. Since expression of Sumo1-3 was silenced in this mouse model, we need to verify in future studies which of the SUMO paralogues play the pivotal role in episodic and emotional memory. Our results indicate that a functional SUMO conjugation pathway is essential for emotionality and cognition. This novel Sumo knockdown mouse model and the technology used in generating this mutant may help to reveal novel mechanisms that underlie a variety of neuropsychiatric conditions associated with anxiety and impairment of episodic and emotional memory.

  20. Does age at onset of first major depressive episode indicate the subtype of major depressive disorder?: the clinical research center for depression study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seon-Cheol; Hahn, Sang-Woo; Hwang, Tae-Yeon; Kim, Jae-Min; Jun, Tae-Youn; Lee, Min-Soo; Kim, Jung-Bum; Yim, Hyeon-Woo; Park, Yong Chon

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of age at onset of the first major depressive episode on the clinical features of individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) in a large cohort of Korean depressed patients. We recruited 419 MDD patients of age over 18 years from the Clinical Research Center for Depression study in South Korea. At the start of the study, the onset age of the first major depressive episode was self-reported by the subjects. The subjects were divided into four age-at-onset subgroups: childhood and adolescent onset (ages depressive episodes (F=3.475, p=0.016) and higher scores on the brief psychiatric rating scale (F=3.254, p=0.022), its negative symptom subscale (F=6.082, pmajor depressive episode is a promising clinical indicator for the clinical presentation, course, and outcome of MDD.

  1. Acute rejection episodes after kidney transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamida Fethi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute rejection episodes (AREs are a major determinant of renal allograft survival. The incorporation of new immunosuppressive agents explains, at least partially, the improvement seen in the results of transplantation in recent years. The objectives of this study are to analyze the incidence and severity of AREs, their risk factors and their influence on graft and patient survival. We retrospectively studied 280 kidney transplants performed in adults at the Charles Nicolle Hospital, Tunis, between 1986 and 2004. The diagnosis of ARE was based on clinical data and response to treatment. Allograft biopsies were performed in ten cases. The treatment of AREs consisted of pulse methylprednisolone and anti-thymocyte globulin. There were 186 males (66.4% and 94 females (33.6%, and their mean age was 31 ± 8.9 years. Overall, the 280 study patients experienced a total of 113 AREs. Of them, 85 had only one ARE, 28 had two to three and none had more than three AREs. A total of 68 AREs were completely re-versible, 42 were partially reversible while three could not be reversed with treatment. The mean inci-dence of AREs was 40.4%. The incidence was > 45% between 1986 and 1997, decreased to 20.5% between 1998 and 2000 and to 9% between 2001 and 2004. Graft survival rates in patients with and without AREs were respectively 91% and 93% at three years, 82% and 90% at five years and 73% and 83% at 10 years. We found a decrease in the incidence of AREs in recent years in our study patients, and this was related to the introduction of sensitized cross-match and the newer immunosuppressive agents, particularly MMF. Additionally, AREs had a deleterious impact on late graft survival in our study population.

  2. The OCAPI collaborative platform: study of two particle pollution episodes in 2016 in Paris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foret, Gilles; Michoud, Vincent; Formenti, Paola; Gratien, Aline; Beekmann, Matthias; Peinado, Florian; Favez, Olivier; Haeffelin, Martial; Dupont, Jean-Charles; Bodichon, Renaud; Gros, Valérie; Ghersi, Véronique; Meleux, Frédérik; Xuéref-Rémy, Irène

    2017-04-01

    Air pollution and its impacts are subject to an expanded interest since the middle of the 20th century, especially in urban areas which gathered an important part of emission sources. These polluted urban air masses are composed by a complex mixture of gases and aerosols coming from various emission sources (vehicular traffic, industries, residential heating, agricultural activities, natural sources) or chemical processes. To efficiently reduce this pollution and its impacts on population, it is important to understand its drivers, its sources and its impact on human health. To get some insights in Paris air pollution, a collaborative measurement platform called OCAPI ("Observation de la Composition Atmosphérique Parisienne de l'IPSL") has been built and implies several Parisian research laboratories of IPSL institute (CEREA, LSCE, LMD, LISA, LATMOS, LERMA and METIS) as well as public agencies and institutes in charge of Paris air pollution monitoring (AIRPARIF, INERIS). OCAPI platform aims at gathering skills and instruments of these laboratories to measure the composition and dynamics of Paris atmosphere. In this framework, multi-site measurements were performed during two intense particle pollution episodes which occurred in March 2016 and between November and December 2016. These two episodes were characterized by different meteorological conditions and different type of emission sources. Indeed, March episode was related to intense agricultural activities and high ammonium nitrate contribution to aerosol composition; while end of year episode was related to low wind speed, cold conditions and thin boundary layer which favoured the stagnation of locally emitted pollutants. This latter episode was characterized by large contribution of organics in aerosol composition. In this presentation, a study of these two episodes will be presented. We will first present the context and the OCAPI platform. Then, first results of dynamics and aerosol composition

  3. The quality of life among first-episode psychotic patients in the OPUS trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Anne; Petersen, Lone; Jeppesen, Pia

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: From an 'objective' perspective, treatment of first-episode psychosis has improved in many ways with the development of specialised early and intensive team-based treatment like e.g. the 'OPUS' treatment. However, the patients' perspective is also important and was investigated...... in the 'OPUS' study by analysing data concerning quality of life. AIM: We aimed to investigate the 'quality of life from patients' perspective' among a cohort of young adults with a first-episode psychosis at the time of treatment initiation and after two years. Especially, we were interested in analysing...... if there were any significant effects on the subjective quality of life of receiving an intensive psychosocial assertive community treatment called 'OPUS' compared to standard treatment (ST). METHOD: This study is part of the Danish 'OPUS' trial, a randomised controlled trial (RCT) comparing 'treatment as usual...

  4. Depressive episodes with suicide attempts in severe depression: suicides and controls differ only in the later episodes of unipolar depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brådvik, Louise; Berglund, Mats

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the distribution of suicide attempts across the depressive episodes in suicides and controls with a severe depression. A blind record evaluation was performed of 100 suicide victims and matched controls admitted to the Department of Psychiatry between 1956 and 1969 and monitored to 2006. There was a similar number of episodes in suicides and controls and in the early episodes a similar number of suicide attempts in both groups. However, in the later episodes future suicides showed more suicide attempts as compared to controls. This was found for unipolar depression only. This difference was found despite previously shown similar rates of adequate treatment and improvement. In conclusion, more depressive episodes including suicide attempts appeared to be related to suicide.

  5. Differential effect of first versus second concussive episodes on wavelet information quality of EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobounov, Semyon; Cao, Cheng; Sebastianelli, Wayne

    2009-05-01

    Recent reports have suggested that long-term residual brain dysfunctions from mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) that are often overlooked by clinical criteria may be detected using advanced research methods. The aim of the present study was to examine the feasibility of EEG wavelet information quality measures (EEG-IQ) in monitoring alterations of brain functions as well as to determine the differential rate of recovery between the first and second concussive episodes. Student-athletes at high risk for MTBI (n=265) were tested prior to concussive episodes as a baseline. From this subject pool, twenty one athletes who suffered from two concussive episodes within one athletic season and were tested on days 7, 14 and 21 post-first and second injuries using a within-subjects design. Specifically, EEG was recorded and processed using wavelet entropy (EEG-IQ) algorithm along with a battery of neuropsychological (NS) tests. Spatial distribution of EEG-IQ and its dynamics in conjunction with NS data were analyzed prior to and after MTBI. No neuropsychological deficits were present in concussed subjects beyond 7 days post-injury after first and second concussions. However, EEG-IQ measures were significantly reduced primarily at temporal, parietal and the occipital regions (ROIs) after first and especially after second MTBI (pEEG-IQ measures was significantly slower after second MTBI compared to those after the first concussion (pEEG-IQ measures may reveal alterations in the brain of concussed individuals that are most often overlooked by current assessment tools. In this regard, EEG-IQ may potentially be a valuable tool for assessing and monitoring residual brain dysfunction in "asymptomatic" MTBI subjects. The results demonstrate the potential utility of EEG-IQ measures to classify concussed individuals at various stages of recovery.

  6. The parallel impact of episodic memory and episodic future thinking on food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartanian, Lenny R; Chen, William H; Reily, Natalie M; Castel, Alan D

    2016-06-01

    This research examined the effects of both episodic memory and episodic future thinking (EFT) on snack food intake. In Study 1, female participants (n = 158) were asked to recall their lunch from earlier in the day, to think about the dinner they planned to have later in the day, or to think about a non-food activity before taking part in a cookie taste test. Participants who recalled their lunch or who thought about their dinner ate less than did participants who thought about non-food activities. These effects were not explained by group differences in the hedonic value of the food. Study 2 examined whether the suppression effect observed in Study 1 was driven by a general health consciousness. Female participants (n = 74) were asked to think about their past or future exercise (or a non-exercise activity), but thinking about exercise had no impact on participants' cookie consumption. Overall, both thinking about past food intake and imagining future food intake had the same suppression effect on participants' current food intake, but further research is needed to determine the underlying mechanism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Episodic and Binge Gambling: An Exploration and Preliminary Quantitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowlishaw, S; Nespoli, E; Jebadurai, J K; Smith, N; Bowden-Jones, H

    2017-06-03

    The DSM-5 includes provisions for episodic forms of gambling disorder, with such changes aligned with earlier accounts of potential binge gambling behaviours. However, there is little research that indicates the utility of these classifications of episodic or binge gambling, and this study considered their characteristics in a clinical sample. It involved administration of a new binge gambling screening tool, along with routine measures, to n = 214 patients entering a specialist treatment clinic for gambling problems. Results indicated that episodic gambling was common in this clinical context, with 28 and 32% of patients reporting gambling episodes that were (a) regular and alternating, and (b) irregular and intermittent, respectively. These patterns were distinguished by factors including associations with covariates that indicated differences from continuous gamblers. For example, the irregular episodic gamblers, but not the regular pattern, demonstrated lower levels of problem gambling severity and comorbidity. Rates of potential binge gambling, which was defined in terms of additional criteria, were around 4% and numbers were insufficient for comparable analyses. The findings support inclusion of episodic forms of gambling disorder in the DSM-5, but highlight the need for improved recognition and research on heterogeneous forms of episodic gambling.

  8. Examining factors associated with heavy episodic drinking among college undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Scholly

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Heavy episodic drinking among college students is a serious health concern. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with heavy episodic drinking behaviors amongst a predominately Asian undergraduate college student population in the United States. A survey measuring alcohol use behaviors was completed by a random sample of 18-24 year old undergraduates during April, 2011. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine factors associated with students’ heavy episodic drinking behavior. Independent factors associated with heavy episodic drinking included living on campus, ethnicity, perceived drinking behavior among peers, and a belief that alcohol is a central part of one’s social life. Heavy episodic drinking was also associated with poor academic performance. Campus-wide educational strategies to reduce heavy episodic drinking among college undergraduates should incorporate accurate information regarding alcohol use norms to correct students’ perceived over estimation of their peers alcohol consumption rates and the under estimation of students protective alcohol use behaviors. These efforts should focus in on-campus residence halls where a higher occurrence of heavy episodic drinking is often found.

  9. Acetylcholine facilitates recovery of episodic memory after brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxson, Paula L; Browning, Philip G F; Gaffan, David; Baxter, Mark G

    2012-10-03

    Episodic memory depends on a network of interconnected brain structures including the inferior temporal cortex, hippocampus, fornix, and mammillary bodies. We have previously shown that a moderate episodic memory impairment in monkeys with transection of the fornix is exacerbated by prior depletion of acetylcholine from inferotemporal cortex, despite the fact that depletion of acetylcholine from inferotemporal cortex on its own has no effect on episodic memory. Here we show that this effect occurs because inferotemporal acetylcholine facilitates recovery of function following structural damage within the neural circuit for episodic memory. Episodic memory impairment caused by lesions of the mammillary bodies, like fornix transection, was exacerbated by prior removal of temporal cortical acetylcholine. However, removing temporal cortical acetylcholine after the lesion of the fornix or mammillary bodies did not increase the severity of the impairment. This lesion order effect suggests that acetylcholine within the inferior temporal cortex ordinarily facilitates functional recovery after structural lesions that impair episodic memory. In the absence of acetylcholine innervation to inferotemporal cortex, this recovery is impaired and the amnesia caused by the structural lesion is more severe. These results suggest that humans with loss of cortical acetylcholine function, for example in Alzheimer's disease, may be less able to adapt to memory impairments caused by structural neuronal damage to areas in the network important for episodic memory.

  10. Microbiology of peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis patients with multiple episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessim, Sharon J; Nisenbaum, Rosane; Bargman, Joanne M; Jassal, Sarbjit V

    2012-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD)-associated peritonitis clusters within patients. Patient factors contribute to peritonitis risk, but there is also entrapment of organisms within the biofilm that forms on PD catheters. It is hypothesized that this biofilm may prevent complete eradication of organisms, predisposing to multiple infections with the same organism. Using data collected in the Canadian multicenter Baxter POET (Peritonitis, Organism, Exit sites, Tunnel infections) database from 1996 to 2005, we studied incident PD patients with 2 or more peritonitis episodes. We determined the proportion of patients with 2 or more episodes caused by the same organism. In addition, using a multivariate logistic regression model, we tested whether prior peritonitis with a given organism predicted the occurrence of a subsequent episode with the same organism. During their time on PD, 558 patients experienced 2 or more peritonitis episodes. Of those 558 patients, 181 (32%) had at least 2 episodes with the same organism. The organism most commonly causing repeat infection was coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CNS), accounting for 65.7% of cases. Compared with peritonitis caused by other organisms, a first CNS peritonitis episode was associated with an increased risk of subsequent CNS peritonitis within 1 year (odds ratio: 2.1; 95% confidence interval: 1.5 to 2.8; p < 0.001). Among patients with repeat CNS peritonitis, 48% of repeat episodes occurred within 6 months of the earlier episode. In contrast to previous data, we did not find a high proportion of patients with multiple peritonitis episodes caused by the same organism. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was the organism most likely to cause peritonitis more than once in a given patient, and a prior CNS peritonitis was associated with an increased risk of CNS peritonitis within the subsequent year.

  11. Emotion episodes of Afrikaans-speaking employees in the workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara S. Jonker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Emotions must be investigated within the natural contexts in which they occur. It therefore becomes crucial to study episodes in the workplace.Research purpose: The objective of this study was to determine the positive and negative emotion episodes and frequencies of working Afrikaans-speaking adults.Motivation for the study: To date, no study has been conducted to determine emotion episodes amongst White Afrikaans-speaking working adults in South Africa. Gooty, Connelly, Griffith and Gupta also argue for research on emotions in the natural settings in which they occur – the workplace.Research design, approach and method: A survey design with an availability sample was used. The participants (N = 179 consisted of White Afrikaans-speaking working adults. The Episode Grid was administered to capture the emotion episodes.Main findings: The main emotion episodes reported on with positive content included goal achievement, receiving recognition and personal incidents. Emotion episodes with negative content included categories such as behaviour of work colleagues, acts of boss/superior/management and task requirements.Practical and/or managerial implications: The findings are useful for managers who want to enhance the emotional quality of the work-life of employees. Changes could be made, for example, to practices of giving recognition within work environments and the clarification of task requirements. The knowledge on emotion episodes could be very useful in planning interventions.Contribution and/or value-adding: The findings and results of this study provided insight into emotion episodes as events in the workplace can cause positive and negative workplace experiences. This information should be taken into consideration with regard to wellness and emotion measurement efforts.

  12. Microbiology of Peritonitis in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients with Multiple Episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessim, Sharon J.; Nisenbaum, Rosane; Bargman, Joanne M.; Jassal, Sarbjit V.

    2012-01-01

    ♦ Background: Peritoneal dialysis (PD)–associated peritonitis clusters within patients. Patient factors contribute to peritonitis risk, but there is also entrapment of organisms within the biofilm that forms on PD catheters. It is hypothesized that this biofilm may prevent complete eradication of organisms, predisposing to multiple infections with the same organism. ♦ Methods: Using data collected in the Canadian multicenter Baxter POET (Peritonitis, Organism, Exit sites, Tunnel infections) database from 1996 to 2005, we studied incident PD patients with 2 or more peritonitis episodes. We determined the proportion of patients with 2 or more episodes caused by the same organism. In addition, using a multivariate logistic regression model, we tested whether prior peritonitis with a given organism predicted the occurrence of a subsequent episode with the same organism. ♦ Results: During their time on PD, 558 patients experienced 2 or more peritonitis episodes. Of those 558 patients, 181 (32%) had at least 2 episodes with the same organism. The organism most commonly causing repeat infection was coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CNS), accounting for 65.7% of cases. Compared with peritonitis caused by other organisms, a first CNS peritonitis episode was associated with an increased risk of subsequent CNS peritonitis within 1 year (odds ratio: 2.1; 95% confidence interval: 1.5 to 2.8; p peritonitis, 48% of repeat episodes occurred within 6 months of the earlier episode. ♦ Conclusions: In contrast to previous data, we did not find a high proportion of patients with multiple peritonitis episodes caused by the same organism. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was the organism most likely to cause peritonitis more than once in a given patient, and a prior CNS peritonitis was associated with an increased risk of CNS peritonitis within the subsequent year. PMID:22215659

  13. Atmospheric boundary layer dynamics in the Grenoble valley during strongly stable episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staquet, C.; Largeron, Y.; Chollet, J.

    2013-12-01

    This paper addresses the dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer in the Grenoble valley under strongly stable and polluted conditions. Numerical modeling is used for this purpose, along with available ground temperature measurements. Though the Grenoble valley is the most populated area in the Alps and is subjected to serious pollution episodes in winter, no such study had been conducted previously. We first analyzed ground temperature data within the valley at altitudes ranging between 220 m (valley bottom) and 1730 m during 5 months of winter 2006-2007. These data were provided by Meteo-France et by Air Rhône-Alpes, the air quality agency of Région Rhône-Alpes. Our purpose was to detect strongly stable episodes, these being defined by the episode-averaged vertical gradient of the absolute temperature being larger than the winter average during at least three days. Five episodes were selected from this criterion. We also analyzed air quality data recorded by Air Rhône-Alpes during the same winter to detect strongly polluted events for PM10 and found that the five episodes were also strongly polluted ones. To perform a more detailed analysis of these five episodes, we used the numerical code Meso-NH developed by Météo-France and the Laboratory of Aérology in Toulouse and simulated the dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer during each episode. Four nested domains were used, the horizontal resolution of the innermost (and smallest) domain, containing the Grenoble valley, being 333 m; from comparison with the ground temperature data, we found that the vertical resolution above ground level had to be as low as 4 meters. As expected, the boundary layer dynamics in the numerical simulation for each episode was found to be decoupled from the (anticyclonic, weak) synoptic flow, consistent with the value of the Froude number associated with the inversion layer. These dynamics are controlled by thermal (mostly katabatic) winds flowing from the higher altitude

  14. Imaging episodic memory: implications for cognitive theories and phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, L

    1999-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies are beginning to identify neuroanatomical correlates of various cognitive functions. This paper presents results relevant to several theories and phenomena of episodic memory, including component processes of episodic retrieval, encoding specificity, inhibition, item versus source memory, encoding-retrieval overlap, and the picture-superiority effect. Overall, by revealing specific activation patterns, the results provide support for existing theoretical views and they add some unique information which may be important to consider in future attempts to develop cognitive theories of episodic memory.

  15. Familial Hemiplegic Migraine and Recurrent Episodes of Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaBianca, Sonja; Jensen, Rigmor; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M

    2015-01-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) is a rare autosomal dominant form of migraine with motor aura. We present a case report of a father and son with very similar attacks of hemiplegic migraine and recurrent episodes of accompanying psychoses. Previously, such episodes led to hospitalization...... and extended clinical examinations, which further worsened the psychoses. Since the episodes were recognized as related to the hemiplegic migraine, a treatment strategy combining sleep and sedation was initiated and progression onto psychosis was almost completely avoided in both father and son. Genetic...

  16. Acupuncture for the prevention of episodic migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Klaus; Allais, Gianni; Brinkhaus, Benno; Fei, Yutong; Mehring, Michael; Vertosick, Emily A.; Vickers, Andrew; White, Adrian R

    2016-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is often used for migraine prevention but its effectiveness is still controversial. We present an update of our Cochrane review from 2009. Objectives To investigate whether acupuncture is a) more effective than no prophylactic treatment/routine care only; b) more effective than sham (placebo) acupuncture; and c) as effective as prophylactic treatment with drugs in reducing headache frequency in adults with episodic migraine. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL: 2016, issue 1); MEDLINE (via Ovid, 2008 to January 2016); Ovid EMBASE (2008 to January 2016); and Ovid AMED (1985 to January 2016). We checked PubMed for recent publications to April 2016. We searched the World Health Organization (WHO) Clinical Trials Registry Platform to February 2016 for ongoing and unpublished trials. Selection criteria We included randomized trials at least eight weeks in duration that compared an acupuncture intervention with a no-acupuncture control (no prophylactic treatment or routine care only), a sham-acupuncture intervention, or prophylactic drug in participants with episodic migraine. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers checked eligibility; extracted information on participants, interventions, methods and results, and assessed risk of bias and quality of the acupuncture intervention. The primary outcome was migraine frequency (preferably migraine days, attacks or headache days if migraine days not measured/reported) after treatment and at follow-up. The secondary outcome was response (at least 50% frequency reduction). Safety outcomes were number of participants dropping out due to adverse effects and number of participants reporting at least one adverse effect. We calculated pooled effect size estimates using a fixed-effect model. We assessed the evidence using GRADE and created ’Summary of findings’ tables. Main results Twenty-two trials including 4985 participants in total (median 71, range

  17. Irregularity and lack of p-waves in short tachycardia episodes predict atrial fibrillation and ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Linda S B; Persson, Anders P; Wollmer, Per; Juul-Möller, Steen; Juhlin, Tord; Engström, Gunnar

    2018-02-12

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is defined as an irregular supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) without p-waves, with a duration >30s. It is not known whether AF characteristics in shorter SVT episodes predict AF and stroke. To determine if irregularity and lack of p-waves, alone or in combination, at short SVT episodes increased the risk of incident AF and ischemic stroke. The population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer study includes 24hECG screening of 377 AF-free individuals (mean age 64.5 years, 43% men) who were prospectively followed for >13 years. There were 65 AF events and 25 ischemic stroke events during follow-up. Subjects with an SVT episode ≥5 beats were identified and the longest SVT episode was assessed for irregularity and lack of p-waves. The association between SVT classification and AF and stroke was assessed using multivariable adjusted Cox regression. Incidence of AF increased with increasing abnormality of the SVTs. The risk-factor adjusted hazards ratio (HR) for AF was 4.95 (95%CI 2.06-11.9, pSVT episodes without p-waves (HR 14.2 (95%CI 3.76-57.6, pSVT episodes at detected at 24hECG screening are associated with incident AF and ischemic stroke. Short irregular SVTs without p-waves likely represent early stages of AF or atrial myopathy. 24hECG could identify subjects suitable for primary prevention efforts. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Potential human neurotoxicity of MDMA ('Ecstasy'): subjective self-reports, evidence from an Italian drug addiction centre and clinical case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schifano, F

    2000-01-01

    The present paper attempts to give an updated overview of the magnitude of the phenomenon of ecstasy abuse in Italy and other European countries. It gives an account of some clinical case studies and of a larger-scale report on polydrug (including MDMA) consumers attending our Public Health Addiction Treatment Unit in recent years, with a view to clarifying the characteristics and psychopathological consequences (mainly depression, psychotic disorders, cognitive disturbances, bulimic episodes, impulse control disorders, panic disorders, social phobia) of MDMA consumption. Longer-term, larger-dose (acute or cumulative) MDMA consumers were found to be at high risk of developing these psychopathological disturbances. A tentative description of certain personological dimensions of ecstasy consumers is also given (the novelty-seeking dimension was characteristic of those who occasionally experimented with the drug) while those who ingested larger quantities revealed low harm avoidance scores). Results are discussed in the light of the complex and different methodological issues arising from this kind of study, in which MDMA is far from being the only drug of abuse. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  19. Size distributions of nano/micron dicarboxylic acids and inorganic ions in suburban PM episode and non-episodic aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Li-Ying; Kuo, Su-Ching; Chen, Chien-Lung; Tsai, Ying I.

    The distribution of nano/micron dicarboxylic acids and inorganic ions in size-segregated suburban aerosol of southern Taiwan was studied for a PM episode and a non-episodic pollution period, revealing for the first time the distribution of these nanoscale particles in suburban aerosols. Inorganic species, especially nitrate, were present in higher concentrations during the PM episode. A combination of gas-to-nuclei conversion of nitrate particles and accumulation of secondary photochemical products originating from traffic-related emissions was likely a crucial cause of the PM episode. Sulfate, ammonium, and oxalic acid were the dominant anion, cation, and dicarboxylic acid, respectively, accounting for a minimum of 49% of the total anion, cation or dicarboxylic acid mass. Peak concentrations of these species occurred at 0.54 μm in the droplet mode during both non-episodic and PM episode periods, indicating an association with cloud-processed particles. On average, sulfate concentration was 16-17 times that of oxalic acid. Oxalic acid was nevertheless the most abundant dicarboxylic acid during both periods, followed by succinic, malonic, maleic, malic and tartaric acid. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of oxalic acid was 0.77 μm with a bi-modal presence at 0.54 μm and 18 nm during non-episodic pollution and an MMAD of 0.67 μm with mono-modal presence at 0.54 μm in PM episode aerosol. The concomitant formation of malonic acid and oxalic acid was attributed to in-cloud processes. During the PM episode in the 5-100 nm nanoscale range, an oxalic acid/sulfate mass ratio of 40.2-82.3% suggested a stronger formation potential for oxalic acid than for sulfate in the nuclei mode. For total cations (TC), total inorganic anions (TIA) and total dicarboxylic acids (TDA), major contributing particles were in the droplet mode, with least in the nuclei mode. The ratio of TDA to TIA in the nuclei mode increased greatly from 8.40% during the non-episodic pollution

  20. Reduced auditory segmentation potentials in first-episode schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, Brian A; Haigh, Sarah M; Murphy, Timothy K; Leiter-Mcbeth, Justin; Salisbury, Dean F

    2017-10-22

    Auditory scene analysis (ASA) dysfunction is likely an important component of the symptomatology of schizophrenia. Auditory object segmentation, the grouping of sequential acoustic elements into temporally-distinct auditory objects, can be assessed with electroencephalography through measurement of the auditory segmentation potential (ASP). Further, N2 responses to the initial and final elements of auditory objects are enhanced relative to medial elements, which may indicate auditory object edge detection (initiation and termination). Both ASP and N2 modulation are impaired in long-term schizophrenia. To determine whether these deficits are present early in disease course, we compared ASP and N2 modulation between individuals at their first episode of psychosis within the schizophrenia spectrum (FE, N=20) and matched healthy controls (N=24). The ASP was reduced by >40% in FE; however, N2 modulation was not statistically different from HC. This suggests that auditory segmentation (ASP) deficits exist at this early stage of schizophrenia, but auditory edge detection (N2 modulation) is relatively intact. In a subset of subjects for whom structural MRIs were available (N=14 per group), ASP sources were localized to midcingulate cortex (MCC) and temporal auditory cortex. Neurophysiological activity in FE was reduced in MCC, an area linked to aberrant perceptual organization, negative symptoms, and cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia, but not temporal auditory cortex. This study supports the validity of the ASP for measurement of auditory object segmentation and suggests that the ASP may be useful as an early index of schizophrenia-related MCC dysfunction. Further, ASP deficits may serve as a viable biomarker of disease presence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The neurobiology and treatment of first-episode schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, R S; Sommer, I E

    2015-02-01

    It is evident that once psychosis is present in patients with schizophrenia, the underlying biological process of the illness has already been ongoing for many years. At the time of diagnosis, patients with schizophrenia show decreased mean intracranial volume (ICV) as compared with healthy subjects. Since ICV is driven by brain growth, which reaches its maximum size at approximately 13 years of age, this finding suggests that brain development in patients with schizophrenia is stunted before that age. The smaller brain volume is expressed as decrements in both grey and white matter. After diagnosis, it is mainly the grey matter loss that progresses over time whereas white matter deficits are stable or may even improve over the course of the illness. To understand the possible causes of the brain changes in the first phase of schizophrenia, evidence from treatment studies, postmortem and neuroimaging investigations together with animal experiments needs to be incorporated. These data suggest that the pathophysiology of schizophrenia is multifactorial. Increased striatal dopamine synthesis is already evident before the time of diagnosis, starting during the at-risk mental state, and increases during the onset of frank psychosis. Cognitive impairment and negative symptoms may, in turn, result from other abnormalities, such as NMDA receptor hypofunction and low-grade inflammation of the brain. The latter two dysfunctions probably antedate increased dopamine synthesis by many years, reflecting the much earlier presence of cognitive and social dysfunction. Although correction of the hyperdopaminergic state with antipsychotic agents is generally effective in patients with a first-episode psychosis, the effects of treatments to correct NMDA receptor hypofunction or low-grade inflammation are (so far) rather modest at best. Improved efficacy of these interventions can be expected when they are applied at the onset of cognitive and social dysfunction, rather than at the

  2. Episodes from the Early History of Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaboe, Asger

    The author does not attempt to give a general survey of early astronomy; rather, he chooses to present a few "episodes" and treats them in detail. However, first he provides the necessary astronomical background in his descriptive account of what you can see when you look at the sky with the naked eye, unblinkered by received knowledge, but with curiosity and wit. Chapter 1 deals with the arithmetical astronomy of ancient Mesopotamia where astronomy first was made an exact science. Next are treated Greek geometrical models for planetary motion, culminating in Ptolemy's equant models in his Almagest. Ptolemy does not assign them absolute size in this work, but, as is shown here, if we scale the models properly, they will yield good values, not only of the directions to the planets, but of the distances to them, as well. Thus one can immediately find the dimensions of the Copernican System from parameters in the Almagest - we have evidence that Copernicus did just that. Further, Islamic astronomers' modifications of Ptolemy's models by devices using only uniform circular motion are discussed, as are Copernicus's adoption of some of them. finally, it is made precise which bothersome problem was resolved by the heliocentric hypothesis, as it was by the Tychonic arrangement. Next, the Ptolemaic System, the first cosmological scheme to incorporate quantitative models, is described as Ptolemy himself did it in a recenlty recovered passage from his Planetary Hypotheses. Here he does assign absolute size to his models in order to fit them into the snugly nested spherical shells that made up his universe. This much maligned system was, in fact, a harmonious construct that remained the basis for how educated people thought of their world for a millennium and a half. Finally, after a brief review of the geometry of the ellipse, the author gives an elementary derivation of Kepler's equation, and shows how Kepler solved it, and further proves that a planet moves very nearly

  3. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-1993)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  4. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-1995)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  5. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  6. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2012)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  7. Treatment Episode Data Set: Discharges (TEDS-D-2011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Discharges (TEDS-D) is a national census data system of annual discharges from substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-D...

  8. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-1997)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  9. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-1994)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  10. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  11. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2000)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  12. Treatment Episode Data Set: Discharges (TEDS-D-2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Discharges (TEDS-D) is a national census data system of annual discharges from substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-D...

  13. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-1998)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  14. Treatment Episode Data Set: Discharges (TEDS-D-2009)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Discharges (TEDS-D) is a national census data system of annual discharges from substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-D...

  15. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2009)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  16. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-1999)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  17. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2004)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  18. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2001)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  19. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-1992)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  20. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2008)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  1. Treatment Episode Data Set: Discharges (TEDS-D-2008)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Discharges (TEDS-D) is a national census data system of annual discharges from substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-D...

  2. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  3. Treatment Episode Data Set: Discharges (TEDS-D-2007)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Discharges (TEDS-D) is a national census data system of annual discharges from substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-D...

  4. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2007)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  5. Treatment Episode Data Set: Discharges (TEDS-D-2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Discharges (TEDS-D) is a national census data system of annual discharges from substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-D...

  6. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2005)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  7. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-1996)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  8. The development of episodic foresight: emerging concepts and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Judith A; Mayhew, Estelle M Y; Prabhakar, Janani

    2011-01-01

    Episodic foresight is here defined as the ability to project oneself into the future and mentally simulate situations and outcomes. Tasks used to study the development of episodic foresight in young children are reviewed and compared to tasks used to study other future-oriented abilities (planning, delay of gratification, and prospective memory) in the same age-group. We argue for the importance of accounting for and minimizing the role of other cognitive demands in research tasks. Because episodic foresight is an emerging ability in young children, more research needs to be directed at the contexts in which it emerges and the extent to which episodic foresight is part of a growing ability for mental representation.

  9. Episode-Based Payment, Evaluating the Impact on Chronic...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Policy makers are interested in aggregating fee-for-service reimbursement into episode-based bundle payments, hoping it will lead to greater efficiency in the...

  10. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  11. Episodic Memory Decline in Huntington's Disease, A Binding Deficit?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Haj, M.; Caillaud, M.; Fasotti, L.; Verny, C.; Allain, P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Huntington's disease (HD) is characterized by episodic memory deterioration. Objective: Our paper investigates the cognitive mechanisms that might underlie this decline. To this aim, we tested two executive hypotheses, the binding and the inhibition hypotheses. Methods: Fifteen HD

  12. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  13. Interaction between categorical knowledge and episodic memory across domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmer, Pernille; Persaud, Kimele

    2014-01-01

    Categorical knowledge and episodic memory have traditionally been viewed as separate lines of inquiry. Here, we present a perspective on the interrelatedness of categorical knowledge and reconstruction from memory. We address three underlying questions: what knowledge do people bring to the task of remembering? How do people integrate that knowledge with episodic memory? Is this the optimal way for the memory system to work? In the review of five studies spanning four category domains (discrete, continuous, temporal, and linguistic), we evaluate the relative contribution and the structure of influence of categorical knowledge on long-term episodic memory. These studies suggest a robustness of peoples' knowledge of the statistical regularities of the environment, and provide converging evidence of the quality and influence of category knowledge on reconstructive memory. Lastly, we argue that combining categorical knowledge and episodic memory is an efficient strategy of the memory system.

  14. Levocarnitine Decreases Intradialytic Hypotension Episodes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra-Sifuentes, Héctor Raúl; Del Cueto-Aguilera, Ángel; Gallegos-Arguijo, Daniel Alberto; Castillo-Torres, Sergio Andres; Vera-Pineda, Raymundo; Martínez-Granados, Rolando Jacob; Atilano-Díaz, Alexandro; Cuellar-Monterrubio, Jesus Eduardo; Pezina-Cantú, Cesar Octaviano; Martínez-Guevara, Edgar de Jesús; Ortiz-Treviño, Juan Francisco; Delgado-García, Guillermo Rubén; Martínez-Jiménez, José Guadalupe; Cruz-Valdez, Jesús; Sánchez-Martínez, Concepción

    2017-10-01

    Intradialytic hypotension is common complication in stage 5 chronic kidney disease patients on hemodialysis. Incidence ranges from 15 to 30%. These patients have levocarnitine deficiency. A randomized, placebo-controlled quadruple-blinded trial was designed to demonstrate the levocarnitine efficiency on intradialytic hypotension prevention. Patients were randomized into four groups, to receive levocarnitine or placebo. During the intervention period, levocarnitine and placebo was administered 0 and 30 min before each hemodialysis session, respectively. During the trial, 33 patients received 1188 hemodialysis sessions. We identified 239 (21.3%) intradialytic hypotension episodes. The intradialytic hypotension episodes were less frequent in the levocarnitine group (9.3%, 60 IH events) (P hypotension episodes. Levocarnitine supplementation before each hemodialysis session efficiently diminishes the intradialytic hypotension episodes. This is a new application method that must be considered and explored. © 2017 International Society for Apheresis, Japanese Society for Apheresis, and Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy.

  15. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2003)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  16. Episodic respiratory failure due to focal epileptic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alldinger, Ingo; Siebler, M; Peiper, M; Cupisti, K; Rado, Y; Kindgen-Milles, D; Knoefel, W T

    2006-02-21

    We report on a patient with a complicated course after surgical abdominal intervention and episodic life threatening respiratory failures successfully treated with carbamazepine after diagnosis of a ponto-medullary lesion in the MRI.

  17. Lower LINE-1 methylation in first-episode schizophrenia patients with the history of childhood trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiak, Błażej; Szmida, Elżbieta; Karpiński, Paweł; Loska, Olga; Sąsiadek, Maria M; Frydecka, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    We investigated methylation of DNA repetitive sequences (LINE-1 and BAGE) in peripheral blood leukocytes from first-episode schizophrenia (FES) patients and healthy controls (HCs) with respect to childhood adversities. Patients were divided into two subgroups based on the history of childhood trauma - FES(+) and FES(-) subjects. The majority of HCs had a negative history of childhood trauma - HCs(-) subjects. FES(+) patients had significantly lower LINE-1 methylation in comparison with FES(-) patients or HC(-) subjects. Emotional abuse and total trauma score predicted lower LINE-1 methylation in FES patients, while general trauma score was associated with lower BAGE methylation in HCs. Childhood adversities might be associated with global DNA hypomethylation in adult FES patients.

  18. Postoperative episodic oxygen desaturation in the sleep apnoea syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Kehlet, H

    1991-01-01

    We describe a patient with sleep apnoea syndrome who showed severe episodic hypoxaemia in the late postoperative period. The sleep apnoea syndrome should be studied further to evaluate its significance as a surgical risk factor.......We describe a patient with sleep apnoea syndrome who showed severe episodic hypoxaemia in the late postoperative period. The sleep apnoea syndrome should be studied further to evaluate its significance as a surgical risk factor....

  19. Patients' relatives delayed help seeking after a first psychotic episode

    OpenAIRE

    Vera B M Monteiro; Santos,José Quirino dos; Martin, Denise

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Recent studies show that proper treatment after the first psychotic episode may be delayed for a long time. Some patients remain without care even while exhibiting serious symptoms. The objective of the study was to understand the reasons why patients' relatives waited at least 6 months to look for psychiatric counseling and treatment. METHOD: Qualitative analyses of semi-structured interviews with 15 relatives (of patients with first psychotic episode) who have waited more than si...

  20. Episodic Memory during Middle Childhood: Active vs. Passive Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Blankenship, Tashauna L.

    2014-01-01

    Episodic memory refers to context based explicit memory and shows vast improvements during middle childhood. In this study, episodic encoding was manipulated using stimuli that were hypothesized to require active or passive processing. Nine to eleven-year-old children were presented with a recall task using lower resolution (active processing) and clear (passive processing) images. It was hypothesized that children would recall more low resolution images than clear images. Executive function ...

  1. Episodic memories predict adaptive value-based decision-making

    OpenAIRE

    Murty, Vishnu; FeldmanHall, Oriel; Hunter, Lindsay E.; Phelps, Elizabeth A.; Davachi, Lila

    2016-01-01

    Prior research illustrates that memory can guide value-based decision-making. For example, previous work has implicated both working memory and procedural memory (i.e., reinforcement learning) in guiding choice. However, other types of memories, such as episodic memory, may also influence decision-making. Here we test the role for episodic memory—specifically item versus associative memory—in supporting value-based choice. Participants completed a task where they first learned the value assoc...

  2. Premorbid Personality and Insight in First-Episode Psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Campos, Maria S.; Garcia-Jalon, Elena; Gilleen, James K.; David, Anthony S.; Peralta MD, Victor; Cuesta, Manuel J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Insight in psychosis and schizophrenia is considered a complex biopsychosocial phenomenon. Premorbid personality is regarded by some authors as part of the substrate to many psychiatric phenomena, but it is not clear if this applies to insight. Aim: To examine longitudinal relationships between personality traits and insight dimensions in first-episode psychosis. Methods: One hundred consecutive antipsychotic-naïve first-episode nonaffective psychotic patients admitted to hospital...

  3. fMRI brain activation changes following treatment of a first bipolar manic episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strakowski, Stephen M; Fleck, David E; Welge, Jeffrey; Eliassen, James C; Norris, Matthew; Durling, Michelle; Komoroski, Richard A; Chu, Wen-Jang; Weber, Wade; Dudley, Jonathan A; Blom, Thomas J; Stover, Amanda; Klein, Christina; Strawn, Jeffrey R; DelBello, Melissa P; Lee, Jing-Huei; Adler, Caleb M

    2016-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that, with treatment, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) regional brain activation in first-episode mania would normalize - i.e., that differences from healthy subjects would diminish over time, and would be associated with clinical remission status, potentially identifying neuroanatomic treatment response markers. Forty-two participants with bipolar I disorder were recruited during their first manic episode, pseudo-randomized to open-label lithium or quetiapine, and followed for 8 weeks. fMRI scans were obtained at baseline and then after 1 and 8 weeks of treatment, while participants performed a continuous performance task with emotional distracters. Healthy participants received fMRI scans at these same intervals. Specific region-of-interest (ROI) activations within prefrontal emotional networks were assessed as potential measures of treatment response. ROI data were reduced using exploratory factor analysis, which identified five factors that were organizationally consistent with functional anatomic models of human emotion modulation. Half of the participants with bipolar disorder achieved remission by Week 8 and were contrasted with the other half that did not. Analyses demonstrated that, in the bipolar disorder group in general, treatment led to decreases in activation across brain regions toward healthy subject values. However, differences in activation changes were observed between subjects with bipolar disorder who did or did not achieve remission in subcortical and amygdala factors. These findings provide evidence for potential neuroanatomic treatment response markers in first-episode bipolar disorder. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. [MELAS: Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy, Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-Like Episodes].

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    Murakami, Hidetomo; Ono, Kenjiro

    2017-02-01

    Mitochondrial disease is caused by a deficiency in the energy supply to cells due to mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) is a mitochondrial disease that presents with stroke-like episodes such as acute onset of neurological deficits and characteristic imaging findings. Stroke-like episodes in MELAS have the following features: 1) neurological deficits due to localization of lesions in the brain, 2) episodes often accompany epilepsy, 3) lesions do not follow the vascular supply area, 4) lesions are more often seen in the posterior brain than in the anterior brain, 5) lesions spread to an adjacent area in the brain, and 6) neurological symptoms often disappear together with imaging findings, but later relapse. About 80% of patients with MELAS have an A-to-G transition mutation at the nucleotide pair 3243 in the dihydrouridine loop of mitochondrial tRNALeu(UUR), which causes the absence of posttranscriptional taurine modification at the wobble nucleotide of mitochondrial tRNALeu(UUR) and disrupts protein synthesis. However, the precise pathophysiology of stroke-like episodes is under investigation, with possible hypotheses for these episodes including mitochondrial angiopathy, mitochondrial cytopathy, and neuron-astrocyte uncoupling. With regard to treatment, L-arginine and taurine have recently been suggested for relief of clinical symptoms.

  5. An inherited episodic head tremor syndrome in Doberman pinscher dogs.

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    Wolf, Martina; Bruehschwein, Andreas; Sauter-Louis, Carola; Sewell, Adrian C; Fischer, Andrea

    2011-11-01

    Episodic head tremor anecdotally occurs in the Doberman pinscher dog breed, but it is not described in sufficient detail in the literature. We evaluated 87 Doberman pinschers affected with episodic head tremor and appropriate controls. The data analyzed were collected through detailed questionnaires, elaborate telephone interviews, and video recordings. Affected dogs underwent clinical, neurological, and laboratory examination, and a detailed diagnostic workup was conducted in 5 affected dogs. Pedigrees of affected dogs were collected and reviewed. The affected dogs expressed individual phenotypes of either horizontal or vertical head movements, but rarely did a dog exhibit head movements in both directions. There was considerable variation in duration (10 seconds to 3 hours; median: 3 minutes), frequency of occurrence (1-20 episodes/day; median: 2/day) of head tremor and length of the period without head tremor (1-1,800 days; median: 60 days). Subtle dystonic posturing of the head and neck during head tremor was evident on video recordings of 5 dogs. Certain exceptional conditions such as illness, surgery, some medications, heat, pseudopregnancy, or pregnancy triggered episodes. Two main important forms of episodic head tremor were identified: a familial early-onset form (age dogs were traced back to 1 common sire, also including sporadic cases. Episodic head tremor is an inherited, paroxysmal movement disorder that affects the Doberman pinscher breed. Identification of the causative genes in the future will allow us to obtain a more detailed description of the syndrome. Copyright © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

  6. Effect of Taurine on Febrile Episodes in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

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    Mina Islambulchilar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effect of oral taurine on the incidence of febrile episodes during chemotherapy in young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods: Forty young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, at the beginning of maintenance course of their chemotherapy, were eligible for this study. The study population was randomized in a double blind manner to receive either taurine or placebo (2 gram per day orally. Life quality and side effects including febrile episodes were assessed using questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Pearson’s Chi square test. Results: Of total forty participants, 43.8% were female and 56.3 % were male. The mean age was 19.16±1.95 years (ranges: 16-23 years. The results indicated that the levels of white blood cells are significantly (P<0.05 increased in taurine treated group. There was no elevation in blasts count. A total of 70 febrile episodes were observed during study, febrile episodes were significantly (P<0.05 lower in taurine patients in comparison to the control ones. Conclusion: The overall incidence of febrile episodes and infectious complications in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients receiving taurine was lower than placebo group. Taurine’s ability to increase leukocyte count may result in lower febrile episodes.

  7. Episodic Memory Impairments in Primary Brain Tumor Patients.

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    Durand, Thomas; Berzero, Giulia; Bompaire, Flavie; Hoffmann, Sabine; Léger, Isabelle; Jego, Virginie; Baruteau, Marie; Delgadillo, Daniel; Taillia, Hervé; Psimaras, Dimitri; Ricard, Damien

    2018-01-04

    Cognitive investigations in brain tumor patients have mostly explored episodic memory without differentiating between encoding, storage, and retrieval deficits. The aim of this study is to offer insight into the memory sub-processes affected in primary brain tumor patients and propose an appropriate assessment method. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical and memory assessments of 158 patients with primary brain tumors who had presented to our departments with cognitive complaints and were investigated using the Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test. Retrieval was the process of episodic memory most frequently affected, with deficits in this domain detected in 92% of patients with episodic memory impairments. Storage and encoding deficits were less prevalent, with impairments, respectively, detected in 41% and 23% of memory-impaired patients. The pattern of episodic memory impairment was similar across different tumor histologies and treatment modalities. Although all processes of episodic memory were found to be impaired, retrieval was by far the most widely affected function. A thorough assessment of all three components of episodic memory should be part of the regular neuropsychological evaluation in patients with primary brain tumors.

  8. Emotional Intelligence in a Group of Patients with First-Episode Psychosis in Iran

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    Hamid Reza Pooretemad

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to evaluate the Emotional Intelligence (EI of a group of patients with first episode psychosis in Iran as compared with a healthy control group. A case-control design was used. EI was assessed using Persian version of Bar-On Emotional Quotient inventory (EQ-i administered on 25 patients with history of a single psychotic episode in the last two years, as well as 64 healthy participants. The mean (±SD of EI scores of patients and healthy controls group was 319.8 (±40.9 and 328.8 (±33.3, respectively. Two-independent sample t-test revealed no significant difference in the EI scores of two groups (P=0.29. In contrast with chronic schizophrenia, the patients with first-episode psychosis were not different from the healthy subjects in terms of emotional intelligence score. It might be implied that the low emotional intelligence of the patients with chronic psychotic disorders is an accumulative result of the underlying disease over time.

  9. Computational dissection of human episodic memory reveals mental process-specific genetic profiles.

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    Luksys, Gediminas; Fastenrath, Matthias; Coynel, David; Freytag, Virginie; Gschwind, Leo; Heck, Angela; Jessen, Frank; Maier, Wolfgang; Milnik, Annette; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G; Scherer, Martin; Spalek, Klara; Vogler, Christian; Wagner, Michael; Wolfsgruber, Steffen; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2015-09-01

    Episodic memory performance is the result of distinct mental processes, such as learning, memory maintenance, and emotional modulation of memory strength. Such processes can be effectively dissociated using computational models. Here we performed gene set enrichment analyses of model parameters estimated from the episodic memory performance of 1,765 healthy young adults. We report robust and replicated associations of the amine compound SLC (solute-carrier) transporters gene set with the learning rate, of the collagen formation and transmembrane receptor protein tyrosine kinase activity gene sets with the modulation of memory strength by negative emotional arousal, and of the L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) interactions gene set with the repetition-based memory improvement. Furthermore, in a large functional MRI sample of 795 subjects we found that the association between L1CAM interactions and memory maintenance revealed large clusters of differences in brain activity in frontal cortical areas. Our findings provide converging evidence that distinct genetic profiles underlie specific mental processes of human episodic memory. They also provide empirical support to previous theoretical and neurobiological studies linking specific neuromodulators to the learning rate and linking neural cell adhesion molecules to memory maintenance. Furthermore, our study suggests additional memory-related genetic pathways, which may contribute to a better understanding of the neurobiology of human memory.

  10. Sensory Processing Disorders are Associated with Duration of Current Episode and Severity of Side Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Gianluca; Engel-Yeger, Batya; Vazquez, Gustavo H; Pompili, Maurizio; Amore, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Longer duration of untreated illness, longer duration of current episode, and the severity of medication side effects may negatively impact on the perceived disability and psychosocial impairment of patients with major affective and anxiety disorders. Studies also suggested the involvement of sensory perception in emotional and psychopathological processes. The present study aimed to examine the relationship between Sensory Processing Disorders (SPD), duration of untreated illness and current illness episode, and the severity of side effects related to psychoactive medications. The sample included 178 participants with an age ranging from 17 to 85 years (mean=53.84±15.55). Participants were diagnosed with unipolar Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) (50%), Bipolar Disorder (BD) (33.7%), and Anxiety disorders (16.3%). They completed a socio-demographic questionnaire, the Udvalg for Kliniske Undersøgelser (UKU), and Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile (AASP) questionnaire. Longer duration of current episode correlated with greater registration of sensory input and lower avoidance from sensory input among unipolar patients; with lower registration of sensory input, and higher tendency for sensory sensitivity/avoidance among bipolar participants; with lower sensory sensitivity/avoidance among anxiety participants, respectively. Also, mean UKU total scores correlated with lower sensory sensitivity among bipolar individuals. SPD expressed in either hypo/hyper sensitivity may serve to clinically characterize subjects with major affective and anxiety disorders.

  11. Neural mechanisms supporting the extraction of general knowledge across episodic memories.

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    Sweegers, Carly C G; Takashima, Atsuko; Fernández, Guillén; Talamini, Lucia M

    2014-02-15

    General knowledge acquisition entails the extraction of statistical regularities from the environment. At high levels of complexity, this may involve the extraction, and consolidation, of associative regularities across event memories. The underlying neural mechanisms would likely involve a hippocampo-neocortical dialog, as proposed previously for system-level consolidation. To test these hypotheses, we assessed possible differences in consolidation between associative memories containing cross-episodic regularities and unique associative memories. Subjects learned face-location associations, half of which responded to complex regularities regarding the combination of facial features and locations, whereas the other half did not. Importantly, regularities could only be extracted over hippocampus-encoded, associative aspects of the items. Memory was assessed both immediately after encoding and 48 h later, under fMRI acquisition. Our results suggest that processes related to system-level reorganization occur preferentially for regular associations across episodes. Moreover, the build-up of general knowledge regarding regular associations appears to involve the coordinated activity of the hippocampus and mediofrontal regions. The putative cross-talk between these two regions might support a mechanism for regularity extraction. These findings suggest that the consolidation of cross-episodic regularities may be a key mechanism underlying general knowledge acquisition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dose effects of triazolam on brain activity during episodic memory encoding: a PET study.

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    Mintzer, Miriam Z; Kuwabara, Hiroto; Alexander, Mohab; Brasic, James R; Ye, Weiguo; Ernst, Monique; Griffiths, Roland R; Wong, Dean F

    2006-11-01

    Although it is well established that acute benzodiazepine administration impairs episodic memory encoding, little is known about the neuroanatomical substrates of this effect. The objective was to examine the acute dose effects of the benzodiazepine hypnotic triazolam on brain activity during episodic memory encoding. After oral capsule administration (placebo, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mg/70 kg triazolam), regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured using positron emission tomography (PET) with 15O-H2O during performance of semantic categorization and orthographic categorization tasks in a double-blind, within-subject design in 12 healthy volunteers. The rCBF associated with episodic memory encoding was measured by subtracting the rCBF during orthographic categorization from that during semantic categorization and by examining correlations between brain activity during encoding and subsequent recognition memory performance. Results in the placebo condition replicated those of nonpharmacological encoding studies, including activation in left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex. Correlations between brain activity and subsequent memory performance additionally showed medial temporal activation. Triazolam produced dose-related impairment in memory performance and dose-related deactivation in encoding-associated areas including right prefrontal cortex, left parahippocampal gyrus, and left anterior cingulate cortex. Results are consistent with behavioral evidence that benzodiazepines impair prefrontal control processes as well as contextual memory and episodic binding processes thought to be controlled by the medial temporal lobe. In addition to elucidating the brain mechanisms underlying these benzodiazepine-induced behavioral deficits, results of this study also help validate hypotheses generated in nonpharmacological neuroimaging studies regarding the processes controlled by these brain regions.

  13. A prefrontal-hippocampal comparator for goal-directed behavior: the intentional self and episodic memory

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    Robert eNuman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe hypothesis of this article is that the interactions between the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus play a critical role in the modulation of goal-directed self-action and the strengthening of episodic memories. We describe various theories that model a comparator function for the hippocampus, and then elaborate the empirical evidence that supports these theories. One theory which describes a prefrontal-hippocampal comparator for voluntary action, is emphasized. Action plans are essential for successful goal-directed behavior, and are elaborated by the prefrontal cortex. When an action plan is initiated, the prefrontal cortex transmits an efference copy (or corollary discharge to the hippocampus where it is stored as a working memory for the action plan (which includes the expected outcomes of the action plan. The hippocampus then serves as a response intention-response outcome working memory comparator. Hippocampal comparator function is enabled by the hippocampal theta rhythm allowing the hippocampus to compare expected action outcomes to actual action outcomes. If the expected and actual outcomes match, the hippocampus transmits a signal to prefrontal cortex which strengthens or consolidates the action plan. If a mismatch occurs, the hippocampus transmits an error signal to the prefrontal cortex which facilitates a reformulation of the action plan, fostering behavioral flexibility. The corollary discharge provides the self-referential component to the episodic memory, affording the personal and subjective experience of what behavior was carried out, when it was carried out, and in what context (where it occurred. Such a perspective can be applied to episodic memory in humans, and episodic-like memory in subhuman animal species.

  14. Large Genomic Deletions in CACNA1A Cause Episodic Ataxia Type 2

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    Jijun eWan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Episodic ataxia (EA syndromes are heritable diseases characterized by dramatic episodes of imbalance and incoordination. Episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2, the most common and the best characterized subtype, is caused by mostly nonsense, splice site, small indel and sometimes missense mutations in CACNA1A. Direct sequencing of CACNA1A fails to identify mutations in some patients with EA2-like features, possibly due to incomplete interrogation of CACNA1A or defects in other EA genes not yet defined. Previous reports described genomic deletions between 4-40kb in EA2. In 47 subjects with EA (26 with EA2-like features who tested negative for mutations in the known EA genes, we used Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA to analyze CACNA1A for exonic copy number variations. Breakpoints were further defined by long-range PCR. We identified distinct multi-exonic deletions in three probands with classic EA2-like features: episodes of prolonged vertigo and ataxia triggered by stress and fatigue, interictal nystagmus, with onset during infancy or early childhood. The breakpoints in all three probands are located in Alu sequences, indicating errors in homologous recombination of Alu sequences as the underlying mechanism. The smallest deletion spanned exons 39 and 40, while the largest deletion spanned 200kb, missing all but the first three exons. One deletion involving exons 39 through 47 arose spontaneously. The search for mutations in CACNA1A appears most fruitful in EA patients with interictal nystagmus and onset early in life. The finding of large heterozygous deletions suggests haploinsufficiency as a possible pathomechanism of EA2.

  15. Episodic memory, perceptual memory, and their interaction: foundations for a theory of posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewin, Chris R

    2014-01-01

    A number of autobiographical memory theories and clinical theories of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) make claims that are different from standard views of memory and have been the subject of controversy. These claims include the existence of a long-term perceptual memory system supporting conscious experience separate to episodic memory; greater involvement of perceptual memory in the response to emotion-laden and personally meaningful events; increased perceptual memory intrusions accompanied by impaired episodic memory for the traumatic event among PTSD patients; and a lack of association, or inverse association, between indices of voluntary recall and involuntary images relating to the same traumatic materials. In this article I review current research on perceptual memory, which supports the presence of long-term representations that are selective or incomplete reflections of sensory input. The functional independence of perceptual and episodic memory is illustrated by research on verbal overshadowing but is most clearly exemplified by the strong evidence in favor of enhanced perceptual memory and impaired episodic memory in PTSD. Theoretical predictions concerning the relation between perceptual priming and the development of intrusive images, the effect of verbal versus visuospatial secondary tasks on intrusive trauma images, and the independence of voluntary and involuntary memory for the same materials have garnered widespread support. Reasons for the continuing controversy over traumatic memory are discussed, and some implications of the review for general theories of recall and recognition, clinical theories of PTSD, and "special mechanism" views of memory are set out. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Verbal episodic memory along the course of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: a new perspective.

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    Czepielewski, Letícia S; Massuda, Raffael; Goi, Pedro; Sulzbach-Vianna, Miréia; Reckziegel, Ramiro; Costanzi, Monise; Kapczinski, Flavio; Rosa, Adriane R; Gama, Clarissa S

    2015-02-01

    Impairment on episodic memory (EM) has been strongly correlated with psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD). Morevover, the effects of course and progression of the illness on cognitive functioning have not been well established. The aim of the present study is to assess performance of episodic memory in BD and SZ according to their clinical stages. Subjects who met DSM-IV criteria for bipolar disorder (n=43) and schizophrenia (31), on euthymia or clinical remission, were recruited from the outpatients facilities at Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (Brazil). They were classified into two clinical stages (early or late for BD, and recent onset or chronic for SZ) and compared to 54 healthy controls. Episodic memory performance was assessed by means the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R) that measures verbal learning and episodic memory in both disorders. Our results showed that patients in early stage of BD (EBD) performed better performance on the total immediate free recall (p<0.0001, F=12.060) as well as in delayed free recall (p<0.0001, F=13.914) compared to late stage (LBD) and SZ groups. In the ability to retain words learned, LBD and chronic (CSZ) were more impaired than other groups. Furthermore, the variation of learning (i.e, learning effects) along the 3 trials of immediate free recall was similar between groups. In conclusion, we found a cognitive decline alongside with the progression of BD whereas such impairment was evident in the early of SZ. Despite this, both groups (BD and SZ) seem to maintain the ability to learn. It emphasizes the relevance of studying new therapeutic strategies, in particular, cognitive rehabilitation/remediation techniques as promissory treatment for psychiatric patients, even in those with moderate disabilities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  17. Sensibility and Subjectivity: Levinas’ Traumatic Subject

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    Rashmika Pandya

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The importance of Levinas’ notions of sensibility and subjectivity are evident in the revision of phenomenological method by current phenomenologists such as Jean-Luc Marion and Michel Henry. The criticisms of key tenants of classical phenomenology, intentionality and reduction, are of a particular note. However, there are problems with Levinas’ characterization of subjectivity as essentially sensible. In “Totality and Infinity” and “Otherwise than Being”, Levinas criticizes and recasts a traditional notion of subjectivity, particularly the notion of the subject as the first and foremost rational subject. The subject in Levinas’ works is characterized more by its sensibility and affectedness than by its capacity to reason or affect its world. Levinas ties rationality to economy and suggests an alternative notion of reason that leads to his analysis of the ethical relation as the face-to-face encounter. The ‘origin’ of the social relation is located not in our capacity to know but rather in a sensibility that is diametrically opposed to the reason understood as economy. I argue that the opposition in Levinas’ thought between reason and sensibility is problematic and essentially leads to a self-conflicted subject. In fact, it would seem that violence characterizes the subject’s self-relation and, thus, is also inscribed at the base of the social relation. Rather than overcoming a problematic tendency to dualistic thought in philosophy Levinas merely reverses traditional hierarchies of reason/emotion, subject/object and self/other. 

  18. Functional connectivity pattern during rest within the episodic memory network in association with episodic memory performance in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertel-Knöchel, Viola; Reinke, Britta; Matura, Silke; Prvulovic, David; Linden, David E J; van de Ven, Vincent

    2015-02-28

    In this study, we sought to examine the intrinsic functional organization of the episodic memory network during rest in bipolar disorder (BD). The previous work suggests that deficits in intrinsic functional connectivity may account for impaired memory performance. We hypothesized that regions involved in episodic memory processing would reveal aberrant functional connectivity in patients with bipolar disorder. We examined 21 patients with BD and 21 healthy matched controls who underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a resting condition. We did a seed-based functional connectivity analysis (SBA), using the regions of the episodic memory network that showed a significantly different activation pattern during task-related fMRI as seeds. The functional connectivity scores (FC) were further correlated with episodic memory task performance. Our results revealed decreased FC scores within frontal areas and between frontal and temporal/hippocampal/limbic regions in BD patients in comparison with controls. We observed higher FC in BD patients compared with controls between frontal and limbic regions. The decrease in fronto-frontal functional connectivity in BD patients showed a significant positive association with episodic memory performance. The association between task-independent dysfunctional frontal-limbic FC and episodic memory performance may be relevant for current pathophysiological models of the disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Repeated poisoning episodes: Alarm sign of risk situations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García González, Elsa; Trenchs Sainz de la Maza, Victoria; Martínez Sánchez, Lidia; Ferrer Bosch, Nuria; Luaces Cubells, Carles

    2017-11-01

    Prevention is an essential aspect in paediatric poisonings, especially when recurrent episodes are detected. The aims of this article are to detect the recurrence rate for suspected poisoning in emergency consultations, as well as to identify the cases in which specific preventive measures are indicated, and to determine whether the creation of a specific item for recurrent episodes in the computerised medical records system facilitates its detection. A retrospective study was conducted on patients less than 18 years of age treated in the emergency room due to suspected poisoning during 2013 and 2014. Patients were divided according to the presence or absence of previous episodes. From January 2014, a specific item is present in the computerised medical records of the poisoned patient, where the history of previous episodes is registered. The preventive measures used between both groups were compared. A total of 731 consultations were recorded for suspected poisoning. A history of previous episodes was detected in 9% of cases. Medical injury reports and follow-up in outpatient clinics were more often performed in patients with recurrent episodes than in patients without them (28.8% vs 18.0%, P=.034, and 65.2% vs. 18.8%, P<.001, respectively). In 2013, the recurrence rate was 5.9% vs 12% in 2014 (P=.004). The recurrence rate observed is significant. Although preventive measures are more frequently indicated in these patients, their application is low. The creation of a specific item for recurrent episodes in a computerised medical records system facilitates their detection. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional brain imaging of episodic memory decline in ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, L

    2017-01-01

    The episodic long-term memory system supports remembering of events. It is considered to be the most age-sensitive system, with an average onset of decline around 60 years of age. However, there is marked interindividual variability, such that some individuals show faster than average change and others show no or very little change. This variability may be related to the risk of developing dementia, with elevated risk for individuals with accelerated episodic memory decline. Brain imaging with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signalling or positron emission tomography (PET) has been used to reveal the brain bases of declining episodic memory in ageing. Several studies have demonstrated a link between age-related episodic memory decline and the hippocampus during active mnemonic processing, which is further supported by studies of hippocampal functional connectivity in the resting state. The hippocampus interacts with anterior and posterior neocortical regions to support episodic memory, and alterations in hippocampus-neocortex connectivity have been shown to contribute to impaired episodic memory. Multimodal MRI studies and more recently hybrid MRI/PET studies allow consideration of various factors that can influence the association between the hippocampal BOLD signal and memory performance. These include neurovascular factors, grey and white matter structural alterations, dopaminergic neurotransmission, amyloid-Β and glucose metabolism. Knowledge about the brain bases of episodic memory decline can guide interventions to strengthen memory in older adults, particularly in those with an elevated risk of developing dementia, with promising results for combinations of cognitive and physical stimulation. © 2016 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  1. Pycnogenol treatment of acute hemorrhoidal episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcaro, Gianni; Cesarone, Maria Rosaria; Errichi, Bruno; Di Renzo, Andrea; Grossi, Maria Giovanna; Ricci, Andrea; Dugall, Mark; Cornelli, Umberto; Cacchio, Marisa; Rohdewald, Peter

    2010-03-01

    We investigated the efficacy of orally and topically applied Pycnogenol for the management of acute hemorrhoidal attacks in a controlled, randomized study with 84 subjects. Within less than 48 h of onset of an acute attack, patients were enrolled and signs and symptoms were scored. This evaluation was repeated after seven days' treatment and again seven days following treatment cessation. The decrease in scores was significantly more pronounced in the Pycnogenol-treated groups than in the control group given placebo (p Pycnogenol for relieving signs and symptoms of acute external hemorrhoids. In a group of patients given topical (0.5%) Pycnogenol in addition to oral Pycnogenol the improvement in symptoms set in significantly faster and was more pronounced. The most prominent symptom, hemorrhoidal bleeding, was completely absent in all patients treated with Pycnogenol for seven days and also at the 14 days follow-up. In contrast, bleedings were still observed in the control group during the two weeks follow-up. This study indicates that Pycnogenol, both in oral and in topical form, is effective for controlling this common, disabling health problem. The application of Pycnogenol eases the management of acute hemorrhoidal attacks and help avoid bleedings. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Effects of episodic acidification on Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) smolts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, J.A.; Obedzinski, M.; McCormick, S.D.; Kocik, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of episodic acidification on Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) smolt physiology and survival in fresh water (FW) and seawater (SW) was investigated. Smolts were held in either ambient (control, pH 6.0-6.6), acidified (chronic, pH 4.4-6.1), or episodically acidified (episodic, pH reduction from control levels to pH ???5.2 for 48 h once weekly) river water for 31 days and then transferred to 34??? SW. Smolts fed little while in acidified conditions and chronic smolts did not grow in length or weight. In FW, chronic smolts experienced increases in hematocrit and plasma potassium and reductions in plasma sodium and chloride. Upon transfer to SW, chronic and episodic smolts experienced reductions in hematocrit, increases in plasma sodium, chloride, and potassium levels, and suffered mortalities. Gill Na+,K+-ATPase and citrate synthase activities were reduced by exposure to acid. For most parameters, the effect of episodic acid exposure was less than that of chronic acidification. Exposure to acidic conditions, even when short in duration and followed by a 30-h recovery period in suitable water (pH 6.5), led to a 35% mortality of smolts upon transfer to SW. This study highlights the importance of measuring and assessing sublethal stresses in FW and their ultimate effects in marine ecosystems.

  3. Different genetic factors underlie fear conditioning and episodic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrikson, Mats; Annas, Peter; Hettema, John M

    2015-08-01

    Fear conditioning seems to account for the acquisition of post-traumatic stress disorder, whereas conscious recall of events in aftermath of trauma reflects episodic memory. Studies show that both fear conditioning and episodic memory are heritable, but no study has evaluated whether they reflect common or separate genetic factors. To this end, we studied episodic memory and fear conditioning in 173 healthy twin pairs using visual stimuli predicting unconditioned electric shocks. Fear conditioning acquisition and extinction was determined using conditioned visual stimuli predicting unconditioned mild electric shocks, whereas electrodermal activity served as the fear learning index. Episodic memory was evaluated using cued recall of pictorial stimuli unrelated to conditioning. We used multivariate structural equation modeling to jointly analyze memory performance and acquisition as well as extinction of fear conditioning. Best-fit twin models estimated moderate genetic loadings for conditioning and memory measures, with no genetic covariation between them. Individual differences in fear conditioning and episodic memory reflect distinct genetically influenced processes, suggesting that the genetic risk for learning-induced anxiety disorders includes at least two memory-related genetic factors. These findings are consistent with the facts that the two separate learning forms are distant in their evolutionary development, involve different brain mechanisms, and support that genetically independent memory systems are pivotal in the development and maintenance of syndromes related to fear learning.

  4. Neurophysiological handover from MMN to P3a in first-episode and recurrent major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiu; Zhang, Yan; Wei, Dunhong; Wu, Xingqu; Fu, Qinghai; Xu, Fan; Wang, Huan; Ye, Ming; Ma, Wentao; Yang, Laiqi; Zhang, Zhijun

    2015-03-15

    Mismatch negativity (MMN) and P3a components are sequential and co-occur. MMN represents the pre-attentive index of deviance detection and P3a represents the attention orienting response. Major depressive disorder (MDD) is characterized by impaired pre-attentive information processing. To assess whether impaired pre-attentive information processing can lead to an impairment of subsequent orienting process as the neurophysiological transmission spreads from MMN to P3a in MDD. MMN/P3a was obtained during a two-tone auditory paradigm with 8% duration deviants in 45 first-episode major depression subjects (F-MD), 40 recurrent major depression subjects (R-MD), and 46 healthy controls (HC). Compared with HC, F-MD and R-MD had lower MMN amplitudes and no differences were found between F-MD and R-MD. Notably, R-MD had lower P3a amplitudes and longer P3a latencies compared to HC, while F-MD had no differences. Interestingly, no correlations were found between the severity of depression and the deficits of MMN amplitude. The deficits of P3a amplitude, however, were negatively correlated with the severity of depression in F-MD and R-MD. Furthermore, the P3a amplitude deficits were positively correlated with the number of episodes in R-MD. Patients were on antidepressant medication. The recurrence of depressive episodes can lead to impaired pre-attentive information processing, causing an impairment of subsequent orienting process as the neurophysiological transmission from MMN to P3a. It further suggests that the impaired processing indexed by MMN amplitude may be a stable trait biomarker for the appearance of depression, while P3a amplitude can be used a potential biomarker for recurrence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Hippocampal neurochemical markers in bipolar disorder patients following the first-manic episode: A prospective 12-month proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Leonardo E; Bond, David J; MacMillan, Erin Leigh; Kozicky, Jan-Marie; Muralidharan, Kesavan; Bücker, Joana; Rosa, Adriane Ribeiro; Kapczinski, Flavio; Yatham, Lakshmi N

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies reported decreased N-acetyl aspartate and increased Glx (the sum of glutamate plus glutamine) in bipolar disorder. Since these studies included patients at different stages of illness, it is unknown whether these changes have a causal role or a consequence of multiple episodes and treatments. The studies in early-stage bipolar disorder patients have the potential to provide answers to these issues. Therefore, we evaluated N-acetyl aspartate and Glx levels in hippocampi of first-episode bipolar disorder patients and health subjects at baseline and at 12 months, and examined the impact of episode recurrence on these measures. We used single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to compare the hippocampal neurometabolites ( N-acetyl aspartate and Glx) levels between 41 patients with bipolar disorder following recovery from their first-manic episode and 27 matched healthy subjects at recruitment and 12 months later. We also compared N-acetyl aspartate and Glx levels between patients who had a recurrence of a mood episode and those who did not. There was no main effect of either group (diagnosis) or time for hippocampal N-acetyl aspartate and Glx levels in bipolar disorder patients and healthy subjects. We also did not find any group-by-time interaction for the levels of these metabolites. There were also no differences in N-acetyl aspartate and Glx between patients who experienced a recurrence of a mood episode and those who did not over 12-month follow-up. Our data suggest that N-acetyl aspartate and Glx levels are not altered in early stage bipolar disorder. Further, these data suggest that episode recurrence in early stages does not have a significant impact on the levels of these metabolites. These may suggest that there may be an early window for intervention to potentially arrest neuroprogression of the disease.

  6. Metamemory ratings predict long-term changes in reactivated episodic memories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amnon eYacoby

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Reactivation of long-term memory can render the memory item temporarily labile, offering an opportunity to modify it via behavioral or pharmacological intervention. Declarative memory reactivation is accompanied by a metamemory ability to subjectively assess the knowledge available concerning the target item (Feeling of knowing, FOK. We set out to examine whether FOK can predict the extent of change of long-term episodic memories by post-retrieval manipulations. To this end, participants watched a short movie and immediately thereafter tested on their memory for it. A day later, they were reminded of that movie, and either immediately or one day later, were presented with a second movie. The reminder phase consisted of memory cues to which participants were asked to judge their FOK regarding the original movie. The memory performance of participants to whom new information was presented immediately after reactivating the original episode corresponded to the degree of FOK ratings upon reactivation such that the lower their FOK, the less their memory declined. In contrast, no relation was found between FOK and memory strength for those who learned new information one day after the reminder phase. Our findings suggest that the subjective accessibility of reactivated memories may determine the extent to which new information might modify those memories.

  7. Influence of acute tryptophan depletion on verbal declarative episodic memory in young adult females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmbold, K; Bubenzer, S; Dahmen, B; Eisert, A; Gaber, T J; Habel, U; Konrad, K; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B; Zepf, F D

    2013-11-01

    Diminished synthesis of the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) in the brain has been linked to disturbed memory processes. The present study investigated the effects of diminished central nervous 5-HT synthesis as achieved by an acute dietary tryptophan depletion (ATD) on verbal declarative episodic memory in young women while controlling for the effects of female sex hormones. Eighteen healthy females (aged 20-31 years) participated in a within-subject repeated measures study, with two separate days of assessment spaced at least one individual menstrual cycle apart. On one day, participants were subjected to ATD, thus lowering central nervous 5-HT synthesis. The other day participants received a tryptophan-balanced amino acid load (BAL = control condition). The study was randomized, counterbalanced and double blind in terms of ATD/BAL administration. Measurements took place in the early follicular phase of the participants' menstrual cycle. Estrogen, FSH and LH levels were assessed at baseline. Verbal declarative episodic memory was assessed using a structured word-learning task. Short-term memory, as indexed by immediate recall, was reduced after ATD intake, whereas delayed recall and recognition after a 25-min delay did not show any differences after intake of ATD or BAL. In young women, verbal short-term memory function was more vulnerable to ATD than consolidation processes. In light of the possible interplay between female sex hormones and 5-HT, further studies comparing different menstrual cycle phases are needed.

  8. Genetics of human episodic memory: dealing with complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2011-09-01

    Episodic memory is a polygenic behavioral trait with substantial heritability estimates. Despite its complexity, recent empirical evidence supports the notion that behavioral genetic studies of episodic memory might successfully identify trait-associated molecules and pathways. The development of high-throughput genotyping methods, of elaborated statistical analyses and of phenotypic assessment methods at the neural systems level will facilitate the reliable identification of novel memory-related genes. Importantly, a necessary crosstalk between behavioral genetic studies and investigation of causality by molecular genetic studies will ultimately pave the way towards the identification of biologically important, and hopefully druggable, genes and molecular pathways related to human episodic memory. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Property content guides children's memory for social learning episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Anne E; Kalish, Charles W; Alibali, Martha W

    2014-05-01

    How do children's interpretations of the generality of learning episodes affect what they encode? In the present studies, we investigated the hypothesis that children encode distinct aspects of learning episodes containing generalizable and non-generalizable properties. Two studies with preschool (N=50) and young school-aged children (N=49) reveal that their encoding is contingent on the generalizability of the property they are learning. Children remembered generalizable properties (e.g., morphological or normative properties) more than non-generalizable properties (e.g., historical events or preferences). Conversely, they remembered category exemplars associated with non-generalizable properties more than category exemplars associated with generalizable properties. The findings highlight the utility of remembering distinct aspects of social learning episodes for children's future generalization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Automatic cough episode detection using a vibroacoustic sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynczak, Marcel; Pariaszewska, Katarzyna; Cybulski, Gerard

    2015-08-01

    Cough monitoring is an important element of the diagnostics of respiratory diseases. The European Respiratory Society recommends objective assessment of cough episodes and the search for methods of automatic analysis to make obtaining the quantitative parameters possible. The cough "events" could be classified by a microphone and a sensor that measures the vibrations of the chest. Analysis of the recorded signals consists of calculating the features vectors for selected episodes and of performing automatic classification using them. The aim of the study was to assess the accuracy of classification based on an artificial neural networks using vibroacoustic signals collected from chest. Six healthy, young men and eight healthy, young women carried out an imitated cough, hand clapping, speech and shouting. Three methods of parametrization were used to prepare the vectors of episode features - time domain, time-frequency domain and spectral modeling. We obtained the accuracy of 95% using artificial neural networks.

  11. Individuals with episodic amnesia are not stuck in time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, Carl F; Kwan, Donna; Steindam, Chloe; Rosenbaum, R Shayna

    2014-05-01

    The metaphor that individuals with episodic amnesia due to hippocampal damage are "stuck in time" persists in science, philosophy, and everyday life despite mounting evidence that episodic amnesia can spare many central aspects of temporal consciousness. Here we describe some of this evidence, focusing specifically on KC, one of the most thoroughly documented and severe cases of episodic amnesia on record. KC understands the concept of time, knows that it passes, and can orient himself with respect to his personal past and future. He expresses typical attitudes toward his past and future, and he is able to make future-regarding decisions. Theories claiming that the hippocampus plays an essential role in temporal consciousness need to be revised in light of these findings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Depression and depressive symptoms in first episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romm, Kristin Lie; Rossberg, Jan Ivar; Berg, Akiah Ottesen; Barrett, Elizabeth Ann; Faerden, Ann; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Melle, Ingrid

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the prevalence and pattern of lifetime Diagnostic and Structural Manual of Mental Disorders (fourth version) major depressive episodes, and the relationship between patient characteristics and current severity of depressive symptoms in first episode psychosis patients (FEPP). A total of 122 FEPP from the ongoing longitudinal thematically organized psychosis research study were included at first treatment. A total of 58 patients (48%) had experienced one or more major depressive episodes; 21 (17%) before onset of psychosis and 37 (30%) during or after onset of psychosis. Poor premorbid childhood adjustment, substance abuse, and excitative symptoms at start of treatment were statistically significant associated with higher current severity of depressive symptoms. Alcohol use was significantly associated with current severity of depression in men, while excitative symptoms were associated in women. Thus depressive symptoms are frequent among FEPP, with indications of gender specific differences in patient characteristics that might imply different approaches to treatment.

  13. Annual Patterns of Atmospheric Pollutions and Episodes over Cairo Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Aboel Fetouh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Nile Delta major cities, particularly Cairo, experienced stagnant air pollution episodes, known as Black Cloud, every year over the past decade during autumn. Low-elevated thermal inversion layers play a crucial role in intensifying pollution impacts. Carbon monoxide, ozone, atmospheric temperature, water vapor, and methane measurements from the tropospheric emission spectrometer (TES on board the Aura have been used to assess the dominant component below the inversion layer. In this study, time series analysis, autocorrelations, and cross correlations are performed to gain a better understanding of the connections between those parameters and their local effect. Satellite-based data were obtained for the years 2005–2010. The parameters mentioned were investigated throughout the whole year in order to study the possible episodes that take place in addition to their change from year to year. Ozone and carbon monoxide were the two major indicators to the most basic episodes that occur over Cairo and the Delta region.

  14. Social cognition and neurocognitive deficits in first-episode schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliksted, Vibeke Fuglsang; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Weed, Ethan

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent research has shown a significant impact of social cognitive domains on real world functioning and prognosis in schizophrenia. However, the correlations between specific aspects of social cognition, neurocognition, IQ and clinical symptoms remain unclear in first......-episode schizophrenia. Researchers have speculated about social cognitive subgroups since patients with schizophrenia appear to be a very heterogeneous group. METHODS: Patients with a recent diagnosis of first-episode schizophrenia were tested regarding theory of mind, social perception, neurocognition, IQ......, and clinical symptoms. RESULTS: Data from 36 first-episode schizophrenia patients and 36 one to one matched healthy controls were analysed. Principal component analysis in the patient group was used to examine the variance contributed by different aspects of social cognition, neurocognition, and clinical...

  15. The Structure of Cognition: Attentional Episodes in Mind and Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, John

    2013-01-01

    Cognition is organized in a structured series of attentional episodes, allowing complex problems to be addressed through solution of simpler subproblems. A “multiple-demand” (MD) system of frontal and parietal cortex is active in many different kinds of tasks, and using data from neuroimaging, electrophysiology, neuropsychology, and cognitive studies of intelligence, I propose a core role for MD regions in assembly of the attentional episode. Monkey and human data show dynamic neural coding of attended information across multiple MD regions, with rapid communication within and between regions. Neuropsychological and imaging data link MD function to fluid intelligence, explaining some but not all “executive” deficits after frontal lobe lesions. Cognitive studies link fluid intelligence to goal neglect, and the problem of dividing complex task requirements into focused parts. Like the innate releasing mechanism of ethology, I suggest that construction of the attentional episode provides a core organizational principle for complex, adaptive cognition. PMID:24094101

  16. Analysis of clinical characteristics and antipsychotic medication prescribing practices of first-episode schizophrenia in Israel: a naturalistic prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strous, Rael D; Bar, Faina; Keret, Noa; Lapidus, Raya; Kosov, Nikolai; Chelben, Joseph; Kotler, Moshe

    2006-01-01

    Investigation of the clinical presentation and treatment of first-episode psychosis is important in order to exclude effects of age, chronic illness, long-term treatment and institutionalization. The aim of this descriptive study was to investigate the management practices of first-episode schizophrenia in a cohort of patients in Israel and to document use of the various "typical" or "atypical" antipsychotic agents. Fifty-one consecutive patients (26 M, 25 F) with first-episode psychosis were recruited for study participation and were administered either typical or atypical antipsychotic medications in a naturalistic manner. While an approximately equal number of subjects received typical and atypical medications at illness onset, a prominent shift to atypical antipsychotic treatment occurred over the study course; 18 subjects had medication class shifts: 17 from typical to atypical, and one from atypical to typical. Negative symptoms did not affect length of hospitalization, but were associated with aggression. Higher depression rates were noted in patients with long hospitalizations who received typical antipsychotic medications. Immigrants were admitted at an age approximately four years older than native-born Israelis. The prominent shift from "typical" to "atypical" antipsychotic medications may indicate sensitivity of first-episode psychotic patients to side-effects of "typical" medications and prominence of use of atypical medications in this patient subpopulation be it due to improved efficacy over time or successful marketing. Unique cultural and population characteristics may contribute to the manifestation of first-episode psychosis and suggest the importance of more effective outreach to the immigrant population in order to manage an apparent treatment delay.

  17. Tissue memory in healing tendons: short loading episodes stimulate healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Therese; Eliasson, Pernilla; Aspenberg, Per

    2009-08-01

    Intact tendons adapt slowly to changes in mechanical loading, whereas in healing tendons the effect of mechanical loading or its absence is dramatic. The longevity of the response to a single loading episode is, however, unknown. We hypothesized that the tissue has a "memory" of loading episodes and that therefore short loadings are sufficient to elicit improved healing. The Achilles tendon of 70 female rats was transected and unloaded by tail suspension for 12 days (suspension started on day 2 after surgery). Each day, the rats were let down from suspension for short daily training episodes according to different regimes: 15 min of cage activity or treadmill running for 15, 30, 60, or 2x15 min. Rats with transected Achilles tendons and full-time cage activity served as controls. The results demonstrated that full-time cage activity increased the peak force over three times compared with unloading. Short daily loading episodes (treadmill running) increased the peak force about half as much as full-time activity. Prolongation of treadmill running above 15 min or dividing the daily training in two separate episodes had minimal further effect. This mechanical stimulation increased the cross-sectional area but had no effect on the mechanical properties of the repair tissue. The findings indicate that once the tissue had received information from a certain loading type and level, this is "memorized" and leads to a response lasting many hours. This suggests that patients might be allowed early short loading episodes following, e.g., an Achilles tendon rupture for a better outcome.

  18. Dopamine transporter gene polymorphism and psychiatric symptoms seen in schizophrenic patients at their first episode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inada, Toshiya; Sugita, Tetsuyoshi; Dobashi, Izumi [National Institute of Mental Health, Chiba (Japan)] [and others

    1996-07-26

    To investigate the possible role of the dopamine transporter (DAT) gene in determining the phenotype in human subjects, allele frequencies for the 40-bp variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphism at this site were compared between 117 Japanese normal controls and 118 schizophrenic patients, including six subgroups: early-onset, those with a family history, and those suffering from one of the following psychiatric symptoms at their first episode: delusion and hallucination; disorganization; bizarre behavior; and negative symptoms. No significant differences were observed between the group as a whole or any subgroup of schizophrenic patients and controls. The results indicate that VNTR polymorphism in the DAT gene is unlikely to be a major contributor to any of the psychiatric parameters examined in the present population of schizophrenic subjects. 12 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  19. Comparative Analysis of Theory of Mind Tests in First Episode Psychosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Alexandra; Garakh, Zhanna; Bendova, Marie; Zaytseva, Yuliya

    2017-09-01

    The research is based on comparative analysis of 'Hinting Task', 'Faux Pas', and 'Reading the Mind in the Eyes' tests sensitivity in detection of Theory of Mind deficits. The study included 20 subjects with schizophrenia and schizophrenia spectrum disorders with the first episode of psychosis. Every subject performed the three proposed tests. It was shown that success rate of the three tests differed significantly. The non-verbal test 'Reading the Mind in the Eyes' caused the most difficulties. The success rate percentage of this test performance correlated negatively with the severity of psychopathological symptoms evaluated according to the PANSS scale. Thus, 'Reading the Mind in the Eyes' test is the most sensitive out of the three to Theory of Mind deficits detection, which may be used for diagnostic purposes.

  20. Episode-Centered Guidelines for Teacher Belief Change toward Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Erkan; Kim, ChanMin

    2017-01-01

    Teachers' episodic memories influence their beliefs. The investigation of episodic memories can help identify the teacher beliefs that limit technology-integration. We propose the Episode-Centered Belief Change (ECBC) model that utilizes teachers' episodic memories for changing beliefs impeding effective technology integration. We also propose…

  1. Temporal Clustering and Sequencing in Short-Term Memory and Episodic Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Simon

    2012-01-01

    A model of short-term memory and episodic memory is presented, with the core assumptions that (a) people parse their continuous experience into episodic clusters and (b) items are clustered together in memory as episodes by binding information within an episode to a common temporal context. Along with the additional assumption that information…

  2. CPEB3 is associated with human episodic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Christian; Spalek, Klara; Aerni, Amanda; Demougin, Philippe; Müller, Ariane; Huynh, Kim-Dung; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2009-01-01

    Cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding (CPEB) proteins are crucial for synaptic plasticity and memory in model organisms. A highly conserved, mammalian-specific short intronic sequence within CPEB3 has been identified as a ribozyme with self-cleavage properties. In humans, the ribozyme sequence is polymorphic and harbors a single nucleotide polymorphism that influences cleavage activity of the ribozyme. Here we show that this variation is related to performance in an episodic memory task and that the effect of the variation depends on the emotional valence of the presented material. Our data suggest a role for human CPEB3 in human episodic memory.

  3. Mortality increases with recurrent episodes of nonaccidental trauma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Katherine J; Thackeray, Jonathan; Askegard-Giesmann, Johanna R; Earley, Elizabeth; Groner, Jonathan I; Minneci, Peter C

    2013-07-01

    Nonaccidental trauma (NAT) is a leading cause of childhood traumatic injury and death. Our objectives were to compare the mortality rates of children who experience recurrent episodes of NAT (rNAT) with children who experience a single episode of NAT and to identify factors associated with rNAT and increased mortality from rNAT. Patients of NAT and rNAT in the Ohio State Trauma Registry were identified by matching date of birth, race, and sex between records of patients younger than 16 years between 2000 and 2010 with an DRG International Classification of Diseases--9th Rev. e-code for child abuse (E967-E967.9). Statistical comparisons were made using Fisher's exact and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. A total of 1,572 patients of NAT were identified, with 53 patients meeting criteria for rNAT. Compared with patients with single-episode NAT, patients with rNAT were more commonly male (66% vs. 52%, p = 0.05), were white (83% vs. 65%, p = 0.02), were evaluated at a pediatric trauma center (87% vs. 69%, p = 0.008), and had higher mortality (24.5% vs. 9.9%, p = 0.002). Compared with rNAT patients who did not die, those who died with rNAT had a longer interval from initial episode to second episode (median [interquartile range], 527 days [83-1,099] vs. 166 days [52-502]; p = 0.07) and were older during their second episode (1 year [<6 months to 3 years] vs. <6 months [<6 months to 1 year]; p = 0.06). At initial presentation, lower-extremity fractures (p = 0.09) and liver injuries (p = 0.06) were reported more commonly in nonsurvivors of rNAT. Mortality is significantly higher in children who experience rNAT. Therefore, it is critically important to effectively intervene with appropriate resources and follow-up after a child's initial episode of NAT to prevent a future catastrophic episode.

  4. Episodic memory in frontotemporal dementia: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornberger, Michael; Piguet, Olivier

    2012-03-01

    This review offers a critical appraisal of the literature on episodic memory performance in frontotemporal dementia. Historically, description of patients diagnosed with what was then known as Pick's disease included the presence of memory deficits and an underlying amnestic syndrome was noted in some of these patients. Over the last 20 years, however, the clinical view has been that episodic memory processing is relatively intact in the frontotemporal dementia syndrome. In particular, patients with the subtypes of behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and progressive non-fluent aphasia are reported to perform within normal limits on standard memory tests. In the third clinical presentation of frontotemporal dementia, semantic dementia, relatively intact episodic memory against a significantly impaired semantic memory was regarded as the hallmark. This position was instrumental in the development of clinical diagnostic criteria for frontotemporal dementia in which amnesia was explicitly listed as an exclusion criterion for the disease. The relative intactness of episodic memory, therefore, appeared to be a useful diagnostic marker to distinguish early frontotemporal dementia from Alzheimer's disease, in which early episodic memory disturbance remains the most common clinical feature. We argue that recent evidence questions the validity of preserved episodic memory in frontotemporal dementia, particularly in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia. In semantic dementia, a complex picture emerges with preservation of some components of episodic memory, notably recognition-based visual memory and recall of recent autobiographical events. We propose a critical synthesis of recent neuropsychological evidence on retrograde and anterograde memory in light of neuroimaging and neuropathological findings, demonstrating involvement of medial temporal structures in frontotemporal dementia, structures known to be critical for episodic memory processing. We further

  5. Relationship of Sensory Modality to Retention of Episodic Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jeri; Woodworth, Craig; Swier-Vosnos, Amy; Rossini, Edward; Jackson, Ilana

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the difference between episodic memory for verbal information presented in an oral format versus equivalent material presented in a written format. The study utilized the Logical Memory subtest of the Wechsler Memory Scales-Fourth Edition and the recently validated Morris Revision-IV Paragraphs. In a sample of 97 normal participants, auditory and visual memory performances were found to be significantly correlated (r = .651, p retention in the visual modality. The results demonstrate a high-degree correlation for retention of episodic memory for these two sensory modalities in normal participants.

  6. CPEB3 is associated with human episodic memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Vogler

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding (CPEB proteins are crucial for synaptic plasticity and memory in model organisms. A highly conserved, mammalian-specific short intronic sequence within CPEB3 has been identified as a ribozyme with self-cleavage properties. In humans the ribozyme sequence is polymorphic and harbors a single nucleotide polymorphism which influences cleavage activity of the ribozyme. Here we show that this variation is related to performance in an episodic memory task and that the effect of the variation depends on the emotional valence of the presented material. Our data support a role for human CPEB3 in human episodic memory.

  7. Obsessive-compulsive disorder followed by psychotic episode in long-term ecstasy misuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, Carlo; Tonna, Matteo; Maggini, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    We report the case of two young subjects who developed an obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) during a heavy use of ecstasy. After several months of discontinuation of the drug, major depression with psychotic features developed in one subject and a psychotic disorder in the other individual. No mental disorder preceded the use of ecstasy in any subject. A familial and personality vulnerability for mental disorder was revealed in one subject, but not in the other, and all physical, laboratory and cerebral NMR evaluations showed normal results in both patients. Remission of OCD and depressive episode or psychotic disorder was achieved after treatment with a serotoninergic medication associated with an antipsychotic. The heavy long-term use of ecstasy may induce an alteration in the brain balance between serotonin and dopamine, which might constitute a pathophysiological mechanism underlying the onset of obsessive-compulsive, depressive and psychotic symptoms. The heavy use of ecstasy probably interacted with a vulnerability to psychiatric disorder in one subject, whereas we cannot exclude that an "ecstasy disorder" ex novo affected the other individual.

  8. The Strauss and Carpenter Prognostic Scale in subjects clinically at high risk of psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieman, D. H.; Velthorst, E.; Becker, H. E.; de Haan, L.; Dingemans, P. M.; Linszen, D. H.; Birchwood, M.; Patterson, P.; Salokangas, R. K. R.; Heinimaa, M.; Heinz, A.; Juckel, G.; von Reventlow, H. G.; Morrison, A.; Schultze-Lutter, F.; Klosterkötter, J.; Ruhrmann, S.; McGorry, Patrick D.; McGlashan, Thomas H.; Knapp, Martin; van de Fliert, Reinaud; Klaassen, Rianne; Picker, Heinz; Neumann, Meike; Brockhaus-Dumke, Anke; Pukrop, Ralf; Svirskis, Tanja; Huttunen, Jukka; Laine, Tiina; Ilonen, Tuula; Ristkari, Terja; Hietala, Jarmo; Skeate, Amanda; Gudlowski, Yehonala; Ozgürdal, Seza; French, Paul; Stevens, Helen

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the predictive value of the Strauss and Carpenter Prognostic Scale (SCPS) for transition to a first psychotic episode in subjects clinically at high risk (CHR) of psychosis. Two hundred and forty-four CHR subjects participating in the European Prediction of Psychosis Study were

  9. First Lapses to Smoking: Within-Subjects Analysis of Real-Time Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffman, Saul; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Studies of smoking relapse and temptation have relied on retrospective recall and confounded between- and within-subject variability. Real-time data on temptations and lapses to smoke were gathered using palm-top computers in 108 ex-smokers. Made within-subject comparisons of initial lapse, a temptation episode, and base rate data obtained through…

  10. A subjective scheduler for subjective dedicated networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suherman; Fakhrizal, Said Reza; Al-Akaidi, Marwan

    2017-09-01

    Multiple access technique is one of important techniques within medium access layer in TCP/IP protocol stack. Each network technology implements the selected access method. Priority can be implemented in those methods to differentiate services. Some internet networks are dedicated for specific purpose. Education browsing or tutorial video accesses are preferred in a library hotspot, while entertainment and sport contents could be subjects of limitation. Current solution may use IP address filter or access list. This paper proposes subjective properties of users or applications are used for priority determination in multiple access techniques. The NS-2 simulator is employed to evaluate the method. A video surveillance network using WiMAX is chosen as the object. Subjective priority is implemented on WiMAX scheduler based on traffic properties. Three different traffic sources from monitoring video: palace, park, and market are evaluated. The proposed subjective scheduler prioritizes palace monitoring video that results better quality, xx dB than the later monitoring spots.

  11. Relation between serum IL-4, IL-13 and IFN-gamma levels and recurrence of wheezing episodes in infants with acute bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzuner, Nevin; Gurcu, Ozlem; Olmez, Duygu; Babayigit, Arzu; Islekel, Huray; Karaman, Ozkan; Tezcan, Dilek

    2008-11-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections are the most important factors among various causes which trigger wheezing in the first year of life. The factors associated with episodic wheezing in children with acute bronchiolitis are still subjects of research. Infections, environmental factors, immunologic mechanisms are sorted as etiologic risk factors of episodic wheezing. We aimed to investigate the relationship between serum interleukin (IL)-4, IL-13 and gamma-interferon (IFN-gamma) levels and recurrence of wheezing episodes in infants with acute bronchiolitis. One hundred twenty infants between 3 and 36 months with acute bronchiolitis enrolled in the study. Personal histories, clinical and laboratory data of infants were recorded. The patients were followed for a year. Venous blood samples were obtained to determine serum IL-4, IL-13, and IFN-gamma levels during acute bronchiolitis episode. The number of wheezing episodes was significantly higher in infants with a positive family history of allergy. A statistically significant correlation was determined between serum IL-13 levels of infants and number of wheezing episodes. High serum IL-13 levels and a positive history of allergy may have important roles in the recurrence of acute bronchiolitis.

  12. Functioning after a major depressive episode : complete or incomplete recovery?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist-Bouwman, MA; Ormel, J; de Graaf, R; Vollebergh, WAM

    2004-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies have shown improved functioning after a depression, but often substantial limitations at follow-up remained. The goal of this study is to examine (1) whether functioning returns to pre-morbid levels after a major depressive episode (MDE), (2) predictors of incomplete

  13. Psychosocial Acute Treatment in Early-Episode Schizophrenia Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bola, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This article reviews evidence on the treatment of early episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders that contradicts, in some cases, the American Psychiatric Association's generic recommendation of antipsychotic medication treatment for at least a year. Method: Evidence on lack of diagnostic validity, absence of demonstrated long-term…

  14. Structural brain abnormalities in early onset first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, A K; Baaré, William Frans Christian; Raabjerg Christensen, A M

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain morphometry in children and adolescents with first-episode psychosis offer a unique opportunity for pathogenetic investigations. METHODS: We compared high-resolution 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance images of the brain in 29 patients (schizophrenia, schizotypal disorder...

  15. Characterization of Episodic Air Pollution in Cities (CHEAP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen HJTh; Mennen M; Meulen A van der; LLO

    1995-01-01

    To assess the behaviour of fine suspended particulate matter (PM10), a descriptive study was undertaken in the Netherlands in the City of Amsterdam and in a rural area some 50 km north-east of Amsterdam. During winter-smog episodes the contribution of PM1 to PM10 increases from approximately 10 to

  16. The development of mental scenario building and episodic foresight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suddendorf, Thomas; Redshaw, Jonathan

    2013-08-01

    Episodic foresight is the future-directed counterpart of episodic memory. It is a sophisticated, potentially uniquely human capacity, with tremendous adaptive consequences. Here we review what is currently known about its development through early childhood. We tackle this from two distinct perspectives. First, we present the first systematic evaluation of the development of purported components of mental scenario building as highlighted by a theater metaphor: the stage, the playwright, the set, the actors, the director, the executive producer, and the broadcaster. We find that, although there are diverse developmental trajectories, by 4 years of age children have acquired the basic cognitive components required to mentally construct specific future events. Second, we examine recent attempts to test children's episodic foresight more directly and find that results are in line with those examining the development of required components. This is not to say that children younger than four have no inkling of upcoming events or that older children have nothing left to learn about constructing the future. Episodic foresight, and its neurocognitive foundations, continues to develop throughout childhood. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  17. Factors associated with hypoglycemia episodes in hospitalized type ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors associated with hypoglycemia episodes in hospitalized type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in a tertiary health facility in Malaysia. Hasniza Zaman Huri1,2*, Muhammad Irfan Abdul Aziz1, Shireene Ratna. Vethakkan3 and Riyanto Teguh Widodo1. 1Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, ...

  18. Late Globalization and Evolution, Episodes and Epochs of Industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.; Boujarzadeh, Behnam; Dholakia, Nikhilesh

    While the empirical focus of this paper is the Danish Textile and Fashion Industry (DTFI) – specifically the episodes and epochs in the emergence and evolution of DTFI, in essence the micro and macro time-slices – the theoretical intent is wider. We aim to explore the conceptual terrain of what we...

  19. Preferences for treatment during a first psychotic episode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, L.; van Raaij, B.; van den Berg, R.; Jager, M.; Houweling, P.; Stockmann, M.; Delsing, P.; Linszen, D.; Peters, B.; Wouters, L.

    2001-01-01

    Psychiatric services providing care for patients and their families confronted with a first psychotic episode need to be sensitive towards patients' and families' preferences. Ten patients, ten family members and ten professional caregivers composed a list of 42 preferences in the treatment for a

  20. Chronic and Episodic Stress in Children of Depressed Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feurer, Cope; Hammen, Constance L; Gibb, Brandon E

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine chronic and episodic stress in children of mothers with and without a history of major depressive disorder (MDD) during the children's lives. Participants were 255 mothers selected according to their history of MDD (present vs. absent during child's life) and their children (age 8-14; 53% girls, 81% Caucasian). Mothers' and children's histories of MDD were assessed using diagnostic interviews, and their depressive symptoms were assessed via self-report measures. Children's levels of chronic and episodic stress were assessed using a semistructured contextual threat interview. Children of mothers with a history of recurrent MDD, compared to single MDD or no depression, experienced more chronic stress within several domains including peers, mother-child relations, and other family member relations as well as greater episodic dependent interpersonal stress. Each of these group differences was maintained after excluding children with a history of MDD themselves and controlling for their current depressive symptoms. However, only the group difference in chronic peer stress was maintained when controlling for mothers' current depression. The results suggest that children exposed to recurrent maternal MDD experience higher levels of both chronic and episodic stress, at least some of which they contribute to themselves (dependent interpersonal stress) and which is at least partially independent of the effects of children's depression. In addition, much of this stress is associated primarily with current depression in the mother, though it appears that chronic peer stress may remain elevated even after the remission of maternal depression.

  1. Recent Alcohol Use and Episodic Heavy Drinking among Hispanic Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Keith A.; Vidourek, Rebecca A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: A sizeable percentage of Hispanic youth are affected by alcohol use. Research is needed to identify specific factors placing Hispanic youth at elevated risk. Purpose: This study examined whether recent alcohol use (past 30 days) and frequent episodic heavy drinking among 7th - 12th grade Hispanic students (N = 946) in Greater…

  2. Episodic radiations in the fly tree of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegmann, Brian M.; Trautwein, Michelle D.; Winkler, Isaac S.

    2011-01-01

    obscured by multiple episodes of rapid diversification. We provide a phylogenomic estimate of fly relationships based on molecules and morphology from 149 of 157 families, including 30 kb from 14 nuclear loci and complete mitochondrial genomes combined with 371 morphological characters. Multiple analyses...

  3. Outcome of first-episode schizophrenia and the new antipsychotics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article reviews the English literature over the past 10 years with regard to treatment outcome in first-episode schizophrenia. Particular attention is paid to factors associated w~h poor outcome ard predictors of relapse, and the use of the new antipsychotic agents. Since the mid-195Gs, conventional antipsychotic agents.

  4. Visual perspective in remembering and episodic future thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Kathleen B; Wooldridge, Cynthia L; Rice, Heather J; Berg, Jeffrey J; Szpunar, Karl K

    2016-01-01

    According to the constructive episodic simulation hypothesis, remembering and episodic future thinking are supported by a common set of constructive processes. In the present study, we directly addressed this assertion in the context of third-person perspectives that arise during remembering and episodic future thought. Specifically, we examined the frequency with which participants remembered past events or imagined future events from third-person perspectives. We also examined the different viewpoints from which third-person perspective events were remembered or imagined. Although future events were somewhat more likely to be imagined from a third-person perspective, the spatial viewpoint distributions of third-person perspectives characterizing remembered and imagined events were highly similar. These results suggest that a similar constructive mechanism may be at work when people remember events from a perspective that could not have been experienced in the past and when they imagine events from a perspective that could not be experienced in the future. The findings are discussed in terms of their consistency with--and as extensions of--the constructive episodic simulation hypothesis.

  5. Turnaround Migration as an Episode of Collective Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Rex R.; Garkovich, Lorraine

    1984-01-01

    Presents a collective behavior model for examining the population turnaround (urban to rural migration) of the 1960s/1970s as a specific form of mass movement. Specifies the value-added process that produced this particular episode at this particular point in social history. Explores factors influencing decline in turnaround migration. (Author/MH)

  6. Cannabis use and family history in adolescent first episode ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To investigate the clinical correlates of cannabis use in adolescents with first episode psychosis (FEP). Methods: Inpatient psychiatric records provided demographic, lifetime cannabis use, family history of mental illness, and clinical data on 45 FEP adolescents, aged 12–18 years, admitted to a psychiatric unit in ...

  7. Brief Report: Episodic Foresight in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Laura K.; Atance, Cristina M.

    2014-01-01

    Episodic foresight (EpF) or, the ability to imagine the future and use such imagination to guide our actions, is an important aspect of cognition that has not yet been explored in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This is despite its proposed links with theory of mind (ToM) and executive function (EF), two areas found to be impaired in…

  8. SuchThatCast Episode 3: J.D. Trout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soraker, Johnny

    2012-01-01

    SuchThatCast goes mobile in the third episode, as I interview J.D. Trout on the appr. 2 hour train ride between Enschede and Schiphol airport. Trout received his PhD in Philosophy at Cornell University and is currently Professor of Philosophy and Psychology at Loyola University Chicago. He was

  9. First episode schizophrenia: functional MRI findings and treatment response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veelen, N.M.J.

    2011-01-01

    The research of this thesis centers on the investigation of first-episode medication-naive and recent onset schizophrenia patients. In part I, functional MRI studies are described, in part II short term treatment effects are compared between ziprasidone and olanzapine. Part I, chapter 2: Differences

  10. Differential Contributions of Language Skills to Children's Episodic Recall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemfuss, J. Zoe

    2015-01-01

    Theorists have identified language as a critical contributor to children's episodic memory development, yet studies linking language and memory have had mixed results. The present study aimed to clarify the mechanisms linking language and memory and to explain the previous mixed results. Sixty-four preschool children's receptive and productive…

  11. Factors associated with hypoglycemia episodes in hospitalized type ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the factors associated with severity of hypoglycemia in hospitalized type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in a tertiary health facility in Malaysia. Methods: This retrospective study involved 207 hospitalised T2DM patients with hypoglycaemia episodes from January 2008 to December 2012 and was ...

  12. Episode-constrained cross-validation in video concept retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gemert, J.C.; Veenman, C.J.; Geusebroek, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Whereas video tells a narrative by a composition of shots, current video retrieval methods focus mainly on single shots. In retrieval performance estimation, similar shots in a narrative may result in performance overestimation. We propose an episode-based version of cross-validation leading up to

  13. Mineralization episodes and their concentration sites in a typical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The other widespread variety of mineral occurrences, notably calcite, siderite and sometime pyrite in the coal basin and traceable to precipitates in various joints, cleats, cell voids and lumens are associated/formed during epigenetic mineralization episode (post depositional phase), when the macerals have differentiated ...

  14. Social cognition and neurocognitive deficits in first-episode schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliksted, Vibeke; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Weed, Ethan; Frith, Chris; Videbech, Poul

    2014-03-01

    Recent research has shown a significant impact of social cognitive domains on real world functioning and prognosis in schizophrenia. However, the correlations between specific aspects of social cognition, neurocognition, IQ and clinical symptoms remain unclear in first-episode schizophrenia. Researchers have speculated about social cognitive subgroups since patients with schizophrenia appear to be a very heterogeneous group. Patients with a recent diagnosis of first-episode schizophrenia were tested regarding theory of mind, social perception, neurocognition, IQ, and clinical symptoms. Data from 36 first-episode schizophrenia patients and 36 one to one matched healthy controls were analysed. Principal component analysis in the patient group was used to examine the variance contributed by different aspects of social cognition, neurocognition, and clinical symptoms. Complex aspects of social cognition explained 24% of the variance in the patient group. The other principal components consisted mainly of aspects of simple perception of theory of mind. Neurocognition and clinical symptoms only explained a minor proportion of the variance in the patient group. The results imply that social cognitive deficits in first-episode schizophrenia come in two distinct versions where one is a complex, cognitive demanding form linked with IQ. The other version is related to simpler forms of social cognition and independent of IQ. These two forms are comparable to the implicit and explicit mentalising discussed in the developmental literature. The two forms of social cognitive deficits are likely to require quite different social cognitive interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Early detection strategies for untreated first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Jan Olav; McGlashan, T H; Larsen, Tor Ketil

    2001-01-01

    -episode cases. The study ultimately will compare early detected with usual detected patients. This paper describes the study's major independent intervention variable, i.e. a comprehensive education and detection system to change DUP in first onset psychosis. System variables and first results from the four...

  16. Remember Bach: an investigation in episodic memory for music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschrich, Susann; Münte, Thomas F; Altenmüller, Eckart O

    2005-12-01

    Emotional events are remembered better than nonemotional ones, especially after a long period of time. In this study, we investigated whether emotional music is kept better in episodic long-term memory than less emotional music and to which extent musical structure is important.

  17. Direct Cost of Treating Acute Psychotic Episodes in Nnewi, South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Major psychotic disorders such as the schizophrenias consume a high proportion of health budgets in developed countries. The economic implications of ... Aim: To estimate the direct cost of treating patients with acute psychotic episodes in a mental health unit in Anambra State, Nigeria. Methods: Forty one ...

  18. Frequency of fever episodes related to febrile seizure recurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Stuijvenberg (Margriet); N.E. Jansen (Nichon); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); G. Derksen-Lubsen (Gerarda); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this study was to assess the number of fever episodes as a risk factor for febrile seizure recurrence during the first 6 months after the last previous febrile seizure. In a 6-month follow-up study of 155 children, aged 3 months to 5 y, with a first or a recurrent febrile

  19. Effects of anticholinergic drugs on verbal episodic memory function in the elderly: a retrospective, cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Marie-Pierre; Rouch, Isabelle; Dauphinot, Virginie; Gédéon, Claire; Genthon, Stella; Bonnefoy, Marc; Krolak-Salmon, Pierre

    2011-03-01

    An increasing number of medications that are frequently prescribed to elderly patients have been identified as having weak but definite anticholinergic properties. Few epidemiological studies have evaluated the impact of these drugs on verbal episodic memory using sensitive and specific neuropsychological testing in an elderly population presenting with cognitive impairment. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of drugs with anticholinergic properties on verbal episodic memory function in elderly patients presenting for memory evaluation. We performed a retrospective, cross-sectional study that included 134 consecutive elderly outpatients who attended the daycare memory unit of Centre Hospitalier Sud, Lyon, France. We searched the MEDLINE database (1973-2008) to identify drugs with anticholinergic properties. All drugs with well known anticholinergic activity, mild reported anticholinergic effects or in vitro anticholinergic activity were included in the study. We used the Free and Cued Selective Reminding (FCSR) test to evaluate verbal episodic memory. The mean ± SD number of drugs with anticholinergic properties taken by the subjects was 0.64 ± 0.82. Fifty percent of the subjects (n = 67) had a prescription for at least one drug with anticholinergic properties and 16% (n = 21) had a prescription for two or more. Drugs with anticholinergic properties most frequently prescribed in our cohort were cardiovascular (furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide, digoxin), antidepressant (paroxetine, sertraline, fluoxetine) and antispasmodic (oxybutynin chloride) drugs. The number of drugs with anticholinergic properties that subjects were taking was associated with reduced performance on tasks that assessed verbal memory (p drugs with anticholinergic activity on episodic verbal memory. Tests evaluating other cognitive functions were not affected by use of drugs with anticholinergic activity. These associations remained following multivariate analysis adjusting for age

  20. Roles of hippocampal subfields in verbal and visual episodic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zammit, Andrea R; Ezzati, Ali; Zimmerman, Molly E; Lipton, Richard B; Lipton, Michael L; Katz, Mindy J

    2017-01-15

    Selective hippocampal (HC) subfield atrophy has been reported in older adults with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. The goal of this study was to investigate the associations between the volume of hippocampal subfields and visual and verbal episodic memory in cognitively normal older adults. This study was conducted on a subset of 133 participants from the Einstein Aging Study (EAS), a community-based study of non-demented older adults systematically recruited from the Bronx, N.Y. All participants completed comprehensive EAS neuropsychological assessment. Visual episodic memory was assessed using the Complex Figure Delayed Recall subtest from the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS). Verbal episodic memory was assessed using Delayed Recall from the Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test (FCSRT). All participants underwent 3T MRI brain scanning with subsequent automatic measurement of the hemispheric hippocampal subfield volumes (CA1, CA2-CA3, CA4-dente gyrus, presubiculum, and subiculum). We used linear regressions to model the association between hippocampal subfield volumes and visual and verbal episodic memory tests while adjusting for age, sex, education, and total intracranial volume. Participants had a mean age of 78.9 (SD=5.1) and 60.2% were female. Total hippocampal volume was associated with Complex Figure Delayed Recall (β=0.31, p=0.001) and FCSRT Delayed Recall (β=0.27, p=0.007); subiculum volume was associated with Complex Figure Delayed Recall (β=0.27, p=0.002) and FCSRT Delayed Recall (β=0.24, p=0.010); CA1 was associated with Complex Figure Delayed Recall (β=0.26, pmemory. Our results suggest that hippocampal subfields have sensitive roles in the process of visual and verbal episodic memory. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical correlates of acute bipolar depressive episode with psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldieraro, Marco Antonio; Sylvia, Louisa G; Dufour, Steven; Walsh, Samantha; Janos, Jessica; Rabideau, Dustin J; Kamali, Masoud; McInnis, Melvin G; Bobo, William V; Friedman, Edward S; Gao, Keming; Tohen, Mauricio; Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A; Ketter, Terence A; Calabrese, Joseph R; McElroy, Susan L; Thase, Michael E; Shelton, Richard C; Bowden, Charles L; Kocsis, James H; Deckersbach, Thilo; Nierenberg, Andrew A

    2017-08-01

    Psychotic bipolar depressive episodes remain remarkably understudied despite being common and having a significant impact on bipolar disorder. The aim of this study is to identify the characteristics of depressed bipolar patients with current psychosis compared to those without psychosis. We used baseline data of a comparative effectiveness study of lithium and quetiapine for bipolar disorder (the Bipolar CHOICE study) to compare demographic, clinical, and functioning variables between those with and without psychotic symptoms. Of the 482 participants, 303 (62.9%) were eligible for the present study by meeting DSM-IV criteria for an acute bipolar depressive episode. Univariate analyses were conducted first, and then included in a model controlling for symptom severity. The sample was composed mostly of women (60.7%) and the mean age was 39.5±12.1 years. Psychosis was present in 10.6% (n=32) of the depressed patients. Psychotic patients had less education, lower income, and were more frequently single and unemployed. Psychosis was also associated with a more severe depressive episode, higher suicidality, more comorbid conditions and worse functioning. Most group differences disappeared when controlling for depression severity. Only outpatients were included and the presence of psychosis in previous episodes was not assessed. Psychosis during bipolar depressive episodes is present even in an outpatient sample. Psychotic, depressed patients have worse illness outcomes, but future research is necessary to confirm if these outcomes are only associated with the severity of the disorder or if some of them are independent of it. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Using data to attribute episodes of warming and cooling in instrumental records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Ka-Kit; Zhou, Jiansong

    2013-01-01

    The observed global-warming rate has been nonuniform, and the cause of each episode of slowing in the expected warming rate is the subject of intense debate. To explain this, nonrecurrent events have commonly been invoked for each episode separately. After reviewing evidence in both the latest global data (HadCRUT4) and the longest instrumental record, Central England Temperature, a revised picture is emerging that gives a consistent attribution for each multidecadal episode of warming and cooling in recent history, and suggests that the anthropogenic global warming trends might have been overestimated by a factor of two in the second half of the 20th century. A recurrent multidecadal oscillation is found to extend to the preindustrial era in the 353-y Central England Temperature and is likely an internal variability related to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), possibly caused by the thermohaline circulation variability. The perspective of a long record helps in quantifying the contribution from internal variability, especially one with a period so long that it is often confused with secular trends in shorter records. Solar contribution is found to be minimal for the second half of the 20th century and less than 10% for the first half. The underlying net anthropogenic warming rate in the industrial era is found to have been steady since 1910 at 0.07–0.08 °C/decade, with superimposed AMO-related ups and downs that included the early 20th century warming, the cooling of the 1960s and 1970s, the accelerated warming of the 1980s and 1990s, and the recent slowing of the warming rates. Quantitatively, the recurrent multidecadal internal variability, often underestimated in attribution studies, accounts for 40% of the observed recent 50-y warming trend. PMID:23345448

  3. Early report on brain arousal regulation in manic vs depressive episodes in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittekind, Dirk Alexander; Spada, Janek; Gross, Alexander; Hensch, Tilman; Jawinski, Philippe; Ulke, Christine; Sander, Christian; Hegerl, Ulrich

    2016-09-01

    The arousal regulation model of affective disorders attributes an important role in the pathophysiology of affective disorders to dysregulation of brain arousal regulation. According to this model, sensation avoidance and withdrawal in depression and sensation seeking and hyperactivity in mania can be explained as auto-regulatory attempts to counteract a tonically high (depression) or unstable (mania) arousal. The aim of this study was to compare brain arousal regulation between manic and depressive bipolar patients and healthy controls. We hypothesized that currently depressed patients with bipolar disorder show hyperstable arousal regulation, while currently manic patients show unstable arousal regulation. Twenty-eight patients with bipolar disorder received a 15-min resting electroencephalogram (EEG) during a depressive episode and 19 patients received the same during a manic/hypomanic episode. Twenty-eight healthy control subjects were matched for age and sex. The Vigilance Algorithm Leipzig (VIGALL), which classifies 1-s EEG segments as one of seven EEG-vigilance substages, was used to measure brain arousal regulation. Manic patients showed more unstable EEG-vigilance regulation as compared to the control sample (P = .004) and to patients with a depressive episode (P ≤ .001). Depressive patients had significantly higher mean vigilance levels (P = .045) than controls. A clear difference was found in the regulation of brain arousal of manic patients vs depressive patients and controls. These data suggest that brain arousal might depend on the current mood state, which would support the arousal regulation model of affective disorders. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Using data to attribute episodes of warming and cooling in instrumental records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Ka-Kit; Zhou, Jiansong

    2013-02-05

    The observed global-warming rate has been nonuniform, and the cause of each episode of slowing in the expected warming rate is the subject of intense debate. To explain this, nonrecurrent events have commonly been invoked for each episode separately. After reviewing evidence in both the latest global data (HadCRUT4) and the longest instrumental record, Central England Temperature, a revised picture is emerging that gives a consistent attribution for each multidecadal episode of warming and cooling in recent history, and suggests that the anthropogenic global warming trends might have been overestimated by a factor of two in the second half of the 20th century. A recurrent multidecadal oscillation is found to extend to the preindustrial era in the 353-y Central England Temperature and is likely an internal variability related to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), possibly caused by the thermohaline circulation variability. The perspective of a long record helps in quantifying the contribution from internal variability, especially one with a period so long that it is often confused with secular trends in shorter records. Solar contribution is found to be minimal for the second half of the 20th century and less than 10% for the first half. The underlying net anthropogenic warming rate in the industrial era is found to have been steady since 1910 at 0.07-0.08 °C/decade, with superimposed AMO-related ups and downs that included the early 20th century warming, the cooling of the 1960s and 1970s, the accelerated warming of the 1980s and 1990s, and the recent slowing of the warming rates. Quantitatively, the recurrent multidecadal internal variability, often underestimated in attribution studies, accounts for 40% of the observed recent 50-y warming trend.

  5. Differences in cannabis-related experiences between patients with a first episode of psychosis and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianconi, F; Bonomo, M; Marconi, A; Kolliakou, A; Stilo, S A; Iyegbe, C; Gurillo Muñoz, P; Homayoun, S; Mondelli, V; Luzi, S; Dazzan, P; Prata, D; La Cascia, C; O'Connor, J; David, A; Morgan, C; Murray, R M; Lynskey, M; Di Forti, M

    2016-04-01

    Many studies have reported that cannabis use increases the risk of a first episode of psychosis (FEP). However, only a few studies have investigated the nature of cannabis-related experiences in FEP patients, and none has examined whether these experiences are similar in FEP and general populations. The aim of this study was to explore differences in self-reported cannabis experiences between FEP and non-psychotic populations. A total of 252 subjects, who met International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10 criteria for FEP, and 217 controls who reported cannabis use were selected from the Genetics and Psychosis (GAP) study. The Medical Research Council Social Schedule and the Cannabis Experience Questionnaire were used to collect sociodemographic data and cannabis use information, respectively. Both 'bad' and 'enjoyable' experiences were more commonly reported by FEP subjects than controls. Principal components factor analysis identified four components which explained 62.3% of the variance. Linear regression analysis on the whole sample showed that the type of cannabis used and beliefs about the effect of cannabis on health all contributed to determining the intensity and frequency of experiences. Linear regression analysis on FEP subjects showed that the duration of cannabis use and amount of money spent on cannabis were strongly related to the intensity and frequency of enjoyable experiences in this population. These results suggest a higher sensitivity to cannabis effects among people who have suffered their first psychotic episode; this hypersensitivity results in them reporting both more 'bad' and 'enjoyable' experiences. The greater enjoyment experienced may provide an explanation of why FEP patients are more likely to use cannabis and to continue to use it despite experiencing an exacerbation of their psychotic symptoms.

  6. The 2-year prognosis of panic episodes in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batelaan, N M; de Graaf, R; Penninx, B W J H; van Balkom, A J L M; Vollebergh, W A M; Beekman, A T F

    2010-01-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is generally considered to be a chronic or intermittent disorder. This view may be biased because of a lack of general population studies investigating panic from the onset of an episode onwards. Data regarding the course of subthreshold panic disorder (sub-PD) and predictors of its course are lacking. Using data from a large community-based survey, the Netherlands Mental Health and Incidence Study (NEMESIS), that retrospectively assessed the 2-year course of panic with a Life Chart Interview (LCI), this study investigated remission, chronicity and recurrence in subjects with new episodes of PD or sub-PD. Predictor variables of remission consisted of sociodemographics, psychobiological, environmental, psychiatric and panic-related factors. In PD, remission of panic attacks occurred in 64.5% of subjects, mean time to remission was 5.7 months, and the remission rate was 5.8/100 person-months. In 43.3% of subjects panic was still present after 1 year. Recurrence of panic attacks occurred in 21.4% of those with PD who had achieved remission and for whom sufficient follow-up time was available. In general, the course of sub-PD was more favourable. Predictors of remission were female gender, the absence of ongoing difficulties, subthreshold panic and a low initial frequency of attacks. These results suggest that the course of panic is diverse in the general population, thereby underlining the need for accurate predictors. This requires further research including biological data and additional psychological data. In addition, given the large proportion with a relapse, relapse prevention should be part of any treatment programme.

  7. Sociocultural Experiences of Bulimic and Non-Bulimic Adolescents in a School-Based Chinese Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Todd; Chen, Hong

    2010-01-01

    From a large school-based sample (N = 3,084), 49 Mainland Chinese adolescents (31 girls, 18 boys) who endorsed all DSM-IV criteria for bulimia nervosa (BN) or sub-threshold BN and 49 matched controls (31 girls, 18 boys) completed measures of demographics and sociocultural experiences related to body image. Compared to less symptomatic peers, those…

  8. Process-specific analysis in episodic memory retrieval using fast optical signals and hemodynamic signals in the right prefrontal cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Sunghee; Jeong, Jichai

    2018-02-01

    Objective. Memory is formed by the interaction of various brain functions at the item and task level. Revealing individual and combined effects of item- and task-related processes on retrieving episodic memory is an unsolved problem because of limitations in existing neuroimaging techniques. To investigate these issues, we analyze fast and slow optical signals measured from a custom-built continuous wave functional near-infrared spectroscopy (CW-fNIRS) system. Approach. In our work, we visually encode the words to the subjects and let them recall the words after a short rest. The hemodynamic responses evoked by the episodic memory are compared with those evoked by the semantic memory in retrieval blocks. In the fast optical signal, we compare the effects of old and new items (previously seen and not seen) to investigate the item-related process in episodic memory. The Kalman filter is simultaneously applied to slow and fast optical signals in different time windows. Main results. A significant task-related HbR decrease was observed in the episodic memory retrieval blocks. Mean amplitude and peak latency of a fast optical signal are dependent upon item types and reaction time, respectively. Moreover, task-related hemodynamic and item-related fast optical responses are correlated in the right prefrontal cortex. Significance. We demonstrate that episodic memory is retrieved from the right frontal area by a functional connectivity between the maintained mental state through retrieval and item-related transient activity. To the best of our knowledge, this demonstration of functional NIRS research is the first to examine the relationship between item- and task-related memory processes in the prefrontal area using single modality.

  9. Low Cerebral Oxygen Consumption and Blood Flow in Patients With Cirrhosis and an Acute Episode of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Peter; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Waagepetersen, Helle Sønderby

    2009-01-01

    (15)O-water PET in 6 patients with liver cirrhosis and an acute episode of overt HE, 6 cirrhotic patients without HE, and 7 healthy subjects. RESULTS: Neither whole-brain CMRO(2) nor CBF differed significantly between cirrhotic patients without HE and healthy subjects, but were both significantly...... reduced in cirrhotic patients with HE (P subjects, and CBF was 0.29 +/- 0.01 mL blood/mL brain tissue....../min in patients with HE, 0.47 +/- 0.02 in patients without HE, and 0.49 +/- 0.03 in healthy subjects. CMRO(2) and CBF were correlated, and both variables correlated negatively with arterial ammonia concentration. Analysis of regional values, using individual magnetic resonance co-registrations, showed...

  10. Herbal medicine for hospitalized patients with severe depressive episode: a retrospective controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lan-Ying; Feng, Bin; Chen, Jiong; Tan, Qing-Rong; Chen, Zheng-Xin; Chen, Wen-Song; Wang, Pei-Rong; Zhang, Zhang-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Herbal medicine is increasingly used in depressed patients. The purpose of this retrospective controlled study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of herbal medicine treatment of severe depressive episode. A total of 146 severely depressed subjects were selected from patients who were admitted to the Department of Psychosomatics of Tongde Hospital at Hangzhou, China between 1st September 2009 and 30th November 2013. While all were medicated with psychotropic drugs, 78 received additional individualized herbal medicine. The severity of depressive symptoms was measured using 24-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD-24) at admission and thereafter once weekly during hospital stay. The proportion of patients achieving clinical response and remission and incidence of adverse events were compared. The two groups had similar average length of hospital stay for approximately 28 days and were not different in the use of psychotropic medications. Survival analysis revealed that patients with herbal medicine had significantly higher chance of achieving clinical response [relative risk (RR)=2.179, Pherbal medicine. Patients with herbal medicine experienced remarkably fewer incidences of physical tiredness, headache, palpitation, dry mouth and constipation, but had a significantly higher incidence of digestive discomfort compared to patients without herbal medicine. These results indicate that additional treatment with individualized herbal medicine enhances antidepressant response and reduces certain side effects associated with psychotropic medications. Herbal medicine is an effective and relatively safe therapy for severe depressive episode (Trial Registration: ChiCTR-OCH-13003864). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Suicide attempts in major depressive episode: evidence from the BRIDGE-II-Mix study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Dina; Vieta, Eduard; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Angst, Jules; Bowden, Charles L; Mosolov, Sergey; Young, Allan H; Perugi, Giulio

    2015-11-01

    The Bipolar Disorders: Improving Diagnosis, Guidance, and Education (BRIDGE-II-Mix) study aimed to estimate the frequency of mixed states in patients with a major depressive episode (MDE) according to different definitions and to compare their clinical validity, looking into specific features such as suicidality. A total of 2,811 subjects were enrolled in this multicenter cross-sectional study. Psychiatric symptoms, and sociodemographic and clinical variables were collected. The analysis compared the characteristics of patients with MDE with (MDE-SA group) and without (MDE-NSA) a history of suicide attempts. The history of suicide attempts was registered in 628 patients (22.34%). In the MDE-SA group, women (72.5%, p = 0.028), (hypo)mania in first-degree relatives (20.5%, p suicide attempts. In the MDE-SA group, 75 patients (11.9%) fulfilled Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM)-5 criteria for MDE with mixed features, and 250 patients (39.8%) fulfilled research-based diagnostic criteria for a mixed depressive episode. Important differences between MDE-SA and MDE-NSA patients have emerged. Early identification of symptoms such as risky behavior, psychomotor agitation, and impulsivity in patients with MDE, and treatment of mixed depressive states could represent a major step in suicide prevention. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The Effects of an Afternoon Nap on Episodic Memory in Young and Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scullin, Michael K; Fairley, Jacqueline; Decker, Michael J; Bliwise, Donald L

    2017-05-01

    In young adults, napping is hypothesized to benefit episodic memory retention (eg, via consolidation). Whether this relationship is present in older adults has not been adequately tested but is an important question because older adults display marked changes in sleep and memory. Between-subjects design. Sleep laboratory at Emory University School of Medicine. Fifty healthy young adults (18-29) and 45 community-dwelling older adults (58-83). Participants were randomly assigned to a 90-minute nap opportunity or an equal interval of quiet wakefulness. Participants underwent an item-wise directed forgetting learning procedure in which they studied words that were individually followed by the instruction to "remember" or "forget." Following a 90-minute retention interval filled with quiet wakefulness or a nap opportunity, they were asked to free recall and recognize those words. Young adults retained significantly more words following a nap interval than a quiet wakefulness interval on both free recall and recognition tests. There was modest evidence for greater nap-related retention of "remember" items relative to "forget" items for free recall but not recognition. Older adults' memory retention did not differ across nap and quiet wakefulness conditions, although they demonstrated greater fragmentation, lower N3, and lower rapid eye movement duration than the young adults. In young adults, an afternoon nap benefits episodic memory retention, but such benefits decrease with advancing age.

  13. Effects of emotion and reward motivation on neural correlates of episodic memory encoding: a PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemune, Yayoi; Abe, Nobuhito; Suzuki, Maki; Ueno, Aya; Mori, Etsuro; Tashiro, Manabu; Itoh, Masatoshi; Fujii, Toshikatsu

    2010-05-01

    It is known that emotion and reward motivation promote long-term memory formation. It remains unclear, however, how and where emotion and reward are integrated during episodic memory encoding. In the present study, subjects were engaged in intentional encoding of photographs under four different conditions that were made by combining two factors (emotional valence, negative or neutral; and monetary reward value, high or low for subsequent successful recognition) during H2 15O positron emission tomography (PET) scanning. As for recognition performance, we found significant main effects of emotional valence (negative>neutral) and reward value (high value>low value), without an interaction between the two factors. Imaging data showed that the left amygdala was activated during the encoding conditions of negative pictures relative to neutral pictures, and the left orbitofrontal cortex was activated during the encoding conditions of high reward pictures relative to low reward pictures. In addition, conjunction analysis of these two main effects detected right hippocampal activation. Although we could not find correlations between recognition performance and activity of these three regions, we speculate that the right hippocampus may integrate the effects of emotion (processed in the amygdala) and monetary reward (processed in the orbitofrontal cortex) on episodic memory encoding. 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Administration of Antithymocyte Globulin (Rabbit) to Treat a Severe, Mixed Rejection Episode in a Pregnant Renal Transplant Recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzler, Heather L; Ye, Xiaoyi; Rochon, Caroline; Martin, Spencer T

    2016-04-01

    Pregnancy in solid organ transplant recipients carries numerous risks to the mother such as increased risk of rejection, gestational diabetes mellitus, and preeclampsia. The developing fetus is subjected to risks such as birth defects, preterm delivery, and low birth weight. Typically, these risks can be managed through intensive, multidisciplinary prenatal care and a proper immunosuppressive regimen. In the setting of rejection, however, little data are available to suggest safe and effective treatment of acute cellular rejection, antibody-mediated rejection, or mixed rejection episodes in the pregnant solid organ transplant recipient. We describe the first case, to our knowledge, in which antithymocyte globulin (rabbit) was used to successfully treat a pregnant renal transplant recipient who experienced a mixed rejection episode. A 22-year-old, African American woman with stage 6 chronic kidney disease received a deceased donor renal transplant after undergoing hemodialysis for 3 years. Her maintenance immunosuppressive regimen at the time of transplantation consisted of tacrolimus, prednisone, and mycophenolate mofetil. Despite counseling efforts on the importance of having a planned pregnancy after kidney transplantation so that her immunosuppressive medications could be optimized, the patient became pregnant 12 months later; her mycophenolate mofetil was changed to azathioprine to reduce the risk of fetal deformities or death. Three months later, the patient was admitted for biopsy of her transplanted kidney and was evaluated for possible kidney rejection. After confirmation of a mixed 1B acute cellular rejection and antibody-mediated rejection episode, the patient decided to pursue resolution of her rejection episode and continue the pregnancy despite the potential risks to the fetus. She was treated with high-dose corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, plasmapheresis, and antithymocyte globulin (rabbit). Twenty-nine months after transplantation, the

  15. Dissociative fugue: Recurrent episodes in a young adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chintan Madhusudan Raval

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dissociative fugue is a rare disorder which has been described as sudden, unexpected, travel away from home or one′s customary place of daily activities, with the inability to recall some or all of one′s past. There is no systematic data existing on it and very few cases reported in the literature. Here we report a case of fugue in a young adult male who travelled 8 times away from his home during last 1΍ year. He has a loss of memory for episodes with patchy recall of few events. Longest duration of fugue episode was of 1-month. The case describes mode of presentation to hospital and treatment given to restore his identity and reunite him in society and family.

  16. Common carotid artery occlusion presenting with recurrent syncopal episodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Kader

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic common carotid artery (CCA occlusion is an uncommon occurrence that may require surgical intervention. We aim to describe a case of CCA occlusion that presented with the unusual symptom of recurrent syncope. A 69-year-old lady presented with a history of recurrent syncopal episodes and amaurosis fugax associated with left leg weakness. She was found to have a right CCA occlusion on duplex ultrasound and angiography. She underwent a right common carotid endarterectomy and intraoperative findings revealed a heavily calcified plaque in the CCA just proximal to the bifurcation with organised thrombus filling the CCA proximally. CCA occlusion can rarely present with recurrent syncopal episodes. Surgery may be curative.

  17. Substance abuse in first-episode non-affective psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tor K; Melle, Ingrid; Auestad, Bjørn

    2006-01-01

    Abuse of alcohol and drugs is an important and clinically challenging aspect of first-episode psychosis. Only a few studies have been carried out on large-sized and reliably characterized samples. These are reviewed, and the results are compared with a sample of 300 first-episode psychosis patients...... recruited for the TIPS (Early Treatment and Identification of Psychosis) study from Norway and Denmark. Prevalence rates from the literature vary from 6% to 44% for drugs and 3% to 35% for alcohol. In our sample, 23% abused drugs and 15% abused alcohol during the last 6 months. When compared to non-abusers......, the drug-abusing group is characterized by the following: male gender, younger age, better premorbid social, poor premorbid academic functioning, and more contact with friends in the last year before onset. Alcohol abusers were the oldest group and they had the least contact with friends. A group...

  18. Episodic Reasoning for Vision-Based Human Action Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria J. Santofimia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Smart Spaces, Ambient Intelligence, and Ambient Assisted Living are environmental paradigms that strongly depend on their capability to recognize human actions. While most solutions rest on sensor value interpretations and video analysis applications, few have realized the importance of incorporating common-sense capabilities to support the recognition process. Unfortunately, human action recognition cannot be successfully accomplished by only analyzing body postures. On the contrary, this task should be supported by profound knowledge of human agency nature and its tight connection to the reasons and motivations that explain it. The combination of this knowledge and the knowledge about how the world works is essential for recognizing and understanding human actions without committing common-senseless mistakes. This work demonstrates the impact that episodic reasoning has in improving the accuracy of a computer vision system for human action recognition. This work also presents formalization, implementation, and evaluation details of the knowledge model that supports the episodic reasoning.

  19. Late postoperative nocturnal episodic hypoxaemia and associated sleep pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Wildschiødtz, G; Pedersen, M H

    1994-01-01

    pattern is disturbed severely with early depression of REM and slow wave sleep and with rebound of REM sleep on the second and third nights. Postoperative rebound of REM sleep may contribute to the development of sleep disordered breathing and nocturnal episodic hypoxaemia....... was depressed significantly on the first two nights after operation (P sleep-associated hypoxaemic episodes for individual patients increased about three-fold on the second and third nights after operation compared with the night before operation (P sleep...... significantly after surgery (P sleep decreased significantly on the first night after operation (P sleep (rebound) on the second, third or both nights after operation compared with the preoperative night. Slow wave sleep...

  20. Procrastination, consideration of future consequences, and episodic future thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebetez, Marie My Lien; Barsics, Catherine; Rochat, Lucien; D'Argembeau, Arnaud; Van der Linden, Martial

    2016-05-01

    Despite the intrinsic temporal nature of procrastination, little research has examined the link between this form of self-regulatory failure and the consideration of future consequences, and no study has addressed the link between procrastination and episodic future thinking. The aim of the present study was to explore these relationships. Participants were asked to project themselves into possible future events and to rate the amount of sensory-perceptual details and autonoetic consciousness associated with their representations. They were also asked to complete questionnaires that assessed procrastination, the consideration of future consequences, and negative affect. Results showed that both the consideration of future consequences and episodic future thinking were associated with procrastination, and in particular with procrastination-related decision making abilities and procrastination-related motivational dispositions, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Episodic Reasoning for Vision-Based Human Action Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-del-Rincon, Jesus

    2014-01-01

    Smart Spaces, Ambient Intelligence, and Ambient Assisted Living are environmental paradigms that strongly depend on their capability to recognize human actions. While most solutions rest on sensor value interpretations and video analysis applications, few have realized the importance of incorporating common-sense capabilities to support the recognition process. Unfortunately, human action recognition cannot be successfully accomplished by only analyzing body postures. On the contrary, this task should be supported by profound knowledge of human agency nature and its tight connection to the reasons and motivations that explain it. The combination of this knowledge and the knowledge about how the world works is essential for recognizing and understanding human actions without committing common-senseless mistakes. This work demonstrates the impact that episodic reasoning has in improving the accuracy of a computer vision system for human action recognition. This work also presents formalization, implementation, and evaluation details of the knowledge model that supports the episodic reasoning. PMID:24959602

  2. Gender Differences among Patients with a Single Depressive Episode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Jens D; Bock, Camilla; Vinberg, Maj

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies on gender differences in depression have usually included a mixture of patients with first-episode, chronic and recurrent depression. Consequently, the results might be confounded by the history of depression among participants. The present study evaluated gender differences...... in sociodemographic, clinical and treatment variables among patients suffering exclusively from single-episode depression. METHOD: Systematic recruitment of 301 participants via the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register and assessment by means of questionnaires and interviews regarding psychiatric diagnoses......, personality traits and disorders, stressful life events, family history, and treatment response. RESULTS: Female patients showed a higher level of neuroticism and more residual anxiety symptoms after treatment of the depression. There were no gender differences in severity of depression, psychiatric co...

  3. Positive and negative caregiver experiences in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Jens Einar; Lysaker, Paul H.; Harder, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Objectives While caregivers of persons with first-episode psychosis often report a range of negative experiences, little is known about what psychological factors are involved. The aim of this study was to examine how caregivers' general wellbeing, emotional overinvolvement and metacognition...... influenced their reports of both positive and negative caregiving experiences. Design A prospective consecutive cross-sectional study. Methods Forty caregivers of patients with first-episode psychosis were interviewed using semi-structured interview and questionnaires. Results Greater levels of distress...... and overinvolvement were associated with more negative experiences of caregiving while greater metacognitive capacity was associated with more positive experiences of caregiving. Conclusions The experience of positive and negative aspects of caregiving seems to be associated with different variables. Greater...

  4. Fentanyl and Midazolam Are Ineffective in Reducing Episodic Intracranial Hypertension in Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Timothy P; Wallendorf, Michael J; Kharasch, Evan D; Leonard, Jeffrey R; Doctor, Allan; Pineda, Jose A

    2016-04-01

    -cerebral perfusion pressure). Bolus dosing of fentanyl and midazolam fails to reduce the intracranial hypertension burden when administered for episodic intracranial hypertension. Paradoxically, we observed an overall increase in intracranial hypertension burden following drug administration, even after accounting for within-subject effects and time after injury. Future work is needed to confirm these findings in a prospective study design.

  5. Estimating Subjective Probabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Fountain, John; Harrison, Glenn W.

    Subjective probabilities play a central role in many economic decisions, and act as an immediate confound of inferences about behavior, unless controlled for. Several procedures to recover subjective probabilities have been proposed, but in order to recover the correct latent probability one must...

  6. Estimating Subjective Probabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Fountain, John; Harrison, Glenn W.

    2014-01-01

    Subjective probabilities play a central role in many economic decisions and act as an immediate confound of inferences about behavior, unless controlled for. Several procedures to recover subjective probabilities have been proposed, but in order to recover the correct latent probability one must ...

  7. Subjective meaning: an introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijnbergen-Huitink, Janneke; van Wijbergen-Huitink, Janneke; Meier, Cécile

    This introductory chapter traces some of the considerations on the basis of which relativistic approaches to subjective meaning became en vogue. In doing so, the chapter provides an overview of the relevant linguistic and philosophical issues when developing a treatment of subjectivity. In addition,

  8. Subjective safety in traffic.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    The term ‘subjective safety in traffic’ refers to people feeling unsafe in traffic or, more generally, to anxiety regarding being unsafe in traffic for oneself and/or others. Subjective safety in traffic can lead to road users limiting their mobility and social activities, which is one of the

  9. Subjective poverty line definitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Flik; B.M.S. van Praag (Bernard)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we will deal with definitions of subjective poverty lines. To measure a poverty threshold value in terms of household income, which separates the poor from the non-poor, we take into account the opinions of all people in society. Three subjective methods will be discussed

  10. Suicidal behavior and mortality in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete; Madsen, Trine; Fedyszyn, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Suicide is a serious public health problem, with more than 800,000 deaths taking place worldwide each year. Mental disorders are associated with increased risk of suicide. In schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, the lifetime risk of suicide death is estimated to be 5.6%. The risk is parti...... in first-episode psychosis, and staff members should, in collaboration with the patients, monitor the risk of suicide and develop and revise crisis plans....

  11. Summertime low-ozone episodes at northern high latitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Orsolini, Y. J.; Eskes, H.; Hansen, G.; Hoppe, U.-P.; Kylling, A.; Kyrö, E.; Notholt, Justus; Van der A, R.; von der Gathen, Peter

    2003-01-01

    A pool of low-ozone air resides in the Arctic stratosphere in summer. Its formation and maintenance arise from a combination of chemical ozone-destruction and transport processes. The summertime ozone destruction is induced by gas-phase chemistry dominated by nitrogen and hydrogen catalytic cycles, which are efficient due to long summertime insolation at high latitudes. It is shown that, during events referred to as low-ozone episodes (LOEs), column ozone can locally decrease to values compar...

  12. ATLAS experiment - Episode 2 - The Particles Strike Back

    CERN Multimedia

    Michael Barnett - Erik Johansson

    2006-01-01

    ATLAS, The Particles Strike Back is the second episode in a three part series that uncovers the mysteries of the ATLAS experiment. Shot with a bug's eye view of the inside of the detector. The viewer is shown the inner, middle and outer sections of the ATLAS detector. The narrator describes how different parts of the detector are able to detect 6 different types of particles: electrons, photons, protons, neutrons, muons and neutrinos.

  13. A Recurrent Episode of Dermatomyositis Associated with Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Eranki, Vijay Gopal

    2017-01-01

    Objective. It is uncommon for dermatomyositis to be associated with papillary thyroid cancer. We report an unusual case of papillary thyroid cancer presenting with dermatomyositis. Methods. The case history, imaging and laboratory data is reviewed. Results. We report the case of a 62-year-old female with a prior history of dermatomyositis and breast cancer who presented with a recurrent episode of dermatomyositis. Extensive evaluation of the cause of the dermatomyositis recurrence revealed no...

  14. The ROKS nomogram for predicting a second symptomatic stone episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rule, Andrew D; Lieske, John C; Li, Xujian; Melton, L Joseph; Krambeck, Amy E; Bergstralh, Eric J

    2014-12-01

    Most patients with first-time kidney stones undergo limited evaluations, and few receive preventive therapy. A prediction tool for the risk of a second kidney stone episode is needed to optimize treatment strategies. We identified adult first-time symptomatic stone formers residing in Olmsted County, Minnesota, from 1984 to 2003 and manually reviewed their linked comprehensive medical records through the Rochester Epidemiology Project. Clinical characteristics in the medical record before or up to 90 days after the first stone episode were evaluated as predictors for symptomatic recurrence. A nomogram was developed from a multivariable model based on these characteristics. There were 2239 first-time adult kidney stone formers with evidence of a passed, obstructing, or infected stone causing pain or gross hematuria. Symptomatic recurrence occurred in 707 of these stone formers through 2012 (recurrence rates at 2, 5, 10, and 15 years were 11%, 20%, 31%, and 39%, respectively). A parsimonious model had the following risk factors for recurrence: younger age, male sex, white race, family history of stones, prior asymptomatic stone on imaging, prior suspected stone episode, gross hematuria, nonobstructing (asymptomatic) stone on imaging, symptomatic renal pelvic or lower-pole stone on imaging, no ureterovesicular junction stone on imaging, and uric acid stone composition. Ten-year recurrence rates varied from 12% to 56% between the first and fifth quintiles of nomogram score. The Recurrence of Kidney Stone nomogram identifies kidney stone formers at greatest risk for a second symptomatic episode. Such individuals may benefit from medical intervention and be good candidates for prevention trials. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  15. Autobiographical and episodic memory deficits in mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wammes, Jeffrey D; Good, Tyler J; Fernandes, Myra A

    2017-02-01

    Those who have suffered a concussion, otherwise known as a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), often complain of lingering memory problems. However, there is little evidence in the behavioral literature reliably demonstrating memory deficits. Thus, in the present study, cognitive profiles including measures of general executive functioning and processing speed, as well as episodic and semantic memory were collected in younger and older adult participants with or without a remote (>1year prior to testing) mTBI. We first investigated whether there were observable episodic and autobiographical memory impairments associated with mTBI within an otherwise healthy young group. Next, because previous work had demonstrated some overlap in patterns of behavioral impairment in normally aging adults and younger adults with a history of mTBI (e.g. Ozen, Fernandes, Clark, & Roy, 2015), we sought to determine whether these groups displayed similar cognitive profiles. Lastly, we conducted an exploratory analysis to test whether having suffered an mTBI might exacerbate age-related cognitive decline. Results showed the expected age-related decline in episodic memory performance, coupled with a relative preservation of semantic memory in older adults. Importantly, this pattern was also present in younger adults with a history of remote mTBI. No differences were observed across older adult groups based on mTBI status. Logistic regression analyses, using each measure in our battery as a predictor, successfully classified mTBI status in younger participants with a high degree of specificity (79.5%). These results indicate that those who have had an mTBI demonstrate a distinct cognitive signature, characterized by impairment in episodic and autobiographical memory, coupled with a relative preservation of semantic memory. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Intense winter atmospheric pollution episodes affecting the Western Mediterranean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pey, Jorge; Pérez, Noemí; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés; Cusack, Michael; Reche, Cristina

    2010-03-15

    The geographic location of the Western Mediterranean Basin and its peculiar topography, the climatic conditions and the intense anthropogenic and natural emissions of atmospheric pollutants are key factors necessary to interpret the atmospheric aerosol phenomenology over this area. During the cold season it is common to have severe atmospheric particulate matter (PM) pollution episodes (of an anthropogenic origin) affecting this region, not only in the urban and industrial areas but also in the regional and rural sites. During these episodes, the midday hourly PM(1) levels at regional background sites are in many cases higher than those at urban areas. Around 10% of the days under winter anticyclonic conditions registered similar PM(1) levels at the regional background than at the urban area and, sporadically the daily PM(1) levels at the regional background sites may exceed those at urban sites. Furthermore, the very high hourly PM(1) levels measured at regional background sites during these episodes are not regularly attained in the closest urban areas, which leads to the hypothesis that an important formation of secondary aerosols occurs during the transport of the polluted air masses towards the elevated rural sites. The interpretation of the variability of PM levels and composition (2002-2008) at one urban site (Barcelona) and at one regional background site (Montseny) allows us to illustrate the phenomenology of these scenarios, to quantify the mean annual contributions to the PM levels and to identify their main tracers. Ammonium nitrate appears to be the most abundant compound during these scenarios, although organic species and trace metals also increase markedly. Owing to the intensity, composition and recurrence of these atmospheric pollution episodes, important health, climatic and ecological implications may be derived.

  17. Insecticide-treated nets usage and malaria episodes among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... It is also suggested that ITN usage among boarding school pupils should be incorporated into school health service. Keywords: Boarding schools, ITN use and malaria episodes, Nigeria, students. Résumé arrière-plan: malgré le paludisme est la plus grand problème de santé en Afrique au sud du Sahara ...

  18. NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT IN THE ALZHEIMER DISEASE: EPISODIC AND SEMANTIC MEMORY

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Comesaña; Marcela González

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to review the neuropsychological evaluation process in Alzheimer (AD) patients, specifically that related to episodic and semantic memory. Alzheimer-style dementia is the main form of dementia, and is nowadays one of the most important social, cultural and health-related problems. Diagnosis and differentiation from normal aging are difficult in the initial stages, and so neuropsychological evaluation is key. The criteria currently utilized are those of the DSM IV (American Psy...

  19. The CRISP theory of hippocampal function in episodic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sen

    2013-01-01

    Over the past four decades, a "standard framework" has emerged to explain the neural mechanisms of episodic memory storage. This framework has been instrumental in driving hippocampal research forward and now dominates the design and interpretation of experimental and theoretical studies. It postulates that cortical inputs drive plasticity in the recurrent cornu ammonis 3 (CA3) synapses to rapidly imprint memories as attractor states in CA3. Here we review a range of experimental studies and argue that the evidence against the standard framework is mounting, notwithstanding the considerable evidence in its support. We propose CRISP as an alternative theory to the standard framework. CRISP is based on Context Reset by dentate gyrus (DG), Intrinsic Sequences in CA3, and Pattern completion in cornu ammonis 1 (CA1). Compared to previous models, CRISP uses a radically different mechanism for storing episodic memories in the hippocampus. Neural sequences are intrinsic to CA3, and inputs are mapped onto these intrinsic sequences through synaptic plasticity in the feedforward projections of the hippocampus. Hence, CRISP does not require plasticity in the recurrent CA3 synapses during the storage process. Like in other theories DG and CA1 play supporting roles, however, their function in CRISP have distinct implications. For instance, CA1 performs pattern completion in the absence of CA3 and DG contributes to episodic memory retrieval, increasing the speed, precision, and robustness of retrieval. We propose the conceptual theory, discuss its implications for experimental results and suggest testable predictions. It appears that CRISP not only accounts for those experimental results that are consistent with the standard framework, but also for results that are at odds with the standard framework. We therefore suggest that CRISP is a viable, and perhaps superior, theory for the hippocampal function in episodic memory.

  20. Neural correlates of the episodic encoding of pictures and words

    OpenAIRE

    Grady, Cheryl L.; Anthony R. Mcintosh; Rajah, M. Natasha; Craik, Fergus I.M.

    1998-01-01

    A striking characteristic of human memory is that pictures are remembered better than words. We examined the neural correlates of memory for pictures and words in the context of episodic memory encoding to determine material-specific differences in brain activity patterns. To do this, we used positron emission tomography to map the brain regions active during encoding of words and pictures of objects. Encoding was carried out by using three different strategies to explore possible interaction...

  1. Guided episodic sampling for capturing and characterizing industrial plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Liao, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Chih-Chung; Hsieh, Hsin-Cheng; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2018-02-01

    An integrated sampling technique, dubbed trigger sampling, was developed to capture characteristic industrial emissions or plumes. In the field experiment, a hydrogen sulfide (H2S) analyzer was used as the triggering instrument at the boundary of a refinery plant due to frequent complaints of foul smell from local residents. Ten episodic samples were captured when the H2S level surpassed the prescribed trigger level of 8.5 ppbv over a three-day period. Three non-episodic (blank) samples and 23 road-side samples were also collected for comparison. All the 36 flask samples were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/flame ionization detection (GC-MS/FID) for 108 volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The total VOC abundance of the event samples was exceedingly higher than the non-episodic samples by over 80 times in the extreme case. Alkanes were found to be the dominant constituents in the event samples, amounting to over 90% of the total VOC concentrations vs. only 30-40% for the blank and metropolitan samples. In addition, light alkanes in the event samples were highly correlated with the trigger species H2S (R2 = 0.82), implying their common origin. The matrix of chemical composition vs. sample types permitted easy visualization of the dominance of light alkanes for the event samples compared to other types of samples. Principle component analysis (PCA) identified two major contributors to cover 93% of the total variance arising from the 36 samples, further quantifying the distinction of the triggered episodic samples from the contrast samples. The proposed trigger sampling is a coupling of fast-and-slow measurement techniques. In this example, the fast-response H2S analyzer served to "guide" sampling to capture industrial plumes which were then characterized by a relatively slow method of GC-MS/FID for detailed chemical composition representative of the prominent sources.

  2. Treatment and violent behavior in persons with first episode psychosis during a 10-year prospective follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeveld, Johannes; Bjørkly, Stål; Auestad, Bjørn; Barder, Helene; Evensen, Julie; Ten Velden Hegelstad, Wenche; Joa, Inge; Johannessen, Jan Olav; Larsen, Tor Ketil; Melle, Ingrid; Opjordsmoen, Stein; Røssberg, Jan Ivar; Rund, Bjørn Rishovd; Simonsen, Erik; Vaglum, Per; McGlashan, Thomas; Friis, Svein

    2014-07-01

    First episode psychosis (FEP) patients have an increased risk for violence and criminal activity prior to initial treatment. However, little is known about the prevalence of criminality and acts of violence many years after implementation of treatment for a first episode psychosis. To assess the prevalence of criminal and violent behaviors during a 10-year follow-up period after the debut of a first psychosis episode, and to identify early predictors and concomitant risk factors of violent behavior. A prospective design was used with comprehensive assessments of criminal behavior, drug abuse, clinical, social and treatment variables at baseline, five, and 10-year follow-up. Additionally, threatening and violent behavior was assessed at 10-year follow-up. A clinical epidemiological sample of first-episode psychosis patients (n=178) was studied. During the 10-year follow-up period, 20% of subjects had been apprehended or incarcerated. At 10-year follow-up, 15% of subjects had exposed others to threats or violence during the year before assessment. Illegal drug use at baseline and five-year follow-up, and a longer duration of psychotic symptoms were found to be predictive of violent behavior during the year preceding the 10-year follow-up. After treatment initiation, the overall prevalence of violence in psychotic patients drops gradually to rates close to those of the general population. However, persistent illicit drug abuse is a serious risk factor for violent behavior, even long after the start of treatment. Achieving remission early and reducing substance abuse may contribute to a lower long-term risk for violent behavior in FEP patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Mindfulness Enhances Episodic Memory Performance: Evidence from a Multimethod Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kirk Warren; Goodman, Robert J; Ryan, Richard M; Anālayo, Bhikkhu

    2016-01-01

    Training in mindfulness, classically described as a receptive attentiveness to present events and experiences, has been shown to improve attention and working memory. Both are key to long-term memory formation, and the present three-study series used multiple methods to examine whether mindfulness would enhance episodic memory, a key form of long-term memory. In Study 1 (N = 143), a self-reported state of mindful attention predicted better recognition performance in the Remember-Know (R-K) paradigm. In Study 2 (N = 93), very brief training in a focused attention form of mindfulness also produced better recognition memory performance on the R-K task relative to a randomized, well-matched active control condition. Study 3 (N = 57) extended these findings by showing that relative to randomized active and inactive control conditions the effect of very brief mindfulness training generalized to free-recall memory performance. This study also found evidence for mediation of the mindfulness training-episodic memory relation by intrinsic motivation. These findings indicate that mindful attention can beneficially impact motivation and episodic memory, with potential implications for educational and occupational performance.

  4. Episodic future thinking as a predictor of children's prospective memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Giovanna; Brandimonte, Maria A; Cicogna, PierCarla; Cosenza, Marina

    2014-11-01

    The primary goal of this study was to investigate the relationship among retrospective memory, episodic future thinking, and event-based prospective memory performance in preschool, first-grade, and second-grade children. A total of 160 children took part in the experiment. The study included participants from four age groups: 4-year-olds, 5-year-olds, 6-year-olds, and 7-year-olds. Participants were administered a recognition memory task, a task to test the ability to pre-experience future events, and an event-based prospective memory task. Data were submitted to correlational analyses, analyses of variance (ANOVAs), and logistic regression analyses. Results showed that, overall, all of these abilities improve with age and are significantly correlated with one another. However, when partialling out age and retrospective memory, episodic future thinking and prospective memory performance remained correlated. Logistic regression further showed that age and episodic future thinking abilities were significant predictors of prospective memory performance independent of retrospective memory abilities. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Mindfulness Enhances Episodic Memory Performance: Evidence from a Multimethod Investigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk Warren Brown

    Full Text Available Training in mindfulness, classically described as a receptive attentiveness to present events and experiences, has been shown to improve attention and working memory. Both are key to long-term memory formation, and the present three-study series used multiple methods to examine whether mindfulness would enhance episodic memory, a key form of long-term memory. In Study 1 (N = 143, a self-reported state of mindful attention predicted better recognition performance in the Remember-Know (R-K paradigm. In Study 2 (N = 93, very brief training in a focused attention form of mindfulness also produced better recognition memory performance on the R-K task relative to a randomized, well-matched active control condition. Study 3 (N = 57 extended these findings by showing that relative to randomized active and inactive control conditions the effect of very brief mindfulness training generalized to free-recall memory performance. This study also found evidence for mediation of the mindfulness training-episodic memory relation by intrinsic motivation. These findings indicate that mindful attention can beneficially impact motivation and episodic memory, with potential implications for educational and occupational performance.

  6. Structural brain abnormalities in early onset first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, A K; Baaré, W F C; Raabjerg Christensen, A M

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain morphometry in children and adolescents with first-episode psychosis offer a unique opportunity for pathogenetic investigations. METHODS: We compared high-resolution 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance images of the brain in 29 patients (schizophrenia, schizotypal disorder, delusi...... already at illness onset in young schizophrenia spectrum patients, suggests aberrant neurodevelopmental processes in the pathogenesis of these disorders. Gray matter volume changes, however, appear not to be a key feature in early onset first-episode psychosis.......BACKGROUND: Brain morphometry in children and adolescents with first-episode psychosis offer a unique opportunity for pathogenetic investigations. METHODS: We compared high-resolution 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance images of the brain in 29 patients (schizophrenia, schizotypal disorder......, delusional disorder or other non-organic psychosis), aged 10-18 to those of 29 matched controls, using optimized voxel-based morphometry. RESULTS: Psychotic patients had frontal white matter abnormalities, but expected (regional) gray matter reductions were not observed. Post hoc analyses revealed...

  7. Music-related reward responses predict episodic memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreri, Laura; Rodriguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2017-12-01

    Music represents a special type of reward involving the recruitment of the mesolimbic dopaminergic system. According to recent theories on episodic memory formation, as dopamine strengthens the synaptic potentiation produced by learning, stimuli triggering dopamine release could result in long-term memory improvements. Here, we behaviourally test whether music-related reward responses could modulate episodic memory performance. Thirty participants rated (in terms of arousal, familiarity, emotional valence, and reward) and encoded unfamiliar classical music excerpts. Twenty-four hours later, their episodic memory was tested (old/new recognition and remember/know paradigm). Results revealed an influence of music-related reward responses on memory: excerpts rated as more rewarding were significantly better recognized and remembered. Furthermore, inter-individual differences in the ability to experience musical reward, measured through the Barcelona Music Reward Questionnaire, positively predicted memory performance. Taken together, these findings shed new light on the relationship between music, reward and memory, showing for the first time that music-driven reward responses are directly implicated in higher cognitive functions and can account for individual differences in memory performance.

  8. Episodic and Semantic Autobiographical Memory in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia P. Múnera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autobiographical memory (AM is understood as the retrieval of personal experiences that occurred in specific time and space. To date, there is no consensus on the role of medial temporal lobe structures in AM. Therefore, we investigated AM in medial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE patients. Twenty TLE patients candidates for surgical treatment, 10 right (RTLE and 10 left (LTLE, and 20 healthy controls were examined with a version of the Autobiographical Interview adapted to Spanish language. Episodic and semantic AM were analyzed during five life periods through two conditions: recall and specific probe. AM scores were compared with clinical and cognitive data. TLE patients showed lower performance in episodic AM than healthy controls, being significantly worst in RTLE group and after specific probe. In relation to semantic AM, LTLE retrieved higher amount of total semantic details compared to controls during recall, but not after specific probe. No significant differences were found between RTLE and LTLE, but a trend towards poorer performance in RTLE group was found. TLE patients obtained lower scores for adolescence period memories after specific probe. Our findings support the idea that the right hippocampus would play a more important role in episodic retrieval than the left, regardless of a temporal gradient.

  9. Adaptive scaling of reward in episodic memory: a replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Alice; Ludwig, Casimir; Farrell, Simon

    2017-11-01

    Reward is thought to enhance episodic memory formation via dopaminergic consolidation. Bunzeck, Dayan, Dolan, and Duzel [(2010). A common mechanism for adaptive scaling of reward and novelty. Human Brain Mapping, 31, 1380-1394] provided functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and behavioural evidence that reward and episodic memory systems are sensitive to the contextual value of a reward-whether it is relatively higher or lower-as opposed to absolute value or prediction error. We carried out a direct replication of their behavioural study and did not replicate their finding that memory performance associated with reward follows this pattern of adaptive scaling. An effect of reward outcome was in the opposite direction to that in the original study, with lower reward outcomes leading to better memory than higher outcomes. There was a marginal effect of reward context, suggesting that expected value affected memory performance. We discuss the robustness of the reward memory relationship to variations in reward context, and whether other reward-related factors have a more reliable influence on episodic memory.

  10. Theory of mind and social functioning in first episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Sarah; Herzig, Daniela; Mohr, Christine; Lewis, Glyn; Corcoran, Rhiannon; Drake, Richard; Evans, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    There is evidence of associations between social functioning and theory of mind performance and between social functioning and negative symptoms in chronic psychosis. This study investigates these associations in those with first episode psychosis who are unaffected by factors related to long-term mental illness. Our first hypothesis states that there is an association between theory of mind and social functioning. The second hypothesis states that there is no association between symptoms of psychosis and social functioning. Fifty-two individuals with first episode psychosis were assessed for social functioning, theory of mind ability (using the Hinting test with verbal stimuli and the Visual Cartoon test with pictorial stimuli), and symptoms of psychosis. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine associations. Social functioning and theory of mind were associated when measured by the Hinting test (OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.08, 2.66), but not with the Visual Cartoon test (ToM jokes OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.15, 2.53). There was no association between social functioning and symptoms (psychotic symptoms; OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.81, 1.12; selected negative symptoms; OR 1.33, 95% CI 0.78, 2.25). Theory of mind assessed by verbal stimuli is associated with social functioning in a population with first episode psychosis. These findings may be related to language disorders in psychosis.

  11. Neurocognitive performance in first-episode and chronic schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Steffen; Andresen, Burghard; Perro, Christian; Schickel, Marc; Krausz, Micheal; Naber, Dieter

    2002-02-01

    Previous research on neuropsychological disturbances in first-episode and chronic schizophrenic patients has provided mixed results which can be partially attributed to methodological inconsistencies. For the present study, 70 schizophrenic patients (40 with chronic and 30 with first-episode schizophrenia) were compared to 30 healthy controls on a large battery of neuropsychological tests. Special attention was paid to potential confounds such as differences in psychopathology, age and educational level between the schizophrenic sub-samples. Healthy controls performed better than both first-episode and chronic patients in almost all cognitive domains (P < 0.01), while the patient samples did not differ in any of the tasks. Results were confirmed in a second series of analyses in which patient subgroups were equated for sociodemographic background variables. The present results confirm recent data collected in longitudinal studies, thus, lending further support for a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia. It is suggested that neuropsychological disturbances occur early in schizophrenia and do not worsen in the course beyond age-related decrement. Possible reasons why previous research has produced contradictory findings are discussed.

  12. Episodic memory in aspects of large-scale brain networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woorim eJeong

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding human episodic memory in aspects of large-scale brain networks has become one of the central themes in neuroscience over the last decade. Traditionally, episodic memory was regarded as mostly relying on medial temporal lobe (MTL structures. However, recent studies have suggested involvement of more widely distributed cortical network and the importance of its interactive roles in the memory process. Both direct and indirect neuro-modulations of the memory network have been tried in experimental treatments of memory disorders. In this review, we focus on the functional organization of the MTL and other neocortical areas in episodic memory. Task-related neuroimaging studies together with lesion studies suggested that specific sub-regions of the MTL are responsible for specific components of memory. However, recent studies have emphasized that connectivity within MTL structures and even their network dynamics with other cortical areas are essential in the memory process. Resting-state functional network studies also have revealed that memory function is subserved by not only the MTL system but also a distributed network, particularly the default-mode network. Furthermore, researchers have begun to investigate memory networks throughout the entire brain not restricted to the specific resting-state network. Altered patterns of functional connectivity among distributed brain regions were observed in patients with memory impairments. Recently, studies have shown that brain stimulation may impact memory through modulating functional networks, carrying future implications of a novel interventional therapy for memory impairment.

  13. Episodic memory in aspects of large-scale brain networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Woorim; Chung, Chun Kee; Kim, June Sic

    2015-01-01

    Understanding human episodic memory in aspects of large-scale brain networks has become one of the central themes in neuroscience over the last decade. Traditionally, episodic memory was regarded as mostly relying on medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures. However, recent studies have suggested involvement of more widely distributed cortical network and the importance of its interactive roles in the memory process. Both direct and indirect neuro-modulations of the memory network have been tried in experimental treatments of memory disorders. In this review, we focus on the functional organization of the MTL and other neocortical areas in episodic memory. Task-related neuroimaging studies together with lesion studies suggested that specific sub-regions of the MTL are responsible for specific components of memory. However, recent studies have emphasized that connectivity within MTL structures and even their network dynamics with other cortical areas are essential in the memory process. Resting-state functional network studies also have revealed that memory function is subserved by not only the MTL system but also a distributed network, particularly the default-mode network (DMN). Furthermore, researchers have begun to investigate memory networks throughout the entire brain not restricted to the specific resting-state network (RSN). Altered patterns of functional connectivity (FC) among distributed brain regions were observed in patients with memory impairments. Recently, studies have shown that brain stimulation may impact memory through modulating functional networks, carrying future implications of a novel interventional therapy for memory impairment. PMID:26321939

  14. Episodic memories predict adaptive value-based decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murty, Vishnu P; FeldmanHall, Oriel; Hunter, Lindsay E; Phelps, Elizabeth A; Davachi, Lila

    2016-05-01

    Prior research illustrates that memory can guide value-based decision-making. For example, previous work has implicated both working memory and procedural memory (i.e., reinforcement learning) in guiding choice. However, other types of memories, such as episodic memory, may also influence decision-making. Here we test the role for episodic memory-specifically item versus associative memory-in supporting value-based choice. Participants completed a task where they first learned the value associated with trial unique lotteries. After a short delay, they completed a decision-making task where they could choose to reengage with previously encountered lotteries, or new never before seen lotteries. Finally, participants completed a surprise memory test for the lotteries and their associated values. Results indicate that participants chose to reengage more often with lotteries that resulted in high versus low rewards. Critically, participants not only formed detailed, associative memories for the reward values coupled with individual lotteries, but also exhibited adaptive decision-making only when they had intact associative memory. We further found that the relationship between adaptive choice and associative memory generalized to more complex, ecologically valid choice behavior, such as social decision-making. However, individuals more strongly encode experiences of social violations-such as being treated unfairly, suggesting a bias for how individuals form associative memories within social contexts. Together, these findings provide an important integration of episodic memory and decision-making literatures to better understand key mechanisms supporting adaptive behavior. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Epilepsy Characteristics and Clinical Outcome in Patients With Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-Like Episodes (MELAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ha Neul; Eom, Soyong; Kim, Se Hoon; Kang, Hoon-Chul; Lee, Joon Soo; Kim, Heung Dong; Lee, Young-Mock

    2016-11-01

    Epileptic seizures in patients with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) are heterogeneous with no pathognomonic features. We reviewed epilepsy characteristics and clinical outcome exclusively in a pediatric population. Twenty-two children and adolescents (13 males) with confirmed mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes due to mitochondrial DNA A3243G mutation and epilepsy were recruited. Clinical data including seizure semiology, treatment response, neuroimaging findings, and electroencephalography were analyzed. We also examined the effect of the age at seizure onset and initial symptoms on the clinical variables. Seizure semiology and electroencephalography abnormalities showed no syndrome-specific findings. Focal seizures occurred in 21 of 22 subjects (95.5%), whereas generalized seizures developed in seven of 22 subjects (31.8%). Twenty of 22 subjects (90.9%) achieved partial to complete reduction of clinical seizures for more than one year with a combination of more than two antiepileptic drugs. The subgroup with earlier seizure onset presented significantly earlier and showed significantly higher rates of drug-resistant epilepsy compared with the late onset group, although there were no significant differences in the initial symptoms. The subjects with severe epileptic conditions tended to have more severe clinical dysfunction and more severe organ involvement. Both focal and generalized seizures occurred in patients with MELAS. Epilepsy in this population is drug resistant, but a certain degree of clinical seizure reduction was achievable with antiepileptic drugs, with more favorable outcomes than historically expected. Close observation and active epilepsy treatment of individuals with MELAS episodes and earlier seizure onset might improve the prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Incidental and intentional learning of verbal episodic material differentially modifies functional brain networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Therese Kuhnert

    Full Text Available Learning- and memory-related processes are thought to result from dynamic interactions in large-scale brain networks that include lateral and mesial structures of the temporal lobes. We investigate the impact of incidental and intentional learning of verbal episodic material on functional brain networks that we derive from scalp-EEG recorded continuously from 33 subjects during a neuropsychological test schedule. Analyzing the networks' global statistical properties we observe that intentional but not incidental learning leads to a significantly increased clustering coefficient, and the average shortest path length remains unaffected. Moreover, network modifications correlate with subsequent recall performance: the more pronounced the modifications of the clustering coefficient, the higher the recall performance. Our findings provide novel insights into the relationship between topological aspects of functional brain networks and higher cognitive functions.

  17. Unifying Subjectivity and Objectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murugesan Chandrasekaran

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of modern science to the progress of civilization is immeasurable. Even its tendency toward exclusive concentration on the objective world has had salutary effects of great value. Modern science has wiped away much that was merely superstitious or speculative. Its rejection of unfounded opinions and prejudices has helped the thinking mind question conventional beliefs, shed preferences and prejudices, and challenge established authority. But modern systems thinking inherited from natural science is the suppression of the subjective dimension of reality. Many complex systems are an attempt to define and represent all subjective experience in physical terms. The modern man has a bias towards objectivity. The powerful influence of sense impressions on his mind and thinking makes him ignore the subjective experience and consider only objective facts as a valid, legitimate and representation of reality. Observing objective factors that are physical is easier than observing subjective factors that are subtle. The mechanistic view of reality has led to the rejection of the role of the individual in social development as insignificant. The individuals determine the development of society. Their social power has its roots both in subjective factors and objective factors. Economy, politics, society, and culture are inseparable dimensions of a single integrated reality. Subject and object constitute an integrated whole. The mind sees them as separate and independent. Or it views one as completely subordinate to the other. Unbiased approach to the study of all human experiences may prove that subject and object are interdependent dimensions or elements of reality.

  18. Future-directed thinking in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodby, Emmeline; MacLeod, Andrew K

    2016-06-01

    This study employed the Future Thinking Task (MacLeod et al., 2005, Br. J. Clin. Psychol., 44, 495) to investigate whether future-directed thinking in first-episode psychosis is significantly different from that of matched controls, and to identify its correlates in this patient group. Cross-sectional, mixed-model, case-control design. Participants were 30 patients with first-episode psychosis and 27 matched controls. The Future Thinking Task was used to assess future-directed thinking in both groups. Anxiety and depression were also measured as well as self-report measures of hopelessness, suicide ideation and a measure of negative symptoms. Individuals with psychosis were impaired in future-directed thinking in both positive and negative domains, particularly with respect to the coming year. Increased self-reported hopelessness was associated with reduced positive future thinking and increased negative future thinking. Increased positive future thinking was also associated with reduced severity of negative symptoms, whilst negative future thinking was associated with suicide ideation. Individuals with first-episode psychosis show a reduction in positive future thinking in line with that seen in other clinical groups, but this is accompanied by an unexpected reduction in negative future thinking. The findings suggest a general disengagement with the future in this group that may affect recovery and functioning. Individuals with first-episode psychosis may benefit from interventions to help them engage with their future, in particular in the mid-range, up to 1 year. The Future Thinking Task may be a helpful addition to the assessment of suicide risk in those with first-episode psychosis. Decreased positive future thinking was associated with increased severity of negative symptoms, indicating a potential new treatment angle for this resistant aspect of psychosis. The cross-sectional design of this study does not allow for conclusions about the causal relationship

  19. Single episode of major depressive disorder. First episode of recurrent mood disorder or distinct subtype of late-onset depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassano, G B; Akiskal, H S; Savino, M; Soriani, A; Musetti, L; Perugi, G

    1993-01-01

    Of 687 consecutive inpatients and outpatients with primary major depressive illness, 213 (31%) were categorized as single episode (SE) by DSM-III-R criteria. Systematic evaluation of familial, sociodemographic, temperamental and symptomatological characteristics permitted the nearly equal division of SE into two categories: a. early-onset (temperaments (against a bipolar and unipolar familial background), more severe depression, higher rates of suicide attempts, greater anxiety-somatization and psychotic tendencies, and with the potential for recurrence; b. late-onset (> or = 45 years) isolated episode (against an unipolar familial background) with greater life stressors, pursuing a protracted course with less likelihood of recurrence. In most other respects, early-onset SE was intermediate between recurrent major depression and late-onset SE. The implications of these findings for the now largely abandoned category of "involutional melancholia" are discussed.

  20. RUSSIAN LAW SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.N. Bakhrakh

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The question about the subjects of law branches is concerning the number of most important and difficult in law science. Its right decision influences on the subject of law regulation, precise definition of addressees of law norms, the volume of their rights and duties, the limits of action of norms of Main part of the branch, its principles. Scientific investigations, dedicated to law subjects system, promote the development of recommendations for the legislative and law applying activity; they are needed for scientific work organization and student training, for preparing qualified lawyers.

  1. Deficits in Neurite Density Underlie White Matter Structure Abnormalities in First-Episode Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Charlotte L; Davies, Geoff; Garfinkel, Sarah N; Gabel, Matt C; Dowell, Nicholas G; Cercignani, Mara; Seth, Anil K; Greenwood, Kathryn E; Medford, Nick; Critchley, Hugo D

    2017-11-15

    Structural abnormalities across multiple white matter tracts are recognized in people with early psychosis, consistent with dysconnectivity as a neuropathological account of symptom expression. We applied advanced neuroimaging techniques to characterize microstructural white matter abnormalities for a deeper understanding of the developmental etiology of psychosis. Thirty-five first-episode psychosis patients, and 19 healthy controls, participated in a quantitative neuroimaging study using neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging, a multishell diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging technique that distinguishes white matter fiber arrangement and geometry from changes in neurite density. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity images were also derived. Tract-based spatial statistics compared white matter structure between patients and control subjects and tested associations with age, symptom severity, and medication. Patients with first-episode psychosis had lower regional FA in multiple commissural, corticospinal, and association tracts. These abnormalities predominantly colocalized with regions of reduced neurite density, rather than aberrant fiber bundle arrangement (orientation dispersion index). There was no direct relationship with active symptoms. FA decreased and orientation dispersion index increased with age in patients, but not control subjects, suggesting accelerated effects of white matter geometry change. Deficits in neurite density appear fundamental to abnormalities in white matter integrity in early psychosis. In the first application of neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging in psychosis, we found that processes compromising axonal fiber number, density, and myelination, rather than processes leading to spatial disruption of fiber organization, are implicated in the etiology of psychosis. This accords with a neurodevelopmental origin of aberrant brain-wide structural connectivity predisposing individuals to

  2. Dust-induced episodic phytoplankton blooms in the Arabian Sea during winter monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, P.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    to potential iron limitation. Although, all the phytoplankton blooms within CAS were observed following episodic dust events, only four blooms can be attributed to dust depositions. Our work shows that phytoplankton blooms fueled by episodic dust storms...

  3. Efficacy of antipsychotic drugs against hostility in the European First-Episode Schizophrenia Trial (EUFEST)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volavka, Jan; Czobor, Pal; Derks, Eske M.; Bitter, Istvan; Libiger, Jan; Kahn, René S.; Fleischhacker, W. Wolfgang; Kahn, R. S.; Fleischhacker, W. W.; Boter, H.; Keet, I. P. M.; Brugman, C.; Davidson, M.; Dollfus, S.; Gaebel, W.; Galderisi, S.; Gheorghe, M.; Gonen, I.; Grobbee, D. E.; Hranov, L. G.; Hummer, M.; Libiger, J.; Králové, Hradec; Lindefors, N.; López-Ibor, J. J.; Nijssen, K.; Peuskens, J.; Prelipceanu, D.; Riecher-Rössler, A.; Rybakowski, J. K.; Sedvall, G.; von Wilmsdorff, M.

    2011-01-01

    To compare the effects of haloperidol, amisulpride, olanzapine, quetiapine, and ziprasidone on hostility in first-episode schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or schizophreniform disorder. We used the data acquired in the European First-Episode Schizophrenia Trial, an open, randomized trial

  4. An investigation of high ozone episodes in the City of Johannesburg

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Padayachi, YR

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A study of ozone monitoring data in Johannesburg highlighted that the city is frequently affected by high ozone episodes. There is limited knowledge about the chemical and meteorological drivers of these high ozone episodes in Johannesburg...

  5. Episodes of breathlessness: types and patterns: a qualitative study exploring experiences of patients with advanced diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, S.T.; Higginson, I.J.; Benalia, H.; Gysels, M.; Murtagh, F.E.M.; Spicer, J.; Bausewein, C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Despite the high prevalence and impact of episodic breathlessness, information about characteristics and patterns is scarce. Aim: To explore the experience of patients with advanced disease suffering from episodic breathlessness, in order to describe types and patterns. Design and

  6. Physical activity in schizophrenia is higher in the first episode than in subsequent ones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eWalther

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is frequently associated with abnormal motor behavior, particularly hypokinesia. The course of the illness tends to deteriorate in the first years. We aimed to assess gross motor activity in patients with a first episode (n = 33 and multiple episodes (n = 115 of schizophrenia spectrum disorders using wrist actigraphy. First episode patients were younger, had higher motor activity and reduced negative symptom severity. Covarying for age, chlorpromazine equivalents and negative symptoms, first episode patients still had higher motor activity. This was also true after excluding patients with schizophreniform disorder from the analyses. In first episode patients but not in patients with multiple episodes, motor activity was correlated with antipsychotic dosage. In conclusion, after controlling for variables related to disorder chronicity, patients with first episodes were still more active than patients with multiple episodes. Thus, reduced motor activity is a marker of deterioration in the course of schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

  7. Infantile Pain Episodes Associated with Novel Nav1.9 Mutations in Familial Episodic Pain Syndrome in Japanese Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Hiroko; Noguchi, Atsuko; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Kondo, Daiki; Harada, Kouji H; Youssefian, Shohab; Shioi, Hirotomo; Kabata, Risako; Domon, Yuki; Kubota, Kazufumi; Kitano, Yutaka; Takayama, Yasunori; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Ohno, Kousaku; Saito, Yoshiaki; Asano, Takeshi; Tominaga, Makoto; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Koizumi, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Painful peripheral neuropathy has been correlated with various voltage-gated sodium channel mutations in sensory neurons. Recently Nav1.9, a voltage-gated sodium channel subtype, has been established as a genetic influence for certain peripheral pain syndromes. In this study, we performed a genetic study in six unrelated multigenerational Japanese families with episodic pain syndrome. Affected participants (n = 23) were characterized by infantile recurrent pain episodes with spontaneous mitigation around adolescence. This unique phenotype was inherited in an autosomal-dominant mode. Linkage analysis was performed for two families with 12 affected and nine unaffected members, and a single locus was identified on 3p22 (LOD score 4.32). Exome analysis (n = 14) was performed for affected and unaffected members in these two families and an additional family. Two missense variants were identified: R222H and R222S in SCN11A. Next, we generated a knock-in mouse model harboring one of the mutations (R222S). Behavioral tests (Hargreaves test and cold plate test) using R222S and wild-type C57BL/6 (WT) mice, young (8-9 weeks old; n = 10-12 for each group) and mature (36-38 weeks old; n = 5-6 for each group), showed that R222S mice were significantly (p Nav1.9 (WT, R222S, and R222H)-overexpressing ND7/23 cell lines. These results suggest that our novel mutation is a gain-of-function mutation that causes infantile familial episodic pain. The mouse model developed here will be useful for drug screening for familial episodic pain syndrome associated with SCN11A mutations.

  8. Is liability to recurrent major depressive disorder present before first episode onset in adolescence or acquired after the initial episode?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Jeremy W; Hartley, Chelsey; Lewinsohn, Peter M; Seeley, John R; Klein, Daniel N

    2013-05-01

    Many individuals who experience a major depressive episode will subsequently develop recurrent episodes. Although numerous studies have investigated predictors of recurrent episodes, methodological limitations have made it difficult to determine the extent to which liability to recurrent major depressive disorder (rMDD) exists prior to first onset or develops after first onset. This study used a prospective design in a community sample of adolescents to examine variables before and after first onset MDD as predictors of rMDD over a 12-year follow-up. Among 59 adolescents who experienced first onset MDD, 72.88% developed rMDD during the follow-up period. Parental history of rMDD and lifetime history of minor depression prior to MDD onset significantly predicted rMDD. These two effects replicated in ancillary analyses in an expanded sample of N = 205. Following MDD onset, a higher number of major life events significantly predicted rMDD. Liability to rMDD exists prior to MDD onset in the form of familial risk and less severe mood disturbances, whereas liability to rMDD in the form of elevated stress may develop following a first onset in adolescence. © 2013 American Psychological Association

  9. Neurotypical subjective experience is caused by a hippocampal simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faw, Matt; Faw, Bill

    2017-09-01

    We propose that the phenomenon known to neurologically intact people as 'Subjective Experience' is best understood as the activation of various sites in both extrinsic and intrinsic networks by a brand new episodic memory engram (i.e., a complex theta wave coding pattern originating from field CA1 of the hippocampus). Like a media news outlet, the hippocampal complex receives reportage from widely distributed structures around the brain and organizes and binds those reports together into a brand new episodic memory (i.e., a virtual-reality, movie-like, unified, contextualized, but vastly simplified summation of what just happened). This memory pattern is then 'broadcast' back to structures across the brain (via bidirectional pathways to and from the entorhinal cortex and perirhinal area) for error correction, to expedite predictive processing, and to inform sites in both extrinsic and intrinsic networks of one unified history. It is the cortical activation by the new episodic memory engram that gives rise to the event of experiencing. Because episodic memory is the only unified and contextualized representation of self-in-the-world in the brain, and because it informs most of the major cortices about 'what just happened,' it is subjectively misinterpreted as the actual interaction of the body/mind with its environment. This misinterpretation offers insight into many of the distinct and mysterious features of neurotypical subjective experience and the pathologies of consciousness. WIREs Cogn Sci 2017, 8:e1412. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1412 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The Data Subject

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blume, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This article considers whether it is fortunate that data protection rules, as a starting point, apply to all physical persons as data subjects, or whether it would be better to differentiate between kinds of persons on grounds of their ability to act as a data subject. In order to protect all...... persons, it is argued that a principle of care should be part of data protection law....

  11. Predicting progression of amnesic MCI: The integration of episodic memory impairment with perfusion SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Davide; Gainotti, Guido; Di Giuda, Daniela; Vita, Maria Gabriella; Cocciolillo, Fabrizio; Lacidogna, Giordano; Guglielmi, Valeria; Masullo, Carlo; Giordano, Alessandro; Marra, Camillo

    2018-01-30

    The present study aimed at assessing if the ability to predict progression from amnesic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI) to dementia is improved by considering the presence at the baseline of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) perfusion abnormalities in addition to a defect of long term memory. The Episodic Memory Score (EMS), a global index which integrates results obtained in subtests of the Rey's Verbal Learning Test and the Rey-Osterrieth Figure recall, were taken into account to evaluate defects of long term memory. The study sample consisted of 42 subjects affected by aMCI, who were followed-up during a two-year period. At the final follow-up 15 subjects progressed to AD. The EMS predicted progression from aMCI to dementia with a high level of sensitivity and a lower level of specificity, but the association of neuropsychological (EMS) and SPECT data (hypoperfusion in the Posterior Cingulate Cortex) increased the accuracy in predicting conversion from aMCI to AD. The association of results obtained by aMCI patients on memory tests and perfusion SPECT may improve the accuracy in detecting subjects who will progress to dementia. The use of currently available and low-cost investigations could be advantageous in terms of public health policies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Extremely Bright GRB 160625B with Multiple Emission Episodes: Evidence for Long-term Ejecta Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Hou-Jun; Lü, Jing; Zhong, Shu-Qing; Huang, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Hai-Ming; Lan, Lin; Xie, Wei; Lu, Rui-Jing; Liang, En-Wei

    2017-11-01

    GRB 160625B is an extremely bright GRB with three distinct emission episodes. By analyzing its data observed with the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi mission, we find that a multicolor blackbody (mBB) model can be used to fit very well the spectra of the initial short episode (Episode I) within the hypothesis of photosphere emission of a fireball model. The time-resolved spectra of its main episode (Episode II), which was detected with both GBM and LAT after a long quiescent stage (∼180 s) following the initial episode, can be fitted with a model comprising an mBB component plus a cutoff power-law (CPL) component. This GRB was detected again in the GBM and LAT bands with a long extended emission (Episode III) after a quiescent period of ∼300 s. The spectrum of Episode III is adequately fitted with CPL plus single power-law models, and no mBB component is required. These features may imply that the emission of the three episodes are dominated by distinct physics processes, i.e., Episode I is possible from the cocoon emission surrounding the relativistic jet, Episode II may be from photosphere emission and internal shock of the relativistic jet, and Episode III is contributed by internal and external shocks of the relativistic jet. On the other hand, both X-ray and optical afterglows are consistent with the standard external shocks model.

  13. Developmental Differences in Relations between Episodic Memory and Hippocampal Subregion Volume during Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggins, Tracy; Blankenship, Sarah L.; Mulligan, Elizabeth; Rice, Katherine; Redcay, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Episodic memory shows striking improvement during early childhood. However, neural contributions to these behavioral changes are not well understood. This study examined associations between episodic memory and volume of subregions (head, body, and tail) of the hippocampus--a structure known to support episodic memory in school-aged children and…

  14. Modulation of Task Demands Suggests That Semantic Processing Interferes with the Formation of Episodic Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Nicole M.; Kahana, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Although episodic and semantic memory share overlapping neural mechanisms, it remains unclear how our pre-existing semantic associations modulate the formation of new, episodic associations. When freely recalling recently studied words, people rely on both episodic and semantic associations, shown through temporal and semantic clustering of…

  15. Episodic-Like Memory in a Gorilla: A Review and New Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, B.L.; Hoffman, M.L.; Evans, S.

    2005-01-01

    The current paper examines if gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) possess an episodic memory system. Episodic memory, in humans, is a neurocognitive system that stores information about the personal past. Unique to episodic memory is its palinscopic or past-focused orientation; most memory systems serve to provide the organism with up to date…

  16. The Burden of Repeated Mood Episodes in Bipolar I Disorder: Results From the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Amy T; West, Amy E; Eisner, Lori; Baek, Jihyun; Deckersbach, Thilo

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between previous mood episodes and clinical course/functioning in a community sample (National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions [NESARC]). Subjects (n = 909) met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, criteria for bipolar I disorder and provided data on number of previous episode recurrences. Number of previous mood episodes was used to predict outcomes at wave 1 and wave 2 of the NESARC. Previous mood episodes accounted for small but unique variance in outcomes. Recurrence was associated with poorer functioning, psychiatric and medical comorbidity, and increased odds of suicidality, disability, unemployment, and hospitalization at wave 1. Recurrences were associated with greater risk for new onset suicidality, psychiatric comorbidity, disability, unemployment, and poor functioning by wave 2. The course of bipolar disorder does worsen with progressive mood episodes but is attenuated in community, relative to clinical samples. Interventions to prevent future relapse may be particularly important to implement early in the course of illness.

  17. Comparison of Microbial Communities in a Simulated Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System Subjected to Episodes of Nitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial populations were examined in a simulated chloraminated drinking water distribution system. After six months of continuous operation, coupons were incubated in CDC reactors receiving water from the simulated system to study biofilm development. The study was organized ...

  18. Comparison of Microbial Communities in a Simulated Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System Subjected to Episodes of Nitrification (poster)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial populations were examined in a simulated chloraminated drinking water distribution system (i.e. PVC pipe loop). After six months of continuous operation, coupons were incubated in CDC reactors receiving water from the simulated system to study biofilm development. The s...

  19. Radionuclide Transport in Fractured Tuff under Episodic Flow Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Q.; Sun, Y.; Ewing, R. P.

    2005-12-01

    The current conceptual model of radionuclide transport in unsaturated fractured rock includes water movement in fractures, with migration of the entrained radionuclides being retarded by diffusion into and sorption within the rock matrix. Water infiltration and radionuclide transport through low-permeability unsaturated fractured rock are episodic and intermittent in nature, at least at local scales. Under episodic flow conditions, the matrix is constantly imbibing or draining, and this fluctuating wetness both drives two-way advective movement of radionuclides, and forces changes in the matrix diffusivity. This work is intended to examine, both experimentally and numerically, how radionuclide transport under episodic flow conditions is affected by the interacting processes of imbibition and drainage, diffusion, and matrix sorption. Using Topopah Spring welded volcanic tuff, collected from the potential repository geologic unit at Yucca Mountain for storing high-level nuclear waste, we prepared a saw-cut fracture core (length 10.2 cm, diameter 4.4 cm, and fracture aperture 100 microns). The dry core was packed into a flow reactor, flushed with CO2, then saturated via slow pumping (0.01 mL/min) of synthetic groundwater. The fractured core was then flushed with air at 97% relative humidity (to simulate in situ unsaturated fractured rock conditions at Yucca Mountain), then the episodic transport experiment was conducted. Episodic flow involved 4 cycles of tracer solution flow within the fracture, followed by flushing with high humidity air. Each flow episode contained a different suite of non-sorbing and sorbing tracers, which included 3H, ReO4- (a chemical analog for 99TcO4-), I- (for 129I-), Sr and Cs (for 90Sr and 137Cs), plus the radionuclides 235U, 237Np, and 241Pu. These radionuclides span a variety of sorption strengths and represent a large fraction of the radionuclides of concern at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. Meanwhile, the non-sorbing 3H and Re

  20. First-episode schizophrenia: characterization and clinical correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Bilder

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychological impairments are well documented in schizophrenia and are important targets of treatment. Information about the severity and pattern of deficits after treatment for the first psychotic episode and about relationships between these deficits and syndromal characteristics remains limited. Comprehensive neuropsychological assessments including 41 individual tests were given to 94 patients with first-episode schizophrenia after initial stabilization of psychosis and to a comparison group of 36 healthy volunteers. Profiles of neuropsychological deficits and the relationship of deficits to sex and handedness were examined. Correlations of neuropsychological deficit with a broad range of historical and clinical characteristics, including outcome, were explored. Patients had a large generalized neuropsychological deficit. Patients also had, superimposed on the generalized deficit, subtle relative deficits in memory and executive functions. Learning/memory dysfunction best distinguished patients from healthy individuals; after accounting for this difference, only motor deficits further distinguished the groups. Patients with higher neuropsychological ability had only memory deficits, and patients with lower ability had both memory and executive deficits. Dextral patients had less severe generalized deficit. Severity of residual symptoms was associated with greater generalized deficit. Executive and attentional deficits were most linked to global functional impairment and poor outcome. The results document a large generalized deficit, and more subtle differential deficits, in clinically stabilized first-episode patients. Learning/memory deficits were observed even in patients with less severe generalized deficit, but the pattern was unlike the amnestic syndrome and probably reflects different mechanisms. Executive and attentional deficits marked the more severe ly disabled patients, and may portend relatively poor outcome. Failure to

  1. Strong ridge episodes and precipitation deficits in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, J.; Pinto, J. G.; Ulbrich, U.; Leckebusch, G. C.; Andrade, C.; Leite, S.; Corte-Real, J.

    2009-04-01

    The occurrence and persistence of strong ridge episodes over the Eastern North Atlantic close to the Iberian Peninsula is investigated in order to identify its role in winter drought episodes over Portugal. With this aim, NCEP reanalysis data is analyzed for the period 1957/58-2007/08. The core winter months (December to February) are considered. As a large part of the annual precipitation falls during these three months, occurring deficits implicate severe impacts for the rest of the hydrological year. Results show that the establishment of hydrological droughts over Western/Central Iberia is often associated with the occurrence of strong and persistent ridges (at least 10 days), which in turn correspond to 17% of all ridge episodes. During the dry (wet) winters there is a high (low) frequency of occurrence of strong ridge days that tend to last for long (short) periods of time. This duality is also evident in the composites of the number of cyclone counts and of the storm track densities: these quantities are significantly reduced (increased) close to Iberia for the dry (wet) winters. Finally, the occurrence of these ridges is classified based on two different weather typing approaches, the empirical Grosswetterlagen (GWL) weather regimes and the previously defined five automatic weather regimes for Portugal (k-mean cluster approach on 500 hPa geopotential height field). Results show that the frequencies of occurrence of dry conditions are associated with an enhanced frequency of GWLs 2 (Cyclonic Westerly), 8 (Cyclonic North-Westerly) and 10 (Zonal Ridge across Central Europe). These GWLs correspond to particular cases of the k-means regimes "NAO+" and "E" regimes, which dominate for dry periods, hence documenting the robustness of the results.

  2. Dominant KCNA2 mutation causes episodic ataxia and pharmacoresponsive epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Mark A; Bellows, Susannah T; Li, Melody; Carroll, Renée; Micallef, Silvana; Carvill, Gemma L; Myers, Candace T; Howell, Katherine B; Maljevic, Snezana; Lerche, Holger; Gazina, Elena V; Mefford, Heather C; Bahlo, Melanie; Berkovic, Samuel F; Petrou, Steven; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Gecz, Jozef

    2016-11-08

    To identify the genetic basis of a family segregating episodic ataxia, infantile seizures, and heterogeneous epilepsies and to study the phenotypic spectrum of KCNA2 mutations. A family with 7 affected individuals over 3 generations underwent detailed phenotyping. Whole genome sequencing was performed on a mildly affected grandmother and her grandson with epileptic encephalopathy (EE). Segregating variants were filtered and prioritized based on functional annotations. The effects of the mutation on channel function were analyzed in vitro by voltage clamp assay and in silico by molecular modeling. KCNA2 was sequenced in 35 probands with heterogeneous phenotypes. The 7 family members had episodic ataxia (5), self-limited infantile seizures (5), evolving to genetic generalized epilepsy (4), focal seizures (2), and EE (1). They had a segregating novel mutation in the shaker type voltage-gated potassium channel KCNA2 (CCDS_827.1: c.765_773del; p.255_257del). A rare missense SCN2A (rs200884216) variant was also found in 2 affected siblings and their unaffected mother. The p.255_257del mutation caused dominant negative loss of channel function. Molecular modeling predicted repositioning of critical arginine residues in the voltage-sensing domain. KCNA2 sequencing revealed 1 de novo mutation (CCDS_827.1: c.890G>A; p.Arg297Gln) in a girl with EE, ataxia, and tremor. A KCNA2 mutation caused dominantly inherited episodic ataxia, mild infantile-onset seizures, and later generalized and focal epilepsies in the setting of normal intellect. This observation expands the KCNA2 phenotypic spectrum from EE often associated with chronic ataxia, reflecting the marked variation in severity observed in many ion channel disorders. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  3. A computational theory of episodic memory formation in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolls, Edmund T

    2010-12-31

    A quantitative computational theory of the operation of the hippocampus as an episodic memory system is described. The CA3 system operates as a single attractor or autoassociation network to enable rapid, one-trial associations between any spatial location (place in rodents or spatial view in primates) and an object or reward and to provide for completion of the whole memory during recall from any part. The theory is extended to associations between time and object or reward to implement temporal order memory, also important in episodic memory. The dentate gyrus performs pattern separation by competitive learning to produce sparse representations, producing for example neurons with place-like fields from entorhinal cortex grid cells. The dentate granule cells produce by the very small number of mossy fibre connections to CA3 a randomizing pattern separation effect important during learning but not recall that separates out the patterns represented by CA3 firing to be very different from each other, which is optimal for an unstructured episodic memory system in which each memory must be kept distinct from other memories. The direct perforant path input to CA3 is quantitatively appropriate to provide the cue for recall in CA3, but not for learning. The CA1 recodes information from CA3 to set up associatively learned backprojections to neocortex to allow subsequent retrieval of information to neocortex, providing a quantitative account of the large number of hippocampo-neocortical and neocortical-neocortical backprojections. Tests of the theory including hippocampal subregion analyses and hippocampal NMDA receptor knockouts are described and support the theory. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Episodic evolution and adaptation of chloroplast genomes in ancestral grasses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojian Zhong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that the chloroplast genomes of the grass family, Poaceae, have undergone an elevated evolutionary rate compared to most other angiosperms, yet the details of this phenomenon have remained obscure. To know how the rate change occurred during evolution, estimation of the time-scale with reliable calibrations is needed. The recent finding of 65 Ma grass phytoliths in Cretaceous dinosaur coprolites places the diversification of the grasses to the Cretaceous period, and provides a reliable calibration in studying the tempo and mode of grass chloroplast evolution. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using chloroplast genome data from angiosperms and by taking account of new paleontological evidence, we now show that episodic rate acceleration both in terms of non-synonymous and synonymous substitutions occurred in the common ancestral branch of the core Poaceae (a group formed by rice, wheat, maize, and their allies accompanied by adaptive evolution in several chloroplast proteins, while the rate reverted to the slow rate typical of most monocot species in the terminal branches. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our finding of episodic rate acceleration in the ancestral grasses accompanied by adaptive molecular evolution has a profound bearing on the evolution of grasses, which form a highly successful group of plants. The widely used model for estimating divergence times was based on the assumption of correlated rates between ancestral and descendant lineages. However, the assumption is proved to be inadequate in approximating the episodic rate acceleration in the ancestral grasses, and the assumption of independent rates is more appropriate. This finding has implications for studies of molecular evolutionary rates and time-scale of evolution in other groups of organisms.

  5. Premorbid personality and insight in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Maria S; Garcia-Jalon, Elena; Gilleen, James K; David, Anthony S; Peralta, Victor M D; Cuesta, Manuel J

    2011-01-01

    Insight in psychosis and schizophrenia is considered a complex biopsychosocial phenomenon. Premorbid personality is regarded by some authors as part of the substrate to many psychiatric phenomena, but it is not clear if this applies to insight. To examine longitudinal relationships between personality traits and insight dimensions in first-episode psychosis. One hundred consecutive antipsychotic-naïve first-episode nonaffective psychotic patients admitted to hospital were included in the study. Eighty-one patients completed at 1 month a premorbid personality evaluation, plus baseline, and 6-month insight assessments. We used the Assessment and Documentation of Psychopathology inventory for assessing insight dimensions (not feeling ill, lack of insight, and refusal of treatment) and the Personality Assessment Schedule for ascertaining 5 dimensions of premorbid personality (schizoid, passive-dependent, anancastic, sociopathic, and schizotypy). At baseline, personality dimensions did not show any association with insight dimensions, with the exception of schizotypy traits. At 6 months, schizoid and sociopathic personality showed a significant association with not feeling ill (r = .30, P ≤ .007; r = .27, P = .01) and lack of insight (r = .36, P = .001; r = .41, P schizoid and sociopathic personality had moderate correlation with the lack of insight dimension (r = -.34, P = .002; r = .38, P schizoid personality significantly predicted lack of insight at 6 months and change from baseline to the 6 months assessment. Sociopathic and schizoid personality dimensions were not only significantly associated with lack of insight at 6 months but also predicted change on lack of insight over 6 months. Therefore, exploring premorbid personality traits at the beginning of a psychotic episode may be helpful in identifying patients at high risk for lack of insight during the initial course of the illness.

  6. Are antibiotic-resistant pathogens more common in subsequent episodes of diabetic foot infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebowitz, Dan; Gariani, Karim; Kressmann, Benjamin; Dach, Elodie von; Huttner, Benedikt; Bartolone, Placido; Lê, Nam; Mohamad, Morad; Lipsky, Benjamin A; Uçkay, Ilker

    2017-06-01

    After antibiotic therapy of an initial diabetic foot infection (DFI), pathogens isolated from subsequent episodes might become more resistant to commonly prescribed antibiotics. If so, this might require a modification of the current recommendations for the selection of empiric antibiotic therapy. This study investigated whether the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) DFI guideline recommendations should be modified based on the number of past DFI episodes. This was a single-centre retrospective cohort survey of DFI patients seen during the years 2010 to 2016. A total 1018 episodes of DFI in 482 adult patients were identified. These patients were followed-up for a median of 3.3 years after the first DFI episode. The total number of episodes was 2257 and the median interval between recurrent episodes was 7.6 months. Among the recurrent DFIs, the causative pathogens were the same as in the previous episode in only 43% of cases (158/365). Staphylococcus aureus was the predominant pathogen in all episodes (range 1 to 13 episodes) and was not more prevalent with the increasing number of episodes. DFIs were treated with systemic antibiotics for a median duration of 20 days (interquartile range 11-35 days). Overall, there was no significant increase in the incidence of antibiotic resistance to methicillin, rifampicin, clindamycin, or ciprofloxacin over the episodes (Pearson's Chi-square test p-values of 0.76, 1.00, 0.06, and 0.46, respectively; corresponding p-values for trend of 0.21, 0.27, 0.38, and 0.08, respectively). After the successful treatment of a DFI, recurrent episodes are frequent. A history of a previous DFI episode did not predict a greater likelihood of any antibiotic-resistant isolate in subsequent episodes. Thus, broadening the spectrum of empiric antibiotic therapy for recurrent episodes of DFI does not appear necessary. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. The role of heavy episodic drinking and hostile sexism in men's sexual aggression toward female intimate partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisco, Claire G; Parrott, Dominic J; Tharp, Andra Teten

    2012-11-01

    Research indicates that men's heavy episodic drinking is a significant risk factor for their perpetration of sexual aggression toward intimate partners. The aim of this investigation was to examine how hostile sexism (i.e., antipathy toward women) and benevolent sexism (i.e., subjectively positive, yet patriarchal, views of women) influence the relation between men's heavy episodic drinking and their perpetration of sexual aggression toward intimate partners. Participants were 205 heterosexual drinking men who completed self-report measures of quantity of alcohol consumption during the past 12 months, hostile sexism, and sexual aggression toward an intimate partner during the past 12 months. Men's heavy episodic drinking was positively associated with sexual aggression perpetration toward intimate partners amongst men who endorsed high, but not low, levels of hostile sexism. No such interactive effect emerged for men's endorsement of benevolent sexism. These results have important implications for understanding cumulative risk factors for the perpetration of sexual aggression toward intimates. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Decrease in temporal gyrus gray matter volume in first-episode, early onset schizophrenia: an MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsong Tang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Loss of gray matter has been previously found in early-onset schizophrenic patients. However, there are no consistent findings between studies due to different methods used to measure grey matter volume/density and influences of confounding factors. METHODS: The volume of gray matter (GM was measured in 29 first episode early-onset schizophrenia (EOS and 34 well-matched healthy controls by using voxel-based morphometry (VBM. Psychotic symptoms were assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS. The correlations between the GM volume and PANSS scores, age of psychosis onset, duration of psychosis, and chlorpromazine (CPZ equivalent value were investigated. RESULTS: Relative to healthy subjects, the patients with first episode EOS showed significantly lower GM volume in the left middle and superior temporal gyrus. The loss of GM volume negatively correlated with PANSS-positive symptoms (p = 0.002, but not with PANSS-negative symptoms, PANSS-general psychopathology, and PANSS-total score. No significant correlation was found between GM volume and age of psychosis onset, duration of psychosis, and CPZ equivalent value. CONCLUSION: Patients with first episode EOS have evidence of reduced GM in the left middle and superior temporal gyrus. Structural abnormalities in the left middle and superior temporal gyrus may contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  9. Does the Inclusion of Virtual Reality Games within Conventional Rehabilitation Enhance Balance Retraining after a Recent Episode of Stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaratnam, B S; Gui Kaien, J; Lee Jialin, K; Sweesin, Kwek; Sim Fenru, S; Enting, Lee; Ang Yihsia, E; Keathwee, Ng; Yunfeng, Su; Woo Yinghowe, W; Teo Siaoting, S

    2013-01-01

    This randomised controlled and double-blinded pilot study evaluated if interactive virtual reality balance related games integrated within conventional rehabilitation sessions resulted in more superior retraining of dynamic balance compared to CR after stroke. 19 subjects diagnosed with a recent episode of stroke were recruited from a local rehabilitation hospital and randomly assigned to either a control or an experimental group. Subjects in the control groups underwent 60 minutes of conventional rehabilitation while those in the experimental groups underwent 40 minutes of convention rehabilitation and 20 minutes of self-directed virtual reality balanced rehabilitation. Functional Reach Test, Timed Up and Go, Modified Barthel Index, Berg Balance Scale, and Centre of Pressure of subjects in both groups were evaluated before and on completion of the rehabilitation sessions. Results indicate that the inclusion of interactive virtual reality balance related games within conventional rehabilitation can lead to improved functional mobility and balance after a recent episode of stroke without increasing treatment time that requires more health professional manpower.

  10. Does the Inclusion of Virtual Reality Games within Conventional Rehabilitation Enhance Balance Retraining after a Recent Episode of Stroke?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Rajaratnam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This randomised controlled and double-blinded pilot study evaluated if interactive virtual reality balance related games integrated within conventional rehabilitation sessions resulted in more superior retraining of dynamic balance compared to CR after stroke. 19 subjects diagnosed with a recent episode of stroke were recruited from a local rehabilitation hospital and randomly assigned to either a control or an experimental group. Subjects in the control groups underwent 60 minutes of conventional rehabilitation while those in the experimental groups underwent 40 minutes of convention rehabilitation and 20 minutes of self-directed virtual reality balanced rehabilitation. Functional Reach Test, Timed Up and Go, Modified Barthel Index, Berg Balance Scale, and Centre of Pressure of subjects in both groups were evaluated before and on completion of the rehabilitation sessions. Results indicate that the inclusion of interactive virtual reality balance related games within conventional rehabilitation can lead to improved functional mobility and balance after a recent episode of stroke without increasing treatment time that requires more health professional manpower.

  11. Macrolides for Acute Wheezing Episodes in Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raissy, Hengameh H; Blake, Kathryn

    2016-06-01

    The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program's Expert Panel Report 3, Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma does not recommend antibiotics for the management of acute episodes of asthma exacerbation. Macrolides seem to have some potential effect beyond or in addition to their antibacterial effect. It has been reported that macrolides may potentially benefit patients with chronic inflammatory airway diseases due to their antibacterial, antiviral, and/or anti-inflammatory effects. This review presents recent data on use of azithromycin in prevention and management of acute exacerbation of respiratory symptoms in infants and young children.

  12. The principle of activity specificity in episodic memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasyukova, Ekaterina E.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of chess skill, age, and conditions for memorization on the efficiency of the recall of sequences of opening chess moves was studied. Thirty-nine chess players of different skill levels (from category 2 to grandmaster and ages (from 17 to 81 years old were divided into four groups (ELO > 2000 before and after the age of 40; ELO 2000. The current memory of the chess experts was to a greater extent mediated by opening schemes and knowledge than was that of the intermediate players. A hypothesis about the activity specificity of the coding in episodic memory was confirmed and concretized.

  13. Air pollution episodes associated with East Asian winter monsoons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hien, P.D., E-mail: pdhien@gmail.com [Vietnam Atomic Energy Agency, 59 Ly Thuong Kiet str. Hanoi (Viet Nam); Loc, P.D.; Dao, N.V. [National Hydro-Meteorological Center, 62-A2 Nguyen Chi Thanh str. Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2011-11-01

    A dozen multi-day pollution episodes occur from October to February in Hanoi, Vietnam due to prolonged anticyclonic conditions established after the northeast monsoon surges (cold surges). These winter pollution episodes (WPEs) account for most of the 24-h PM{sub 10} exceedances and the highest concentrations of gaseous pollutants in Hanoi. In this study, WPEs were investigated using continuous air quality monitoring data and information on upper-air soundings and air mass trajectories. The 24-h pollutant concentrations are lowest during cold surges; concurrently rise thereafter reaching the highest levels toward the middle of a monsoon cycle, then decline ahead of the next cold surge. Each monsoon cycle usually proceeds through a dry phase and a humid phase as Asiatic continental cold air arrives in Hanoi through inland China then via the East China Sea. WPEs are associated with nighttime radiation temperature inversions (NRTIs) in the dry phase and subsidence temperature inversions (STIs) in the humid phase. In NRTI periods, the rush hour pollution peak is more pronounced in the evening than in the morning and the pollution level is about two times higher at night than in daytime. In STI periods, broad morning and evening traffic peaks are observed and pollution is as high at night as in daytime. The close association between pollution and winter monsoon meteorology found in this study for the winter 2003-04 may serve as a basis for advance warning of WPEs and for forecasting the 24-h pollutant concentrations. - Highlights: {yields} Dozen pollution episodes from Oct. to Feb in Hanoi associated with anticyclones after monsoon surges. {yields} 24-h concentrations of PM{sub 10}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}, CO rise after surge and decline ahead of the next. {yields} Episodes caused by nighttime radiation and subsidence inversions in dry and humid monsoon phases. {yields} Distinct diurnal variations of pollutant concentrations observed in the two periods. {yields} Close

  14. Late postoperative episodic and constant hypoxaemia and associated ECG abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Rasmussen, Verner; von Jessen, F

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-two patients without cardiopulmonary disease and undergoing elective major abdominal surgery were monitored continuously with a Holter tape recorder and a pulse oximeter on one night before operation and the first two nights after operation (23:00 to 07:00), without oxygen therapy. Mean...... were observed in 10 patients before operation and in 16 patients after operation (ns). Individual maximum ST depression was more pronounced after than before operation (P less than 0.05). Episodic desaturation was related closely to tachycardia in six patients before operation and one patient after...

  15. PSIC - Description of an First-Episode Early Intervention Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Maia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe the Fernando Fonseca Psychiatric Department and after a brief theoric report about Psychosis early intervention and its prognostic implications, describe more specificaly the PSIC Program (Early intervention pro- gram after a first psychotic episode. After characterizing the initial sample, they describe the patients' evolution during the three phases of the Program evaluation. Finally they present future implications in the development of new projects in this area in the Service, regarding the good therapeutic adherence, the low rate of readmissions and the decrease of Psychosocial level.

  16. Episodic tremor and slip in Northern Sumatra subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sianipar, Dimas; Subakti, Hendri

    2017-07-01

    The first reported observation of non-volcanic tremor in Sunda Arc in Sumbawa, Indonesia open a possibility of discovery of episodic tremor and slip (ETS) from out of Pacific Rim. Non-volcanic tremor gives some important information about dynamic of plate boundaries. The characteristics of these tremors are visually as non-impulsive, high frequency, long-duration and low-amplitude signals. Tectonic tremor occurred in a transition part of brittle-ductile of a fault and frequently associated with the shearing mechanism of slow slip. Tectonic tremor is a seismic case that also very interested, because it shows strong sensitivity to stress changes. Deep non-volcanic tremor is usually associated with episodic slow-slip events. Tectonic tremor is found in close association with geodetically observed slow-slip events (SSE) in subduction zones. One research found that there is possibility of SSE occurrence on Banyak Islands, North Sumatra revealed from coral observation. The SSE occurred on the Banyak Islands portion of the megathrust at 30-55 km depth, within the downdip transition zone. We do a systematic search of episodic tremor and its possible relationship with slow-slip phenomena in Northern Sumatra subduction zone. The spectrogram analysis is done to analyze the potential tremor signals. We use three component broadband seismic stations with 20, 25, and 50 sampling per second (BH* and SH* channels). We apply a butterworth 5 Hz highpass filter to separate the signal as local tremor and teleseismic/regional earthquakes. Before computing spectrogram to avoid high-frequency artifacts to remote triggering, we apply a 0.5 Hz filter. We also convert the binary seismic data into sound waves to make sure that these events meet the tectonic tremor criterion. We successfully examine 3 seismic stations with good recording i.e. GSI, SNSI and KCSI. We find there are many evidences of high frequency episodic tremor like signals. This include an analysis of potential triggered

  17. Subject (of documents)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjørland, Birger

    2017-01-01

    such as concepts, aboutness, topic, isness and ofness are also briefly presented. The conclusion is that the most fruitful way of defining “subject” (of a document) is the documents informative or epistemological potentials, that is, the documents potentials of informing users and advance the development......This article presents and discuss the concept “subject” or subject matter (of documents) as it has been examined in library and information science (LIS) for more than 100 years. Different theoretical positions are outlined and it is found that the most important distinction is between document......-oriented views versus request-oriented views. The document-oriented view conceive subject as something inherent in documents, whereas the request-oriented view (or the policy based view) understand subject as an attribution made to documents in order to facilitate certain uses of them. Related concepts...

  18. Science of the subjective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, R G; Dunne, B J

    2007-01-01

    Over the greater portion of its long scholarly history, the particular form of human observation, reasoning, and technical deployment we properly term "science" has relied at least as much on subjective experience and inspiration as it has on objective experiments and theories. Only over the past few centuries has subjectivity been progressively excluded from the practice of science, leaving an essentially secular analytical paradigm. Quite recently, however, a compounding constellation of newly inexplicable physical evidence, coupled with a growing scholarly interest in the nature and capability of human consciousness, are beginning to suggest that this sterilization of science may have been excessive and could ultimately limit its epistemological reach and cultural relevance. In particular, an array of demonstrable consciousness-related anomalous physical phenomena, a persistent pattern of biological and medical anomalies, systematic studies of mind/brain relationships and the mechanics of human creativity, and a burgeoning catalogue of human factors effects within contemporary information processing technologies, all display empirical correlations with subjective aspects that greatly complicate, and in many cases preclude, their comprehension on strictly objective grounds. However, any disciplined re-admission of subjective elements into rigorous scientific methodology will hinge on the precision with which they can be defined, measured, and represented, and on the resilience of established scientific techniques to their inclusion. For example, any neo-subjective science, while retaining the logical rigor, empirical/theoretical dialogue, and cultural purpose of its rigidly objective predecessor, would have the following requirements: acknowledgment of a proactive role for human consciousness; more explicit and profound use of interdisciplinary metaphors; more generous interpretations of measurability, replicability, and resonance; a reduction of ontological

  19. The Subjectivity of Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Morten

    What is a 'we' – a collective – and how can we use such communal self-knowledge to help people? This book is about collectivity, participation, and subjectivity – and about the social theories that may help us understand these matters. It also seeks to learn from the innovative practices and ideas...... practices. Through this dialogue, it develops an original trans-disciplinary critical theory and practice of collective subjectivity for which the ongoing construction and overcoming of common sense, or ideology, is central. It also points to ways of relating discourse with agency, and fertilizing insights...... from interactionism and ideology theories in a cultural-historical framework....

  20. Paternal postpartum mood: bipolar episodes? Depressão paterna: episódio bipolar?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Amaral Tavares Pinheiro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We describe the prevalence of depressive and bipolar spectrum episodes in fathers in antenatal and postnatal periods, as well as at 12 months after childbirth. METHOD: A longitudinal follow-up study was conducted with a representative sample of 739 fathers whose children were born between April 2007 and May 2008 in maternity wards in the city of Pelotas, southern Brazil. Paternal psychopathology was measured with the Mini Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI across three time points: between 28 and 34 weeks of pregnancy (T1, 30 to 60 days postpartum (T2, and 12 months after childbirth (T3. RESULTS: The prevalence of depressive episodes was 5.0% at T1, 4.5% at T2, and 4.3% at T3. Mixed episodes were present in 3%, 1.7%, and 0.9% of subjects, respectively, and accounted for 61.1% of the cases of depression in the antenatal period, 37.5% in postpartum, and 21.4% at 12 months. Depressive and manic/hypomanic episodes were significantly associated during pregnancy and in postpartum, but not at 12 months after childbirth. CONCLUSION: Bipolar episodes were common in men with depressive symptoms during their partner's pregnancy in the postpartum period and, to a lesser extent, 12 months after childbirth. Therefore, this population should be carefully investigated for manic and hypomanic symptoms.OBJETIVO: Verificar a prevalência dos episódios depressivos e bipolares em homens no período pré e pós-natal, assim como 12 meses após o parto. MÉTODO: Estudo longitudinal com amostra de pais cujas crianças nasceram entre abril de 2007 e maio de 2008 em maternidades da cidade de Pelotas-RS, no sul do Brasil. Episódios depressivos e maníacos/hipomaníacos foram mensurados com o Mini Neuropsychiatric Interview em três tempos diferentes: entre a 28ª e 34ª semanas de gestação (T1, 30 a 60 dias após o parto (T2 e 12 meses após o nascimento da criança. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de episódios depressivos foi 5,0% em T1, 4,5% em T2 e 4,3% em T3