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Sample records for subject physical geography

  1. Core Concepts in Introductory Physical Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Robert S.; Green, Jerry E.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis of 14 introductory physical geography textbooks yielded 121 core concepts (basic concepts appearing in 7-10 books). The authors suggest that the trend toward overspecialization in introductory geography classes can be reversed if teachers agree to stress core concepts and their relationships to geography as a whole. (AM)

  2. Geosystems: An Introduction to Physical Geography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christopherson, Robert, W.; Birkeland, Ginger

    Among the most highly regarded in physical geography, Robert Christopherson’s best-selling texts are known for their meticulous attention to detail, currency, accuracy, and rich integration of climate change science. Geosystems: An Introduction to Physical Geography,Ninth Edition is uniquely...... edition presents bold new features that cultivate an active learning environment both in and outside the classroom.The Ninth Edition is available with MasteringGeography™ , the most effective and widely used online tutorial, homework, and assessment system for the sciences. This program will provide...... an interactive and engaging learning experience for your students. Here’s how: Personalize learning with Mastering Geography: Mastering Geography provides students with engaging and interactive experiences that coach them through introductory physical geography with specific wrong-answer feedback, hints...

  3. Strengthening the ties between university and school - Bilingual geography is the future for our multifarious subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnikel, F.

    2003-04-01

    An incessantly growing interaction between numerous fields of human activity asks for an open-minded approach and interdisciplinarity. No subject matches geography when it comes to bridging the gaps between different aspects of human life. Geography does not only describe, analyse and explain the "natural" state of the world we live in, it does also connect the disciplines within the physical branch of the subject with disciplines in the human or anthropogenic part, which describes the state of the world "as is". Geography is, therefore, in itself multi-disciplinary. Considering the immense importance of geography as the subject dealing with our environment and facing the fact that it is this environment which is already endangered by the multiple forms of human interference, geography and its multi-disciplinary character deserve even increased attention. The growth of the world's population, future climatic change and shortages of natural resources add to the importance of geography as the one subject in school dealing with these problems. In our societies, which are constantly growing together in political and economic issues, the structures of communication additionally mainly rely on an easily accessible and widely spread language like English to serve the needs of modern international contact. In Bavaria, the signs of the times have been recognized quite early. Nearly 8000 pupils at more than 80 high-level secondary schools ("Gymnasien") attend bilingual teaching, a large part of which is performed in geography. The Adolf-Weber-Gymnasium serves as an example, since it has the largest group of pupils instructed in bilingual geography in Munich. Next term, more than 150 boys and girls from five grades will be taught geography in English. Our goal is, in contrast to concepts of bilingual teaching in some other German states, not only to improve the language capability of our pupils. It is more an investment in scientific propaedeutics. It strenghtens the ties

  4. REFERENCE POINTS IN CURRICULUM DESIGN: GEOGRAPHY AS A SCHOOL SUBJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian MÂNDRUŢ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is theoretical and exploratory. It aims to describe a reference system which should determine or influence the decisions for the new curriculum design. The example of geography as a subject matter (or, in a wider perspective, of a field of study called “Geography – Environmental Studies” reveals specific elements resulting from the characteristics of the interior structure. The reference system may be altered, reduced, amplified, categorized or adjusted with respect to other subjects or fields of study, that are at least similar. The example of the “vertical” curriculum of Geography (grades V – XII relies upon a system of outcomes (competencies in progression (according to levels and ages and it depends on the time horizon of the design. Consequently, different options might come out within the process. Nevertheless, the curriculum depends a lot on the paradigm of its design: with a scientific dominance (with a likely minimal individual human insertion or with a subjective touch, as a result of some individual or group opinions which are more or less justified.

  5. A Teacher's Perspective of Geography: A School Subject for Today, Tomorrow, and for All Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Douglas G.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, a retired long-time geography teacher offers his perspective on what a geography teacher needs to keep in mind when teaching geography. The author notes that geography is a useful school subject because it helps young people make their way in the world by giving them some tools to become lifelong learners. The author encourages…

  6. Pre-Service Geography Teachers' Confidence in Geographical Subject Matter Knowledge and Teaching Geographical Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte, Wendy; Reitano, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This research tracked the confidence of 16 undergraduate and postgraduate pre-service geography teachers as they completed a single semester, senior phase geography curriculum course. The study focused specifically on the pre-service teachers' confidence in geographical subject matter knowledge and their confidence in teaching geographical skills.…

  7. The London Geography Alliance: Re-Connecting the School Subject with the University Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, Alex; Hawley, Duncan; Willy, Tessa

    2016-01-01

    The London Geography Alliance was established to provide a network of subject-based support to primary and secondary schools, by linking teachers and university lecturers. Workshops and fieldwork were conducted over a 17-month period to address different aspects of the geography curriculum. The effects of the project were evaluated using…

  8. The geography of recreational physical activity in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rind, Esther; Jones, Andy P

    2011-01-01

    Levels of physical activity have declined considerably over recent decades in England, and there is evidence that activity patterns vary across areas. Previous studies of the geography of physical activity have frequently relied on model based synthetic estimates. Using data from a large population survey this study develops a direct measure of recreational physical activity and investigates variations in activity patterns across English Local Authorities. For both sexes the results show a distinct geography of recreational physical activity associated with north/south variations and urban/rural status. The environmental and behavioural factors driving those patterns are still poorly understood. We conclude that the variations observed might reflect recreational opportunities and the socio-cultural context of areas. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sebuah Pandangan Mengenai Mater! Pelajaran Geografi Di Pra-Perguruan Tinggi = An idea on Geography Subject at the Pre-University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bintarto

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Education of geography for SLTA students (secondary school is aimed at teaching students to behave as members of a modern Indonesian society with self-confidence and capable of solving a variety of daily-life problems both at pesent and in the .future. Some problems which arise in the Indonesian society are both of a social and physical nature. For that reason, attention should be paid to these problems in the reaching and learning materials for the SLTA, especially during the geography lessons. Moreover, geography based on the study of social and physical phenomena on a national and international level, should widen the scope of perception of the students. Concerning the criteria for lesson materials, on the one hand the geography subject should comply with the SLTA. curriculum and on the other hand, the physical and human aspects of the subject should reflect daily life realities. The materials should be taught as a whole package, not as separated fragments of physical and human aspects, to satisfy the geographical paradigm. Another aspect which should be given due consideration, is the continuation of the geography education from nursery school up to the university, with the teaching materials adjusted to the respective school levels. A well-designed balance of geography education in the school curricula and lesson materials is thought to intensify logical deductive thinking and stimulates character development of the students. It is therefore the right moment for geography teachers to reconsider the geography education in the SLTA curriculum, to improve the teaching package whenever necessary and publish books on geography topics.

  10. CURRICULUM POLICIES AND GEOGRAPHY TEACHING: perspectives ond discourse, subjectivity and subject community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Heleno Camilo Costa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper I discuss, in the context of research in curriculum policy for the teaching of Geography, the processes of constitution of the subjects involved in policy. Present initially snippets of the course of research development, drawing attention to possibilities of understanding about the processes that lead to the production of curriculum policies for Geography. I call attention to the subjectivity involved in the production of such policies, questioning the category subject community in reflection on the constitution of political subjects that operate in the discursive field of Geography. I discuss, from the Discourse Theory of Ernesto Laclau and also the works of Lopes and Macedo, the importance of the curriculum policy is conceived as a process by mobilizing articulations that aim to hegemony and unleash political subjectivities. I conclude criticizing Goodson's formulations on political subjects considering the theoretical contributions of Laclau, through which I propose the incorporation the idea of povo as element capable of assisting in critique to readings about the disciplines and curriculum in structural view, and resize reflection on the demands articulated in the production of curriculum policies and the processes of constitution of subjects.RESUMO: Neste trabalho discuto, com foco no contexto da pesquisa em políticas de currículo para o ensino de Geografia, os processos de constituição dos sujeitos envolvidos nas políticas. Apresento, inicialmente, trechos do percurso da pesquisa que desenvolvo, ponderando possibilidades de compreensão sobre os processos que levam à produção da política de currículo para Geografia. Chamo a atenção para as subjetividades envolvidas na produção de tais políticas, problematizando a categoria comunidade disciplinar na reflexão sobre a constituição dos sujeitos políticos atuantes no campo discursivo da Geografia. Discuto, a partir da Teoria do Discurso de Ernesto Laclau e dos

  11. The human footprint in Mexico: physical geography and historical legacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Abraham, Charlotte; Ezcurra, Exequiel; Garcillán, Pedro P; Ortega-Rubio, Alfredo; Kolb, Melanie; Bezaury Creel, Juan E

    2015-01-01

    Using publicly available data on land use and transportation corridors we calculated the human footprint index for the whole of Mexico to identify large-scale spatial patterns in the anthropogenic transformation of the land surface. We developed a map of the human footprint for the whole country and identified the ecological regions that have most transformed by human action. Additionally, we analyzed the extent to which (a) physical geography, expressed spatially in the form of biomes and ecoregions, compared to (b) historical geography, expressed as the spatial distribution of past human settlements, have driven the patterns of human modification of the land. Overall Mexico still has 56% of its land surface with low impact from human activities, but these areas are not evenly distributed. The lowest values are on the arid north and northwest, and the tropical southeast, while the highest values run along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico and from there inland along an east-to-west corridor that follows the Mexican transversal volcanic ranges and the associated upland plateau. The distribution of low- and high footprint areas within ecoregions forms a complex mosaic: the generally well-conserved Mexican deserts have some highly transformed agro-industrial areas, while many well-conserved, low footprint areas still persist in the highly-transformed ecoregions of central Mexico. We conclude that the spatial spread of the human footprint in Mexico is both the result of the limitations imposed by physical geography to human development at the biome level, and, within different biomes, of a complex history of past civilizations and technologies, including the 20th Century demographic explosion but also the spatial pattern of ancient settlements that were occupied by the Spanish Colony.

  12. The Influence of Gender, Grade Level and Favourite Subject on Czech Lower Secondary School Pupils' Perception of Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiatko, Milan; Janko, Tomas; Mrazkova, Katerina

    2012-01-01

    Geography is an important school subject that brings pupils' description and explanation of social, economic and/or political aspects of the changing world. It has been affirmed that the interest in a subject depends on the attitude to this subject. This study investigates Czech lower secondary school pupils' perception of geography. The research…

  13. Will There Be a Place for my Life?: Cities, Subjectivities and Geographies of Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Savransky

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The present paper pursues an encounter between pressing questions in both human geography and psycho-social and cultural theory, namely, between processes of subject-formation and the production of subjectivity and the way these are always already emplaced, enfolded within a culturally signified geography that in turn they come to sustain or contest through different means. The argument, or rather, the invitation, is that insofar as subjectivities take place, it might be promising to regard cities and urban spaces as spaces of subjectivation. Thus, firstly, the question of how it is we come to engender a subjectivity is posed and addressed following performativity theory. Secondly,  some of the implications of the proposed notion of ‘spaces of subjectivation' are stressed and a theoretical case of abject urban spaces is analysed.  Finally, the question of resistance and the possibility of contesting those geographies of subjectivation through geographies of resistance is posed and a possible approach is offered.

  14. Geopolitics and "The Courage to Teach": Identity, Integrity and the Subject of Political Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Colin

    2002-01-01

    Previous literature discussing and exemplifying the teaching of political geography has emphasized the material to be disseminated. Building upon those contributions, this paper offers a means of connecting student, teacher, and subject matter. Using the perspective of Parker Palmer, as illustrated in his book "The Courage to Teach," it is…

  15. PROPOSAL FOR A TEACHING METHODOLOGY FOR THE ADAPTATION OF DESCRIPTIVE GEOGRAPHY SUBJECTS TO THE EHEA: THE CASE OF THE GEOGRAPHY OF EUROPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ÁNGEL LUIS LUCENDO MONEDERO

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available  The objective of this communication is to present the most significant aspects of the teaching experience carried out in the Geography of Europe of the first year in Geography and Territory Management degree in the Seville University during the year 2014/2015. The experiment consisted in designing, implementing and evaluating a new methodology for the teaching and learning of active character, autonomous and based on problems (in English New Education in Works, paraphrasing, New Method based on jobs. The NEW methodology is opposed and replaces Traditional Teaching Methods (MDT that is commonly used in the teaching of the subjects of Geography of descriptive type or general. 

  16. Enhancing the earth-science content and inquiry basis of physical geography education in Singapore schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughey, J.; Chong, E.

    2011-12-01

    Singapore has a long tradition of geography education at the secondary and Junior College levels (ages 12-18). Although most geography teachers teach both human and physical geography, many of them have received more extensive university training in human geography. The Earth Obervatory of Singapore (EOS), a newly established research institute at Nanyang Technological University (NTU), is building an education and outreach program to integrate its research across formal and informal education. We are collaborating with the Singapore Ministry of Education to enhance the earth-science content and inquiry basis of physical geography education in Singapore classrooms. EOS is providing input to national curriculum, textbook materials, and teaching resources, as well as providing inquiry-based field seminars and workshops for inservice teachers. An upcoming 5-year "Our Dynamic Earth" exhibit at the Science Centre Singapore will be a centerpoint of outreach to younger students, their teachers and parents, and to the community at large. On a longer time scale, the upcoming undergraduate program in earth science at NTU, the first of its kind in Singapore, will provide a stream of earth scientists into the geography teaching workforce. Developing ties between EOS and the National Institute of Education will further enhance teacher training. With a highly centralized curriculum, small land area, high-performing student population, and key stakeholders eager to collaborate with EOS, Singapore presents an unusual opportunity to impact classrooms on a national scale.

  17. Guided Educational Tourism as Informal Physical Geography Education on St. Helena Island, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Joseph M.; Stoltman, Joseph P.

    2017-01-01

    Guided educational tours are a major activity within informal education. This article examines the potential for tour guides of a largely historical tour of St. Helena Island, Michigan, to include physical geography within the tour. Using field data and interview methods, the researchers identified the physical features of the island that could be…

  18. Infusing Physical Activities into the Classroom: Effects on Preschool Children's Geography Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavilidi, Myrto-Foteini; Okely, Anthony D.; Chandler, Paul; Paas, Fred

    2016-01-01

    In this intervention study, we investigated the effects of physical activities that were integrated into a geography task on preschool children's learning performance and enjoyment. Eight childcare centers with 87 four-to-five-year-old children were randomly assigned across an integrated physical activity condition, an unintegrated physical…

  19. "Riding the Rip": An Experiential and Integrated Human-Physical Geography Curriculum in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannstrom, Christian; Houser, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Integrating research into short-term study abroad programs is challenging because of language, fieldwork logistics, and traditional learning models based on passive classroom experiences. Experiential learning often makes use of research as experience, but relatively few examples integrate human and physical geography. Here, we describe an…

  20. Teaching across the Divide: Physical and Human Geographies of Hurricane Katrina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iveson, Kurt; Neave, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    This article critically reflects on our effort to "teach across the divide", by integrating physical and human geography in a new first-year course. We achieved this integration by structuring our course around a series of key events, in order to draw out the interaction of "natural" and "social" forces. After setting…

  1. PROPOSAL FOR A TEACHING METHODOLOGY FOR THE ADAPTATION OF DESCRIPTIVE GEOGRAPHY SUBJECTS TO THE EHEA: THE CASE OF THE GEOGRAPHY OF EUROPE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    ÁNGEL LUIS LUCENDO MONEDERO

    2016-01-01

     The objective of this communication is to present the most significant aspects of the teaching experience carried out in the Geography of Europe of the first year in Geography and Territory Management...

  2. Czech Student Attitudes towards Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiatko, Milan; Janko, Tomas; Mrazkova, Katerina

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates 540 Czech lower secondary students' attitudes towards geography. It examined the general influence of gender and grade level on attitudes towards geography with an emphasis on four specific areas in particular: geography as a school subject; geography and the environment; the importance of geography; and the relevance of…

  3. The Course of Physical Geography of Immanuel Kant (1724-1804 : the contribution for the geographical science history and the epistemology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Domingues Ribas

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a relative weakness about our knowledge concerning Kant philosophy and the constitution of the modern geography and, consequently, the scientific one. That relation, whenever studied, happens – many times – in an oblique or tangential way, this means that it lies almost exclusively confined in the act of notifying that Kant offered, for approximately four decades, “Physical Geography” courses  in Konigsberg, or, that he was the first philosopher teaching the subject at any College, even before the creation of Geography chair in Berlin, in 1820, by Karl Ritter. Not overcoming the early spread of that act itself only made us throw a curtain over the absence of a major understanding about Kant’s tribute to epistemic justification of modern and scientific geography. To open a breach in this curtain indicates, necessarily, to lighten the role and place of “Physical Geography Course” inside Kantian transcendental philosophy. So, we began from the conjecture that “Physical Geography” has always shown for Kant as a knowledge carrier of an unmeasured philosophic sense, once it showed the possibility of empiricization of his philosophy. Therefore, a “Physical Geography” would be, for Kant, the empiric basis of his philosophic thoughts, because it communicates the empirics of the world invention; it made him to build metaphysically the “Earth’s surface”. In the same way Geography, in its general surface, has given a particular tribute to the empiric validation of Modernity (since the XVI century, the “Physical Geography” introduced itself as an empiric basis to Kantian philosophical reflection about “nature’s metaphysics” and the “world metaphysics” as well.

  4. The concept of spatial redistribution in modern subject field of social geography

    OpenAIRE

    Sonko, Serhii

    2016-01-01

    For 25 years of the Ukrainian independence the domestic geography “was looking for itself” in the methodology of modern science. Such searches were not always fruitful, as under conditions of the market economy they were largely carried out “by feel”. However, during this time the surrounding world was developing by its own laws, becoming multidimensional. It remains to be understood by most geographers of the old classical school. The geographical space and areas of its development, traditio...

  5. Proposal for a teaching methodology for the adaptation of descriptive geography subjects to the EHEA: the case of the geography of Europe

    OpenAIRE

    ÁNGEL LUIS LUCENDO MONEDERO

    2016-01-01

     The objective of this communication is to present the most significant aspects of the teaching experience carried out in the Geography of Europe of the first year in Geography and Territory Management degree in the Seville University during the year 2014/2015. The experiment consisted in designing, implementing and evaluating a new methodology for the teaching and learning of active character, autonomous and based on problems (in English New Education in Works, paraphrasing, New Method based...

  6. Teaching physics as a service subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, T. L.; Hayes, M.

    1986-07-01

    At South Glamorgan Institute of Higher Education physics is taught over a wide range of courses. In addition to the more conventional courses found in science, technology and education faculties there is a physics input into areas such as beauty therapy, applied biology, catering, chiropody, dental technology, environmental health, food technology, hairdressing, human-movement studies, industrial design, applied life sciences, marine technology, medical laboratory science, physiological measurement, nursing and speech therapy. Due to the fundamental differences in emphasis required when teaching physics as a 'minor' subject on these types of courses, and since the authors have no courses which lead to a 'major' physics qualification, it is necessary to develop a rational strategy for teaching physics as a 'service' subject. If this is not achieved then staff satisfaction and student interest are likely to suffer. They describe their strategy.

  7. Physical geography of the Nete basin and surroundings; Fysische geografie van het Netebekken en omgeving

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beerten, K.

    2011-05-15

    The report briefly describes the main features of the physical geography of the Nete basin (Campine region, Belgium) and its immediate surroundings. First, an integrated overview of the topography, morphology and hydrography is given. This overview serves as the basis for the assessment of the morphological stability of the region and also explains the relationship between the topography and the hydrology. Furthermore, special attention is paid to soil science including a quantitative survey of some soil characteristics data. Another part of this report deals with erosion processes caused by water and wind action, and the (potential) impact on the morphology. Finally, the palaeogeographical evolution during the Quaternary is discussed. This evolution shows that the environment is stable over 10 000 years or more in the current and similar climatic conditions. Altering climatic conditions, notably glacial-interglacial periods, have impacted erosion with periods of strong erosion.

  8. Experiences of using mobile technologies and virtual field tours in Physical Geography: implications for hydrology education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, D. G.; Eastwood, W. J.; Jones, P. I.; Johnson, R.; Marshall, S.; Hannah, D. M.

    2012-05-01

    Education in hydrology is changing rapidly due to diversification of students, emergent major scientific and practical challenges that our discipline must engage with, shifting pedagogic ideas and higher education environments, the need for students to develop new discipline specific and transferrable skills, and the advent of innovative technologies for learning and teaching. This paper focuses on new technologies in the context of learning and teaching in Physical Geography and reflects on the implications of our experiences for education in hydrology. We evaluate the experience of designing and trialling novel mobile technology-based field exercises and a virtual field tour for a Year 1 undergraduate Physical Geography module at a UK university. The new exercises are based on using and obtaining spatial data, operation of meteorological equipment (explained using an interactive DVD), and include introductions to global positioning systems (GPS) and geographical information systems (GIS). The technology and exercises were well received in a pilot study and subsequent rolling-out to the full student cohort (∼150 students). A statistically significant improvement in marks was observed following the redesign. Although the students enjoyed using mobile technology, the increased interactivity and opportunity for peer learning were considered to be the primary benefits by students. This is reinforced further by student preference for the new interactive virtual field tour over the previous "show-and-tell" field exercise. Despite the new exercises having many advantages, exercise development was not trivial due to the high start-up costs, the need for provision of sufficient technical support and the relative difficulty of making year-to-year changes (to the virtual field tour in particular). Our experiences are highly relevant to the implementation of novel learning and teaching technologies in hydrology education.

  9. Experiences of using mobile technologies and virtual fieldtrips in Physical Geography: implications for hydrology education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, D. G.; Eastwood, W. J.; Jones, P. I.; Johnson, R.; Marshall, S.; Hannah, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    Education in hydrology is changing rapidly due to diversification of students, emergent major scientific and practical challenges that our discipline must engage with, shifting pedagogic ideas and higher education environments, the need for students to develop new discipline specific and transferrable skills, and the advent of innovative technologies for learning and teaching. This paper focuses on new technologies in the context of learning and teaching in Physical Geography and reflects on the implications of our experiences for education in hydrology. We evaluate the experience of designing and trialling novel mobile technology-based field exercises and a virtual field trip for a Year 1 undergraduate Physical Geography module at a UK university. The new exercises are based on using and obtaining spatial data, operation of meteorological equipment (explained using an interactive DVD), and include introductions to global positioning systems (GPS) and geographical information systems (GIS). The technology and exercises were well received in a pilot study and subsequent rolling-out to the full student cohort (∼150 students). A statistically significant improvement in marks was observed following the redesign. Although the students enjoyed using mobile technology, the increased interactivity and opportunity for peer learning were considered to be the primary benefits by students. This is reinforced further by student preference for the new interactive virtual field trip over the previous "show-and-tell" field exercise. Despite the new exercises having many advantages, exercise development was not trivial due to the high start-up costs, the need for provision of sufficient technical support and the relative difficulty of making year-to-year changes (to the virtual field trip in particular). We believe our experiences are directly relevant to the implementation of such novel learning and teaching technologies in hydrology education.

  10. Physical activity impairment in depressed COPD subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Marco, Fabiano; Terraneo, Silvia; Roggi, Maria Adelaide; Repossi, Alice C; Pellegrino, Giulia M; Veronelli, Anna; Santus, Pierachille; Pontiroli, Antonio E; Centanni, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    Limited exercise tolerance is a cardinal clinical feature in COPD. Depression and COPD share some clinical features, such as reduced physical activity and impaired nutritional status. The aim of the present study was to evaluate maximum and daily physical activities and the nutritional status of COPD patients affected or not by depression. In 70 COPD out-patients, daily and maximum physical activities were assessed by multisensor accelerometer armband, 6-min walk test, and cardiopulmonary exercise test. Mental status, metabolic/muscular status, and systemic inflammation were evaluated using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, by bioelectrical impedance analysis, and with regard to fibrinogen/C-reactive protein, respectively. Depressed subjects (27% of the sample) showed a similar level of respiratory functional impairment but a higher level of shortness of breath and a worse quality of life compared to non-depressed subjects (P physical activity impairment consisting of a reduced number of steps per day, a lower peak of oxygen consumption, an early anaerobic threshold, and a reduced distance in the 6-min walk test (P daily number of steps. Our study found that depressed COPD patients have a reduced daily and maximum exercise capacity compared to non-depressed patients. This further suggests the potential utility of screening for depression in COPD.

  11. Field-based, research-focused experiential learning in undergraduate geoscience and physical geography classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliphant, A. J.; Ackerman, A.; Flynn, M.; Mclain, J.; Moller, C.; Clements, C. B.

    2011-12-01

    Field-based experiential learning in undergraduate courses in geosciences or physical geography is essential for cementing theoretical understanding through observation, illustrating the complexity of natural systems, understanding uncertainty in observational records and providing students with tools to teach themselves beyond the instructor and the classroom. In addition, it helps stimulate interest in pursuing graduate studies and associated research in many important bio-geophysical topics. There is a real challenge to provide this type of learning opportunity to large numbers of students and to students currently under-represented in the geosciences. The learning experience in this case was focused around experimental deployment of a sophisticated atmospheric profiling system over a weekend field trip involving 50 students from three classes in two campuses; San Francisco State University and San Jose State University. Students were involved in experimental design, instrument calibration and field deployment, manual measurements and data analysis phases of field-based experimental research. The results of student work is presented as well as specific student responses to the field experience that highlight the pedagogical values provided as well as challenges to improve the learning opportunity.

  12. Feminist Physics Education: Deconstructed Physics and Students' Multiple Subjectivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jammula, Diane Crenshaw

    Physics is one of the least diverse sciences; in the U.S. in 2010, only 21% of bachelors degrees in physics were awarded to women, 2.5% to African Americans, and 4% to Hispanic Americans (AIP, 2012). Though physics education reform efforts supporting interactive engagement have doubled students' learning gains (Hake, 1998), gender and race gaps persist (Brewe et al., 2010; Kost, Pollock, & Finkelstein, 2009). When students' subjectivities align with presentations of physics, they are more likely to develop positive physics identities (Hughes, 2001). However, both traditional and reformed physics classrooms may present physics singularly as abstract, elite, and rational (Carlone, 2004). Drawing from feminist science, I argue that binaries including abstract / concrete, elite / accessible, and rational / emotional are hierarchal and gendered, raced and classed. The words on the left define conventional physics and are associated with middle class white masculinity, while the words on the right are associated with femininity or other, and are often missing or delegitimized in physics education, as are females and minorities. To conceptualize a feminist physics education, I deconstructed these binaries by including the words on the right as part of doing physics. I do not imply that women and men think differently, but that broadening notions of physics may allow a wider range of students to connect with the discipline. I used this conceptual framework to modify a popular reformed physics curriculum called Modeling Instruction (Hestenes, 1987). I taught this curriculum at an urban public college in an introductory physics course for non-science majors. Twenty-three students of diverse gender, race, ethnic, immigrant and class backgrounds enrolled. I conducted an ethnography of the classroom to learn how students negotiate their subjectivities to affiliate with or alienate from their perceptions of physics, and to understand how classroom experiences exacerbate or

  13. Using Folk Dance and Geography to Teach Interdisciplinary, Multicultural Subject Matter: A School-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovegno, Inez; Gregg, Madeleine

    2007-01-01

    Background: Many scholars have called for physical education to be part of interdisciplinary units at the elementary level. The study of Native American cultures is required in most North American elementary schools. Folk dance, however, has traditionally included Western European folk dances, square dance, and, more recently, line dancing. In our…

  14. South African School Geography:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lorraine Innes

    now poised to prepare geospatially competent school leavers for a GIS-enabled future in South. Africa is discussed ... Studies in the first three years of primary school and that Geography was included with History, ... 1967, Social Studies incorporating Geography, History and Civics became a compulsory subject for learners ...

  15. Ghana Journal of Geography

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Ghana Journal of Geography publishes the best of original research and scholarship in physical and human geography as well as research from other disciplines ... This issue/volume was produced with financial support from the Carnegie Corporation of New York through the University of Ghana Building the Next ...

  16. Possibilities for an International Assessment in Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Rod; Bourke, Terri

    2017-01-01

    A recent editorial in International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education (IRGEE) highlighted an opportunity for the inclusion of geography as a subject in the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) tests. At present, TIMSS tests only encompass mathematics and physical sciences. The IRGEE editors encouraged…

  17. Novi prostori istraživanja ženskih subjektiviteta u umetnosti: generacije i geografije / New Spaces of Exploring Female Subjectness in Art: Generations and Geographies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Stojanović

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available New Spaces of Exploring Female Subjectness in Art: Generations and Geographies is a text that deals with the questions of a possibility of new perspectives on gendered body, gendered subject, female bodies and femaleness, invoking the opening of new fields of space in a context of feminist and postfeminist interventions in art. As Julija Kristeva and Griselda Pollock have already suggested, we need to explore the theoretical and intervening methods of reconceptualization, reinterpretation and resignification, since a revolution of any kind in its main sense would not bring anything new and transgressive into the linear, chronological principles of phallogocentric discourse. This paper brings out the questions of écriture féminine, a women’s writing, a possibility of inscription of a female body in the field of art, mapping the new spaces for generations and geographies to come.

  18. Effects of an Introductory Geography Course on Student Perceptions of Geography at the University of Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowlick, Forrest J.; Kolden, Crystal A.

    2013-01-01

    This case study surveyed students in geography courses at the University of Idaho, investigating perceptions of geography's role in their daily lives, relevance to careers or academics, and parts of their geographic skill. Primarily, white, younger than 20, gender-balanced students in Introduction to Physical Geography and Human Geography courses…

  19. Geographic-didactical games as interactive tools to test and improve student's basic knowledge in Physical Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, S.; Tintrup Gen. Suntrup, A.

    2009-04-01

    Due to an increasing disproportion between experienced teaching staff and student numbers at German universities, the time available for teaching the fundamental basic knowledge in Physical Geography was condensed during the past decade. Unfortunately, this mainly has been achieved at the expense of practical lessons of testing student's knowledge. The recent introduction of the Bachelor/Master degree has not solved this problem, but rather accelerated that tend. The "losers" of this tendency are those students enrolled in trainee teacher studies in Geography. In conjunction with the recent modifications of the study programs putting more focus on applied or specialized fields of Geography and its methodology, the trainee teacher students often express their critics and urgently demand opportunities to improve and test their basic knowledge (because it is especially that knowledge, they need at school and for their traditional examination). As the study program is quite dense, there is no room for special courses or seminars. By contrast, one has to use some free time slots available e.g. in the evenings of the usually quite long German excursions or of weekend seminars. However, after a day in the field or in the classroom, the teacher has to find a method owing enough excitement and clearly visible benefit for the students to achieve sufficient motivation. Interactive geographic-didactical games have been developed exclusively for this purpose and applied at different occasions. Those games had the goal of testing student's basic knowledge in a rather unconventional and "casual" style in order to motivate active participation. Most of the games could be played in small groups of students with the teacher only occasionally being involved as referee. Of course, the games had the general aim of improving the basic knowledge - or at least give the students the possibility to discover their own strength (or weakness) just before it is too late (as it e.g. would be

  20. Associations of objectively and subjectively measured physical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PBSSs) calculated from physical activity (PA) questionnaires and accelerometry measures of PA with trabecular and cortical bone properties in prepubertal children. Methods. We compared PBSSs calculated from the bone-specific component of PA ...

  1. the subject of physical education and extracurricular physical activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Campos Izquierdo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article there is analyzed the possible connection of physical education classes with the extracurricular physical activities in the Primary School of the Region of Madrid. This research places inside the methodology of quantitative type of descriptive cut, across survey, which has been in use as instrument of withdrawal of information the interview standardized by means of questionnaire created ad hoc, that was completed by 300 teachers. In the study there is obtained that the vast majority of the teachers who give classes in the extracurricular physical activities say they do not establish any coordination with the Physical Education teacher of the school. However, most of these teachers feel they would be good if there were a coordination with the teachers of Physical Education. However, more than half of teachers who give classes in the extracurricular physical activities believe that the objectives of the activities they provide are not related to the objectives of the Physical Education.

  2. Aesthetics in Geography: Ideas for Teaching Geography Using Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirman, Joseph M.

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how poetry can be used for teaching geography. The rational for using and writing poetry, its relationship to the National Standards for Geography, grade levels, pedagogical concerns associated with poetry writing, and subject integration are discussed. There are also classroom activities, sample discussion questions, lesson…

  3. AP Geography, Environmental Science Thrive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2012-01-01

    Geography may not be particularly known as a hot topic among today's students--even some advocates suggest it suffers from an image problem--but by at least one measure, the subject is starting to come into its own. Across more than 30 topics covered in the Advanced Placement (AP) program, participation in geography is rising faster than any…

  4. Making connections and thinking through emotions: between geography and psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bondi, Liz

    2005-01-01

    The current upsurge of interest in emotions within geography has the potential to contribute to critical perspectives that question conventional limits to scholarship. Three precursors of emotional geographies are discussed in this context (humanistic, feminist and non-representational geographies). Connections between emotional geographies and psychotherapy are explored with a view to resisting the equation of emotion with individualised subjective experience, and developing s...

  5. Walking With Meaning: Subjective Experiences of Physical Activity in Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDuff, Jennifer; Phinney, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity is beneficial for people with dementia, but little research explores subjective experiences of physical activity in this population. Interpretive description guided the analysis of 26 interviews conducted with 12 people with dementia. Three themes described the subjective meaning of everyday physical activity: Participants were attracted to activity because it improved physical well-being, provided social connections, gave opportunity to be in nature, and provided structure and focus; participants experienced impediments to activity because of physical discomfort, environmental factors, lack of enthusiasm, and memory loss; and participants made adjustments by choosing walking over other activities and by being active with others. Results show that physical activity remains important for people with dementia, although they encounter barriers. They may prefer walking with others as a form of activity. Findings could influence how nurses conceptualize wandering and suggest that walking programs could be well received by people with dementia.

  6. What shape is your neighbourhood? Investigating the micro geographies of physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivory, Vivienne C; Russell, Marie; Witten, Karen; Hooper, Carolyn M; Pearce, Jamie; Blakely, Tony

    2015-05-01

    Being physically active has demonstrated health benefits, and more walkable neighbourhoods can potentially increase physical activity. Yet not all neighbourhoods provide opportunities for active lifestyles. This paper examines the social context of being active in local and non-local places. We use a social practice theoretical framework to examine how residents talk about and make sense of physical activity and places, contrasting individual and neighbourhood factors. In 2010, fourteen focus groups were held in four neighbourhoods varying by walkability and area-level deprivation (two Auckland and two Wellington, New Zealand), and with participants grouped by gender, ethnicity, and employment. Focus groups elicited discussion on where local residents go for physical activity, and the opportunities and barriers to physical activity in their local area and beyond. Thematic analyses compared across all groups for contrasts and similarities in the issues discussed. Neighbourhood walkability factors appeared to shape where residents engage with public places, with residents seeking out good places. Individual factors (e.g. employment status) also influenced how residents engage with their local neighbourhoods. All groups referred to being active in places both close by and further afield, but residents in less walkable neighbourhoods with fewer local destinations drew attention to the need to go elsewhere, notably for exercise, being social, and to be in pleasant, restorative environments. Being physically active in public settings was valued for social connection and mental restoration, over and above specifically 'health' reasons. Residents talk about being active in local and non-local places revealed agency in how they managed the limitations and opportunities within their immediate residential setting. That is, factors of place and people contributed to the 'shape' of everyday residential environments, at least with regard to physical activity. Copyright © 2014

  7. Butterfly extinctions in European states: do socioeconomic conditions matter more than physical geography?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konvička, Martin; Fric, Zdeněk; Beneš, Jiří

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2006), s. 82-92 ISSN 1466-822X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB6007306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : butterflies * distibution * Europe Subject RIV: EH - Ecology , Behaviour Impact factor: 3.314, year: 2006

  8. Is Singapore’s School Geography Relevant to Our Changing World?

    OpenAIRE

    CHANG, Chew-Hung

    2011-01-01

    How school geography should be taught has been a longstanding issue for geography educators. In some countries, state or national level curriculum predicates how the subject should be taught in schools. This paper examines these questions in relation to existing frameworks of conceptualizing school geography, such as the International Charter on Geographical Education. School geography in Singapore has evolved from regional geography to thematic geography to systematic geography. A review of ...

  9. Commonsense Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHoul, Alec

    1990-01-01

    Presents an ethnomethodological study of how Australian high school geography teachers and students rely on common sense knowledge and reasoning to facilitate learning. Analyzes portions of transcripts from a class activity in which students built a scale model of a city. Explains location categorization devices, illustrating how learning involves…

  10. Geography Influences Dietary Intake, Physical Activity and Weight Status of Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Shauna M.; Fraser, Shawn N.; Storey, Kate E.; Forbes, Laura E.; Spence, John C.; Plotnikoff, Ronald C.; Raine, Kim D.; Hanning, Rhona M.; McCargar, Linda J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to assess rural and urban differences in the dietary intakes, physical activity levels and weight status of a large sample of Canadian youth in both 2005 and 2008. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional study of rural and urban adolescents (n = 10, 023) in Alberta was conducted in both 2005 and 2008 using a web-based survey. Results. There was an overall positive change in nutrient intakes between 2005 and 2008; however, rural residents generally had a poorer nutrient profile than urban residents (P < .001). They consumed less fibre and a greater percent energy from saturated fat. The mean physical activity scores increased among rural youth between 2005 and 2008 (P < .001), while remaining unchanged among urban youth. Residence was significantly related to weight status in 2005 (P = .017), but not in 2008. Conclusion. Although there were small improvements in nutrient intakes from 2005 to 2008, several differences in the lifestyle behaviours of adolescents living in rural and urban areas were found. The results of this study emphasize the importance of making policy and program recommendations to support healthy lifestyle behaviours within the context of the environments in which adolescents live. PMID:22685637

  11. Geography Influences Dietary Intake, Physical Activity and Weight Status of Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shauna M. Downs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to assess rural and urban differences in the dietary intakes, physical activity levels and weight status of a large sample of Canadian youth in both 2005 and 2008. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional study of rural and urban adolescents (n=10,023 in Alberta was conducted in both 2005 and 2008 using a web-based survey. Results. There was an overall positive change in nutrient intakes between 2005 and 2008; however, rural residents generally had a poorer nutrient profile than urban residents (P<.001. They consumed less fibre and a greater percent energy from saturated fat. The mean physical activity scores increased among rural youth between 2005 and 2008 (P<.001, while remaining unchanged among urban youth. Residence was significantly related to weight status in 2005 (P=.017, but not in 2008. Conclusion. Although there were small improvements in nutrient intakes from 2005 to 2008, several differences in the lifestyle behaviours of adolescents living in rural and urban areas were found. The results of this study emphasize the importance of making policy and program recommendations to support healthy lifestyle behaviours within the context of the environments in which adolescents live.

  12. Danish geography teachers' perceptions of their own teaching professionalism according to climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Søren Witzel

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports from research examining eight Geography teachers’ own perceptions of their teaching professionalism, understood as Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK), in relation to the topic of climate change. Apparently, Geography teachers with a strong academic profile in Physical Geography...

  13. Subject Didactic Studies of Research Training in Biology and Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lybeck, Leif

    1984-01-01

    The objectives and design of a 3-year study of research training and supervision in biology and physics are discussed. Scientific problems arising from work on the thesis will be a focus for the postgraduate students and their supervisors. Attention will be focused on supervisors' and students' conceptions of science, subject range, research,…

  14. Cloud geographies : computing, data, sovereignty.

    OpenAIRE

    Amoore, L.

    2016-01-01

    The architecture of cloud computing is becoming ever more closely intertwined with geopolitics – from the sharing of intelligence data, to border controls, immigration decisions, and drone strikes. Developing an analogy with the cloud chamber of early twentieth century particle physics, this paper explores the geography of the cloud in cloud computing. It addresses the geographical character of cloud computing across two distinct paradigms. The first, ‘Cloud I’ or a geography of cloud forms, ...

  15. GeoGebra in a Geography Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herceg, Ðorde; Herceg-Mandic, Vera

    2013-01-01

    Certain secondary school subjects, such as geography, contain topics which are based on mathematical concepts. However, some geography teachers either fail to recognize this connection or choose to ignore it when they teach. Instead, they present the subject matter as a collection of facts, which need to be memorized and reproduced by the pupils.…

  16. The Cardiovascular Function Profile and Physical Fitness in Overweight Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megawati, E. R.; Lubis, L. D.; Harahap, F. Y.

    2017-03-01

    Obesity in children and young adult is associated with cardiovascular risk in short term and long term. The aim of this study was to describe the profile of the cardiovascular functions parameters and physical fitness in overweight. This is an analytical observational study with cross sectional approach. The samples of this study were 85 randomly selected subjects aged 18 to 24 years with normoweight and body mass index parameters measures were body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), waist-hip ratio (WHR), cardiovascular function parameters (resting pulse, blood pressure, and peak flow meter) and physical fitness parameters (VO2max dengan McArdle step test). The mean BMI was 24,53±4,929. The WC and WHR mean were 86,7±14,10 cms and 0,89±0,073 cm respectively. The mean of resting pulses were higher in normoweight subject (p=0,0209). The mean systole were lower in normoweight subject (p=0,0026). No differences VO2 max between groups (p=0,3888). The peak flow meter was higher in normoweight (p=0,0274). The result of this study indicate that heart rate, systole and peak flow meter are signifantly different between groups. The heart rate and the peak flow meter in the overweight subjects were lower meanwhile the systole blood pressure was higher compared to normoweight subjects.

  17. Geography Education Research and Why It Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, David

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a commentary on the "condition" of geography education research as a field of study. It does so partly through a comparative discussion with another subject field in education, mathematics. In the context of fragility and comparative weakness of research in geography education, the paper urges researchers to keep focused on…

  18. Defining Primary Geography from Teachers' Expertise: What Chilean Teachers Mean by Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Silva, Victor; Perez-Gallardo, Patricio; Arenas-Martija, Andoni

    2015-01-01

    This article examines teachers' subject expertise in a context where geography could be considered a neglected school subject. Using an empirical approach to the problem, the article aims to provide a view on the dynamics of teaching primary geography in Chile, through considering teachers' narratives on curriculum making and their associated…

  19. Nutritional strategies of physically active subjects with muscle dysmorphia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contesini, Nadir; Adami, Fernando; Blake, Márcia de-Toledo; Monteiro, Carlos Bm; Abreu, Luiz C; Valenti, Vitor E; Almeida, Fernando S; Luciano, Alexandre P; Cardoso, Marco A; Benedet, Jucemar; de Assis Guedes de Vasconcelos, Francisco; Leone, Claudio; Frainer, Deivis Elton Schlickmann

    2013-05-26

    The aim of this study was to identify dietary strategies for physically active individuals with muscle dysmorphia based on a systematic literature review. References were included if the study population consisted of adults over 18 years old who were physically active in fitness centers. We identified reports through an electronic search ofScielo, Lilacs and Medline using the following keywords: muscle dysmorphia, vigorexia, distorted body image, and exercise. We found eight articles in Scielo, 17 in Medline and 12 in Lilacs. Among the total number of 37 articles, only 17 were eligible for inclusion in this review. The results indicated that the feeding strategies used by physically active individuals with muscle dysmorphia did not include planning or the supervision of a nutritionist. Diet included high protein and low fat foods and the ingestion of dietary and ergogenic supplements to reduce weight. Physically active subjects with muscle dysmorphia could benefit from the help of nutritional professionals to evaluate energy estimation, guide the diet and its distribution in macronutrient and consider the principle of nutrition to functional recovery of the digestive process, promote liver detoxification, balance and guide to organic adequate intake of supplemental nutrients and other substances.

  20. [Body image and participation in physical activities by obese subjects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcellini, Anne; Perera, Éric; Rodhain, Angélique; Férez, Sylvain

    2016-06-08

    From a sociological perspective, physical activity and diet are perceived as social and cultural practices, constructed and transmitted within human societies. The body is then thought of as a social construct, a sign and foundation of individual and collective identities. In this context, this article was designed to highlight some social processes underlying the obesity epidemic. Clarifying issues about a medical definition of obesity in an obesogenic society, and theoretical approaches to the meanings of the obesity epidemic are proposed. Individual stories of a gradual shift towards obesity are presented to illustrate the variety of trajectories that can lead to obesity in adulthood but also the variety of subjective experiences about the situation of obesity. In particular, the relationship to the body and experiences in terms of physical activity are investigated in order to understand how obesity is associated with non-commitment, low commitment or abandonment of physical activity. The issue of configurations in which commitment or re-commitments in regular exercise for sedentary populations can be possible are discussed. The discussion shows that although commitment to regular and sustainable physical activity requires a profound transformation of lifestyle for the persons concerned, the collective dimension of this change is rarely taken into account..

  1. Geography in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geographical Education, 1973

    1973-01-01

    This statement, prapared by the Council of the Australian Geography Teachers Association to assist geography teachers, curriculum planners, and educational administrators, describes geography as a field of study focusing on the environment through the use of spatial concepts and establishes the usefulness and importance of geography in school…

  2. The International Challenge of More Thinking Through Geography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schee, J. van der; Vankan, L.J.A.E.; Leat, D.

    2004-01-01

    Geography is a brilliant, exciting subject but you would not say that when you look in some classrooms. Often pupils are bored and demotivated. The question is how to make geography lessons more interesting. In the 1990s the Thinking Through Geography (TTG) group, comprising teachers and

  3. Effects of the Use of Thinking Through Geography Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schee, J.A.; Vankan, L.; Leat, D.

    2006-01-01

    Expressing the desire that geography should be a more challenging subject that helps pupils to become better learners a group of academic geographers and geography teachers from northeast England developed teaching strategies to stimulate pupils to think through geography. Teachers in England and

  4. Making Secondary School Geography Come Alive in Nigeria: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geography studies and describes the earth. It concentrates on both physical and human or ... Geography is the study of the earth's distribution of its living and non- living creatures. Geographers have aptly ... round a number of schools in Oyo state, my undergraduate and graduate students have been involved in geography ...

  5. Sound quality (SQ) of concert halls: Physical and subjective attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beranek, Leo L.

    2003-10-01

    Each new concert hall has the following stated goal: ``Acoustics equal to the best in the world.'' The owner can specify the number of seats, areas of public spaces, lighting intensities, etc. But, the attributes of acoustical quality cannot as yet be specified. Most acoustical consultants seem to feel that a ``seat of the pants'' experience is the only possible specification. But the architect's goal is a monument to himself and he believes the acoustical consultant should achieve the ``best in the world'' goal without visible means. Numbers for specifications are needed. In this paper 40 years of pertinent research are described: What are the critical physical attributes of good acoustics, how do we measure them, and how can they be translated into architectural specifications? Four steps have been involved: (1) interviews of conductors and music critics to determine (a) their acoustical rank orderings of a large number of halls and (b) which acoustical characteristics do they believe are important, viz., reverberance, strength of sound, etc.; (2) a determination of which physical measures correlate with their beliefs plus others that are physiologically important; (3) measurements of those physical quantities in the rank-ordered halls; and (5) the correlation of the measured values with the subjective quality ratings.

  6. Physical Education Teachers' Subjective Theories about Integrating Information and Communication Technology (ICT) into Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmann, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    As well as other school subjects, physical education (PE) is emerging in terms of integrating information and communication technology (ICT) into regular classes. Such innovative teaching practices that implement ICT in PE involve diverse parties that are affected by these teaching processes. Students, principals, districts, parents,…

  7. Geography of the asteroid belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellner, B. H.

    1978-01-01

    The CSM classification serves as the starting point on the geography of the asteroid belt. Raw data on asteroid types are corrected for observational biases (against dark objects, for instance) to derive the distribution of types throughout the belt. Recent work on family members indicates that dynamical families have a true physical relationship, presumably indicating common origin in the breakup of a parent asteroid.

  8. Development of Geography and Geology Terminology in British Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meara, Rhian; Cameron, Audrey; Quinn, Gary; O'Neill, Rachel

    2016-04-01

    The BSL Glossary Project, run by the Scottish Sensory Centre at the University of Edinburgh focuses on developing scientific terminology in British Sign Language for use in the primary, secondary and tertiary education of deaf and hard of hearing students within the UK. Thus far, the project has developed 850 new signs and definitions covering Chemistry, Physics, Biology, Astronomy and Mathematics. The project has also translated examinations into BSL for students across Scotland. The current phase of the project has focused on developing terminology for Geography and Geology subjects. More than 189 new signs have been developed in these subjects including weather, rivers, maps, natural hazards and Geographical Information Systems. The signs were developed by a focus group with expertise in Geography and Geology, Chemistry, Ecology, BSL Linguistics and Deaf Education all of whom are deaf fluent BSL users.

  9. ¿Habrá un Lugar para mi Vida?: Ciudades, Subjetividades y Geografías de Resistencia Will There Be a Place for my Life?: Cities, Subjectivities and Geographies of Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Savransky

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available El presente texto persigue un encuentro de cuestiones de relevancia en los campos de la geografía humana y la teoría psico-social y cultural, es decir, un encuentro entre procesos de formación de la subjetividad y las formas en que estos se encuentran emplazados, envueltos en una geografía cargada de significaciones culturales, que estos mismos procesos contribuyen a sostener o a contestar. El argumento, o mejor, la invitación del presente texto consiste en la propuesta de reflexionar sobre el emplazamiento de la formación de la subjetividad a través de concebir las ciudades y los espacios urbanos como espacios constitutivos de esa formación, es decir como espacios de subjetivación. En primer lugar, entonces, la cuestión de cómo llegamos a habitar una subjetividad es planteada y abordada desde la perspectiva de la teoría de la performatividad. En segunda instancia, algunas de las implicaciones de la noción de "espacios de subjetivación" propuesta son señalados, y un caso teórico de espacios urbanos abyectos es analizado. Finalmente, se plantea la problemática de la resistencia y la posibilidad de contestar geografías de subjetivación a través de geografías de resistencia es valorada e ilustrada.The present paper pursues an encounter between pressing questions in both human geography and psycho-social and cultural theory, namely, between processes of subject-formation and the production of subjectivity and the way these are always already emplaced, enfolded within a culturally signified geography that in turn they come to sustain or contest through different means. The argument, or rather, the invitation, is that insofar as subjectivities take place, it might be promising to regard cities and urban spaces as spaces of subjectivation. Thus, firstly, the question of how it is we come to engender a subjectivity is posed and addressed following performativity theory. Secondly,  some of the implications

  10. New approaches in Slovenian soil geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaž Repe

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In Slovenia, soil research of a given landscape is often neglected in physical geography studies. Despite the fact of an equivalent position of soil geography within the science system of Slovene geography. Reasons can be found in time consuming field research, expensive laboratory analysis and soil data and also the lack of its own methodology. The drawbacks could be partially replaced by different approaches of research and especially to establish links with other physical elements of the environment. The use of easily accessible digital and cartographic data, basic field techniques, in combination with simple GIS tools and quantitative methods overcomes many of the financial or time constraints.

  11. Geography From Another Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The GEODESY software program is intended to promote geographical awareness among students with its remote sensing capabilities to observe the Earth's surface from distant vantage points. Students and teachers using GEODESY learn to interpret and analyze geographical data pertaining to the physical attributes of their community. For example, the program provides a digital environment of physical features, such as mountains and bodies of water, as well as man-made features, such as roads and parks, using aerial photography, satellite imagery, and geographic information systems data in accordance with National Geography Standards. The main goal is to have the students and teachers gain a better understanding of the unique forces that drive their coexistence. GEODESY was developed with technical assistance and financial support from Stennis Space Center's Commercial Remote Sensing Program Office, now known as the Earth Science Applications Directorate.

  12. Integrating Opportunities: Applied Interdisciplinary Research in Undergraduate Geography and Geology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiatko, Milan; Mrazkova, Katerina; Janko, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    Pupils' perception of any science subject significantly influences their achievement. Identification of perception of some subject is essential part of educational research. This study is focused on finding out differences in the four dimensions of geography perception (1. Geography as a school subject; 2. Geography and environment; 3 Importance…

  13. Powerpoint presentation usage in geography education

    OpenAIRE

    Mrázová, Marcela

    2010-01-01

    The thesis studies using PowerPoint presentation in geography teaching, especially for the impact of visualized substance on the effectiveness of teaching. The theoretical part is followed by questionnaire survey to monitor the current situation in Czech schools. Students and teachers of Geography were asked if they are computer users and how are their subjective views and experiences of using PowerPoint in teaching. I also examined the technical background of Czech schools and whether there ...

  14. Geography, memory and non-representational geographies

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, O.

    2011-01-01

    I discuss the presence of memory within geography, particularly in relation to the interweaving\\ud non-representational ⁄ peformative ⁄ affective ‘turns’. Memory seems under-considered in these nonrepresentational\\ud geographies (nrgs) which focus on the affective performativities of the present and the richness and creative potentials therein. As memory is a fundamental aspect of becoming, the roles it plays in the peformative moment need to be considered. Richness, potential and creativity ...

  15. Changes in the subjective symptoms of fatigue of American college students after physical education activity

    OpenAIRE

    前橋,明

    1991-01-01

    To understand the effects of physical loading on the health status of the college students who attend the physical education activity classes, the subjective changes in their living body caused by exercise were studied according to sex and type of activity. In this investigation, 225 college students attending their physical education class for 50 minutes, were asked of their subjective symptoms of fatigue before and after the physical education activities (tennis, racketball, bowling and wei...

  16. Nutritional strategies of physically active subjects with muscle dysmorphia

    OpenAIRE

    Contesini, Nadir ; Adami, Fernando ; Blake, Márcia ; MONTEIRO, Carlos Bandeira de Mello; Abreu, Luiz C; Valenti, Vitor E; Almeida, Fernando S; Luciano, Alexandre P; Cardoso, Marco A; Benedet, Jucemar ; de Assis Guedes de Vasconcelos, Francisco ; Leone, Claudio ; Frainer, Deivis Elton Schlickmann 

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to identify dietary strategies for physically active individuals with muscle dysmorphia based on a systematic literature review. Method References were included if the study population consisted of adults over 18 years old who were p...

  17. Teacher´s Discourses and Subjectivity in Physics Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Villani

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we will analyze some didactical interviews with two high school students about collision in Mechanics. After presenting some categories of analysis, we will show how subjective conditions and relationship to both knowledge and interviewer played important roles in the development of a searching process and in the production of mental schemes. Simultaneously, we will point out how and why interviewer interference was resonant or dissonant with those conditions.

  18. Geography Makes a Comeback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPike, Elizabeth; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents two lesson plans exemplifying analytical geography. The first lesson shows how medical geography can be used to track the silent route of cholera. The second lesson about the Bermuda Triangle is an exercise in fundamental mapping skills and teaches children a valuable lesson in double-checking facts. (RLC)

  19. The Practices of Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Sarah Witham

    2016-01-01

    Sarah Bednarz begins by thanking Rebecca Theobald for the invitation to contrubute to this issue of "The Geography Teacher"("TGT"). As a member of the National Council for Geographic Education (NCGE) Publications Committee and coeditor of the "Journal of Geography," Bednarz confesses that she was not favorably…

  20. Sexing Geography, Teaching Sexualities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Kim

    1999-01-01

    Draws on experiences as a straight feminist geographer to address questions regarding teaching sexualities in geography. Looks at "sexing" and "queering" geography curricula at the college level; discusses strategies to make universities and classrooms less heterosexist and lesbo/homophobic; and discusses dilemmas of disclosing…

  1. Eastern Movement Disciplines (EMDs) and Mindfulness: A New Path to Subjective Knowledge in Western Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chunlei; Tito, Johanna M.; Kentel, Jeanne A.

    2009-01-01

    Linda Bain (1995) argues that subjective knowledge is of central importance to her life, both personally and professionally, and that a purely objective approach to physical education should be complemented with subjective knowledge, the key to which is "mindfulness." Following her lead, we argue that the traditional model of physical education…

  2. Physical Modelling of Bucket Foundations Subjected to Axial Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaitkunaite, Evelina

    Compared to oil and gas structures, marine renewable energy devices are usually much lighter, operate in shallower waters and are subjected to severe cyclic loading and dynamic excitations. These factors result in different structural behaviours. Bucket foundations are a potentially cost-effectiv......Compared to oil and gas structures, marine renewable energy devices are usually much lighter, operate in shallower waters and are subjected to severe cyclic loading and dynamic excitations. These factors result in different structural behaviours. Bucket foundations are a potentially cost......-effective solution for various offshore structures, and not least marine renewables. The present thesis focuses on several critical design problems related to the behaviour of bucket foundations exposed to tensile loading. Among those are the soil-structure interface parameters, tensile loading under various...... displacement rates and tensile cyclic loading. A new laboratory testing facility is constructed allowing large scale foundation model testing under long-term cyclic loadings. Another test set-up - a pressure tank – is employed for the displacement rate analysis. The extensive testing campaign provides valuable...

  3. Reconstructionism Ideology: A Perpective on Geography Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Sugeng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the philosophical questions which should be pricipally answered in curriculum development for any subject is why a particular subject needs to be taught to children in school. The answer to such a question is basically influenced by ideology or beliefs and values system believed in society. Reconstructionism is regarded as an appropriate educational ideology which gives the basis for the Geography curriculum development in society characterised with democratic values such as that of Idonesia. The discussion on this issue leads to suggestion that Indonesian primary school educators need to reconsider the deferment on Geography teaching until Grade Three in prinary school and to regard Geography as an important and strategic subject matter to be taught to the primary pupils as early as posible

  4. The biosphere at Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg - a description based on literature concerning climate, physical geography, ecology, land use and environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindborg, T.; Schueldt, R. [NaturRaadet, (Sweden)

    1998-12-01

    The current safety analysis, SR 97, compares three sites in Sweden. This report compares the biosphere for the three areas, Aespoe, Finnsjoen and Gideaa, which have been studied to describe the conditions at three hypothetical sites, Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg. Data from these sites will be used in analysis and to make realistic models of the biosphere development. The report is based on a literature study considering climate, physical geography, vegetation, ecology, land use, environment and population. Data from each site is presented separately and is compared for present conditions and from a future perspective. The locations of the sites along the south-north gradient influences the climate, temperature, vegetation period and precipitation. Aberg has a more humid climate with a longer vegetation period, a higher mean temperature, a higher diversity and a faster turn-over time than Beberg and Ceberg. There is also a difference in land use, where Beberg has the greatest potential for agriculture, because of the soil types and topography. Abergs location in the archipelago makes it very exposed to shore level displacement, compared to Beberg and Ceberg with a higher elevation. The highest population density is found in Aberg, but Beberg has the highest potential for increase. Simplified models made from present and future biosphere conditions, show that the sites have different prerequisite concerning biosphere factors. The parameters that may affect the ecosystem and the biosphere over time are more likely to change in Aberg due to position above sea level, climate, sea level displacement and land use. Biosphere changes are however in a long time perspective hard to predict. The models used in this report are a suggestion on how to evaluate biological data in a more thorough study. 99 refs, 14 figs, 31 tabs

  5. Insights from a Subject Knowledge Enhancement Course for Preparing New Chemistry and Physics Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Michael; Mallaburn, Andrea; Tynan, Richard; Clays, Ken; Jones, Robert Bryn

    2013-01-01

    A recent Government response to shortages of new physics and chemistry teachers is the extended subject knowledge enhancement (SKE) course. Graduates without a physics or chemistry bachelor degree are prepared by an SKE course to enter a Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) programme to become science teachers with a physics or chemistry…

  6. Subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Vega Encabo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I claim that subjectivity is a way of being that is constituted through a set of practices in which the self is subject to the dangers of fictionalizing and plotting her life and self-image. I examine some ways of becoming subject through narratives and through theatrical performance before others. Through these practices, a real and active subjectivity is revealed, capable of self-knowledge and self-transformation. 

  7. Primary Geography in the Republic of Ireland: Practices, Issues and Possible Futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Susan

    2015-01-01

    In the Republic of Ireland, geography is recognized as an important subject for children to learn and all pupils take it throughout their primary school years. The current curriculum, the Primary School Curriculum-Geography, follows a tradition of innovative, child-centered geography curricula in Ireland. This article outlines the history of…

  8. Learning with and by Language: Bilingual Teaching Strategies for the Monolingual Language-Aware Geography Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawski, Michael; Budke, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Geography lessons center on a language-based product with socially relevant geographic content. The subject of geography in secondary schools in Germany faces three major challenges that make a stronger focus on language in the monolingual geography classroom necessary. First, more than 30 percent of German pupils in secondary schools have a…

  9. China's urban geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannell, C W

    1990-06-01

    "In this paper I seek to review recent work on Chinese urban geography and to appraise the development of China's urban geography as a field of study both inside and outside China. The temporal scope will span scholarship finished and published mainly during the 1980s." The focus is on works published in English. The author examines the primary topics of interest, methodologies and theories, and available sources of data. excerpt

  10. Water- versus land-based exercise in elderly subjects: effects on physical performance and body composition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bergamin, Marco; Ermolao, Andrea; Tolomio, Silvia; Berton, Linda; Sergi, Giuseppe; Zaccaria, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a 24-week exercise protocol carried out in geothermal spring water to improve overall physical function and muscle mass in a group of healthy elderly subjects...

  11. Central Asia, Physical Geography Handbook,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1960-06-20

    resistant "stone-lovers" and "sand-lovers" (Ammophila arenaria ) and also halophytes. Zoogeographically, Central Asia is a kingdom of ungulates and rodents...Lasiagrostis, reeds, heterophyllous poplarB, small species of Carex , and tamarisk. In such "wandering" oases small streams are frequently found with lengths...bushes and underbushes belonging to the "kamnelyuby," "peskolyuby," (Ammophila arenaria ) and "solelyuby." Annual plants do not play any noticeable,role

  12. Values and the Teaching of Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D.

    1978-01-01

    Examines how values are included in the geography curriculum as modes of conduct acceptable in a classroom, methodologies of the subject, canons for validity and truth of information, and as part of the hidden curriculum. Concludes that teachers are responsible for helping learners develop their own value positions. Journal availability: see SO…

  13. Geography: research and teaching in nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Gavin J

    2006-10-01

    This paper outlines how geography might be integrated into nurse education. At one level, researching nurse education geographically could add to the current academic understanding of the many transitional places that make educational experiences and influence outcomes. At another level, as part of a nursing curriculum, teaching geographical concepts and issues to students might provide them with unique insights into core subjects.

  14. Subject Knowledge Enhancement (SKE) Courses for Creating New Chemistry and Physics Teachers: Do They Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynan, Richard; Mallaburn, Andrea; Jones, Robert Bryn; Clays, Ken

    2014-01-01

    During extended subject knowledge enhancement (SKE) courses, graduates without chemistry or physics bachelor degrees prepared to enter a Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) programme to become chemistry or physics teachers. Data were gathered from the exit survey returned by Liverpool John Moores University SKE students about to start…

  15. Reciprocal relations between physical disability, subjective health, and atrial fibrillation : The Framingham Heart Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rienstra, Michiel; Lyass, Asya; Murabito, Joanne M; Magnani, Jared W; Lubitz, Steven A; Massaro, Joseph M; Ellinor, Patrick T; Benjamin, Emelia J

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation (AF)-related symptoms and physical performance are relied upon to guide therapeutic management of patients with AF. We sought to understand whether AF predisposes to or is a result of physical disability and poor subjective health in the community. METHODS: We studied

  16. South Asian American Writers: Geography and Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katrak, Ketu H.

    1996-01-01

    Explores post-1965 South Asian American writers writing in English and the role of geography and memory and how political and societal factors of the "capitalist new world order" continue to determine the physical and metaphorical location of postcolonial writers in the diaspora. It examines South Asian American writers' compelling evocations of…

  17. Body composition changes over 9 years in healthy elderly subjects and impact of physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genton, Laurence; Karsegard, Véronique L; Chevalley, Thierry; Kossovsky, Michel P; Darmon, Patrice; Pichard, Claude

    2011-08-01

    Age-related changes of body composition affect health status. This study aims at clarifying body composition changes in healthy elderly subjects, and evaluating the impact of physical activity on these changes. In 1999, 213 subjects ≥ 65 years recruited through advertisements underwent assessment of health state, energy expenditure by physical activity, body composition by bioimpedance analysis and body cell mass by total body potassium. In 2008, 112 of them repeated these assessments with additional determination of Barthel index, Mini Mental State Examination and Geriatric Depression Score. Lean tissues decreased in both genders (p physical activity limited lean tissue loss in men but not in women. Loss of lean tissues occurs exponentially with aging. Further research should confirm these changes in subjects over 80 years. Increasing physical activity limits fat-free mass loss in men but not women. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  18. Is Subjective Social Status a Unique Correlate of Physical Health? A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cundiff, Jenny M; Matthews, Karen A

    2017-07-20

    Both social stratification (e.g., social rank) as well as economic resources (e.g., income) are thought to contribute to socioeconomic health disparities. It has been proposed that subjective socioeconomic status (an individual's perception of his or her hierarchical rank) provides increased predictive utility for physical health over and above more traditional, well-researched socioeconomic constructs such as education, occupation, and income. PsycINFO and PubMed databases were systematically searched for studies examining the association of subjective socioeconomic status (SES) and physical health adjusting for at least 1 measure of objective SES. The final sample included 31 studies and 99 unique effects. Meta-analyses were performed to: (a) estimate the overlap among subjective and objective indicators of SES and (b) estimate the cumulative association of subjective SES with physical health adjusting for objective SES. Potential moderators such as race and type of health indicator assessed (global self-reports vs. more specific and biologically based indicators) were also examined. Across samples, subjective SES shows moderate overlap with objective indicators of SES, but associations are much stronger in Whites than Blacks. Subjective SES evidenced a unique cumulative association with physical health in adults, above and beyond traditional objective indicators of SES (Z = .07, SE = .01, p Subjective SES may provide unique information relevant to understanding disparities in health, especially self-rated health. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Coordination between the subject of physical education and extracurricular physical activities

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Campos Izquierdo; María Dolores González Rivera

    2013-01-01

    In this article there is analyzed the possible connection of physical education classes with the extracurricular physical activities in the Primary School of the Region of Madrid. This research places inside the methodology of quantitative type of descriptive cut, across survey, which has been in use as instrument of withdrawal of information the interview standardized by means of questionnaire created ad hoc, that was completed by 300 teachers. In the study there is obtained that the vast ma...

  20. An analysis of university subjects from the field of adapted physical activity in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Baloun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The inclusion of students with special educational needs is a process, which faces many challenges. An essential condition for the success of inclusion is the competence of physical educators. We suggest that it is necessary to establish courses focused on adapted physical activity as part of the university education for physical education (PE teachers. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to analyze courses focused on adapted physical activity within teacher preparation programs. METHODS: We conducted quantitative and qualitative content analysis of subjects which was focused on adapted physical activity at selected public universities in the Czech Republic. In total, subjects from the six faculties met the conditions. RESULTS: The results show the lack of emphasis for this area in the current PE teacher preparations programs, which is one of basic requirements for success of the inclusion process.

  1. The Geography of the Beatles Approaching Concepts of Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Robert J., II

    2004-01-01

    Human geography can be taught by focusing on popular culture contexts with which undergraduate students may already be familiar such as rock music. The Geography of the Beatles introduced undergraduate students to concepts of "new" cultural geography such as space, place, representation, geopolitics, social space, and tourism-pilgrimage…

  2. Geography for Life: National Geography Standards 1994. Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Anthony R.; Downs, Roger M.

    This booklet is both an executive summary of "Geography for Life: National Geography Standards 1994" and an introduction to geography as an essential part of every child's education, and as an integral part of the lives of all U.S. citizens. The publication is illustrated on every page with photographs, paintings, graphs, and maps. It…

  3. Geography Teachers' Views on Effective Geography Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocalar, Ali Osman; Demirkaya, Hilmi

    2017-01-01

    Geography teaching is fulfilled within the frame of a specific curriculum and in order to achieve some acquirements in Turkey. Though there are course books prepared in accordance with the curriculum and activities in order to achieve the acquirements in geography teaching, they are geography teachers who will coordinate and fulfill the curriculum…

  4. What Is Innovative Geography Teaching? A Perspective from Geography Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artvinli, Eyüp

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to examine views of geography teachers on innovative geography teaching. The study group consists of 15 geography teachers (8 Females, 7 Males). The study is designed in keeping with phenomenological research. Semi-structured interview form is used as a data collection tool in the study. The collected data are analyzed…

  5. Geography Teachers' Metaphors Concerning the Concept of "Geography"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagdic, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to reveal geography teachers' perception on the concept of "Geography", by means of the metaphors they use. The study was participated by 116 geography teachers working in several high-schools in Istanbul City center within the 2012-2013 academic year. Answers to the following questions were sought in…

  6. Physical activity reduces the risk of dementia in mild cognitive impairment subjects: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Giulia; Vanacore, Nicola; Maggiore, Laura; Cucumo, Valentina; Ghiretti, Roberta; Galimberti, Daniela; Scarpini, Elio; Mariani, Claudio; Clerici, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Leisure activities, particularly exercise, play a protective role against dementia in healthy people, but it is unknown if this protective effect could be generalized to subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). To investigate the influence of leisure activities on the risk of progression of MCI to dementia. 176 MCI subjects attending a memory clinic underwent a standardized lifestyle questionnaire between October 2007 and May 2010. Social, cognitive, and physical scores were derived based on the assiduity of interpersonal contacts and on the frequency of participation in individual leisure activities. Subjects were requested to return every 12 months for dementia surveillance. The outcome measure was the risk of dementia associated with social, cognitive, and physical scores. Over a median follow-up time of 2.59 year, 92 (52.2%) MCI subjects developed dementia. Subjects with physical scores in the highest third had a lower risk (HR 0.44; 95% CI 0.23-0.85) of dementia compared with those in the lowest third. No association was found between cognitive or social scores and the risk of dementia. To our knowledge, this is the first prospective clinical study which demonstrates that high levels of participation in physical leisure activities are associated with reduced risk of dementia in subjects with MCI. In line with findings coming from community-based studies on healthy elderly, our finding suggests that the protective role of exercise against the development of dementia can be generalized to MCI subjects seen in clinical practice. Clinicians should encourage MCI subjects to participate in physical leisure activities.

  7. GEOGRAPHY HOMEWORK. STUDENTS’ OPINIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius-Alin NICOLAE

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The topic of homework is constantly brought into discussion, not only by researchers or curriculum designers, but also by students, teachers and parents, its importance for learning quality being generally recognised. The present study aims to identify the views of a sample of 30 students from a high school with a vocational profile (economic. Their opinions are related to some aspects referring to the Geography homework: attractiveness, content (the types of tasks, the usefulness of homework in learning Geography, time spent by students in doing their homework, working methods, etc. Data were collected using a 30-item questionnaire. The responses received from the students acknowledge the importance of homework in the process of learning Geography.

  8. A geography of big things

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The journal Cultural Geographies, and its predecessor Ecumene, has provided flagship scholarship in cultural geography for over a decade. Cultural Geographies has played this part in a period that has witnessed both unprecedented enthusiasm for the (now not so new) cultural turn, and an emergent scepticism around what cultural geography has come to stand for, and specifically its apparent over- emphasis on representation. As Catherine Nash and I have observed elsewhere, this ne...

  9. The reciprocal relationship between depression and physical morbidity: The role of subjective age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segel-Karpas, Dikla; Palgi, Yuval; Shrira, Amit

    2017-09-01

    The study aims to examine whether the reciprocal effects of physical morbidity and depression are moderated by subjective age-that is, individuals' perception of themselves as young or old. Data from the first two waves of the Midlife in the United States study (1995-6, T1; 2004-6, T2; http://midus.wisc.edu/) were analyzed using a cross-lagged design. We assessed 3,591 individuals who participated in both waves and provided full data on all the relevant variables (mean age at T1 = 47.4). Depression and the number of chronic illnesses (the indicator of physical morbidity) were measured at both waves and were tested as predictors and outcomes in a cross-lagged model. The moderating role of subjective age was assessed by examining whether T1 variables interacted with subjective age in predicting T2 outcomes. Subjective age moderated the T1 depression-T2 morbidity relationship, so that the relationship was stronger for those with older subjective age. Subjective age did not moderate the T1 morbidity-T2 depression relationship. Older subjective age could be a risk factor for experiencing greater physical morbidity following depression. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. The Information Revolution in Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikunov, Vladimir S.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a number of topics in geography that are effected by the multimedia information revolution. These include research in political geography, finance, and the geography of tourism and medicine. Considers new technologies assisting spatial modeling and visualization of data and their effects on these fields. (MJP)

  11. The role of physical activity in pre-service teachers’ subjective vitality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Bora Özkara

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the present study, subjective vitality considered to be one of the contributions provided by participation in physical activity is examined on a sample of pre-service teachers. When teachers who are important part of education system are healthy and fit, it will help to build future generations. Materials: The research was conducted in the city of Trabzon, located in the northeastern region of Turkey. The sample of the study is composed of 328 last grade pre-service teachers (133 women, 195 men, age: 23.14 ± 2.62 studying at Karadeniz Technical University in the academic year of 2015-2016. Data was collected through Childhood and Adolescence Physical Activity Levels Questionnaire, Subjective Vitality Scale, and a personal information form asking for information about gender, doing sports as a certified sportsman/woman and department. Results: The research results yielded a significant difference between subjective vitality levels of those who do sports as a certified sportsman/woman and those who do not, and between pre-service teachers of physical education and those of other departments (p<0,01. There was also a positive and low-level significant relationship between subjective vitality and physical activity experiences of pre-service teachers (r= .23; p<0.01. However, subjective vitality did not differ significantly by gender. Conclusions: The research results seem to support other studies that reveal social and psychological contributions provided by participation in physical activity. Therefore, participation in physical activity seems to have positive effects on the subjective vitality of pre-service teachers.

  12. Relations between contents from teaching subjects mathematics and physical and health education in primary education

    OpenAIRE

    Jovanova-Mitkovska, Snezana; Popeska, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    Considering modern educational tendency in the system of primary education that refers to the possibilities to establish integration - correlation relationships between educational contents from different teaching subjects in primary education, in this paper we made a theoretical elaboration of contents from two teaching subjects: math and physical and health education as an approach that allows efficient acquisition of knowledge and their efficient application in everyday life. The analyses ...

  13. Testing principle working mechanisms of the health action process approach for subjective physical age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienert, Julian; Kuhlmann, Tim; Fink, Sebastian; Hambrecht, Rainer; Lippke, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated differences in social-cognitive predictors and self-regulatory planning, as proposed by the health action process approach (HAPA), across three different subjective physical age groups for physical activity. With a cross-sectional design, 521 participants across the chronological age span from 25 to 86 years (M = 48.79; SD = 12.66) were separated into three groups: those who feel physically younger than they are in terms of chronological age, the same perceived and chronological age, and feeling physically older compared to their chronological age. Participants were assessed regarding their perceived vulnerability, outcome expectancies, general intentions, planning, self-efficacy, and stages of physical activity (non-intenders, intenders, and actors). Data were analysed via mean comparison and multigroup structural equation modelling. Mean differences for all but one construct were eminent in all groups, generally showing that those feeling physically younger also report better social-cognitive predictors of physical activity (e.g. lower perceived vulnerability) in comparison to those who feel the same age or older. The model showed that basic working mechanisms of the HAPA can be applied to all groups. With that, the results provide for the first time evidence that principle working mechanism of the HAPA can be applied to all subjective physical age groups. These may be used to tailor health promoting interventions according to participants' needs as a more suitable proxy than chronological age.

  14. Tourism and Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmire, Joan M.

    1997-01-01

    Presents a lesson outline in which students study the application of geography to the tourism industry by first discussing tourism, then researching various tourist destinations and comparing them. Notes the geographic skills and national standards addressed, materials needed, lesson objective, suggested teaching procedures, and a student handout.…

  15. Department of Geography

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2015-04-28

    Apr 28, 2015 ... Department of Geography, University of Lagos, Akoka-Lagos, Nigeria. Abstract. The precipitation concentration index (PCI) of Owerri and Enugu for 19 4 to 2011 was ..... UNESCO (2007). Zonation of water regimes in Latin America and the. Caribbean from a climatic point of view, focusing on vulnerable ...

  16. The Revenge of Geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ia. Belokrenitsky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This author discussed the prominent book of American journalist and expert Robert D. Kaplan in the light of the recent publication of its Russian translation: [Kaplan R. Mest’ geografi i (The revenge of geography / Transl. by M. Kotov. Moscow: Ko-Libri, 2015. P.277].

  17. Geography, Planning and EIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, R . K.

    1987-01-01

    Defines Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) as a major tool for environmental management throughout the world. Provides background to the EIA concept and describes how it might be used within secondary school geography as an integrative teaching device. Special emphasis is given to the new EIA/Seventh-Form syllabus currently being used in New…

  18. Geography from Money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, Ray

    1991-01-01

    Suggests utilizing foreign coins and banknotes as teaching aids for geography. Discusses coins portrayal of such issues as societal goals, historical commemorations, or conservation of wildlife. Cites banknotes as a source of even more geographical information than coins. Suggests sources of information, coins, and banknotes. (DK)

  19. Department of Geography,

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2016-11-18

    Accepted: November 18, 2016. Department of Geography, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ago-Iwoye, Nigeria. Email: otunwo@yahoo.com. Abstract .... location plan the new locations will simply involve the movement of personnel and ..... University of Otago, Dunedin, New. Zealand, November, 2005. Ewhrudjakpor, C. (2010).

  20. Department of Geography, Ibra

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2016-09-07

    Accepted: September 07, 2016. Department of Geography, Ibrahim Badamasi Babangida University Lapai Niger State,. Nigeria. Abstract ... Data for the study was obtained from primary and secondary sources using questionnaire, interview ..... water are mostly children of school age that are supposedly to be in the school at.

  1. Objectively and subjectively measured physical activity: associations with cognition and academic achievement in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, Martin; De Groot, Renate; Van Acker, Frederik; Savelberg, Hans; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Van Dijk, M. L., De Groot, R. H. M., Van Acker, F., Savelberg, H. C. M., & Kirschner, P. A. (2013, 26 February). Objectively and subjectively measured physical activity: associations with cognition and academic achievement in adolescents. Presentation at the CELSTEC plenary, Heerlen, The

  2. National Board Certified Physical Educators: Background Characteristics, Subjective Warrants, and Motivations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Amelia Mays; Rhoades, Jesse Lee

    2010-01-01

    This study examined National Board Certified Physical Education Teacher's (NBCPETs) demographic characteristics, recalled subjective warrants for entrance into the profession, and reasons for seeking this advanced certification. An extensive search for approximately 1,200 NBCPETs resulted in contact information for 819 NBCPETs. All were sent a…

  3. Who Teaches Primary Physical Education? Change and Transformation through the Eyes of Subject Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Luke; Green, Ken

    2017-01-01

    Primary physical education (PE) lessons tend to be taught by one, or a combination of, three different groups: generalist classroom teachers, specialist primary PE teachers and so-called adults other than teachers, who are almost exclusively sports coaches. Drawing upon data gathered from one-to-one interviews with 36 subject leaders (SLs), this…

  4. Objectively versus subjectively measured physical activity: associations with cognition and academic achievement in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, Martin; De Groot, Renate; Savelberg, Hans; Van Acker, Frederik; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Van Dijk, M. L., De Groot, R. H. M., Savelberg, H. C. M., Van Acker, F. H. M., & Kirschner, P. A. (2013, 25 May). Objectively versus subjectively measured physical activity: associations with cognition and academic achievement in adolescents. Poster presentation at the ISBNPA conference 2013, Ghent,

  5. Subject Knowledge Enhancement Courses for Creating New Chemistry and Physics Teachers: The Students' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynan, Richard; Jones, Robert Bryn; Mallaburn, Andrea; Clays, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Subject knowledge enhancement (SKE) courses are one option open in England to graduates with a science background whose first degree content is judged to be insufficient to train to become chemistry or physics teachers. Previous articles in "School Science Review" have discussed the structure of one type of extended SKE course offered at…

  6. Subjective relative deprivation is associated with poorer physical and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sandeep; Carleton, R Nicholas

    2015-12-01

    Substantial epidemiological evidence has shown that income inequality and objective measures of relative deprivation are associated with poorer health outcomes. However, surprisingly little research has examined whether subjective feelings of relative deprivation are similarly linked with poorer health outcomes. The relative deprivation hypothesis suggests that inequality affects health at the individual level through negative consequences of social comparison. We directly examined the relationship between subjective feelings of personal relative deprivation and self-reported physical and mental health in a diverse community sample (n = 328). Results demonstrated that subjective feelings of personal relative deprivation are associated with significantly poorer physical and mental health. These relationships held even when accounting for covariates that have been previously associated with both relative deprivation and health. These results further support the link between relative deprivation and health outcomes and suggest that addressing root causes of relative deprivation may lead to greater individual health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Physical exercise, sickness absence and subjective employability: An 8-year longitudinal observational study among musculoskeletal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Vera; Paech, Juliane; Ziegelmann, Jochen P; Lippke, Sonia

    2016-06-13

    Physical exercise recommendations become particularly effective when embedded into medical rehabilitation. However, little is known about long-term behaviour maintenance and its effect on sickness absence and subjective employability. The current longitudinal observational study investigated self-reported physical exercise, sickness absence and subjective employability over a period of 8 years. A total of 601 (T0) outpatients (mean age 45.14 years; standard deviation 10.73 years, age range 18-65 years) with different orthopaedic disorders were recruited during their 3-week medical rehabilitation in Germany. Of these, 61.7% (n = 371) were female. Follow-ups were carried out at 6 months (T1, n = 495), 12 months (T2, n = 340), 3 years (T3, n = 296) and 8 years (T4, n = 142) after baseline. Patient characteristics, exercise status, social-cognitive variables, sickness absence and subjective employability were obtained via self-report questionnaires. SPSS hierarchical regression models were used for data analysis, controlling for baseline measures and sociodemographic variables. Physical exercise status 6 months after rehabilitation treatment (T1) predicted sickness absence at 12 months (T2). Inactive people were 3.28 times more likely to be on sick leave at T2. In addition, physical exercise at T1 predicted subjective employability 12 months (T2) and 3 years (T3) later. Those who met the recommendations to be physically active for at least 40 min a week were more likely to feel able to work. Exercise appears to play an important role in reducing sickness absence and subjective employability and should be promoted within and after rehabilitation treatment.

  8. The Implementation Of Character Education Values In Integrated Physical Education Subject In Elementary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suherman Ayi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of this research emphasizes on the implementation of character building values through physical education learning in elementary school. The effort in developing this character building practice is essential to be done in order to tackle moral and character crises, which already occur in both individual and collective levels reflected in educational institution from elementary school to higher education. Hence, to form culture and national character, educational program and process are inseparable from environmental factor including the values of society, culture, and humanity. Physical education subject that is based on 2013 Curriculum has significant difference compared to the previous physical education subject. This is due to the fact that integrated physical education has its own uniqueness in terms of planning, systematic implementation, and instructional medium. This research aims at producing guidance in implementing character values integrated in physical education in elementary school. The method used in this research is research and development (R&D method, which includes preliminary research, model designing, limited trial, and extensive trial, as well as validation and dissemination. The findings of the research show that character values can be implemented in physical education in elementary schools in Sumedang Regency.

  9. Subjective Versus Objective Estimated Cardiovascular Disease Risk and Adherence to Physical Activity in African American Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Nadia; Miller, Arlene; Wilbur, JoEllen; Fogg, Louis

    2017-07-18

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death for African American (AA) women in the United States. Despite high prevalence of CVD risk factors, AA women perceive their CVD risk as low. Our objectives were to (1) identify relationships between subjective (self-reported perceived) CVD risk and objective CVD risk estimated by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association atherosclerotic CVD (ASCVD) risk estimator, (2) identify demographic and psychosocial factors associated with subjective perceived risk and discrepancy with objective estimated CVD risk, and (3) determine whether subjective perceived CVD risk was associated with physical activity (PA) adherence. This was a secondary data analysis of data collected from a 12-month lifestyle PA intervention conducted with 281 AA women. Subjective perceived CVD risk was measured by 1 question; objective estimated CVD risk was calculated using the ASCVD score. Women were categorized by congruence or discrepancy between subjective perceived and objective estimated CVD risk. Subjective perceived CVD risk and objective ASCVD risk scores were both low. Approximately 20% subjectively perceived their risk as lower than objective ASCVD scores. Atherosclerotic CVD risk discrepancy groups differed by depressed mood symptoms. Participants reported many perceived barriers to PA. Perceived CVD risk was not related to PA adherence. The significance of associated CVD risk factors may be underestimated by AA women, leading to discrepancy between subjective and objective risk estimates. Research is needed to clarify relationships among perceived risk, estimated risk using risk calculators such as ASCVD, and health behavior.

  10. Transformation of Geography as an Interdisciplinary Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Afrakhteh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Geography as a science of the spatial analysis of phenomena is based on three main objectives: studying spatial structures, examining the locational-spatial order of socio-economic activities, and searching spatial relationships and functions through hierarchical leveling of rural and urban settlements. The applied form of geography or “spatial planning” addresses the modification of spatial structures, the locational-spatial order of activities, and the organization of spatial relationships and functions. There are mutual interactions between structure and function in this spatial order. Science has developed a complex structure through the electronic revolution, which is called “third wave science”; also specialized studies have developed. Specialized studies result in a very deep understanding of subjects, but this deep understanding always remains just in a “spot” and its applications could be traumatic, which is because it is not regulated in combination with other dimensions of human life. This kind of science cannot be beneficial in human life or solve some important problems. The main aim of this article, which is based on qualitative content analysis, is to analyze geography as an interdisciplinary science. The findings of the study show that geographical research has interdisciplinary characteristics; otherwise it cannot explain today’s complex problems. Geography can both use the findings of other sciences, including statistics, mathematics, economics, sociology, history and psychology, and provide them with services and help.

  11. GEOGRAPHY nEtQUIPMENT to study geography: the homepage and reflections from the users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajtok-Tari, I.

    2009-04-01

    The main objective of the GEOGRAPHY nEtQUIPMENT is to convey structured information to teachers and pupils, as well as, professors and students of geography. This learning aid is a homepage, first published in Hungarian still in 2006 (http://netszkozkeszlet.ektf.hu), to help in orientation among the rapidly growing information on the Internet, to provide extra digitalized professional materials that are not yet available digitally and to share experiences of the teachers and professors working in the same area of interest and language environment. At present, its English version is already prepared and partly available at the same address. The GEOGRAPHY nEtQUIPMENT can be used free after registration, at present the homepage counts 2807 registered users. The interested user first enters a virtual office where the entries of the Menu can be opened by clicking at the drawer, shelf, wall map, globe, laptop, TV-set, etc. These entries are professional lesson plans using digital technology, photos, video clips, animations on physical and social geography. The homepage also mirrors pieces of music, maps, collection of minerals, database links, diagrams, bibliography, lecture notes, dictionaries, scientific and popular journals, geography games, web pages, etc. The whole set of appliances is based on Dreamweaver MX program. During the past 2.5 years some experience has been gained about the GEOGRAPHY nEtQUIPMENT in use, mainly from teachers of geography, who downloaded and responded to the questionnaire. Another source of information is the group of students in the College, where future teachers of geography are trained in a one-semester course on application of the Info-Communication Technology. From the first group, i.e. 59 active teachers of geography, 54 % use the Internet "always" or "frequently" in the classroom, whereas 75 % of them rely on it for preparation to the lessons. Before trying the homepage, these numbers were 25 % and 54 %, only. From among the listed

  12. Vitamin C and common cold incidence: a review of studies with subjects under heavy physical stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemilä, H

    1996-07-01

    Several studies have observed an increased risk of respiratory infections in subjects doing heavy physical exercise. Vitamin C has been shown to affect some parts of the immune system, and accordingly it seems biologically conceivable that it could have effects on the increased incidence of respiratory infections caused by heavy physical stress. In this report the results of three placebo-controlled studies that have examined the effect of vitamin C supplementation on common cold incidence in subjects under acute physical stress are analyzed. In one study the subjects were school-children at a skiing camp in the Swiss Alps, in another they were military troops training in Northern Canada, and in the third they were participants in a 90 km running race. In each of the three studies a considerable reduction in common cold incidence in the group supplemented with vitamin C(0.6-1.0 g/day) was found. The pooled rate ratio (RR) of common cold infections in the studies was 0.50 (95% CI: 0.35-0.69) in favour of vitamin C groups. Accordingly, the results of the three studies suggest that vitamin C supplementation may be beneficial for some of the subjects doing heavy exercise who have problems with frequent upper respiratory infections.

  13. Merging physical parameters and laboratory subjective ratings for the soundscape assessment of urban squares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Giovanni; Maffei, Luigi; Di Gabriele, Maria; Gallo, Veronica

    2013-07-01

    An experimental study was carried out in 20 squares in the center of Rome, covering a wide range of different uses, sonic environments, geometry, and architectural styles. Soundwalks along the perimeter of each square were performed during daylight and weekdays taking binaural and video recordings, as well as spot measurements of illuminance. The cluster analysis performed on the physical parameters, not only acoustic, provided two clusters that are in satisfactory agreement with the "a priori" classification. Applying the principal component analysis (PCA) to five physical parameters, two main components were obtained which might be associated to two environmental features, namely, "chaotic/calm" and "open/enclosed." On the basis of these two features, six squares were selected for the laboratory audio-video tests where 32 subjects took part filling in a questionnaire. The PCA performed on the subjective ratings on the sonic environment showed two main components which might be associated to two emotional meanings, namely, "calmness" and "vibrancy." The linear regression modeling between five objective parameters and the mean value of subjective ratings on chaotic/calm and enclosed/open attributes showed a good correlation. Notwithstanding these interesting results being limited to the specific data set, it is worth pointing out that the complexity of the soundscape quality assessment can be more comprehensively examined merging the field measurements of physical parameters with the subjective ratings provided by field and/or laboratory tests.

  14. Development of Web Based Learning Material in Physics Subject for Kalor and Temperature Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatwa Aji Kurniawan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been done, the research which aims to develop a web-based teaching materials on the subjects of physics subject with subject mater of temperature and heat. This study using a modified model of the 4D development by eliminating the deployment phase. The validation of product development conducted by validator media experts and experts matter of physics, whereas small-scale trials conducted by physics teacher and 10 students. Validator review results stating that the quality of the product development were included in the category very well with the average percentage rating of 83.93%. The percentage value assigned by media expert by 75% in the good category and the percentage of the value provided by a matter expert 92.85% were in the very good category. Experiments by physics teacher to obtain result of equal to 94.44% were in the very good category and the average percentage of the test results by the students of 90.5% were in the very good category. The characteristics of the products developed include material composition using the curriculum in 2013, there was a recording facility and the results of evaluation of students' activities, there were feedback evaluation results were immediately known by the students and there were some links related to the material either youtube or other learning website.

  15. The Vision of Geography Underlying the Australian Geography Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    MAUDE, Alaric

    2014-01-01

    A common geography curriculum for Australian schools was approved in May 2013. This paper describes the conceptual and philosophical foundations of the curriculum through a discussion of its definition of geography, selection of concepts, integration of skills into the process of inquiry, and specification of learning about countries and continents, and of the perspectives that are stated or implied. It describes a view of geography that is eclectic yet emphasises the subject’s distinctive wa...

  16. Practice and Economic Geography

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, A.; Murphy, J. T.

    2010-01-01

    Economic geography has over the last decade become increasingly interested in the role of practice, conceptualised as the regularised or stabilised social actions through which economic agents organize or coordinate production, marketing, service provision, exchange and/or innovation activities. Interest in practice is most clearly manifest in a growing body of research concerned to conceptualise how the regularized social relations and interactions linking economic actors (e.g. entrepreneurs...

  17. Urban geography and complexity

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    Denise Pumain

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The contemporary approach of complex systems raises common questions that could be handled by a transdisciplinary theory. We demonstrate how the main concepts of urban geography could be integrated in such a theory ofcomplexity. We illustrate the complexity approach by a short presentationof the SIMPOP model that uses a multi-agents formalism for the simulationof the evolutionary properties of systems of cities.

  18. Examining the Place of Geography in the American Social Studies Curriculum and the Efforts toward an Effective Teacher Education in K-12 Geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemalettin AYAS

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper primarily focuses on locating geography education in the American secondary social studies curriculum, and then examines the American teacher education in geography. Therefore, the paper first defines the common ground between social studies and geography, followed by a discussion regarding how geography as a school subject fits in to the social studies curriculum. It next analyzes the American experience in preparing pre- and in-service geography and/or social studies teachers as there have been quite efforts to that end due to the widespread “geographic illiteracy” in the American schools. As a result, the current paper attempts to provide the interested audience with a general perspective concerning the place of geography education in the American schools, and suggests a comprehensive teacher education model based on the related literature investigated

  19. Support for Physical Education as a Core Subject in Urban Elementary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jacqueline C; Clark, B Ruth; Butler, Carling E; Racette, Susan B

    2015-11-01

    Physical inactivity and childhood obesity are prevalent in American children, with increased vulnerability in minority, low-resource populations. The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of physical education (PE) on in-school physical activity quantity and intensity in urban minority children attending public elementary schools. This observational study included elementary children (N=212; mean age, 9.9 years; 81.7% black) in Grades 2-5 attending urban public schools with high eligibility for the National School Lunch Program. In-school physical activity was quantified during 4 school weeks across 4 months (January-April 2012) using Omron HJ-151 accelerometer-pedometers. Fitness was assessed with the 20-meter Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run. Data were analyzed in 2013 using generalized estimating equations to determine the influence of PE and sex on total in-school steps and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) steps. Based on 3,379 observation days (mean, 15.9 school days/student), students achieved higher in-school physical activity on days with PE (4,979 steps) than on days without PE (3,683 steps, pschool and MVPA steps in urban minority elementary children. PE as a core subject can provide opportunities for urban, minority public school children in low-resource areas to achieve age-appropriate physical activity and fitness goals. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Geography Education Through Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Demiralp

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Geography studies the relationship between human and the earth and pay attention to space, place and environment. In its simplest definition, maps are language and communication tools in transferring knowledge of an area in the science of geography which studies the space. Thus teaching and teaching how to use maps is quite important. This is not valid just for all matters of geography education; they can be used at any point, level, age or grade in teaching. This is because map reading involves transferring a piece of information by coding it on a platform and the users to read and interpret the information by encoding it according to their needs. Thus, we can say that teaching maps and teaching how to use maps is the transformation or translation of a piece of knowledge from life, with the appropriate language. In order for this kind of teaching and learning to be accomplished it is a must that the map maker and the map user to know the common language of maps, which is map language, and for them to know qualities, types and limitations of maps. To gain this kind of knowledge, students must see every type of map from the simplest to the most complicated and study and analyse them, as well as get to know their different usages.

  1. The Applied Behavior Analysis Research Paradigm and Single-Subject Designs in Adapted Physical Activity Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haegele, Justin A; Hodge, Samuel Russell

    2015-10-01

    There are basic philosophical and paradigmatic assumptions that guide scholarly research endeavors, including the methods used and the types of questions asked. Through this article, kinesiology faculty and students with interests in adapted physical activity are encouraged to understand the basic assumptions of applied behavior analysis (ABA) methodology for conducting, analyzing, and presenting research of high quality in this paradigm. The purposes of this viewpoint paper are to present information fundamental to understanding the assumptions undergirding research methodology in ABA, describe key aspects of single-subject research designs, and discuss common research designs and data-analysis strategies used in single-subject studies.

  2. Geography - Changing Faces of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanacek-Schubert, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    Geography - Changing Faces of the Earth In Austria there are currently some major reforms concerning high school education underway. At our school, the Bundesgymnasium and Bundesrealgymnasium Draschestrasse, a school belonging to the Vienna Bilingual Schooling branch, we have developed a course system in which pupils can select courses and determine individually which areas of study they want to focus on. Specially devised courses have been developed which fit within the framework of natural and applied sciences but go beyond the basic curriculum in geography. At the same time the structure of the basic courses, compulsory for all pupils, was altered in order to allow for topics that are currently in the news to be dealt with sufficiently. In the basic courses of geography exogenic and endogenic forces are dealt with extensively. The main idea is to make children aware of the powers that make landscapes look the way the do now - and what their appearance may have been thousands or millions of years ago. A piece of rubble, a depression in the landscape or the way a tree may bend may serve as the key to what lies underneath earth's surface. These tell-tale signs are worth investigating, they can open up our eyes and change our perception of the world. A great focus, in particular in the 7th grade, is placed on glaciers and karst, most notably in the Alps and the Mediterranean region, whereas the 6th grade emphasizes weathering, erosion and endogenic forces in the geography curriculum. The newly installed whiteboards at our school allow for excellent visualization of subject-related aspects concerning the aforementioned topics and issues. In addition to the geography basic-course we have devised a special course entitled „Dante's Peak" which deals specifically with the endogenic forces that help shape the appearance of the earth, in particular plate tectonics, vulcanism, earthquakes.

  3. Geography 2050, November 19, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-04

    16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: On November 19, 2014, the American Geographical Society hosted Geography 2050, a high?level symposium including top...UU UU UU UU 04-02-2016 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Geography 2050, November 19, 2014 The views, opinions and/or findings...ABOVE ADDRESS. University of Kansas 2385 Irving Hill Road Lawrence, KS 66044 -7552 ABSTRACT Geography 2050, November 19, 2014 Report Title On November

  4. Imagining Geographies, Mapping Identities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Graves

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The ambition of this issue of Portal is to reach across the methodological boundaries of history, politics, literature and geography to apply their complementary perspectives to the study of identity and its relation to space and place, an aim that involves attempting to identify the many different ways the notoriously slippery concepts of identity and geography may intersect. For this issue we have selected articles that cast a fresh perspective on two areas where identity and geography intersect: the construction of identity through the imaginative recreation of place in literature: Mapping Literary Spaces; and the study of the shifting relationships of centre and periphery, exclusion and inclusion in urban settings and geopolitical confrontations: Social and Political Peripheries. Gerard Toal has written that geography is not a noun but a verb: it does not describe what space is but studies what we do with space, imaginatively and politically. The articles in this issue illustrate the exercise of the literary and political imagination and the role of materiality and memory in the creation of geographic representation. They show too a new awareness of the centrality of space in the constitution of identities, and the need for a new geocritical reading of its discourse, as the interrelations of place and community are played out on the many scales of social and political life, from the local to the global.   The special issue is organised thus: Introduction Matthew Graves (Aix-Marseille University & Liz Rechniewski (Sydney University: “Imagining Geographies, Mapping Identities.” I. Mapping Literary Spaces - Isabelle Avila (University of Paris XIII, "Les Cartes de l'Afrique au XIXe siècle et Joseph Conrad : Perceptions d'une Révolution Cartographique." - Daniela Rogobete (University of Craiova, "Global vs Glocal: Dimensions of the post-1981 Indian English Novel." II. Social and Political Peripheries - Elizabeth Rechniewski (Sydney

  5. Objective and subjective measures of neighborhood environment (NE): relationships with transportation physical activity among older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyunt, Ma Shwe Zin; Shuvo, Faysal Kabir; Eng, Jia Yen; Yap, Keng Bee; Scherer, Samuel; Hee, Li Min; Chan, Siew Pang; Ng, Tze Pin

    2015-09-15

    This study examined the associations of subjective and objective measures of the neighbourhood environment with the transportation physical activity of community-dwelling older persons in Singapore. A modified version of the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale (NEWS) and Geographical Information System (GIS) measures of the built environment characteristics were related to the frequency of walking for transportation purpose in a study sample of older persons living in high-density apartment blocks within a public housing estate in Singapore. Relevant measured variables to assess the complex relationships among built environment measures and transportation physical activity were examined using structural equation modelling and multiple regression analyses. The subjective measures of residential density, street connectivity, land use mix diversity and aesthetic environment and the objective GIS measure of Accessibility Index have positively significant independent associations with transportation physical activity, after adjusting for demographics, socio-economic and health status. Subjective and objective measures are non-overlapping measures complementing each other in providing information on built environment characteristics. For elderly living in a high-density urban neighborhood, well connected street, diversity of land use mix, close proximity to amenities and facilities, and aesthetic environment were associated with higher frequency of walking for transportation purposes.

  6. Teaching Qualitative Geography: A JGHE Written Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Roger

    1992-01-01

    Reviews the recent growth of interest in qualitative geography. Discusses whether or not qualitative research can be accepted on the same scholarly level as quantitative research. Contends that qualitative methodology has much to offer geography and geography instruction. (CFR)

  7. Comparison of Subjective and Objective Physical Functions in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agwubike EO

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the subjective and objective physical function scores of patients with Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP. Method: A cross- sectional survey design was used. Fifty-one patients with CLBP of mechanical origin were recruited from the physiotherapy out patient clinics of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital and the National Orthopedic Hospital both in Enugu, Nigeria. The box numerical scale, Roland-Morris Questionnaire (RMQ-24 and the Back Performance Scale (BPS were used to assess the present pain intensity, the subjective and objective functional status of the participants respectively. Pearson correlation was used to determine relationships. Multiple Regressions were used to determine the predictors of objective function. Alpha level was set at 0.5. Results: The mean age and Body Mass Index of the participants were 49.04 ± 14.33 years and 26.57 ± 4.29 kg/m2 respectively. The mean Pain Intensity, subjective disability (RMQ and objective disability (BPS scores were 6.33 ± 2.09, 9.76 ± 5.14 and 6.43 ± 2.9 respectively. Stepwise multiple regressions showed that when all the variables were entered only marital status was a significant predictor of objective physical function. Conclusion: There is no significant association between subjective and objective functions in patients with CLBP. However, marital status (married is a significant predictor of objective function in CLBP.

  8. The relationship between vitamin D status, physical activity and insulin resistance in overweight and obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavadar, Gülis; Demircioğlu, Demet Tekdöş; Özgönenel, Levent; Emre, Tuluhan Yunus

    2015-05-20

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) incidence has been increasing worldwide along with the rise of obesity and sedantery lifestyle. Decreased physical activity (PA) and obesity have also been associated with the low vitamin D levels. We aimed to determine the association between PA, vitamin D status and insulin resistance in overweight and obese subjects. A total of 294 (186 female, 108 male) overweight or obese subjects were included in this cross-sectional study. 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D), insulin, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and HbA1c levels were measured in blood samples. Body mass index (BMI), HOMA-index and total score of International Physical Activity Questionnaire-long form (IPAQ) were calculated. Insulin resistant subjects were compared with the non-resistant group. The mean age of the participants was 45 ± 12.25 and 41.39 ± 10.32; 25(OH)D levels were 8.91 ± 4.30 and 17.62 ± 10.47 ng/dL; BMIs were 31.29 ± 4.48 and 28.2 ± 3.16 kg/m², IPAQ total scores were 548.71 ± 382.81 and 998 ± 486.21 in the insulin resistant and nonresistant subjects, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in terms of 25(OH)D, FPG, insulin levels, IPAQ total score and BMI between the two groups (p = 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.001).Significantly low 25(OH)D levels, high BMI and low PA in insulin resistant subjects confirm the importance of active lifestyle and the maintenance of normal vitamin D levels in overweight and obese subjects in prevention of T2DM.

  9. The relationship between vitamin D status, physical activity and insulin resistance in overweight and obese subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülis Kavadar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM incidence has been increasing worldwide along with the rise of obesity and sedantery lifestyle. Decreased physical activity (PA and obesity have also been associated with the low vitamin D levels. We aimed to determine the association between PA, vitamin D status and insulin resistance in overweight and obese subjects. A total of 294 (186 female, 108 male overweight or obese subjects were included in this cross-sectional study. 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OHD, insulin, fasting plasma glucose (FPG and HbA1c levels were measured in blood samples. Body mass index (BMI, HOMA-index and total score of International Physical Activity Questionnaire-long form (IPAQ were calculated. Insulin resistant subjects were compared with the non-resistant group. The mean age of the participants was 45±12.25 and 41.39±10.32; 25(OHD levels were 8.91 ± 4.30 and 17.62 ± 10.47 ng/dL; BMIs were 31.29 ± 4.48  and 28.2 ± 3.16 kg/m², IPAQ total scores were 548.71±382.81 and 998±486.21 in the insulin resistant and nonresistant subjects, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in terms of 25(OHD, FPG, insulin levels, IPAQ  total score and BMI between the two groups (p = 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.001.Significantly low 25(OHD levels, high BMI and low PA in insulin resistant subjects confirm the importance of active lifestyle and the maintenance of normal vitamin D levels in overweight and obese subjects in prevention of T2DM.

  10. The Vision of Geography Underlying the Australian Geography Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maude, Alaric

    A common geography curriculum for Australian schools was approved in May 2013. This paper describes the conceptual and philosophical foundations of the curriculum through a discussion of its definition of geography, selection of concepts, integration of skills into the process of inquiry, and specification of learning about countries and…

  11. Associations of Subjective Social Status with Physical Activity and Body Mass Index across Four Asian Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Frerichs

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aims of this study were to (1 assess physical activity and weight status differences and (2 explore the direction and shape of subjective social status (SSS association with physical activity and weight status within four Asian countries. Methods. Cross section data of adult respondents from the nationally representative East Asian Social Survey were used for analyses. Logistic regression stratified by gender was conducted for the first aim, and simple and quadratic logistic regression models were used for the second. Results. SSS was significantly associated with odds of weekly or daily physical activity across all countries and genders, except for South Korean and Japanese females. Quadratic models provided significantly better fit for Chinese males (LR (d.f. = 1 = 6.51, P value <.05 and females (LR (d.f. = 1 = 7.36, P value <.01, South Korean males (LR (d.f. = 1 = 4.40, P value <.05, and Taiwanese females (LR (d.f. = 1 = 4.87, P value <.05. Conclusions. This study provides a comparable cross Asian country measure of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and new findings that a connection exists between SSS and physical activity. Differences of class distinction help explain the different shaped SSS relationships.

  12. Comparative study of anthropometric variables in female classical ballet dancers, volleyball players and physically active subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Vaz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare anthropometric variables (body weight, height, and percent body fat and plantarflexion and dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM between three different groups of women: classical ballet dancers (n=14, volleyball players (n=22 and physically active subjects (n=13. The assumption was that different functional requirements should produce differences in the anthropometric variables and ROM between the three groups. Body weight and height were higher in volleyball players (66.42 ± 5.8 kg; 174.77 ± 5.6 cm, followed by physically active women (59.93 ±10.3 kg; 164 ± 7.5 cm and ballet dancers (49.25 ± 4.5 kg; 157.03 ± 3.6 cm (p<0.05. Percent body fat was higher in physically active women (30.67 ± 4.6% compared to theother two groups, which showed similar percentages (volleyball players: 24.93 ± 4.1%; ballet dancers: 21.94 ± 4.3%. The three groups were similar in terms of total ankle ROM and active dorsiflexion ROM between the right and left sides. However, plantarflexion ROM was higher in ballet dancers (~83°, followed by physically active women (~68° and volleyball players who presented the smallest ROM (~60°. The different requirements imposed by the three distinct physical activities seem to be responsible for changes in some of the anthropometric variables and ankle joint ROM.

  13. Italian information geographies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paradiso

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction A range of papers focusing on Italian cases of ICTs use and changes in society are presented here in this NETCOM issue. A national research group on Geography of Information Society was founded in 2007 and hosted by the Italian Geographical Society later evolved in a specialty group within AgeI, the Association of Italian Geographers. This issue brings together papers from members of the Italian specialty group along the general theme of Internet mediation in everyday life. A pre...

  14. Industrial Dynamics and Economic Geography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capasso, Marco; Stam, Erik; Cefis, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Capasso M., Stam E. and Cefis E. Industrial dynamics and economic geography, Regional Studies. How do industries emerge and evolve over space? In this special issue the fields of industrial dynamics and economic geography are brought together in order to achieve a richer and more fundamental

  15. Students' Conceptual Thinking in Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trygestad, JoAnn

    This study explores students' conceptual thinking by examining the extent and complexity of their concept identification and organization in geography. The study investigated students' conceptual thinking through identification of salient geography concepts and construction of individual concept maps at three academic achievement and grade levels.…

  16. Geography: The South Australian Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, Malcolm; Shepherd, Rita

    2006-01-01

    Geography as a discipline has a long and healthy history in South Australia. Due to the passion of individual educators and the activities of the Geography Teachers Association of South Australia (GTASA) since its foundation in 1936, South Australia has experienced ongoing curriculum development and indeed innovation in the geographical studies in…

  17. Omani Students' Definitions of Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nofli, Mohammed Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Very few studies have been conducted on students' definitions of geography. The purpose of the present study was to add to the existing literature by exploring Omani students' definitions of geography. Participants were 477 students of grade 6 (ages 11-12) and grade 10 (ages 15-16) in one school district in Oman. They had been taught geography…

  18. [Influence of affectivity trait on relationships between occupational stress and subjective physical health and job satisfaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shan-fa; Zhou, Wen-hui; Gu, Gui-zhen

    2008-09-01

    To explore the influence of affectivity trait on relationships between occupational stress and subjective physical health and job satisfaction. Self-reports for psychosocial work conditions and health and well-being in a sample of 878 workers from a thermal power plant in China were conducted using the job demand-control model, the effort-reward imbalance model, job satisfaction, depression symptom, and physical health complaints questionnaires. Logistic regression analysis was used by controlling for age, sex, and educational level. Negative and positive affectivity were correlated with occupational stressors or strains (Paffectivity or positive affectivity was controlled; Odds ratios decreased greater when negative affectivity and positive affectivity were controlled simultaneously. Furthermore in some equation no variable entered. Affectivity trait has effect on relationships between occupational stress and subjective physical health and job satisfaction. According to the outcome category of study, the possible confounding role of affectivity should be controlled in the study of the relationships between occupational stress and health self-reports.

  19. Students’ Preference of E-learning in Physical Subjects at Mendel University in Brno

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Kumbár

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article there is observed e-learing study support in subjects focused on physics, mainly in praktikum of these subjects. Teaching e-learning software made by collective of physics teachers at Mendel university in Brno is possible to use as a electronic exercise book, homework aid for solving of laboratory homework, dataprojector presentation in teaching and also as a examination of students by means of didactic tests. It is necessary to be mindful that programme is valid, simplify studying and also to raise deeper interest in physics. The goal of teaching aid is to simplify studying process and create possibility for teachers to devote all students to a higher extent. Important fact is of course contribution such a support for students themselves. E-learning support can be very valuable, highly developed and contributive but if it is not accepted by all students, all devoted lessons for its creation would be useless. That is why it is very important to monitor regular feedback of students who have a chance to use these supports, afterwords to adapt them according to actual both teachers requests and mainly students requests. It is also very suitable if students have a chance to make a choice among several study supports because not all students are same.

  20. Effects of acute physical exercise on oxidative stress and inflammatory status in young, sedentary obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accattato, Francesca; Greco, Marta; Pullano, Salvatore A; Carè, Ilaria; Fiorillo, Antonino S; Pujia, Arturo; Montalcini, Tiziana; Foti, Daniela P; Brunetti, Antonio; Gulletta, Elio

    2017-01-01

    Circulating oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory markers change after regular physical exercise; however, how a short session of acute physical activity affects the inflammatory status and redox balance in sedentary individuals is still unclear. Aim of this study is to assess antioxidant and inflammatory parameters, both at rest and after acute exercise, in sedentary young men with or without obesity. Thirty sedentary male volunteers, aged 20-45 (mean age 32 ± 7 years), were recruited, divided into 3 groups (normal weight: BMI group comparisons demonstrated significantly higher Glutathione Reductase activity in severely obese subjects in the post-exercise period (P = 0.036), and higher EGF levels in normal weight individuals, either before (P = 0.003) and after exercise (P = 0.05). Intra-group comparisons showed that the acute exercise stress induced a significant increase in Glutathione Reductase activity in severely obese subjects only (P = 0.007), a significant decrease in MCP-1 in the normal weight group (P = 0.02), and a decrease in EGF levels in all groups (normal weight: P = 0.025, overweight/moderate obesity: P = 0.04, severe obesity: P = 0.018). Altogether, these findings suggest that in sedentary individuals with different ranges of BMI, Glutathione Reductase and distinct cytokines are differentially involved into the adaptive metabolic changes and redox responses induced by physical exercise. Therefore, these biomarkers may have the potential to identify individuals at higher risk for developing diseases pathophysiologically linked to oxidative stress.

  1. European dimension and European identity through the perspective of geography teaching in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Resnik Planinc

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses geography teaching inSloveniaas viewed through the prism of a European dimension and identity. The author aims to identify to what extent the ‘European dimension’ and ‘European identity’ exist within school geography curricula, and how they are represented and constructed. Surveys discussed in the paper cover a 15 year period and dealing with the three most important elements of (geography education: teachers, content and pupils/students. Using the results of the surveys, the author suggests possibilities for the development of geography teaching, particularly with regard to subject areas concerning the implementation of European identity issues within the framework of European dimension.

  2. The effect of psychomotor physical therapy on subjective health complaints and psychological symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitve, Monica H; Hynninen, Minna J; Kvåle, Alice

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of Norwegian psychomotor physical therapy on subjective health complaints and psychological symptoms. A non-randomized waiting list controlled design was used. Physiotherapists in Norway recruited patients for a treatment group (n = 40) and waiting list control group (n = 22). Patients on the waiting list could only be included for 6 months, as they then started treatment. Symptoms registration was obtained from both groups at baseline and 6 months, and only for the treatment group also at 12 months. The following self-report forms were used; Subjective Health Complaints Inventory (SCH); Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II); Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Trait (STAI-T); Bergen Insomnia Scale (BIS); Fatigue Questionnaire (FQ); Quality of Life Inventory (QOLI); The Client Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ). The patients had had widespread and clinically significant health problems for an average of 9 years upon entrance to the study. After 6 months in psychomotor physical therapy, all the measured symptoms in the treatment group were significantly reduced, but only quality of life was significantly reduced when compared to the waiting list control group. After 12 months in therapy, the patients in the treatment group had continued to improve on all measured variables. The symptoms of anxiety and depression, as well as quality of life, were improved from clinical to non-clinical level. Norwegian psychomotor physical therapy seems to have potential for reducing symptoms of subjective health complaints, depression, anxiety, insomnia, fatigue and improving quality of life, although the process takes time. Further research is needed to gain more rigorous data, and randomized controlled studies are highly welcomed. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. A Comparative Study of the Empirical Relationship in Student Performance between Physics and Other STEM Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Maricela

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) advocated by the National Research Council emphasize the connections among Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines. By design, NGSS is expected to replace the previous science education standards to enhance the quality of STEM education across the nation. To support this initiative, this investigation was conducted to fill a void in the research literature by developing an empirical indicator for the relationship of student performance across STEM subjects using a large-scale database from the Trends in Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). In particular, an innovative approach has been taken in this study to support the canonical correlation analysis of student plausible scores between physics and other STEM subjects at different grade levels and in a cross-country context. Results from this doctoral research revealed the need to strengthen the alignment between the intended, implemented, and attained curricula to support the integration of STEM disciplines in the United States.

  4. The relationship between physical activity, meaning in life, and subjective vitality in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Haewon

    2017-11-01

    The present study examined the potential contribution of meaning in life to the relationship between physical activity and subjective vitality in older adults. Two-hundred and fifty community-dwelling elders completed the instruments assessing physical activity, meaning in life, and subjective vitality. Results from structural equation modeling indicated that physical activity was positively associated with both meaning in life and subjective vitality. Further, the relationship between physical activity and vitality was partially mediated by meaning in life. Although previous studies have consistently found a positive impact of physical activity on vitality, the current study suggested that it is more productive to focus not only on physical activity, but also on meaning in life, in order to vitalize elders. Further, a focus on meaning in life can be a productive way to continue to vitalize older adults who are unable to engage in regular physical activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Interest of Grade Ten Students toward Physics among Other Science Subjects, Case of Wolaita Soddo Town Governmental Secondary Schools, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelo, Shewangzaw

    2016-01-01

    This paper has proposed to investigate the interest in students towards physics among other science subjects. The investigation was carried out with 490 samples of grade ten students in Wolaita Soddo town governmental schools. Thus, overall result indicates that the interest in students towards physics is low and students hate to learn physics in…

  6. Curriculum Development in New Zealand: New Directions, Opportunities and Challenges for School Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fastier, Murray

    2013-01-01

    Geography as a senior subject in New Zealand secondary schools has been long overdue for curriculum change. The 2007 New Zealand Curriculum (NZC) currently being implemented at the senior school level provides geography with the mechanisms for positive curriculum change, giving teachers the opportunity to refocus on existing teaching, learning and…

  7. Effects of Infographics on Students Achievement and Attitude towards Geography Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çifçi, Taner

    2016-01-01

    Geography is a very comprehensive field of study with many subjects to study topics. Using a wide range of materials in the teaching of this course can this lesson be made effective and permanent because we do not have chances to observe natural phenomena. Therefore, in geography education materials natural environment is to be brought to class by…

  8. Geography in the Finnish School Curriculum: Part of the "Success Story"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Sirpa

    2014-01-01

    The article investigates the status of geography education in the Finnish national curricula from the 1970s until today. Conceptions of teaching, learning and change in society are traced through curriculum texts; in addition, the ways in which these are applied in the subject-specified aims and content of the geography curriculum are explored.…

  9. The Use of Planning in English and German (NRW) Geography School Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Veit; Budke, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Although it is not possible to predict the future, at least some ideas can be developed through planning. Geography focuses on current social, environmental and spatial problems; however, it should, at the same time, teach us to plan its future handling. At school, this is a responsible role for the subject geography. This article compares how…

  10. Advanced Placement® Human Geography: Looking Back and Looking Ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanegran, David A.; Zeigler, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, AP Human Geography has grown in numbers and spread to almost every state. This article synopsizes the early history of the subject, summarizes the course and the exam, highlights positive impacts on the discipline of geography, and focuses on the following three issues: teachers who come to the course having majored in…

  11. Not Nearly Enough Geography! University Provision for England's Pre-Service Primary Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catling, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Research into geography provision in primary initial teacher education [ITE] courses in the United Kingdom and worldwide is very limited. England educates pre-service primary teachers of 5-11 year olds to be "generalists" who teach the full range of curriculum subjects, including geography. This article identifies that the provision of…

  12. Do Curriculum Reforms Affect Classroom Teaching in Geography? The Case Study of Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinfried, Sibylle

    2004-01-01

    The Swiss national curriculum for upper secondary schools requires geography to be taught according to new paradigms concerning subject contents and learning methodology. Today, nearly 10 years after the new curriculum was enacted, the question arises whether the paradigmatic changes were acknowledged by geography teachers and integrated into…

  13. UK High School Pupils' Conceptions of Geography: Research Findings and Methodological Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Nick

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores substantive and methodological issues in relation to pupils' conceptions of geography. It draws on an in-depth qualitative study with 13-14-year-old pupils from three secondary schools. Selected pupils were interviewed numerous times about their geography classroom experiences and ideas about the subject in general. A detailed…

  14. The Effects of Geography Information System (GIS) Based Teaching on Underachieving Students' Mastery Goal and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Soon Singh Bikar; Rathakrishnan, Balan; Sharif, Sabariah; Talin, Rosy; Eboy, Oliver Valentine

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the number of students electing to study Geography in Malaysian upper secondary schools, and their level of achievement in the subject, has declined. The main factor appears to be a lack of motivation. Yet there has been little research into the impact of instructional methods on Geography students' motivation and…

  15. Secondary Geography and the Australian Curriculum--Directions in School Implementation: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casinader, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    At first glance, the introduction of a national curriculum for Australian schools suggested a new era of revival for school geography. Since the late 1980s, the development and introduction of more integrated conceptions of curriculum design and implementation has seen the decline of Geography as a distinct subject in Australian schools, with…

  16. Doing Justice to Geography in the Secondary School: Deconstruction, Invention and the National Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Christine

    2006-01-01

    The subject of geography is declining in popularity at secondary school level and recent developments following the "cultural turn" in Higher Education have had little impact in revitalising it. In this paper I explore the question: is there a problem with the school geography curriculum policy? After briefly sketching the history of the…

  17. Gaining Insight into Cultural Geography through the Study of Musical Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Alexander K.

    2010-01-01

    At present, the need for an understanding of both physical and cultural geography is increasingly urgent in America's schools. The present study explores using music as focus for the exploration of geography. Not only is music strongly linked to culture and environment but also its study provides an experiential understanding of a given culture in…

  18. An Analysis of Geography Content in Relation to Geography for Life Standards in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nofli, Mohammed Abdullah

    2018-01-01

    Since the publication of "Geography for Life: National Geography Standards" in the United States (Geography Education Standards Project, 1994), it has been widely used to develop quality curriculum materials for what students should know and able to do in geography. This study compared geography content taught in Omani public schools…

  19. Recent Trends in Geography Education in Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohli, Robert V.; Binford, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Geography at elementary and middle schools in Louisiana, USA., remains a social studies strand along with civics, economics, and history, with no state-required geography course at any level. But because schools may require more geography than the state standard, this research examines the extent to which K-12 students are exposed to geography in…

  20. Introduction. Teaching Advanced Placement Human Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Alexander B.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces this special issue of "Journal of Geography" focusing on the teaching of Advanced Placement (AP) human geography. States that essays were developed by members of the AP Human Geography Development Committee focusing on areas in the human geography course outline which are included in the appendix. (CMK)

  1. A Road Map for Improving Geography Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertheim, Jill A.; Edelson, Daniel C.; Hildebrant, Barbara; Hinde, Elizabeth; Kenney, Marianne; Kolvoord, Robert; Lanegran, David; Marcello, Jody Smothers; Morrill, Robert; Ruiz-Primo, Maria; Seixas, Peter; Shavelson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    In late 2012, both the second edition of the "Geography for Life: National Geography Standards" and the National Science Foundation-funded "Road Map for Geography Education Project" reports were released; the former document describes the conceptual goals for K-12 geography education, and the latter, a route to coordinating reform efforts to…

  2. Physical Characteristics. Resource Unit III, Grade 6. Providence Social Studies Curriculum Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Providence Public Schools, RI.

    GRADES OR AGES: Grade 6. SUBJECT MATTER: Social studies; physical geography of Latin America and Africa. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The major portion of the guide, which develops the unit, is laid out in three columns, one each for topics, activities, and materials. Other sections are in list form. The guide is mimeographed and…

  3. (Re)theorising population geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, P; Jackson, P

    1995-12-01

    "Population geography has become separated from other branches of human geography by not engaging strongly with recent debates in social theory. The reasons for this partly lie in the wealth of data that population geographers have available to them concerning their major interest--demographic events....A case is made here for population geographers to consider in particular three areas of social theoretic debate--social construction theories, realist ideas on extensive and intensive research, and the politics of position. Suggestions are made as to what a (re)theorised population geography might look like." excerpt

  4. History, geography and world-systems theory

    OpenAIRE

    Kearns, Gerry

    1988-01-01

    Peter Taylor's Political geography: world-economy, nation-state and locality presents the work of Immanuel Wallerstein to geographers in a clear and accurate fashion, It reconnects political geography and political science, mapping Mackinder onto Spykman and Whittlesey onto Deutsch. It urges that human geography be a historical social science. Elsewhere, Taylor has teasingly averred "that all geography is historical geography", and has argued that the world-systems project s...

  5. Physical activity, screen time and the risk of subjective health complaints in school-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Eimear; Kelly, Colette; Molcho, Michal; Nic Gabhainn, Saoirse

    2017-03-01

    Internationally, subjective health complaints have become increasingly prevalent in children. Thus, a comprehensive understanding of the determinants of health complaints is needed to inform effective policies and strategies. This study explores if meeting physical activity and total screen time (TST) recommendations are associated with the risk of reporting health complaints weekly or more. The 2014 Irish Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study collected questionnaire data from 10,474 10-17year olds. Children reported how often they experienced eight health complaints as less than weekly or weekly or more. Children who met moderate-to-vigorous physical activity recommendations were active for 60min/day in the past seven days. Three types of screen based activity were categorised to reflect if children met TST recommendations of ≤2h/day. Poisson regression examined the association between meeting recommendations and the risk of health complaints. The prevalence of individual health complaints ranged from 20.4-44.3% in girls and from 10.1-35.4% in boys. Overall, 5.1% (4.5-5.6%) of girls and 8.7% (7.8-9.5%) of boys met both (physical activity and TST) recommendations, while two thirds of girls (67.3%, 66.1-68.5%) and over half of boys (55.0%, 53.5-56.6%) met neither recommendation. Not meeting TST recommendations was significantly associated with the risk of reporting health complaints while associations with physical activity were less apparent. Children who did not meet either recommendation had a significantly increased risk for six of the health complaints when compared to those who met both recommendations. As health complaints and poor lifestyle behaviours were common in children, population level measures are warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Geography in an Urban Age: Trials of High School Geography Project Materials in New Zealand Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, John; Slater, Frances

    1974-01-01

    The High School Geography Project was used and evaluated by 15-year old students in New Zealand. The program, highly innovative in approaches in teaching Geography, is found to be highly adapted to Australian needs in Geography instruction. (JR)

  7. Ghana Journal of Geography: Contact

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Principal Contact. Joseph A. Yaro Professor University of Ghana, Legon. Department of Geography and Resource Development. P. O. Box LG 59. Legon. Ghana. Alternative email address: jayaro@ug.edu.gh. Phone: +233244038915. Email: jayaro@ug.edu.gh ...

  8. Comparing Subjective With Objective Sleep Parameters Via Multisensory Actigraphy in German Physical Education Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kölling, Sarah; Endler, Stefan; Ferrauti, Alexander; Meyer, Tim; Kellmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This study compared subjective with objective sleep parameters among 72 physical education students. Furthermore, the study determined whether 24-hr recording differs from nighttime recording only. Participants wore the SenseWear Armband™ for three consecutive nights and kept a sleep log. Agreement rates ranged from moderate to low for sleep onset latency (ICC = 0.39 to 0.70) and wake after sleep onset (ICC = 0.22 to 0.59), while time in bed (ICC = 0.93 to 0.95) and total sleep time (ICC = 0.90 to 0.92) revealed strong agreement during this period. Comparing deviations between 24-hr wearing time (n = 24) and night-only application (n = 20) revealed no statistical difference (p > 0.05). As athletic populations have yet to be investigated for these purposes, this study provides useful indicators and practical implications for future studies.

  9. The geography of spatial synchrony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Jonathan A; Sheppard, Lawrence W; Anderson, Thomas L; Kastens, Jude H; Bjørnstad, Ottar N; Liebhold, Andrew M; Reuman, Daniel C

    2017-07-01

    Spatial synchrony, defined as correlated temporal fluctuations among populations, is a fundamental feature of population dynamics, but many aspects of synchrony remain poorly understood. Few studies have examined detailed geographical patterns of synchrony; instead most focus on how synchrony declines with increasing linear distance between locations, making the simplifying assumption that distance decay is isotropic. By synthesising and extending prior work, we show how geography of synchrony, a term which we use to refer to detailed spatial variation in patterns of synchrony, can be leveraged to understand ecological processes including identification of drivers of synchrony, a long-standing challenge. We focus on three main objectives: (1) showing conceptually and theoretically four mechanisms that can generate geographies of synchrony; (2) documenting complex and pronounced geographies of synchrony in two important study systems; and (3) demonstrating a variety of methods capable of revealing the geography of synchrony and, through it, underlying organism ecology. For example, we introduce a new type of network, the synchrony network, the structure of which provides ecological insight. By documenting the importance of geographies of synchrony, advancing conceptual frameworks, and demonstrating powerful methods, we aim to help elevate the geography of synchrony into a mainstream area of study and application. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  10. Joint physical custody and adolescents' subjective well-being: a personality × environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodermans, An Katrien; Matthijs, Koen

    2014-06-01

    Shared residence after divorce is rising in most Western countries and legally recommended by law in Belgium since 2006. Living with both parents after divorce is assumed to increase children's well-being, through a better parent-child relationship, but may also be stressful, as children live in 2 different family settings. In this study, we investigate whether the association between the residential arrangement of adolescents and 3 measures of subjective well-being (depressive feelings, life satisfaction, and self-esteem) is moderated by the Big Five personality factors. The sample is selected from the national representative Divorce in Flanders study and contains information about 506 children from divorced parents between 14- and 21-years-old. Our findings indicated a consistent pattern of interactions between conscientiousness and joint physical custody for 2 of the 3 subjective well-being indicators. The specific demands of this residential arrangement (making frequent transitions, living at 2 places, adjustment to 2 different lifestyles, etc.) may interfere with the nature of conscientious adolescents: being organized, ordered, and planful. Our results showed support for a Person × Environment interaction, and demonstrate the need for considering the individual characteristics of the child when settling postdivorce residential arrangements. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. The Moderating Role of Autonomous Motivation on the Relationship between Subjective Well-Being and Physical Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinko, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the moderator effects of autonomous motivation on the relationship between subjective well-being and physical health. Using a cluster sampling approach 486 students (403 female and 83 male students) were included in this study. Subjective well-being, physical health and autonomous motivation were determined by self-report measures. Data were analysed using hierarchical regression analysis and analysis of variance. The results show that high self-determination moderates the relationship between high subjective well-being and physical health. Accordingly, the best physical health was reported by participants who had high level of subjective well-being and whose behaviours were self-determined. Additional analyses have shown that the moderating effect of self-determination is based on the moderational impact of autonomous motives and not the controlling ones. Additionally, whether autonomous motivation moderates the relationship between components of subjective well-being and physical health was also tested. The findings have shown that autonomous motives moderate relationship between physical health and one component of well-being, positive affect. Consequently, a good physical health was found among participants with high positive affect and behaviours regulated by high degree of autonomous motives. Conclusion which can be drawn from these findings is that if an individual behaves autonomously then it can contribute to positive mind-body influences and support their own health.

  12. The Moderating Role of Autonomous Motivation on the Relationship between Subjective Well-Being and Physical Health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Marcinko

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the moderator effects of autonomous motivation on the relationship between subjective well-being and physical health. Using a cluster sampling approach 486 students (403 female and 83 male students were included in this study. Subjective well-being, physical health and autonomous motivation were determined by self-report measures. Data were analysed using hierarchical regression analysis and analysis of variance. The results show that high self-determination moderates the relationship between high subjective well-being and physical health. Accordingly, the best physical health was reported by participants who had high level of subjective well-being and whose behaviours were self-determined. Additional analyses have shown that the moderating effect of self-determination is based on the moderational impact of autonomous motives and not the controlling ones. Additionally, whether autonomous motivation moderates the relationship between components of subjective well-being and physical health was also tested. The findings have shown that autonomous motives moderate relationship between physical health and one component of well-being, positive affect. Consequently, a good physical health was found among participants with high positive affect and behaviours regulated by high degree of autonomous motives. Conclusion which can be drawn from these findings is that if an individual behaves autonomously then it can contribute to positive mind-body influences and support their own health.

  13. The Moderating Role of Autonomous Motivation on the Relationship between Subjective Well-Being and Physical Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinko, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the moderator effects of autonomous motivation on the relationship between subjective well-being and physical health. Using a cluster sampling approach 486 students (403 female and 83 male students) were included in this study. Subjective well-being, physical health and autonomous motivation were determined by self-report measures. Data were analysed using hierarchical regression analysis and analysis of variance. The results show that high self-determination moderates the relationship between high subjective well-being and physical health. Accordingly, the best physical health was reported by participants who had high level of subjective well-being and whose behaviours were self-determined. Additional analyses have shown that the moderating effect of self-determination is based on the moderational impact of autonomous motives and not the controlling ones. Additionally, whether autonomous motivation moderates the relationship between components of subjective well-being and physical health was also tested. The findings have shown that autonomous motives moderate relationship between physical health and one component of well-being, positive affect. Consequently, a good physical health was found among participants with high positive affect and behaviours regulated by high degree of autonomous motives. Conclusion which can be drawn from these findings is that if an individual behaves autonomously then it can contribute to positive mind—body influences and support their own health. PMID:25942449

  14. The Subjective Index for Physical and Social Outcome (SIPSO in Stroke: investigation of its subscale structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Steve

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Short and valid measures of the impact of a stroke on integration are required in health and social settings. The Subjective Index of Physical and Social Outcome (SIPSO is one such measure. However, there are questions whether scores can be summed into a total score or whether subscale scores should be calculated. This paper aims to provide clarity on the internal construct validity of the subscales and the total scale. Methods SIPSO data were collected as part of two parallel surveys of the met and unmet needs of 445 younger people (aged 18-65 with non-recent stroke (at least one year and living at home. Factor, Mokken and Rasch analysis were used. Results Factor analysis supported a two factor structure (explaining 68% of the variance as did the Mokken analysis (overall Loevinger coefficient 0.77 for the Physical Integration subscale; 0.51 for the Social Integration subscale. Both subscales fitted the Rasch model (P > 0.01 after adjusting for some observed differential item functioning. The 10-items together did not fit the Rasch model. Conclusions The SIPSO subscales are valid for use with stroke patients of working age but the total SIPSO is not. The conversion table can be used by clinicians and researchers to convert ordinal data to interval level prior to mathematical operations and other parametric procedures. Further work is required to explore the occurrence of bias by gender for some of the items.

  15. Physical and psychosocial disability in elderly subjects in relation to pain in the hip and/or knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman-Rock, M.; Odding, E.; Hofman, A.; Kraaimaat, F. W.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    To determine physical and psychosocial disability in subjects aged 55 to 74 years living in the community, in relation to pain in the hip and/or knee, and to explore the relationships between pain, physical and psychosocial disability, and selected background variables. A subsample from a community

  16. Physical and psychosocial disability in elderly subjects in relation to pain in the hip and/or knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman-Rock, M.; Odding, E.; Hofman, A.; Kraaimaat, F.W.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    1996-01-01

    Objective. To determine physical and psychosocial disability in subjects aged 55 to 74 years living in the community, in relation to pain in the hip and/or knee, and to explore the relationships between pain, physical and psychosocial disability, and selected background variables. Methods. A

  17. Factors Affecting the Enrolment of Students in Geography in Public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main objective of the study was to determine the relationship between availability and use of teaching/learning resources and enrolment in the subject. The study adopted a survey design. The target population consisted of Form III students, geography teachers and the head teachers of the thirty-one public secondary ...

  18. Countries: General, Electricity, Geography, Health, Literature: Children's, Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Web Feet, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Presents an annotated list of Web site educational resources kindergarten through eighth grade. The Web sites this month cover the following subjects: countries (general); electricity; geography; health; children's literature; and plants. Includes a list of "Calendar Connections" to Web site sources of information on Earth Day in April…

  19. The geography of urban agriculture: New trends and challenges

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Duží, Barbora; Frantál, Bohumil; Rojo, M. S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 3 (2017), s. 130-138 ISSN 1210-8812 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : urban agriculture * peri-urban agriculture * food production * urban farming * food gardening Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.149, year: 2016 http://www.geonika.cz/EN/research/ENMGRClanky/2017_3_DUZI.pdf

  20. Objectively measured sedentary behaviour and moderate and vigorous physical activity in different school subjects: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Mooses, Kerli; M?gi, Katrin; Riso, Eva-Maria; Kalma, Maarja; Kaasik, Priit; Kull, Merike

    2017-01-01

    Background Evidence shows the positive influence of moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and negative influence of sedentary time on health and academic achievement. Although schools can significantly contribute to overall physical activity, little is known about MVPA and sedentary behaviour in different school subjects in different grades. Methods Physical activity of 646 students from 18 schools (94 classes) and from three school stages (grades 1?9, aged 7?16) was measured with ac...

  1. Objectively measured sedentary behaviour and moderate and vigorous physical activity in different school subjects: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Kerli Mooses; Katrin Mägi; Eva-Maria Riso; Maarja Kalma; Priit Kaasik; Merike Kull

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Evidence shows the positive influence of moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and negative influence of sedentary time on health and academic achievement. Although schools can significantly contribute to overall physical activity, little is known about MVPA and sedentary behaviour in different school subjects in different grades. Methods Physical activity of 646 students from 18 schools (94 classes) and from three school stages (grades 1–9, aged 7–16) was measure...

  2. Economic Geography and Economic Development in Sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosker, Maarten; Garretsen, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africas (SSA) physical geography is often blamed for its poor economic performance. A countrys geographical location does, however, not only determine its agricultural conditions or disease environment. It also pins down a countrys relative position vis--vis other countries, affecting

  3. Young people’s world-mindedness and the global dimension in their geography education : a comparative study of upper secondary school students’ ideas in Finland, Germany and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Béneker, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/080258018; Tani, S.; Uphues, R.; van der Vaart, R.J.F.M.

    2013-01-01

    Geography is one of the most important school subjects for the development of global awareness and international understanding. Curricular concepts and pedagogical strategies for developing global awareness through geography abound. What is largely unknown, however, is howyoung peoplemake sense of

  4. CULTURAL HERITAGE IN STUDIES OF GEOGRAPHY AND TERRITORIAL PLANNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARÍA DOLORES PALAZÓN BOTELLA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available  The Geography and Territorial Planning Degree replaces, under the provisions of the European Higher Education Area and the recommendations of the “Libro Blanco: Título de Grado en Geografía y Ordenación del Territorio”, the Geography Bachelor’s Degree. This change not only affected its name, including territory and its planning, but it also developed into a regulation of its curricula, introducing new subjects that would train the future geographer in order to make him capable of confronting new challenges in their areas of work, where cultural heritage has become an additional option. 

  5. Study about the subject analysis in children’s literature published in Spain dealing with Physical Education and Sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Guimarães Botelho

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper has the aim to investigate the subject of children’s books published in Spain dealing with Physical Education and Sport. To develop the paper, the subject analysis technique was employed. The corpus of analysis, 60 children’s books collected, can be found in the doctoral thesis Physical Education and children’s literature: applications in the scholastic environment (Botelho, 2010. The results obtained in this paper indicated that: (a 30 subjects were identified in the 60 children’s books analysed; (b the subject football presented the great incidence, with 13,33% (eight books; (c the second subject with great incidence is games, with 10,00% (six children’s books; (d the subjects ballet and running had, each one, 8,33% (five books; (e the other subjects registered an inferior incidence of 8% (with 4 or less books; (f the majority of subjects presented an incidence of 1,67% (only one children’s book. The conclusions obtained in this article indicate that: (1 from the 30 subjects identified in the 60 children’s books, the subject football had the great incidence; (2 the majority of subjects presented only one incidence.

  6. Geography of European Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhitin Dmitry V.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, the role of international migration has increased dramatically in most European countries. The growth in migration has made some authors proclaim the beginning of a second Migration Period that could transform the social and cultural identity of Europe. The article presents an analysis of international migration geography in Europe in the last twenty-five years. The authors identify the main trends in migration, provide migration profiles of European countries, and propose a classification based on the recent changes in the migrant stock. Changes in the migrant stock (total emigration and immigration reflect the level of involvement in international and global processes. They can serve as an indicator of a country’s attractiveness for both foreigners and the country’s citizens. The study shows that European countries are increasingly split into ‘immigrant’ and ‘emigrant’ states. The authors describe spatial patterns of migration. The volume and localisation of migration flows in Europe are affected not only by cultural and historical circumstance, such as a colonial past or a common language. The scale of immigrant influx often does not depend on a donor country’s demographic potential or the level of its socio-economic development. The links between the place of origin and destination are often more complex than it might initially seem. The authors stress the importance of a differentiated immigration policy taking into account ethnic and cultural features of host societies.

  7. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin; Nolte, Adam C; Sturgeon, Gregory M; Segars, William P; Ghate, Sujata V; Nolte, Loren W; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y

    2015-07-01

    Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power-law descriptions of the phantom images

  8. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Nolte, Adam C. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Ghate, Sujata V. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Segars, William P. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Nolte, Loren W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. Methods: The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. Results: The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power

  9. Consolidating Pre-Service Physics Teachers' Subject Matter Knowledge Using Didactical Reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäntylä, T.; Nousiainen, M.

    2014-01-01

    In the Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, there are advanced physics courses designed for the needs of pre-service physics teachers. The starting point is that after introductory and intermediate physics courses, pre-service physics teachers know laws and definitions but the knowledge is quite fragmented and does not form coherent…

  10. The Case for Geography through CLIL: Exploring the Linguistic and Intercultural Potential in Thrace

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelly Zafeiriades; Georgia Kosma

    2017-01-01

    .... Driven from the theoretical principles underpinning CLIL, the article argues for Geography as the most appropriate subject area justified by the students' linguistic profile and the sociocultural context in Thrace...

  11. How Can Geography and Mobile Phones Contribute to Psychotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrás, Carlos; García, Yolanda; Aguilera, Adrián; Rocha, Álvaro

    2017-06-01

    Interdisciplinary relationships between Geography and Psychotherapy are an opportunity for innovation. Indeed, scientific works found on bibliographic databases and concerning this theme are scarce. Geographical sub-fields, such as the Geography of Emotions or Psychoanalytical Geography have started to emerge, theorizing about and interpreting feelings, emotions, moods, sufferings, of the chronically ill or diversified social groups and sites. But a less theoretical and more practical approach, in the sense of proposing, predicting and intervening, is lacking; as well as research into the possibilities offered by communication technologies and mobile phones. In the present work, we present the results of a review of the most relevant scientific works published internationally; we reflect on the contributions of Geography and mobile phones to psychosocial therapies and define the orientation and questions that should be posed in future research, from the point of view of geography and regarding psychotherapy. We conclude that the production of georeferenced data via mobile phones concerning the daily lives of people opens great possibilities for cognitive behavioural therapy and mental health. They allow for the development of personalized mood maps that locate the places where a person experiences greater or lesser stress on a daily basis; they allow for a cartography of emotions, a cognitive cartography of the places we access physically or through the Internet, of our feelings and psychosocial experiences. They open the door to the possibility of offering personalized psychotherapy treatments focusing on the ecological-environmental analysis of the places frequented by the person on a daily basis.

  12. Estimation of physical activity levels using cell phone questionnaires: a comparison with accelerometry for evaluation of between-subject and within-subject variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bexelius, Christin; Sandin, Sven; Trolle Lagerros, Ylva; Litton, Jan-Eric; Löf, Marie

    2011-09-25

    Physical activity promotes health and longevity. Further elaboration of the role of physical activity for human health in epidemiological studies on large samples requires accurate methods that are easy to use, cheap, and possible to repeat. The use of telecommunication technologies such as cell phones is highly interesting in this respect. In an earlier report, we showed that physical activity level (PAL) assessed using a cell phone procedure agreed well with corresponding estimates obtained using the doubly labeled water method. However, our earlier study indicated high within-subject variation in relation to between-subject variations in PAL using cell phones, but we could not assess if this was a true variation of PAL or an artifact of the cell phone technique. Our objective was to compare within- and between-subject variations in PAL by means of cell phones with corresponding estimates using an accelerometer. In addition, we compared the agreement of daily PAL values obtained using the cell phone questionnaire with corresponding data obtained using an accelerometer. PAL was measured both with the cell phone questionnaire and with a triaxial accelerometer daily during a 2-week study period in 21 healthy Swedish women (20 to 45 years of age and BMI from 17.7 kg/m² to 33.6 kg/m²). The results were evaluated by fitting linear mixed effect models and descriptive statistics and graphs. With the accelerometer, 57% (95% confidence interval [CI] 40%-66%) of the variation was within subjects, while with the cell phone, within-subject variation was 76% (95% CI 59%-83%). The day-to-day variations in PAL observed using the cell phone questions agreed well with the corresponding accelerometer results. Both the cell phone questionnaire and the accelerometer showed high within-subject variations. Furthermore, day-to-day variations in PAL within subjects assessed using the cell phone agreed well with corresponding accelerometer values. Consequently, our cell phone

  13. Novi pristopi pri proučevanju prsti v pokrajini = New approaches in Slovenian soil geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaž Repe

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In Slovenia, soil research of a given landscape is often neglected in physical geography studies. Despite the fact of an equivalent position of soil geography within the science system of Slovene geography. Reasons can be found in time consuming fi eld research, expensive laboratory analysis and soil data and also the lack of its own methodology. The drawbacks could be partially replaced by different approaches of research and especially to establish links with other physical elements of the environment. The use of easily accessible digital and cartographic data, basic field techniques, in combination with simple GIS tools and quantitative methods overcomes many of the financial or time constraints.

  14. The effect of sauna bathing on lipid profile in young, physically active, male subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Gryka

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate effects of Finnish sauna bathing on lipid profile in healthy, young men. Material and Methods: Sixteen male subjects (20–23 years were subjected to 10 sauna bathing sessions in a Finnish sauna every 1 or 2 days. The mean sauna temperature was 90±2°C, while humidity was 5–16%. Each session consisted of three 15-minute parts and a 2-minute cool-down between them. The following measurements were taken before and after the sauna sessions: body mass, heart rate, body skinfold thickness. The percentage fat content and then, the lean body mass were calculated. Total cholesterol, triacylglycerols, lipoprotein cholesterol LDL and HDL were measured in blood samples. Results: A statistically significant decrease of total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol was observed during 3 weeks of sauna treatment and in the week afterwards. A significant decline in triacylglycerols was found directly after the 1st and 24 h directly after the 10th sauna session. After the 10th sauna session the level of HDL cholesterol remained slightly increased, but this change was not statistically significant. A decrease in blood plasma volume was found directly after the 1st and the last sauna bathing session due to perspiration. An adaptive increase in blood plasma volume was also found after the series of 10 sauna sessions. Conclusions: Ten complete sauna bathing sessions in a Finnish sauna caused a reduction in total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol fraction levels during the sessions and a gradual return of these levels to the initial level during the 1st and the 2nd week after the experiment. A small, statistically insignificant increase in HDL-C level and a transient decline in triacylglycerols were observed after those sauna sessions. The positive effect of sauna on lipid profile is similar to the effect that can be obtained through a moderate-intensity physical exercise.

  15. The Construction of Physics as a Quintessentially Masculine Subject: Young People's Perceptions of Gender Issues in Access to Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Becky; Archer, Louise; Moote, Julie; DeWitt, Jen; MacLeod, Emily; Yeomans, Lucy

    2017-01-01

    The present article investigates explanations for gendered trends in Physics and Engineering access, reporting findings from a large-scale study funded by the UK Economic and Social Research Council and drawing primarily on data from interviews with 132 15-16 year-old adolescents and their parents. Survey results in our study and elsewhere show strong gender disparities in anticipated pursuit of Physics after completion of compulsory education. In order to explore the constructions of gender and Physics underlying these trends, we focus on qualitative interview data, applying Foucaultian analysis of discourse to investigate gendered narratives underpinning adolescents' and their parents' articulations. This analysis reveals three key discourses at work on the topic of women's access to Physics: (a) equality of opportunity, (b) continued gender discrimination in and around Physics, and (c) Physics as quintessentially masculine. We additionally identify five distinct narratives supporting the discourse of physics as masculine. These various discourses and narratives are interrogated, and their implications explored. We conclude that it is only by disrupting prevalent constructions of the Physical sciences as a masculine and "hard" domain will we increase the presence of women in the sector. Working with young people to analyse and deconstruct the discursive assumptions made in relation to gender and Physics, as well as further work to increase accessibility and broaden representation in Physics, may be fruitful ways to challenge these longstanding associations between Physics and masculinity.

  16. Replacing positivism in medical geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, David

    2005-06-01

    Revisiting debates about philosophical approaches in medical geography suggests that logical positivism may have been prematurely discarded. An analysis of authoritative texts in medical geography and their sources in human geography shows that logical positivism has been conflated with Comtean positivism, science, empiricism, quantification, science politics, scientism and so on, to produce the "standard version" of the all-purpose pejorative "positivism", which it is easy to dismiss as an evil. It is argued that the standard version fails to do justice to logical positivism, being constructed on sources which are at some distance from the logical positivist movement itself. An alternative approach is then developed, an historically and geographically situated interpretation of logical positivism as a deliberately and knowingly constructed oppositional epistemology within an oppressive and anti-scientific culture predicated on idealist intuitionism. Contrasting the standard version with this alternative reading of logical positivism suggests that much may have been lost in human, and thus, medical geography, by throwing out the logical positivist baby with the "positivism" bath water. It is concluded that continuing to unpack the standard version of logical positivism may identify benefits from a more nuanced appreciation of logical positivism, but it is premature to take these to the level of detailed impacts on the kinds of medical geographies that could be done or the ways of doing them.

  17. Urban Geography Evolving: Toward an Evolutionary Urban Geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weaver Russell C.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite growing interest in the application of evolutionary concepts to research questions in human geography, the literature is largely characterised by metaphors or analogies that are disconnected from a broader evolutionary theoretical framework. This paper takes initial steps toward developing such a framework for the subfield of urban geography by defining critical elements and relationships from Darwinian and multilevel selection theories. It then synthesises those components in an application to the issues of urban blight and disorder, to demonstrate how an evolutionary understanding of urban spatial phenomena - an “evolutionary urban geography” - can produce new insights for managing complex processes.

  18. Adding geography to the new economic geography : bridging the gap between theory and empirics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosker, E.M.; Brakman, S.; Garretsen, J.H.; Schramm, M.

    2010-01-01

    For reasons of analytical tractability, new economic geography (NEG) models treat geography in a very simple way, focusing on stylized 'unidimensional' geography structures (e.g. an equidistant or line economy). All the well-known NEG results are based on these simple geography structures. When

  19. Long-Term Monitoring of Physical Behavior Reveals Different Cardiac Responses to Physical Activity among Subjects with and without Chronic Neck Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Hallman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We determined the extent to which heart rate variability (HRV responses to daily physical activity differ between subjects with and without chronic neck pain. Method. Twenty-nine subjects (13 women with chronic neck pain and 27 age- and gender-matched healthy controls participated. Physical activity (accelerometry, HRV (heart rate monitor, and spatial location (Global Positioning System (GPS were recorded for 74 hours. GPS data were combined with a diary to identify periods of work and of leisure at home and elsewhere. Time- and frequency-domain HRV indices were calculated and stratified by period and activity type (lying/sitting, standing, or walking. ANCOVAs with multiple adjustments were used to disclose possible group differences in HRV. Results. The pain group showed a reduced HRV response to physical activity compared with controls (p=.001, according to the sympathetic-baroreceptor HRV index (LF/HF, ratio between low- and high-frequency power, even after adjustment for leisure time physical activity, work stress, sleep quality, mental health, and aerobic capacity (p=.02. The parasympathetic response to physical activity did not differ between groups. Conclusions. Relying on long-term monitoring of physical behavior and heart rate variability, we found an aberrant sympathetic-baroreceptor response to daily physical activity among subjects with chronic neck pain.

  20. A tale of two California droughts: Lessons amidst record warmth and dryness in a region of complex physical and human geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Daniel L.

    2015-11-01

    The state of California has experienced the worst drought in its historical record during 2012-2015. Adverse effects of this multiyear event have been far from uniformly distributed across the region, ranging from remarkably mild in most of California's densely populated coastal cities to very severe in more rural, agricultural, and wildfire-prone regions. This duality of impacts has created a tale of two very different California droughts—highlighting enhanced susceptibility to climate stresses at the environmental and socioeconomic margins of California. From a geophysical perspective, the persistence of related atmospheric anomalies has raised a number of questions regarding the drought's origins—including the role of anthropogenic climate change. Recent investigations underscore the importance of understanding the underlying physical causes of extremes in the climate system, and the present California drought represents an excellent case study for such endeavors. Meanwhile, a powerful El Niño event in the Pacific Ocean offers the simultaneous prospect of partial drought relief but also an increased risk of flooding during the 2015-2016 winter—a situation illustrative of the complex hydroclimatic risks California and other regions are likely to face in a warming world.

  1. A Conceptual Framework for Assessing the Impacts of GIS on the Motivation and Achievement in Geography among Underachieving Students of Smart School in Sabah, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Soon Singh Bikar; Kleeman, Grant; Van Bergen, Penny

    2013-01-01

    In 1988, the integrated secondary school curriculum was introduced as a continuation of the curriculum changes introduced in the primary school. These changes have impacted geography subject in the secondary school. Geography becomes a compulsory subject for lower secondary and elective subject at the upper secondary school level. As a result,…

  2. The New Zealand Geography Olympiad Maatangi Whenua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Andrea

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the New Zealand Geography Olympiad for 4th, 5th, and 6th form geography students, focusing on the schools round, the regional rounds, and the National Final, which produced a four member team that traveled to Toronto (Canada) to compete in the 4th National Geographic International Geography Olympiad. Discusses the International Olympiad.…

  3. Turkish Primary Students' Perceptions of Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senyurt, Secil

    2014-01-01

    This study provides an in-depth investigation of Turkish primary school students' perceptions of geography. Gender differences in students' perceptions of geography were investigated, including definitions of geography and its field of study. The findings showed that "landforms," "our geographical regions/Turkey,"…

  4. Ghana Journal of Geography: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The Ghana Journal of Geography publishes the best of original research and scholarship in physicaland human geography as well as research from other disciplines working on ideas of relevance to the Developing world. ... Joseph Mensah, Department of Geography, York University, (Canada); Prof.

  5. The All-Russian Geography Olympiad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, Alexey

    2007-01-01

    The history of intellectual geography competitions for secondary school students in Russia (by that time--USSR) began after World War II, when the Faculty of Geography of Lomonosov Moscow State University started to organise a yearly Geography Olympiad for Muscovite youngsters. Soon, organisers of this Olympiad decided to open it for secondary…

  6. Perspectives on Political Geography in AP® Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leib, Jonathan; Smothers-Marcello, Jody

    2016-01-01

    Two trends have remade the field of political geography over the past quarter-century. First, a revision of taken-for-granted concepts that amounted to "spatial determinism." Second, pioneering many new and emerging concepts such as political ecology. Both trends are important contributions to the evolving section of the AP Human…

  7. Building Geography's New Frontier: Implementing the Australian Curriculum Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnell, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of Geography as a compulsory learning area from Foundation year, such as Kindergarten, to Year 8 in Australia provides new opportunities for learning and teaching. Opportunities, in part, will be driven by challenges associated with the introduction of this learning area. Key challenges are about variability: in take-up of the…

  8. Perspectives on Cultural Geography in AP® Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Christopher; Johnston-Anumonwo, Ibipo

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of selected current concerns in cultural geography and the way it is taught. It includes coverage of cultural convergence and divergence, race and gender as culturally defined topics, and best teaching practices, including those related to analyzing controversial issues. Two important geographical models are laid…

  9. AXIOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF PHYSICS AND TECHNICAL SUBJECTS STUDY OF THE FUTURE ENGINEERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Slipukhina

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Formulation of the problem. Formation and development of the value orientations of the individual is the groundwork of education of young people at all educational levels. Necessity for axiologization of the process of education of the future engineers is strengthened by the specifics of technical and technological activity in the situation of the widespread use of ICT. Integration of value-motivational factors with the physics and technical disciplines study is an actual aspect in the development of modern higher technical education. Methods. The research uses a conceptual and comparative analysis of psycho-pedagogical and methodological literature, innovative experience and generalization of the authors’ long-term experience in pedagogical activity, as well as observation, conversations with teachers and students of higher educational institutions. Results. By the concretization of the functions, the essence of axiology in the system of higher education has been found out. The importance of transferring the motives of educational activity from the final result to the process and the determining role of motives for self-education has been established. The interrelations between the degree of value-motivational development of the personality and his individual characteristics are investigated. There is shown the essence of the phenomenon of attitude to study, its types have been determined. The research concretizes the place and importance of the most important professionally significant moral and ethical principles. Conclusions. Axiologization of higher technical education is a powerful means of forming the social, personal, subject and professional competence of the future engineer. Creation of the corresponding personally oriented didactic means is based on interdisciplinary methodological approaches in higher education.

  10. Effects of recreational soccer on physical fitness and health indices in sedentary healthy and unhealthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, A; Chamari, K; Slimani, M; Shephard, R J; Yousfi, N; Tabka, Z; Bouhlel, E

    2016-06-01

    Recreational soccer (RS) is becoming a popular alternative to the classical continuous exercise mode used for the improvement of cardiovascular and metabolic fitness in untrained people. The objective of this paper was to conduct a detailed systematic review of the literature, identifying the physiological responses to RS and the training effects of RS on aerobic fitness and health in untrained healthy individuals and clinical patients. PubMed, Google Scholar and ScienceDirect databases were searched using terms related to recreational soccer. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials (RCT) that assessed acute physiological responses to RS or the training effects of RS on physical fitness and health in sedentary, untrained subjects of any age or health status. All studies were assessed for methodological quality using the PEDro scale. Thirty-five articles met the inclusion criteria; seven examined the acute response to RS, and 28 assessed training effects. Clear evidence was found that RS had positive effects on many health-related indices and variables, including VO2max (gains of 7-16%), blood pressure (reductions of 6-13 mmHg), body composition (decreased fat mass and improved indices of bone health), and metabolic and cardiac function. These positive effects were observed in both healthy individuals and clinical patients, irrespective of age or sex. Although this review provides clear evidence of the positive effects of RS on health, most studies had limitations of methodology (an average PEDro score < 6). Furthermore, many of the training studies were from a small number of research groups. Future studies should be extended to other countries and institutions to ensure generality of the results. Regular RS training leads to significant cardiovascular and muscular adaptations and gains of health both in sedentary individuals and clinical patients at all ages, suggesting that RS is a potentially highly motivational method to enhance population health.

  11. Motivation toward Physical Exercise and Subjective Wellbeing: The Mediating Role of Trait Self-Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briki, Walid

    2016-01-01

    Motivation toward physical exercise (MPE) and trait self-control (TSC) were identified as key predictors of subjective wellbeing (SWB). However, there has not been any research designed to examine the mediating role of TSC in the relationship between MPE and SWB. The present study utilizes self-determination theory, control-process theory of self-regulation, and theory of multiple pathways of TSC in order to examine whether TSC mediates the relationships of autonomous MPE (A-MPE), controlled MPE (C-MPE), and impersonal MPE (NO-MPE) with SWB using structural equation modeling (XLSTAT PLS). Three hundred seventeen adult American individuals (Mage = 32.97, SDage = 11.30), who reported to be regular exercisers, voluntarily answered questionnaires assessing MPE, TSC, and SWB. Correlational analyses revealed positive relationships between A-MPE, TSC, and SWB, and negative relationships of C-MPE and NO-MPE with TSC and SWB. Mediation analyses revealed that TSC mediated the relationships of A-MPE (partial mediation) and C-MPE (full mediation) with SWB, but did not mediate the relationship between NO-MPE and SWB. The estimates of the quality of the hypothesized model were acceptable (outer model GoF = 0.935; absolute GoF = 0.330; relative GoF = 0.942; inner model GoF = 1.008; R2 = 36.947%). Finally, this study supports the view that MPE can influence SWB through TSC, and incites to pursue the examination of the relationships between self-determined motivation, self-regulation mechanisms, and health-related outcomes. PMID:27761126

  12. Motivation toward Physical Exercise and Subjective Wellbeing: The Mediating Role of Trait Self-Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briki, Walid

    2016-01-01

    Motivation toward physical exercise (MPE) and trait self-control (TSC) were identified as key predictors of subjective wellbeing (SWB). However, there has not been any research designed to examine the mediating role of TSC in the relationship between MPE and SWB. The present study utilizes self-determination theory, control-process theory of self-regulation, and theory of multiple pathways of TSC in order to examine whether TSC mediates the relationships of autonomous MPE (A-MPE), controlled MPE (C-MPE), and impersonal MPE (NO-MPE) with SWB using structural equation modeling (XLSTAT PLS). Three hundred seventeen adult American individuals (Mage = 32.97, SDage = 11.30), who reported to be regular exercisers, voluntarily answered questionnaires assessing MPE, TSC, and SWB. Correlational analyses revealed positive relationships between A-MPE, TSC, and SWB, and negative relationships of C-MPE and NO-MPE with TSC and SWB. Mediation analyses revealed that TSC mediated the relationships of A-MPE (partial mediation) and C-MPE (full mediation) with SWB, but did not mediate the relationship between NO-MPE and SWB. The estimates of the quality of the hypothesized model were acceptable (outer model GoF = 0.935; absolute GoF = 0.330; relative GoF = 0.942; inner model GoF = 1.008; R2 = 36.947%). Finally, this study supports the view that MPE can influence SWB through TSC, and incites to pursue the examination of the relationships between self-determined motivation, self-regulation mechanisms, and health-related outcomes.

  13. Motivation toward Physical Exercise and Subjective Wellbeing: The Mediating Role of Trait Self-Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Briki

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Motivation toward physical exercise (MPE and trait self-control (TSC were identified as key predictors of subjective wellbeing (SWB. However, there has not been any research designed to examine the mediating role of TSC in the relationship between MPE and SWB. The present study utilizes self-determination theory, control-process theory of self-regulation, and theory of multiple pathways of TSC in order to examine whether TSC mediates the relationships of autonomous MPE (A-MPE, controlled MPE (C-MPE, and impersonal MPE (NO-MPE with SWB using structural equation modeling (XLSTAT PLS. Three hundred seventeen adult American individuals (Mage = 32.97, SDage = 11.30, who reported to be regular exercisers, voluntarily answered questionnaires assessing MPE, TSC, and SWB. Correlational analyses revealed positive relationships between A-MPE, TSC, and SWB, and negative relationships of C-MPE and NO-MPE with TSC and SWB. Mediation analyses revealed that TSC mediated the relationships of A-MPE (partial mediation and C-MPE (full mediation with SWB, but did not mediate the relationship between NO-MPE and SWB. The estimates of the quality of the hypothesized model were acceptable (outer model GoF = .935; absolute GoF = .330; relative GoF = .942; inner model GoF = 1.008; R2 = 36.947%. Finally, this study supports the view that MPE can influence SWB through TSC, and incites to pursue the examination of the relationships between self-determined motivation, self-regulation mechanisms, and health-related outcomes.

  14. Associations of subjective vitality with DNA damage, cardiovascular risk factors and physical performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; Keijzers, Guido; Hansen, A-M

    2015-01-01

    To examine associations of DNA damage, cardiovascular risk factors and physical performance with vitality, in middle-aged men. We also sought to elucidate underlying factors of physical performance by comparing physical performance parameters to DNA damage parameters and cardiovascular risk factors....

  15. BODY BUILD AND BODY COMPOSITION VS. PHYSICAL CAPACITY IN YOUNG JUDO CONTESTANTS COMPARED TO UNTRAINED SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lech

    2011-11-01

    .05, and fat mass index (-0.67, p<0.01 were observed. Heart rate at the anaerobic threshold (%max showed positive relationships with fat-free mass index (r=0.52, p<0.05. In the untrained subjects, only a negative relationship between BM and TOPP was observed (r=-0.48, p<0.05. These findings confirm interrelations between structural and functional parameters, developed through many years of training. Although physical capacity might affect the course of a fight, it should be considered....

  16. Kinesiology taping does not alter shoulder strength, shoulder proprioception, or scapular kinematics in healthy, physically active subjects and subjects with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Karen A; Akins, Jonathan S; Varnell, Michelle; Abt, John; Lovalekar, Mita; Lephart, Scott; Sell, Timothy C

    2017-03-01

    To examine the effect of kinesiology tape (KT) on shoulder strength, proprioception, and scapular kinematics in healthy and Subacromial Impingement Syndrome (SAIS) subjects. Placebo-controlled quasi-experimental study. Research laboratory. A total of 30 physically active subjects participated. Ten healthy subjects with no previous history of shoulder pathology received KT on the dominant shoulder. Twenty subjects with shoulder pain for a minimum of two weeks and presenting with clinical signs of impingement were allotted to receive KT (n = 10) or placebo taping (PT, n = 10) on the involved shoulder. All participants were tested pre- and post-application. Shoulder internal/external rotation (IR/ER) strength was assessed with isokinetic dynamometry (average peak torque/body weight). Shoulder IR/ER proprioception was assessed through threshold to detect passive motion (mean absolute error in degrees). Scapular position at 90° and 120° of shoulder abduction during arm raising/lowering were assessed using a 3D motion analysis system. No significant within group or between group differences were demonstrated for any measure. Taping does not appear to aid/impair shoulder strength, shoulder proprioception, or scapular kinematics. Future research should explore if the effects of KT are time-dependent and similar in other pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Primary teacher educators' perception of desired and attached pedagogical content knowledge in geography education in primary teacher training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankman, M.C.M.; van der Schee, J.A.; Volman, M.; van den Boogaard, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a study conducted among primary geography teacher educators. The research examines the perceptions of educators of primary teacher students' desired and achieved levels of substantial knowledge, syntactic knowledge, and beliefs about the subject of geography. The

  18. Primary Teacher Educators' Perception of Desired and Achieved Pedagogical Content Knowledge in Geography Education in Primary Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankman, Marian; van der Schee, Joop; Volman, Monique; Boogaard, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a study conducted among primary geography teacher educators. The research examines the perceptions of educators of primary teacher students' desired and achieved levels of substantial knowledge, syntactic knowledge, and beliefs about the subject of geography. The findings indicate that primary teacher educators…

  19. Tracing Sustainability: Education for Sustainable Development in the Lower Secondary Geography Curricula of Germany, Romania, and Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagoly-Simó, Péter

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) has received increasing attention. Due to the close affinity that geography as a school subject shares with both theoretical constructs and methodologies of ESD, geography has assumed a key position in the implementation of ESD in formal education. Still, little attention has so…

  20. Primary teacher educators' perception of desired and achieved pedagogical content knowledge in geography education in primary teacher training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankman, M.; Schee, J.; Volman, M.; Boogaard, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a study conducted among primary geography teacher educators. The research examines the perceptions of educators of primary teacher students’ desired and achieved levels of substantial knowledge, syntactic knowledge, and beliefs about the subject of geography. The

  1. Primary teacher educators’ perception of desired and achieved pedagogical content knowledge in geography education in primary teacher training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joop van der Schee; Drs Marian Blankman; dr Marianne Boogaard; Monique Volman

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a study conducted among primary geography teacher educators. The research examines the perceptions of educators of primary teacher students’ desired and achieved levels of substantial knowledge, syntactic knowledge, and beliefs about the subject of geography. The

  2. Geospatial Technology in Geography Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muniz Solari, Osvaldo; Demirci, A.; van der Schee, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    The book is presented as an important starting point for new research in Geography Education (GE) related to the use and application of geospatial technologies (GSTs). For this purpose, the selection of topics was based on central ideas to GE in its relationship with GSTs. The process of geospatial

  3. Department of Geography and Environment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2017-01-30

    Jan 30, 2017 ... Department of Geography and Environmental, Management, University of Ilorin, Nigeria. Abstract. This study examines the perilous impact of leachate s foray on Kubwa-Abu a s environment; with the purpose to enlightening city s inhabitants from dumping refuse indiscriminately on unauthorized sites which ...

  4. Ghana Journal of Geography: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Submission to the Ghana Journal of Geography. Papers submitted to the journal should follow the guidelines set out below. All correspondence between editor and author is performed by e-mail, and paper copies are not required at all stages. A manuscript must be submitted electronically as an email ...

  5. The Economic Geography of Offshoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørberg Jensen, Peter D.; Pedersen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    We draw from the literature on economic geography and from the thematic offshoring literature, and propose three hypotheses that rest on the assumption that the choice of offshoring location is based on the fit between the attributes of different destinations and the attributes of the offshored...

  6. Teaching Energy Geography? It's Complicated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The premise of this essay is that energy geographies are complicated, and this in itself presents some pedagogical difficulties. As someone who wants students to critically examine and confront the complexity of energy systems, it can be frustrating when students react to demonstrate frustration, apathy, or even confusion. In what follows, I will…

  7. Department of Geography and Regi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2015-01-16

    Jan 16, 2015 ... Department of Geography and Regional Planning, Faculty of Social and Management. Sciences, Olabisi Onabanjo University Ago-Iwoye, Ogun State, Nigeria. Email: rajbasholaniyi@yahoo.co.uk. Abstract. The study examines the use of auto-rickshaw (three - wheeled cycle) as poverty alleviation scheme in ...

  8. The geography of Chinese science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, David Emanual; Gunessee, Saileshsingh; Matthiessen, Christian Wichmann

    2014-01-01

    . The geography of Chinese science is thus not only monocentric as regards overall scientific output, but also exhibits unusually hierarchical collaboration patterns. Unlike in Europe and North America, national and regional capitals are becoming ever more important as scientific coordination centers....

  9. Writing in the Geography Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchell, Dick; Elder, Dana

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the concept of writing across the curriculum and how it is used in a university level geography class. Suggests that writing as a resource for learning benefits students by encouraging critical thinking, the organization of bodies of information, and increased memory. Includes specific reading and writing assignments. (DK)

  10. The Geography of Virtual Questioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mon, Lorri; Bishop, Bradley Wade; McClure, Charles R.; McGilvray, Jessica; Most, Linda; Milas, Theodore Patrick; Snead, John T.

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the geography of virtual questioning by using geographic information systems to study activity within the Florida Electronic Library "Ask a Librarian" collaborative chat service. Researchers mapped participating libraries throughout the state of Florida that served as virtual "entry portals" for users as…

  11. Innovation, Entrepreneurship, Geography and Growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCann, P.; Oxley, L.

    This paper sets the contributions to this special issue in the context of a large and rapidly growing literature. It argues that although our understanding of the relationships between entrepreneurship, innovation, geography and economic growth is much clearer than in the past, there remains much

  12. Subjective well-being in Swedish active seniors and its relationship with physical activity and commonly available biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsson LA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Lovisa A Olsson,1,2 Anita Hurtig-Wennlöf,2 Torbjörn K Nilsson3 1Department of Laboratory Medicine/Clinical Chemistry, Örebro University Hospital, 2School of Health and Medical Science, Örebro University, Örebro; 3Department of Medical Biosciences/Clinical Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden Background: Physical activity is claimed to be related to well-being and to a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. Therefore, the possible associations of well-being with physical activity and biomarkers of somatic health were studied in a sample of Swedish active seniors to determine the strength of these associations. Methods: Three hundred and eighty-nine community-dwelling senior citizens (127 men and 262 women of mean age 74±5 years were recruited for this cross-sectional population study. Serum samples were analyzed for lipoproteins and markers of inflammation. The Psychological General Well-Being (PGWB index was used to measure subjective well-being. Physical activity was assessed by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire modified for the elderly. Results: More than 50% of men and women rated their physical activity as high; in the women, there was a significant difference between the age groups (younger and older than the median age [median =74.1 years], respectively. The mean PGWB index indicates a high degree of subjective well-being in this group of Swedish seniors. Of the PGWB subdimensions, general health had the strongest positive relationship with physical activity (r2=5.4%. for the subdimensions of depressed mood, positive well-being, vitality, and PGWB index, physical activity had an r2 ≤4%, while the contributions of sex, age, and biomarkers were minor. Conclusion: We have estimated the contribution of physical activity to the variance of subjective well-being in active seniors. Physical activity appears to play a greater role as a determinant of subjective well-being than do biomarkers of somatic health

  13. Geography teachers PCK according to climate change - match between beliefs and reality?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Søren Witzel; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    The aim of this study is to uncover differences or similarities between Geography teachers’ own perception of their Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) in relation to teaching weather formation and climate change and how they actually perform “in-action” in the lower secondary school. The concept...... of Pedagogical Content Knowledge is understood as an amalgam of Subject Matter Knowledge (SMK), Pedagogical Knowledge (PK) and Knowledge of Context (KofC). There will be presented results from interviews and observations from eight lower secondary Geography teachers and from a questionnaire send to Geography...

  14. Physical activity of subjects aged 50-64 years involved in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haftenberger, M; Schuit, A.J.; Tormo, M J; Boeing, H; Wareham, N; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; Kumle, M; Hjartåker, A; Chirlaque, M D; Ardanaz, E; Andren, C; Lindahl, B; Peeters, P H M; Allen, N E; Overvad, K; Tjønneland, A; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Linseisen, J; Bergmann, M M; Trichopoulou, A; Lagiou, P; Salvini, S; Panico, S; Riboli, E; Ferrari, P; Slimani, N

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe physical activity of participants in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Design: A cross-sectional analysis of baseline data of a European prospective cohort study. Subjects: This analysis was restricted to participants in the age group

  15. Child Physical Abuse and the Related PTSD in Taiwan: The Role of Chinese Cultural Background and Victims' Subjective Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chia-Ying; Su, Yi-Jen; Wu, Ho-Mao; Chen, Sue-Huei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate child physical abuse (CPA) while taking into account the more rigorous definitions of CPA in the Chinese societies. The prevalence of CPA and CPA-related PTSD were estimated, together with the examination of peri-traumatic subjective reactions and their impacts on PTSD. Methods: In a Taiwanese sample of…

  16. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 73 - Physical Protection of Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit, Training Program Subject Schedule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Physical Protection of Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit... Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit, Training Program Subject Schedule Pursuant to the provision of § 73.37 of... reactor fuel is required to assure that individuals used as shipment escorts have completed a training...

  17. Physical activity, subjective sleep quality and time in bed do not vary by moon phase in German adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Maia P; Standl, Marie; Schulz, Holger; Heinrich, Joachim

    2017-06-01

    Lunar periodicity in human biology and behaviour, particularly sleep, has been reported. However, estimated relationships vary in direction (more or less sleep with full moon) if they exist at all, and studies tend to be so small that there is potential for confounding by weekly or monthly cycles. Lunar variation in physical activity has been posited as a driver of this relationship, but is likewise not well studied. We explore the association between lunar cycle, sleep and physical activity in a population-based sample of 1411 Germans age 14-17 years (46% male). Physical activity (daily minutes moderate-to-vigorous activity) was objectively assessed by accelerometry for a total of 8832 days between 2011 and 2014. At the same time, time in bed (h) and subjective sleep quality (1-6) were diaried each morning. In models corrected for confounding, we found that lunar phase was not significantly associated with physical activity, subjective sleep quality or time in bed in either sex, regardless of season. Observed relationships varied randomly in direction between models, suggesting artefact. Thus, this large, objectively-measured and well-controlled population of adolescents displayed no lunar periodicity in objective physical activity, subjective sleep quality or time in bed. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  18. The integration of the contents of the subject Physics-Chemistry (I in Biology-Chemistry specialty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sc. Luis AZCUY LORENZ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This work is the result of a research task developed in the Natural Sciences Education Department during 2013-2014 academic year, and it emerged from the necessity of solving some insufficiencies in the use of the real potentialities offered by the content of the subject Physics-Chemistry (I, that is part of the curriculum of the Biology-Chemistry career. Its main objective is to offer a set of exercises to contribute to achieve the integration of contents from the subject Physics-chemistry (I in the mentioned career at «Ignacio Agramonte Loynaz» University of Camaguey. The exercises proposed are characterized for being related to the real practice and to other subjects of the career. Their implementation through review lessons, partial tests and final evaluations during the formative experiment made possible a better academic result in the learners overall performance.

  19. α-Synuclein Aggregated with Tau and β-Amyloid in Human Platelets from Healthy Subjects: Correlation with Physical Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Daniele

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The loss of protein homeostasis that has been associated with aging leads to altered levels and conformational instability of proteins, which tend to form toxic aggregates. In particular, brain aging presents characteristic patterns of misfolded oligomers, primarily constituted of β-amyloid (Aβ, tau, and α-synuclein (α-syn, which can accumulate in neuronal membranes or extracellular compartments. Such aging-related proteins can also reach peripheral compartments, thus suggesting the possibility to monitor their accumulation in more accessible fluids. In this respect, we have demonstrated that α-syn forms detectable hetero-aggregates with Aβ or tau in red blood cells (RBCs of healthy subjects. In particular, α-syn levels and its heteromeric interactions are modulated by plasma antioxidant capability (AOC, which increases in turn with physical activity. In order to understand if a specific distribution of misfolded proteins can occur in other blood cells, a cohort of human subjects was enrolled to establish a correlation among AOC, the level of physical exercise and the concentrations of aging-related proteins in platelets. The healthy subjects were divided depending on their level of physical exercise (i.e., athletes and sedentary subjects and their age (young and older subjects. Herein, aging-related proteins (i.e., α-syn, tau and Aβ were confirmed to be present in human platelets. Among such proteins, platelet tau concentration was demonstrated to decrease in athletes, while α-syn and Aβ did not correlate with physical exercise. For the first time, α-syn was shown to directly interact with Aβ and tau in platelets, forming detectable hetero-complexes. Interestingly, α-syn interaction with tau was inversely related to plasma AOC and to the level of physical activity. These results suggested that α-syn heterocomplexes, particularly with tau, could represent novel indicators to monitor aging-related proteins in platelets.

  20. RCT - subjective physical performance and quality of life after a 6-month programmed sports therapy (PST) in patients with haemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkel, B; Von Mackensen, S; Hilberg, T

    2017-01-01

    Musculoskeletal bleedings lead to limitations in the locomotor system and consequently, in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with haemophilia (PwH). Sports therapy is increasingly recommended to improve their physical performance. Until today, randomised controlled studies investigating changes in physical performance in PwH are rare. This study investigates the impact of programmed sports therapy on the subjective physical performance and the HRQoL in PwH. A randomised controlled trial (RCT) was conducted with a training intervention for over 6 months. For this purpose, 64 PwH with moderate (n = 5) or severe (n = 59) haemophilia A (n = 57) or B (n = 7) were randomised into two groups - intervention (IG) or control group (CG). The HRQoL was assessed with the SF-36 questionnaire and the disease-specific Haem-A-QoL before and after the intervention. The subjective physical performance was tested by the HEP-Test-Q. After the 6-month training intervention, PwH in the IG subjectively reported significant better 'endurance' (P = 0.000) in the HEP-Test-Q compared to the CG. In the SF-36, a significant difference in the domains 'general health perceptions' (P = 0.005) and 'mental health' (P = 0.001) was detected. The haemophilia-specific HRQoL questionnaire showed a significant improvement in the dimensions 'feeling' (P = 0.049), 'work' (P = 0.046) and 'family' (P = 0.040). In the first RCT evaluating the impact of a 6-month training intervention on the subjective perception of PwH, an increase in subjective physical performance and some domains of HRQoL was demonstrated in the IG. Specific sports therapy should be included into the comprehensive treatment under supervision and monitoring by experienced staff. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Pre-Service Physical Education Teachers' Perceptions of Subject Knowledge: Augmenting Learning to Teach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Frank; Waring, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores pre-service teachers' perceptions of subject knowledge as they learn to teach during a one-year postgraduate certificate in education (PGCE) programme in England. The article examines the impact of pre-service teachers' previous experiences and individual subject knowledge profiles on their development during their PGCE course.…

  2. Teaching Body and Spatial Awareness in Elementary Physical Education Using Integration of Core Content Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollett, Nikki; Sluder, J. Brandon; Taunton, Sally; Howard-Shaughnessy, Candice

    2016-01-01

    Studies have found that movement can have a positive effect on the linguistic and intellectual capabilities of the brain, proving that physical fitness is related to academic performance. By allowing elementary students to move around and be involved in physical activity at school, the brain is able to make stronger connections with the material…

  3. Formation of student personality’s physical culture as subject of professional functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otravenko O.V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: generalization of experience of higher educational establishments’ future specialists’ professional training, oriented on formation of students’ personalities’ physical culture. Material: we questioned students (n=50 and institute teachers (n=30. Results: it was found that for increase of future specialists’ professional fitness effectiveness it was important to consider orientation of educational process on formation of student personality’s physical culture. Besides, it was noticed that professional fitness of future specialists is greatly influenced by implementation of modern technologies of formation of students’ physical culture in educational-learning process. Physical education means, oriented on aesthetic are of great health related and recreation significance. Conclusions: educational process shall be oriented on support of active motor functioning, motivation for physical exercises’ and healthy life style practicing.

  4. Curriculum Development in New Zealand: New Directions, Opportunities and Challenges for School Geography

    OpenAIRE

    FASTIER, Murray

    2013-01-01

    Geography as a senior subject in New Zealand secondary schools has been long overdue for curriculum change. The 2007 New Zealand Curriculum (NZC) currently being implemented at the senior school level provides geography with the mechanisms for positive curriculum change, giving teachers the opportunity to refocus on existing teaching, learning and assessment practices. Important paradigm shifts include devolving curriculum making to schools, embracing student ownership of learning, emphasizin...

  5. Changes in depression status in low socioeconomic perinatal subjects in rural India after supervised physical exercise: A randomized controlled study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Gopal Nambi Subash Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Perinatal depression is a major public health problem, affecting up to a quarter of all pregnant women in rural Asean countries and often leads to psychologic symptoms, lower quality of life, and higher health care costs. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of supervised physical exercise on depression level of perinatal subjects. Subjects/Intervention: 60 subjects who fulfill the selection criteria were randomly assigned to exercise (Group-1, n=30) and control group (Group-2, n=30). Participants completed general screening form and Physical health questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) before their intervention and again 4 weeks and 8 weeks later. Group-1 underwent aerobic training with 60-65% maximum heart rate and Group-2 was prescribed with handouts for 4 weeks. Statistics: Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was use to analyze group differences over time while controlling for baseline differences. Results: Demographic and the baseline values show homogenous population (P>0.05). Patients in both groups experienced significant reduction in depression level. Group A showed reduction of 91.70% (P=0.00) as compared to Group B 69.01% (P=0.00). Conclusion: These results suggest that supervised physical exercise provides better improvement in depression status in perinatal subjects than providing handouts alone. PMID:26816432

  6. Use of music during physical therapy intervention for an infant with Erb's palsy: a single-subject design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahlin, Mary; Cech, Donna; Rheault, Wendy; Stoecker, Judith

    2007-01-01

    Evidence supporting the use of music during pediatric physical therapy intervention is limited. The purpose of this single-subject design was to evaluate the effects of music on patient progress, the amount of crying during therapy, and parent satisfaction with physical therapy services. The subject was an infant girl with Erb's palsy who participated in this study from age 8 months to age 20 months. An A-B-A withdrawal single-subject design was used. The patient's progress was assessed by using the T.I.M.E. The amount of crying was documented in the Crying Log. A parent satisfaction questionnaire was administered three times over the course of the study. The subject's progress in the music intervention period increased on three of five primary subtests of the T.I.M.E. The amount of crying decreased and parent satisfaction increased when music was played during therapy. Music may be used by pediatric physical therapists to decrease the patient's crying, increase parent satisfaction, and possibly to increase the child's rate of progress. Further research conducted with a group of infants and toddlers may help generalize these findings to a wider patient population.

  7. Subjective health complaints in patients with chronic Whiplash Associated Disorders (WAD. Relationships with physical, psychological, and collision associated factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Ihlebæk

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available  Aims: Investigate subjective health complaints (SHC in chronic whiplash associated disorder (WAD, grade I & II patients, and to identify physical, psychological, and collision associated factors that might be associated with high levels of comorbidity. Method: During the years 2000-2002 171 chronic WAD patients filled in questionnaires and underwent physical examination. The prevalence of SHC was recorded and compared with a representative sample of the Norwegian population (n=1014. Results: The chronic WAD patients reported higher number of subjective health complaints (median: 9 than the general population (median: 5. They showed significantly higher risk of reporting all musculoskeletal complaints, palpitation, heat flushes, sleep problems, tiredness, dizziness, anxiety, depression, breathing difficulties, chest pain, coughing, heartburn, gas discomfort, and obstipation. The patients with the highest level of comorbid subjective health complaints also reported more function loss, reading difficulties, poorer quality of life, higher psychological distress, higher use of medication, and less optimism about their situation. There were no differences however, in any collision factors or physical meassures recorded by physiotherapists between the high, medium and low comorbidity groups. Conclusion: The high comorbidity of other complaints, the strong relationships between degree of comorbidity and psychological factors, and the lack of relationships between degree of comorbidity and collision factors and physical tests, suggest that chronic WAD is best understood as a syndrome and not simply as a neck injury. Sensitization is suggested as a possible psychobiological mechanism

  8. Formation of student personality’s physical culture as subject of professional functioning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Otravenko O.V

    2015-01-01

    ...: it was found that for increase of future specialists’ professional fitness effectiveness it was important to consider orientation of educational process on formation of student personality’s physical culture...

  9. Joint physical custody, turning to parents for emotional support, and subjective health: A study of adolescents in Stockholm, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Låftman, Sara Brolin; Bergström, Malin; Modin, Bitte; Östberg, Viveca

    2014-07-01

    Among children with separated parents, the arrangement of joint physical custody, i.e. children living equally much in both parents' homes, has increased substantially during the last decades in Sweden. To date, empirical research on the living conditions of this group is limited. This study analyses family type differences in turning to parents for emotional support and in subjective health among adolescents. The focus of the study is adolescents in joint physical custody, who are compared with those living with two original parents in the same household; those living (only) in a single-parent household; and those living (only) in a reconstituted family. The data come from the Stockholm School Survey of 2004, a total population survey of students in grade 9 (15-16 years) in Stockholm (n=8,840). Ordinary least squares (OLS) regressions were conducted. Turning to both parents about problems is most commonly reported by adolescents in intact families, followed by those in joint physical custody. Adolescents in non-traditional family types report worse subjective health than adolescents in intact families, but the difference is smaller for those in joint physical custody than for those living with a single parent. The slightly poorer health of adolescents in joint physical custody than those in intact families is not explained by their lower use of parents as a source of emotional support. The study suggests that joint physical custody is associated with a higher inclination to use parents as a source of emotional support and better subjective health than other post-divorce family types. © 2014 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  10. ‘Tourism geographies are moving out’ : A comment on the current state of institutional geographies of tourism geographies

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Dieter K.

    2014-01-01

    Tourism geographies are a vibrant field of scientific inquiry. Despite this, it is obvious that the sub-disciplineis met with disinterest within geography departments, at the same time as tourism geographers are welcomedand acknowledged within the wider tourism community. This article offers some reflections and an institutionalperspective on the tourism–geography nexus. This is accomplished by reviewing the institutional andgeographical affiliations of authors in the journal Tourism Geograph...

  11. USING LITERATURE IN GEOGRAPHY LESSONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROXANA HOBAI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Including in a novel information about relief, climate, vegetation, fauna and various aspects of socio-economic life can make literature a real source of geographical information. Using realistic literary works in Geography lessons has multiple benefits, which are not limited only to geographical knowledge. In this paper there are some fragments from literature, suggestions of activities about how to integrate the fragments during Geography lessons and the results of these activities. The activities are from fifth to twelfth grade, passing through a first example of water pollution resulting from a Hercules labour, through the lyricism of the aurora borealis description, through the dramatic life of a refugee from Darfur, through the Dobrudgea winter landscape, through the grey urban landscape of Bucharest in the 90s and so on. Students were put into learning situations that stimulated their creativity, developed communication competencies and enriched their general knowledge.

  12. Geographies of High Frequency Trading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the geographies of high frequency trading. Today shares shift hands within micro seconds, giving rise to a form of financial geographies termed algorithmic capitalism. This notion refers to the different spatio-temporalities produced by high frequency trading, under...... the valuation of time. As high frequency trading accelerates financial markets, the paper examines the spatio-temporalities of automated trading by the ways in which the speed of knowledge exploitation in financial markets is not only of interest, but also the expansion between different temporalities....... The paper demonstrates how the intensification of time-space compression produces radical new dynamics in the financial market and develops information rent in HFT as convertible to a time rent and a spatio-temporal rent. The final section discusses whether high frequency trading only responds to crises...

  13. Leisure-Time Physical Inactivity Associated with Vascular Depression or Apathy in Community-Dwelling Elderly Subjects: The Sefuri Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hiroshi; Takashima, Yuki; Araki, Yuko; Uchino, Akira; Yuzuriha, Takefumi; Hashimoto, Manabu

    2015-11-01

    Although physical inactivity is a major public health problem, the causative factors for physical inactivity per se are poorly understood. To address this issue, we investigated the relationship between deep white matter lesions (DWMLs) on magnetic resonance imaging, apathy, and physical activities using structural equation modeling (SEM). We examined 317 community-dwelling elderly subjects (137 men and 180 women with a mean age of 64.5 years) without dementia or clinically apparent depression. Physical activity was assessed with a questionnaire consisting of 3 components (leisure-time, work, and sport activities). The mean score from the apathy scale (a visual analogue version of Starkstein's apathy scale) of the Grades 2-3 DWML group was 420 (95% confidence interval [CI] 379-461), which was lower (more apathetic) than the Grade 0 DWML group score of 478 (95% CI 463-492) after adjustment for education as a covariate. SEM showed that the direct paths from DWMLs or education to apathy were significant, and the direct path from apathy to leisure-time activity was highly significant (β = .25, P effects on leisure-time physical activity in community-dwelling elderly subjects. Even a minor level of apathy without major depression would have a significant impact on activities of daily living and quality of life. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Task value profiles across subjects and aspirations to physical and IT-related sciences in the United States and Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Angela; Eccles, Jacquelynne S; Salmela-Aro, Katariina

    2012-11-01

    Two independent studies were conducted to extend previous research by examining the associations between task value priority patterns across school subjects and aspirations toward the physical and information technology- (IT-) related sciences. Study 1 measured task values of a sample of 10th graders in the United States (N = 249) across (a) physics and chemistry, (b) math, and (c) English. Study 2 measured task values of a sample of students in the second year of high school in Finland (N = 351) across (a) math and science, (b) Finnish, and (c) the arts and physical education. In both studies, students were classified into groups according to how they ranked math and science in relation to the other subjects. Regression analyses indicated that task value group membership significantly predicted subsequent aspirations toward physical and IT-related sciences measured 1-2 years later. The task value groups who placed the highest priority on math and science were significantly more likely to aspire to physical and IT-related sciences than were the other groups. These findings provide support for the theoretical assumption regarding the predictive role of intraindividual hierarchical patterns of task values for subsequent preferences and choices suggested by the Eccles [Parsons] (1983) expectancy-value model.

  15. Theories of practice and geography

    OpenAIRE

    Everts, J.; Lahr, M.; Watson, M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in theories of practice have seen place and space taken explicitly into account. In particular,\\ud THEODORE SCHATZKI’s ‘site ontology’ offers distinctive but as yet under-explored means of engaging with human\\ud geographies. By giving ontological priority to practices as constitutive of the social, this kind of practice theory provides an integrative conceptual framework that enables the analysis of diverse phenomena in relation to each other, over space and time, as they ...

  16. The Geography of Economic Segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Florida, Richard; Mellander, Charlotta

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the geography of economic segregation in America. Most studies of economic segregation focus on income, but our research develops a new measure of overall economic segregation spanning income, educational, and occupational segregation which we use to examine the economic, social and demographic factors which are associated with economic segregation across US metros. Adding in the two other dimensions of educational and occupational segregation– seems to provide additional,...

  17. Effect of potassium and calcium loading on healthy subjects under hypokinesia and physical exercise with fluid and salt supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorbas, Yan G.; Naexu, Konstantin A.; Federenko, Youri F.

    1995-08-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the acute responses to the electrolyte challenges under hypokinesia and physical exercise (PE) of different intensities with fluid and salt supplementation (FSS). The studies were performed on 12 physically healthy male volunteers aged 19-24 years under 364 days of hypokinesia (decreased number of steps per day) with a set of PE with FSS. The volunteers were divided into two equal groups. The first group was subjected to a set of intensive PE and the second group was submitted to a set of moderate PE. Both groups of subjects consumed daily water and salt supplements that aimed to increase the body hydration level. For simulation of the hypokinetic effect all subjects were kept under an average of 3000 steps per day. Functional tests with a potassium chloride (KCl) and calcium lactate (Cal) load were performed during the hypokinetic period of 364 days and the 60-day prehypokinetic period that served as control, while both groups of subjects consumed daily calcium and potassium supplements. The concentration of electrolyte and hormone levels in the blood and their excretion rate in urine were determined. Renal excretion of calcium and potassium and the blood concentration thereof increased markedly in both groups of subjects. With the potassium chloride load tests the increased potassium excretion was accompanied by higher aldosterone and insulin blood levels, and with the calcium lactate load tests the increased calcium excretion was accompanied by a decreased parathyroid content in the blood. FSS and PE, regardless of intensity, failed to attenuate calcium and potassium losses. Additional intake of KCl and Cal also failed to normalize potassium and calcium abnormalities. It was concluded that during the KCl and Cal loading tests, the increased losses of potassium and calcium in the hypokinetic subjects were due to the inability of their bodies to retain these electrolytes, and that electrolyte abnormalities could

  18. Sports Participation in Youth With Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: The Role of Disease Activity and Subjective Physical Health Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenley, Rachel Neff; Naftaly, Jessica P; Walker, Rachel J; Kappelman, Michael D; Martin, Christopher F; Schneider, Kristin L

    2018-01-18

    Physical activity is important for youth with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), and sports participation is a common way in which youth are physically active. Yet, studies examining sports participation in youth with IBD and barriers to sports participation are lacking. This study examined the role of disease complications, body mass index (BMI), subjective physical health, and psychosocial functioning in influencing sports participation in a large sample of youth with IBD participating in the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America Partners (CCFA Partners) Kids and Teens Registry. CCFA Partners Kids and Teens is an internet-based cohort study in which participants and their parents self-report demographics, disease characteristics, anthropometrics, and validated assessments of physical health, psychosocial functioning, and perceived impairment in sports participation. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 450 cohort participants, age 12-17 years. Nearly two-thirds of the sample reported that their IBD resulted in some impairment in sports participation. IBD disease activity was associated with perceived impairment in sports participation. In a forward regression analysis controlling for disease activity, fatigue, pain, and past IBD-related surgery emerged as the most salient correlates of impairment in sports participation. Disease activity and subjective physical health symptoms were the most salient correlates of impairment in sports participation. Whether these barriers interfere with physical activity more generally deserves further study, as does replication of these findings longitudinally. Ultimately, a greater understanding of potential barriers to sports participation may be useful for generating targeted physical activity recommendations for youth with IBD.

  19. Baby Boomers' subjective life course and its physical health effects: how distinctive is the "forever young" cohort?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Anne E; Toothman, Erica L

    2014-01-01

    We consider members of the "forever young" cohort's negotiation of aging by examining how shifts in their views of the life course and their location in it influence their physical health. Using OLS regression (Midlife in the United States, 1995-1996 and 2004-2006; n = 1,257), we compare Early and Late Baby Boomers' subjective life course, measured as age identity and timing of middle age, and its physical health effects with those of an earlier cohort, the Lucky Few. Contrary to expectations, the earlier cohort not only held more elongated conceptions of the life course at Wave 1 but also lengthened them more between waves than did Baby Boomers. Results also failed to support the notion of youthful conceptions having stronger health consequences for Baby Boomers. Examining more cohorts over longer timespans would illuminate how developmental aging processes intersect with sociohistorical contexts to shape the subjective life course and its health consequences.

  20. Physical activity after surgically obtained weight loss: study with a SenseWear armband in subjects undergoing biliopancreatic diversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradaschi, Raffaella; Camerini, Giovanni; Carlini, Flavia; Sukkar, Samyr; Sopinaro, Nicola; Adami, Gian Franco

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to understand the role of the extra load of body mass in limiting physical activity and in preventing an active lifestyle in severely obese patients. The study was carried out in a University Hospital setting, and investigates severely obese patients, having undergone biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) for obesity and control subjects with a body weight closely similar to that of the BPD subjects; energy intake was evaluated by alimentary interview and energy expenditure was assessed with the Body Media SenseWear® Pro armband (SWA). SWA metabolic efficiency (MET) was negatively associated with body mass index values (ρ = -0.464, p active persons (27% vs. 0 and 7%, respectively) and a lower number of sedentary persons (27% vs. 70 and 43%, respectively) was found (p physical activity and leading to a sedentary lifestyle.

  1. SUBJECTIVE AND OBJECTIVE ESTIMATION OF THE LEVEL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN SERVICE OF CONSERVING HEALTH STATUS IMPROVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Krivokapić

    2014-06-01

    . One of the most important publications in which this connection is emphasized is the report of the American Ministry of Health, called Physical activity and health (1996, which gives a number of useful effects on health status of people who participated in some form of physical activity. Exact minimal volume and intensity of physical activity enough to cause positive effects on health status is still unknown, so the estimation of elements of physical form related to health became important for many institutions occupied with health of people. Discussion: For each of the above mentioned elements of physical form related to health, there were different subjective and objective procedures established that can be used for their estimation. Carpensen CJ. Powell KE, Cristenson GM Besides (1985, it is very important to take into account a clear aim for which a certain estimation is done, because it enables implementation of the most appropriate protocol for estimation of each element of physical form. In that sense, subjective and objective estimation of the level of physical activity of an individual is essential for preservation and improvement of their health status. References: American College for Sports Medicine, Guildelines for exericise testing and Prescription.8th ed. Philadelphia: 2009 Lippincott Williams&Wilkins, 248-52. Carpensen CJ, Powell KE, Cristenson GM (1985. Physical activity , ehercise, and physical fitness: definitions and distinctions for healt-related research. Public Health Rep., 100(2, 126-31. U.S. Department of Healt and Human Services and Centers for DiseaseControl and Prevention. Physical Activity and health: A report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta (GA: 1996 National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 89-90.

  2. Educational space and objective-subject domain of sports and adaptive physical training - a discourse-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriev S.V.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The modern going is analysed near research of AFK technologies. Their basis is made by interdisciplinary approach. On new theoretical and methodical basis selected and described base components of structure of educational space and subject domain of sporting and adaptive physical culture. Modern AFK technologies must carry out professional preparation of students as far as essence forces, making and individual capabilities of man.

  3. Connection of the contents of teaching subjects mathematics and – physical and health education in primary teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Jovanova-Mitkovska, Snezana; Popeska, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    Considering modern educationaltendency in the system of primary education that refers to the possibilities to establish integration-correlation relationship between educational contents from different teaching subjects in primary education, in this paper we made a theoretical elaboration of math and physical and health education contents as an approach that allow more efficient acquisition of knowledge and their efficient application in everyday life. The analyses of math and PHE curricula i...

  4. The geography of the knowledge economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Teis

    of the thesis highlight that geographical proximity has a significant impact on interactive knowledge creation; however, the effect of geography cannot be isolated from other forms of proximity, such as established social relationships and common institutional frameworks. In fact, it is exactly by leaving...... behind the narrow focus on geography, and replacing it with an approach sensitive to social, institutional, cognitive and organisational relations, that the importance of geography for interactive knowledge creation becomes evident. While the role of geographical proximity varies depending...

  5. Perspectives in geography of culture and civilizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grčić Мirko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparative analysis of relevant methodological essence of "traditional" and "new" cultural geography. In the introduction is given an explanation of philosophic concepts of space, environment, place and the region in cultural geography. In second section is analyzed the meaning of civilization and the genesis of geography of civilization (géographie de civilisation. Special attention is on features of geographical posibilism as methodological paradigm, and the concept of cultural landscape as the essence of classical geography of culture and civilization. After this part are researched specific characteristics of certain academic schools and methodological perspectives in cultural geography. Postmodern paradigm and essence of "new" cultural geography are in the main focus. Postmodernism is changing the meaning of the basic concepts in cultural geography, which are analyzed in the introduction, such as space, culture, cultural region, cultural landscape and others. "New" cultural geography reassessed social and moral issues associated with the characteristics of the postmodern era. In this regard, methodological paradigm must be changed. This ascertainment is based on the interpretation of humanistic geography, where the emphasis is on the interpretation of cultural symbols, causal link and the "spirit of place" (Spiritus Loci. In accordance with modern conceptions of human in psychological notion, there are at least three theoretical directions, which find resonance in the appropriate cultural geography: behaviorism, psychoanalytic concept and cognitive concept - gestaltism and geography of perception. In conclusion is emphasized the need of finding a dialectical unity in "classical" and "new" cultural geography. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176017

  6. The geography of trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joni, Saj-nicole A

    2004-03-01

    Leaders who rely forever on the same internal advisers, entrusting them with issues of ever greater sensitivity and consequence, run the risk of being sold short and possibly betrayed. Alternatively, lone-wolf leaders who trust no one may make enormous, yet preventable, mistakes when trying to sort through difficult decisions. A sophisticated understanding of trust can protect leaders from both fates. During the past decade, author and consultant Saj-nicole Joni studied leadership in more than 150 European and North American companies. Her research reveals three fundamental types of trustpersonal trust, expertise trust, and structural trust. Executives may persevere in relationships that are based on personal trust, no matter how exalted their leadership roles become. But such relationships are unlikely to remain static. They also probably won't provide the kinds of deep, often specialized knowledge leaders need. In circumstances where advisers' competence matters as much as their character, expertise trust--reliance on an adviser's ability in a specific subject--enters the picture. In organizations, leaders develop expertise trust by working closely with people who consistently demonstrate their mastery of particular subjects or processes. Structural trust refers to how roles and ambitions influence advisers' perspectives and candor. It shifts constantly as people rise through organizations. High-level structural trust can provide leaders with pure insight and information--but advisers in positions of the highest structural trust generally reside outside organizations. These advisers provide leaders with insights that their organizations cannot. High-performing leaders' most enduring--and most valuable--relationships are characterized by enormous levels of all three kinds of trust.

  7. Influence of physical activity and dietary habits on lipid profile, blood pressure and BMI in subjects with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muros Molina, J J; Oliveras López, Ma J; Mayor Reyes, Ma; Reyes Burgos, T; López García de la Serrana, H

    2011-01-01

    The present study was determined the influence of physical activity and dietary habits on lipid profile, blood pressure (BP) and body mass index (BMI) in subjects with metabolic syndrome (MS). Identify the relationship between physical activity and proper nutrition and the probability of suffering from myocardial infarction (MI). Hundred chronically ill with MS who were active and followed a healthy diet were classified as compliant, while the remaining subjects were classified as non-compliant. The compliant subjects show lower BMI values (30.8±4.9 vs 32.5±4.6), as well as lower levels of triacylglycerol (130.4±48.2 vs 242.1±90.1), total cholesterol (193.5±39 vs 220.2±52.3) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (105.2±38.3 vs 139.2±45). They show higher values in terms of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (62.2±20.1 vs 36.6±15.3), with statistically significant differences. In terms of both systolic and diastolic pressure, no differences were revealed between the groups; however, those who maintain proper dietary habits show lower systolic blood pressure levels than the inactive subjects. The probability of suffering from MI greatly increases among the group of non-compliant subjects. Our results demonstrate how performing aerobic physical activity and following an individualized, Mediterranean diet significantly reduces MS indicators and the chances of suffering from MI.

  8. Effective Inclusion of e-Learning in a Subject of Physics Experiments: Introductory Electronics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, T.; Abe, K.; Yamazaki, N.; Ooe, A.; Igarashi, K.; Hayashi, S.; Suzuki, M.

    2010-07-01

    A Web-based e-Learning homework system was introduced in the undergraduate subject of the introductory electronics experiment; "Introductory Electronics Laboratory". This homework is appended to practical trainings and face-to-face guidance in the laboratory (blended-type e-Learning). The e-Learning is mainly prepared to teach basic electronics and to guide necessary apparatus before the practical training. The overall impression about this subject in students' questionnaires has improved from 3.5 for 2005/2006 (e-Learning not introduced) to 3.9 2007/2008 (e-Learning introduced) (5 for good, 3 for average, and 1 for bad). Students understanding of the experiments has also improved from 3.43 for 2005/2006 to 3.45 for 2007/2008 (5, 4, 3, 2 for S, A, B, C grade). This subject is compulsory for all second-year students in our department (˜120 students). The e-Learning system in our case is considered to be effective especially for required subjects of experiments and large classes.

  9. Race and Physical Attractiveness as Criteria for White Subjects' Dating Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Bem P.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments involving "desirability for a date" ratings of black and white stimulus persons who varied in attractiveness indicated white male and female subjects gave appreciable weight to race and attractiveness, but females gave race more weight than attractiveness, while attractiveness was given more weight than race by males. (Author)

  10. The 10-year Course of Physically Self-destructive Acts Reported by Borderline Patients and Axis II Comparison Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanarini, Mary C.; Frankenburg, Frances R.; Reich, D. Bradford; Fitzmaurice, Garrett; Weinberg, Igor; Gunderson, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this paper was to determine the frequency and methods of two forms of physically self-destructive acts (i.e., self-mutilation and suicide attempts) reported by borderline patients and axis II comparison subjects over ten years of prospective follow-up. Methods 290 borderline patients and 72 axis II comparison subjects were interviewed about their physically self-destructive acts during their index admission and at five contiguous two-year follow-up periods. Results It was found that a high percentage of borderline patients reported multiple acts and methods of each of these two forms of physically self-destructive behavior prior to their index admission. It was also found that the percentage of borderline patients reporting multiple acts and methods declined significantly over time. However, these acts remained significantly more common among borderline patients than axis II comparison subjects. Conclusions The course of self-mutilation and suicide attempts among borderline patients is initially more serious and ultimately more benign than previously recognized. PMID:18241308

  11. Physical quality of grains subjected to moistening and drying processes for marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo C. Coradi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim was to evaluate the physical quality of conventional and transgenic corn grains, through drying and wetting processes for marketing. The experimental design was completely randomized in a factorial scheme (7 x 3 x 2, corresponding to seven drying times (0, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100 and 120 min, three temperatures of the drying air (80, 100 and 120 °C and two hybrids of corn (conventional AG 1051 and transgenic Herculex@ 30S31H. Grain drying was held in convection oven with forced air ventilation while the wetting was done in a B.O.D chamber. The water movement in the grain, the volume and the electrical conductivity were evaluated periodically. The results showed that the transgenic corn grain reduced the negative effects of drying and moistening on the physical quality. The increase in drying air temperature accelerated the physical deterioration of conventional and transgenic corn grains. The increase in water content by the moistening process caused losses in grain physical quality, similar to the drying process, for both the conventional and transgenic corn grains.

  12. Information technologies at physics practicums in a subject-oriented school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tishchenko Lyudmila V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper suggests a new method of implementing an activity approach in a physicsoriented program. Such method implies the use of a system which comprises three types of practical sessions: a laboratory practicum, a practical training aimed at analyzing physical processes on the basis of computerized modeling and a problem-solving practicum. A methodology used for holding practicums provides for an active use of information technologies. At laboratory sessions we use computerized sensors, tablets with an integrated data recorder, an electronic oscilloscope and process data in Excel tables. At practicums aimed at analyzing physical processes, we develop programs in Visual Basic and Рascal in order to visualize physical processes in the form of motion trajectories, dynamic charts; besides, we conduct computer experiments. At problem-solving practicums we use our own PowerPoint “Study Guide for an Interactive Whiteboard”, which contains a database of graphic and pictorial physics problems for students of 10–11 grades. Knowledge of information technologies facilitates students’ adaptation in modern society, improves education quality.

  13. Does the High School Geography Experience Influence Enrollment in University Geography Courses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leydon, Joseph; McLaughlin, Christina; Wilson, Heather

    2017-01-01

    The literature suggests that owing to profound difficulties with high school geography curricula, teachers play a vital role in stimulating student interest and in providing a platform for continuation in the study of geography at university. Yet, with little empirical evidence offered in support, it is unclear why students select geography at…

  14. How Are Non-Geography Majors Motivated in a Large Introductory World Geography Course?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung Won; Huynh, Niem Tu

    2015-01-01

    University students who do not declare geography as their major are at risk of poor motivation to learn in an introductory geography class. However, research exploring the role of non-majors' motivation is lacking. This study examines motivational factors impacting non-geography students' engagement and performance. The findings suggest that…

  15. Reconciling Discourse about Geography and Teaching Geography: The Case of Singapore Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Tricia

    2016-01-01

    This study draws upon a Foucauldian notion of discourse to explore how four pre-service geography teachers in Singapore made decisions about what geography is and how to enact their understandings of geography in their classrooms. This analysis of discursive power is particularly relevant to Singapore because of the high level of state control…

  16. Geography Education: Applying Spatial Aspects to Everyday Life: American Association of Geographers Geography Education Specialty Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessell, Jonathan E.

    2016-01-01

    Throughout his career teaching geography, Johnathan Wessell has always stressed to his students that they already knew a lot about geography before they entered his classroom. He writes in this article that once he convinces his students of this, they begin to realize that geography is all around them, and that they, in turn, begin to shift their…

  17. Taking Stock in Geography Education around the World: An International Perspective on the Teaching of Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaSilva, Edmar Bernardes; Kvasnak, Robb Neil

    2011-01-01

    The identity of geography as a discipline since the nineteenth-century naissance of contemporary academia, if not before, has been often disputed. In higher education, geography is often part of the geosciences, often located in a geography, geology, earth science, and environmental science department or departments. In the world of education…

  18. Physical and Cognitive Stimulation Using an Exergame in Subjects with Normal Aging, Mild and Moderate Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Sadoun, Grégory; Sacco, Guillaume; Manera, Valeria; Bourgeois, Jérémy; König, Alexandra; Foulon, Pierre; Fosty, Baptiste; Bremond, François; d'Arripe-Longueville, Fabienne; Robert, Philippe

    2016-06-30

    The use of Serious exerGames (SeG) as enriched environments (EE), which promotes cognitive simulation with physical activity in a positive emotional context, has been proposed to represent a powerful method to slow down the decline due to neurodegenerative diseases (ND), such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, so far, no SeG targeting EE has been tested in ND subjects. This study aimed at evaluating the usability and short-term training effects of X-Torp, an action SeG designed for elderly ND subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD. X-Torp is a SeG played using the Microsoft® Kinect™. 10 ND subjects and 8 healthy elderly controls (HEC) were enrolled in a 1-month program with three training sessions per week. Usability was evaluated through game time, game performance, the aerobic intensity level reached, perceived emotions, and perceived usability. All participants successfully completed the training program. ND subjects played less and had a lower game performance compared to HEC. During the sessions, ND subjects maintained a light intensity of aerobic activity, while HEC maintained a moderate intensity. Both groups experienced only positive emotions, and reported a 'moderate' to 'high' perceived competence, a 'moderate' game difficulty, and a 'high' interest in the game. Usability results suggest that X-Torp represents a usable EE for healthy subjects and persons with MCI and AD. However, in order to reach moderate or high intensity of aerobic activity, X-Torp control modes should be adapted to become more physically stimulating.

  19. Digital versatile disc as an information and communication technology variant to support geography teaching and learning / Christoffel Petrus Van der Westhuizen

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Westhuizen, Christoffel Petrus

    2007-01-01

    The application of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) as supportive tool in teaching and learning within the framework of the radical change that Outcomes Based Education (OBE) has created, pervades and consequently alters the pedagogy and methodology of Geography teaching. Geography Is a subject in which ICT can make a definite and worthwhile contribution and it is, therefore, important that Geography educators know how to harness the benefits of ICT for their learners. Apart ...

  20. Designing Moral, Healthy and Patriotic Subjects. Physical Education Teachers’ Training. Argentina, 1938–1967

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Andrea Feiguin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article shows the political and ideological foundations as well as the disciplinary and pedagogical conceptions that characterized the school culture of the General Belgrano National Physical Education Institute as a new teacher education apparatus for the whole country. Its creation is interpreted as a local expression of a set of ideas that stressed training between renovation and conservation, and produced a number of rituals, a mystic and an esthetic that would last as a teaching model in the discipline over time. The research was based on the analysis of documents and interviews with graduates.

  1. Independent and combined association of overall physical fitness and subjective well-being with fibromyalgia severity : the al-Ándalus project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Estévez-López, Fernando; Gray, Cindy M; Segura-Jiménez, Víctor; Soriano-Maldonado, Alberto; Álvarez-Gallardo, Inmaculada C; Arrayás-Grajera, Manuel J; Carbonell-Baeza, Ana; Aparicio, Virginia A; Delgado-Fernández, Manuel; Pulido-Martos, Manuel

    PURPOSE: The present study aimed: (1) to test the associations of overall physical fitness and subjective well-being with fibromyalgia severity and (2) to determine whether the combination of overall physical fitness and subjective well-being is associated with fibromyalgia severity among adult

  2. Racial/ethnic identity and subjective physical and mental health of Latino Americans: an asset within?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Amy L; Aisenberg, Eugene; Weiss, Saskia I; Salazar, Dulny

    2014-03-01

    Social Identity Theory indicates that ethnic identity could benefit minority members in a society because of its promotion of a sense of belonging, or of its buffering of the damage of discrimination. Despite growing investigation about Latinos' overall health, few studies have simultaneously examined the influence of multiple cultural strength factors, especially racial/ethnic identity, social support, and religious attendance, on these outcomes. Using the National Latino and Asian American Study, we examine the potential predictive value of these cultural strength factors on Latinos' Self-Rated Mental and Physical Health (SRMH and SRPH). Two separate two-step regression models revealed significant positive effects of racial/ethnic identity on both mental and physical health of Latinos, above and beyond the effect of known demographic and acculturation factors, such as discrimination. Religious attendance had a positive effect on SRMH but not on SRPH. The deteriorating roles of discrimination, in mental health only, and that of Length in the US in both outcomes, however, was primarily not altered by entry of these cultural strength factors. The independent direct effect of racial/ethnic identity among Latinos nationwide may suggest that this cultural strength is an internalized protective asset. Longitudinal data is needed to explore its underlying mechanism and long-term impact.

  3. Relationship between energy expenditure, physical activity and weight loss during CPAP treatment in obese OSA subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamberga, Michele; Rizzi, Maurizio; Gadaleta, Felice; Grechi, Attilio; Baiardini, Renata; Fanfulla, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Increased energy expenditure (EE) has been reported in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). It has been postulated that CPAP treatment may induce weight reduction in obese patients, even if it has not been confirmed by recent studies. In the present study we investigated the effect of OSA on EE and the effect of CPAP on body weight and physical activity. One hundred and seven obese OSA patients and 25 healthy obese volunteers, as control group, matched for age, sex and BMI, were enrolled. The following evaluation was performed only in OSA patients after 6 months of CPAP treatment. Baseline total EE was similar in the two groups, but OSA patients showed higher EE during the night, while control group during daytime. In patients, EE correlates with OSA severity, degree of daytime sleepiness or obesity. At follow-up evaluation, BMI and total EE were unchanged. However, daytime EE increased (1066 ± 131.5 vs 1104 ± 133 Kcal/die, p weight and daily physical activity did not change in statistically significant way. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Migrations in Slovenian geography textbooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurij Senegačnik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In Slovenia, the migrations are treated in almost all geographical textbooks for different levels of education. In the textbooks for the elementary school from the sixth to ninth grade, students acquire knowledge of the migrations by the inductive approach. Difficulty level of treatment and quantity of information are increasing by the age level. In the grammar school program a trail of gaining knowledge on migration is deductive. Most attention is dedicated to migrations in general geography textbooks. The textbooks for vocational and technical school programs deal with migrations to a lesser extent and with different approaches.

  5. The Geography of Green Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OShaughnessy, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Heeter, Jenny S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Volpi, Christina M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-10-25

    Green power refers to the voluntary purchase of renewable electricity by retail electricity customers. Green power is unlike compliance-based renewable energy procurement imposed by law or regulation. In 2016, over six million customers procured about 95 million megawatt-hours (MWh) of green power in the United States, which represents about 28% of all U.S. renewable energy sales, excluding large hydropower. In this fact sheet, we use available data to illustrate the geography of green power demand (in terms of number of customers) and supply (in terms of MWh of generation) by state.

  6. THEORETICAL CONCEPTIONS OF GEOGRAPHY TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloy Montes Galbán

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this research was to determine the current theoretical concepts handled by third stage basic education geography teachers. A non experimental descriptive study was made. Data was collected through a semi structured questionnaire. The population was conformed by the teachers who work at the National schools placed in the parishes Raul Leoni and Cacique Mara of Maracaibo city, Zulia State. There is not clarity in regard to the correct handling of the different geographic currents, and the slight notion teachers have leans towards a traditional, descriptive, retrospective memory based conception.

  7. DIFFERENT CIRCULATING BRAIN-DERIVED NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR RESPONSES TO ACUTE EXERCISE BETWEEN PHYSICALLY ACTIVE AND SEDENTARY SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Nofuji

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Although circulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF level is affected by both acute and chronic physical activity, the interaction of acute and chronic physical activity was still unclear. In this study, we compared the serum and plasma BDNF responses to maximal and submaximal acute exercises between physically active and sedentary subjects. Eight active and 8 sedentary female subjects participated in the present study. Both groups performed 3 exercise tests with different intensities, i.e. 100% (maximal, 60% (moderate and 40% (low of their peak oxygen uptake. In each exercise test, blood samples were taken at the baseline and immediately, 30 and 60 min after the test. The serum BDNF concentration was found to significantly increase immediately after maximal and moderate exercise tests in both groups. In maximal exercise test, the pattern of change in the serum BDNF concentration was different between the groups. While the serum BDNF level for the sedentary group returned to the baseline level during the recovery phase, the BDNF levels for the active group decreased below the baseline level after the maximal exercise test. No group differences were observed in the pattern of plasma BDNF change for all exercise tests. These findings suggest that regular exercise facilitates the utilization of circulating BDNF during and/or after acute exercise with maximal intensity

  8. An ethic for geography: The role of the affective domain in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geography is a subject with integral ethical and moral components. However, because of the subject's traditionally close association with scientific rationality this factor has not always been recognised. The significance .of the affective dimension of geographical learning is explored for tts value in creating and developing ...

  9. Dealing with Maths Anxiety: How "Do" You Teach Mathematics in a Geography Department?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Lee

    2010-01-01

    Mathematics is often taught covertly as a "service" subject in geography departments, but can often be a cause of fear for students who may not have studied the subject post-GCSE. Negative attitudes are common and many students show signs of maths anxiety. This paper details how students' attitudes were changed by a new foundation mathematics…

  10. Teaching Gender Geography in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, Robyn

    2011-01-01

    In New Zealand universities, gender is still not a substantial part of the curriculum in most geography departments. Although at the University of Waikato, the situation is different. Its specific history of radical scholarship has enabled feminist academics in a variety of disciplines including geography to have had a stronger voice than in other…

  11. A Geography Syllabus for the Next Millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirling, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Proposes content changes for a revised geography syllabus in New Zealand discussing each strand: (1) social organization; (2) culture and heritage; (3) place and environment; (4) time, continuity, and change; (5) resources and economic activities; and (6) making sense of planet earth and beyond. Addresses current trends in geography and syllabus…

  12. The emerging empirics of evolutionary economic geography.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschma, R.A.; Frenken, K.

    2011-01-01

    Following last decade’s programmatic papers on Evolutionary Economic Geography, we report on recent empirical advances and how this empirical work can be positioned vis-a`-vis other strands of research in economic geography. First, we review studies on the path dependent nature of clustering, and

  13. Perspectives on Population in AP® Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Max; Keller, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    A study of human geography begins with the human population. In fact, demographic topics frequently relate to other units in the AP Human Geography course. The three main concepts elaborated upon in this article are (1) the demographic transition model, (2) Malthusian theory and its critics, and (3) pronatalist and antinatalist policies that might…

  14. Teaching Geography through an Animated Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, Joshua L.; Waters, Stewart

    2017-01-01

    Geography is a fun and exciting discipline involving the interrogation of place and space. Film is a powerful and meaningful tool, which also transmits perceptions of place and space. Therefore, this article builds a rationale for utilizing film in the teaching of geography, particularly animated film. Next, it discusses two classroom-tested…

  15. Department of Geography and Environmental Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2016-09-02

    Sep 2, 2016 ... Department of Geography and Environmental Management, University of Abuja, Nigeria. 2. Department of Geography and Planning, University of Jos, Nigeria. Abstract. This study assessed rainfall variations in Northern part of Nigeria. To achieve this aim, the study sets out the following ob ectives; ...

  16. Beyond Science and Math: Integrating Geography Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Michael E.; Grubbs, Steven

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the status of World Geography Education and the importance of these concepts in developing 21st century students. Moreover, the authors also showcase how World Geography concepts can be intentionally taught through a technological/engineering, design-based learning challenge that requires students to solve a global housing…

  17. Economic development and the geography of institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosker, E.M.; Garretsen, J.H.

    To explain cross-country income differences, research has recently focused on the so-called deep determinants of economic development, notably institutions and geography. This article shows that it is not only absolute geography, in terms of for instance climate or being landlocked, but also

  18. Mapping Possibilities for a Critical Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Examines the possibility of developing a socially critical geography curriculum in Australian schools. Emphasizes teachers' responsibility to evaluate, select, and use appropriate instructional materials. Explains technical, interpretive, and critical approaches to geography instruction by contrasting three activities based on "Women of…

  19. Human Geography and the Geographical Imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, William

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the development of human geography, pointing out linkages between human geography and sociology. Defines sociological imagination, summarizing the logic behind it. Provides arguments for a parallel geographical imagination, and assesses the extent to which geographers exhibit a geographical imagination. (LS)

  20. A Geography Undergraduate Course in Multiculturalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, John W.

    2008-01-01

    Increasing multicultural course offerings in the undergraduate curriculum is a challenge for geography programs. Effective approaches to teaching multicultural geography of the United States include emphasizing institutional affects on minority populations and the life experiences and geographic expressions of minority groups. This article shares…

  1. Trade costs in empirical New Economic Geography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosker, E.M.; Garretsen, J.H.

    Trade costs are a crucial element of New Economic Geography (NEG) models. Without trade costs there is no role for geography. In empirical NEG studies the unavailability of direct trade cost data calls for the need to approximate these trade costs by introducing a trade cost function. In doing so,

  2. Primary Tendencies in Research on Geography Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gecit, Yilmaz

    2010-01-01

    The principal aim of this study is to classify research on geography education performed in the process from 2000 to present, shed light on research hereafter, and determine the fields of geography education which should be given priority. The items that constitute data of this research are obtained as a result of data scan. As a result of archive…

  3. [Seed geography: its concept and basic scientific issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shun-Li; Wang, Zong-Shuai; Zeren, Wangmu

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a new concept 'seed geography' was provided, and its definition, research contents, and scientific issues were put forward. Seed geography is a newly developed interdisciplinary science from plant geography, seed ecology, and phytosociology, which studies the geographic variation patterns of seed biological traits as well as their relationships with environmental factors from macroscopic to microscopic, and the seed formation, development, and change trends. The main research contents would include geography of seed mass, geography of seed chemical components, geography of seed morphology, geography of seed cell biological characteristics, geography of seed physiological characteristics, geography of seed genetic characteristics, and geography of flower and fruit. To explore the scientific issues in seed geography would help us to better understand the long-term adaptation and evolution of seed characteristics to natural environments.

  4. Cuff pressure pain detection is associated with both sex and physical activity level in nonathletic healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemming, Dag; Börsbo, Björn; Sjörs, Anna

    2017-01-01

    analogue scale (VAS). The pain detection threshold (PDT) was defined as when the pressure was perceived as painful, and pain tolerance (PTT) was when the subject terminated the cuff inflation. For PTT, the corresponding VAS score was recorded (VAS-PTT). The protocol was repeated with two chambers inflated......PURPOSE : The aim of this study was to evaluate pressure pain sensitivity on leg and arm in 98 healthy persons (50 women) using cuff algometry. Furthermore, associations with sex and physical activity level were investigated. METHOD:  Normal physical activity level was defined as Godin Leisure......-Time Exercise Questionnaire (GLTEQ) score ≤ 45 and high activity level as GLTEQ > 45. A pneumatic double-chamber cuff was placed around the arm or leg where a single chamber was inflated. The cuff inflation rate (1 kPa/s) was constant, and pain intensity was registered continuously on a 10 cm electronic visual...

  5. Predicting self-rated mental and physical health: the contributions of subjective socioeconomic status and personal relative deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callan, Mitchell J; Kim, Hyunji; Matthews, William J

    2015-01-01

    Lower subjective socioeconomic status (SSS) and higher personal relative deprivation (PRD) relate to poorer health. Both constructs concern people's perceived relative social position, but they differ in their emphasis on the reference groups people use to determine their comparative disadvantage (national population vs. similar others) and the importance of resentment that may arise from such adverse comparisons. We investigated the relative utility of SSS and PRD as predictors of self-rated physical and mental health (e.g., self-rated health, stress, health complaints). Across six studies, self-rated physical and mental health were on the whole better predicted by measures of PRD than by SSS while controlling for objective socioeconomic status (SES), with SSS rarely contributing unique variance over and above PRD and SES. Studies 4-6 discount the possibility that the superiority of PRD over SSS in predicting health is due to psychometric differences (e.g., reliability) or response biases between the measures.

  6. Physical activity, heart rate variability-based stress and recovery, and subjective stress during a 9-month study period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Föhr, T; Tolvanen, A; Myllymäki, T; Järvelä-Reijonen, E; Peuhkuri, K; Rantala, S; Kolehmainen, M; Korpela, R; Lappalainen, R; Ermes, M; Puttonen, S; Rusko, H; Kujala, U M

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between physical activity (PA) and objective heart rate variability (HRV)-based stress and recovery with subjective stress in a longitudinal setting. Working-age participants (n = 221; 185 women, 36 men) were overweight (body mass index, 25.3-40.1 kg/m(2) ) and psychologically distressed (≥3/12 points on the General Health Questionnaire). Objective stress and recovery were based on HRV recordings over 1-3 work days. Subjective stress was assessed with the Perceived Stress Scale and PA level with a questionnaire. Data were collected at three time points: baseline, 10 weeks post intervention, and at the 36-week follow-up. We adopted a latent growth model to investigate the initial level and change in PA, objective stress and recovery, and subjective stress at the three measurement time points. The results showed that initial levels of PA (P stress (P = 0.001) and recovery (P stress. The results persisted after adjustment for intervention group. The present results suggest that high PA and objectively assessed low stress and good recovery have positive effects on changes in subjective stress in the long-term. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Physical activity and sedentary behavior measured objectively and subjectively in overweight and obese adults with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janney, Carol A; Ganguli, Rohan; Tang, Gong; Cauley, Jane A; Holleman, Robert G; Richardson, Caroline R; Kriska, Andrea M

    2015-10-01

    Describe objective and subjective physical activity levels and time spent being sedentary in adults with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorders (SZO/SA). Baseline physical activity and sedentary behaviors were assessed among 46 overweight and obese community-dwelling adults (aged 18-70 years; BMI > 27 kg/m(2)) diagnosed with SZO/SA by DSM-IV-TR, with mild symptom severity (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale score physical activity levels, measured using actigraphs, in WAIST were compared to a nationally representative sample of users (n = 46) and nonusers (n = 46) of mental health service (MHS) from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 2003-2004) matched by sex, BMI, and age. On average, adults with SZO/SA wore actigraphs more than 15 h/d for 7 days averaging 151,000 counts/d. The majority of monitoring time (81%) was classified as sedentary (approximately 13 h/d). Moderate/vigorous and light physical activity accounted for only 2% (19 min/d) and 17% (157 min/d) of monitoring time/d, respectively. Primary source of activity was household activities (409 ± 438 min/wk). Fifty-three percent reported walking for transportation or leisure. Adults with SZO/SA were significantly less active (176 min/d) and more sedentary (756 min/d) than NHANES users of MHS (293 and 640 min/d, respectively) and nonusers of MHS (338 and 552 min/d, respectively) (P physical activity; and significantly less active than NHANES users and nonusers of MHS. This sedentary lifestyle is significantly lower than those of other inactive US populations, is costly for the individual and community, and highlights the need for physical activity promotion and interventions in this high risk population. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  8. The multi-modal responses of a physical head model subjected to various blast exposure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellet, S.; Phillippens, M.

    2017-11-01

    The local and global biomechanical response of the body to a blast wave is the first step of a sequence that leads to the development of stresses and strains which can exceed the tolerance of brain tissue. These stresses and strains may then lead to neuro-physical changes in the brain and contribute to initiate a cascade of events leading to injury. The specific biomechanical pathways by which the blast energy is transmitted through the head structure are, however, not clearly understood. Multiple transmission mechanisms have been proposed to explain the generation of brain stresses following the impingement of a blast wave on the head. With the use of a physical head model, the work presented here aims at demonstrating that the proposed transmission mechanisms are not mutually exclusive. They are part of a continuum of head responses where, depending on the exposure conditions, a given mechanism may or may not dominate. This article presents the joint analysis of previous blast test results generated with the brain injury protection evaluation device (BIPED) headform under four significantly different exposure conditions. The focus of the analysis is to demonstrate how the nature of the recorded response is highly dependent on the exposure characteristics and consequently, on the method used to reproduce blast exposure in a laboratory environment. The timing and magnitude of the variations in intra-cranial pressures (ICP) were analysed relative to the external pressure field in order to better understand the wave dynamics occurring within the brain structure of the headform. ICP waveforms were also analysed in terms of their energy spectral density to better identify the energy partitioning between the different modes of response. It is shown that the BIPED response is multi-modal and that the energy partitioning between its different modes of response is greatly influenced by exposure characteristics such as external peak overpressure, impulse, blast wave

  9. Objectively measured sedentary behaviour and moderate and vigorous physical activity in different school subjects: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerli Mooses

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence shows the positive influence of moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA and negative influence of sedentary time on health and academic achievement. Although schools can significantly contribute to overall physical activity, little is known about MVPA and sedentary behaviour in different school subjects in different grades. Methods Physical activity of 646 students from 18 schools (94 classes and from three school stages (grades 1–9, aged 7–16 was measured with accelerometry for 5 school days. Time and proportion of MVPA and sedentary time, also average sedentary bout length was calculated for native language (Estonian, mathematics, science, foreign language, music and crafts lessons. Results A total of 6363 lessons were measured, with lesson duration of 45 min. The average lesson time MVPA remained below 2.2 min in all school stages and in all subjects. Students in grades 4–6 had greatest decline in the proportion of lesson time MVPA in science (β = −1.9, 95%CI −3.1– -0.6 and music (−1.2, −2.1– -0.4 and in grades 7–9 in music (−1.7, −3.1– -0.3 lessons compared to grades 1–3. In grades 1–3 students spent on average 76% of lesson time (34.0 ± 7.0 min as sedentary, whereas in grades 7–9 the average proportion of sedentary time was 87% (38.9 ± 5.7 min. An average sedentary bout length increased from 13 min in grades 1–3 to 20 min in grades 7–9. An increase in sedentary bout length from grades 1–3 compared to grades 7–9 was present in most subjects, except crafts, with smallest increase in foreign language (6 min, 3.5–8.9 and greatest in music lessons (16.6 min, 11.9–21.3. Lessons with prolonged sedentary bouts formed a maximum 36% of all lessons in grades 1–3 and 73% in grades 7–9. Conclusion The long sedentary time, bout length and low MVPA in most subjects were unfavourable in respect of both health and academic achievement. Significantly

  10. Objectively measured sedentary behaviour and moderate and vigorous physical activity in different school subjects: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooses, Kerli; Mägi, Katrin; Riso, Eva-Maria; Kalma, Maarja; Kaasik, Priit; Kull, Merike

    2017-01-23

    Evidence shows the positive influence of moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and negative influence of sedentary time on health and academic achievement. Although schools can significantly contribute to overall physical activity, little is known about MVPA and sedentary behaviour in different school subjects in different grades. Physical activity of 646 students from 18 schools (94 classes) and from three school stages (grades 1-9, aged 7-16) was measured with accelerometry for 5 school days. Time and proportion of MVPA and sedentary time, also average sedentary bout length was calculated for native language (Estonian), mathematics, science, foreign language, music and crafts lessons. A total of 6363 lessons were measured, with lesson duration of 45 min. The average lesson time MVPA remained below 2.2 min in all school stages and in all subjects. Students in grades 4-6 had greatest decline in the proportion of lesson time MVPA in science (β = -1.9, 95%CI -3.1- -0.6) and music (-1.2, -2.1- -0.4) and in grades 7-9 in music (-1.7, -3.1- -0.3) lessons compared to grades 1-3. In grades 1-3 students spent on average 76% of lesson time (34.0 ± 7.0 min) as sedentary, whereas in grades 7-9 the average proportion of sedentary time was 87% (38.9 ± 5.7 min). An average sedentary bout length increased from 13 min in grades 1-3 to 20 min in grades 7-9. An increase in sedentary bout length from grades 1-3 compared to grades 7-9 was present in most subjects, except crafts, with smallest increase in foreign language (6 min, 3.5-8.9) and greatest in music lessons (16.6 min, 11.9-21.3). Lessons with prolonged sedentary bouts formed a maximum 36% of all lessons in grades 1-3 and 73% in grades 7-9. The long sedentary time, bout length and low MVPA in most subjects were unfavourable in respect of both health and academic achievement. Significantly increasing sedentary time and sedentary bout length in older school stages highlights the need for

  11. Defining competitiveness through the theories of new economic geography and regional economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuković Darko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of work is defining competitiveness through a multidisciplinary approach of the theories of new economic geography and regional economy. The paper describes in detail the theory of competitiveness, defined by numerous authors in this area, with special emphasis on the opposing views of Michael Porter and Paul Krugman. A regional competitiveness that is colsely related to economic geography and regional economy, the development of regional economy and typology of regions have been defined in the work. One of the first authors that stressed the importance of geographical location was Michael Porter. In his model called “diamond“, the author emphasizes that geographical concentration of a business enhances the productivity, innovativity and sector export. After this theory, many authors have foccussed on the location problem research, which resulted in better interconnection of economy and geography. As the result of such activities, new directions have been developed, such as the new theory of economic geography and regional economy. New economic geography has been mentioned mostly in connection with the Nobel Prize winner, Paul Krugman, whose theories are often opposed to Porter's ones. Krugman had the most credit for the development of New Economic Geography. At the end of the work, the differences between comparative and competitive adventages were explained. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 47007, br. 47009 i br. 179015

  12. Studying the Physical Properties of Hma with Recycled Aggregate Subjected to Moisture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahlam K. Razzaq

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As being exposed to water that exists on asphalt road, HMA that is created by utilizing a certain resources may require to be made strong due to the capability of that water to stop the covering to be attached to the aggregate, consequently, asphalt road layers will not be held jointly, this will have a negative influence on the asphalt that will be damaged quickly. Such phenomenon is known as "the erosion", which requires to be dealt with by, for example, improving asphalt layers by means of specific resources that assist in existence of water. Different ways in this work are employed to calculate the strength of various mixes via using used aggregate that is exposed to  saturation times, similarly, the importance of exploiting the anti-stripping as chemical addition is determined. Three kinds of HMA were exposed in the current study, 60% of the first kind were made of used aggregate taking from crushed pavement, and 60% of the second kind were taking from using aggregate that is part of concrete mix, while the third mixture has 10% of wax used as an addition by pavement weight. These mixtures were soaked in water bath of 25o C for various intervals of time that are (3, 7, 15, 28 days. Many investigations examinations had been as well executed, and then the outcomes were contrasted against standard pavement blend subjected to similar circumstances. Number of examinations were adopted in this study, these are (Marshall Stability and flow, mass thickness, roundabout elasticity, compressive quality, affectability to temperature, flexible modulus. The study achieved a good success as it makes important outcomes, the enhanced pavement showed strength against moisture damage while taking advantage of used aggregate of preceding blends, on other hand, the wax has affective role in raising these strengths in addition to develop the characteristics of HMA. 

  13. Effect of Concept Mapping and Outline Note-Taking Patterns in Students Academic Achievement in Geography in Secondary Schools in Enugu South Lga of Enugu State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, Gabriel A.

    2016-01-01

    The WAEC Chief Examiner's report of 2013 pointed out that mass failure in geography had badly affected students who have the desire to study science related subjects in our Universities. The poor image of geography among students was attributed partly to its wide content and partly to the old fashioned approach to its teaching. This study…

  14. Young People's World-Mindedness and the Global Dimension in Their Geography Education: A Comparative Study of Upper Secondary School Students' Ideas in Finland, Germany and the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béneker, Tine; Tani, Sirpa; Uphues, Rainer; van der Vaart, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Geography is one of the most important school subjects for the development of global awareness and international understanding. Curricular concepts and pedagogical strategies for developing global awareness through geography abound. What is largely unknown, however, is how young people make sense of the world in which they are growing up and if…

  15. Accuracy of the screening physical examination to identify subclinical atherosclerosis and peripheral arterial disease in asymptomatic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cournot, Maxime; Boccalon, Henri; Cambou, Jean-Pierre; Guilloux, Jérôme; Taraszkiewicz, Dorota; Hanaire-Broutin, Hélène; Chamontin, Bernard; Galinier, Michel; Ferrières, Jean

    2007-12-01

    This study assessed the accuracy of the screening vascular physical examination for predicting asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) or subclinical atherosclerosis in asymptomatic and apparently healthy subjects. A standardized physical examination and a carotid and femoral ultrasonography were administered to 2736 men and women aged 20 to 90 years old, with no personal history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and no complaint of neurologic, coronary, or lower limb symptom. We assessed the accuracy of auscultation for bruits and pulse palpation for identifying the presence of significant carotid stenosis, carotid plaque, femoral plaque, and ankle-brachial index (ABI) factors. The absence of both pedal pulses also provided additional information, beyond risk factors, on the presence of an ABI <0.9 (+LR, 3.57; 95% CI, 1.93 to 6.60). The presence of a carotid bruit did not affect the likelihood of carotid stenosis, plaque, or intima-media thickness above the median. Unlike carotid auscultation, pulse palpation and auscultation for femoral bruits provided valuable information on the presence of asymptomatic PAD and underlying atherosclerosis in apparently healthy subjects.

  16. Surveying and Mapping Geographical Information from the Perspective of Geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LÜ Guonian

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available It briefly reviewed the history of geographic information content development since the existence of geographic information system. It pointed out that the current definition of geographic information is always the extension from the "spatial+ attributes" basic mapping framework of geographic information. It is increasingly difficult to adapt to the analysis and application of spatial-temporal big data. From the perspective of geography research subject and content, it summarized systematically that the content and extension of the "geographic information" that geography needs. It put forward that a six-element expression model of geographic information, including spatial location, semantic description, attribute characteristics, geometric form, evolution process, and objects relationship.Under the guidance of the laws of geography, for geographical phenomenon of spatial distribution, temporal pattern and evolution process, the interaction mechanism of the integrated expression, system analysis and efficient management, it designed that a unified GIS data model which is expressed by six basic elements, a new GIS data structure driven by geographical rules and interaction, and key technologies of unstructured spatio-temporal data organization and storage. It provided that a theoretical basis and technical support for the shift from the surveying and mapping geographic information to the scientific geographic information, and it can help improving the organization, management, analysis and expression ability of the GIS of the geographical laws such as geographical pattern, evolution process, and interaction between elements.

  17. Approaches of researches in medical geography in Poland and Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantylej, Wiktoria

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the historical review of medical geography in the world, in Poland and in Ukraine. There are different approaches in medical geography: according to the research subject (ecological and economic approaches) and according to the current affairs of research (approach concerns sexuality, the age of the population and accordingly, accessibility of health care services to the population). To the author's mind, the most perspective approaches in medical geography in Poland and Ukraine are as follows: - integrative - dedicated to the health status of the population in connection with the quality and life level; - mathematical-statistical - connected with the problem of synthetic indexes of health status of the populations and factors influencing it, and with the problem of economic value of health and life of the population; - social-economic - the analysis of the influence of socioeconomic factors (such as wealth measure, rate of unemployment, work conditions and others) on public health; - ecological - connected with the researches dedicated to the analysis of environmental impact on public health status of the population; - demographical - the analysis of demographical factors of forming public health status; - social-psychological - health culture of the population, perception of the own health/morbidity and health care systems existing in different countries.

  18. Geography Teachers' Stories of Sustainability: An Introduction to Narrative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Clare

    2016-01-01

    Geography teacher recruitment and retention is an important issue for the future of geography education. This Special Issue of "International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education" ("IRGEE") tackles this issue head on by focusing on geography teachers' narratives about their experiences of teaching geography, and…

  19. Looking for an international strategy for geography education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schee, Joop

    Geography education is under pressure in many countries in the world. Many publications in the field of geography education and a lot of papers presented at geography conferences focus on the problematic position of geography in primary and secondary education. However, describing the problem is

  20. Geography in Australian Schools: A View from the AGTA Chair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Nick

    2006-01-01

    The Australian Geography Teachers' Association (AGTA) seeks to: (1) foster the teaching and learning of geography in Australian schools and enhance awareness of its applications in society; (2) promote and circulate the results of research into geography education; (3) maintain a professional network through which teachers of geography in…

  1. A case for historical and landscape approaches to geography ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Historical and Landscape approaches to the study of geography are issues that have loomed large in methodological discussions in geography. This paper evaluates and discusses the arguments about historical and landscape geography. It examines the methodological problems in historical and landscape geography,

  2. Mapping Students' Lives: Children's Geographies, Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Anna Gahl

    2009-01-01

    The relatively new field of children's geographies builds on the theoretical foundations of human geography, critical geography, and spatial theories to examine the places and spaces children inhabit and create. This article reviews four major themes in children's geographies relevant to education: exclusion and agency, the social construction of…

  3. Evolution of nature management scientific concept in Russian geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasovskaya Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nature management is regarded as a process reflecting multiple interrelations in Nature-Human society system. As practical activities it appeared with the beginning of human nature exploitation. But its scientific concept is being developed only nowadays when synthesis of natural and human sciences knowledge became possible. This synthesis reflects the postnonclassical stage of science development in general marked by philosophers. Evolution history of nature management scientific concepts in Russia is presented. It started at the second half of the 20th c. Contributions of economic and physical geography to this process are described. Differences of nature management and geoecology which tasks are often regarded as similar are demonstrated. Geographical nature management absorbs several concepts of geoecology, economic geography, economy, culture studies but must be regarded as a an individual branch of science Examples of geographical nature management outside Russia are given. It develops within the frames of regional analysis- traditional for European and American modern geography. This analysis presents synthesis of geographical, social-economic, geoecological, ethnic-cultural and other knowledge about the studded area and is directed at revealing of nature management administration mechanism.

  4. Finding consistent strain distributions in the glenohumeral capsule between two subjects: implications for development of physical examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Nicholas J; Ellis, Benjamin J; Weiss, Jeffrey A; McMahon, Patrick J; Debski, Richard E

    2011-02-24

    The anterior-inferior glenohumeral capsule is the primary passive stabilizer to the glenohumeral joint during anterior dislocation. Physical examinations following dislocation are crucial for proper diagnosis of capsule pathology; however, they are not standardized for joint position which may lead to misdiagnoses and poor outcomes. To suggest joint positions for physical examinations where the stability provided by the capsule may be consistent among patients, the objective of this study was to evaluate the distribution of maximum principal strain on the anterior-inferior capsule using two validated subject-specific finite element models of the glenohumeral joint at clinically relevant joint positions. The joint positions with 25 N anterior load applied at 60° of glenohumeral abduction and 10°, 20°, 30° and 40° of external rotation resulted in distributions of strain that were similar between shoulders (r² ≥ 0.7). Furthermore, those positions with 20-40° of external rotation resulted in capsule strains on the glenoid side of the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament that were significantly greater than in all other capsule regions. These findings suggest that anterior stability provided by the anterior-inferior capsule may be consistent among subjects at joint positions with 60° of glenohumeral abduction and a mid-range (20-40°) of external rotation, and that the glenoid side has the greatest contribution to stability at these joint positions. Therefore, it may be possible to establish standard joint positions for physical examinations that clinicians can use to effectively diagnose pathology in the anterior-inferior capsule following dislocation and lead to improved outcomes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Association between physical exercise and quality of erection in men with ischaemic heart disease and erectile dysfunction subjected to physical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kałka, Dariusz; Domagała, Zygmunt; Dworak, Jacek; Womperski, Krzysztof; Rusiecki, Lesław; Marciniak, Wojciech; Adamus, Jerzy; Pilecki, Witold

    2013-01-01

    In addition to a beneficial effect on exercise tolerance and an associated reduction of global cardiovascular risk, modification of physical activity has a positive effect on the quality of life, reducing, among other things, the severity of erectile dysfunction (ED). The specific nature of sexual activity, which combines the need to maintain appropriate exercise tolerance and good erection quality, prompted us to evaluate the association between exercise tolerance and severity of ED in an intervention group of subjects with ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and ED in the context of cardiac rehabilitation (CR). A total of 138 men treated invasively for IHD (including 99 treated with percutaneous coronary intervention and 39 treated with coronary artery bypass grafting) who scored 21 or less in the initial IIEF-5 test were investigated. Subjects were randomised into two groups. The study group included 103 subjects (mean age 62.07 ± 8.59 years) who were subjected to a CR cycle. The control group included 35 subjects (mean age 61.43 ± 8.81 years) who were not subjected to any CR. All subjects filled out an initial and final IIEF-5 questionnaire and were evaluated twice with a treadmill exercise test. The CR cycle was carried out for a period of 6 months and included interval endurance training on a cycle ergometer (three times a week) and general fitness exercises and resistance training (twice a week). The CR cycle in the study group resulted in a statistically significant increase in exercise tolerance (7.15 ± 1.69 vs. 9.16 ± 1.84 METs,p < 0.05) and an increase in erection quality (12.51 ± 5.98 vs. 14.39 ± 6.82, p < 0.05) which was not observed in the control group. A significant effect of age on a progressive decrease in exercise tolerance and erection quality was found in the study group. Exercise tolerance and erection quality were also negatively affected by hypertension and smoking. A significant correlation between exercise tolerance and erection quality

  6. Croatian National Education Standard for Geography - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragica Husanović-Pejnović

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available We are witnesses to the increasing spreading of knowledge in all fields of scholarship and life itself. This has placed a burden on education at all levels. It has created a gap between possibilities and aspirations, which has in turn resulted in dysfunctional knowledge and dissatisfaction of pupils, teachers and parents. The objective of the Croatian National Education Standard (CNES is to resolve these problems. The CNES is a comprehensive approach to the educational process and encompasses the objectives of education and learning, educational content, proposed instruction methods, expected outcomes of teaching, instruction and the teaching environment. The overall objective here is to educate and prepare younger generations for getting their bearings under unpredictable future circumstances, for a knowledge-based economy and society. A large number of experts from the relevant higher educational and scholarly institutions and practicing teachers from throughout Croatia participated in the development of the CNES. The task of the CNES in the field of geography is to disburden pupils and to develop knowledge, skills and habits, and to train and socialize individuals, in compliance with the value system of the European Union. The CNES in geography has been presented, as in all subjects of the natural science group, through lecture topics. The structure of topics is tabular, with 13 parameters that indicate objectives of the CNES. An analysis of the CNES clearly shows that teaching geography is inconceivable without maps, because complex spatial reality cannot be perceived without corresponding knowledge, ability and habits from the field of cartography. The map, with its universal nature (cartographic symbols, is an irreplaceable lecture aid to educate and socialize pupils. Implementation of the CNES commenced in 2005 in an experimental 5% (49 of Croatia's schools. Implementation of CNES requires additional education of geography teachers

  7. Learning Strategy of Role Playing in The Material Submission of The Nuclear Power Application Environmental Physics Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Legowo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Establishment controversy of the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP that is delivered in the Environmental Physics course of Department of Physics of Faculty of Mathematic and Natural Science of Sebelas Maret University use the Role Playing strategy. This strategy brings active student playing the role of the government (policy makers, a group of scientists (neutral and community groups who refused. Literature studies and group discussions conducted by its students to summarize back knowledge of nuclear power plants, according to the role that will be presented in lectures. The course made in the form of an open debate, where the lecturer acts as a moderator / facilitator. This strategy encourages students to hone the skills of independent learning (individual or group and can help students to appreciate his knowledge either in small discussion (group as well as the delivery of openly (public debate. How to CiteLegowo, B. (2016. Learning Strategy of Role Playing in The Material Submission of The Nuclear Power Application Environmental Physics Subjects. International Journal of Active Learning, 1(1. 

  8. Big Data in Transport Geography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinau, Kristian Hegner; Agerholm, Niels; Lahrmann, Harry Spaabæk

    The emergence of new tracking technologies and Big Data has caused a transformation of the transport geography field in recent years. One new datatype, which is starting to play a significant role in public transport, is smart card data. Despite the growing focus on smart card data, there is a need...... for studies that explicitly compare the quality of this new type of data to traditional data sources. With the current focus on Big Data in the transport field, public transport planners are increasingly looking towards smart card data to analyze and optimize flows of passengers. However, in many cases...... it is not all public transport passengers in a city, region or country with a smart card system that uses the system, and in such cases, it is important to know what biases smart card data has in relation to giving a complete view upon passenger flows. This paper therefore analyses the quality and biases...

  9. Considerações sobre os conceitos de natureza, espaço e morfologia em Alexander von Humboldt e a gênese da geografia física moderna Considerations on the concepts of nature, space, and morphology in Alexander von Humboldt and on the genesis of modern physical geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Vitte

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Discute a formação dos conceitos de natureza, espaço e morfologia na obra de Alexander von Humboldt e seus impactos na formação da geografia física moderna. Influenciado pelas reflexões de Kant em Crítica do juízo e pelos trabalhos de Goethe e Schelling, Humboldt desenvolveu nova interpretação e representação para a natureza na superfície da Terra, em que o conceito de espacialidade é fundamental para a explicação dos fenômenos da natureza. A geografia física moderna estrutura-se a partir de complexo cruzamento de influências estéticas e instrumentais desenvolvidas por Humboldt, nas quais o princípio da conexão é importante para a invenção artística e científica do conceito de paisagem geográfica.The article discusses how Alexander von Humboldt developed the concepts of nature, space, and morphology in his works and impacted the shaping of modern physical geography. Influenced by Kant's ideas in Critique of judgment and also by the writings of Goethe and Schelling, Humboldt devised a new interpretation and representation of nature on Earth's surface, wherein the concept of space is essential to explaining natural phenomena. Modern physical geography is grounded in a complex interweaving of aesthetic and instrumental influences fashioned by Humboldt, with the principle of connection playing an important role in the artistic and scientific development of the notion of a geographic landscape.

  10. Imagined Transcultural Histories and Geographies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwyn Winter

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In a globalised world, an assumption prevails that the nation has somehow lost its power to regulate our lives, being undermined by other forces, either top-down through the impact of global capitalism or bottom-up through migrations, transnational religious, ethnic or social movement communities or other transversal politics. A related idea is that ‘culture’ is now irrevocably hybridised and border-zoned, that we no longer live in a world of discrete, located, identifiable and historically grounded cultures but in some unstable and for-the-moment insterstitiality, a sort of cultural interlanguage that sits outside well-mapped structures of power. Yet, just as the nation and the boundaries it sets around culture are being conceptually chased from our maps of the world, they come galloping back to reassert themselves. They do so politically, economically, legally, symbolically. Amidst all the noise of our transnationalisms, hybridities and interstitialities, the idea of what it is to be ‘Australian’ or ‘French’ or ‘Filipino’ or ‘Asian’ reaffirms itself, in mental geographies and constructed histories, as our ‘imagined community’ (to use Benedict Anderson’s famous term [Anderson 1983], or indeed, ‘imagined Other’, even if it is an imagined ‘Other’ that we would somehow wish to incorporate into our newly hybridised Self. Using the notion of transcultural mappings, the articles in this special issue investigate this apparent paradox. They look at how the Self and Other have been mapped through imagined links between geography, history and cultural location. They interrogate the tension between the persistence of mappings of the world based on discrete national or cultural identities on one hand, and, on the other hand, the push to move beyond these carefully guarded borders and problematise precise notions of identity and belonging.

  11. Hippocampal atrophy and memory dysfunction associated with physical inactivity in community-dwelling elderly subjects: The Sefuri study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Manabu; Araki, Yuko; Takashima, Yuki; Nogami, Kohjiro; Uchino, Akira; Yuzuriha, Takefumi; Yao, Hiroshi

    2017-02-01

    Physical inactivity is one of the modifiable risk factors for hippocampal atrophy and Alzheimer's disease. We investigated the relationship between physical activity, hippocampal atrophy, and memory using structural equation modeling (SEM). We examined 213 community-dwelling elderly subjects (99 men and 114 women with a mean age of 68.9 years) without dementia or clinically apparent depression. All participants underwent Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Rivermead Behavioral Memory Test (RBMT). Physical activities were assessed with a structured questionnaire. We evaluated the degree of hippocampal atrophy (z-score-referred to as ZAdvance hereafter), using a free software program-the voxel-based specific regional analysis system for Alzheimer's disease (VSRAD) based on statistical parametric mapping 8 plus Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through an Exponentiated Lie algebra. Routine magnetic resonance imaging findings were as follows: silent brain infarction, n = 24 (11.3%); deep white matter lesions, n = 72 (33.8%); periventricular hyperintensities, n = 35 (16.4%); and cerebral microbleeds, n = 14 (6.6%). Path analysis based on SEM indicated that the direct paths from leisure-time activity to hippocampal atrophy (β = -.18, p < .01) and from hippocampal atrophy to memory dysfunction (RBMT) (β = -.20, p < .01) were significant. Direct paths from "hippocampus" gray matter volume to RBMT and MMSE were highly significant, while direct paths from "whole brain" gray matter volume to RBMT and MMSE were not significant. The presented SEM model fit the data reasonably well. Based on the present SEM analysis, we found that hippocampal atrophy was associated with age and leisure-time physical inactivity, and hippocampal atrophy appeared to cause memory dysfunction, although we are unable to infer a causal or temporal association between hippocampal atrophy and memory dysfunction from the present observational study.

  12. Blue space geographies: Enabling health in place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Ronan; Kistemann, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Drawing from research on therapeutic landscapes and relationships between environment, health and wellbeing, we propose the idea of 'healthy blue space' as an important new development Complementing research on healthy green space, blue space is defined as; 'health-enabling places and spaces, where water is at the centre of a range of environments with identifiable potential for the promotion of human wellbeing'. Using theoretical ideas from emotional and relational geographies and critical understandings of salutogenesis, the value of blue space to health and wellbeing is recognised and evaluated. Six individual papers from five different countries consider how health can be enabled in mixed blue space settings. Four sub-themes; embodiment, inter-subjectivity, activity and meaning, document multiple experiences within a range of healthy blue spaces. Finally, we suggest a considerable research agenda - theoretical, methodological and applied - for future work within different forms of blue space. All are suggested as having public health policy relevance in social and public space. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Geography, sustainability and the concept of glocalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Theodoor Verstappen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability focuses on the question whether our planet can sustain the present and future global human impact. The related environmental issues and particularly global changes, such as increasing temperatures, rising sea level, deforestation and deteriorating biodiversity, have become a key subject in earth science research. The social and economic components of sustainability, however, get less scientific attention and are often ignored in political and religious circles. Emphasis is on the symptoms of the issue rather than on coping strategies. Are the growing population numbers and social discrepancies compatible with sustainability and is the free market economy of our consumption society compatible with the ecological limits of growth, social balance and human aspirations? Sustainable development is a realistic concept only if its economic aspects are shouldered by social and environmental considerations and if regional and local diversity is respected. The globalization required today thus should be coupled with decentralized glocalization. In this interdisciplinary field of regional differentiation geography can make important contributions. Earth observation from satellites and data handling using geoinformation systems are essential tools.

  14. Geography Textbooks, Pedagogy and Disciplinary Traditions

    OpenAIRE

    Sidaway, James; Hall, Tim

    2018-01-01

    We consider geography textbooks in the context of discussions of canonicity, disciplinary histories and genre. Our paper, an introduction to the set that follows, presents an argument about the importance of textbooks and the shifting relationship of geography at different levels (school and university) to disciplinary history in the context of changes in the modes of publication. The papers that follow draw on material from a range of anglophone textbooks with reflections from Aoteraea/New Z...

  15. Contrapuntal urbanisms: towards a postcolonial relational geography

    OpenAIRE

    Cian OâCallaghan

    2012-01-01

    Relational geography has reformulated how we study cities, but has reiterated perennial problems in the discipline between the utility of theory and the complex realities it purports to represent. I argue that by constructing this problem as a dialogue between urban and postcolonial studies, we can find better ways to understand this frustration and reflexively engage with it. Through reworking Edward Said’s ‘contrapuntal’ perspective, I propose a relational urban geography which is more sens...

  16. The creation and circulation of public geographies

    OpenAIRE

    Kitchin, Rob; Linehan, Denis; O'Callaghan, Cian; Lawton, Philip

    2013-01-01

    In response to the commentaries, we discuss further how social media disrupts and remakes the creation and circulation of geographical knowledges and potentially reconfigures the moral economy of the social sciences. In particular, we examine questions of what is meant by public geography, the publics which such geographies serve, alternative and complementary approaches to social media, the politics of authorship within collective blogs, the politics and mechanisms of knowledge c...

  17. China Report, Agriculture Hunan Agricultural Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-13

    plant stalks and stems for high temperature composting in heaps, with regulation of the per- centage of carbon and nitrogen to promoting rotting and...300127 JPRS-CAG-84-022 13 August 1984 China Report AGRICULTURE HUNAN AGRICULTURAL GEOGRAPHY DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A \\ Approved for...Road, Arlington, Virginia 22201. JPRS-CAG-84-022 13 August 1984 CHINA REPORT AGRICULTURE HUNAN AGRICULTURAL GEOGRAPHY Changsha HUNAN NONGYE DILI

  18. Predicting Self-Rated Mental and Physical Health: The Contributions of Subjective Socioeconomic Status and Personal Relative Deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell J. Callan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lower subjective socioeconomic status (SSS and higher personal relative deprivation (PRD relate to poorer health. Both constructs concern people’s perceived relative social position, but they differ in their emphasis on the reference groups people use to determine their comparative disadvantage (national population vs. similar others and the importance of resentment that may arise from such adverse comparisons. We investigated the relative utility of SSS and PRD as predictors of self-rated physical and mental health (e.g., self-rated health, stress, health complaints. Across 6 studies, self-rated physical and mental health were on the whole better predicted by measures of PRD than by SSS while controlling for objective socioeconomic status (SES, with SSS rarely contributing unique variance over and above PRD and SES. Studies 4 to 6 discount the possibility that the superiority of PRD over SSS in predicting health is due to psychometric differences (e.g., reliability or response biases between the measures.

  19. Wide Disagreement Between Alternative Assessments of Premorbid Physical Activity: Subjective Patient and Surrogate Reports and Objective Smartphone Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluck, Samuel; Summers, Matthew J; Goddard, Thomas P; Andrawos, Alice; Smith, Natalie C; Lange, Kylie; Iwashyna, Theodore J; Deane, Adam M

    2017-10-01

    Surrogate-decision maker and patient self-reported estimates of the distances walked prior to acute illness are subjective and may be imprecise. It may be possible to extract objective data from a patient's smartphone, specifically, step and global position system data, to quantify physical activity. The objectives were to 1) assess the agreement between surrogate-decision maker and patient self-reported estimates of distance and time walked prior to resting and daily step-count and 2) determine the feasibility of extracting premorbid physical activity (step and global position system) data from critically ill patients. Prospective cohort study. Quaternary ICU. Fifty consecutively admitted adult patients who owned a smartphone, who were ambulatory at baseline, and who remained in ICU for more than 48 hours participated. There was no agreement between patients and surrogates for all premorbid walking metrics (mean bias 108% [99% lower to 8,700% higher], 83% [97% to 2,100%], and 71% [96% to 1,080%], for distance, time, and steps, respectively). Step and/or global position system data were successfully extracted from 24 of 50 phones (48%; 95% CI, 35-62%). Surrogate-decision makers, but not patient self-reported, estimates of steps taken per day correlated with smartphone data (surrogates: n = 13, ρ = 0.56, p smartphones was feasible in approximately 50% of patients.

  20. Perceived social support as a moderator between perceived discrimination and subjective well-being among people with physical disabilities in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzick, Michal; Kagan, Maya; Tal-Katz, Patricia

    2017-05-26

    Perceived social support has gained importance as a significant preventive factor of depressive symptoms and as helpful for rebuilding feelings of self-worth and subjective well-being among people with physical disabilities. The current study examined whether perceived social support moderates the association between perceived discrimination and subjective well-being among people with physical disabilities in Israel. Data were collected by means of structured questionnaires among a convenience sample of 433 people with physical disabilities in Israel and hierarchical multiple regression was performed. The findings reveal that perceived social support has a moderating role in the association between perceived discrimination and subjective well-being among people with physical disabilities, such that those with low and moderate levels of perceived social support showed a negative association between perceived discrimination and subjective well-being, while those with high levels of perceived social support showed no association between perceived discrimination and subjective well-being. Findings are discussed in light of the social model of disability, and practical implications are suggested. Implications for Rehabilitation A negative association was found between perceived discrimination and subjective well-being among people with physical disabilities with low and moderate levels of perceived social support. Professionals working with people with physical disabilities must acknowledge the importance of social support for people with physical disabilities and for their families. Professionals working with people with physical disabilities should take a proactive approach to locating disabled people who do not receive or do not have adequate social support and offer them assistance. Professionals working with people with physical disabilities should engage in wide social activities aimed at providing resources and opportunities to service beneficiaries. Society

  1. The Reform of National Geography Standards in South Korea--Trends, Challenges and Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongwon; Butt, Graham

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine recent changes in the geography national curriculum in South Korea through the lenses of three curriculum components that often find themselves in competition--subject content, educational processes and national/social purposes. In recent years, the prevailing national and social aims outlined for the…

  2. An Example of the Use of Personal Analogy in Teaching Geography: If I Were a Mineral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman, Nese

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to use personal analogy as a pre-organizer. The subject of the personal analogy is chosen as minerals. For this purpose, geography teacher candidates were asked the questions, "Which mineral would you like to be? Why?" They explain the properties of the minerals by matching them with their own…

  3. Combining Geography, Math, and Science to Teach Climate Change and Sea Level Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldakowski, Ray; Johnson, Ashley

    2018-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of integrating geography into existing math and science curriculum to teach climate change and sea level rise. The desired outcome is to improve student performance in all three subjects. A sample of 120 fifth graders from three schools were taught the integrated curriculum over a period of two to three weeks.…

  4. Teaching Landscape in Spanish Universities: Looking for New Approaches in Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alomar-Garau, Gabriel; Gómez-Zotano, José; Arias-García, Jonatan

    2017-01-01

    In order to determine the degree of implementation of the teaching of landscape in the new curriculum for Geography Degrees in Spain, some aspects are analysed: educational plans are analysed and verified, the presence therein of subjects directly devoted to landscape, as well as the inclusion of indirect or cross landscape issues in the subjects…

  5. Reflected Places of Childhood: Applying the Ideas of Humanistic and Cultural Geographies to Environmental Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Sirpa

    2017-01-01

    The article investigates people-environment relationships from the viewpoint of humanistic and cultural geographies and highlights the importance of subjective experiences and emotional place attachment in the construction of environmental attitudes. Some core concepts of these research fields (e.g. "place,"…

  6. Applying Geography Course Projects to Issues in City Resilience and Global Connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalafsky, Ronald V.; Rosko, Helen M.

    2017-01-01

    Globalization would appear to be a subject that easily could be addressed in geography classrooms, yet this is not always the case. In terms of pedagogy, many geographers are concerned whether the field has been adequately engaging various components of this topic (e.g., connectivity, core-periphery), especially in terms of making the subject…

  7. The Importance of Direct Experience: A Philosophical Defence of Fieldwork in Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Max

    2009-01-01

    Human geography fieldwork is important. Research has shown that when students "see it for themselves" their enjoyment and understanding is enhanced. In addition it helps develop subject-specific and transferable skills, promotes 'active learning' and links theory to "real world" examples in a "spiral of learning".…

  8. Student Perspectives on the Teaching of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in Geography Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seremet, Mehmet; Chalkley, Brian

    2015-01-01

    In an era when graduate employability is a key concern, the teaching of geographical information systems (GIS) has become a subject of considerable interest. This paper reports on a study of the GIS student learning experience using student survey data from six UK geography undergraduate programmes. The findings show that although students'…

  9. Geographies of American Popular Music: Introducing Students to Basic Geographic Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Stephen S.

    2010-01-01

    Popular music can be used to study many subjects and issues related to the social sciences. "Geographies of American Popular Music" was a workshop that not only examined the history and development of select genres of American music, it also introduced students to basic geographic concepts such as the culture hearth and spatial diffusion. Through…

  10. Geografia de America Latina. Grados Seis-Diez (Geography of Latin America. Grades Six-Ten).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford Univ., CA. Stanford Program on International and Cross Cultural Education.

    This publication, intended for Spanish-speaking students in grades 6-10, has three main objectives. First, it serves as an introduction (or refresher) to basic geographic concepts. Second, it is an examination of the physical and political geography of Latin America. Third, it is designed to help students examine maps in a critical manner. The…

  11. Teaching the Six Essential Elements of Geography with Quality Children's Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    In this article the author describes how she teaches third and sixth grade classes about the six essential elements of geography at the beginning of each school year. The six elements organize the eighteen national standards and include: the world in spatial terms, places and regions, physical systems, human systems, environment and society, and…

  12. A Philosophy of Geography for New Zealand Schools. Foreword: Clark on a Philosophy of Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Provides background information on Andrew Clark specifically addressing his work in geography while in New Zealand in order to place Clark's 1941 paper entitled "A Philosophy of Geography for New Zealand Schools" into intellectual context by emphasizing links between this paper and his later work. Provides his 1941 paper in full. (CMK)

  13. The Nature of Geography and Its Perspectives in AP® Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Alexander B.; Hare, Phillip R.

    2016-01-01

    AP Human Geography students need to develop an understanding of what it means to examine the world around them from a geographic perspective. Focusing attention on geography's concern with spatial relationships, place characteristics, and geographic context helps student appreciate the nature of the discipline and the insights it offers. These…

  14. Placing Advanced Placement® Human Geography: Its Role in U.S. Geography Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Sarah Witham

    2016-01-01

    This article examines Advanced Placement Human Geography (AP HG) in the context of its place in efforts to reform geography education. It presents a critical analysis of the AP program and its curriculum, asserting that it represents "powerful knowledge" as conceptualized by Young. It concludes with a call for research in AP HG aligned…

  15. An Investigation into Geography Teachers' Use of Current Events in Geography Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degirmenci, Yavuz; Ilter, Ilhan

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the extent to which geography teachers use current events within the context of their geography instruction, their sources of information about current events, the methods and techniques they adopt while using current events in their teaching and the skills and values they expect their students to develop. The…

  16. Fieldwork in Geography Education: Defining or Declining? The State of Fieldwork in Canadian Undergraduate Geography Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Heather; Leydon, Joseph; Wincentak, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the prevalence of fieldwork in undergraduate Geography programs in Canada. It examines the presence of fieldwork, provided through both field courses and courses that include fieldwork components, by reviewing program requirements and course offerings in undergraduate geography programs. The research explores the extent to…

  17. Perspectives on Urban Geography in Advanced Placement® Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton-Short, Lisa; Monk, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    "Perspectives on Urban Geography" constitutes a major part of the AP Human Geography course outline. In this article, urban core revitalization and rising suburban poverty are considered as two challenges facing cities in developed countries; and industrialization and the growth of megacities as two challenges facing cities in developing…

  18. Subjective and objective assessment of physical activity in multiple sclerosis and their relation to health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Theresa; Behrens, Janina R; Grobelny, Anuschka; Otte, Karen; Mansow-Model, Sebastian; Kayser, Bastian; Bellmann-Strobl, Judith; Brandt, Alexander U; Paul, Friedemann; Schmitz-Hübsch, Tanja

    2017-01-13

    Physical activity (PA) is frequently restricted in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) and aiming to enhance PA is considered beneficial in this population. We here aimed to explore two standard methods (subjective plus objective) to assess PA reduction in PwMS and to describe the relation of PA to health-related quality of life (hrQoL). PA was objectively measured over a 7-day period in 26 PwMS (EDSS 1.5-6.0) and 30 matched healthy controls (HC) using SenseWear mini® armband (SWAmini) and reported as step count, mean total and activity related energy expenditure (EE) as well as time spent in PA of different intensities. Measures of EE were also derived from self-assessment with IPAQ (International Physical Activity Questionnaire) long version, which additionally yielded information on the context of PA and a classification into subjects' PA levels. To explore the convergence between both types of assessment, IPAQ categories (low, moderate, high) were related to selected PA parameters from objective assessment using ANOVA. Group differences and associated effect sizes for all PA parameters as well as their relation to clinical and hrQoL measures were determined. Both, SWAmini and IPAQ assessment, captured differences in PA between PwMS and HC. IPAQ categories fit well with common cut-offs for step count (p = 0.002) and mean METs (p = 0.004) to determine PA levels with objective devices. Correlations between specifically matched pairs of IPAQ and SWAmini parameters ranged between r .288 and r .507. Concerning hrQoL, the lower limb mobility subscore was related to four PA measures, while a relation with patients' report of general contentment was only seen for one. Both methods of assessment seem applicable in PwMS and able to describe reductions in daily PA at group level. Whether they can be used to track individual effects of interventions to enhance PA levels needs further exploration. The relation of PA measures with hrQoL seen with lower limb

  19. Model and Effectiveness of Endurance Exercise to Increase Physical Fitness in Intellectual Disability Subjects with Obesity: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirza Z Tamin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to design a model and assess the effectiveness of endurance exercise to increase physical fitness in intelectual disability (ID patients with obesity. Methods: a randomized-controlled clinical trial was performed in ID patients with obesity aged 10-30 years old from all Special School in DKI Jakarta, which were randomly allocated into 3 groups and then given 3 different type of exercises: lower extremity muscles endurance exercise for 20 RM followed by cardiorespiratory endurance exercise for 24-25 minutes (type I, lower extremity muscles endurance exercises for 10 RM followed by cardiorespiratory endurance exercises for 26-27 minutes (type II, and threw a tennis ball with 10 m distance for 10 minutes as control (type III. These program was performed 3 times a week for 4 months. Assesment of the exercise effectiveness was done by measuring maximum load that can be lifted and six-minutes walking test on rectangular track which was converted with the VO2 max prediction formula. Analysis was perfomed with Kruskal Wallis test. Results: two hundred and twelve (212 subjects were included in the study, randomly allocated into three types (I, II, and III of exercises groups. The type II of endurance exercise model was proved to be more effective in increasing lower extremity muscles endurance level compared to type I and III for ID patients with obesity (p<0.05. Meanwhile, type I of endurance exercise model was proved to be more effective in increasing cardiorespiratory endurance level compared to type II and III for ID patients with obesity (p<0.05. Conclusion: lower extremity muscles endurance exercise followed by a cardiorespiratory endurance exercise can be used to increase physical fitness in ID patients with obesity. Key words: intelectual disability patient, obesity, lower extremity muscles and cardiorespiratory endurance exercise, lower extremity muscles endurance level, cardiorespiratory endurance level.

  20. Development of population geography from antropogeography to spatial-analitical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasovski Milena

    2013-01-01

    overly broad. But two research areas were of particular interest to geographers - population distribution and migration. Both items acquired an international dimension. Recently, eminent population geographers exchanged various view points in an attempt to provoke new thinking on subject and define the answers of new fields research in population geography. Population geography in the XXI Century is no longer a field comprised of spatial applications of fertility, mortality and migration only. Contemporary population geography is theoretically sophisticated, integrating spatial analysis, GIS and geo-referenced data. Future progress in the field of population geography will derive from more research at the intersections of population processes and societal issues and concerns. Major themes of future empirical researches in population geography should be: global population growth, studies of migration, transnationalism, human security issues, population-health-environment nexus, human-environment sustainability, economic development and poverty issues. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176017: Problemi i tendencije razvoja geoprostornih sistema Republike Srbije

  1. Schools That Make a Difference to Post-Compulsory Uptake of Physical Science Subjects: Some comparative case studies in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Judith; Lubben, Fred; Hampden-Thompson, Gillian

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents the findings of the qualitative component of a combined methods research study that explores a range of individual and school factors that influence the uptake of chemistry and physics in post-compulsory study in England. The first phase involves using the National Pupil Database to provide a sampling frame to identify four matched pairs of high-uptake and low-uptake schools by salient school factors. Case studies of these eight schools indicate that students employ selection strategies related to their career aspirations, their sense of identity and tactics, and their prior experience. The school factors influencing subject choice relate to school management, student support and guidance, and student empowerment. The most notable differences between students in high-uptake and low-uptake schools are that students in high-uptake schools appear to make a proactive choice in relation to career aspirations, rather than a reactive choice on the basis of past experience. Schools with a high uptake offer a diverse science curriculum in the final two years of compulsory study, set higher examination entry requirements for further study and, crucially, provide a range of opportunities for students to interact with the world of work and to gain knowledge and experience of science-related careers.

  2. How academic career and habits related to the school environment influence on academic performance in the physical education subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vizuete Carrizosa, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to analyze the degree of influence of some school habits and scholar trayectory on academic achievement in physical education (PE students in secondary education (ESO in the city of Badajoz. A total sample of 1197 students in compulsory secondary education 49.9% men, and 50.1% women, participated in the study. They spent a questionnaire filled out by the river questions about major school habits, of which eight variables were analyzed also included the final course in the subject of EF as a variable for analysis of academic performance. Through statistical analysis with ANOVA, Mann-Whitney U, and Kruskal Wallis H, there are significant differences in PE scores in all variables analyzed (p d».001, among which being repetitive, being truant, the time to read and study daily. In the variable environment perceived in class, there is a degree of significance (p d».05. Pupils who were repeaters, missing more classes or were delayed more times than read and studied less and earned a worse environment in their classes, are those who obtained poorer performance on EF.

  3. Subjectivities in Research in Science Education presented at the National Symposium of Physics Education of the last five years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Choiti Yamazaki

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a survey conducted in a public university in the country, which aimed to identify the presence elements ordinarily related to subjective phenomena, in the works published in National Symposium of Physics Education, an event that provides meeting between teachers, researchers and students from around the country. The elements to which we have referred are found in contemporary didactic and pedagogical proposals, because it is identified that purely cognitive or even cultural rights are not sufficient to understand the phenomena that happen in the classroom, or more broadly, in education as a whole. The analysis contemplated the publications of the past 3 symposia, and the results infer a small increase of citations of these elements. However, this growth must be questioned because the quotes are made in isolation, not being taken to support the analysis of the authors. In addition, this research also shows that the presence of these elements is very small compared with the total number of papers published in the events.

  4. The Geography of Financial Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Bumcrot

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores how well equipped today’s households are to make complex financial decisions in the face of often high-cost and high-risk financial instruments. Specifically we focus on financial literacy. Most importantly, we describe the geography of financial literacy, i.e., how financial literacy is distributed across the fifty US states. We describe the correlation of financial literacy and some important aggregate variables, such as state-level poverty rates. Finally, we examine the extent to which differences in financial literacy can be explained by states’ demographic and economic characteristics. To assess financial literacy, five questions were added to the 2009 National Financial Capability Study, covering fundamental concepts of economics and finance encountered in everyday life: simple calculations about interest rates and inflation, the workings of risk diversification, the relationship between bond prices and interest rates, and the relationship between interest payments and maturity in mortgages. We constructed an index of financial literacy based on the number of correct answers provided by each respondent to the five financial literacy questions. The financial literacy index reveals wide variation in financial literacy across states. Much of the variation is attributable to differences in the demographic makeup of the states; however, a handful of states have either higher or lower levels of financial literacy than is explained by demographics alone. Also, there is a significant correlation between the financial literacy of a state and that state’s poverty level. The findings indicate directions for policy makers and practitioners interested in targeting areas where financial literacy is low.

  5. Demographic Trends (1970-2010) for Coastal Geographies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Demographic Trends (1970-2010) were derived from Census Block Group Data for 13 different coastal geographies. For a full listing of the geographies available,...

  6. The Geography of the Knowledge Economy in Denmark:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytt, Christine Benna

    2011-01-01

    and regions. Consequently, debates about the knowledge economy have raised questions about how geography affects processes and practices of knowledge creation. Two main approaches have been particularly influential in economic geography: the first stresses geographical proximity between economic actors...

  7. Geography in Australian Society, Part Two: The Current Situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, John; Powell, Joe

    1985-01-01

    Educational trends and practices in geography instruction at the secondary and college levels in Australia are examined and features that can make geography a core element in Australia's reformed educational system are discussed. (RM)

  8. Philosophy and science in geography, XVI-XXI centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horacio Capel

    2016-03-01

    Without losing the critical contributions that the discipline had in the last half century, and the ones that they have been made in various branches of human geography, from the historical to cultural geography.

  9. EDUCOPEDIA, A TOOL TO TEACH GEOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Bernardo Andrade

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The present work proposal had as objective to analyze how the Educopedia platform referring to the Geography discipline, created in 2010, by the Municipal Department of Education of the City of Rio de Janeiro, can contribute to carry out a geographic education of the elementary school students. The platform is online, contains digital classes in which students and teachers can access self-explanatory activities from anywhere and anytime. The use of new Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs is growing and can help students develop their cognitive ability to think about concepts, contents and geographic phenomena. As a qualitative research methodology, the content analysis was used, in which the analysis of the page was developed, as well as the general geography contents described. As a result of the preliminary analysis, it is possible to verify the importance of using the platform, as soon as the teacher develops other practices and learning activities during Geography classes.

  10. BRICS: an explanation in critical geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnendra Meena

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BRICS, an abbreviation for Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa, a group of five influential and emerging economies successfully completed its fifth annual summit in Durban during March 26-27, 2013. A significantly unique feature of the group is its geographical spread as evident from the location of these five constituent states which are situated in four continents. The paper seeks to explain the phenomenon of the disparate group BRICS through literature in Critical Geography as it is understood that the recent phase of globalization has created spatial patterns which were hitherto not experienced and therefore not clearly recognized in the literature on International Relations and traditional geography. Such spatially variegated groupings like the BRICS could be analyzed and interpreted in Critical Geography and Critical Geopolitics literature through three important concepts: a Space b Geographical and Geopolitical Imaginations and c Region. The paper seeks to explain BRICS through these conceptual tools.

  11. Change in subjective social status following HIV diagnosis and associated effects on mental and physical health among HIV-positive gay men in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, Wendy; Lyons, Anthony

    2017-07-01

    This study investigates the impact of HIV diagnosis on subjective social status and if changes are linked to health outcomes. Two measures of subjective social status, socio-economic and standing in the community were examined in 342 Australian HIV-positive gay men in 2014. Participants recalled ratings at diagnosis were compared with current ratings. Self-reported mental (psychological distress, self-esteem, positive mental health and satisfaction with life) and physical health (self-rated health, CD4 count, viral load). Half of the participants reported improvements in subjective socio-economic status (59%) or standing in the community (52%) since diagnosis, yet one quarter reported socio-economic status (25%) or standing in the community had decreased (23%). Increases in either measure of subjective social status were linked to higher self-esteem, positive mental health, satisfaction with life and better self-rated health. Decreases in subjective social status, however, were strongly linked to poorer outcomes on all mental health measures. Decreases in standing in the community were also associated with poorer physical self-rated health. Most participants reported their subjective social status were the same or better since diagnosis. Changes in subjective social status following diagnosis were strongly linked to mental health outcomes. Those who reported a decrease in subjective social status were particularly vulnerable to mental health problems.

  12. Conceptualizing violence for health and medical geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVerteuil, Geoffrey

    2015-05-01

    Despite the fact that violence is a major threat to public health, the term itself is rarely considered as a phenomenon unto itself, and rarely figures explicitly in work by health and medical geographers. In response, I propose a definitionally and conceptually more robust approach to violence using a tripartite frame (interpersonal violence, structural violence, mass intentional violence) and suggest critical interventions through which to apply this more explicit and conceptually more robust approach: violence and embodiment via substance abuse in health geography, and structural violence via mental illness in medical geography. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Rethinking Postgraduate Geography Education in the USA: Issues and Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Kenneth; Bednarz, Sarah; Monk, Janice; Solem, Michael; Stoltman, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Postgraduate geography education in the USA is growing and changing. In recent years, the number of postgraduate programs has increased at both the doctoral and master's levels. Interest in improving and reforming doctoral education has increased dramatically both inside and outside geography, and geography has been involved in these reforms.…

  14. New Teaching Opportunities and Challenges for US Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Robert A.

    1985-01-01

    Today two opportunities are open to geography educators. First they must respond to the new opportunity to return geography to a place in the preparation of business students. Second, geography educators must take advantage of the current interest in international understanding and global education. New courses and textbooks are needed. (RM)

  15. Teachers Envisioning Future Geography Education at Their Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béneker, Tine; Palings, Hans; Krause, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    One of the challenges of a geography teacher education program is preparing teachers for their leading roles in keeping geography education relevant for the young people of today. It is important to allow teachers to think about geography education and the future and to foster their curriculum-making competences. In a master course at Fontys…

  16. Teachers envisioning future geography education at their schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beneker, Tine; Palings, Hans; Krause, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    One of the challenges of a geography teacher education program is preparing teachers for their leading roles in keeping geography education relevant for the young people of today. It is important to allow teachers to think about geography education and the future and to foster their

  17. The Problems of Geography Education and Some Suggestions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokce, Nazli

    2009-01-01

    When teacher education programs in Turkey are scrutinized in detail, it can be seen that geography education is included in the teacher training programs of Geography, Primary School, and Social Studies. These programs aim to provide field knowledge, general culture, and field teaching skills. The success of geography teaching depends on defining…

  18. A Comparative Analysis of Geography Education: International Samples and Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incekara, Suleyman

    2010-01-01

    In today's world, the developments being experienced in geography education are focusing on issues like the following: integrating technology into geography courses, placing a comprehensive and integrative perspective regarding geography into the curriculum, stressing independent learning and team-learning simultaneously, educating students to…

  19. Multimedia tests and geographical education: the 2008 International Geography Olympiad

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schee, J.A.; Kolkman, R.

    2010-01-01

    Although there is a widespread interest in testing in geography, very few empirical studies exist of internationally validated testing models. Arguably the best international geography test in secondary education is found in the International Geography Olympiad, and this test is the focus of this

  20. Incidence of atrial fibrillation is associated with age and gender in subjects practicing physical exercise: A meta-analysis and meta-regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Natale Daniele; Santoro, Francesco; Correale, Michele; De Gennaro, Luisa; Conte, Giusy; Di Biase, Matteo

    2016-10-15

    The link between physical activity and the risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) remains controversial. We therefore sought to further assess by a meta-analysis whether increased levels of physical activity may increase the risk of AF. In October 2015, a PubMed research was conducted for studies that investigated this topic. We identified 11 relevant studies with a total of 81,787 participants. The pooled analysis did not show an increased risk of AF in subjects practicing physical activity (odds ratio (OR)=0.92, 95% C.I.=0.84-1.01, p=0.077, I(2)=90%). However, given the observed large heterogeneity among studies, a subgroup analysis was performed in order to identify possible variables influencing the risk of AF. Significantly higher risk of AF in subjects with reported physical activity was found in studies enrolling exclusively male participants (OR=7.49, 95% C.I.=3.12-19.01, pmeta-regression analysis between age and OR of AF (p=0.047). In conclusion, in our meta-analysis, there is a non-significant trend toward lower risk of AF in subjects practicing physical activity. The risk seems higher in male subjects. A reverse correlation between age and risk of AF seems to be evident. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. M-learning in a geography lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirski, Katri

    2014-05-01

    their work in Google Earth where they did a tour of their journey. In the feedback students said that it was a very interesting and an educational practical task. A new opportunity in M-learning is to use QR codes. This means that you don't have to print out worksheets with questions. You can hide question in the code and students can read them with their own devices on site. From the Master's thesis I also developed a tutorial material named "M-learning in a geography lesson" (in Estonian: M-õpe geograafiatunnis), you can see it in the webpage katrimope@wordpress.com. The tutorial received a second place on the Estonian study material contest in 2013. This is only one example on how to use M-learning. In Gustav Adolf Grammar School we use M-learning in lots of different subjects because it's really important in modern school to link new technologies, surrounding environment and learning for the purpose of better obtainment of knowledge.

  2. Effects of Counselor and Subject Race and Counselor Physical Attractiveness on Impressions and Expectations of a Female Counselor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Cheryl F.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Subjects' ratings of counselor charactristics were more positive for attractive than for unattractive counselors, regardless of subject or counselor race. Black counselors were expected to be more helpful than were White counselors. Black subjects saw attractive counselors as being more helpful than unattractive counselors. (Author/BL)

  3. Review of Effects of Physical Activity on Strength, Balance, Mobility and ADL Performance in Elderly Subjects with Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankevoort, Christiaan G.; van Heuvelen, Marieke J. G.; Boersma, Froukje; Luning, Helga; de Jong, Jeltsje; Scherder, Erik J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims: Elderly individuals with dementia are vulnerable for a decline in physical functioning and basic activities of daily living (BADL) which can lead to a decline in autonomy and participation. This study reviews the effect of physical activity on physical functioning and BADL in

  4. Impact of ethnicity, geography, and disease on the microbiota in health and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prideaux, Lani; Kang, Seungha; Wagner, Josef; Buckley, Michael; Mahar, Jackie E; De Cruz, Peter; Wen, Zhonghui; Chen, Liping; Xia, Bing; van Langenberg, Daniel R; Lockett, Trevor; Ng, Siew C; Sung, Joseph J Y; Desmond, Paul; McSweeney, Chris; Morrison, Mark; Kirkwood, Carl D; Kamm, Michael A

    2013-12-01

    The gut microbiota is central to health and disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. Differences in microbiota related to geography and ethnicity may hold the key to recent changes in the incidence of microbiota-related disorders. Gut mucosal microbiota was analyzed in 190 samples from 87 Caucasian and Chinese subjects, from Australia and Hong Kong, comprising 22 patients with Crohn's disease, 30 patients with ulcerative colitis, 29 healthy controls, and 6 healthy relatives of patients with Crohn's disease. Bacterial 16S rRNA microarray and 454 pyrosequencing were performed. The microbiota was diverse in health, regardless of ethnicity or geography (operational taxonomic unit number and Shannon diversity index). Ethnicity and geography, however, did affect microbial composition. Crohn's disease resulted in reduced bacterial diversity, regardless of ethnicity or geography, and was the strongest determinant of composition. In ulcerative colitis, diversity was reduced in Chinese subjects only, suggesting that ethnicity is a determinant of bacterial diversity, whereas composition was determined by disease and ethnicity. Specific phylotypes were different between health and disease. Chinese patients with inflammatory bowel disease more often than healthy Chinese tended to have had a Western diet in childhood, in the East and West. The healthy microbiota is diverse but compositionally affected by geographical and ethnic factors. The microbiota is substantially altered in inflammatory bowel disease, but ethnicity may also play an important role. This may be key to the changing epidemiology in developing countries, and emigrants to the West.

  5. Geography Teachers' Concepts of Working with Thinking through Geography Strategies--Results of an Empirical Reconstructive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applis, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The educational standards in geography in the German-speaking world separately refer to the areas of competence of judgment and evaluation and thus attach outstanding importance to reflective value orientation in geography classes. The tasks and challenges that arise from that for geography teachers will be investigated in a…

  6. Putting Geography Education into Place: What Geography Educators Can Learn from Place-Based Education, and Vice Versa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Andrei L.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, geography educators have sought to make their pedagogy relevant to pressing social and environmental issues, but these efforts have largely imported pedagogies from outside of geography. In place-based education, in contrast, place--one of geography's defining themes--serves as a central organizing principle for a socially…

  7. STUDENTS’ EXPECTATIONS ABOUT THE STUDY OF GEOGRAPHY IN HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ILEANA VASILESCU

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This research emerged from the idea that the education system in Romania would achieve efficiency and applicability if it acknowledged the needs of students, who are in fact the ones who benefit from the system. The research was based on the scientific implementation of the methodology of designing and administering questionnaires, which were devised bearing in mind the importance of their purpose and role as instruments of inquiry. The aim of this study is that of identifying and reporting the students’ views on Geography as a subject, with a view to materializing its findings, particularly at this stage when the education system is redefining itself. In this context,after designing the questionnaire, we administered it to 120 12th grade students from three high schools in Baia Mare. The interpretation of the results enabled us to draw some conclusions which reflected a significant gap between students’ expectations and what we considered to be in line with the requirements of a society based on knowledge, globalization, and what they were offered by the education system in terms of Geography.

  8. Geography is not destiny: geography, institutions and literacy in England, 1837–63

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory Clark; Rowena Gray

    2014-01-01

    Geography made rural society in the southeast of England unequal. Economies of scale in grain growing created a farmer elite and many landless labourers. In the pastoral northwest, in contrast, family farms dominated, with few hired labourers and modest income disparities. Did this geography driven difference in social structure influence educational outcomes in England 1810–45? Using new micro-level data we show that this geographically driven inequality is not a strong predictor of regional...

  9. Care recipients’ physical frailty is independently associated with subjective burden in informal caregivers in the community setting: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thom J. Ringer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical frailty is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in community-dwelling older adults. Burden in informal caregivers of older adults causes significant physical and psychological distress. However, the relationship between these two clinical phenomena has not been extensively studied. This cross-sectional study evaluated the relationship between physical frailty of community-dwelling older adults attending an outpatient geriatric clinic and the subjective burden reported by their informal caregivers. Methods We measured the following characteristics of 45 patient-caregiver dyads attending an outpatient geriatric assessment clinic: Physical frailty using the Fried Frail Scale (FFS; self-reported independence in activities of daily living (ADL using the Katz Index; clinical diagnosis of dementia; and subjective caregiver burden using the short 12-item version of the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI. Multivariable linear regression was performed with FFS, Katz Index score, gender, age, and diagnosis of dementia as independent variables, and ZBI score as the dependent variable. Results Only physical frailty significantly predicted caregiver burden (β = 8.98 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.15, 15.82. Conclusions Physical frailty is independently associated with caregiver burden in a population of community-dwelling older adults. Despite limitations related to sample size and lack of data about caregiver characteristics, this study suggests that the relationship between physical frailty and caregiver burden merits further study.

  10. Geography, GIS and Employability in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seremet, Mehmet; Chalkley, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Although higher education in Turkey does not have especially well-advanced systems and resources for addressing graduate employability, two developments are making it particularly important for Turkish geography departments to give increased priority to this agenda. One is the country's new Higher Education Qualifications Framework and the other…

  11. Human discourses, animal geographies: Imagining Umfolozi's White ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper reviews recent literature in the field of animal geographies, a scholarship that reflects a developing interest in the way discursive orderings shape human attitudes to animals, as well as a concern with the spatial outcomes for animals of these discourses. Insights from this literature are employed to narrate the ...

  12. Geography Education for "An Attainable Global Perspective"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Phil; Pawson, Eric; Solem, Michael; Ray, Waverly

    2014-01-01

    This article considers approaches to promoting global perspectives as both cognitive and affective learning outcomes within geography education. Particular attention is paid to the work of Robert Hanvey, who proposed "An Attainable Global Perspective" in the 1970s, which explicitly ties to the content and perspectives embedded in…

  13. Environmental Concerns in the Geography Curriculum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'at all levels of education and in all regions of the world' (Reinfried 2009:229). The geography National Curriculum Statement (NCS) (Department of Education, .... economy. Drawing from UNESCO (2005), Firth and Smith (2013:171) explain that: ESD is an evolving approach with the key characteristics of holism and ...

  14. Project Marco Polo: Experiences Applying Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trygestad, JoAnn; Nelson, Jasmine

    1993-01-01

    Describes a summer 1992 study tour of Egypt and Greece by 15 teachers, 15 students, and 5 geography administrators. Focuses on the experiences and attitudes of one eighth-grade student. Asserts that her presentations to student and adult groups have encouraged other students to become more interested in travel and other cultures. (CFR)

  15. Community Engagement for Student Learning in Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Sarah Witham; Chalkley, Brian; Fletcher, Stephen; Hay, Iain; Le Heron, Erena; Mohan, Audrey; Trafford, Julie

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the role and purpose of community engagement as a learning and teaching strategy within higher education geography. It explores different interpretations of the concept of community engagement and illustrates different examples of this kind of learning through six case studies drawn from Australia, New Zealand, the UK, and…

  16. Contemporary Textbook Treatment of Political Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Dan B.; Morrill, Robert W.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a critical examination of six high school geography textbooks to see how they varied in their treatment of world politics, and comments on the degree of nationalistic bias in each one. Suggestions for teachers are included to help them deal with political concepts and bias in textbooks. (Author/AM)

  17. A futures perspective in Dutch geography education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pauw, Iris; Béneker, Tine

    2015-01-01

    Geography education offers many possibilities for futures education. In The Netherlands, a future perspective is obvious in the vision behind the curriculum for secondary education, but this perspective becomes thinner and less open when elaborated in the syllabus, textbooks and examinations. From

  18. Department of Geography and Environmental Management,

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2015-01-21

    Jan 21, 2015 ... Department of Geography and Environmental Management, University of Ilorin, Nigeria. Abstract. In the last few decades, urban development in Lagos Metropolis had posed great challenges resulting from increasing population growth, decay and degradation of inner city, urban sprawl including slums.

  19. What Happens When America Flunks Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosvenor, Gilbert M.

    Knowledge of geography is fundamental to understanding many other disciplines and many of the important issues which face the world, yet it has practically disappeared from our curricula, having been swallowed and dissolved by social studies. We know about malnutrition, but we know little about where millions are dying of famine. Ignorance of…

  20. Department of Geography and Environmental Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2014-10-24

    Oct 24, 2014 ... Department of Geography and Environmental Management, University of Abuja, P.M.B 117. Abuja, Nigeria Email: mercy_ade@yahoo.com. Abstract. The study assessed suitability of land for lowland rice production in Benue State using. Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Soil map with 12 mapping ...

  1. Department of Geography and Regional Planning, Olabisi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2015-08-21

    Accepted: August 21, 2015. Department of Geography and Regional Planning, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ago-Iwoye,. Ogun State, Nigeria. Email: adebayooluwasegunhezekiah@gmail.com. Abstract. In recent years there has been serious concern on the increasing rate of road traffic accidents in Nigeria. Geographic ...

  2. Applying Disciplinary Literacy in Elementary Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Judy; Ming, Kavin

    2017-01-01

    In this article, a social studies teacher and a literacy teacher describe a vision for social studies that highlights reading practices that foster disciplinary literacy in elementary geography. Their purpose is to share a practical approach for enriching elementary social studies lessons and activities with a geographic lens. During the…

  3. Implementation Challenges of the New Geography Diploma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study focused on implementation challenges of the new Geography Diploma Syllabus in Tanzania. The study used Korogwe and Dakawa Teachers' Training Colleges as a case. Dakawa teachers' training college is located in Morogoro region while Korogwe teachers' training college is based in Korogwe district, ...

  4. Genetics: A New Landscape for Medical Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrel, Margaret; Emch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The emergence and re-emergence of human pathogens resistant to medical treatment will present a challenge to the international public health community in the coming decades. Geography is uniquely positioned to examine the progressive evolution of pathogens across space and through time, and to link molecular change to interactions between population and environmental drivers. Landscape as an organizing principle for the integration of natural and cultural forces has a long history in geography, and, more specifically, in medical geography. Here, we explore the role of landscape in medical geography, the emergent field of landscape genetics, and the great potential that exists in the combination of these two disciplines. We argue that landscape genetics can enhance medical geographic studies of local-level disease environments with quantitative tests of how human-environment interactions influence pathogenic characteristics. In turn, such analyses can expand theories of disease diffusion to the molecular scale and distinguish the important factors in ecologies of disease that drive genetic change of pathogens. PMID:24558292

  5. Department of Geography and Environmental M

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2016-04-11

    Apr 11, 2016 ... Department of Geography and Environmental Management, University of Abuja, Abuja. Abstract. This work attempts investigating the pattern of minimum temperature from 19 1 to 2006, an attempt was also made to predict the pattern from 200 to 2030. The aim of the study therefore is to see the behaviour of ...

  6. Geography and Geographical Education in Victoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriewaldt, Jeana

    2006-01-01

    Victoria has just emerged from 10 years where Geography has been one of three strands in the key learning area of Studies of Society and Environment (SOSE). The overarching framework emerged from an attempt to develop a national curriculum. Whilst the national curriculum was rejected by Australian state and territories who each hold legislative…

  7. Australian Geography and the Corporate Management Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Criticizes the intrusion into Australian higher education of the corporate management model. Considers the implications of this mechanization for geography instruction. Notes centralizing tendencies and merger policies with the corresponding market imperatives of efficiency and accountability. Argues that this produces employable manpower but does…

  8. Sustainability in the Australian Curriculum: Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maude, Alaric

    2014-01-01

    "Sustainability" is one of the seven major concepts in the geography curriculum. It is also one of the three cross-curriculum priorities in the Australian curriculum, together with Asia and Australia's engagement with Asia, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures. This paper describes how the concept is explained…

  9. Middle Eastern Geographies of World War I

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    retain.131 Soon after the fall of Basra, Sir Percy Cox, Chief Political Officer to the campaign, and Lord Hardinge, the Viceroy of India, both made...34Why Geography Matters ... But So Little is Learned." Orbis 47, no. 2 (Spring 2003): 217- 233. McFate, Montgomery, and Andrea Jackson . "An

  10. Toward Securing a Future for Geography Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spronken-Smith, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Geography graduates face an uncertain future. To help students think and practice as a geographer, we must teach disciplinary knowledge--particularly threshold concepts--as well as skills and attributes. We must role model and articulate our geographical reasoning using signature pedagogies and promote high-impact and signature learning…

  11. Gapminder: An AP Human Geography Lab Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Kenneth H.

    2012-01-01

    This lesson is designed as a lab assignment for Advanced Placement (AP) Human Geography students wherein they use the popular Gapminder web site to compare levels of development in countries from different world regions. For this lesson, it is important for the teacher to practice with Gapminder before giving the assignment to students. (Contains…

  12. Politics: critical essays in human geography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agnew, J.; Mamadouh, V.

    2008-01-01

    Depending on the breadth or narrowness of the understanding of politics and the political, 'politics' in human geography is defined as either the operation of power in all social relations or the workings of power directed to or by the state. This volume avoids the two extremes by acknowledging the

  13. Framing Learning Conditions in Geography Excursions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonasson, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate and frame some learning conditions involved in the practice of geographical excursions. The empirical material from this study comes from several excursions made by students in human geography and an ethnomethodological approach through participant observation is used. The study is informed by theories from…

  14. [Mathematical models and theories in population geography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosque Sendra, J

    1985-01-01

    The application of mathematical concepts to the study of population geography is reviewed. Forecasting techniques such as logistic function, multi-regional analysis, and demographic accounting are explained. Consideration is also given to theoretical approaches to the demographic analysis of fertility, mortality, and migration. (SUMMARY IN ENG AND FRE)

  15. Genetics: A New Landscape for Medical Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrel, Margaret; Emch, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The emergence and re-emergence of human pathogens resistant to medical treatment will present a challenge to the international public health community in the coming decades. Geography is uniquely positioned to examine the progressive evolution of pathogens across space and through time, and to link molecular change to interactions between population and environmental drivers. Landscape as an organizing principle for the integration of natural and cultural forces has a long history in geography, and, more specifically, in medical geography. Here, we explore the role of landscape in medical geography, the emergent field of landscape genetics, and the great potential that exists in the combination of these two disciplines. We argue that landscape genetics can enhance medical geographic studies of local-level disease environments with quantitative tests of how human-environment interactions influence pathogenic characteristics. In turn, such analyses can expand theories of disease diffusion to the molecular scale and distinguish the important factors in ecologies of disease that drive genetic change of pathogens.

  16. Environmental Concerns in the Geography Curriculum: Perceptions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The data reveals that the three teachers have conceptual difficulties regarding these terms. I argue that unless these conceptual difficulties are addressed through pre-service teacher training and in-service professional development programmes, the implementation of EE and ESD through the geography curriculum is not ...

  17. Teaching Geography Using Films: A Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Palma, Maria Teresa

    2009-01-01

    Films are often used in schools to illustrate geography, but doing so may favor mainly passive learning. An experiment with twenty-eight pupils aged thirteen years (a whole class) had the aim of using cinema to promote active geographical learning. First, it was ascertained what the dominant geographical stereotypes were among the pupils and the…

  18. Food's cultural geographies: texture, creativity, and publics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cook, I.; Jackson, P.; Hayes-Conroy, A.; Abrahamsson, S.; Sandover, R.; Sheller, M.; Henderson, H.; Hallett, L.; Imai, S.; Maye, D.; Hill, A.; Johnson, N.; Schein, R.; Winders, J.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is about emerging cultural geographies of food. It is the result of a collaborative blog-to-paper process that led to an experimental, fragmented, dialogic text. Food is often researched precisely because it can help to vividly animate tensions between the small and intimate realms of

  19. Gender Representation in Geography: Singapore. Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeoh, Brenda S. A.; Huang, Shirlena; Wong, Theresa

    2004-01-01

    In Singapore, geography emerged as a strongly masculinist university discipline during the interwar years under colonial rule. Localizing staff hires in the postcolonial era did not immediately produce gender-balanced staff profiles. Instead, a more equitable gender representation was achieved only in the last decade, following the increasing…

  20. Teaching Gender and Geography in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ramon, Maria-Dolors

    2011-01-01

    Since the introduction of gender themes into university teaching in geography in Spain in 1989, significant gains have been made but challenges remain in relation to placing gender into undergraduate curricula and developing teaching resources in local languages. Geographers in Spain have to meet those challenges in the near future in order to…

  1. Towards an international approach for geography education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schee, J.A.; Lidstone, J.; Brooks, C.

    2014-01-01

    "Geography education is indispensable to the development of responsible and active citizens in the present and future world" is one of the main statements in the International Charter on Geographical Education. This charter was edited in 1992 by Haubrich, chair of the Commission on Geographical

  2. Internationalizing Geography Education: A Focus on India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solem, Michael; Balachandran, Chandra Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    The Association of American Geographers (AAG), through its Center for Global Geography Education (CGGE) project, recently published a collection of online educational resources examining important geographic issues affecting people, places, and environments in India. The resources were created by a delegation of high school teachers and academic…

  3. Towards an international approach for geography education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schee, Joop; Lidstone, John; Brooks, Clare

    2014-01-01

    Geography education is indispensable to the development of responsible and active citizens in the present and future world’ is one of the main statements in the International Charter on Geographical Education. This charter was edited in 1992 by Haubrich, chair of the Commission on Geographical

  4. The Geography of Education and Comparative Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Colin

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the synergy between a long established discipline, geography, and the younger discipline of educational studies, especially its component, comparative education. Although this synergy was recognised by the founding father of comparative education, Michael Sadler, and one of his principal followers, George Bereday, the…

  5. Simplified Classifications for Teaching Human Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Robert H.

    Introductory college level geography textbooks can be enhanced by using scatter diagrams and double criteria classifications, both of which reveal generalizations and specific facts about location. Scatter diagrams, a series of dots on a graph, illustrate relationships among phenomena that covary, e.g., national birth and infant mortality rates.…

  6. The Implementation of Environmental Education in Geography ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    world of rapid change since environmental challenges are dynamic. This paper is based on a study carried ... National Development Plan of 2008. (NDP3) identified sustainable development as an important national development strategy ... is high quality, low impact tourism and food security. (MoE, 2010). The Geography ...

  7. Geography and Geographical Information Science: Interdisciplinary Integrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellul, Claire

    2015-01-01

    To understand how Geography and Geographical Information Science (GIS) can contribute to Interdisciplinary Research (IDR), it is relevant to articulate the differences between the different types of such research. "Multidisciplinary" researchers work in a "parallel play" mode, completing work in their disciplinary work streams…

  8. Teaching Cultural Geography with "The Amazing Race"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiley, Sarah L.

    2017-01-01

    The reality show "The Amazing Race" serves as a useful text for the cultural geography classroom. As competitors travel the world, they complete challenging tasks designed to be both educational and entertaining. Audiences see actual images from destinations around the world and learn about the unique cultures of these places. They also…

  9. Capstone Portfolios and Geography Student Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossa, Joann

    2014-01-01

    Due to increasing demands regarding student learning outcomes and accreditation, a capstone portfolio was added to assess critical thinking and communication skills of geography majors at a large public university in the USA. The portfolio guidelines were designed to be adaptable to a flexible curriculum where about half of the requirements within…

  10. Randomized trial on the effects of a combined physical/cognitive training in aged MCI subjects: the Train the Brain study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffei, L.; Picano, E.; Andreassi, M. G.; Angelucci, A.; Baldacci, F.; Baroncelli, L.; Begenisic, T.; Bellinvia, P. F.; Berardi, N.; Biagi, L.; Bonaccorsi, J.; Bonanni, E.; Bonuccelli, U.; Borghini, A.; Braschi, C.; Broccardi, M.; Bruno, R. M.; Caleo, M.; Carlesi, C.; Carnicelli, L.; Cartoni, G.; Cecchetti, L.; Cenni, M. C.; Ceravolo, R.; Chico, L.; Cintoli, S.; Cioni, G.; Coscia, M.; Costa, M.; D’Angelo, G.; D’Ascanio, P.; Nes, M. De; Turco, S. Del; Coscio, E. Di; Galante, M. Di; Lascio, N. di; Faita, F.; Falorni, I.; Faraguna, U.; Fenu, A.; Fortunato, L.; Franco, R.; Gargani, L.; Gargiulo, R.; Ghiadoni, L.; Giorgi, F. S.; Iannarella, R.; Iofrida, C.; Kusmic, C.; Limongi, F.; Maestri, M.; Maffei, M.; Maggi, S.; Mainardi, M.; Mammana, L.; Marabotti, A.; Mariotti, V.; Melissari, E.; Mercuri, A.; Micera, S.; Molinaro, S.; Narducci, R.; Navarra, T.; Noale, M.; Pagni, C.; Palumbo, S.; Pasquariello, R.; Pellegrini, S.; Pietrini, P.; Pizzorusso, T.; Poli, A.; Pratali, L.; Retico, A.; Ricciardi, E.; Rota, G.; Sale, A.; Sbrana, S.; Scabia, G.; Scali, M.; Scelfo, D.; Sicari, R.; Siciliano, G.; Stea, F.; Taddei, S.; Tognoni, G.; Tonacci, A.; Tosetti, M.; Turchi, S.; Volpi, L.

    2017-01-01

    Age-related cognitive impairment and dementia are an increasing societal burden. Epidemiological studies indicate that lifestyle factors, e.g. physical, cognitive and social activities, correlate with reduced dementia risk; moreover, positive effects on cognition of physical/cognitive training have been found in cognitively unimpaired elders. Less is known about effectiveness and action mechanisms of physical/cognitive training in elders already suffering from Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), a population at high risk for dementia. We assessed in 113 MCI subjects aged 65–89 years, the efficacy of combined physical-cognitive training on cognitive decline, Gray Matter (GM) volume loss and Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) in hippocampus and parahippocampal areas, and on brain-blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) activity elicited by a cognitive task, measured by ADAS-Cog scale, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) and fMRI, respectively, before and after 7 months of training vs. usual life. Cognitive status significantly decreased in MCI-no training and significantly increased in MCI-training subjects; training increased parahippocampal CBF, but no effect on GM volume loss was evident; BOLD activity increase, indicative of neural efficiency decline, was found only in MCI-no training subjects. These results show that a non pharmacological, multicomponent intervention improves cognitive status and indicators of brain health in MCI subjects. PMID:28045051

  11. Randomized trial on the effects of a combined physical/cognitive training in aged MCI subjects: the Train the Brain study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-03

    Age-related cognitive impairment and dementia are an increasing societal burden. Epidemiological studies indicate that lifestyle factors, e.g. physical, cognitive and social activities, correlate with reduced dementia risk; moreover, positive effects on cognition of physical/cognitive training have been found in cognitively unimpaired elders. Less is known about effectiveness and action mechanisms of physical/cognitive training in elders already suffering from Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), a population at high risk for dementia. We assessed in 113 MCI subjects aged 65-89 years, the efficacy of combined physical-cognitive training on cognitive decline, Gray Matter (GM) volume loss and Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) in hippocampus and parahippocampal areas, and on brain-blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) activity elicited by a cognitive task, measured by ADAS-Cog scale, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) and fMRI, respectively, before and after 7 months of training vs. usual life. Cognitive status significantly decreased in MCI-no training and significantly increased in MCI-training subjects; training increased parahippocampal CBF, but no effect on GM volume loss was evident; BOLD activity increase, indicative of neural efficiency decline, was found only in MCI-no training subjects. These results show that a non pharmacological, multicomponent intervention improves cognitive status and indicators of brain health in MCI subjects.

  12. Is Practical Subject Matter Knowledge Still Important? Examining the Siedentopian Perspective on the Role of Content Knowledge in Physical Education Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Frank; Waring, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background: The role that content knowledge, an important component of practical subject matter knowledge, plays for pre-service teachers (PSTs) in physical education teacher education (PETE) remains contested and unclear. Whilst some researchers emphasise the facilitative nature of such knowledge, others criticise that too much focus on content…

  13. So Much to Learn, so Little Time...: Pre-Service Physical Education Teachers' Interpretations and Development of Subject Knowledge as They Learn to Teach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Frank Andreas; Waring, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the development of pre-service teachers during a one-year programme of initial teacher training and education (ITTE) of secondary physical education (PE) in England. It concentrates in particular on the interpretation and development of different dimensions of subject knowledge during different phases of their ITTE programme.…

  14. The geography teacher's set of appliances - `GEOGRAPHY nEtQUIPMENT' - Self improved school equipment used in teaching geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajtok-Tari, I.

    2009-04-01

    The multimedia application and the use of Internet are becoming more and more common at schools and at homes due to the widespread of computers. The multimedia programs offer a great help for geography teachers because with their use all the visual aids are not needed in the classroom. They mix the advantages of blacboards, slides, displays, overhead projectors and VCR-s. At the same time offering other opportunities which could not be provided by the aids mentioned above because of their limits. Using a projector connected to a computer students can see the visual aids prepared by the teacher projected. Their use is justified because student's books cannot contain all the increasing amount of knowledge. Success is guaranteed because students are sensitive to new approaches. Digitalizing the material and finding it on the internet that way preparing a colourful, varied geography lesson is a time-consuming process. Being the methodologist and didactic information technologist at the Geography Department of Eszterházy Károly College I have been working for years on facilitating the work of my students, colleagues and my own activity using varied visual aids and types of equipment as preparation for the geography lesson. I have created an electronic set of appliances using the Dreamweaver MX program (‘GEOGRAPHY nEtQUIPMENT', from the 1st September 2006 on the Internet), it can be a real help for the teacher in each teaching situation. The ‘GEOGRAPHY nEtQUIPMENT' is a multimedia, Internet service which can be loaded free, the teacher gets into a virtual office clicking to the different pieces (drawer, shelf, wall map, globe, laptop, Tv set etc.) the teacher can continue with the necessary school equipment. Such equipment like: lesson plans for the lessons using digital technology, photos, video clips, animation, illustrations, pieces of music, maps, collection of minerals, database, diagrams, charts, bibliography, student's books, geography lexicons, magazines

  15. Hu Huanyong: father of China's population geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, W

    1998-08-01

    Professor Hu Huanyong died of an illness on April 30, 1998, in Shanghai, China. The professor was a forefather of modern Chinese demography and the founder of China's population geography. He drew the "Aihui-Tengchong Line," which was known internationally as the "Hu Line," in 1934; the line marked a striking difference in the distribution of China's population. He was born in 1901, in Yixing, Jiangsu Province. He studied literature, history, and geography at Nanjing Normal School (later named the Southeast University of China); he continued his education at the University of Paris from 1926 to 1928. Upon his return to China, he began teaching at the Nanjing Central University and was later appointed dean of the Department of Geography and president of the China Geographical Association. During this time, he wrote "Distribution of China's Population," a paper in which he drew China's first population density contour chart based on the 1933 national census data by county; this produced the "Hu Line." The professor began teaching at East-China Normal University in Shanghai in 1953; in 1957, he became director of the research office of population geography (which he helped to establish), the first demographic research institution in China. In 1958, he focused on the population geography of Jiangsu Province. In 1983, the office expanded to become a population research institute; Professor Hu became its president. During the 1980s, he described a geographic division of China's population based on differences in population density, ecological environment, socioeconomic conditions, and historical development. This resulted in 8 regions: 1) the lower parts of the Yellow River region; 2) the Liaoning-Jilin-Heilongjiang region; 3) the middle and lower parts of the Yangtze River region; 4) the southeast coastal region; 5) the Shanxi-Shaanxi-Gansu-Ningxia region; 6) the Sichuan-Guizhou-Yunnan region; 7) the Inner Mongolia-Xinjiang region; and 8) the Qinghai-Tibet region. This

  16. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity in individuals with psoriasis: associations with body surface area and subjective disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, P B

    2013-10-01

    Psoriasis is associated with serious comorbidities such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. These comorbidities are related to low physical activity in the general population. Limited research has evaluated physical activity in psoriasis, and thus, the purpose of this investigation was to compare physical activity between individuals with and without psoriasis as well as explore the associations between measures of psoriasis severity and physical activity. Cross-sectional study using data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Self-reported psoriasis diagnosis and psoriasis severity were regressed on moderate/vigorous physical activity, as measured objectively by accelerometers. Measures of psoriasis severity included rating of psoriasis as a problem in life and body surface area involvement. A total of 4316 individuals had data on psoriasis, moderate/vigorous physical activity, and relevant covariates, with 3.6% (population weighted) of participants (N.=117) reporting a diagnosis of psoriasis. A psoriasis diagnosis was not associated with moderate/vigorous physical activity, and furthermore, body surface area involvement was not associated with moderate/vigorous physical activity among participants with psoriasis. However, every tertile increase in psoriasis as a problem in life was associated with 28% less moderate/vigorous physical activity, which remained significant after adjusting for covariates and removing outliers. While a diagnosis of psoriasis and body surface area involvement do not appear to be associated with less moderate/vigorous physical activity, individuals that rate their psoriasis to be a large problem engage in less moderate/vigorous physical activity.

  17. The impact of a videogame-based pilot physical activity program in older adults with schizophrenia on subjectively and objectively measured physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather eLeutwyler

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this report is to describe the impact of a videogame-based pilot physical activity program using the Kinect for Xbox 360 game system (Microsoft, Redmond, WA on physical activity in older adults with schizophrenia. Methods: In this one group pretest posttest pilot study, twenty participants played an active videogame for 30 minutes, once a week for 6 weeks. Physical activity was measured by self-report with the Yale Physical Activity Survey and objectively with the Sensewear Pro armband at enrollment and at the end of the 6-week program. Results: There was a significant increase in frequency of self-reported vigorous physical activity. We did not detect a statistically significant difference in objectively measured physical activity although increase in number of steps and sedentary activity were in the desired direction. Conclusions: These results suggest participants’ perception of physical activity intensity differs from the intensity objectively captured with a valid and reliable physical activity monitor.

  18. How to Investigate Within-Subject Associations between Physical Activity and Momentary Affective States in Everyday Life: A Position Statement Based on a Literature Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanning, Martina K.; Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich W.; Schlicht, Wolfgang Michael

    2013-01-01

    Several meta-analyses have investigated the association between physical activity and affective states and have found evidence suggesting that exercise exerts a positive effect on affective state. However, in this field of research, most studies have conducted between-subject analyses. Nonetheless, there is more and more interest in the within-subject associations between physical activity and momentary affective states in everyday life. This position statement pertains to this up-and-coming field of research and provides methodological recommendations for further studies. The paper is divided into three parts: first, we summarize and evaluate three methodological requirements necessary for the proper evaluation of within-subject associations between physical activity and momentary affective states in everyday life. We propose that the following issues should be considered: (a) to address the dynamic nature of such relationships, repeated assessments are necessary; (b) as activities performed in everyday life are mostly spontaneous and unconscious, an objective assessment of physical activity is useful; (c) given that recall of affective states is often affected by systematic distortions, real-time assessment is preferable. In sum, we suggest the use of ambulatory assessment techniques, and more specifically the combination of accelerometer-assessment of physical activity with an electronic diary assessment of the momentary affective state and additional context information. Second, we summarize 22 empirical studies published between 1980 and 2012 using ambulatory assessment to investigate within-subject associations between momentary affective states and physical activity in everyday life. Generally, the literature overview detects a positive association, which appears stronger among those studies that were of high methodological quality. Third, we propose the use of ambulatory assessment intervention (AAIs) strategies to change people’s behavior and to enable

  19. How to investigate within-subject associations between physical activity and momentary affective states in everyday life: A position statement based on a literature overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina K. Kanning

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Several meta-analyses have investigated the association between physical activity and affective states and have found evidence suggesting that exercise exerts a positive effect on affective state. However, in this field of research, most studies have conducted between-subject analyses. Nonetheless, there is more and more interest in the within-subject associations between physical activity and momentary affective states in everyday life. This position statement pertains to this up-and-coming field of research and provides methodological recommendations for further studies. The paper is divided into three parts:First, we summarise and evaluate three methodological requirements necessary for the proper evaluation of within-subject associations between physical activity and momentary affective states in everyday life. We propose that the following issues should be considered: a to address the dynamic nature of such relationships, repeated assessments are necessary; b as activities performed in everyday life are mostly spontaneous and unconscious, an objective assessment of physical activity is useful; c given that recall of affective states is often affected by systematic distortions, real-time assessment is preferable. In sum, we suggest the use of ambulatory assessment techniques, and more specifically the combination of acceloremeter-assessment of physical activity with an electronic diary assessment of the momentary affective state and additional context information. Second, we summarise 22 empirical studies published between 1980 and 2012 using ambulatory assessment to investigate within-subject associations between momentary affective states and physical activity in everyday life. Generally, the literature overview detects a positive association, which appears stronger among those studies that were of high methodological quality.Third, we propose the use of ambulatory assessment intervention strategies to change people's behaviour (ambulatory

  20. Understanding the Rationale for Preschool Physical Education: Implications for Practitioners' and Children's Embodied Practices and Subjectivity Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvilly, Nollaig; Atencio, Matthew; Verheul, Martine; Jess, Mike

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of selected academic research literature that underpins contemporary preschool physical education. We highlight and interrogate diverse rationales and beliefs that serve to influence and structure preschool physical education in various forms. We speculate as to how preschool practitioners and children might engage…

  1. Subjective and objective physical activity patterns after Roux-en Y gastric bypass surgery compared with non-operated obese and non-obese control women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilms, Britta; Ernst, Barbara; Thurnheer, Martin; Schultes, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies on physical activity after bariatric surgery provided inconsistent results. The aim of our study was to comprehensively assess physical activity by subjective (questionnaires) and objective (accelerometry) measures in women who had undergone Roux-en Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery and to compare results with those of women displaying grade II or higher obesity and of non-obese control women. Our cross-sectional case-control study included 12 women in each group (RYGB, obese, non-obese). Wrist accelerometry was performed over 5 days. Two questionnaires were used to assess women's self-reported leisure- and work-time and sport-related physical activity. Accelerometry indicated a lower physical activity in RYGB women than in non-obese women in particular during the weekend (p=0.010), while there was no difference between RYGB and obese women (p=0.57). Questionnaires revealed that RYGB women self-report a greater leisure- and work-time physical activity than obese women and also greater work-related physical activity than non-obese women (all p≤0.032). In contrast, sport-related activities were reduced in RYGB as compared with non-obese women (p=0.011), while there was no difference between RYGB and obese women (p=0.51). Comparison of the obese and non-obese group revealed less leisure-time and sport-related activities in the obese women (both p≤0.002). Despite the preliminary character of our rather small study, data suggest a differential physical activity pattern in women who have previously undergone RYGB surgery that is characterized by rare sport activities, an increased subjective work-related physical activity and objectively reduced physical activity during the weekend as compared with non-obese control women. Copyright © 2015 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. School manuals for teaching geography at the Sovereign State of Santander: 1868-1879

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    Jorge Alejandro Aguirre Rueda

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents at least three objectives. The irst of them:to evidence the legislative aspects of the Organic Decree of Public Primary Instruction –ODPPI– of 1870 in relation to the topic of school manuals, the school knowledge of geography and the way in which it was evaluated. Secondly, this paper presents an identiication and description of the content and dissemination of some of the geography school manuals that existed in the Sovereign State of Santander during the last three decades of the 19th century. Finally, we present the ways in which some teachers from Santander resisted the initiative to consolidate the printed text as the main reference for the dissemination of school knowledge. Based on the previous information, this article comprises four sections which deal with the aforementioned topics. Therefore, it was conirmed that ODPPI regulated the subject of school manuals, to the point of identifying some of the directly responsible agents of its achievement and monitoring. Likewise, geography, as school knowledge, was regulated within the curricula. Besides, evidence shows that geography school manuals did not include as much printed material as subjects like arithmetic or reading. Equally, geography was found to be taught under the following categories: Universal and Colombian and Regional. Finally, even though the State taught the importance of the print text, other voices emerged in defense of oral teaching methods, which made it possible to identify that the consolidation of printing as a diffusion system for culture was not an easy lineal task.

  3. Basic gymnastics as a basic component invariant component of the curriculum subject «Physical culture»

    OpenAIRE

    Alfiya Deyneko

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: the analysis of the program discipline «Physical education» for grades 1–9 students in the context of the use of basic gymnastics. Material and Methods: the primary means of gymnastics, studied by pupils of 1–9 forms, was investigated as a part of the curriculum «Physical education in school». The study examined the content of primary invariant of gymnastics lesson. Results: it is found that the formation of school culture movements (movements exploring their diversity, physical exer...

  4. The Cultural Geography on the III Millennium: epistemic-methodological and educational perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Antonio Correia

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The article puts in evidence the Cultural and Humanistic Geography and its new shapes of working with the knowledge. For such thing, it reflects about the geographic knowledge on the third millennium and the new humanistic perspectives of this lore. So that it points out the feeling and the emotion starting from the subjectivism and from the relation people have with their own living and realized space. These reflections are treated as a general and a geographical knowledge, but more particularly in a geographical sight, pointing out in this last, the categories which envolve the daily life of the local citizens, the more evident and substantials to the grasp in the positioned geographical science, as well, for the teaching of this subject. Reflects also about the position of the contemporary knowledge, as well as pointing out the possible contribution Geography may bring to the efectiveness of those. For that reason, it points some metodologic and pedagogical questions of the actual geography, reaching fenomenological grounds of the social representations, for the elaboration of one more human lore, particularly inside the geographical science, which could contribute to the project of the society at all. For this, the fenomenological vision of Husserl and Merleau-Ponty it is put in evidence, like the Moscovici’s theory of social plays. These theories go towards one humanistic geography to be built and reflected in an academic, educational and pedagogical environment.

  5. Michel Foucault and Francophone geography.

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    Juliet Fall

    2005-09-01

    çais, explorant brièvement le travail de géographes québécois et suisses, fruits d’une nouvelle génération de penseurs francophones. L’auteure propose que de telles approches du politique méritent un public et un débat plus larges, spécifiquement en ce qu’ils sont différents des approches foucaldiennes anglophones qui sombrent souvent dans un moule homogène et totalisant. The enthusiasm for Michel Foucault among Anglo geographers is in stark contrast to the surprising lack of interest among their Francophone counterparts. Despite the seminal interview of 1976 published in Hérodote that appeared to build a bridge between disciplines, Francophone geographers have rarely read and used his work. While political approaches have traditionally not enjoyed much success in the Francophone world for historical reasons, existing works such as Paul Claval’s Espace et pouvoir (1978 or Yves Lacoste’s La géographie ça sert, d’abord, à faire la guerre (1976 are not inspired by Foucault. Drawing from both literature and interviews, this chapter examines the few sparse attempts within Francophone geography to make use of Foucault. In particular, I suggest that while Claude Raffestin’s 1980 work Pour une géographie du pouvoir and his subsequent work on territoriality represents an original attempt to adapt Foucault, institutional, conceptual and personal factors have led this work to be largely ignored. Simultaneously, in pointing to its success in Francophone Switzerland and Quebec, places and universities removed from the power-struggles of French academic circles, I suggest that these adaptations deserve a better audience, specifically because they are distinct from those fashionable and de rigueur among Anglo geographers. Finally, more recent works by a younger generation of Francophone geographers further acting as catalysts is briefly explored.

  6. Emotional but not physical maltreatment is independently related to psychopathology in subjects with various degrees of social anxiety: a web-based internet survey

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    Iffland Benjamin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies reported that social phobia is associated with a history of child maltreatment. However, most of these studies focused on physical and sexual maltreatment whilst little is known about the specific impact of emotional abuse and neglect on social anxiety. We examined the association between emotional maltreatment, including parental emotional maltreatment as well as emotional peer victimization, and social anxiety symptoms in subjects with various degrees of social anxiety. Methods The study was conducted as a web-based Internet survey of participants (N = 995 who had social anxiety symptoms falling within the high range, and including many respondents who had scores in the clinical range. The assessment included measures of child maltreatment, emotional peer victimization, social anxiety symptoms and general psychopathology. Results Regression and mediation analyses revealed that parental emotional maltreatment and emotional peer victimization were independently related to social anxiety and mediated the impact of physical and sexual maltreatment. Subjects with a history of childhood emotional maltreatment showed higher rates of psychopathology than subjects with a history of physical maltreatment. Conclusions Although our findings are limited by the use of an Internet survey and retrospective self-report measures, data indicated that social anxiety symptoms are mainly predicted by emotional rather than physical or sexual types of victimization.

  7. The Geography of Fast Food Outlets: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Lorna K.; Edwards, Kimberly L.; Cade, Janet; Clarke, Graham P.

    2010-01-01

    The availability of food high in fat, salt and sugar through Fast Food (FF) or takeaway outlets, is implicated in the causal pathway for the obesity epidemic. This review aims to summarise this body of research and highlight areas for future work. Thirty three studies were found that had assessed the geography of these outlets. Fourteen studies showed a positive association between availability of FF outlets and increasing deprivation. Another 13 studies also included overweight or obesity data and showed conflicting results between obesity/overweight and FF outlet availability. There is some evidence that FF availability is associated with lower fruit and vegetable intake. There is potential for land use policies to have an influence on the location of new FF outlets. Further research should incorporate good quality data on FF consumption, weight and physical activity. PMID:20623025

  8. The geography of Fast Food outlets: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Lorna K; Edwards, Kimberly L; Cade, Janet; Clarke, Graham P

    2010-05-01

    The availability of food high in fat, salt and sugar through Fast Food (FF) or takeaway outlets, is implicated in the causal pathway for the obesity epidemic. This review aims to summarise this body of research and highlight areas for future work. Thirty three studies were found that had assessed the geography of these outlets. Fourteen studies showed a positive association between availability of FF outlets and increasing deprivation. Another 13 studies also included overweight or obesity data and showed conflicting results between obesity/overweight and FF outlet availability. There is some evidence that FF availability is associated with lower fruit and vegetable intake. There is potential for land use policies to have an influence on the location of new FF outlets. Further research should incorporate good quality data on FF consumption, weight and physical activity.

  9. The Geography of Fast Food Outlets: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorna K. Fraser

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The availability of food high in fat, salt and sugar through Fast Food (FF or takeaway outlets, is implicated in the causal pathway for the obesity epidemic. This review aims to summarise this body of research and highlight areas for future work. Thirty three studies were found that had assessed the geography of these outlets. Fourteen studies showed a positive association between availability of FF outlets and increasing deprivation. Another 13 studies also included overweight or obesity data and showed conflicting results between obesity/overweight and FF outlet availability. There is some evidence that FF availability is associated with lower fruit and vegetable intake. There is potential for land use policies to have an influence on the location of new FF outlets. Further research should incorporate good quality data on FF consumption, weight and physical activity.

  10. What’s Wrong and What’s Right with Geography Education in the USA?

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    Michael J. Passow

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Geographic Education in the United States generally receives less attention than many other subjects, and surveys have found that most students lack proficiency. The resulting level of geographic literacy in the general population carries significant implications for national and international competitiveness and decision-making. This paper reviews factors leading to deficiencies in US Geography Education, including lack of emphasis compared with subjects more prominently tested, teacher preparation and in-service training, curricula design, and high student mobility rates. We also review positive trends, including developing more rigorous sets of learning standards and geographic skills, and support from interested organizations and State educational agencies for encouraging student interest and participation in assessments and contests. We examine selective resources for teaching and learning geographic concepts and skills, many available online from federal and nongovernmental agencies. Finally, we consider the potential for learning geography through such informal science education venues as museums and mass media.

  11. The spaces of urban economic geographies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalsø Hansen, Høgni; Winther, Lars

    2007-01-01

    The paper focuses on the transformation of the industrial structure and the location dynamics on the edge of the metropolitan region of Copenhagen with the aim of explaining the rise of new spaces in the urban economic geography. The main concern of the paper is the role the transformation...... of the outer city plays in the urban economy of Copenhagen. The centre of attention is on the changing industrial structure, the progressively higher complexity of firm location, and the division of labour that have emerged in the past decade of growth as a result of the resurgence of the metropolitan region...... of Copenhagen. The recent changes in the economic geographies of the outer city of Copenhagen are used as a launch pad for discussing the theoretical and analytical challenges in understanding the industrial change in new urban forms....

  12. TYPICAL LINGUISTIC AND EXTRALINGUISTIC EXERCISES OF GEOGRAPHY

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    VIORICA BLÎNDA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The general objective of the present research was to analyze and exemplify some of the exercises in the Geography textbooks in use, both from a linguistic and geographical perspective. The specific objectives of the present research are the following: to analyze some types of exercises; to identify and analyze a sample exercise of each particular type submitted to theoretical analysis. In order to achieve these objectives, we studied several papers of textual linguistics, semiotics, using a corpus of study in various Geography textbooks in current use in Romanian schools, at the pre-university level of education. We analyzed and included in the present paper exercises of scientific geographical analysis, description exercises, exercises for arguing and giving reasons, exercises of providing explanations. These exercises are based on the theory of encyclopedic referencing, on specialised dictionaries of geographical terms, on contextual meaning effects, on schematization of the geographical reality

  13. Subject Teachers as Educators for Sustainability: A Survey Study

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    Anna Uitto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability education (SE is included in school curricula to integrate the principles, values, and practices of sustainable development (SD into all education. This study investigates lower secondary school subject teachers as educators for sustainability. A survey was used to study the perceptions of 442 subject teachers from 49 schools in Finland. There were significant differences between the subject teachers’ perceptions of their SE competence, and the frequency with which they used different dimensions of SE (ecological, economic, social, well-being, cultural in their teaching varied. Teachers’ age had a small effect, but gender, school, and its residential location were nonsignificant factors. Teachers could be roughly classified into three different subgroups according to their perceptions of the role of SE in their teaching; those who considered three SE dimensions rather often and used holistic sustainability approaches in their teaching (biology, geography, history; those who considered two or three dimensions often but were not active in holistic teaching (mother tongue, religion, visual arts, crafts, music, physical and health education, and home economics and those who used one SE dimension or consider only one holistic approach in their teaching (mathematics, physics, chemistry and language. Subject teachers’ awareness of their SE competence is important to encourage them to plan and implement discipline-based and interdisciplinary SE in their teaching. The specific SE expertise of subject teachers should be taken into account in teacher training and education.

  14. Geography, institutions, and compared development in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Vaz Silva

    2007-01-01

    Recent years have seen a significant improvement in the economic performance of some African countries. The resulting increased dispersion in income levels across Africa, combined with the pertinence of detecting regional role models renders an intra-African analysis more attractive. In this paper I estimate the respective contribution of institutions, geography, and policies in determining income levels in sub-Saharan Africa. I find that income per capita in this region can be explained to a...

  15. Towards a geography of emotional analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otrel-Cass, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    This article is a forum response to a research article on self-reporting methods when studying discrete emotions in science education environments. Studying emotions in natural settings is a difficult task because of the complexity of deciphering verbal and non-verbal communication. In my respons...... to map out a geography of analysis that takes also into account who or what emotions are directed at....

  16. The New Geography of Research and Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter D. Ørberg; Choquette, Eliane; Haakonsson, Stine Jessen

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the locational determinants behind the globalization of R&D in the pharmaceutical and biotech industries. The study shows that host-country characteristics previously identified as important for location attractiveness in general play an important role in attracting R&D-re...... study contributes with a fine grained analysis of the interrelationship between firm and location level factors in the new geography of innovation....

  17. "Linguistic Geography of Breton and Sociocultural Motivations"

    OpenAIRE

    Costaouec, Denis

    2012-01-01

    International audience; In this paper I discuss various issues directly related to the study of Breton dialects, and to the practice of linguistic geography. Some of the questions that will be considered are: Where does the border pass between two contiguous dialectal areas? How can the geographical distribution of the varieties of a language be explained? What factors (social, economic, cultural, religious, political, etc) can be correlated with this geographic distribution?

  18. Modeling subjective well-being in individuals with chronic pain and a physical disability: the role of pain control and pain catastrophizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furrer, Angela; Michel, Gisela; Terrill, Alexandra L; Jensen, Mark P; Müller, Rachel

    2017-10-23

    To investigate the associations between subjective well-being and pain intensity, pain interference, and depression in individuals with physical disabilities. We hypothesized that (1) pain control and (2) pain catastrophizing mediate the effects of subjective well-being on pain intensity, pain interference, and depression. Analyses of cross-sectional data from 96 individuals diagnosed with spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, neuromuscular disease, or post-polio syndrome, with average pain intensity of ≥4 (0-10) on at least half the days in the past month. Two models tested study hypotheses using structural equation. Both models showed acceptable model fit. Pain catastrophizing significantly mediated the effect of subjective well-being on pain intensity and pain interference, but not on depression. Pain control did not significantly mediate the effect of subjective well-being on pain intensity, pain interference, or depression. Path coefficients showed significant direct effects of subjective well-being on pain control (β = 0.39), pain catastrophizing (β = -0.61), pain interference (β = -0.48; -0.42), and depression (β = -0.75; -0.78). This study supports the potential of enhancing subjective well-being and lowering pain catastrophizing for reducing pain intensity, pain interference, and depressive symptoms in individuals with chronic pain and a physical disability. The findings indicate that true experiments to test for causal associations are warranted. Implications for rehabilitation The majority of individuals with physical disabilities report having persistent moderate-to-severe pain that may negatively limit daily activities and quality of life. The present cross-sectional study indicates that individuals who reported greater subjective well-being showed significantly lower pain intensity via the mediating effect of lower pain catastrophizing. Since sample size and respective power are low, these findings should be taken as first

  19. Cultural differences in the relationships among autonomy support, psychological need satisfaction, subjective vitality, and effort in British and Chinese physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ian M; Lonsdale, Chris

    2010-10-01

    Using basic psychological needs theory (BPNT; Ryan & Deci, 2000) as our guiding framework, we explored cultural differences in the relationships among physical education students' perceptions of teacher autonomy support, psychological need satisfaction, subjective vitality and effort in class. Seven hundred and fifteen students (age range from 13 to 15 years) from the U.K. and Hong Kong, China, completed a multisection inventory during a timetabled physical education class. Multilevel analyses revealed that the relationships among autonomy support, subjective vitality and effort were mediated by students' perceptions of psychological need satisfaction. The relationship between autonomy support and perceptions of competence was stronger in the Chinese sample, compared with the U.K. sample. In addition, the relationship between perceptions of relatedness and effort was not significant in the Chinese students. The findings generally support the pan-cultural utility of BPNT and imply that a teacher-created autonomy supportive environment may promote positive student experiences in both cultures.

  20. The geography and human cultural resources working group of the EROS program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, A. C.

    1972-01-01

    The functions, activities, and objectives of the Geography and Human-Cultural Resources Working Group of the EROS program are outlined. The Group's primary function is to coordinate remote sensing experiments of physical scientists and the needs of socioeconomic and culturally orientated planners, policy makers, administrators, and other user groups. Other functions of the Group include land use analysis, resource mapping, and development of an operational automatic information system receptive to land use and environmental data.

  1. Rural–Urban Differences in Objective and Subjective Measures of Physical Activity: Findings From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003–2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ming; Kowaleski-Jones, Lori

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Lower levels of physical activity among rural relative to urban residents have been suggested as an important contributor to rural–urban health disparity; however, empirical evidence is sparse. Methods We examined rural–urban differences in 4 objective physical activity measures (2 intensity thresholds by 2 bout lengths) and 4 subjective measures (total, leisure, household, and transportation) in a nationally representative sample of participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003–2006. The sample comprised 5,056 adults aged 20 to 75 years. Rural-Urban Commuting Area (RUCA) codes were matched with NHANES subjects to identify urban status and 2 types of rural status. Rural–urban and within–rural differences in physical activity were estimated without and with controls for demographic and socioeconomic variables. Results Rural residents were less active than urban residents in high-intensity long bout (2,020 counts per minute threshold and 10 miniutes or longer bout length) accelerometer-measured physical activity (42.5 ± 6.2 min/wk vs 55.9 ± 2.8 min/wk) but the difference disappeared with a lower-intensity threshold (760 counts per minute). Rural residents reported more total physical activity than urban residents (438.3 ± 35.3min/wk vs 371.2 ± 12.5 min/wk), with differences primarily attributable to household physical activity. Within rural areas, micropolitan residents were less active than residents in smaller rural areas. Controlling for other variables reduced the size of the differences. Conclusion The direction and significance of rural–urban difference in physical activity varied by the method of physical activity measurement, likely related to rural residents spending more time in low-intensity household physical activity but less time in high-intensity physical activity. Micropolitan residents were substantially less active than residents in smaller rural areas, indicating that physical

  2. Effects of an adapted physical activity program in a group of elderly subjects with flexed posture: clinical and instrumental assessment

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    Frizziero Antonio

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flexed posture commonly increases with age and is related to musculoskeletal impairment and reduced physical performance. The purpose of this clinical study was to systematically compare the effects of a physical activity program that specifically address the flexed posture that marks a certain percentage of elderly individuals with a non specific exercise program for 3 months. Methods Participants were randomly divided into two groups: one followed an Adapted Physical Activity program for flexed posture and the other one completed a non-specific physical activity protocol for the elderly. A multidimensional clinical assessment was performed at baseline and at 3 months including anthropometric data, clinical profile, measures of musculoskeletal impairment and disability. The instrumental assessment of posture was realized using a stereophotogrammetric system and a specific biomechanical model designed to describe the reciprocal position of the body segments on the sagittal plane in a upright posture. Results The Adapted Physical Activity program determined a significant improvement in several key parameters of the multidimensional assessment in comparison to the non-specific protocol: decreased occiput-to-wall distance, greater lower limb range of motion, better flexibility of pectoralis, hamstrings and hip flexor muscles, increased spine extensor muscles strength. Stereophotogrammetric analysis confirmed a reduced protrusion of the head and revealed a reduction in compensative postural adaptations to flexed posture characterized by knee flexion and ankle dorsiflexion in the participants of the specific program. Conclusion The Adapted Physical Activity program for flexed posture significantly improved postural alignment and musculoskeletal impairment of the elderly. The stereophotogrammetric evaluation of posture was useful to measure the global postural alignment and especially to analyse the possible compensatory strategies

  3. Alcohol Levels Do Not Accurately Predict Physical or Mental Impairment in Ethanol-Tolerant Subjects: Relevance to Emergency Medicine and Dram Shop Laws

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, James R.; Dollard, Denis

    2010-01-01

    The human body and the central nervous system can develop tremendous tolerance to ethanol. Mental and physical dysfunctions from ethanol, in an alcohol-tolerant individual, do not consistently correlate with ethanol levels traditionally used to define intoxication, or even lethality, in a nontolerant subject. Attempting to relate observed signs of alcohol intoxication or impairment, or to evaluate sobriety, by quantifying blood alcohol levels can be misleading, if not impossible. We report a ...

  4. "The Peaceful and Constructive Battle": UNESCO and Education for International Understanding in History and Geography, 1947-1967

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, John

    2011-01-01

    From its beginning, UNESCO made education for international understanding in school history and geography a priority. As these were the areas where children were most likely to encounter nationalism in state schools, a reform of these subjects was critical to the success of education for international understanding. The experience of two world…

  5. Subjectivity in Education and Health: Research Notes on School Learning Area and Physical Education in Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Marilia; da Costa, Jonatas Maia

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of two studies researching the theory of subjectivity from a cultural-historical perspective. The studies are situated in the fields of education and health and are conducted using Qualitative Epistemology. The first study discusses the pathological movement problems of learning disabilities in Brazilian schools and…

  6. Bibliography of Research Involving Female Subjects; A Compilation of Theses and Dissertations in Physical Education, Health, and Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirduso, Waneen Wyrick, Ed.

    This bibliography is comprised of theses and dissertations which were written by women or which used women as subjects of investigation. The theses were solicited by the National Association for Girls and Women in Sport (NAGWS) Research Committee from 200 colleges and universities. The entries include papers written during the past 30 years. They…

  7. GEOGRAPHY OF ENERGY. A WORLD IN TRANSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Karanikolas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Geography and energy are two major scientific fields. From one side Geography is the science which answers fundamental questions of spatial behavior of all environmental and human phenomenon and from the other side energy is actually the «fuel» of economic and social development for many countries and regions especially after industrial revolution. In today’s world energy came to be one of the major fields of development, success or even conflict between countries and societies. The division of energy producers and energy suppliers and the world with access to energy or not came to be one of the major problems of world nations. During the last decades’ geography of energy is a result of the tiny mix of geography and energy science. Tiny, because of the very few publications in the field although it is seriously accelerating during the 21st century. It is only after 1961, when the discussion about the role of geographers in the field of energy and the answers to common geographic questions like patterns and spatial understanding of the production, distribution and needs of energy came up to the foreground. It is true that the world face fundamental changes in the patterns of energy production, distribution and use. International and national policies of the countries are driving energy transitions from «conventional» to «unconventional» fossil fuels (Farrell and Brandt, 2006; Greene et al., 2006 and from non-renewable to renewable energy resources (REN21, 2012. These changes follow a pattern behavior and a spatial analysis of the phenomenon is seriously needed. In this paper the transition of energy forms and the spatial behavior of energy production and needs are discussed. The future of an -energy driven- world sets the background for new tools of analysis of the demand for energy from human race. A theoretical background of the field of geography of energy is also given.

  8. Energy Cost and Gait Efficiency of Below-Knee Amputee and Normal Subject with Similar Physical Parameters & Quality of Life: A Comparative Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durbadal Biswas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The study focused on the comparative analysis of energy cost and gait efficiency between a below knee (BK amputee and a reference subject (without amputation. It also attempted to indicate the specific feature responsible for a controlled gait with optimum energy cost for BK amputees. Selection criteria of the subjects were similar physical parameters and quality of life studied with WHOQOL-100 quality of life assessment. A Cosmed® k4 b2 Respiratory Analyzer system was used for the measurement of Oxygen Uptake (VO2, Energy Expenditure per minute (EE and Heart Rate (HR. Gait efficiency (p < 0.0002 was found higher for BK amputee than normal subject. The therapeutic activities and mainly walking rhythm contributed to improve the mobility & balance. This ensures the optimum time & co-ordination of movements and hence improves the gait efficiency for the BK amputee. Comparison with control group was performed to validate the data.

  9. [Geography and health: themes and perspectives in Latin America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iñiguez Rojas, L

    1998-01-01

    Relations between geography and health have been recognized since ancient times. Investigation of such relations has been characterized by isolated and scant efforts. This article aims to explore potential links between geography's theoretical and methodological frame of reference and knowledge and interpretation of the population's health. It approaches the antecedents of medical or health-related geography and the use of the theoretical and methodological framework of geographic space, as well as identifying alternatives for its implementation. Finally, it raises several points relating to current development in the relations between geography and health in Latin America, as well as alternatives for such development.

  10. The Matter of Geography in Education for Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2015-01-01

    Geographical imaginations are absolutely vital to make sense of sustainability challenges. Yet, a number of studies reveal that geography education has been slow in integrating issues of sustainability into curricula. Geography is particularly interesting in the context of ESD, due to its tradition...... of investigating human environment interactions. In this paper we aim to contribute to this particular field of knowledge by providing an empirical analysis of ESD in Danish University Geography. In this paper it is examined how programs in Geography in higher education have taken different approaches...

  11. China Dimensions Data Collection: Bibliography of Chinese Administrative Geography

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Bibliography of Chinese Administrative Geography is a historical collection of bibliographic information on 75 published books describing the administrative...

  12. Consumo de suplementos nutricionais por praticantes de exercícios físicos em academias Use of nutritional supplements by subjects enrolled in physical fitness programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciene Pereira da Rocha

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve por objetivo verificar o consumo de suplementos em indivíduos praticantes de exercícios físicos em academias de Niterói e São Gonçalo (RJ. O grupo de estudo (GE constituiu-se de 160 indivíduos (10 por academia, selecionados ao acaso e que responderam a um questionário. As academias foram escolhidas de acordo com a localização e receptividade para a realização do levantamento. Verificou-se que 51 indivíduos (32% faziam uso de algum tipo de suplemento e 109 não (68%. O grupo de usuários de suplementos compunha-se por indivíduos entre 20 e 30 anos, sendo 35 do sexo masculino e 16 do feminino; 17 praticantes de musculação, 15 de ginástica, 10 de várias modalidades e 9 de ginástica e musculação. Vinte oito pessoas usavam um tipo de suplemento e 23 mais de um, sendo que dois indivíduos usavam seis tipos diferentes. Os praticantes de musculação usavam preferentemente aminoácidos e proteínas, além de produtos de composição mista, bem como "energéticos" e "estimulantes". Os praticantes de ginástica usavam mais suplementos deste último tipo, além de vitaminas e minerais. Os praticantes de ginástica associada à musculação e várias modalidades usavam praticamente todos os tipos de suplemento. A maioria dos usuários consumia suplementos diariamente (82,3% sendo a dose variada, muitos relatando o uso recomendado no rótulo. Trinta e dois participantes relataram que receberam orientação para o consumo dos suplementos. As autoras discutem os resultados encontrados e apresentam uma breve revisão sobre os efeitos do uso de suplementos para a melhoria da saúde ou do desempenho físico.This is a survey on the use of nutritional supplements by subjects enrolled in physical fitness schools in Niterói and São Gonçalo (RJ. The study group had 160 subjects (10 for school, selected at random, who answered a questionnaire. Schools were chosen occording to localization and receptivity to answering the

  13. Disability, Physical Inactivity, and Impaired Health-Related Quality of Life Are Not Different in Metabolically Healthy vs. Unhealthy Obese Subjects

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    Lorenzo M. Donini

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity represents a major health hazard, affecting morbidity, psychological status, physical functionality, quality of life, and mortality. The aim of the present study was to explore the differences between metabolically healthy (MHO and metabolically unhealthy (MUO obese subjects with regard to physical activity, disability, and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL. Methods: All subjects underwent a multidimensional evaluation, encompassing the assessment of body composition, metabolic biomarkers and inflammation, physical activity level (IPAQ questionnaire, disability (TSD-OC test, and HR-QoL (SF-36 questionnaire. MHO and MUO were defined based on the absence or the presence of the metabolic syndrome, respectively. Results: 253 subjects were included (54 men and 199 women; age: 51.7 ± 12.8 vs. 50.3 ± 11.7 years, p = 0.46; BMI: 38.1 ± 5.7 vs. 38.9 ± 6.7 kg/m2, p = 0.37. No significant difference was observed in body composition. There was no difference between MHO and MUO considering inflammation (hs-CRP: 6517.1 ± 11,409.9 vs. 5294.1 ± 5612.2 g/L; p = 0.37, physical inactivity (IPAQ score below 3000 METs-min/week in 77.6% of MHO vs. 80% of MUO subjects; p = 0.36, obesity-related disability (TSD-OC score > 33%, indicating a high level of obesity-related disability, in 20.2% of MHO vs. 26.5% of MUO subjects; p = 0.28, and the HR-QoL (SF-36 total score: 60 ± 20.8 vs. 62.8 ± 18.2, p = 0.27. Discussion and Conclusion: The metabolic comorbidity and the impairment of functional ability and psycho-social functioning may have a different timing in the natural history of obesity. Alterations in the physical activity level and mobility disabilities may precede the onset of metabolic abnormalities. (Trial registration 2369 prot 166/12—registered 23 February 2012; Amendment 223/14—registered 13 February 2014.

  14. Cosmology and Particle Physics/Human evolution and infectious disease/Cognitive evolution (1 page - 3 subjects)

    CERN Multimedia

    Carroll, Sean; Hauser, Marc D

    2007-01-01

    "On the theoretical side, particle phenomenologists will continue to develop physics beyond the Standard Model; string theorists are connecting ore strongly to cosmology and astrophysics/With the recent advent of whole-genome sequencing and increasingly complete surveys of genetic variation, we are now routinely studying 500 thousand variations at a time, enabling complete genome wide surveys in many human populations and in specific disease populations./The most exciting developments today sit at the intersection between science and philosophy.

  15. Basic gymnastics as a basic component invariant component of the curriculum subject «Physical culture»

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    Alfiya Deyneko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the analysis of the program discipline «Physical education» for grades 1–9 students in the context of the use of basic gymnastics. Material and Methods: the primary means of gymnastics, studied by pupils of 1–9 forms, was investigated as a part of the curriculum «Physical education in school». The study examined the content of primary invariant of gymnastics lesson. Results: it is found that the formation of school culture movements (movements exploring their diversity, physical exercises, etc. is in elementary school; due to the introduction of the learning material secondary school pupils gymnastic movements increased complexity is creating a culture of performance and use of basic gymnastics exercises that are the basis of the general culture of motor activity. Conclusions: the main factor reducing the general level of motor culture of pupils identified as a lack of training programs for grades 5–11 clearly defined lines of content on the use of basic gymnastics.

  16. Bio-physical characteristics of gastrointestinal mucosa of celiac patients: comparison with control subjects and effect of gluten free diet-

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    Villanacci Vincenzo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intestinal mucosa is leaky in celiac disease (CD, and this alteration may involve changes in hydrophobicity of the mucus surface barrier in addition to alteration of the epithelial barrier. The aims of our study were i to compare duodenal hydrophobicity as an index of mucus barrier integrity in CD patients studied before (n = 38 and during gluten- free diet (GFD, n = 68, and in control subjects (n = 90, and ii to check for regional differences of hydrophobicity in the gastro-intestinal tract. Methods Hydrophobicity was assessed by measurement of contact angle (CA (Rame Hart 100/10 goniometer generated by a drop of water placed on intestinal mucosal biopsies. Results CA (mean ± SD of distal duodenum was significantly lower in CD patients (56° ± 10° than in control subjects (69° ± 9°, p corpus > rectum > duodenum > oesophagus > ileum. Conclusions We conclude that the hydrophobicity of duodenal mucous layer is reduced in CD patients, and that the resulting decreased capacity to repel luminal contents may contribute to the increased intestinal permeability of CD. This alteration mirrors the severity of the mucosal lesions and is not completely reverted by gluten-free diet. Intestinal hydrophobicity exhibits regional differences in the human intestinal tract.

  17. Objective and subjective assessments of normal walking pace, in comparison with that recommended for moderate intensity physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kathryn L; Fitzsimons, Claire; Mutrie, Nanette

    Despite its common application and widely reported health benefits, walking, in relation to pace and intensity, is under-researched. Few studies have addressed whether people normally walk at a pace that meets the public health recommendations for moderate intensity physical activity (1.34-1.79 ms(-1)) and there is no known research on individuals' perceptions of factors which influence walking pace. This study aimed to objectively assess if participants were reaching the pace required for moderate intensity physical activity during normal walking. This was examined via a Global Positioning System (GPS) over a 1 km outdoor walk and a timed 150 m trial. In both tests participants (n=10, 3 men, 7 women, mean age 54±8 y) were instructed to walk at their normal pace. Through short interviews, the study also investigated the factors that participants' thought influenced their pace. All participants successfully walked at a pace considered as moderate intensity (≥1.34 ms(-1)). Height was significantly correlated with normal walking pace. The interviews provided an in depth insight into factors that affect walking pace; ground surface and footwear were mentioned frequently and the influence of the weather provided conflicting views, prompting a need for further research in the area. The GPS device showed enormous potential as a human locomotion measurement tool, enabling participants to walk unobstructed and unobserved in an outdoor setting, making the results relevant to real life situations.

  18. Comparison of Physical Therapy with Energy Healing for Improving Range of Motion in Subjects with Restricted Shoulder Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda Baldwin, Ann; Schwartz, Gary E.

    2013-01-01

    Two forms of energy healing, Reconnective Healing (RH) and Reiki, which involve light or no touch, were tested for efficacy against physical therapy (PT) for increasing limited range of motion (ROM) of arm elevation in the scapular plane. Participants were assigned to one of 5 groups: PT, Reiki, RH, Sham Healing, or no treatment. Except for no treatment, participants were blinded as to grouping. Range of Motion, self-reported pain, and heart rate variability (HRV) were assessed before and after a 10-minute session. On average, for PT, Reiki, RH, Sham Healing, and no treatment, respectively, ROM increased by 12°, 20°, 26°, 0.6°, and 3° and pain score decreased by 11.5%, 10.1%, 23.9%, 15.4%, and 0%. Physical therapy, Reiki, and RH were more effective than Sham Healing for increasing ROM (PT: F = 8.05, P = 0.008; Reiki: F = 10.48, P = 0.003; RH: F = 30.19, P Reiki, and RH. It is the authors' opinion that the accompanying pain relief is a placebo effect. PMID:24327820

  19. Comparison of Physical Therapy with Energy Healing for Improving Range of Motion in Subjects with Restricted Shoulder Mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Linda Baldwin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two forms of energy healing, Reconnective Healing (RH and Reiki, which involve light or no touch, were tested for efficacy against physical therapy (PT for increasing limited range of motion (ROM of arm elevation in the scapular plane. Participants were assigned to one of 5 groups: PT, Reiki, RH, Sham Healing, or no treatment. Except for no treatment, participants were blinded as to grouping. Range of Motion, self-reported pain, and heart rate variability (HRV were assessed before and after a 10-minute session. On average, for PT, Reiki, RH, Sham Healing, and no treatment, respectively, ROM increased by 12°, 20°, 26°, 0.6°, and 3° and pain score decreased by 11.5%, 10.1%, 23.9%, 15.4%, and 0%. Physical therapy, Reiki, and RH were more effective than Sham Healing for increasing ROM (PT: , ; Reiki: , ; RH: , . It is possible that this improvement was not mediated by myofascial release because the subjects’ HRV did not change, suggesting no significant increase in vagal activity. Sham treatment significantly reduced pain compared to no treatment (, and was just as effective as PT, Reiki, and RH. It is the authors’ opinion that the accompanying pain relief is a placebo effect.

  20. 12-mo intervention of physical exercise improved work ability, especially in subjects with low baseline work ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettunen, Oili; Vuorimaa, Timo; Vasankari, Tommi

    2014-04-04

    This study's objective was to assess the effects of a 12-month physical exercise intervention on work ability (WAI) and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) in healthy working adults. The study group had 371 participants, of which 338 (212 women and 126 men) were allocated in the exercise group and 33 (17 women and 16 men) in the control group. The exercise group underwent a 12-month exercise program followed by a 12-month follow-up. WAI and CRF were evaluated at baseline, and at 4, 8, 12, and 24 study months, in both exercise and control groups. The exercise group was divided into subgroups according to baseline WAI classifications (poor/moderate, good, excellent). During the 12-month exercise intervention, the exercise group increased their leisure-time physical activity by 71% (p = 0.016) and improved the mean WAI by 3% and CRF by 7% (p group (ANCOVA using age, sex and BMI as covariates, for WAI, p = 0.013 and for CRF, p = 0.008). The changes in WAI and CRF between the exercise group and control group were significantly different during the intervention (baseline vs. 12-months, p = 0.028 and p = 0.007) and after the follow-up (p = 0.001 and p = 0.040), respectively. A light positive correlation between the changes in WAI and in CRF (r = 0.19, p exercise intervention may improve work ability.