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Sample records for subject instrument instrument

  1. Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2001-04-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on instrumentation involves the assessment and the development of sensitive measurement systems used within a radiation environment. Particular emphasis is on the assessment of optical fibre components and their adaptability to radiation environments. The evaluation of ageing processes of instrumentation in fission plants, the development of specific data evaluation strategies to compensate for ageing induced degradation of sensors and cable performance form part of these activities. In 2000, particular emphasis was on in-core reactor instrumentation applied to fusion, accelerator driven and water-cooled fission reactors. This involved the development of high performance instrumentation for irradiation experiments in the BR2 reactor in support of new instrumentation needs for MYRRHA, and for diagnostic systems for the ITER reactor.

  2. Instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buehrer, W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-12-31

    The present paper mediates a basic knowledge of the most commonly used experimental techniques. We discuss the principles and concepts necessary to understand what one is doing if one performs an experiment on a certain instrument. (author) 29 figs., 1 tab., refs.

  3. Radioisotope instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, J F; Silverleaf, D J

    1971-01-01

    International Series of Monographs in Nuclear Energy, Volume 107: Radioisotope Instruments, Part 1 focuses on the design and applications of instruments based on the radiation released by radioactive substances. The book first offers information on the physical basis of radioisotope instruments; technical and economic advantages of radioisotope instruments; and radiation hazard. The manuscript then discusses commercial radioisotope instruments, including radiation sources and detectors, computing and control units, and measuring heads. The text describes the applications of radioisotop

  4. INSTRUMENTAL CONCEPTUALIZATION SUBJECT AREA SOCIOLOGY: SOME POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Maslennikov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines some of the possible ways of integrating the deployment tool conceptualizing domains of sociology on the basis of the machine sets of steps3. Substantiates the urgency of the problem of application of structural constructs of mathematics as a structure-formalism domain of sociology as a combination of theoretical knowledge. Formulated understanding of the sociological dimension in a broad sense of the concept of research as a measurement based on the use of instrumental in conceptualizing the methodology of sociological research. Under instrumental conceptualization refers to the construction of complex conceptual (conceptual schema structurally interconnected relationships between their individual elements, which are the units of the consideration related conceptual integrity, derived from interpretation of the properties “Set” construct. The paper proposes a definition based on the properties set in the scale set by the structure of N. Bourbaki4 relations systems in the data sets under the structural dimension of social phenomena to understand the interpretation of the investigated properties of social phenomena in terms of a construct that lies at the basis of the theoretical model that reflects the diversity of these qualities with the help of conceptual schemes that determine the quality of each as a structure of relations systems (ie, property in these qualities. In conclusion, the article lists presented in a number of publications, some preliminary results of the application of the methodology of conceptualizing instrumental in related disciplines from sociology. These works can perform suggestive role in the knowledge and understanding of methods of problem fields and objectives of the work on the conceptualization of theoretical sociology, using the mathematical theory of forms. 

  5. Luminescence Instrumentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank; Bøtter-Jensen, Lars

    2014-01-01

    This chapter gives an introduction to instrumentation for stimulated luminescence studies, with special focus on luminescence dating using the natural dosimeters, quartz and feldspars. The chapter covers basic concepts in luminescence detection, and thermal and optical stimulation, and reference...... irradiation. It then briefly describes development of spectrometers in dating applications, and finally gives an overview of recent development in the field directly linked to novel instrumentation. Contents of Paper...

  6. Instrumental Capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Valerio

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available During the history of human kind, since our first ancestors, tools have represented a mean to reach objectives which might otherwise seemed impossibles. In the called New Economy, where tangibles assets appear to be losing the role as the core element to produce value versus knowledge, tools have kept aside man in his dairy work. In this article, the author's objective is to describe, in a simple manner, the importance of managing the organization's group of tools or instruments (Instrumental Capital. The characteristic conditions of this New Economy, the way Knowledge Management deals with these new conditions and the sub-processes that provide support to the management of Instrumental Capital are described.

  7. Instrumental aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Navid

    2017-10-01

    Every neutron scattering experiment requires the choice of a suited neutron diffractometer (or spectrometer in the case of inelastic scattering) with its optimal configuration in order to accomplish the experimental tasks in the most successful way. Most generally, the compromise between the incident neutron flux and the instrumental resolution has to be considered, which is depending on a number of optical devices which are positioned in the neutron beam path. In this chapter the basic instrumental principles of neutron diffraction will be explained. Examples of different types of experiments and their respective expectable results will be shown. Furthermore, the production and use of polarized neutrons will be stressed.

  8. RHIC instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, T. J.; Witkover, R. L.

    1998-12-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) consists of two 3.8 km circumference rings utilizing 396 superconducting dipoles and 492 superconducting quadrupoles. Each ring will accelerate approximately 60 bunches of 1011 protons to 250 GeV, or 109 fully stripped gold ions to 100 GeV/nucleon. Commissioning is scheduled for early 1999 with detectors for some of the 6 intersection regions scheduled for initial operation later in the year. The injection line instrumentation includes: 52 beam position monitor (BPM) channels, 56 beam loss monitor (BLM) channels, 5 fast integrating current transformers and 12 video beam profile monitors. The collider ring instrumentation includes: 667 BPM channels, 400 BLM channels, wall current monitors, DC current transformers, ionization profile monitors (IPMs), transverse feedback systems, and resonant Schottky monitors. The use of superconducting magnets affected the beam instrumentation design. The BPM electrodes must function in a cryogenic environment and the BLM system must prevent magnet quenches from either fast or slow losses with widely different rates. RHIC is the first superconducting accelerator to cross transition, requiring close monitoring of beam parameters at this time. High space-charge due to the fully stripped gold ions required the IPM to collect magnetically guided electrons rather than the conventional ions. Since polarized beams will also be accelerated in RHIC, additional constraints were put on the instrumentation. The orbit must be well controlled to minimize depolarizing resonance strengths. Also, the position monitors must accommodate large orbit displacements within the Siberian snakes and spin rotators. The design of the instrumentation will be presented along with results obtained during bench tests, the injection line commissioning, and the first sextant test.

  9. An instrument to assess subjective task value beliefs regarding the decision to pursue postgraduate training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemeier, Nicholas E; Murawski, Matthew M

    2014-02-12

    To develop and validate an instrument to assess subjective ratings of the perceived value of various postgraduate training paths followed using expectancy-value as a theoretical framework; and to explore differences in value beliefs across type of postgraduate training pursued and type of pharmacy training completed prior to postgraduate training. A survey instrument was developed to sample 4 theoretical domains of subjective task value: intrinsic value, attainment value, utility value, and perceived cost. Retrospective self-report methodology was employed to examine respondents' (N=1,148) subjective task value beliefs specific to their highest level of postgraduate training completed. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analytic techniques were used to evaluate and validate value belief constructs. Intrinsic, attainment, utility, cost, and financial value constructs resulted from exploratory factor analysis. Cross-validation resulted in a 26-item instrument that demonstrated good model fit. Differences in value beliefs were noted across type of postgraduate training pursued and pharmacy training characteristics. The Postgraduate Training Value Instrument demonstrated evidence of reliability and construct validity. The survey instrument can be used to assess value beliefs regarding multiple postgraduate training options in pharmacy and potentially inform targeted recruiting of individuals to those paths best matching their own value beliefs.

  10. Laser instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera, R.J.; Eagar, T.W.

    1986-04-08

    An instrument is described for intercepting a carbon dioxide incident laser beam after it has energized a desired surgical target site but before it energizes material adjacent to the surgical target site. The instrument consists of: a substrate means for transmitting energy received from a laser beam away from a surgical target site, the substrate means having a high thermal conductivity and an exterior surface; a coating means for absorbing laser energy at the wavelength of a carbon dioxide laser, the coating means covering substantially the entirety of the exterior surface of the substrate means and having a high absorptivity for energy at the wavelength of the incident laser beam; and, the coating means having thickness which is large enough to provide high absorptivity but small enough to permit absorbed energy to be readily transferred to the high conductivity substrate means, and the thickness of the coating means being not greater than 0.001 inch.

  11. Instrumentation viewpoint

    OpenAIRE

    Sarti, Centro Tecnológico de Vilanova i la Geltrú

    2010-01-01

    Following our traditional edition line, on this issue our magazine presents the annual summary of the different projects and research activities developed by SARTI research group during 2011. The research projects undertaken by SARTI, in collaboration with other Spanish and international research teams, are linked to the development of instrumentation technology for marine applications, as well as for general industry. SARTI, as research group of the Universitat Politècnica de Cat...

  12. Evaluating an Instrument to Quantify Attitude to the Subject of Physiology in Undergraduate Health Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stephen; White, Sue; Bowmar, Alex; Power, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    The attitude toward a subject contributes to both academic engagement and success at university, yet it is not routinely measured in undergraduate students. Therefore, in two consecutive introductory courses in Human anatomy and physiology (HAP 1, n = 239, and HAP 2, n = 329), an instrument to quantify undergraduate students' attitude to the…

  13. Using subjective judgement to determine the validity of a tutorial performance evaluation instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie L. Lack

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Evaluating students’ learning performance is dependent on assessment criteria from which valid inferences can be made about student learning. An existing 36-item instrument used to evaluate baccalaureate nursing students’ performance in problem-based learning tutorials was presented to experts in nursing for their subjective judgement of item validity. Quantitative analysis of data sets from experts’ judgements was used to construct a valid measurement scale for evaluating students’ tutorial performance. The objectives of the study were to determine the content validity of items in a tutorial performance evaluation (TPE instrument and to determine the construct validity of items through paired comparison of main and sub-items in the instrument. Academic experts (n = 8 from two South African universities were selected by means of purposive, maximum variation sampling. Data were collected in three rounds of the Delphi technique, which incorporated the Subjective Judgement Model for paired comparison of instrument items. Experts’ ratings were captured on a visual analogue scale for each item. Relative item weights were determined using
    paired comparisons. Statistical analysis resulted in ratio scale data, each item being assigned a ratio relative to its weight. It was concluded that quantitative analysis of subjective judgements is useful to determine the construct validity of items through paired comparison of items in a TPE instrument. This article presents the methodological perspectives of subjective judgement to establish instrument validity.

    Opsomming

    Die evaluering van studente se leervermoë is afhanklik van die waardebepalingskriteria waarvan geldige afleidings betreffende die student se leerervaring gemaak kan word. ’n Bestaande instrument met 36 items waarmee baccalaureus-verpleegkundestudente se prestasie in die probleemgebaseerde leertutoriale geëvalueer is, is aan kundiges in

  14. Instrumentation a reader

    CERN Document Server

    Pope, P

    1990-01-01

    This book contains a selection of papers and articles in instrumentation previously pub­ lished in technical periodicals and journals of learned societies. Our selection has been made to illustrate aspects of current practice and applications of instrumentation. The book does not attempt to be encyclopaedic in its coverage of the subject, but to provide some examples of general transduction techniques, of the sensing of particular measurands, of components of instrumentation systems and of instrumentation practice in two very different environments, the food industry and the nuclear power industry. We have made the selection particularly to provide papers appropriate to the study of the Open University course T292 Instrumentation. The papers have been chosen so that the book covers a wide spectrum of instrumentation techniques. Because of this, the book should be of value not only to students of instrumen­ tation, but also to practising engineers and scientists wishing to glean ideas from areas of instrumen...

  15. Across-subject calibration of an instrumented glove to measure hand movement for clinical purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia-Ibáñez, Verónica; Vergara, Margarita; Buffi, James H; Murray, Wendy M; Sancho-Bru, Joaquín L

    2017-05-01

    Motion capture of all degrees of freedom of the hand collected during performance of daily living activities remains challenging. Instrumented gloves are an attractive option because of their higher ease of use. However, subject-specific calibration of gloves is lengthy and has limitations for individuals with disabilities. Here, a calibration procedure is presented, consisting in the recording of just a simple hand position so as to allow capture of the kinematics of 16 hand joints during daily life activities even in case of severe injured hands. 'across-subject gains' were obtained by averaging the gains obtained from a detailed subject-specific calibration involving 44 registrations that was repeated three times on multiple days to 6 subjects. In additional 4 subjects, joint angles that resulted from applying the 'across-subject calibration' or the subject-specific calibration were compared. Global errors associated with the 'across-subject calibration' relative to the detailed, subject-specific protocol were small (bias: 0.49°; precision: 4.45°) and comparable to those that resulted from repeating the detailed protocol with the same subject on multiple days (0.36°; 3.50°). Furthermore, in one subject, performance of the 'across-subject calibration' was directly compared to another fast calibration method, expressed relative to a videogrammetric protocol as a gold-standard, yielding better results.

  16. Instrumentation reference book

    CERN Document Server

    Boyes, Walt

    2002-01-01

    Instrumentation is not a clearly defined subject, having a 'fuzzy' boundary with a number of other disciplines. Often categorized as either 'techniques' or 'applications' this book addresses the various applications that may be needed with reference to the practical techniques that are available for the instrumentation or measurement of a specific physical quantity or quality. This makes it of direct interest to anyone working in the process, control and instrumentation fields where these measurements are essential.* Comprehensive and authoritative collection of technical information* Writte

  17. The effects of receiver placement on probe microphone, performance, and subjective measures with open canal hearing instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alworth, Lynzee N; Plyler, Patrick N; Reber, Monika Bertges; Johnstone, Patti M

    2010-04-01

    Open canal hearing instruments differ in method of sound delivery to the ear canal, distance between the microphone and the receiver, and physical size of the devices. Moreover, RITA (receiver in the aid) and RITE (receiver in the ear) hearing instruments may also differ in terms of retention and comfort as well as ease of use and care for certain individuals. What remains unclear, however, is if any or all of the abovementioned factors contribute to hearing aid outcome. To determine the effect of receiver location on performance and/or preference of listeners using open canal hearing instruments. An experimental study in which subjects were exposed to a repeated measures design. Twenty-five adult listeners with mild sloping to moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss (mean age 67 yr). Participants completed two six-week trial periods for each device type. Probe microphone, objective, and subjective measures (quiet, noise) were conducted unaided and aided at the end of each trial period. Occlusion effect results were not significantly different between the RITA and RITE instruments; however, frequency range was extended in the RITE instruments, resulting in significantly greater maximum gain for the RITE instruments than the RITA instruments at 4000 and 6000 Hz. Objective performance in quiet or in noise was unaffected by receiver location. Subjective measures revealed significantly greater satisfaction ratings for the RITE than for the RITA instruments. Similarly, preference in quiet and overall preference were significantly greater for the RITE than for the RITA instruments. Although no occlusion differences were noted between instruments, the RITE did demonstrate a significant difference in reserve gain before feedback at 4000 and 6000 Hz. Objectively; no positive benefit was noted between unaided and aided conditions on speech recognition tests. These results suggest that such testing may not be sensitive enough to determine aided benefit with open canal

  18. E-MODULE DEVELOPMENT FOR THE SUBJECT OF MEASURING INSTRUMENTS AND MEASUREMENT IN ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuryake Fajaryati

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to develop an e-module as a medium of learning for the practice course of Measuring Instruments and Measurement in the Department of Electronics Engineering Education of Yogyakarta State University and to determine the feasibility of the e-module. This study employed a method of research and development. The development process was conducted through four phases by using the model of Lee and Owens which consisted of analysis phase, design phase, developing and implementation phase, as well as evaluation phase.The evaluation was conducted in several stages. Firstly, an alpha test for product validation was conducted by the experts on material and media. After that, a beta test was conducted by testing the product in small group users. The subjects of this study were the students of Electronics Engineering. The instruments used to collect the data were a validation sheet and questionnaires. The results of qualitative data were then modified into quantitative data with a range of 1 to 5, then they were converted with a rating scale to determine the feasibility of the medium. The results showed that based on the alpha test, the medium was in a very high quality. Meanwhile, in the beta test of the instructional aspect, in terms of material and evaluation and the multimedia aspect the e-module was respectively considered feasible and quite feasible. The four indicators namely text, image, animation and video were all generally considered feasible. In terms of usage aspect, the e-module was considered feasible where its two indicators, namely instructions and navigation, were generally regarded as very feasible by all respondents.

  19. IOT Overview: IR Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, E.

    In this instrument review chapter the calibration plans of ESO IR instruments are presented and briefly reviewed focusing, in particular, on the case of ISAAC, which has been the first IR instrument at VLT and whose calibration plan served as prototype for the coming instruments.

  20. Astronomical Instruments in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Sreeramula Rajeswara

    The earliest astronomical instruments used in India were the gnomon and the water clock. In the early seventh century, Brahmagupta described ten types of instruments, which were adopted by all subsequent writers with minor modifications. Contact with Islamic astronomy in the second millennium AD led to a radical change. Sanskrit texts began to lay emphasis on the importance of observational instruments. Exclusive texts on instruments were composed. Islamic instruments like the astrolabe were adopted and some new types of instruments were developed. Production and use of these traditional instruments continued, along with the cultivation of traditional astronomy, up to the end of the nineteenth century.

  1. Health physics instrument manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupton, E.D.

    1978-08-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide apprentice health physics surveyors and other operating groups not directly concerned with radiation detection instruments a working knowledge of the radiation detection and measuring instruments in use at the Laboratory. The characteristics and applications of the instruments are given. Portable instruments, stationary instruments, personnel monitoring instruments, sample counters, and miscellaneous instruments are described. Also, information sheets on calibration sources, procedures, and devices are included. Gamma sources, beta sources, alpha sources, neutron sources, special sources, a gamma calibration device for badge dosimeters, and a calibration device for ionization chambers are described. (WHK)

  2. Sport participation and subjective well-being: instrumental variable results from German survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruseski, Jane E; Humphreys, Brad R; Hallman, Kirstin; Wicker, Pamela; Breuer, Christoph

    2014-02-01

    A major policy goal of many ministries of sport and health is increased participation in sport to promote health. A growing literature is emerging about the benefits of sport participation on happiness. A challenge in establishing a link between sport participation and happiness is controlling for endogeneity of sport participation in the happiness equation. This study seeks to establish causal evidence of a relationship between sport participation and self reported happiness using instrumental variables (IV). IV estimates based on data from a 2009 population survey living in Rheinberg, Germany indicate that individuals who participate in sport have higher life happiness. The results suggest a U-shaped relationship between age and self-reported happiness. Higher income is associated with greater self-reported happiness, males are less happy than females, and single individuals are less happy than nonsingles. Since the results are IV, this finding is interpreted as a causal relationship between sport participation and subjective well-being (SWB). This broader impact of sport participation on general happiness lends support to the policy priority of many governments to increase sport participation at all levels of the general population.

  3. Subjective memory complaints, depressive symptoms and instrumental activities of daily living in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Seon Young; Lee, Sang Bong; Kim, Tae Woo; Lee, Taek Jun

    2016-03-01

    The diagnostic relevance of subjective memory complaints (SMCs) in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) remains to be unresolved. The aim of this study is to determine clinical correlates of SMCs in MCI. Furthermore, we examined whether there are the differences due to different aspects of complaints (i.e. prospective memory (PM) versus retrospective memory (RM) complaints). We examined the cross-sectional associations between SMCs and depressive symptoms, instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), and cognitive measures in sixty-six individuals with MCI (mean age: 65.7 ± 8.01 years). The criteria for MCI included SMCs, objective cognitive impairment, normal general cognitive function, largely intact functional activities, and absence of dementia. SMCs were assessed using the Prospective and Retrospective Memory Questionnaire (PRMQ), which contains 16 items describing everyday memory failure of both PM and RM. SMC severity (i.e. PRMQ total score) was associated with stronger depressive symptoms and worse IADL performance. SMCs were not related to cognitive measures. For PM and RM subscores, both depressive symptoms and IADL were related to the PRMQ-PM and -RM scores. The main contributors to these PM and RM scores were depressive symptoms and IADL impairment, respectively. This study suggests that SMCs are more associated with depressive symptoms and IADL problems than with cognitive performance in individuals with MCI. Furthermore, while PM and RM complaints are related to both depressive symptoms and IADL, the differences between these main contributors suggest that RM complaints based on IADL could be more associated with the organically driven pathological features of MCI.

  4. Instrument Modeling and Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Andrew B.; Beauchamp, James W.

    During the 1970s and 1980s, before synthesizers based on direct sampling of musical sounds became popular, replicating musical instruments using frequency modulation (FM) or wavetable synthesis was one of the “holy grails” of music synthesis. Synthesizers such as the Yamaha DX7 allowed users great flexibility in mixing and matching sounds, but were notoriously difficult to coerce into producing sounds like those of a given instrument. Instrument design wizards practiced the mysteries of FM instrument design.

  5. The Instrumental Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Devin Rodney

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation is to enable better predictive models by engaging raw experimental data through the Instrumental Model. The Instrumental Model captures the protocols and procedures of experimental data analysis. The approach is formalized by encoding the Instrumental Model in an XML record. Decoupling the raw experimental data from…

  6. Aeroacoustics of Musical Instruments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fabre, B.; Gilbert, J.; Hirschberg, Abraham; Pelorson, X.

    2012-01-01

    We are interested in the quality of sound produced by musical instruments and their playability. In wind instruments, a hydrodynamic source of sound is coupled to an acoustic resonator. Linear acoustics can predict the pitch of an instrument. This can significantly reduce the trial-and-error process

  7. Performing the Super Instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallionpaa, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The genre of contemporary classical music has seen significant innovation and research related to new super, hyper, and hybrid instruments, which opens up a vast palette of expressive potential. An increasing number of composers, performers, instrument designers, engineers, and computer programmers...... have become interested in different ways of “supersizing” acoustic instruments in order to open up previously-unheard instrumental sounds. Super instruments vary a great deal but each has a transformative effect on the identity and performance practice of the performing musician. Furthermore, composers...... provides the performer extensive virtuoso capabilities in terms of instrumental range, harmony, timbre, or spatial, textural, acoustic, technical, or technological qualities. The discussion will be illustrated by a composition case study involving augmented musical instrument electromagnetic resonator...

  8. Social Responsibility Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Mizera

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Responsible business notion is more and more present in Polish economy, however the results of the research carried out in Polish business still shows a low level of CRS idea knowledge, especially in small and medium companies. Although responsible business notion is generally known, its details, ways of preparing strategy, instruments and what is more its benefits are still narrowly spread. Many business people face the lack of knowledge and information, which on one hand make it easier to spread and deepen wrong stereotypes connected with this notion and on the other hand make business people unwilling to implement CRS in their companies. The subjects of this article are examples of instruments which are responsible for realization of social responsibility strategy.

  9. Industrial instrumentation principles and design

    CERN Document Server

    Padmanabhan, Tattamangalam R

    2000-01-01

    Pneumatic, hydraulic and allied instrumentation schemes have given way to electronic schemes in recent years thanks to the rapid strides in electronics and allied areas. Principles, design and applications of such state-of-the-art instrumentation schemes form the subject matter of this book. Through representative examples, the basic building blocks of instrumentation schemes are identified and each of these building blocks discussed in terms of its design and interface characteristics. The common generic schemes synthesized with such building blocks are dealt with subsequently. This forms the scope of Part I. The focus in Part II is on application. Displacement and allied instrumentation, force and allied instrumentation and process instrumentation in terms of temperature, flow, pressure level and other common process variables are dealt with separately and exhaustively. Despite the diversity in the sensor principles and characteristics and the variety in the applications and their environments, it is possib...

  10. Networked Instrumentation Element

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Armstrong researchers have developed a networked instrumentation system that connects modern experimental payloads to existing analog and digital communications...

  11. Ocean Optics Instrumentation Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides instrumentation suites for a wide variety of measurements to characterize the ocean’s optical environment. These packages have been developed to...

  12. Instrumentation Design and Development Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — RTTC has facilities for design, development and fabrication of: custominstrumentation, mobile instrumentation, miniaturized instrumentation, wirelessinstrumentation,...

  13. Sterilization of endoscopic instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabnis, Ravindra B; Bhattu, Amit; Vijaykumar, Mohankumar

    2014-03-01

    Sterilization of endoscopic instruments is an important but often ignored topic. The purpose of this article is to review the current literature on the sterilization of endoscopic instruments and elaborate on the appropriate sterilization practices. Autoclaving is an economic and excellent method of sterilizing the instruments that are not heat sensitive. Heat sensitive instruments may get damaged with hot sterilization methods. Several new endoscopic instruments such as flexible ureteroscopes, chip on tip endoscopes, are added in urologists armamentarium. Many of these instruments are heat sensitive and hence alternative efficacious methods of sterilization are necessary. Although ethylene oxide and hydrogen peroxide are excellent methods of sterilization, they have some drawbacks. Gamma irradiation is mainly for disposable items. Various chemical agents are widely used even though they achieve high-level disinfection rather than sterilization. This article reviews various methods of endoscopic instrument sterilization with their advantages and drawbacks. If appropriate sterilization methods are adopted, then it not only will protect patients from procedure-related infections but prevent hypersensitive allergic reactions. It will also protect instruments from damage and increase its longevity.

  14. Creating a Super Instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallionpää, Maria; Gasselseder, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    traditionally been dependent on their existing instrumental skills, various technological solutions can be used to reach beyond them. This paper focuses on the possibilities of enhancing composers' and performing pianists' technical and expressive vocabulary in the context of electroacoustic super instrument...

  15. [Ambulatory blood pressure in normotensive subjects. Definition of reference values as a function of age by the Spacelabs instrument].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagny, J Y; Delva, R; Aouizerate, M; Chatellier, G; Battaglia, C; Devriès, C; Plouin, P F; Corvol, P; Ménard, J

    1987-10-10

    For a finer assessment, by repeated blood pressure (BP) measurements, of the cardiovascular risk associated with BP levels, new instruments have been developed which provide multiple reading during periods of activity. However, the lack of epidemiological studies makes it necessary to determine reference ambulatory BP levels by another method. Twelve-hour recordings were taken with the Spacelabs instrument in 130 volunteers (45% males) aged from 20 to 90 years during their various activities. Mean systolic and diastolic BP values +/- SD were calculated per age-groups of 10 years each. That this sample was representative of the general population was confirmed by the fact that BP fluctuations and variations according to age and sex in these 130 subjects were identical with those observed in the population of an entire town (Framingham). The concept of hypertension, as defined by ambulatory BP recordings, is discussed. This study provides, for the first time, reference ambulatory BP values according to age and sex, measured in normotensive subjects with the Spacelabs instrument. These values constitute a preliminary step indispensable to evaluate this technique in hypertensive patients.

  16. Subjective evaluation of treatment outcomes of instrumentation with pedicle screws or hybrid constructs in Lenke Type 1 and 2 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: what happens when judges are blinded to the instrumentation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellet, Jean Albert; Shilt, Jeffrey; Shen, Francis H.; Wood, Kirkham; Chan, Donald; Hicks, John; Bersusky, Ernesto; Reddi, Vasantha

    2009-01-01

    Superiority of pedicle screws over hybrid/hook instrumentation or vice versa in the treatment of Lenke Type 1 and 2 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) remains unresolved for moderate curves. Our objective was therefore to compare the assessment of pedicle screw and hybrid/hooks instrumentation with special attention to cosmesis and uninstrumented spine using novel assessment methods. We carried out a retrospective study of radiographs and clinical photos of 40 cases of thoracic AIS between 40° and 70° of Cobb angle Lenke Type 1 and 2, treated with either pedicle screws or hybrid/hooks. The cases were subjectively assessed by four spine surgeons (SRS Travelling Fellows) for radiographic and operative cosmetic result, shoulder balance, trunk shift, rib hump, and waist asymmetry. Instrumentation in the radiographs was obscured with only the non-instrumented part visible, and the surgeons were asked to guess the instrumentation being used. Eighty photographs of patients before and after surgery were assessed for cosmesis by ten non-medical judges for overall cosmetic score, shoulder balance, waist asymmetry, and shoulder blade prominence. Objective assessment of radiographs and clinical photos was performed for Cobb angle of instrumented and non-instrumented spine, global coronal and sagittal balance, number of unfused vertebrae, disc angulation, tilt of last instrumented vertebra, shoulder balance, waist asymmetry, rib prominence, and percent correction. SRS-24 questionnaire was used to measure health-related quality of life in patients. Subjective assessments by surgeons and non-medical judges showed no significant difference by instrumentation (P ≥ 0.05) for all variables. Out of the 160 guesses by surgeons of the cases with instrumentation blocked in the radiographs, they were unable to guess the instrumentation in 92% of the cases. Objective assessment of all variables and SRS-24 scores of all five domains showed no significant difference by

  17. Hindi translation and evaluation of psychometric properties of Craig Hospital Inventory of Environmental Factors instrument in spinal cord injury subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Sandeep; Walia, Shefali; Noohu, Majumi Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    The Craig Hospital Inventory of Environmental Factors instrument (CHIEF) is one of the few tools to assess the environmental barriers. The purpose of this study was to translate long and short CHIEF into Hindi language, and to determine its validity and reliability. The study design was observational case series with repeated measures. It was carried out at Indian Spinal Injuries Centre New Delhi, a specialized center for rehabilitation for spinal cord injury. The CHIEF instrument was translated from English to Hindi based on the Beaton guidelines for the cross-cultural adaptation of health status measures. The Hindi version of the CHIEF instrument was then administered on a convenience sample of 30 spinal cord injured subjects. Its content validity, internal consistency, test-rest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] 2,1), standard error of measurement (SEM), and minimum detectable change (MDC) were determined for both the longer and shorter version. The mean ± SD of total of Hindi-CHIEF instrument, longer version was 1.44 ± 0.82 and total score of the shorter version was 1.07 ± 0.66. The content validity determined by the content validity ratio was found to be 1 for all the items except item number 5, 11, and 12. The content validity index was 0.97 for the longer version and for the shorter version it was 0.98. Internal consistency, Cronbach's α value was found to be 0.92 and test-retest value (ICC 2,1) was 0.80 (P Hindi translated version of the CHIEF scale has acceptable content validity and reliability. It can be used to assess environmental barriers perceived by spinal cord injury patients.

  18. Productivity loss due to absenteeism and presenteeism by different instruments in patients with RA and subjects without RA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braakman-Jansen, Louise M A; Taal, Erik; Kuper, Ina H; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2012-02-01

    To explore the impact of at-work productivity loss on the total productivity cost by different instruments in patients recently diagnosed with RA and controls without RA. Cross-sectional data were collected from outpatients with RA between December 2007 and February 2008. The control group was formed by subjects without RA matched on age and gender. Absenteeism and presenteeism were estimated by the Quantity and Quality (QQ) Questionnaire, Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire General Health V2.0 (WPAI-GH) and Health and Labor Questionnaire (HLQ) questionnaires. Differences between groups were tested by Mann-Whitney U-test. Costs were valued by the human capital approach. Data were available from 62 patients with a paid job and 61 controls. QQ- and WPAI-GH scores of presenteeism were moderately correlated (r = 0.61) while the HLQ presenteeism score correlated poorly with the other instruments (r = 0.34). The contribution of presenteeism on total productivity costs was estimated at ∼70% in the RA group. The mean costs per person per week due to presenteeism varied between €79 and €318 per week in the RA group, dependent on the instrument used. The costs due to presenteeism were about two to four times higher in the RA group compared with the control group. This study indicates that the impact of presenteeism on the total productivity costs in patients with RA is high. However, work productivity in individuals without RA was not optimal either, which implies a risk of overestimation of cost when a normal score is not taken into account. Finally, different presenteeism instruments lead to different results.

  19. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CORE INSTRUMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mims, L.S.

    1961-08-22

    A multi-purpose instrument for measuring neutron flux, coolant flow rate, and coolant temperature in a nuclear reactor is described. The device consists essentially of a hollow thimble containing a heat conducting element protruding from the inner wall, the element containing on its innermost end an amount of fissionsble materinl to function as a heat source when subjected to neutron flux irradiation. Thermocouple type temperature sensing means are placed on the heat conducting element adjacent the fissionable material and at a point spaced therefrom, and at a point on the thimble which is in contact with the coolant fluid. The temperature differentials measured between the thermocouples are determinative of the neutron flux, coolant flow, and temperature being measured. The device may be utilized as a probe or may be incorporated in a reactor core. (AE C)

  20. Carbon Footprint Reduction Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page outlines the major differences between Renewable Energy Certificates (REC) and Project Offsets and what types of claims each instrument allows the organization to make in regards to environmental emissions claims.

  1. Fiber Optics Instrumentation Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Patrick Hon Man; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Richards, W. Lance

    2010-01-01

    This is a general presentation of fiber optics instrumentation development work being conducted at NASA Dryden for the past 10 years and recent achievements in the field of fiber optics strain sensors.

  2. Ultrasound physics and instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, T D

    1998-04-01

    A knowledge of the principles of ultrasound physics and instrumentation allows the surgeon to maintain proper ultrasound techniques and obtain the best possible image. Furthermore, when these principles are understood, artifacts and pitfalls of imaging are avoided.

  3. Medical instruments in museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderqvist, Thomas; Arnold, Ken

    2011-01-01

    This essay proposes that our understanding of medical instruments might benefit from adding a more forthright concern with their immediate presence to the current historical focus on simply decoding their meanings and context. This approach is applied to the intriguingly tricky question of what a...... actually is meant by a "medical instrument." It is suggested that a pragmatic part of the answer might lie simply in reconsidering the holdings of medical museums, where the significance of the physical actuality of instruments comes readily to hand.......This essay proposes that our understanding of medical instruments might benefit from adding a more forthright concern with their immediate presence to the current historical focus on simply decoding their meanings and context. This approach is applied to the intriguingly tricky question of what...

  4. Modeling of Musical Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Rolf; Hansen, Uwe

    Signal processing techniques in acoustics address many concerns. Included are such things as wave propagation variables, amplitude considerations, spectral content, wavelength, and phase. Phase is primarily of concern when waves interact with each other, as well as with a medium, and the imposition of boundary conditions leads to normal mode vibrations. Such conditions are prevalent in all musical instruments, and thus relevant signal processing techniques are essential to both understanding and modeling the structure of musical instruments and the sound radiated.

  5. Future of radiological instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, A.C.

    1988-08-01

    Future trends in the development of radiation protection instrumentation can be expected to be closely related to current trends in political and social activity that drive legislation, rule-making, and standard practice, with assistance provided by trends in material and electronic technology. Wide-range performance will be emphasized to arm the daily worker with instruments that routinely log background rates and, at the same time, are prepared to measure accident rates. Separate and simultaneous accumulation of data from several sensors to ensure complete coverage of the radiation types will be common. Mathematical manipulation of data will provide for summary data logging and, in some cases, solutions to integral equations to provide corrections to experimental data. Instruments will become more reliable by way of self-checking and correction. Miniaturization and large-scale integration of measuring instruments will provide some instrumentation for the people at large. To be effective, the instruments will necessarily cover a wide range and be very reliable. The net result of these several trends will provide for a widespread understanding of radiation protection and an implementation of as low as reasonably achievable among large segments of the population.

  6. [The instrument for thermography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, Shinsuke

    2014-07-01

    Thermography is an imaging method using the instrument to detect infrared rays emitted from the body surface, and to plot them as a distribution diagram of the temperature information. Therefore, a thermographic instrument can be assumed to measure the skin temperature of the diseased region. Such an instrument is a useful device for noninvasive and objective assessment of various diseases. Examination using a thermographic instrument can assess the autonomic dysfunction by measuring the skin blood flow involved with the sympathetic innervation. Thermography is useful in assisting the determination of the therapeutic effect. However, autonomic dysfunction should be confirmed correctly with the assessment of thermatome that shows abnormal thermal distribution in the region of the disease. Thermography should make noticeable the difference between the body temperature of abnormal and normal sites, and show the alteration of temperature. Monitoring using thermography is useful to determine the effect of sympathetic nerve block. If a thermographic instrument is used, it is important that examiners should understand the function of the instrument, as well as its advantages and disadvantages.

  7. Work station learning activities: a flexible and scalable instrument for integrating across basic subjects in biomedical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Soltero, Rocío; Learte, Ana Isabel R; Sánchez, Ana Mª; Gal, Beatriz

    2017-11-29

    Establishing innovative teaching programs in biomedical education involves dealing with several national and supra-national (i.e. European) regulations as well as with new pedagogical and demographic demands. We aimed to develop and validate a suitable instrument to integrate activities across preclinical years in all Health Science Degrees while meeting requirements of national quality agencies. The new approach was conceived at two different levels: first, we identified potentially integrative units from different fields according to national learning goals established for each preclinical year (national quality agency regulations). Secondly, we implemented a new instrument that combines active methodologies in Work Station Learning Activities (WSLA), using clinical scenarios as a guiding common thread to instruct students from an integrated perspective. We evaluated students' perception through a Likert-type survey of a total of 118 students enrolled in the first year of the Bachelor's Degree in Medicine. Our model of integrated activities through WSLA is feasible, scalable and manageable with large groups of students and a minimum number of instructors, two major limitations in many medical schools. Students' perception of WSLA was positive in overall terms. Seventy nine percent of participants stated that WSLA sessions were more useful than non-integrated activities. Eighty three percent confirmed that the WSLA methodology was effective at integrating concepts covered by different subjects. The WSLA approach is a flexible and scalable instrument for moving towards integrated curricula, and it can be successfully adapted to teach basic subjects in preclinical years of Health Science degrees. WSLA can be applied to large groups of students in a variety of contexts or environments using clinical cases as connecting threads.

  8. Virtual Instrumentation and Virtual Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelder, H.J.W.

    1999-01-01

    Instrumentation, interaction and virtual environments provide a challenging triplet for the next generation of instrumentation and measurement tools. As such, they are the logical continuation of an increasingly important component within (virtual) instrumentation. Despite these changes, however,

  9. Heat Flux Instrumentation Laboratory (HFIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Heat Flux Instrumentation Laboratory is used to develop advanced, flexible, thin film gauge instrumentation for the Air Force Research Laboratory....

  10. Biochemistry Instrumentation Core Technology Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The UCLA-DOE Biochemistry Instrumentation Core Facility provides the UCLA biochemistry community with easy access to sophisticated instrumentation for a wide variety...

  11. Aethalometer™ Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacek, Arthur J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Aethalometer is an instrument that provides a real-time readout of the concentration of “Black” or “Elemental” carbon aerosol particles (BC or E) in an air stream (see Figure 1 and Figure 2). It is a self-contained instrument that measures the rate of change of optical transmission through a spot on a filter where aerosol is being continuously collected and uses the information to calculate the concentration of optically absorbing material in the sampled air stream. The instrument measures the transmitted light intensities through the “sensing” portion of the filter, on which the aerosol spot is being collected, and a “reference” portion of the filter as a check on the stability of the optical source. A mass flowmeter monitors the sample air flow rate. The data from these three measurements is used to determine the mean BC content of the air stream.

  12. Calibration of Geodetic Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Bajtala

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of metrology and security systems of unification, correctness and standard reproducibilities belong to the preferred requirements of theory and technical practice in geodesy. Requirements on the control and verification of measured instruments and equipments increase and the importance and up-to-date of calibration get into the foreground. Calibration possibilities of length-scales (of electronic rangefinders and angle-scales (of horizontal circles of geodetic instruments. Calibration of electronic rangefinders on the linear comparative baseline in terrain. Primary standard of planar angle – optical traverse and its exploitation for calibration of the horizontal circles of theodolites. The calibration equipment of the Institute of Slovak Metrology in Bratislava. The Calibration process and results from the calibration of horizontal circles of selected geodetic instruments.

  13. ISSUERS OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian GHEORGHE

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The rules laid down by Romanian Capital Market Law and the regulations put in force for its implementation apply to issuers of financial instruments admitted to trading on the regulated market established in Romania. But the issuers remain companies incorporated under Company Law of 1990. Such dual regulations need increased attention in order to observe the legal status of the issuers/companies and financial instruments/shares. Romanian legislator has chosen to implement in Capital Market Law special rules regarding the administration of the issuers of financial instruments, not only rules regarding admitting and maintaining to a regulated market. Thus issuers are, in Romanian Law perspective, special company that should comply special rule regarding board of administration and general shareholders meeting.

  14. 32 CFR 21.300 - What instruments are subject to the DoD Grant and Agreement Regulations (DoDGARs)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What instruments are subject to the DoD Grant and Agreement Regulations (DoDGARs)? 21.300 Section 21.300 National Defense Department of Defense... MATTERS The DoD Grant and Agreement Regulations § 21.300 What instruments are subject to the DoD Grant and...

  15. Virtual Sensor Test Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Roy

    2011-01-01

    Virtual Sensor Test Instrumentation is based on the concept of smart sensor technology for testing with intelligence needed to perform sell-diagnosis of health, and to participate in a hierarchy of health determination at sensor, process, and system levels. A virtual sensor test instrumentation consists of five elements: (1) a common sensor interface, (2) microprocessor, (3) wireless interface, (4) signal conditioning and ADC/DAC (analog-to-digital conversion/ digital-to-analog conversion), and (5) onboard EEPROM (electrically erasable programmable read-only memory) for metadata storage and executable software to create powerful, scalable, reconfigurable, and reliable embedded and distributed test instruments. In order to maximize the efficient data conversion through the smart sensor node, plug-and-play functionality is required to interface with traditional sensors to enhance their identity and capabilities for data processing and communications. Virtual sensor test instrumentation can be accessible wirelessly via a Network Capable Application Processor (NCAP) or a Smart Transducer Interlace Module (STIM) that may be managed under real-time rule engines for mission-critical applications. The transducer senses the physical quantity being measured and converts it into an electrical signal. The signal is fed to an A/D converter, and is ready for use by the processor to execute functional transformation based on the sensor characteristics stored in a Transducer Electronic Data Sheet (TEDS). Virtual sensor test instrumentation is built upon an open-system architecture with standardized protocol modules/stacks to interface with industry standards and commonly used software. One major benefit for deploying the virtual sensor test instrumentation is the ability, through a plug-and-play common interface, to convert raw sensor data in either analog or digital form, to an IEEE 1451 standard-based smart sensor, which has instructions to program sensors for a wide variety of

  16. Standard NIM Instrumentation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costrell, Louis [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Lenkszus, Frank R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Rudnick, Stanley J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Davey, Eric [Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL), Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Gould, John [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rankowitz, Seymour [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sims, William P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Whitney, R. Roy [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States). Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF); Dobinson, Robert W. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Verweij, Henk [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Latner, Norman [Environmental Measurements Lab., New York, NY (United States); Negro, Vincent C. [Environmental Measurements Lab., New York, NY (United States); Barsotti, Edward J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Droege, Thomas E. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Kerns, Cordon [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Turner, Kathleen J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Downing, Robert W. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Kirsten, Frederick A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Larsh, A. E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Loken, Stewart C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mack, Dick A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wagner, Lee J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lucena, Robert C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); O' Brien, Dennis W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gjovig, Allan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Naivar, Frank [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nelson, Ronald O. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); White, D. Hywell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Akerlof, Carl [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Stilwell, Donald E. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC (United States); Trainor, James H. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC (United States); Gobbi, Bruno [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Biggerstaff, John A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hill, Nat W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Schulze, Gerald K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gustavson, David B. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Horelick, Dale [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kunz, Paul F. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Paffrath, Leo [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Walz, Helmut V. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Dawson, W. Kenneth [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Cresswell, John [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Dhawan, Satish [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Gingell, Charles E. L. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1990-05-01

    NIM is a standard modular instrumentation system that is in wide use throughout the world. As the NIM system developed and accommodations were made to a dynamic instrumentation field and a rapidly advancing technology, additions, revisions and clarifications were made. These were incorporated into the standard in the form of addenda and errata. This standard is a revision of the NIM document, AEC Report TID-20893 (Rev 4) dated July 1974. It includes all the addenda and errata items that were previously issued as well as numerous additional items to make the standard current with modern technology and manufacturing practice.

  17. Instrumentation Cables Test Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muna, Alice Baca [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); LaFleur, Chris Bensdotter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-01

    A fire at a nuclear power plant (NPP) has the potential to damage structures, systems, and components important to safety, if not promptly detected and suppressed. At Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Plant on March 22, 1975, a fire in the reactor building damaged electrical power and control systems. Damage to instrumentation cables impeded the function of both normal and standby reactor coolant systems, and degraded the operators’ plant monitoring capability. This event resulted in additional NRC involvement with utilities to ensure that NPPs are properly protected from fire as intended by the NRC principle design criteria (i.e., general design criteria 3, Fire Protection). Current guidance and methods for both deterministic and performance based approaches typically make conservative (bounding) assumptions regarding the fire-induced failure modes of instrumentation cables and those failure modes effects on component and system response. Numerous fire testing programs have been conducted in the past to evaluate the failure modes and effects of electrical cables exposed to severe thermal conditions. However, that testing has primarily focused on control circuits with only a limited number of tests performed on instrumentation circuits. In 2001, the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) conducted a series of cable fire tests designed to address specific aspects of the cable failure and circuit fault issues of concern1. The NRC was invited to observe and participate in that program. The NRC sponsored Sandia National Laboratories to support this participation, whom among other things, added a 4-20 mA instrumentation circuit and instrumentation cabling to six of the tests. Although limited, one insight drawn from those instrumentation circuits tests was that the failure characteristics appeared to depend on the cable insulation material. The results showed that for thermoset insulated cables, the instrument reading tended to drift

  18. Spectroelectrochemical Instrument Measures TOC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kounaves, Sam

    2011-01-01

    A spectroelectrochemical instrument has been developed for measuring the total organic carbon (TOC) content of an aqueous solution. Measurements of TOC are frequently performed in environmental, clinical, and industrial settings. Until now, techniques for performing such measurements have included, various ly, the use of hazardous reagents, ultraviolet light, or ovens, to promote reactions in which the carbon contents are oxidized. The instrument now being developed is intended to be a safer, more economical means of oxidizing organic carbon and determining the TOC levels of aqueous solutions and for providing a low power/mass unit for use in planetary missions.

  19. Standard NIM instrumentation system

    CERN Document Server

    1990-01-01

    NIM is a standard modular instrumentation system that is in wide use throughout the world. As the NIM system developed and accommodations were made to a dynamic instrumentation field and a rapidly advancing technology, additions, revisions and clarifications were made. These were incorporated into the standard in the form of addenda and errata. This standard is a revision of the NIM document, AEC Report TID- 20893 (Rev 4) dated July 1974. It includes all the addenda and errata items that were previously issued as well as numerous additional items to make the standard current with modern technology and manufacturing practice.

  20. Hindi translation and evaluation of psychometric properties of Craig Hospital Inventory of Environmental Factors instrument in spinal cord injury subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Soni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Craig Hospital Inventory of Environmental Factors instrument (CHIEF is one of the few tools to assess the environmental barriers. The purpose of this study was to translate long and short CHIEF into Hindi language, and to determine its validity and reliability. Design and Setting: The study design was observational case series with repeated measures. It was carried out at Indian Spinal Injuries Centre New Delhi, a specialized center for rehabilitation for spinal cord injury. Methods: The CHIEF instrument was translated from English to Hindi based on the Beaton guidelines for the cross-cultural adaptation of health status measures. The Hindi version of the CHIEF instrument was then administered on a convenience sample of 30 spinal cord injured subjects. Its content validity, internal consistency, test-rest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] 2,1, standard error of measurement (SEM, and minimum detectable change (MDC were determined for both the longer and shorter version. Results: The mean ± SD of total of Hindi-CHIEF instrument, longer version was 1.44 ± 0.82 and total score of the shorter version was 1.07 ± 0.66. The content validity determined by the content validity ratio was found to be 1 for all the items except item number 5, 11, and 12. The content validity index was 0.97 for the longer version and for the shorter version it was 0.98. Internal consistency, Cronbach's α value was found to be 0.92 and test-retest value (ICC 2,1 was 0.80 (P < 0.001. The MDC was found to be 0.99 and SEM was 0.36 for the longer version. The Cronbach's α was 0.731, ICC 2,1 was 0.63 (P < 0.001, SEM was 0.24, and MDC was 0.66 for the shorter version. Conclusion: The Hindi translated version of the CHIEF scale has acceptable content validity and reliability. It can be used to assess environmental barriers perceived by spinal cord injury patients.

  1. Specification for Instrumentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Margheritini, Lucia; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    This paper is intended to give an overview on instrumentation for monitoring the efficiency of the Converter and the performance of the device. Real-time control of plant and data monitoring and storage are the main objectives of the control system....

  2. The ozone monitoring instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levelt, P.F.; Oord, G.H.J. van den; Dobber, M.R.; Mälkki, A.; Visser, H.; Vries, J. de; Stammes, P.; Lundell, J.O.V.; Saari, H.

    2006-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) flies on the National Aeronautics and Space Adminsitration's Earth Observing System Aura satellite launched in July 2004. OMI is a ultraviolet/visible (UV/VIS) nadir solar backscatter spectrometer, which provides nearly global coverage in one day with a spatial

  3. Integrating Nephelometer Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uin, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The Integrating Nephelometer (Figure 1) is an instrument that measures aerosol light scattering. It measures aerosol optical scattering properties by detecting (with a wide angular integration – from 7 to 170°) the light scattered by the aerosol and subtracting the light scattered by the carrier gas, the instrument walls and the background noise in the detector (zeroing). Zeroing is typically performed for 5 minutes every day at midnight UTC. The scattered light is split into red (700 nm), green (550 nm), and blue (450 nm) wavelengths and captured by three photomultiplier tubes. The instrument can measure total scatter as well as backscatter only (from 90 to 170°) (Heintzenberg and Charlson 1996; Anderson et al. 1996; Anderson and Ogren 1998; TSI 3563 2015) At ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement), two identical Nephelometers are usually run in series with a sample relative humidity (RH) conditioner between them. This is possible because Nephelometer sampling is non-destructive and the sample can be passed on to another instrument. The sample RH conditioner scans through multiple RH values in cycles, treating the sample. This kind of setup allows to study how aerosol particles’ light scattering properties are affected by humidification (Anderson et al. 1996). For historical reasons, the two Nephelometers in this setup are labeled “wet” and “dry”, with the “dry” Nephelometer usually being the one before the conditioner and sampling ambient air (the names are switched for the MAOS measurement site due to the high RH of the ambient air).

  4. Measurement and Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkham, Harold

    2018-01-02

    This is a chapter for a book called the Standard Handbook for Electrical Engineering. Though it is not obvious from the title, the book deals mainly with power engineering. The first chapter (not mine) is about the fundamental quantities used in measurement. This chapter is about the process and the instrumentation.

  5. Neutron instrumentation for biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, S.A. [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France)

    1994-12-31

    In the October 1994 round of proposals at the ILL, the external biology review sub- committee was asked to allocate neutron beam time to a wide range of experiments, on almost half the total number of scheduled neutron instruments: on 3 diffractometers, on 3 small angle scattering instruments, and on some 6 inelastic scattering spectrometers. In the 3.5 years since the temporary reactor shutdown, the ILL`s management structure has been optimized, budgets and staff have been trimmed, the ILL reactor has been re-built, and many of the instruments up-graded, many powerful (mainly Unix) workstations have been introduced, and the neighboring European Synchrotron Radiation Facility has established itself as the leading synchrotron radiation source and has started its official user program. The ILL reactor remains the world`s most intense dedicated neutron source. In this challenging context, it is of interest to review briefly the park of ILL instruments used to study the structure and energetics of small and large biological systems. A brief summary will be made of each class of experiments actually proposed in the latest ILL proposal round.

  6. Economic Policy Instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemmensen, Børge

    2007-01-01

    Økonomiske instrumenter begrundes med behovet for politiske indgreb, der muliggør internaliseringen af omkostningerne ved de miljøpåvirkninger, produktion and levevis afstedkommer, således at hensyntagen til miljøet bliver en del af virksomheders og husholdningers omkostninger og dermed en tilsky...

  7. Virtual reality musical instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serafin, Stefania; Erkut, Cumhur; Kojs, Juraj

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development and availability of low cost technologies has created a wide interest in virtual reality (VR), but how to design and evaluate multisensory interactions in VR remains as a challenge. In this paper, we focus on virtual reality musical instruments, present an overview of our...

  8. SUBJECTIVE ACCEPTANCE OF PEDIATRIC PATIENTS DURING CAVITY PREPARATION WITH Er:YAG LASER AND CONVENTIONAL ROTARY INSTRUMENTS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Belcheva

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the present study is to evaluate and compare the subjective acceptance in children during hard dental tissue therapy using Er:YAG laser 2940nm and conventional rotary instruments. Methods and materials: The study included ninety 6-12-years-old children with matched carious lesions (D3 threshold, WHO system, divided into two equal treatment groups. In the intervention group the cavities were prepared with Erbium:YAG laser 2940nm and in the control group with conventional rotary instruments, without anaesthesia. After cavity preparation patient’s subjective acceptance was assessed by a questionnaire concerning primary stress triggers. Results: The annoyance factor (vibration was found as a stress trigger in the majority of control children (86.7%, while in the intervention group it was found in 2.2% of cases. The most anxiety provoking items in the intervention group were smell (67.7% and taste (42.2%. The sound was found to be a stress trigger in more than half of control children (62.2% and less than one-fifth of the children in the intervention group (15.6%. The study results showed significant difference in these items between two groups (p< 0.001. Conclusions: The Erbium:YAG lasers reduce three of four stress triggers in `4S` principle - vibration, sight and sound. They are a good treatment option for fearful children since they have acceptable efficiency in treatment of pediatric anxiety disorders compared to the mechanical preparation.

  9. Deep Impact instrument calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaasen, K.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Baca, M.; Delamere, A.; Desnoyer, M.; Farnham, T.; Groussin, O.; Hampton, D.; Ipatov, S.; Li, J.-Y.; Lisse, C.; Mastrodemos, N.; McLaughlin, S.; Sunshine, J.; Thomas, P.; Wellnitz, D.

    2008-09-01

    Calibration of NASA's Deep Impact spacecraft instruments allows reliable scientific interpretation of the images and spectra returned from comet Tempel 1. Calibrations of the four onboard remote sensing imaging instruments have been performed in the areas of geometric calibration, spatial resolution, spectral resolution, and radiometric response. Error sources such as noise (random, coherent, encoding, data compression), detector readout artifacts, scattered light, and radiation interactions have been quantified. The point spread functions (PSFs) of the medium resolution instrument and its twin impactor targeting sensor are near the theoretical minimum [~1.7 pixels full width at half maximum (FWHM)]. However, the high resolution instrument camera was found to be out of focus with a PSF FWHM of ~9 pixels. The charge coupled device (CCD) read noise is ~1 DN. Electrical cross-talk between the CCD detector quadrants is correctable to <2 DN. The IR spectrometer response nonlinearity is correctable to ~1%. Spectrometer read noise is ~2 DN. The variation in zero-exposure signal level with time and spectrometer temperature is not fully characterized; currently corrections are good to ~10 DN at best. Wavelength mapping onto the detector is known within 1 pixel; spectral lines have a FWHM of ~2 pixels. About 1% of the IR detector pixels behave badly and remain uncalibrated. The spectrometer exhibits a faint ghost image from reflection off a beamsplitter. Instrument absolute radiometric calibration accuracies were determined generally to <10% using star imaging. Flat-field calibration reduces pixel-to-pixel response differences to ~0.5% for the cameras and <2% for the spectrometer. A standard calibration image processing pipeline is used to produce archival image files for analysis by researchers.

  10. [Organising an instrumental elective abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brûlé, Annie

    2015-12-01

    Family planning centres are structures designed to receive and care for women requesting elective abortions. Here the specially trained, dedicated teams offer personalised care. The instrumental elective abortion is prepared in the same way as a surgical procedure and is subject to the same monitoring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. The Science of String Instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Rossing, Thomas D

    2010-01-01

    Many performing musicians, as well as instrument builders, are coming to realize the importance of understanding the science of musical instruments. This book explains how string instruments produce sound. It presents basic ideas in simple language, and it also translates some more sophisticated ideas in non-technical language. It should be of interest to performers, researchers, and instrument makers alike.

  12. netherland hydrological modeling instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogewoud, J. C.; de Lange, W. J.; Veldhuizen, A.; Prinsen, G.

    2012-04-01

    Netherlands Hydrological Modeling Instrument A decision support system for water basin management. J.C. Hoogewoud , W.J. de Lange ,A. Veldhuizen , G. Prinsen , The Netherlands Hydrological modeling Instrument (NHI) is the center point of a framework of models, to coherently model the hydrological system and the multitude of functions it supports. Dutch hydrological institutes Deltares, Alterra, Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, RWS Waterdienst, STOWA and Vewin are cooperating in enhancing the NHI for adequate decision support. The instrument is used by three different ministries involved in national water policy matters, for instance the WFD, drought management, manure policy and climate change issues. The basis of the modeling instrument is a state-of-the-art on-line coupling of the groundwater system (MODFLOW), the unsaturated zone (metaSWAP) and the surface water system (MOZART-DM). It brings together hydro(geo)logical processes from the column to the basin scale, ranging from 250x250m plots to the river Rhine and includes salt water flow. The NHI is validated with an eight year run (1998-2006) with dry and wet periods. For this run different parts of the hydrology have been compared with measurements. For instance, water demands in dry periods (e.g. for irrigation), discharges at outlets, groundwater levels and evaporation. A validation alone is not enough to get support from stakeholders. Involvement from stakeholders in the modeling process is needed. There fore to gain sufficient support and trust in the instrument on different (policy) levels a couple of actions have been taken: 1. a transparent evaluation of modeling-results has been set up 2. an extensive program is running to cooperate with regional waterboards and suppliers of drinking water in improving the NHI 3. sharing (hydrological) data via newly setup Modeling Database for local and national models 4. Enhancing the NHI with "local" information. The NHI is and has been used for many

  13. Developments in analytical instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, G.

    The situation regarding photogrammetric instrumentation has changed quite dramatically over the last 2 or 3 years with the withdrawal of most analogue stereo-plotting machines from the market place and their replacement by analytically based instrumentation. While there have been few new developments in the field of comparators, there has been an explosive development in the area of small, relatively inexpensive analytical stereo-plotters based on the use of microcomputers. In particular, a number of new instruments have been introduced by manufacturers who mostly have not been associated previously with photogrammetry. Several innovative concepts have been introduced in these small but capable instruments, many of which are aimed at specialised applications, e.g. in close-range photogrammetry (using small-format cameras); for thematic mapping (by organisations engaged in environmental monitoring or resources exploitation); for map revision, etc. Another innovative and possibly significant development has been the production of conversion kits to convert suitable analogue stereo-plotting machines such as the Topocart, PG-2 and B-8 into fully fledged analytical plotters. The larger and more sophisticated analytical stereo-plotters are mostly being produced by the traditional mainstream photogrammetric systems suppliers with several new instruments and developments being introduced at the top end of the market. These include the use of enlarged photo stages to handle images up to 25 × 50 cm format; the complete integration of graphics workstations into the analytical plotter design; the introduction of graphics superimposition and stereo-superimposition; the addition of correlators for the automatic measurement of height, etc. The software associated with this new analytical instrumentation is now undergoing extensive re-development with the need to supply photogrammetric data as input to the more sophisticated G.I.S. systems now being installed by clients, instead

  14. Virtual Reality Musical Instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serafin, Stefania; Erkut, Cumhur; Kojs, Juraj

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development and availability of low-cost technologies have created a wide interest in virtual reality. In the field of computer music, the term “virtual musical instruments” has been used for a long time to describe software simulations, extensions of existing musical instruments......, and ways to control them with new interfaces for musical expression. Virtual reality musical instruments (VRMIs) that include a simulated visual component delivered via a head-mounted display or other forms of immersive visualization have not yet received much attention. In this article, we present a field...... overview of VRMIs from the viewpoint of the performer. We propose nine design guidelines, describe evaluation methods, analyze case studies, and consider future challenges....

  15. Pesticide reducing instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lars-Bo; Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård; Andersen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    -mentioned models and tools. All three scenarios are constructed such that they result in the same welfare implication (measured by national consumption in the CGE model). The scenarios are: 1) pesticide taxes resulting in a 25 percent overall reduction; 2) use of unsprayed field margins, resulting in the same...... welfare loss as in scenario 1; and finally 3) increased conversion to organic farming also resulting in the same welfare loss as in scenario 1. Biological and geological results from the first part of our analysis suggest that the use of unsprayed field margins is the most cost-effective instrument...... for improving bio-diversity and securing drinking water. That is, combining economic modeling with physical biological modeling and geological evaluation allows us to select unsprayed field margins as the most effective instrument. Sensitivity analysis conducted on bio-diversity suggest that this result...

  16. Axis instrumentation: surgical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei F. Joaquim

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the surgical results of axis screw instrumentation. METHODS: Retrospective evaluation of the clinical and radiological data of patients submitted to axis fixation using screws. RESULTS: Seventeen patients were surgically treated. The mean age was 41.8 years (range: 12-73. Spinal cord trauma was the most common cause of instability (8 patients - 47%. Bilateral axis fixation was performed in all cases, except one, with laminar screw (total of 33 axis screws. Seven patients (41.1% underwent bilateral pars screws; laminar screws were used in six cases and pedicular screws were used in two. In two cases, we performed a hybrid construction (laminar + pars and pedicle + pars. There was no neurological worsening or death, nor complications directly related to use axis screws. CONCLUSION: Axis instrumentation was effective and safe, regardless of the technique used for stabilization. Based on our learnt experience, we proposed an algorithm to choose the best technique for axis screw fixation.

  17. Data acquisition instruments: Psychopharmacology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, D.S. III

    1998-01-01

    This report contains the results of a Direct Assistance Project performed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., for Dr. K. O. Jobson. The purpose of the project was to perform preliminary analysis of the data acquisition instruments used in the field of psychiatry, with the goal of identifying commonalities of data and strategies for handling and using the data in the most advantageous fashion. Data acquisition instruments from 12 sources were provided by Dr. Jobson. Several commonalities were identified and a potentially useful data strategy is reported here. Analysis of the information collected for utility in performing diagnoses is recommended. In addition, further work is recommended to refine the commonalities into a directly useful computer systems structure.

  18. Spectroradiometric Instruments And Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Richard A.; Miller, Kenneth A.; Bulpitt, Thomas H.

    1983-10-01

    This paper discusses spectroradiometric instruments and applications. Multiple-detector spectroradiometers and single-detector scanning spectroradiometers are described, with particular emphasis on current state-of-the-art integrated systems. Applications discussed include: color measurement (colorimetry); photometry and colorimetry of cathode-ray-tubes , light-emitting-diodes and other displays; photometry and colorimetry of light sources and flash lamps; and colorimetry of reflective and transmissive materials. Future trends are also discussed.

  19. Guide to Instrumentation Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    1955-12-14

    pp. 2622. L. K. Spink, Princirles and practice of flow meter engineering., Iie Foxboro Coo, Foxboro$ Mass., Ed. 7# 1950. 1418 pp. 2623. Reid F...ring. 1952. 269 pp. Vol., 2 - Method- for associating mathematical solutions with common forms, 1953. 827 pp. Vol. 3 - Applications of the instrument...weights, and Volumetric glassware. -13.1 - 2.9. Periodicals P1100. Standards; Metrology; Testing, General (Cont.) P1127. Revista chilena do

  20. Instrumentation: endoscopes and equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaab, Michael R

    2013-02-01

    The technology and instrumentation for neuroendoscopy are described: endoscopes (principles, designs, applications), light sources, instruments, accessories, holders, and navigation. Procedures for cleaning, sterilizing, and storing are included. The description is based on the author's own technical development and neuroendoscopic experience, published technology and devices, and publications on endoscopic surgery. The main work horses in neuroendoscopy are rigid glass rod endoscopes (Hopkins optics) due to the optical quality, which allows full high-definition video imaging, different angles of view, and autoclavability, which is especially important in neuroendoscopy due to the risk of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease infection. Applications are endoscopy assistance to microsurgery, stand-alone endoscopy controlled approaches such as transnasal skull base, ventriculoscopy, and cystoscopy in the cranium. Rigid glass rod optics are also applicable in spinal endoscopy and peripheral nerve decompression using special tubes and cannulas. Rigid minifiberoptics with less resolution may be used in less complex procedures (ventriculoscopy, cystoscopy, endoscopy assistance with pen-designs) and have the advantages of smaller diameters and disposable designs. Flexible fiberoptics are usually used in combination with rigid scopes and can be steered, e.g. through the ventricles, in spinal procedures for indications including syringomyelia and multicystic hydrocephalus. Upcoming flexible chip endoscopes ("chip-in-the-tip") may replace flexible fiberoptics in the future, offering higher resolution and cold LED-illumination, and may provide for stereoscopic neuroendoscopy. Various instruments (mechanical, coagulation, laser guides, ultrasonic aspirators) and holders are available. Certified methods for cleaning and sterilization, with special requirements in neuroapplications, are important. Neuroendoscopic instrumentation is now an established technique in neurosurgical practice and

  1. Instrumentation and diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakaishi, C.V.; Bedick, R.C.

    1990-12-01

    This Technology Status Report describes research and accomplishments for the Instrumentation and Diagnostics (I D) Projects within the Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR TD) Program of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). Process understanding and control can be improved through the development of advanced instrumentation and diagnostics. The thrust of the I D Projects is to further develop existing measurement and control techniques for application to advanced coal-based technologies. Project highlights are: an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) instrument has been developed to analyze trace elements in gasification and combustion process streams. An in situ two-color Mie scattering technique with LSS can simultaneously measure the size, velocity, and elemental composition of coal particles during combustion. A high-temperature, fluorescence thermometry technique has accurately measured gas temperatures during field testing in combustion and gasification environments. Expert systems have been developed to improve the control of advanced coal-based processes. Capacitance flowmeters were developed to determine the mass flowrate, solid volume fraction, and particle velocities of coal slurries. 32 refs., 9 figs.

  2. Simulation visualization through dynamic instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisset, K.R.

    1998-09-01

    The goal of the instrument composition system is to allow a simulation user to dynamically create instruments as a simulation executes. Instruments can include graphical displays, data collectors, and debugging aides. Instruments are made up of small building blocks which can be easily combined into larger, more complex instruments. Through the sue of an Attribute Server (a distributed publication/subscription mechanism), the actors and instruments in a simulation can interact without direct knowledge of each other. Instead, each actor publishes the attributes which it has available. An instrument subscribes to the attributes in which it is interested, and is notified whenever the value of one of these attribute changes. An instrument can also publish attributes for use by other instruments. Since the Attribute Server is distributed, the publisher of an attribute need not execute on the same machine as the subscriber. This allows CPU intensive data visualization to execute on separate machines from the simulation, minimizing the impact on the simulation.

  3. FHR Process Instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride salt-cooled High temperature Reactors (FHRs) are entering into early phase engineering development. Initial candidate technologies have been identified to measure all of the required process variables. The purpose of this paper is to describe the proposed measurement techniques in sufficient detail to enable assessment of the proposed instrumentation suite and to support development of the component technologies. This paper builds upon the instrumentation chapter of the recently published FHR technology development roadmap. Locating instruments outside of the intense core radiation and high-temperature fluoride salt environment significantly decreases their environmental tolerance requirements. Under operating conditions, FHR primary coolant salt is a transparent, low-vapor-pressure liquid. Consequently, FHRs can employ standoff optical measurements from above the salt pool to assess in-vessel conditions. For example, the core outlet temperature can be measured by observing the fuel s blackbody emission. Similarly, the intensity of the core s Cerenkov glow indicates the fission power level. Short-lived activation of the primary coolant provides another means for standoff measurements of process variables. The primary coolant flow and neutron flux can be measured using gamma spectroscopy along the primary coolant piping. FHR operation entails a number of process measurements. Reactor thermal power and core reactivity are the most significant variables for process control. Thermal power can be determined by measuring the primary coolant mass flow rate and temperature rise across the core. The leading candidate technologies for primary coolant temperature measurement are Au-Pt thermocouples and Johnson noise thermometry. Clamp-on ultrasonic flow measurement, that includes high-temperature tolerant standoffs, is a potential coolant flow measurement technique. Also, the salt redox condition will be monitored as an indicator of its corrosiveness. Both

  4. CARMENES instrument overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirrenbach, A.; Amado, P. J.; Caballero, J. A.; Mundt, R.; Reiners, A.; Ribas, I.; Seifert, W.; Abril, M.; Aceituno, J.; Alonso-Floriano, F. J.; Ammler-von Eiff, M.; Antona Jiménez, R.; Anwand-Heerwart, H.; Azzaro, M.; Bauer, F.; Barrado, D.; Becerril, S.; Béjar, V. J. S.; Benítez, D.; Berdiñas, Z. M.; Cárdenas, M. C.; Casal, E.; Claret, A.; Colomé, J.; Cortés-Contreras, M.; Czesla, S.; Doellinger, M.; Dreizler, S.; Feiz, C.; Fernández, M.; Galadí, D.; Gálvez-Ortiz, M. C.; García-Piquer, A.; García-Vargas, M. L.; Garrido, R.; Gesa, L.; Gómez Galera, V.; González Álvarez, E.; González Hernández, J. I.; Grözinger, U.; Guàrdia, J.; Guenther, E. W.; de Guindos, E.; Gutiérrez-Soto, J.; Hagen, H.-J.; Hatzes, A. P.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Helmling, J.; Henning, T.; Hermann, D.; Hernández Castaño, L.; Herrero, E.; Hidalgo, D.; Holgado, G.; Huber, A.; Huber, K. F.; Jeffers, S.; Joergens, V.; de Juan, E.; Kehr, M.; Klein, R.; Kürster, M.; Lamert, A.; Lalitha, S.; Laun, W.; Lemke, U.; Lenzen, R.; López del Fresno, Mauro; López Martí, B.; López-Santiago, J.; Mall, U.; Mandel, H.; Martín, E. L.; Martín-Ruiz, S.; Martínez-Rodríguez, H.; Marvin, C. J.; Mathar, R. J.; Mirabet, E.; Montes, D.; Morales Muñoz, R.; Moya, A.; Naranjo, V.; Ofir, A.; Oreiro, R.; Pallé, E.; Panduro, J.; Passegger, V.-M.; Pérez-Calpena, A.; Pérez Medialdea, D.; Perger, M.; Pluto, M.; Ramón, A.; Rebolo, R.; Redondo, P.; Reffert, S.; Reinhardt, S.; Rhode, P.; Rix, H.-W.; Rodler, F.; Rodríguez, E.; Rodríguez-López, C.; Rodríguez-Pérez, E.; Rohloff, R.-R.; Rosich, A.; Sánchez-Blanco, E.; Sánchez Carrasco, M. A.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Sarmiento, L. F.; Schäfer, S.; Schiller, J.; Schmidt, C.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Solano, E.; Stahl, O.; Storz, C.; Stürmer, J.; Suárez, J. C.; Ulbrich, R. G.; Veredas, G.; Wagner, K.; Winkler, J.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.; Zechmeister, M.; Abellán de Paco, F. J.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; del Burgo, C.; Klutsch, A.; Lizon, J. L.; López-Morales, M.; Morales, J. C.; Perryman, M. A. C.; Tulloch, S. M.; Xu, W.

    2014-07-01

    This paper gives an overview of the CARMENES instrument and of the survey that will be carried out with it during the first years of operation. CARMENES (Calar Alto high-Resolution search for M dwarfs with Exoearths with Near-infrared and optical Echelle Spectrographs) is a next-generation radial-velocity instrument under construction for the 3.5m telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory by a consortium of eleven Spanish and German institutions. The scientific goal of the project is conducting a 600-night exoplanet survey targeting ~ 300 M dwarfs with the completed instrument. The CARMENES instrument consists of two separate echelle spectrographs covering the wavelength range from 0.55 to 1.7 μm at a spectral resolution of R = 82,000, fed by fibers from the Cassegrain focus of the telescope. The spectrographs are housed in vacuum tanks providing the temperature-stabilized environments necessary to enable a 1 m/s radial velocity precision employing a simultaneous calibration with an emission-line lamp or with a Fabry-Perot etalon. For mid-M to late-M spectral types, the wavelength range around 1.0 μm (Y band) is the most important wavelength region for radial velocity work. Therefore, the efficiency of CARMENES has been optimized in this range. The CARMENES instrument consists of two spectrographs, one equipped with a 4k x 4k pixel CCD for the range 0.55 - 1.05 μm, and one with two 2k x 2k pixel HgCdTe detectors for the range from 0.95 - 1.7μm. Each spectrograph will be coupled to the 3.5m telescope with two optical fibers, one for the target, and one for calibration light. The front end contains a dichroic beam splitter and an atmospheric dispersion corrector, to feed the light into the fibers leading to the spectrographs. Guiding is performed with a separate camera; on-axis as well as off-axis guiding modes are implemented. Fibers with octagonal cross-section are employed to ensure good stability of the output in the presence of residual guiding errors. The

  5. Micromachining inertial instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Marc S.; Bernstein, Jonathan J.; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.; Campbell, J.; Cousens, J.; Cunningham, Robert K.; Fields, R.; Greiff, Paul; Hugh, Brenda; Niles, Les; Sohn, Jerome B.

    1996-09-01

    Draper Laboratory, using silicon microfabrication techniques to achieve high yields by batch processing, has been developing miniature microelectromechanical instruments for over 10 years. During this time, considerable progress has been made in the development and fabrication of micromechanical gyroscopes, accelerometers, and acoustic sensors. Inertial instruments have become a worldwide research and commercial topic. Draper gyroscopes and accelerometers have been fabricated with measurement ranges from 50 to 500 deg/s and 10 to 100,000 g, respectively. In gyroscopes, stabilities are 20 deg/h in room temperature tests and 4.4 deg/h applying 0.3 degrees C thermal control. For accelerometers, less than 1 mg has been demonstrated in room temperature tests. These units have performed successfully across a temperature range of -40 to 85 degrees C, and have survived 80,000- to 120,000-g shock tests along all axes. Continuing development activities are expected to yield over an order of magnitude in performance enhancement. These micromechanical instruments are built using a silicon wafer process that results in crystal silicon structures that are anodically bonded on a Pyrex substrate that contains sensing and control electrodes. This silicon-on-glass configuration has low stray capacitance, and is ideally suited for hybrid or flip-chip bonding technology. Draper's inertial sensors incorporate excellent fabrication, however, building the silicon and Pyrex sensor chip is only one of many important contributions in a complete sensor system. Other equally important steps include: 1) electronics and application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) 2) packaging, 3) test, and 4) modeling and analysis. This presentation focuses on sensor fabrication. Draper's accelerometers and gyroscopes and the dissolved wafer fabrication process are described. The evolution of gyro design, fabrication, and performance is summarized. Garnered through experience in both conventional and

  6. Instruments of Transformative Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrás, Susana

    production and distribution channels. PDPs aim at overcoming current market and government failures by pooling resources in the attempt to solve this global social challenge. Thus, PDPs are a case of instruments of transformative research and innovation, operating in a transnational governance context....... They exhibit three novelties: they address strategic long-term problems in a holistic manner, set substantive output-oriented goals, and are implemented through new organizational structures. After characterizing the different types of current PDPs and the context in which they emerged, the paper examines...

  7. Jedem Kind ein Instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Finn

    2015-01-01

    I forbindelse med skolereformen 2014 er der kommet øget fokus på samarbejdet mellem musikskole og folkeskole (grundskole). En kortlægningsundersøgelse viste op til reformen, at så godt som alle musikskoler har et samarbejde med grundskolen, mens der er en del folkeskoler, som ikke har et samarbej...... muligheder. Jedem Kind ein Instrument (JeKi) er et grundskoleprogram med instrumentundervisning, som bygger på samarbejde mellem musikskole og grundskole. Der indgår over 70.000 elever årligt, og der er etableret et omfattende forskningsprogram....

  8. Leir beam instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Bal, C; Burger, S; Dutriat, C; Gasior, M; Lefèvre, T; Lenardon, F; Odier, P; Raich, U; Soby, L; Tan, J; Tranquille, G; Vuitton, C

    2005-01-01

    The Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR) is central to the “Ions for LHC” project. Its role is to transform a serie of long low intensity ion pulses from Linac 3, into short high density pulses, which will be further accelerated in the PS and SPS rings, before injection into LHC. To do so the injected pulses are stacked and phase space cooled using electron cooling, before acceleration to the ejection energy of 72 MEV/u. This note describes different types of instruments which will be installed in the LEIR ring and transfer lines.

  9. Payment Instrument Characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jacques; Kjeldsen, Martin; Hedman, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, we have witnessed payment innovations that fundamentally have changed the ways we pay. Payment innovations, such as mobile payments and on-line banking, include characteristics or features that are essential to understand if we want to know how and why payers choose among...... payment innovations. Using the Repertory Grid technique to explore 15 payers’ perception of six payment instruments, including coins, banknotes, debit cards, credit cards, mobile payments, and on-line banking, we identify 16 payment characteristics. The characteristics aggregate seventy-six unique...... features. Many of the characteristics and one of the categories are completely novel and unaccounted for in previous works....

  10. Productivity loss due to absenteeism and presenteeism by different instruments in patients with RA and subjects without RA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakman-Jansen, Louise Marie Antoinette; Kuper, Ina H.; van de Laar, Mart A F J; Taal, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To explore the impact of at-work productivity loss on the total productivity cost by different instruments in patients recently diagnosed with RA and controls without RA. Methods. Cross-sectional data were collected from outpatients with RA between December 2007 and February 2008. The

  11. Calibration of "Babyline" RP instruments

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

      If you have old RP instrumentation of the “Babyline” type, as shown in the photo, please contact the Radiation Protection Group (Joffrey Germa, 73171) to have the instrument checked and calibrated. Thank you. Radiation Protection Group

  12. An Instrumental Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Think of guitars and you think of rock and country music, or the vigorous rhythms of the gypsy flamenco, or perhaps the classical strumming of a Segovia. About the last thing you would associate with guitars is aerospace technology. Yet there is a connection. A whole family of quality guitars is an outgrowth of helicopter rotor research conducted for the military services and NASA by an aerospace contractor. These musical spinoffs, commercially available and rapidly gaining in popularity, are the Ovation guitar line, manufactured by Ovation Instruments, Inc., Bloomfield, Connecticut. Ovation Instruments is a subsidiary of Kaman Corporation, a diversified company originally formed to develop and build helicopters. A helicopter's rotor system, with thousands of moving parts, is highly susceptible to vibration. For rotor efficiency, vibration must be "dampened," or reduced. Like other helicopter builders, Kaman Corporation spent years of research toward that end. The technology thus developed, together with the availability of staff experts in vibration engineering, sparked an idea in the mind of the company's president and founder, Charles H. Karnan. A guitarist of professional caliber, Kaman reasoned that vibration-dampening technology could be turned around to enhance vibration and thereby produce a guitar with superior sound.

  13. Far ultraviolet instrument technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Larry J.; Schaefer, Robert K.; Zhang, Yongliang; Kil, Hyosub

    2017-02-01

    The far ultraviolet (FUV) spectral range (from about 115 nm to 180 nm) is one of the most useful spectral regions for characterizing the upper atmosphere (thermosphere and ionosphere). The principal advantages are that there are FUV signatures of the major constituents of the upper atmosphere as well as the signatures of the high-latitude energy inputs. Because of the absorption by thermospheric O2, the FUV signatures are seen against a "black" background, i.e., one that is not affected by ground albedo or clouds and, as a consequence, can make useful observations of the aurora during the day or when the Moon is above the horizon. In this paper we discuss the uses of FUV remote sensing, summarize the various techniques, and discuss the technological challenges. Our focus is on a particular type of FUV instrument, the scanning imaging spectrograph or SIS: an instrument exemplified by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Special Sensor Ultraviolet Imager and Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics Global Ultraviolet Imager. The SIS combines spatial imaging of the disk with limb profiles as well as spectral information at each point in the scan.

  14. The QUIET Instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bischoff, C.; et al.

    2012-07-01

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) is designed to measure polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background, targeting the imprint of inflationary gravitational waves at large angular scales ({approx}1{sup o}). Between 2008 October and 2010 December, two independent receiver arrays were deployed sequentially on a 1.4m side-fed Dragonian telescope. The polarimeters which form the focal planes use a highly compact design based on High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs) that provides simultaneous measurements of the Stokes parameters Q, U, and I in a single module. The 17-element Q-band polarimeter array, with a central frequency of 43.1 GHz, has the best sensitivity (69 {mu}Ks{sup 1/2}) and the lowest instrumental systematic errors ever achieved in this band, contributing to the tensor-to-scalar ratio at r < 0:1. The 84-element W-band polarimeter array has a sensitivity of 87 {mu}Ks{sup 1/2} at a central frequency of 94.5 GHz. It has the lowest systematic errors to date, contributing at r < 0:01. The two arrays together cover multipoles in the range {ell} {approx} 25 -- 975. These are the largest HEMT-based arrays deployed to date. This article describes the design, calibration, performance of, and sources of systematic error for the instrument.

  15. Balances instruments, manufacturers, history

    CERN Document Server

    Robens, Erich; Kiefer, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    The book deals mainly with direct mass determination by means of a conventional balances. It covers the history of the balance from the beginnings in Egypt earlier than 3000 BC to recent developments. All balance types are described with emphasis on scientific balances. Methods of indirect mass determination, which are applied to very light objects like molecules and the basic particles of matter and celestial bodies, are included.  As additional guidance, today’s manufacturers are listed and the profile of important companies is reviewed. Several hundred photographs, reproductions and drawings show instruments and their uses. This book includes commercial weighing instruments for merchandise and raw materials in workshops as well as symbolic weighing in the ancient Egyptian’s ceremony of ‘Weighing of the Heart’, the Greek fate balance, the Roman  Justitia, Juno Moneta and Middle Ages scenes of the Last Judgement with Jesus or St. Michael and of modern balances. The photographs are selected from the...

  16. Instrument Remote Control via the Astronomical Instrument Markup Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sall, Ken; Ames, Troy; Warsaw, Craig; Koons, Lisa; Shafer, Richard

    1998-01-01

    The Instrument Remote Control (IRC) project ongoing at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Information Systems Center (ISC) supports NASA's mission by defining an adaptive intranet-based framework that provides robust interactive and distributed control and monitoring of remote instruments. An astronomical IRC architecture that combines the platform-independent processing capabilities of Java with the power of Extensible Markup Language (XML) to express hierarchical data in an equally platform-independent, as well as human readable manner, has been developed. This architecture is implemented using a variety of XML support tools and Application Programming Interfaces (API) written in Java. IRC will enable trusted astronomers from around the world to easily access infrared instruments (e.g., telescopes, cameras, and spectrometers) located in remote, inhospitable environments, such as the South Pole, a high Chilean mountaintop, or an airborne observatory aboard a Boeing 747. Using IRC's frameworks, an astronomer or other scientist can easily define the type of onboard instrument, control the instrument remotely, and return monitoring data all through the intranet. The Astronomical Instrument Markup Language (AIML) is the first implementation of the more general Instrument Markup Language (IML). The key aspects of our approach to instrument description and control applies to many domains, from medical instruments to machine assembly lines. The concepts behind AIML apply equally well to the description and control of instruments in general. IRC enables us to apply our techniques to several instruments, preferably from different observatories.

  17. Beijing opera percussion instrument dataset

    OpenAIRE

    CompMusic

    2014-01-01

    The Beijing Opera percussion instrument dataset is a collection of audio examples of individual strokes spanning the four percussion instrument classes used in Beijing Opera (Jingju, 京剧)./nBeijing Opera uses six main percussion instruments that can be grouped into four classes: /n/n1/ Bangu (Clapper-drum) consisting of Ban (the clapper, a wooden board-­shaped instrument) + danpigu (a wooden drum struck by two wooden sticks)/n2/ Naobo (Cymbals) consisting of two cymbal instruments Qibo+Danao/n...

  18. Instrumented Pipeline Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Piro; Michael Ream

    2010-07-31

    This report summarizes technical progress achieved during the cooperative agreement between Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) and U.S. Department of Energy to address the need for a for low-cost monitoring and inspection sensor system as identified in the Department of Energy (DOE) National Gas Infrastructure Research & Development (R&D) Delivery Reliability Program Roadmap.. The Instrumented Pipeline Initiative (IPI) achieved the objective by researching technologies for the monitoring of pipeline delivery integrity, through a ubiquitous network of sensors and controllers to detect and diagnose incipient defects, leaks, and failures. This report is organized by tasks as detailed in the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO). The sections all state the objective and approach before detailing results of work.

  19. Astronomical Instrumentation System Markup Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbaum, Jesse M.

    2016-05-01

    The Astronomical Instrumentation System Markup Language (AISML) is an Extensible Markup Language (XML) based file format for maintaining and exchanging information about astronomical instrumentation. The factors behind the need for an AISML are first discussed followed by the reasons why XML was chosen as the format. Next it's shown how XML also provides the framework for a more precise definition of an astronomical instrument and how these instruments can be combined to form an Astronomical Instrumentation System (AIS). AISML files for several instruments as well as one for a sample AIS are provided. The files demonstrate how AISML can be utilized for various tasks from web page generation and programming interface to instrument maintenance and quality management. The advantages of widespread adoption of AISML are discussed.

  20. Instrumental Variable Estimation with Heteroskedasticity and Many Instruments

    OpenAIRE

    Jerry A. Hausman; Newey, Whitney K.; Woutersen, Tiemen; Chao, John; Swanson, Norman

    2009-01-01

    This paper gives a relatively simple, well behaved solution to the problem of many instruments in heteroskedastic data. Such settings are common in microeconometric applications where many instruments are used to improve efficiency and allowance for heteroskedasticity is generally important. The solution is a Fuller (1977) like estimator and standard errors that are robust to heteroskedasticity and many instruments. We show that the estimator has finite moments and high asymptotic efficiency ...

  1. Pancreatitis Quality of Life Instrument: Development of a new instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahid Wassef

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The goal of this project was to develop the first disease-specific instrument for the evaluation of quality of life in chronic pancreatitis. Methods: Focus groups and interview sessions were conducted, with chronic pancreatitis patients, to identify items felt to impact quality of life which were subsequently formatted into a paper-and-pencil instrument. This instrument was used to conduct an online survey by an expert panel of pancreatologists to evaluate its content validity. Finally, the modified instrument was presented to patients during precognitive testing interviews to evaluate its clarity and appropriateness. Results: In total, 10 patients were enrolled in the focus groups and interview sessions where they identified 50 items. Once redundant items were removed, the 40 remaining items were made into a paper-and-pencil instrument referred to as the Pancreatitis Quality of Life Instrument. Through the processes of content validation and precognitive testing, the number of items in the instrument was reduced to 24. Conclusions: This marks the development of the first disease-specific instrument to evaluate quality of life in chronic pancreatitis. It includes unique features not found in generic instruments (economic factors, stigma, and spiritual factors. Although this marks a giant step forward, psychometric evaluation is still needed prior to its clinical use.

  2. Pancreatitis Quality of Life Instrument: Development of a new instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassef, Wahid; Bova, Carol; Barton, Bruce; Hartigan, Celia

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this project was to develop the first disease-specific instrument for the evaluation of quality of life in chronic pancreatitis. Focus groups and interview sessions were conducted, with chronic pancreatitis patients, to identify items felt to impact quality of life which were subsequently formatted into a paper-and-pencil instrument. This instrument was used to conduct an online survey by an expert panel of pancreatologists to evaluate its content validity. Finally, the modified instrument was presented to patients during precognitive testing interviews to evaluate its clarity and appropriateness. In total, 10 patients were enrolled in the focus groups and interview sessions where they identified 50 items. Once redundant items were removed, the 40 remaining items were made into a paper-and-pencil instrument referred to as the Pancreatitis Quality of Life Instrument. Through the processes of content validation and precognitive testing, the number of items in the instrument was reduced to 24. This marks the development of the first disease-specific instrument to evaluate quality of life in chronic pancreatitis. It includes unique features not found in generic instruments (economic factors, stigma, and spiritual factors). Although this marks a giant step forward, psychometric evaluation is still needed prior to its clinical use.

  3. Impact Disdrometers Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomew, Mary Jane [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    To improve the quantitative description of precipitation processes in climate models, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility has been collecting observations of the drop size spectra of rain events since early in 2006. Impact disdrometers were the initial choice due to their reliability, ease of maintenance, and relatively low cost. Each of the two units deployed was accompanied by a nearby tipping bucket. In 2010, the tipping buckets were replaced by weighing buckets rain gauges. Five video disdrometers were subsequently purchased and are described in ARM’s VDIS Handbook.1 As of April 2011, three of the weighing bucket instruments were deployed, one was to travel with the second ARM Mobile Facility, and the fifth was a spare. Two of the video disdrometers were deployed, a third was to be deployed later in the spring of 2011, one was to travel with the second ARM Mobile Facility, and the last was a spare. Detailed descriptions of impact disdrometers and their datastreams are provided in this document.

  4. Instruments to assess integrated care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsø, Anne Marie; Godtfredsen, Nina Skavlan; Høst, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Although several measurement instruments have been developed to measure the level of integrated health care delivery, no standardised, validated instrument exists covering all aspects of integrated care. The purpose of this review is to identify the instruments concerning how...... to measure the level of integration across health-care sectors and to assess and evaluate the organisational elements within the instruments identified. METHODS: An extensive, systematic literature review in PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, Web of Science for the years 1980-2011. Selected...... abstracts were independently reviewed by two investigators. RESULTS: We identified 23 measurement instruments and, within these, eight organisational elements were found. No measurement instrument covered all organisational elements, but almost all studies include well-defined structural and process aspects...

  5. Advancements in Actuated Musical Instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overholt, Daniel; Berdahl, Edgar; Hamilton, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This article presents recent developments in actuated musical instruments created by the authors, who also describe an ecosystemic model of actuated performance activities that blur traditional boundaries between the physical and virtual elements of musical interfaces. Actuated musical instruments...... are physical instruments that have been endowed with virtual qualities controlled by a computer in real-time but which are nevertheless tangible. These instruments provide intuitive and engaging new forms of interaction. They are different from traditional (acoustic) and fully automated (robotic) instruments...... in that they produce sound via vibrating element(s) that are co-manipulated by humans and electromechanical systems. We examine the possibilities that arise when such instruments are played in different performative environments and music-making scenarios, and we postulate that such designs may give rise to new...

  6. Measurement, instrumentation, and sensors handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Eren, Halit

    2014-01-01

    The Second Edition of the bestselling Measurement, Instrumentation, and Sensors Handbook brings together all aspects of the design and implementation of measurement, instrumentation, and sensors. Reflecting the current state of the art, it describes the use of instruments and techniques for performing practical measurements in engineering, physics, chemistry, and the life sciences and discusses processing systems, automatic data acquisition, reduction and analysis, operation characteristics, accuracy, errors, calibrations, and the incorporation of standards for control purposes. Organized acco

  7. Instrumentation in Frontal Sinus Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajudeen, Bobby A; Adappa, Nithin D

    2016-08-01

    Frontal recess dissection proposes many challenges to the surgeon. These challenges stem from its highly variable nature, small caliber, difficult visualization, and proximity to vital structures such as the skull base and orbit. As such, delicate mucosal-sparing dissection of the frontal recess with proper instrumentation is paramount to minimize scar formation and ensure patency. Here, the article explores key instrumentation in frontal recess surgery with an emphasis on hand instruments and adjunctive technologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Where are my instruments? Hazards in delivery of surgical instruments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guédon, A.C.P.; Wauben, L.S.G.L.; Van der Eijk, A.C.; Vernooij, A.S.N.; Meeuwsen, F.C.; Van der Elst, M.; Hoeijmans, V.; Dankelman, J.; Van den Dobbelsteen, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Unavailability of instruments is recognised to cause delays and stress in the operating room, which can lead to additional risks for the patients. The aim was to provide an overview of the hazards in the entire delivery process of surgical instruments and to provide insight into how

  9. MISR Instrument Data Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, David; Garay, Michael; Diner, David; Thompson, Charles; Hall, Jeffrey; Rheingans, Brian; Mazzoni, Dominic

    2008-01-01

    The MISR Interactive eXplorer (MINX) software functions both as a general-purpose tool to visualize Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument data, and as a specialized tool to analyze properties of smoke, dust, and volcanic plumes. It includes high-level options to create map views of MISR orbit locations; scrollable, single-camera RGB (red-greenblue) images of MISR level 1B2 (L1B2) radiance data; and animations of the nine MISR camera images that provide a 3D perspective of the scenes that MISR has acquired. NASA Tech Briefs, September 2008 55 The plume height capability provides an accurate estimate of the injection height of plumes that is needed by air quality and climate modelers. MISR provides global high-quality stereo height information, and this program uses that information to perform detailed height retrievals of aerosol plumes. Users can interactively digitize smoke, dust, or volcanic plumes and automatically retrieve heights and winds, and can also archive MISR albedos and aerosol properties, as well as fire power and brightness temperatures associated with smoke plumes derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. Some of the specialized options in MINX enable the user to do other tasks. Users can display plots of top-of-atmosphere bidirectional reflectance factors (BRFs) versus camera-angle for selected pixels. Images and animations can be saved to disk in various formats. Also, users can apply a geometric registration correction to warp camera images when the standard processing correction is inadequate. It is possible to difference the images of two MISR orbits that share a path (identical ground track), as well as to construct pseudo-color images by assigning different combinations of MISR channels (angle or spectral band) to the RGB display channels. This software is an interactive application written in IDL and compiled into an IDL Virtual Machine (VM) ".sav" file.

  10. 14 CFR 27.1337 - Powerplant instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Powerplant instruments. 27.1337 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Instruments: Installation § 27.1337 Powerplant instruments. (a) Instruments and instrument lines. (1) Each powerplant instrument line must meet the...

  11. 14 CFR 29.1337 - Powerplant instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Powerplant instruments. 29.1337 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Instruments: Installation § 29.1337 Powerplant instruments. (a) Instruments and instrument lines. (1) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument...

  12. 14 CFR 25.1337 - Powerplant instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Powerplant instruments. 25.1337 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Instruments: Installation § 25.1337 Powerplant instruments. (a) Instruments and instrument lines. (1) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument...

  13. Technician Program Uses Advanced Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Stephen

    1981-01-01

    Describes various aspects of a newly-developed computer-assisted drafting/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) facility in the chemical engineering technology department at Broome Community College, Binghamton, New York. Stresses the use of new instruments such as microcomputers and microprocessor-equipped instruments. (CS)

  14. Zach's instruments and their characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfschmidt, Gudrun

    The astronomically interested Duke Ernst II von Sachsen-Gotha-Altenburg (1745-1804) hired Baron Franz Xaver von Zach (1754-1832) as court astronomer in 1786. Immediatedly Zach started to make plans for instrumentation for a new observatory. But first they travelled with their instruments (a 2-foot Ramsden transit instrument, the Sisson quadrant, three Hadley sextants, two achromatic refractors and chronometers) to southern France. In Hyàres a tower of the wall around the town was converted into an observatory in 1787. For the building of the new observatory Zach had chosen a place outside of Gotha on the top of the Seeberg. The three main instruments were an 8-foot transit instrument made by Ramsden, a northern and southern mural quadrant made by Sisson and a zenith sector made by Cary, in addition an 8-foot circle made by Ramsden. By analysing the whole instrumentation of Gotha observatory, we can see a change around 1800 in the kind of instruments, from quadrants and sextants to the full circles and from the transit instrument to the meridian circle. The decline of the Gotha observatory started with the early death of the Duke in 1804 and the subsequent departure of Zach in 1806.

  15. Instrumentation issues in implementation science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Ruben G; Lewis, Cara C; Weiner, Bryan J

    2014-09-04

    Like many new fields, implementation science has become vulnerable to instrumentation issues that potentially threaten the strength of the developing knowledge base. For instance, many implementation studies report findings based on instruments that do not have established psychometric properties. This article aims to review six pressing instrumentation issues, discuss the impact of these issues on the field, and provide practical recommendations. This debate centers on the impact of the following instrumentation issues: use of frameworks, theories, and models; role of psychometric properties; use of 'home-grown' and adapted instruments; choosing the most appropriate evaluation method and approach; practicality; and need for decision-making tools. Practical recommendations include: use of consensus definitions for key implementation constructs; reporting standards (e.g., regarding psychometrics, instrument adaptation); when to use multiple forms of observation and mixed methods; and accessing instrument repositories and decision aid tools. This debate provides an overview of six key instrumentation issues and offers several courses of action to limit the impact of these issues on the field. With careful attention to these issues, the field of implementation science can potentially move forward at the rapid pace that is respectfully demanded by community stakeholders.

  16. Developing a workplace resilience instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallak, Larry A; Yildiz, Mustafa

    2016-05-27

    Resilience benefits from the use of protective factors, as opposed to risk factors, which are associated with vulnerability. Considerable research and instrument development has been conducted in clinical settings for patients. The need existed for an instrument to be developed in a workplace setting to measure resilience of employees. This study developed and tested a resilience instrument for employees in the workplace. The research instrument was distributed to executives and nurses working in the United States in hospital settings. Five-hundred-forty completed and usable responses were obtained. The instrument contained an inventory of workplace resilience, a job stress questionnaire, and relevant demographics. The resilience items were written based on previous work by the lead author and inspired by Weick's [1] sense-making theory. A four-factor model yielded an instrument having psychometric properties showing good model fit. Twenty items were retained for the resulting Workplace Resilience Instrument (WRI). Parallel analysis was conducted with successive iterations of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Respondents were classified based on their employment with either a rural or an urban hospital. Executives had significantly higher WRI scores than nurses, controlling for gender. WRI scores were positively and significantly correlated with years of experience and the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire. An instrument to measure individual resilience in the workplace (WRI) was developed. The WRI's four factors identify dimensions of workplace resilience for use in subsequent investigations: Active Problem-Solving, Team Efficacy, Confident Sense-Making, and Bricolage.

  17. A Database Management Assessment Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Jeffrey P.; Pardue, J. Harold; Daigle, Roy; Longenecker, Herbert E., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an instrument designed for assessing learning outcomes in data management. In addition to assessment of student learning and ABET outcomes, we have also found the instrument to be effective for determining database placement of incoming information systems (IS) graduate students. Each of these three uses is discussed in this…

  18. Cryogenic Caging for Science Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penanen, Konstantin; Chui, Talso C.

    2011-01-01

    A method has been developed for caging science instrumentation to protect from pyro-shock and EDL (entry, descent, and landing) acceleration damage. Caging can be achieved by immersing the instrument (or its critical parts) in a liquid and solidifying the liquid by cooling. After the launch shock and/or after the payload has landed, the solid is heated up and evaporated.

  19. Instrumental variables and Mendelian randomization with invalid instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyunseung

    Instrumental variables (IV) methods have been widely used to determine the causal effect of a treatment, exposure, policy, or an intervention on an outcome of interest. The IV method relies on having a valid instrument, a variable that is (A1) associated with the exposure, (A2) has no direct effect on the outcome, and (A3) is unrelated to the unmeasured confounders associated with the exposure and the outcome. However, in practice, finding a valid instrument, especially those that satisfy (A2) and (A3), can be challenging. For example, in Mendelian randomization studies where genetic markers are used as instruments, complete knowledge about instruments' validity is equivalent to complete knowledge about the involved genes' functions. The dissertation explores the theory, methods, and application of IV methods when invalid instruments are present. First, when we have multiple candidate instruments, we establish a theoretical bound whereby causal effects are only identified as long as less than 50% of instruments are invalid, without knowing which of the instruments are invalid. We also propose a fast penalized method, called sisVIVE, to estimate the causal effect. We find that sisVIVE outperforms traditional IV methods when invalid instruments are present both in simulation studies as well as in real data analysis. Second, we propose a robust confidence interval under the multiple invalid IV setting. This work is an extension of our work on sisVIVE. However, unlike sisVIVE which is robust to violations of (A2) and (A3), our confidence interval procedure provides honest coverage even if all three assumptions, (A1)-(A3), are violated. Third, we study the single IV setting where the one IV we have may actually be invalid. We propose a nonparametric IV estimation method based on full matching, a technique popular in causal inference for observational data, that leverages observed covariates to make the instrument more valid. We propose an estimator along with

  20. Instrumentation Automation for Concrete Structures; Report 1: Instrumentation Automation Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    REPORT REMR-r::S-5 INSTRUMENl h 1 !0!\\’ /I’J\\UTOMA-r!n FUK CONCRETE STRUCTURES 1 ~eport 1 INSTRUMENTATION AUTOMATION TECHf\\liQUES by ,John Lindsey...measurements of structural behavior ano environmental conditions at large concrete structures , along with the suggested methods to replace or retrofit...8217.!.’RODUCTION 1. This report is the first of ~ series of three reports entitled, "Instrumentation l:iutomation for Concrete Structures ", and issued by

  1. Instrumental variable estimation with heteroskedasticity and many instruments

    OpenAIRE

    Hausman, Jerry; Newey, Whitney; Chao, John; Swanson, Norman

    2007-01-01

    It is common practice in econometrics to correct for heteroskedasticity.This paper corrects instrumental variables estimators with many instruments for heteroskedasticity.We give heteroskedasticity robust versions of the limited information maximum likelihood (LIML) and Fuller (1977, FULL) estimators; as well as heteroskedasticity consistent standard errors thereof. The estimators are based on removing the own observation terms in the numerator of the LIML variance ratio. We derive asymptotic...

  2. The JCMT future instrumentation project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Jessica T.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Walther, Craig; Friberg, Per; Bintley, Dan; Chen, Ming-Tang

    2016-08-01

    Under the new operational purview of the East Asian Observatory, the JCMT continues to produce premier wide-field submillimetre science. Now the Observatory looks to embark on an ambitious series of instrumentation upgrades and opportunities to keep the telescope at the bleeding edge of its performance capabilities, whilst harnessing the collaborative expertise of the participating EAO regions and its JCMT partners. New heterodyne instruments include a new receiver at 230 GHz, a super array (90 pixels) at 345 GHz and the upgrade possibilities for the continuum camera SCUBA-2. In addition, the opportunities for PI and visiting instruments, including TimePilot and Gismo-2 will be described.

  3. The rod as an instrument of discipline

    OpenAIRE

    Milton Luiz Torres; Centro Universitário Adventista de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP

    2013-01-01

    Both in biblical literature as in ancient extrabiblical literature, the use of the rod appears primarily related to the capacity or to the authority of the one who holds it. It is, above all, an instrument of power. This article investigates the implications of using the rod as a tool of correction and discipline, taking into account the symbolism, culture and literary tradition associated with the use of that instrument of discipline for correction and transformation of those subjected to it...

  4. Industrial Products for Beam Instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Schmickler, Hermann

    2001-01-01

    In various branches of high technology industry there has been considerable progress in the past years which could be used for beam instrumentation. The subject will be introduced by two short demonstrations: a demonstration of modern audio electronics with 24bit-96kHz ADC, digital signal electronics and application programs under windows on a PC, which allow to change the parameters of the signal treatment. Potential applications are data monitoring at constant sampling frequency, orbit feedbacks (including high power audio amplifiers), noise reduction on beam current transformers... digital treatment of video signals webcams, frame grabbers, CCD-data via USB, all one needs for image acquisitions, in particular interesting for profile measurements. These introductory demonstrations will not last longer than 30 minutes. The remaining time will be used to pass through the audience collecting information into a two dimensional table, which shall contain as row index the accelerator and as column index the t...

  5. Technical Training seminar: Texas Instruments

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Monday 6 November TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR 14:00 to 17:30 - Training Centre Auditorium (bldg. 593) Texas Instruments Technical Seminar Michael Scholtholt, Field Application Engineer / TEXAS INSTRUMENTS (US, D, CH) POWER - A short approach to Texas Instruments power products Voltage mode vs. current mode control Differentiating DC/DC converters by analyzing control and compensation schemes: line / load regulation, transient response, BOM, board space, ease-of-use Introduction to the SWIFT software FPGA + CPLD power solutions WIRELESS / CHIPCON Decision criteria when choosing a RF platform Introduction to Texas Instruments wireless products: standardized platforms proprietary platforms ( 2.4 GHz / sub 1 GHz) development tools Antenna design: example for 2.4 GHz questions, discussion Industrial partners: Robert Medioni, François Caloz / Spoerle Electronic, CH-1440 Montagny (VD), Switzerland Phone: +41 24 447 0137, email: RMedioni@spoerle.com, http://www.spoerle.com Language: English. Free s...

  6. Intelligent instrumentation principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bhuyan, Manabendra

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of microprocessors and digital-processing technologies as catalyst, classical sensors capable of simple signal conditioning operations have evolved rapidly to take on higher and more specialized functions including validation, compensation, and classification. This new category of sensor expands the scope of incorporating intelligence into instrumentation systems, yet with such rapid changes, there has developed no universal standard for design, definition, or requirement with which to unify intelligent instrumentation. Explaining the underlying design methodologies of intelligent instrumentation, Intelligent Instrumentation: Principles and Applications provides a comprehensive and authoritative resource on the scientific foundations from which to coordinate and advance the field. Employing a textbook-like language, this book translates methodologies to more than 80 numerical examples, and provides applications in 14 case studies for a complete and working understanding of the material. Beginn...

  7. Compact Formaldehyde Fluorescence Instrument Element

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The successful completion of this IRAD will deliver a fully functional instrument at TRL 6.  The key characteristics that we will demonstrate are simplicity,...

  8. Virtual Sensor Test Instrumentation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Mobitrum has started the development of virtual sensor test instrumentation in Phase I for characterization and measurement of ground testing of propulsion systems....

  9. Power Calculations to Select Instruments for Clinical Trial Secondary Endpoints. A Case Study of Instrument Selection for Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms in Subjects with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjoding, Michael W; Schoenfeld, David A; Brown, Samuel M; Hough, Catherine L; Yealy, Donald M; Moss, Marc; Angus, Derek C; Iwashyna, Theodore J

    2017-01-01

    After the sample size of a randomized clinical trial (RCT) is set by the power requirement of its primary endpoint, investigators select secondary endpoints while unable to further adjust sample size. How the sensitivity and specificity of an instrument used to measure these outcomes, together with their expected underlying event rates, affect an RCT's power to measure significant differences in these outcomes is poorly understood. Motivated by the design of an RCT of neuromuscular blockade in acute respiratory distress syndrome, we examined how power to detect a difference in secondary endpoints varies with the sensitivity and specificity of the instrument used to measure such outcomes. We derived a general formula and Stata code for calculating an RCT's power to detect differences in binary outcomes when such outcomes are measured with imperfect sensitivity and specificity. The formula informed the choice of instrument for measuring post-traumatic stress-like symptoms in the Reevaluation of Systemic Early Neuromuscular Blockade RCT ( www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT02509078). On the basis of published sensitivities and specificities, the Impact of Events Scale-Revised was predicted to measure a 36% symptom rate, whereas the Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms instrument was predicted to measure a 23% rate, if the true underlying rate of post-traumatic stress symptoms were 25%. Despite its lower sensitivity, the briefer Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms instrument provided superior power to detect a difference in rates between trial arms, owing to its higher specificity. Examining instruments' power to detect differences in outcomes may guide their selection when multiple instruments exist, each with different sensitivities and specificities.

  10. Mass Spectrometry Instrumentation in Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprenger, Richard Remko; Roepstorff, Peter

    2012-01-01

    , Orbitrap and ion mobility instruments. Together they offer various and complementary capabilities in terms of ionization, sensitivity, speed, resolution, mass accuracy, dynamic range and methods of fragmentation. Mass spectrometers can acquire qualitative and quantitative information on a large scale....... In terms of desired outcome, cost and time, combining and choosing between available instrumentation and methodologies is key to find the best analytical strategy suiting a particular proteomics experiment....

  11. Luminescence techniques: Instrumentation and methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes techniques, instruments and methods used in luminescence dating and environmental dosimetry in many laboratories around the world. These techniques are based on two phenomena - thermally stimulated luminescence and optically stimulated luminescence. The most commonly used...... luminescence stimulation and detection techniques are reviewed and information is given on recent developments in instrument design and on the stale of the art in luminescence measurements and analysis. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  12. Instruments to assess integrated care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsø, Anne Marie; Godtfredsen, Nina Skavlan; Høst, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    to measure the level of integration across health-care sectors and to assess and evaluate the organisational elements within the instruments identified. METHODS: An extensive, systematic literature review in PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, Web of Science for the years 1980-2011. Selected...... was prevalent. It is uncertain whether development of a single 'all-inclusive' model for assessing integrated care is desirable. We emphasise the continuing need for validated instruments embedded in theoretical contexts....

  13. Notes on instrumentation and control

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, G J

    2013-01-01

    Notes on Instrumentation and Control presents topics on pressure (i.e., U-tube manometers and elastic type gauges), temperature (i.e. glass thermometer, bi-metallic strip thermometer, filled system thermometer, vapor pressure thermometer), level, and flow measuring devices. The book describes other miscellaneous instruments, signal transmitting devices, supply and control systems, and monitoring systems. The theory of automatic control and semi-conductor devices are also considered. Marine engineers will find the book useful.

  14. MIRA: Dual wavelength band instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Georgii

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available MIRA is a dual wavelength band instrument operated by Technische Universität München TUM, which provides neutrons over a wide range of wavelengths 3.5 Å < λ < 20 Å combining the two beam ports of MIRA-1 and MIRA-2. The instrument´s setup is modular and allows for various different cold neutron experiments such as diffraction, spectroscopy or reflectometry.

  15. INSTRUMENTATION FOR FAR INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GRIFFITHS, P.R.; HOMES, C.

    2001-05-04

    Fourier transform spectrometers developed in three distinct spectral regions in the early 1960s. Pierre Connes and his coworkers in France developed remarkably sophisticated step-scan interferometers that permitted near-infrared spectra to be measured with a resolution of better than 0.0 1 cm{sup {minus}1}. These instruments may be considered the forerunners of the step-scan interferometers made by Bruker, Bio-Rad (Cambridge, MA, USA) and Nicolet although their principal application was in the field of astronomy. Low-resolution rapid-scanning interferometers were developed by Larry Mertz and his colleagues at Block Engineering (Cambridge, MA, USA) for remote sensing. Nonetheless, the FT-IR spectrometers that are so prevalent in chemical laboratories today are direct descendants of these instruments. The interferometers that were developed for far-infrared spectrometry in Gebbie's laboratory ,have had no commercial counterparts for at least 15 years. However, it could be argued that these instruments did as much to demonstrate the power of Fourier transform spectroscopy to the chemical community as any of the instruments developed for mid- and near-infrared spectrometry. Their performance was every bit as good as today's rapid-scanning interferometers. However, the market for these instruments is so small today that it has proved more lucrative to modify rapid-scanning interferometers that were originally designed for mid-infrared spectrometry than to compete with these instruments with slow continuous scan or step-scan interferometers.

  16. Sulfur Dioxide Analyzer Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springston, Stephen R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The Sulfur Dioxide Analyzer measures sulfur dioxide based on absorbance of UV light at one wavelength by SO2 molecules which then decay to a lower energy state by emitting UV light at a longer wavelength. Specifically, SO2 + hυ1 →SO2 *→SO2 + hυ2 The emitted light is proportional to the concentration of SO2 in the optical cell. External communication with the analyzer is available through an Ethernet port configured through the instrument network of the AOS systems. The Model 43i-TLE is part of the i-series of Thermo Scientific instruments. The i-series instruments are designed to interface with external computers through the proprietary Thermo Scientific iPort Software. However, this software is somewhat cumbersome and inflexible. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has written an interface program in National Instruments LabView that both controls the Model 43i-TLE Analyzer AND queries the unit for all measurement and housekeeping data. The LabView vi (the software program written by BNL) ingests all raw data from the instrument and outputs raw data files in a uniform data format similar to other instruments in the AOS and described more fully in Section 6.0 below.

  17. Effects of an adapted physical activity program in a group of elderly subjects with flexed posture: clinical and instrumental assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frizziero Antonio

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flexed posture commonly increases with age and is related to musculoskeletal impairment and reduced physical performance. The purpose of this clinical study was to systematically compare the effects of a physical activity program that specifically address the flexed posture that marks a certain percentage of elderly individuals with a non specific exercise program for 3 months. Methods Participants were randomly divided into two groups: one followed an Adapted Physical Activity program for flexed posture and the other one completed a non-specific physical activity protocol for the elderly. A multidimensional clinical assessment was performed at baseline and at 3 months including anthropometric data, clinical profile, measures of musculoskeletal impairment and disability. The instrumental assessment of posture was realized using a stereophotogrammetric system and a specific biomechanical model designed to describe the reciprocal position of the body segments on the sagittal plane in a upright posture. Results The Adapted Physical Activity program determined a significant improvement in several key parameters of the multidimensional assessment in comparison to the non-specific protocol: decreased occiput-to-wall distance, greater lower limb range of motion, better flexibility of pectoralis, hamstrings and hip flexor muscles, increased spine extensor muscles strength. Stereophotogrammetric analysis confirmed a reduced protrusion of the head and revealed a reduction in compensative postural adaptations to flexed posture characterized by knee flexion and ankle dorsiflexion in the participants of the specific program. Conclusion The Adapted Physical Activity program for flexed posture significantly improved postural alignment and musculoskeletal impairment of the elderly. The stereophotogrammetric evaluation of posture was useful to measure the global postural alignment and especially to analyse the possible compensatory strategies

  18. On Representative Spaceflight Instrument and Associated Instrument Sensor Web Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizhner, Semion; Patel, Umeshkumar; Vootukuru, Meg

    2007-01-01

    Sensor Web-based adaptation and sharing of space flight mission resources, including those of the Space-Ground and Control-User communication segment, could greatly benefit from utilization of heritage Internet Protocols and devices applied for Spaceflight (SpaceIP). This had been successfully demonstrated by a few recent spaceflight experiments. However, while terrestrial applications of Internet protocols are well developed and understood (mostly due to billions of dollars in investments by the military and industry), the spaceflight application of Internet protocols is still in its infancy. Progress in the developments of SpaceIP-enabled instrument components will largely determine the SpaceIP utilization of those investments and acceptance in years to come. Likewise SpaceIP, the development of commercial real-time and instrument colocated computational resources, data compression and storage, can be enabled on-board a spacecraft and, in turn, support a powerful application to Sensor Web-based design of a spaceflight instrument. Sensor Web-enabled reconfiguration and adaptation of structures for hardware resources and information systems will commence application of Field Programmable Arrays (FPGA) and other aerospace programmable logic devices for what this technology was intended. These are a few obvious potential benefits of Sensor Web technologies for spaceflight applications. However, they are still waiting to be explored. This is because there is a need for a new approach to spaceflight instrumentation in order to make these mature sensor web technologies applicable for spaceflight. In this paper we present an approach in developing related and enabling spaceflight instrument-level technologies based on the new concept of a representative spaceflight Instrument Sensor Web (ISW).

  19. Using Mathcad To Teach Instrumental Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bramer, Scott E.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a set of Mathcad instrument simulations and documents that introduce important concepts for instrumental analysis. Enables students to adjust parameters and optimize an instrument in a timely fashion. (DDR)

  20. Apical instrumentation in endodontic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurniasri Darliana

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Cleaning and shaping of the root canal as the foundation for successful endodontic therapy. Cleaning of the root canal as the removal of all the contents of the root canal systems before and during shaping. Mechanical cleaning as the most important part of the root canal therapy. Instrumentation of the apical region has long been considered to be an essential component in the cleaning and shaping process. The apical area as the critical zone for instrumentation. The apical portion of the root canal system can retain microorganisms that could potentially cause periradicular inflammation. The nickel-titanium rotary instrumentation system to facilitate the cleaning and shaping process. Larger instrumentation sizes not only allow proper irrigation but also significantly decrease remaining bacteria in the canal system. How the larger apical sizes preparation must be achieved to clinical success. This paper will describe the major factors impacting the selection of final apical size, the factors are the anatomy of the apical constriction, root canal diameter, apical instrumentation, and bacteria in dentin tubuli.

  1. Felix, Design And Instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Van der Geer, C A J

    1999-01-01

    In a Free-Electron Laser, FEL, an intense, high quality, relativistic electron beam is forced into a wiggling motion in a periodic array of alternating magnets, the undulator, where it produces the radiation. The generation of the electron beam is non-trivial and quite expensive. FELs have therefore been constructed at various sites in the world as the core of user facilities. FELIX (Free Electron Laser for Infrared eXperiments) is such a user facility, built at the FOM- Institute for Plasma Physics, Rijnhuizen, where intense infrared light is generated over a large spectral range with two FELs. The FELIX FELs are fed by an electron beam produced by a traveling wave RF accelerator system, the design of which is the main subject of this thesis. The quality of an FEL is determined to a very large extent by the quality of the electron beam. The requirements for all of the following parameters are high: peak current, energy spread, emittance and stability of the micropulse repetition frequency. These aspects are ...

  2. Validation of the organizational culture assessment instrument

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heritage, Brody; Pollock, Clare; Roberts, Lynne

    2014-01-01

    ...] review of the psychometric properties of organizational culture measurement instruments noted many instruments have limited validation data despite frequent use in both theoretical and applied situations...

  3. Composite Rolled Magnetometer and Instrument Boom Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Magnetometers are the most common instrument flown on NASA science missions and interference from onboard electronics requires that these instruments be deployed...

  4. Register of Validated Short Dietary Assessment Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    The register contains descriptive information about the instruments identified (over 135) along with any associated validation studies and publications, and copies of the instruments themselves when available.

  5. Introduction to instrumentation and measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Northrop, Robert B

    2014-01-01

    Weighing in on the growth of innovative technologies, the adoption of new standards, and the lack of educational development as it relates to current and emerging applications, the third edition of Introduction to Instrumentation and Measurements uses the authors' 40 years of teaching experience to expound on the theory, science, and art of modern instrumentation and measurements (I&M). What's New in This Edition: This edition includes material on modern integrated circuit (IC) and photonic sensors, micro-electro-mechanical (MEM) and nano-electro-mechanical (NEM) sensors, chemical and radiation sensors, signal conditioning, noise, data interfaces, and basic digital signal processing (DSP), and upgrades every chapter with the latest advancements. It contains new material on the designs of micro-electro-mechanical (MEMS) sensors, adds two new chapters on wireless instrumentation and microsensors, and incorporates extensive biomedical examples and problems. Containing 13 chapters, this third edition: Describ...

  6. [Portable instrument for arteriosclerosis assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shuai; Chen, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    A portable instrument for arteriosclerosis assessment containing sensor module, acquisition board and embedded module was developed for home care in this paper. The sensor module consists of one ECG module and three pulse wave extraction modules, synchronously acquiring human ECG and pulse wave signal of carotid, radial, and dorsal, respectively. The acquisition board converts the sensor module's analog output signals into digital signals and transmits them to the embedded module. The embedded module realizes the functions including signal display, storage and the calculation and output of pulse wave velocity. The structure of the proposed portable instrument is simple, easy to use, and easy to expand. Small size, low cost, and low power consumption are also the advantages of this device. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed portable instrument for arteriosclerosis assessment has high accuracy, good repeatability and can assess the degree of atherosclerosis appropriately.

  7. Technical presentation - KEITHLEY Instruments - CANCELLED

    CERN Multimedia

    FI Department

    2009-01-01

    10 March 2009 13:30 – 15:30, Council Chamber, Bldg. 503 Keithley markets highly accurate instruments and data acquisition products, as well as complete system solutions for high-volume production and assembly testing. Keithley Instruments, Inc. designs, develops, manufactures and markets complex electronic instruments and systems geared to the specialized needs of electronics manufacturers for high-performance production testing, process monitoring, product development and research. Products and Services: Digital Multimeters and Data Acquisition Systems Current / Voltage Source and Measure Products Low Current / High Resistance Measurement Products Function/Pulse/Arbitrary/Pattern Generators Low Voltage/Low Resistance Measurement Products RF Spectrum Analyzer / RF Signal Generator / RF Switching Semiconductor Device Characterization Program: Topic 1: Welcome and short overview of new Products SMU 26XXA / ARB Generator 3390 / DMM 3706 / E-Meter 6517B Topic 2a: Te...

  8. Tool – Material, Metaphor – Metonymy, Instrument(ness)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Olav Wedege; Breinbjerg, Morten; Pold, Søren

    2008-01-01

    creativity , supported by analysis of, and interviews with, musical composers. Instrumentness is explained through discussions of materiality and metonymy as central strategies for computer mediated creativity. The paper is contributing to an investigation of the aesthetics of use in relation to software...

  9. Small Cold Temperature Instrument Packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P. E.; Millar, P. S.; Yeh, P. S.; Feng, S.; Brigham, D.; Beaman, B.

    We are developing a small cold temperature instrument package concept that integrates a cold temperature power system with ultra low temperature ultra low power electronics components and power supplies now under development into a 'cold temperature surface operational' version of a planetary surface instrument package. We are already in the process of developing a lower power lower temperature version for an instrument of mutual interest to SMD and ESMD to support the search for volatiles (the mass spectrometer VAPoR, Volatile Analysis by Pyrolysis of Regolith) both as a stand alone instrument and as part of an environmental monitoring package. We build on our previous work to develop strategies for incorporating Ultra Low Temperature/Ultra Low Power (ULT/ULP) electronics, lower voltage power supplies, as well as innovative thermal design concepts for instrument packages. Cryotesting has indicated that our small Si RHBD CMOS chips can deliver >80% of room temperature performance at 40K (nominal minimum lunar surface temperature). We leverage collaborations, past and current, with the JPL battery development program to increase power system efficiency in extreme environments. We harness advances in MOSFET technology that provide lower voltage thresholds for power switching circuits incorporated into our low voltage power supply concept. Conventional power conversion has a lower efficiency. Our low power circuit concept based on 'synchronous rectification' could produce stable voltages as low as 0.6 V with 85% efficiency. Our distributed micro-battery-based power supply concept incorporates cold temperature power supplies operating with a 4 V or 8 V battery. This work will allow us to provide guidelines for applying the low temperature, low power system approaches generically to the widest range of surface instruments.

  10. Instrumentation for tropospheric aerosol characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Z.; Young, S.E.; Becker, C.H.; Coggiola, M.J. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wollnik, H. [Giessen Univ. (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    A new instrument has been developed that determines the abundance, size distribution, and chemical composition of tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols with diameters down to 0.2 {mu}m. In addition to aerosol characterization, the instrument also monitors the chemical composition of the ambient gas. More than 25.000 aerosol particle mass spectra were recorded during the NASA-sponsored Subsonic Aircraft: Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study (SUCCESS) field program using NASA`s DC-8 research aircraft. (author) 7 refs.

  11. Instrumentation for Colliding Beam Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    INSTR17, the International Conference on Instrumentation for Colliding Beam Physics, will be held in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk, Russia, on 27 February – 4 March, 2017. The conference covers novel methods of particle detection used in various experiments at particle accelerators as well as in astrophysics. It is organized in close relationship with the Vienna Conference on Instrumentation (last held in 2016) and the Pisa Meeting on Advanced Detectors (last held in 2015). The deadline for registration and abstract submission is 15 January. For more details visit the conference website instr17.inp.nsk.su. Will be published in: JINST

  12. An introduction to biomedical instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Dewhurst, D J

    1976-01-01

    An Introduction to Biomedical Instrumentation presents a course of study and applications covering the basic principles of medical and biological instrumentation, as well as the typical features of its design and construction. The book aims to aid not only the cognitive domain of the readers, but also their psychomotor domain as well. Aside from the seminar topics provided, which are divided into 27 chapters, the book complements these topics with practical applications of the discussions. Figures and mathematical formulas are also given. Major topics discussed include the construction, handli

  13. Key instrumentation in BWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laendner, Alexander; Stellwag, Bernhard; Fandrich, Joerg [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    This paper describes water chemistry surveillance practices at boiling water reactor (BWR) power plants. The key instrumentation in BWR plants consists of on-line as well as off-line instrumentation. The chemistry monitoring and control parameters are predominantly based on two guidelines, namely the VGB Water Chemistry Guidelines and the EPRI Water Chemistry Guidelines. Control parameters and action levels specified in the VGB guideline are described. Typical sampling locations in BWR plants, chemistry analysis methods and water chemistry data of European BWR plants are summarized. Measurement data confirm the high quality of reactor water of the BWRs in Europe. (orig.)

  14. Developing an ELT Context-Specific Teacher Efficacy Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Ramin; Tavassoli, Kobra

    2014-01-01

    Teacher efficacy is a topic of significance in mainstream education and various instruments have been developed to measure this construct. The available instruments however, are general both in terms of their subject matter and context. To compensate for this generality, the present study aims to develop a new teacher efficacy instrument whose…

  15. Psychology Needs Realism, Not Instrumentalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haig, Brian D.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author presents his comments on "Realism, Instrumentalism, and Scientific Symbiosis: Psychological Theory as a Search for Truth and the Discovery of Solutions" by John T. Cacioppo, Gun R. Semin and Gary G. Berntson. In the original article, the authors recommended the combined use of the philosophies of scientific realism and…

  16. A portable luminescence dating instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kook, M.H.; Murray, A.S.; Lapp, Torben

    2011-01-01

    We describe a portable luminescence reader suitable for use in remote localities in the field. The instrument weighs about 8kg and is based around a 30mm bialkali photomultiplier detecting signals through a glass filter centered on 340nm. Stimulation is by 470nm blue LEDs (24W in total) operating...

  17. Market-based Economic Instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemmensen, Børge

    2007-01-01

    Grundkategorien her er markedet som den optimale allokeringsmekanisme for de belastninger, som de økonomiske instrumenter / miljøskatterne påfører. Det mest omfattende og spektakulære eksempel på markedet som allokatorer af skatter er EU's børs for forureningstilladelser, dvs reelt CO-2 beskatnin...

  18. Mobile Instruments Measure Atmospheric Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    As a part of NASA's active research of the Earth s atmosphere, which has included missions such as the Atmospheric Laboratory of Applications and Science (ATLAS, launched in 1992) and the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS, launched on the Earth Probe satellite in 1996), the Agency also performs ground-based air pollution research. The ability to measure trace amounts of airborne pollutants precisely and quickly is important for determining natural patterns and human effects on global warming and air pollution, but until recent advances in field-grade spectroscopic instrumentation, this rapid, accurate data collection was limited and extremely difficult. In order to understand causes of climate change and airborne pollution, NASA has supported the development of compact, low power, rapid response instruments operating in the mid-infrared "molecular fingerprint" portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. These instruments, which measure atmospheric trace gases and airborne particles, can be deployed in mobile laboratories - customized ground vehicles, typically - to map distributions of pollutants in real time. The instruments must be rugged enough to operate rapidly and accurately, despite frequent jostling that can misalign, damage, or disconnect sensitive components. By measuring quickly while moving through an environment, a mobile laboratory can correlate data and geographic points, revealing patterns in the environment s pollutants. Rapid pollutant measurements also enable direct determination of pollutant sources and sinks (mechanisms that remove greenhouse gases and pollutants), providing information critical to understanding and managing atmospheric greenhouse gas and air pollutant concentrations.

  19. Loyaliteitsprogramma's: zinvol CRM-instrument?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenheer, J.

    2006-01-01

    Loyalty programs have been widely adopted by companies and their customers. A loyalty program is a relational marketing instrument that aims to enhance customer loyalty. However, skepticism exists about the implementation and effectiveness of loyalty programs. This paper studies for whom, when and

  20. Literature Review of Multicultural Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarraj, Huda; Carter, Stacy; Burley, Hansel

    2015-01-01

    Demographic changes at the national level emphasize a critical need for multicultural education to be included as part of undergraduate education. This critical review of the literature examines 10 multicultural instruments that are suitable for use in K-12 or higher education institutions. This is a novel literature review in that it is the first…

  1. Presentation of a new instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russell, M B; Rasmussen, B K; Brennum, J

    1992-01-01

    A new instrument, the Diagnostic Headache Diary, based on the operational diagnostic criteria of the International Headache Society (IHS), was tested in 61 migraine patients from a headache research clinic using the clinical diagnosis (IHS criteria) for comparison. All patients kept the diary...... and quantitatively more precise diagnosis than a clinical interview alone....

  2. Scientific Instruments and Epistemology Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Dvořák, T. (Tomáš)

    2012-01-01

    This article outlines the gradually changing attitude towards instruments and materials in the philosophy and historiography of science and confronts contemporary revaluations of the material culture of science with Hans-Jörg Rhein- berger's concept of an experimental system and Don Ihde's notion of an epistemology engine.

  3. Gaze Patterns, Verbal Insult and Instrumental Aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsch, William E.

    This study investigated the effects of three gaze patterns-staring, normal looking, glancing and avoiding eye contact-and verbal insult on instrumental aggression. It was hypothesized that the experimental manipulation of verbal insult will: (1) not affect shock intensity or duration (2) not increase the subjects self-reported hostility, and (3)…

  4. 31 CFR 596.307 - Monetary instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monetary instruments. 596.307 Section... General Definitions § 596.307 Monetary instruments. The term monetary instruments shall have the meaning..., bank checks, and money orders, or investment securities or negotiable instruments, in bearer form or...

  5. 75 FR 31736 - Modifications of Debt Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-04

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BJ30 Modifications of Debt Instruments AGENCY: Internal.... SUMMARY: This document contains proposed regulations relating to the modification of debt instruments. The... into account to determine whether a modified debt instrument will be recharacterized as an instrument...

  6. 40 CFR 1065.915 - PEMS instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false PEMS instruments. 1065.915 Section... instruments. (a) Instrument specifications. We recommend that you use PEMS that meet the specifications of... that meets the same specifications as each lab instrument it replaces. For field testing or for testing...

  7. Temperature documentation - instrument for quality assurance; Temperaturdokumentation - Instrument der Qualitaetssicherung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegglin, A. [Wurm AG, Winterthur (Switzerland)

    2000-10-01

    Important inspection points of a HACCP concept are the temperatures. On the basis of the demands for a systematic temperature documentation, the application of control systems and instruments is described by several examples. (orig.) [German] Wichtige Kontrollpunkte eines HACCP-Konzepts sind die Temperaturen. Ausgehend von den Anforderungen, die an eine systematische Temperaturedokumentation gestellt werden, wird der Einsatz geeigneter Regel- und Ueberwachungsgeraete an mehreren Beispielen erlaeutert. (orig.)

  8. ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information July 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JW Voyles

    2009-08-13

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  9. ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information September 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JW Voyles

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  10. ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information May 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JW Voyles

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  11. ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information August 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JW Voyles

    2009-09-09

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  12. ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information - June 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JW Voyles

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  13. ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information April 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2009-05-07

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  14. Robust Instrumentation[Water treatment for power plant]; Robust Instrumentering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wik, Anders [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-08-01

    Cementa Slite Power Station is a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) with moderate steam data; 3.0 MPa and 420 deg C. The heat is recovered from Cementa, a cement industry, without any usage of auxiliary fuel. The Power station commenced operation in 2001. The layout of the plant is unusual, there are no similar in Sweden and very few world-wide, so the operational experiences are limited. In connection with the commissioning of the power plant a R and D project was identified with the objective to minimise the manpower needed for chemistry management of the plant. The lean chemistry management is based on robust instrumentation and chemical-free water treatment plant. The concept with robust instrumentation consists of the following components; choice of on-line instrumentation with a minimum of O and M and a chemical-free water treatment. The parameters are specific conductivity, cation conductivity, oxygen and pH. In addition to that, two fairly new on-line instruments were included; corrosion monitors and differential pH calculated from specific and cation conductivity. The chemical-free water treatment plant consists of softening, reverse osmosis and electro-deionisation. The operational experience shows that the cycle chemistry is not within the guidelines due to major problems with the operation of the power plant. These problems have made it impossible to reach steady state and thereby not viable to fully verify and validate the concept with robust instrumentation. From readings on the panel of the online analysers some conclusions may be drawn, e.g. the differential pH measurements have fulfilled the expectations. The other on-line analysers have been working satisfactorily apart from contamination with turbine oil, which has been noticed at least twice. The corrosion monitors seem to be working but the lack of trend curves from the mainframe computer system makes it hard to draw any clear conclusions. The chemical-free water treatment has met all

  15. Musical Instruments, Models, and Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershenfeld, Neil

    1996-11-01

    A traditional musical instrument is an analog computer that integrates equations of motion based on applied boundary conditions. We are approaching a remarkable time when advances in transducers, real-time computing, and mathematical modeling will enable new technology to emulate and generalize the physics of great musical instruments from first principles, helping virtuosic musicians to do more and non-musicians to engage in creative expression. I will discuss the underlying problems, including non-contact sensing and state reconstruction for nonlinear systems, describe exploratory performance collaborations with artists ranging from Yo-Yo Ma to Penn & Teller, and then consider the broader implications of these devices for the interaction between people and machines. Part B of program listing

  16. La sauvegarde du patrimoine instrumental

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    LA SAUVEGARDE DU PATRIMOINE INSTRUMENTAL Conférence-débat du 6 juin 2001, Orsay Ouverture par Raymond Duval, délégué régional du CNRS Ile-de-France Sud et introduction de la journée par André Kaspi, président du Comité pour l’histoire du CNRS. Que conserver et comment ? A - L’instrumentation scientifique, un élément essentiel du patrimoine, José Teixeira, Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, CNRS-CEA B - La disparition des matériels et du savoir-faire en neurosciences, Jacques Stinnakre, Laboratoire d...

  17. Virtual Instrumentation in Biomedical Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Faustino Andrade

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the assessment of body composition by estimating the percentage of body fat has a great impact in many fields such as nutrition, health, sports, chronic diseases and others. The main purpose for this work is the development of a virtual instrument that permits more effective assessment of body fat, automatic data processing, recording results and storage in a database, with high potential to conduct new studies, http://lipotool.com.

  18. Instruments de mesure en acoustique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnov, Viggo; Jacobsen, Finn

    2008-01-01

    La mesure en acoustique fait appel à des instruments qui mesurent, d'une part la pression, d'autre part l'intensité du signal. Ce dossier présentera, notamment, deux appareils spécialisés : les sonomètres et les microphones. Il abordera l'ensemble des informations majeures à connaître sur les...

  19. Printed Electrochemical Instruments for Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Beni, Valerio; Nilsson, D.; Arven, P.; Norberg, P.; Gustafsson, G.; Turner, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Mobile diagnostics for healthcare, food safety and environmental monitoring, demand a new generation of inexpensive sensing systems suitable for production in high volume. Herein we report on the development of a new disposable electrochemical instrument exploiting the latest advances in printed electronics and printed biosensors. The current system is manufactured under ambient conditions with all interconnections printed; electrochemical measurements and data elaboration are realized by the...

  20. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  1. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  2. A drilling instrument centering device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remizov, M.I.; Bogomazov, L.D.; Dudkin, M.P.; Kaplun, V.A.; Surma, K.Yu.

    1982-01-01

    A drilling instrument centering device is proposed which contains a body with fins, upper and lower wedge compression elements installed with the capability of interacting with the body, and a subassembly for locking the compression elements. To simplify the assembly and disassembly of the centering device, the upper and lower compressing elements are rigidly linked. The body is made of two parts, while the subassembly for locking the compressing elements is made in the form of a spring installed between the body parts.

  3. The Instruments of Transport Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Štefančić

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The work proposes the transport policy instruments, suchas the infrastructure measures, management measures and informationprovision measures as the means that could reduceor eliminate transport problems. All these measures have beenfollowed through the provisions for passenger cars, provisionsfor public transport, provisions for cyclists and pedestrians andprovisions regarding transport. A range of solutions is given toreduce congestion, improve accessibility and improve the trafficconditions for those who depend on public transport along withthe improvement of environmental conditions.

  4. Instrumentation of VISTA test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seok; Choi, Ki Young; Park, Hyun Sik; Lee, Seong Jae; Park, Chun Kyong; Chung, Moon Ki

    2003-11-01

    VISTA (Experimental Verification by Integral Simulation of Transients and Accidents) is experimental facility to verify the performance and safety issues of SMART-P(Pilot plant of the System-integrated Modular Advanced Reactor), basic design of which has been completed by KAERI. The present report provide instrumentation details of VISTA in order to improve understanding on the phenomena and to certify the experimental data.

  5. SMAP Instrument Mechanical System Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slimko, Eric; French, Richard; Riggs, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, scheduled for launch by the end of 2014, is being developed to measure the soil moisture and soil freeze/thaw state on a global scale over a three-year period. The accuracy, resolution, and global coverage of SMAP measurements are invaluable across many science and applications disciplines including hydrology, climate, carbon cycle, and the meteorological, environment, and ecology applications communities. The SMAP observatory is composed of a despun bus and a spinning instrument platform that includes both a deployable 6 meter aperture low structural frequency Astromesh reflector and a spin control system. The instrument section has engendered challenging mechanical system issues associated with the antenna deployment, flexible antenna pointing in the context of a multitude of disturbances, spun section mass properties, spin control system development, and overall integration with the flight system on both mechanical and control system levels. Moreover, the multitude of organizations involved, including two major vendors providing the spin subsystem and reflector boom assembly plus the flight system mechanical and guidance, navigation, and control teams, has led to several unique system engineering challenges. Capturing the key physics associated with the function of the flight system has been challenging due to the many different domains that are applicable. Key interfaces and operational concepts have led to complex negotiations because of the large number of organizations that integrate with the instrument mechanical system. Additionally, the verification and validation concerns associated with the mechanical system have had required far-reaching involvement from both the flight system and other subsystems. The SMAP instrument mechanical systems engineering issues and their solutions are described in this paper.

  6. Exploring shamanic journeying: repetitive drumming with shamanic instructions induces specific subjective experiences but no larger cortisol decrease than instrumental meditation music.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Gingras

    Full Text Available Exposure to repetitive drumming combined with instructions for shamanic journeying has been associated with physiological and therapeutic effects, such as an increase in salivary immunoglobulin A. In order to assess whether the combination of repetitive drumming and shamanic instructions is specifically associated with these effects, we compared the effect of listening to either repetitive drumming or instrumental meditation music for 15 minutes on salivary cortisol concentration and on self-reported physiological and psychological states. For each musical style, two groups of participants were exposed to two conditions: instructions for shamanic journeying or relaxation instructions. A total of 39 participants (24 females inexperienced in shamanic journeying completed the experiment. Salivary cortisol concentrations were measured before and after exposure to music. In addition, participants filled out a mood questionnaire before and after the experiment and completed a post experiment questionnaire on their experiences. A significant decrease in the concentration in salivary cortisol was observed across all musical styles and instructions, indicating that exposure to 15 minutes of either repetitive drumming or instrumental meditation music, while lying down, was sufficient to induce a decrease in cortisol levels. However, no differences were observed across conditions. Significant differences in reported emotional states and subjective experiences were observed between the groups. Notably, participants exposed to repetitive drumming combined with shamanic instructions reported experiencing heaviness, decreased heart rate, and dreamlike experiences significantly more often than participants exposed to repetitive drumming combined with relaxation instructions. Our findings suggest that the subjective effects specifically attributed to repetitive drumming and shamanic journeying may not be reflected in differential endocrine responses.

  7. Exploring shamanic journeying: repetitive drumming with shamanic instructions induces specific subjective experiences but no larger cortisol decrease than instrumental meditation music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingras, Bruno; Pohler, Gerald; Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to repetitive drumming combined with instructions for shamanic journeying has been associated with physiological and therapeutic effects, such as an increase in salivary immunoglobulin A. In order to assess whether the combination of repetitive drumming and shamanic instructions is specifically associated with these effects, we compared the effect of listening to either repetitive drumming or instrumental meditation music for 15 minutes on salivary cortisol concentration and on self-reported physiological and psychological states. For each musical style, two groups of participants were exposed to two conditions: instructions for shamanic journeying or relaxation instructions. A total of 39 participants (24 females) inexperienced in shamanic journeying completed the experiment. Salivary cortisol concentrations were measured before and after exposure to music. In addition, participants filled out a mood questionnaire before and after the experiment and completed a post experiment questionnaire on their experiences. A significant decrease in the concentration in salivary cortisol was observed across all musical styles and instructions, indicating that exposure to 15 minutes of either repetitive drumming or instrumental meditation music, while lying down, was sufficient to induce a decrease in cortisol levels. However, no differences were observed across conditions. Significant differences in reported emotional states and subjective experiences were observed between the groups. Notably, participants exposed to repetitive drumming combined with shamanic instructions reported experiencing heaviness, decreased heart rate, and dreamlike experiences significantly more often than participants exposed to repetitive drumming combined with relaxation instructions. Our findings suggest that the subjective effects specifically attributed to repetitive drumming and shamanic journeying may not be reflected in differential endocrine responses.

  8. High-temperature borehole instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, B. R.; Koczan, S. P.; Stephani, E. L.

    1985-10-01

    A new method of extracting natural heat from the Earth's crust was invented at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1970. It uses fluid pressures (hydraulic fracturing) to produce cracks that connect two boreholes drilled into hot rock formations of low initial permeability. Pressurized water is then circulated through this connected underground loop to extract heat from the rock and bring it to the surface. The creation of the fracture reservior began with drilling boreholes deep within the Precambrian basement rock at the Fenton Hill Test Site. Hydraulic fracturing, flow testing, and well-completion operations required unique wellbore measurements using downhole instrumentation systems that would survive the very high borehole temperatures, 320(0)C (610(0)F). These instruments were not available in the oil and gas industrial complex, so the Los Alamos National Laboratory initiated an intense program upgrading existing technology where applicable, subcontracting materials and equipment development to industrial manufactures, and using the Laboratory resources to develop the necessary downhole instruments to meet programmatic schedules.

  9. The Polar Plasma Wave Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Persoon, A. M.; Randall, R. F.; Odem, D. L.; Remington, S. L.; Averkamp, T. F.; Debower, M. M.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Huff, R. L.; Kirchner, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    The Plasma Wave Instrument on the Polar spacecraft is designed to provide measurements of plasma waves in the Earth's polar regions over the frequency range from 0.1 Hz to 800 kHz. Three orthogonal electric dipole antennas are used to detect electric fields, two in the spin plane and one aligned along the spacecraft spin axis. A magnetic loop antenna and a triaxial magnetic search coil antenna are used to detect magnetic fields. Signals from these antennas are processed by five receiver systems: a wideband receiver, a high-frequency waveform receiver, a low-frequency waveform receiver, two multichannel analyzers; and a pair of sweep frequency receivers. Compared to previous plasma wave instruments, the Polar plasma wave instrument has several new capabilities. These include (1) an expanded frequency range to improve coverage of both low- and high-frequency wave phenomena, (2) the ability to simultaneously capture signals from six orthogonal electric and magnetic field sensors, and (3) a digital wideband receiver with up to 8-bit resolution and sample rates as high as 249k samples s(exp -1).

  10. Strontium Iodide Radiation Instrumentation (SIRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Lee J.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Woolf, Richard S.; Finne, Theodore T.; Johnson, W. Neil; Jackson, Emily G.

    2017-08-01

    The Strontium Iodide Radiation Instrumentation (SIRI) is designed to space-qualify new gamma-ray detector technology for space-based astrophysical and defense applications. This new technology offers improved energy resolution, lower power consumption and reduced size compared to similar systems. The SIRI instrument consists of a single europiumdoped strontium iodide (SrI2:Eu) scintillation detector. The crystal has an energy resolution of 3% at 662 keV compared to the 6.5% of traditional sodium iodide and was developed for terrestrial-based weapons of mass destruction (WMD) detection. SIRI's objective is to study the internal activation of the SrI2:Eu material and measure the performance of the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) readouts over a 1-year mission. The combined detector and readout measure the gammaray spectrum over the energy range of 0.04 - 4 MeV. The SIRI mission payoff is a space-qualified compact, highsensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer with improved energy resolution relative to previous sensors. Scientific applications in solar physics and astrophysics include solar flares, Gamma Ray Bursts, novae, supernovae, and the synthesis of the elements. Department of Defense (DoD) and security applications are also possible. Construction of the SIRI instrument has been completed, and it is currently awaiting integration onto the spacecraft. The expected launch date is May 2018 onboard STPSat-5. This work discusses the objectives, design details and the STPSat-5 mission concept of operations of the SIRI spectrometer.

  11. TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR: National Instruments

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    From 9:30 to 12:00 and from 13:00 to 16:00 hrs - Council Chamber, Salle B, Salle des Pas Perdus National Instruments (NI) on Tour 2004 Claudia Jüngel, Evrem Yarkin, Joel Clerc, Hervé Baour / NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS The special event NI on Tour 2004, run in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, will be at CERN on March 30. Technical seminars and free introductory courses will be offered all day long in the Council Chamber, Salle B, and Salle des Pas Perdus (buildings 61 and 503). Data acquisition systems on PCs, industrial measurement and control techniques, advanced LabVIEW software and PXI instrumentation, and system components for tests and automation will be presented. Walk-in courses will address DIAdem, LabVIEW and data acquisition. Language: English and French Free seminars and courses, no registration Organisers: Rolf Stampfli / IT-CO / 78102 & 160367 / Rolf.Stampfli@cern.ch Davide Vitè / HR-PMD-ATT / 75141 Davide.Vite@cern.ch For more information and the complete event programme, please visit the...

  12. Instrumentation and fusion for congenital spine deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedequist, Daniel J

    2009-08-01

    A retrospective clinical review. To review the use of modern instrumentation of the spine for congenital spinal deformities. Spinal instrumentation has evolved since the advent of the Harrington rod. There is a paucity of literature, which discusses the use of modern spinal instrumentation in congenital spine deformity cases. This review focuses on modern instrumentation techniques for congenital scoliosis and kyphosis. A systematic review was performed of the literature to discuss spinal implant use for congenital deformities. Spinal instrumentation may be safely and effectively used in cases of congenital spinal deformity. Spinal surgeons taking care of children with congenital spine deformities need to be trained in all aspects of modern spinal instrumentation.

  13. Protecting researchers from instrument biohazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambleton, P; Dedonato, G

    1992-09-01

    The prevention and control of biohazards arising from the use of laboratory instruments have become increasingly important in clinical and research applications. Centrifuges can be susceptible to contamination because of intense wear on primary containers (specimen tubes and bottles), worn O-ring container seals, or rotors and buckets lacking tight seals. A recent study by the Center for Applied Microbiology and Research, Porton Down, UK, has determined the biological safety of certain rotors in various speed ranges. This paper presents and discusses these findings.

  14. Financial instrument pricing using C++

    CERN Document Server

    Duffy, Daniel J

    2004-01-01

    One of the best languages for the development of financial engineering and instrument pricing applications is C++. This book has several features that allow developers to write robust, flexible and extensible software systems. The book is an ANSI/ISO standard, fully object-oriented and interfaces with many third-party applications. It has support for templates and generic programming, massive reusability using templates (?write once?) and support for legacy C applications. In this book, author Daniel J. Duffy brings C++ to the next level by applying it to the design and implementation of class

  15. Condensation Particle Counter Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The Model 3772 CPC is a compact, rugged, and full-featured instrument that detects airborne particles down to 10 nm in diameter, at an aerosol flow rate of 1.0 lpm, over a concentration range from 0 to 1x104 #/cc. This CPC is ideally suited for applications without high concentration measurements, such as basic aerosol research, filter and air-cleaner testing, particle counter calibrations, environmental monitoring, mobile aerosol studies, particle shedding and component testing, and atmospheric and climate studies.

  16. A toolkit for clinical statisticians to fix problems based on biomarker measurements subject to instrumental limitations: from repeated measurement techniques to a hybrid pooled-unpooled design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vexler, Albert; Tao, Ge; Chen, Xiwei

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to review and examine different methods in order to display correct and efficient statistical techniques based on complete/incomplete data subject to different sorts of measurement error (ME) problems. Instrument inaccuracies, biological variations, and/or errors in questionnaire-based self-report data can lead to significant MEs in various clinical experiments. Ignoring MEs can cause bias or inconsistency of statistical inferences. The biostatistical literature well addresses two categories of MEs: errors related to additive models and errors caused by the limit of detection (LOD). Several statistical approaches have been developed to analyze data affected by MEs, including the parametric/nonparametric likelihood methodologies, Bayesian methods, the single and multiple imputation techniques, and the repeated measurement design of experiment. We present a novel hybrid pooled-unpooled design as one of the strategies to provide correct statistical inferences when data is subject to MEs. This hybrid design and the classical techniques are compared to show the advantages and disadvantages of the considered methods.

  17. The 2007 ESO Instrument Calibration Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufer, Andreas; ESO Workshop

    2008-01-01

    The 2007 ESO Instrument Calibration workshop brought together more than 120 participants with the objective to a) foster the sharing of information, experience and techniques between observers, instrument developers and instrument operation teams, b) review the actual precision and limitations of the applied instrument calibration plans, and c) collect the current and future requirements by the ESO users. These present proceedings include the majority of the workshop’s contributions and document the status quo of instrument calibration at ESO in large detail. Topics covered are: Optical Spectro-Imagers, Optical Multi-Object Spectrographs, NIR and MIR Spectro-Imagers, High-Resolution Spectrographs, Integral Field Spectrographs, Adaptive Optics Instruments, Polarimetric Instruments, Wide Field Imagers, Interferometric Instruments as well as other crucial aspects such as data flow, quality control, data reduction software and atmospheric effects. It was stated in the workshop that "calibration is a life-long l...

  18. GRIP LIGHTNING INSTRUMENT PACKAGE (LIP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GRIP Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) dataset was collected by the Lightning Instrument Package (LIP), which consists of 6 rotating vane type electric field...

  19. GRIP LIGHTNING INSTRUMENT PACKAGE (LIP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) consists of 6 rotating vane type electric field sensors along with a central computer to record and monitor the instruments....

  20. The Dream: A Psychodynamically Informative Instrument

    OpenAIRE

    Glucksman, Myron L.

    2001-01-01

    The dream is a unique psychodynamically informative instrument for evaluating the subjective correlates of brain activity during REM sleep. These include feelings, percepts, memories, wishes, fantasies, impulses, conflicts, and defenses, as well as images of self and others. Dream analysis can be used in a variety of clinical settings to assist in diagnostic assessment, psychodynamic formulation, evaluation of clinical change, and the management of medically ill patients. Dreams may serve as ...

  1. LabVIEW instrument control toolbox

    OpenAIRE

    Mazal, Ctibor

    2015-01-01

    This diploma thesis is containing the description of the LabVIEW Instrument Control Toolbox project. Initial preparations like the development environment choosing process, as well as the instrument driver layer choice are present along with the project requirements. A signal approach to the instrument control is defined and described in detail. This thesis also contains the main project development in The National Instruments LabVIEW and at the end, a detailed description and user guidance f...

  2. Bicep2. III. INSTRUMENTAL SYSTEMATICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, P. A. R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Aikin, R. W.; Bock, J. J.; Brevik, J. A.; Filippini, J. P.; Golwala, S. R.; Hildebrandt, S. R. [Department of Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Barkats, D. [Joint ALMA Observatory, ESO, Santiago (Chile); Benton, S. J. [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Bischoff, C. A.; Buder, I.; Karkare, K. S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street MS 42, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bullock, E. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Dowell, C. D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Duband, L. [SBT, Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France); Fliescher, S. [Department of Physics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D., E-mail: csheehy@uchicago.edu [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Collaboration: Bicep2 Collaboration; and others

    2015-12-01

    In a companion paper, we have reported a >5σ detection of degree scale B-mode polarization at 150 GHz by the Bicep2 experiment. Here we provide a detailed study of potential instrumental systematic contamination to that measurement. We focus extensively on spurious polarization that can potentially arise from beam imperfections. We present a heuristic classification of beam imperfections according to their symmetries and uniformities, and discuss how resulting contamination adds or cancels in maps that combine observations made at multiple orientations of the telescope about its boresight axis. We introduce a technique, which we call “deprojection,” for filtering the leading order beam-induced contamination from time-ordered data, and show that it reduces power in Bicep2's actual and null-test BB spectra consistent with predictions using high signal-to-noise beam shape measurements. We detail the simulation pipeline that we use to directly simulate instrumental systematics and the calibration data used as input to that pipeline. Finally, we present the constraints on BB contamination from individual sources of potential systematics. We find that systematics contribute BB power that is a factor of ∼10× below Bicep2's three-year statistical uncertainty, and negligible compared to the observed BB signal. The contribution to the best-fit tensor/scalar ratio is at a level equivalent to r = (3–6) × 10{sup −3}.

  3. Instrumentation for mass spectrometry: 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLuckey, S.A.

    1997-08-01

    All mass spectrometry experiments involve the manipulation of material, an interface with the mass spectrometer, ionization, ion manipulation/analysis, detection and data collection/reduction. Each of these elements involve instrumentation. The wide range of species now amenable to mass spectrometry and the diverse areas of physical science in which it plays a role have led to a seemingly unlimited array of instrumental combinations. However, only a limited number of mass analyzers, and their combinations, dominate. The dominant analyzers include time-of-flight, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance, the Paul trap, the mass filter, and the sector mass spectrometer. Why there are so few (or so many, depending upon one`s point of view) can be understood upon consideration of a set of mass analyzer figures of merit. These include mass resolution, mass accuracy, mass range, dynamic range, abundance sensitivity, precision, efficiency, speed, MS{sup n} capability, compatibility with the ionizer, cost, and size. The most appropriate form of mass spectrometry is determined by the priorities of the particular measurement placed on the various mass analyzer characteristics and the relative strengths of the analyzers in meeting the requirements. Each of the analyzer types has a unique set of figures of merit that makes it optimally suited for particular applications. This paper discusses these figures of merit, provides data illustrating recent developments for each analyzer type, and gives the figures of merit of each type of analyzer as they stand in 1997. 101 refs., 24 figs.

  4. The TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veefkind, Pepijn; Kleipool, Quintus; Aben, Ilse; Levelt, Pieternel

    2015-04-01

    The Copernicus Sentinel 5 Precursor (S5P), scheduled for launch in 2016, is the first of the sentinels dedicated to monitoring of the atmospheric composition. The main application areas of the mission are air quality, climate and the ozone layer. The single payload of the S5P mission is TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI). TROPOMI is a nadir viewing shortwave spectrometer that will measure in the UV-visible wavelength range (270-500 nm), the near infrared (710-770 nm) and the shortwave infrared (2314-2382 nm). TROPOMI will have an unprecedented spatial resolution of about 7x7 km2 at nadir. The spatial resolution is combined with a wide swath to allow for daily global coverage. The high spatial resolution serves two goals: (1) emissions sources can be detected with more accuracy and (2) the number of cloud-free ground pixels will increase substantially. The TROPOMI/S5P geophysical (Level 2) data products include nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, ozone (total column, tropospheric column & profile), methane, sulphur dioxide, formaldehyde and aerosol and cloud parameters. In this contribution we will present the TROPOMI instrument performance and the new science opportunities that it will enable.

  5. Software-Enabled Modular Instrumentation Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soijer, M.W.

    2003-01-01

    Like most other types of instrumentation systems, flight test instrumentation is not produced in series; its development is a one-time achievement by a test department. With the introduction of powerful digital computers, instrumentation systems have included data analysis tasks that were previously

  6. 47 CFR 73.58 - Indicating instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Indicating instruments. 73.58 Section 73.58... Broadcast Stations § 73.58 Indicating instruments. (a) Each AM broadcast station must be equipped with indicating instruments which conform with the specifications described in § 73.1215 for determining power by...

  7. The scientific use of technological instruments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, Mieke; Hansson, Sven Ove

    2015-01-01

    One of the most obvious ways in which the natural sciences depend on technology is through the use of instruments. This chapter presents a philosophical analysis of the role of technological instruments in science. Two roles of technological instruments in scientific practices are distinguished:

  8. 18 CFR 12.41 - Monitoring instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monitoring instruments... Other Responsibilities of Applicant or Licensee § 12.41 Monitoring instruments. (a) In designing a... include, for example, instruments to monitor movement of joints, foundation or embankment deformation...

  9. 14 CFR 29.1549 - Powerplant instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Powerplant instruments. 29.1549 Section 29... Placards § 29.1549 Powerplant instruments. For each required powerplant instrument, as appropriate to the type of instruments— (a) Each maximum and, if applicable, minimum safe operating limit must be marked...

  10. 14 CFR 27.1549 - Powerplant instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Powerplant instruments. 27.1549 Section 27... § 27.1549 Powerplant instruments. For each required powerplant instrument, as appropriate to the type of instrument— (a) Each maximum and, if applicable, minimum safe operating limit must be marked with...

  11. Adult Perspectives of Learning Musical Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulston, Kathryn; Jutras, Peter; Kim, Seon Joo

    2015-01-01

    This article reports findings from a qualitative study of adults' perceptions and experiences of learning musical instruments. Conducted in the south-east United States, 15 adults who were learning instruments were recruited via community music groups and private instrumental teachers. Analysis of transcripts of semi-structured interviews…

  12. 47 CFR 73.558 - Indicating instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Indicating instruments. 73.558 Section 73.558... Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.558 Indicating instruments. The requirements for indicating instruments described in § 73.258 are applicable to all educational FM broadcast stations licensed with a...

  13. 47 CFR 73.258 - Indicating instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Indicating instruments. 73.258 Section 73.258... Broadcast Stations § 73.258 Indicating instruments. (a) Each FM broadcast station shall be equipped with indicating instruments which conform with the specifications described in § 73.1215 for determining power by...

  14. 14 CFR 29.1305 - Powerplant instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Powerplant instruments. 29.1305 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 29.1305 Powerplant instruments. The following are required powerplant instruments: (a) For each rotorcraft— (1) A carburetor air temperature...

  15. 14 CFR 27.1305 - Powerplant instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Powerplant instruments. 27.1305 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 27.1305 Powerplant instruments. The following are the required powerplant instruments: (a) A carburetor air temperature indicator, for each...

  16. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coagulation instrument. 864.5400 Section 864.5400....5400 Coagulation instrument. (a) Identification. A coagulation instrument is an automated or semiautomated device used to determine the onset of clot formation for in vitro coagulation studies. (b...

  17. An Instrumental Perspective on CSCL Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonchamp, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    The theory of instrumental genesis of Rabardel relates the social and the technical through the concept of instrument. An instrument is defined as a mixed entity made up by an artifact, the technical/material part, and a set of utilization schemes, the social/behavioural part, which both result from users' constructive activities. This theory is…

  18. ICFA Instrumentation Bulletin, Volume 14, Spring 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The publication of the ICFA Instrumentation Bulletin is an activity of the Panel on Future Innovation and Development of ICFA (International Committee for Future Accelerators). The Bulletin reports on research and progress in the field of instrumentation with emphasis on application in the field of high-energy physics. It encourages issues of generic instrumentation.

  19. ICFA Instrumentation Bulletin, Volume 13, Fall 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    The publication of the ICFA Instrumentation Bulletin is an activity of the Panel on Future Innovation and Development of ICFA (International Committee for Future Accelerators). The Bulletin reports on research and progress in the field of instrumentation with emphasis on application in the field of high-energy physics. It encourages issues of generic instrumentation.

  20. Program Instrumentation and Trace Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havelund, Klaus; Goldberg, Allen; Filman, Robert; Rosu, Grigore; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Several attempts have been made recently to apply techniques such as model checking and theorem proving to the analysis of programs. This shall be seen as a current trend to analyze real software systems instead of just their designs. This includes our own effort to develop a model checker for Java, the Java PathFinder 1, one of the very first of its kind in 1998. However, model checking cannot handle very large programs without some kind of abstraction of the program. This paper describes a complementary scalable technique to handle such large programs. Our interest is turned on the observation part of the equation: How much information can be extracted about a program from observing a single execution trace? It is our intention to develop a technology that can be applied automatically and to large full-size applications, with minimal modification to the code. We present a tool, Java PathExplorer (JPaX), for exploring execution traces of Java programs. The tool prioritizes scalability for completeness, and is directed towards detecting errors in programs, not to prove correctness. One core element in JPaX is an instrumentation package that allows to instrument Java byte code files to log various events when executed. The instrumentation is driven by a user provided script that specifies what information to log. Examples of instructions that such a script can contain are: 'report name and arguments of all called methods defined in class C, together with a timestamp'; 'report all updates to all variables'; and 'report all acquisitions and releases of locks'. In more complex instructions one can specify that certain expressions should be evaluated and even that certain code should be executed under various conditions. The instrumentation package can hence be seen as implementing Aspect Oriented Programming for Java in the sense that one can add functionality to a Java program without explicitly changing the code of the original program, but one rather writes an

  1. Response-Outcome versus Outcome-Response Associations in Pavlovian-to-Instrumental Transfer: Effects of Instrumental Training Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilroy, Kerry E; Everett, Ebony M; Delamater, Andrew R

    2014-09-01

    One experiment with rats used Pavlovian-to-instrumental transfer (PIT) tests to explore potential competitive interactions between Pavlovian and instrumental processes during instrumental learning. Two instrumental response-outcome relations (e.g., left lever - grain pellets, right lever - sucrose pellets) were first trained in distinct contexts for one group of rats (Group Differential) or in each of two contexts for a second group (Group Non-Differential). Both of these groups then received training with two Pavlovian stimulus-outcome relations in a third experimental context. Selective PIT tests conducted in both the Pavlovian and instrumental contexts revealed greater selective PIT in Group Non-Differential than in Group Differential subjects. This result is discussed in terms of the roles played by context-outcome, response-outcome, and outcome-response associations during instrumental learning. The results further help us understand the nature of Pavlovian-instrumental interactions in specific PIT tasks.

  2. Question order sensitivity of subjective well-being measures: focus on life satisfaction, self-rated health, and subjective life expectancy in survey instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sunghee; McClain, Colleen; Webster, Noah; Han, Saram

    2016-10-01

    This study examines the effect of question context created by order in questionnaires on three subjective well-being measures: life satisfaction, self-rated health, and subjective life expectancy. We conducted two Web survey experiments. The first experiment (n = 648) altered the order of life satisfaction and self-rated health: (1) life satisfaction asked immediately after self-rated health; (2) self-rated health immediately after life satisfaction; and (3) two items placed apart. We examined their correlation coefficient by experimental condition and further examined its interaction with objective health. The second experiment (n = 479) asked life expectancy before and after parental mortality questions. Responses to life expectancy were compared by order using ANOVA, and we examined interaction with parental mortality status using ANCOVA. Additionally, response time and probes were examined. Correlation coefficients between self-rated health and life satisfaction differed significantly by order: 0.313 (life satisfaction first), 0.508 (apart), and 0.643 (self-rated health first). Differences were larger among respondents with chronic conditions. Response times were the shortest when self-rated health was asked first. When life expectancy asked after parental mortality questions, respondents reported considering parents more for answering life expectancy; and respondents with deceased parents reported significantly lower expectancy, but not those whose parents were alive. Question context effects exist. Findings suggest placing life satisfaction and self-rated health apart to avoid artificial attenuation or inflation in their association. Asking about parental mortality prior to life expectancy appears advantageous as this leads respondents to consider parental longevity more, an important factor for true longevity.

  3. Testing and calibration of geodetic instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Bajtala

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of testing, verification and calibration of length-scales (electronic rangefinders and angle-scales (geodetic instruments. The calibration of coded levelling rods and the systemic calibration of digital levelling instruments. The calibration on linear comparative baseline in a terrain – the elaboration of measured data. The testing of universal measuring instruments in laboratory conditions - specific problems in testing of instruments with the passive reflection. Some knowledge about the calibration of horizontal circles of angle-measuring geodetic instruments.

  4. MITIGATING INNOVATION RISKS CONCERNING INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY INSTRUMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea DUMITRESCU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available As protection of innovation is possible using a variety of intellectual property instruments, the current paper aims at emphasizing the vulnerabilities of these instruments in order to facilitate the right choice in terms of protection, exploitation and dissemination of innovation. Based on a review of the intellectual property instruments and their related risk factors, the study identifies and formulates specific proactive strategies which arise from the fact that an instrument alone does not allow for effective protection, exploitation and dissemination and oftentimes the owners of innovation should combine traditional and alternative instruments. Therefore, the results of this analysis represent a helpful tool for managers in the decisional process.

  5. Infrared Instrument for Detecting Hydrogen Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert; Ihlefeld, Curtis; Immer, Christopher; Oostdyk, Rebecca; Cox, Robert; Taylor, John

    2006-01-01

    The figure shows an instrument incorporating an infrared camera for detecting small hydrogen fires. The instrument has been developed as an improved replacement for prior infrared and ultraviolet instruments used to detect hydrogen fires. The need for this or any such instrument arises because hydrogen fires (e.g., those associated with leaks from tanks, valves, and ducts) pose a great danger, yet they emit so little visible light that they are mostly undetectable by the unaided human eye. The main performance advantage offered by the present instrument over prior hydrogen-fire-detecting instruments lies in its greater ability to avoid false alarms by discriminating against reflected infrared light, including that originating in (1) the Sun, (2) welding torches, and (3) deliberately ignited hydrogen flames (e.g., ullage-burn-off flames) that are nearby but outside the field of view intended to be monitored by the instrument. Like prior such instruments, this instrument is based mostly on the principle of detecting infrared emission above a threshold level. However, in addition, this instrument utilizes information on the spatial distribution of infrared light from a source that it detects. Because the combination of spatial and threshold information about a flame tends to constitute a unique signature that differs from that of reflected infrared light originating in a source not in the field of view, the incidence of false alarms is reduced substantially below that of related prior threshold- based instruments.

  6. Online Personalization of Hearing Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert de Vries

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Online personalization of hearing instruments refers to learning preferred tuning parameter values from user feedback through a control wheel (or remote control, during normal operation of the hearing aid. We perform hearing aid parameter steering by applying a linear map from acoustic features to tuning parameters. We formulate personalization of the steering parameters as the maximization of an expected utility function. A sparse Bayesian approach is then investigated for its suitability to find efficient feature representations. The feasibility of our approach is demonstrated in an application to online personalization of a noise reduction algorithm. A patient trial indicates that the acoustic features chosen for learning noise control are meaningful, that environmental steering of noise reduction makes sense, and that our personalization algorithm learns proper values for tuning parameters.

  7. Online Personalization of Hearing Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ypma Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Online personalization of hearing instruments refers to learning preferred tuning parameter values from user feedback through a control wheel (or remote control, during normal operation of the hearing aid. We perform hearing aid parameter steering by applying a linear map from acoustic features to tuning parameters. We formulate personalization of the steering parameters as the maximization of an expected utility function. A sparse Bayesian approach is then investigated for its suitability to find efficient feature representations. The feasibility of our approach is demonstrated in an application to online personalization of a noise reduction algorithm. A patient trial indicates that the acoustic features chosen for learning noise control are meaningful, that environmental steering of noise reduction makes sense, and that our personalization algorithm learns proper values for tuning parameters.

  8. The Bering Target Tracking Instrumentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denver, Troelz; Jørgensen, John Leif; Betto, Maurizio

    2003-01-01

    The key science instrument on the Bering satellite mission is a relative small telescope with an entrance aperture of 300 mm and a focal length between 500 and 1000 mm. The detection of potential targets is performed by one of the target scanning advanced stellar compasses (ASCs). This procedure...... results in a simple prioritized list of right ascension, declination, proper motion and intensity of each prospective target. The telescope itself has a dedicated ASC Camera Head Unit (CHU) mounted on the secondary mirror, largely co-aligned with the telescope. This CHU accurately determines the telescope......'s pointing direction. To achieve fast tracking over a large solid angle, the telescope pointing is achieved by means of a folding mirror in the optical pathway. When a prospective target approaches the telescope FOV, the ASC on the secondary will guide the folding mirror into position such that the target...

  9. Asteroid electrostatic instrumentation and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aplin, K. L.; Bowles, N. E.; Urbak, E.; Keane, D.; Sawyer, E. C.

    2011-06-01

    Asteroid surface material is expected to become photoelectrically charged, and is likely to be transported through electrostatic levitation. Understanding any movement of the surface material is relevant to proposed space missions to return samples to Earth for detailed isotopic analysis. Motivated by preparations for the Marco Polo sample return mission, we present electrostatic modelling for a real asteroid, Itokawa, for which detailed shape information is available, and verify that charging effects are likely to be significant at the terminator and at the edges of shadow regions for the Marco Polo baseline asteroid, 1999JU3. We also describe the Asteroid Charge Experiment electric field instrumentation intended for Marco Polo. Finally, we find that the differing asteroid and spacecraft potentials on landing could perturb sample collection for the short landing time of 20min that is currently planned.

  10. Asteroid electrostatic instrumentation and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aplin, K L; Bowles, N E; Urbak, E [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Keane, D; Sawyer, E C, E-mail: k.aplin1@physics.ox.ac.uk [RAL Space, R25, Harwell Oxford, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-23

    Asteroid surface material is expected to become photoelectrically charged, and is likely to be transported through electrostatic levitation. Understanding any movement of the surface material is relevant to proposed space missions to return samples to Earth for detailed isotopic analysis. Motivated by preparations for the Marco Polo sample return mission, we present electrostatic modelling for a real asteroid, Itokawa, for which detailed shape information is available, and verify that charging effects are likely to be significant at the terminator and at the edges of shadow regions for the Marco Polo baseline asteroid, 1999JU3. We also describe the Asteroid Charge Experiment electric field instrumentation intended for Marco Polo. Finally, we find that the differing asteroid and spacecraft potentials on landing could perturb sample collection for the short landing time of 20min that is currently planned.

  11. Anàlisi instrumental

    OpenAIRE

    Casas Sabata, Josep M. (Josep Maria)

    1994-01-01

    Conté: 2. Cromatografia i electroforesi Aquest text pretén donar una visió general de l'ampli camp dels mètodes instrumentals de separació aplicats al laboratori d'anàlis segons un concepte eminentment pràctic. S'ha dividit en cinc capítols temàtics: teoria de la cromatografia, cromatografia clàssica, cromatografia de gasos, cromatografia de líquids i electroforesi. Va destinat als estudiants d'enginyeria i de les facultats de ciències que dins el seu pla d'estudis incorporin la matèria d'...

  12. Forward Instrumentation for ILC Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, Halina; Afanaciev, Konstantin; Aguilar, Jonathan; Ambalathankandy, Prasoon; Bambade, Philip; Bergholz, Matthias; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Castro, Elena; Chelkov, Georgy; Coca, Cornelia; Daniluk, Witold; Dragone, Angelo; Dumitru, Laurentiu; Elsener, Konrad; Emeliantchik, Igor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Gostkin, Mikhail; Grah, Christian; Grzelak, Grzegorz; Haller, Gunter; Henschel, Hans; Ignatenko, Alexandr; Idzik, Marek; Ito, Kazutoshi; Jovin, Tatjana; Kielar, Eryk; Kotula, Jerzy; Krumstein, Zinovi; Kulis, Szymon; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Levy, Aharon; Moszczynski, Arkadiusz; Nauenberg, Uriel; Novgorodova, Olga; Ohlerich, Marin; Orlandea, Marius; Oleinik, Gleb; Oliwa, Krzysztof; Olshevski, Alexander; Pandurovic, Mila; Pawlik, Bogdan; Przyborowski, Dominik; Sato, Yutaro; Sadeh, Iftach; Sailer, Andre; Schmidt, Ringo; Schumm, Bruce; Schuwalow, Sergey; Smiljanic, Ivan; Swientek, Krzysztof; Takubo, Yosuke; Teodorescu, Eliza; Wierba, Wojciech; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Zawiejski, Leszek; Zhang, Jinlong

    2010-01-01

    Two special calorimeters are foreseen for the instrumentation of the very forward region of the ILC detector, a luminometer designed to measure the rate of low angle Bhabha scattering events with a precision better than 10-3 and a low polar angle calorimeter, adjacent to the beam-pipe. The latter will be hit by a large amount of beamstrahlung remnants. The amount and shape of these depositions will allow a fast luminosity estimate and the determination of beam parameters. The sensors of this calorimeter must be radiation hard. Both devices will improve the hermeticity of the detector in the search for new particles. Finely segmented and very compact calorimeters will match the requirements. Due to the high occupancy fast front-end electronics is needed. The design of the calorimeters developed and optimised with Monte Carlo simulations is presented. Sensors and readout electronics ASICs have been designed and prototypes are available. Results on the performance of these major components are summarised.

  13. Application of Fiber Optic Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, William Lance; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Ko, William L.; Piazza, Anthony; Chan, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optic sensing technology has emerged in recent years offering tremendous advantages over conventional aircraft instrumentation systems. The advantages of fiber optic sensors over their conventional counterparts are well established; they are lighter, smaller, and can provide enormous numbers of measurements at a fraction of the total sensor weight. After a brief overview of conventional and fiber-optic sensing technology, this paper presents an overview of the research that has been conducted at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in recent years to advance this promising new technology. Research and development areas include system and algorithm development, sensor characterization and attachment, and real-time experimentally-derived parameter monitoring for ground- and flight-based applications. The vision of fiber optic smart structure technology is presented and its potential benefits to aerospace vehicles throughout the lifecycle, from preliminary design to final retirement, are presented.

  14. Economic instruments for water management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Echeverría

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Problems related to water management in Costa Rica have an economic origin. Partly, as a consequence of a natural condition of water richness, as well as the concept of public service with fees that don´t promote neither investment nor efficiency of water resource use. Solutions must be targeted toward the economic conditions generating pollution, little efficiency, and lesser infiltration area. Water social cost regarding its use and pollution must be recognized and paid. The water user fee and pollution fee represent a step forward. A higher application of this kind of instruments will generate profit-benefit to the economy and might encourage the protection of the environment and natural resources.

  15. Indirect Instruments of Prudential Supervision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae Dardac

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The qualifying of supervision as “prudential” is used to differentiate it from other forms of supervision, which regards issues related to banking consumer protection. In order to achieve its goal, prudential supervision needs relevant information, provided mostly by the credit institutions their selves. Hence, the existence of a reporting system is essential, a system capable to insure, on the one hand, homogenity of the provided data and, on the other hand, its efficient processing. One indirect instrument which was used more and more during the last decade in banking supervision is represented by credit registers. The first system is directly associated either to the central bank or the supervision authority, and is, in most of cases, managed by the latter. The second system, the so called credit bureau, is mostly operated by private banks.

  16. The Choice of Innovation Policy Instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrás, Susana; Edquist, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the different types of instruments of innovation policy, to examine how governments and public agencies in different countries and different times have used these instruments differently, to explore the political nature of instrument choice and design (and...... associated issues), and to elaborate a set of criteria for the selection and design of the instruments in relation to the formulation of innovation policy. The article argues that innovation policy instruments must be designed and combined into mixes in ways that address the problems of the innovation system....... These mixes are often called “policy mix”. The problem-oriented nature of the design of instrument mixes is what makes innovation policy instruments ‘systemic’....

  17. Laparoscopic splenectomy using conventional instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalvi A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : Laparoscopic splenectomy (LS is an accepted procedure for elective splenectomy. Advancement in technology has extended the possibility of LS in massive splenomegaly [Choy et al., J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A 14(4, 197-200 (2004], trauma [Ren et al., Surg Endosc 15(3, 324 (2001; Mostafa et al., Surg Laparosc Endosc Percutan Tech 12(4, 283-286 (2002], and cirrhosis with portal hypertension [Hashizume et al., Hepatogastroenterology 49(45, 847-852 (2002]. In a developing country, these advanced gadgets may not be always available. We performed LS using conventional and reusable instruments in a public teaching the hospital without the use of the advanced technology. The technique of LS and the outcome in these patients is reported. MATERIALS AND METHODS : Patients undergoing LS for various hematological disorders from 1998 to 2004 were included. Electrocoagulation, clips, and intracorporeal knotting were the techniques used for tackling short-gastric vessels and splenic pedicle. Specimen was delivered through a Pfannensteil incision. RESULTS : A total of 26 patients underwent LS. Twenty-two (85% of patients had spleen size more than 500 g (average weight being 942.55 g. Mean operative time was 214 min (45-390 min. The conversion rate was 11.5% ( n = 3. Average duration of stay was 5.65 days (3-30 days. Accessory spleen was detected and successfully removed in two patients. One patient developed subphrenic abscess. There was no mortality. There was no recurrence of hematological disease. CONCLUSION : Laparoscopic splenectomy using conventional equipment and instruments is safe and effective. Advanced technology has a definite advantage but is not a deterrent to the practice of LS.

  18. MC and A instrumentation catalog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neymotin, L. [ed.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Sviridova, V. [ed.] [All-Russian Research Inst. of Automatics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1998-06-01

    In 1981 and 1985, two editions of a catalog of non-destructive nuclear measurement instrumentation, and material control and surveillance equipment, were published by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The last edition of the catalog included one hundred and twenty-five entries covering a wide range of devices developed in the US and abroad. More than ten years have elapsed since the publication of the more recent Catalog. Devices described in it have undergone significant modifications, and new devices have been developed. Therefore, in order to assist specialists in the field of Material Control and Accounting (MC and A), a new catalog has been created. Work on this instrumentation catalog started in 1997 as a cooperative effort of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), operated by Brookhaven Science Associates under contract to the US Department of Energy, and the All-Russian Research Institute of Automatics (VNIIA), subordinate institute of the Atomic Energy Ministry of the Russian Federation, within the collaborative US-Russia Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC and A) Program. Most of the equipment included in the Catalog are non-destructive assay (NDA) measurement devices employed for purposes of accounting, confirmation, and verification of nuclear materials. Other devices also included in the Catalog are employed in the detection and deterrence of unauthorized access to or removal of nuclear materials (material control: containment and surveillance). Equipment found in the Catalog comprises either: (1) complete devices or systems that can be used for MC and A applications; or (2) parts or components of complete systems, such as multi-channel analyzers, detectors, neutron generators, and software. All devices are categorized by their status of development--from prototype to serial production.

  19. Origins, transformations and key foci in instrumental genesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamborg, Andreas Lindenskov

    This paper investigates the origins of the instrumental genesis and instrumental orchestrations frameworks. This is done by reviewing instrumented activity situations, instrumental genesis, and instrumental orchestrations with the purpose of identifying their epistemological assumptions, what the...... and instrumental orchestrations have potential shortcomings since the technologies that currently exist in school contexts are rather different from the technologies instrumental genesis was originally developed to study....

  20. Origins, transformations and key foci in instrumental genesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamborg, Andreas Lindenskov

    This paper investigates the origins of the instrumental genesis and instrumental orchestrations frameworks. This is done by reviewing instrumented activity situations, instrumental genesis, and instrumental orchestrations with the purpose of identifying their epistemological assumptions, what the...... and instrumental orchestrations have potential shortcomings, since the technologies that currently exist in school contexts are rather different from the technologies instrumental genesis was originally developed to study....

  1. Building a framework for ergonomic research on laparoscopic instrument handles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Wang, Guohui; Tan, Juan; Sun, Xulong; Lin, Hao; Zhu, Shaihong

    2016-06-01

    Laparoscopic surgery carries the advantage of minimal invasiveness, but ergonomic design of the instruments used has progressed slowly. Previous studies have demonstrated that the handle of laparoscopic instruments is vital for both surgical performance and surgeon's health. This review provides an overview of the sub-discipline of handle ergonomics, including an evaluation framework, objective and subjective assessment systems, data collection and statistical analyses. Furthermore, a framework for ergonomic research on laparoscopic instrument handles is proposed to standardize work on instrument design. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Psychometric Adequacy of Three Selected Sex Role Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Judy C.

    The psychometric adequacy of three sex role instruments was determined by performing a factor analysis on the items in the Bem Sex Role Inventory, the Personal Attributes Questionnaire, and Heilbrun's Masculinity and Feminity Subscales. Subjects were 400 college students who responded to 116 bipolar items from the three instruments. The eleven…

  3. THOR Electric Field Instrument - EFI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Bale, Stuart D.; Rothkaehl, Hanna; Bonnell, John; Åhlen, Lennart; Vaivads, Andris; Lindqvist, Per-Arne; Ivchenko, Nickolay; Soucek, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission ever flown in space dedicated to plasma turbulence. The Electric Field Instrument (EFI) is to measure the electric field vector in the frequency range 0-200 kHz. EFI consists of two sets of sensors: Spin-plane Double Probes (EFI-SDP) providing high sensitivity DC electric field in the spacecraft spin plane (2D), and the High-Frequency Antenna (EFI-HFA) providing 3D electric field at frequencies above 1 kHz. EFI-SDP consists of 4 biased spherical probes extended on 50 m long wire booms, 90 degrees apart in the spin plane, giving a 100 m baseline for each of the two spin-plane electric field components. EFI-HFA consists of 6 x 1.25 m long monopoles, forming 3 dipolar antennas crossed at 90 degrees to each other. In addition to the sensors, EFI contains HFA and SDP pre-amplifiers, as well as bias electronics boards (BEBs) hosted in the man electronics box of the Field and Wave processor (FWP). As THOR spacecraft has a sun-pointing spin axis, EFI-SDP measures the electric field in the plane approximately orthogonal to the sun using long wire booms. The sun-pointing attitude greatly reduces errors due to wake effects and asymmetric photoelectron clouds, enabling the highly accurate in comparison to earlier missions ±0.1 mV/m near-DC electric field measurements. Interferometry using the electric field probes can be used to infer wavelengths and scale sizes at the smallest scales in the plasma. EFI also measures the floating potential of the satellite, which can be used to estimate the plasma density at very high time resolution (up to a few hundred Hz). The sun-pointing attitude greatly reduces changes in the illuminated area, and hence the associated spin-dependent errors. In combination with densities derived from the observed plasma frequency emission line, EFI monitors the plasma density from DC to a few hundred Hz. EFI measurements characterize electric field and density variations associated with kinetic

  4. Instruments for Students' Self Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela PUSCASU

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Having in mind that quality is realized at the level of main educational relationship, it is obviously understood that the first main way of evaluation, analysis of the quality is the school itself. Evaluation of education quality within "Mihai Viteazul" Combat Units Training School Piteşti, is based on three main processes: internal quality assurance, quality control and external quality evaluation. Taking into account evaluation as general method of evaluation and interpretation of the training process it was drawn up the Model of evaluation of educational quality at the school level. The way by which students' competences are formed, as they are presented in the "Graduate Model", is realized according to the standing operation Procedure which concerns students' evaluation. Changing the role of student from passive one to an active one within the training process, this becoming one who has equal rights within an educational relationship which is based on a "pedagogical contract", needs the improvement of self evaluation importance, this one becoming the main element of the evaluation strategy. The paper presents the main instruments of student's self evaluation that are used within tests in the 2006-2007 education year, the new Conception concerning development of the new educational curriculum in "Mihai Viteazul" Combat Units Training School of Piteşti. Having in mind that quality is realized at the level of main educational relationship, it is obviously understood that the first main way of evaluation, analysis of the quality is the school itself. Evaluation of education quality within "Mihai Viteazul" Combat Units Training School Pitesti, is based on three main processes: internal quality assurance, quality control and external quality evaluation. Taking into account evaluation as general method of evaluation and interpretation of the training process it was drawn up the Model of evaluation of educational quality at the

  5. Conduction cooled compact laser for chemcam instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, B.; Saccoccio, M.; Maurice, S.; Durand, E.; Derycke, C.

    2017-11-01

    A new conduction cooled compact laser for Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) on Mars is presented. The laser provides pulses with energy higher than 30mJ at 1μm of wavelength with a good spatial quality. Three development prototypes of this laser have been built and functional and environmental tests have been done. Then, the Qualification and Flight models have been developed and delivered. A spare model is now developed. This laser will be mounted on the ChemCam Instrument of the NASA mission MSL 2009. ChemCam Instrument is developed in collaboration between France (CESR and CNES) and USA (LANL). The goal of this Instrument is to study the chemical composition of Martian rocks. A laser source (subject of this presentation) emits a pulse which is focused by a telescope. It creates a luminous plasma on the rock; the light of this plasma is then analysed by three spectrometers to obtain information on the composition of the rock. The laser source is developed by the French company Thales Laser, with a technical support from CNES and CESR. This development is funded by CNES. The laser is compact, designed to work in burst mode. It doesn't require any active cooling.

  6. Bubble measuring instrument and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline-Schoder, Robert (Inventor); Magari, Patrick J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for a non-invasive bubble measuring instrument operable for detecting, distinguishing, and counting gaseous embolisms such as bubbles over a selectable range of bubble sizes of interest. A selected measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected is insonified by two distinct frequencies from a pump transducer and an image transducer, respectively. The image transducer frequency is much higher than the pump transducer frequency. The relatively low-frequency pump signal is used to excite bubbles to resonate at a frequency related to their diameter. The image transducer is operated in a pulse-echo mode at a controllable repetition rate that transmits bursts of high-frequency ultrasonic signal to the measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected and then receives the echo. From the echo or received signal, a beat signal related to the repetition rate may be extracted and used to indicate the presence or absence of a resonant bubble. In a preferred embodiment, software control maintains the beat signal at a preselected frequency while varying the pump transducer frequency to excite bubbles of different diameters to resonate depending on the range of bubble diameters selected for investigation.

  7. Instrumentation, Control, and Intelligent Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-09-01

    Abundant and affordable energy is required for U.S. economic stability and national security. Advanced nuclear power plants offer the best near-term potential to generate abundant, affordable, and sustainable electricity and hydrogen without appreciable generation of greenhouse gases. To that end, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been charged with leading the revitalization of nuclear power in the U.S. The INL vision is to become the preeminent nuclear energy laboratory with synergistic, world-class, multi-program capabilities and partnerships by 2015. The vision focuses on four essential destinations: (1) Be the preeminent internationally-recognized nuclear energy research, development, and demonstration laboratory; (2) Be a major center for national security technology development and demonstration; (3) Be a multi-program national laboratory with world-class capabilities; (4) Foster academic, industry, government, and international collaborations to produce the needed investment, programs, and expertise. Crucial to that effort is the inclusion of research in advanced instrumentation, control, and intelligent systems (ICIS) for use in current and advanced power and energy security systems to enable increased performance, reliability, security, and safety. For nuclear energy plants, ICIS will extend the lifetime of power plant systems, increase performance and power output, and ensure reliable operation within the system's safety margin; for national security applications, ICIS will enable increased protection of our nation's critical infrastructure. In general, ICIS will cost-effectively increase performance for all energy security systems.

  8. Hydrologic research on instrumented watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Luna Bergere

    1970-01-01

    The successful research man is the one who asks himself the right question. Research must go on primarily in the mind and only secondarily in the physical and biological world. It is only too easy to confuse the choice of a proper tool and the choice of a proper question. Some tools are quite unsuited to certain questions and some questions cannot be answered without the appropriate tool.There has been in recent years a large amount of discussion about whether the high costs and the extensive time period required for experimental watershed* research is really worth the investment. Recent discussions of this matter have cited as major criticisms of the instrumented basin that they are expensive, they leak water, they are unrepresentative, they produce changes too small for detection, and it is difficult to transfer the results. (See Hewlett, Lull, and Reinhart, 1969.) These are all questions worth talking about, but in one sense they tend to obscure the main issue. The main issue is what do we want to learn? If we can decide what it is we want to know, then we can logically ask ourselves what is the best way of going about obtaining that knowledge. It is in this context that we are most likely to place the experimental watershed in a useful and logical position in a classification of research methods.

  9. LISA Pathfinder Instrument Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Felipe

    2010-01-01

    LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is an ESA-launched demonstration mission of key technologies required for the joint NASA-ESA gravitational wave observatory in space, LISA. As part of the LPF interferometry investigations, analytic models of noise sources and corresponding noise subtraction techniques have been developed to correct for effects like the coupling of test mass jitter into displacement readout, and fluctuations of the laser frequency or optical pathlength difference. Ground testing of pre-flight hardware of the Optical Metrology subsystem is currently ongoing at the Albert Einstein Institute Hannover. In collaboration with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, the LPF mission data analysis tool LTPDA is being used to analyze the data product of these tests. Furthermore, the noise subtraction techniques and in-flight experiment runs for noise characterization are being defined as part of the mission experiment master plan. We will present the data analysis outcome of preflight hardware ground tests and possible noise subtraction strategies for in-flight instrument operations.

  10. The Juno Gravity Science Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmar, Sami W.; Bolton, Scott J.; Buccino, Dustin R.; Cornish, Timothy P.; Folkner, William M.; Formaro, Roberto; Iess, Luciano; Jongeling, Andre P.; Lewis, Dorothy K.; Mittskus, Anthony P.; Mukai, Ryan; Simone, Lorenzo

    2017-11-01

    The Juno mission's primary science objectives include the investigation of Jupiter interior structure via the determination of its gravitational field. Juno will provide more accurate determination of Jupiter's gravity harmonics that will provide new constraints on interior structure models. Juno will also measure the gravitational response from tides raised on Jupiter by Galilean satellites. This is accomplished by utilizing Gravity Science instrumentation to support measurements of the Doppler shift of the Juno radio signal by NASA's Deep Space Network at two radio frequencies. The Doppler data measure the changes in the spacecraft velocity in the direction to Earth caused by the Jupiter gravity field. Doppler measurements at X-band (˜ 8 GHz) are supported by the spacecraft telecommunications subsystem for command and telemetry and are used for spacecraft navigation as well as Gravity Science. The spacecraft also includes a Ka-band (˜ 32 GHz) translator and amplifier specifically for the Gravity Science investigation contributed by the Italian Space Agency. The use of two radio frequencies allows for improved accuracy by removal of noise due to charged particles along the radio signal path.

  11. Comet coma sample return instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albee, A. L.; Brownlee, Don E.; Burnett, Donald S.; Tsou, Peter; Uesugi, K. T.

    1994-01-01

    The sample collection technology and instrument concept for the Sample of Comet Coma Earth Return Mission (SOCCER) are described. The scientific goals of this Flyby Sample Return are to return to coma dust and volatile samples from a known comet source, which will permit accurate elemental and isotopic measurements for thousands of individual solid particles and volatiles, detailed analysis of the dust structure, morphology, and mineralogy of the intact samples, and identification of the biogenic elements or compounds in the solid and volatile samples. Having these intact samples, morphologic, petrographic, and phase structural features can be determined. Information on dust particle size, shape, and density can be ascertained by analyzing penetration holes and tracks in the capture medium. Time and spatial data of dust capture will provide understanding of the flux dynamics of the coma and the jets. Additional information will include the identification of cosmic ray tracks in the cometary grains, which can provide a particle's process history and perhaps even the age of the comet. The measurements will be made with the same equipment used for studying micrometeorites for decades past; hence, the results can be directly compared without extrapolation or modification. The data will provide a powerful and direct technique for comparing the cometary samples with all known types of meteorites and interplanetary dust. This sample collection system will provide the first sample return from a specifically identified primitive body and will allow, for the first time, a direct method of matching meteoritic materials captured on Earth with known parent bodies.

  12. European Languages: Instruments and Symbols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Ožbot

    2008-07-01

    Further, the role of Latin as the single most important European language over the centuries and as a unifying feature of European culture is discussed. Parallels are drawn between Latin as the historical European lingua franca on the one hand and English as the modern language of international communication on the other: the importance of both languages started growing after substantial territorial expansion of their speakers and it was especially the political and economic power associated to these languages that played a significant role in their diffusion and long-term influence. Taking into consideration the instrumental as well as the symbolic function of languages, the question about the relationship between English and other European languages in today’s Europe is dealt with; it is suggested that the European languages are in principle not endangered as a result of the spread of English, with the exception of those instances in which English has been taking over the functions they have traditionally performed as national or community languages. It is emphasized that the future of Europe lies in the promotion of biand multilingualism, which have, in actual fact, been present on this continent throughout its history, and which in the cases of some European languages (e.g. Catalan, Basque, Irish, etc. have been successfully enhanced over the past decades.

  13. Attention is necessary for subliminal instrumental conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastropasqua, Tommaso; Turatto, Massimo

    2015-08-10

    The capacity of humans and other animals to provide appropriate responses to stimuli anticipating motivationally significant events is exemplified by instrumental conditioning. Interestingly, in humans instrumental conditioning can occur also for subliminal outcome-predicting stimuli. However, it remains unclear whether attention is necessary for subliminal instrumental conditioning to take place. In two experiments, human participants had to learn to collect rewards (monetary gains) while avoiding punishments (monetary losses), on the basis of subliminal outcome-predicting cues. We found that instrumental conditioning can proceed subconsciously only if spatial attention is aligned with the subliminal cue. Conversely, if spatial attention is briefly diverted from the subliminal cue, then instrumental conditioning is blocked. In humans, attention but not awareness is therefore mandatory for instrumental conditioning, thus revealing a dissociation between awareness and attention in the control of motivated behavior.

  14. Optimising the effect of policy instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Branth; Nielsen, Helle Ørsted; Christensen, Tove

    2012-01-01

    Economic modelling generally assumes that businesses are profit maximisers. However, behavioural economics holds that businesses pursue multiple objectives and may even sacrifice some profit. This has implications for the effectiveness of incentive-based environmental policies. Using Danish farmers...... to policy instruments; farmers who focus on yield indicate less responsiveness to economic policy instruments. The results imply that it is important to implement a broad array of policy instruments to match different farmer rationales....

  15. Recent Topics in Instrumentation and Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Kazuo; Watanabe, Hironori; Kodaira, Kazuaki; Matsumura, Taiyo

    Instrumentation and measurement play a vital role in research and development in the science and engineering fields. Recently, the goals of instrumentation and measurement have expanded to meet not only the industrial and science requirements but also the needs in all fields of social life, such as medicine and welfare, the environment, and disaster and security. In this article, recent technical topics in the instrumentation and measurement field are reported.

  16. MAGNETIC GRADIOMETRY: Instrumentation, Calibration and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merayo, Jose Maria Garcia

    independent Compact Spherical Coil (CSC) sensors are set up on an optical bench at a distance of 60cm. Each of the magnetometers is calibrated separately and has an absolute accuracy better than 0.2nT. The controlling electronics has been designed with space specifications and the same instrumentation....... GRADSAT, two 20km separated magnetic instrumented satellites, combines state-of-the-art technology with advanced instrumentation to produce world class science....

  17. Quantitative field spectroscopic measurement instrumentation and techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Schaepman, Michael E.; Dangel, Stefan; Kneubühler, Mathias; Schläpfer, Daniel; Bojinski, Stephan; Brazile, Jason; Kötz, Benjamin; Strub, Gabriela; Kohler, R.; POPP C; Schopfer, Jürg; Klaus I. Itten

    2002-01-01

    Over the past few years imaging spectrometer have increased in number and quality significantly. Directly correlated to this growth, is the need of (near-) simultaneous field work with non-imaging spectroradiometers. Due to severe constraints in technology requirements for these field instruments (portability, power supply, etc.), reliable portable instruments have become available later than their imaging correspondents. The systematic use of a large variety of ground instruments from their ...

  18. Monophonic Instrument Playing Practice System Prototype

    OpenAIRE

    Haarahiltunen, Mika

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the project was to develop a prototype of a system that could be used for practicing the playing of breath instruments, such as flutes or saxophones. However, during the development process, the emphasis shifted from a breath instrument specific design towards a more generic design that could be used with any monophonic instrument. The development of the prototype included studying existing solutions, specifying the functional requirements and finally implementing the prototype. T...

  19. Validation of the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument

    OpenAIRE

    Heritage, Brody; Pollock, Clare; Roberts, Lynne

    2014-01-01

    Organizational culture is a commonly studied area in industrial/organizational psychology due to its important role in workplace behaviour, cognitions, and outcomes. Jung et al.'s [1] review of the psychometric properties of organizational culture measurement instruments noted many instruments have limited validation data despite frequent use in both theoretical and applied situations. The Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) has had conflicting data regarding its psychometric ...

  20. Radon-Nikodym derivatives of quantum instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holevo, A. S.

    1998-03-01

    A convenient representation for Radon-Nikodym derivatives of completely positive (c.p.) instruments on B(H) with respect to a scalar measure is suggested, similar to the Stinespring-Kraus representation for c.p. maps, but involving possibly nonclosable unbounded operators. The structure of covariant c.p. instruments is studied in detail. In particular, an exhaustive description is given to instruments covariant with respect to shifts or rotations, corresponding to "position" or "angle" measurements.

  1. Cognitive instruments in mathematical thinking summary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Magally Corredor de Porras

    2011-01-01

    Based on the Genetic Epistemology of Piaget, according to which the main problem is the construction of thoughts by individuals, this researchpaper examines the cognitive instruments that facilitate...

  2. Millimeter-wave Instrumentation Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Millimeter-wave Instrumentation Test Facility conducts basic research in propagation phenomena, remote sensing, and target signatures. The facility has a breadth...

  3. LESSER KNOWN MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS IN KOSOVO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rešad Fazli

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the author presented the instruments that were originated in this region, as well as those instruments that are brought from other regions, and became deeply carved into the tradition and culture of the local people, that they feel as their own. Some of these instruments are kept only here in this region, and they are not used anymore in the area they originated from. This paper also covers instruments that are rarely used or completely lost in this region.

  4. Instruments for subsurface monitoring of geothermal subsidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Rourke, J.E.; Ranson, B.B.

    1979-07-01

    The requirements for a subsurface geothermal subsidence instrument were reviewed. Available instruments for monitoring subsurface displacements, both vertical and horizontal, were studied and the most capable instruments identified. Techniques and materials for improving existing or developing new instruments were evaluated. Elements of sensor and signal technology with potential for high temperature monitoring of subsidence were identified. Drawing from these studies, methods to adapt production wells for monitoring were proposed and several new instrumentation systems were conceptually designed. Finally, four instrumentation systems were selected for future development. These systems are: triple sensor induction sensor probe (with casing collar markers); triple sensor gamma ray detector probe (with radioactive markers); triple sensor reed switch probe (with magnet markers); and triple sensor oscillator-type magnet detector probe (with magnet markers). All are designed for use in well casing incorporating slip couplings or bellows sections, although the gamma ray detector probe may also be used in unlined holes. These systems all measure vertical moement. Instruments to measure horizontal displacement due to geothermal subsidence were studied and the required instrument performance was judged to be beyond the state-of-the-art. Thus, no conceptual designs for instruments to monitor horizontal movement are included.

  5. [What's new in instrumental dermatology?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amici, J-M

    2014-12-01

    This "What's new in instrumental dermatology" focuses on cutaneous oncologic surgery, base on a review of the 2012-2014 literature. First, the ability of dermatologists to make a good "oncologic reading of tumors" is the key of radical surgical treatment. Advantages and disadvantages of the biopsy are discussed. Then, the second message is the management of anticoagulants, that should not be interrupted for skin surgery. Despite recommendations, this practice is not followed in 40% of cases; this point is critical because bleeding complications are minor compared to potential morbidity of thrombotic events when stopping these medications. Regarding infection, nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus is identified as a risk factor for wound infection. A preoperative shower with chlorhexidine and mupirocin topical decolonization of nostril reduces this risk. Surgical techniques are trying to reach minimalism, by reducing undermining and scarring. On the trunk, using deep slow resorbable sutures improve scarring. In addition using adhesive sutures (strip) reduce the wideness of scar. On the face, the lower third of the nose is the most challenging because of the free edges, which are deformable. In this location bilobed or trilobed transposition flap offer the advantage of remaining in the nasal aesthetic unit and not disturbing the free edges of the nasal orifices. Regarding scarring, early hypertrophic scar is now well defined and linked with transposition flaps of the nasal region. An early treatment with intralesional corticosteroid injection appears to be effective. Finally, the biological mechanism of the effectiveness of compression in the prevention and treatment of dystrophic scar is now clear. The mechanotransduction explain how a mechanical stress of the skin activates biological cell pathways, which regulate the quality of collagen synthesis and the arrangement of skin fibrosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Gender Differences in Musical Instrument Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallam, Susan; Rogers, Lynne; Creech, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Historically, there have been differences in the musical instruments played by boys and girls, with girls preferring smaller, higher-pitched instruments. This article explores whether these gender preferences have continued at a time when there is greater gender equality in most aspects of life in the UK. Data were collected from the 150 Music…

  7. Quality assessment of occupational health services instruments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, F. J.; de Kort, W. L.; Verbeek, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    Interest in the quality of instruments for occupational health services is growing as a result of European legislation on preventive services stressing, for example, risk identification and assessment. The quality of the services can be enhanced when the quality of the applied instruments can be

  8. Pressure ulcer assessment instruments: a critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodbury, M G; Houghton, P E; Campbell, K E; Keast, D H

    1999-05-01

    Numerous evaluation tools have been developed to document various aspects of wound status or appearance of pressure ulcers. These include the Pressure Sore Status Tool (PSST), Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH Tool), Sussman Wound Healing Tool (SWHT), Sessing scale, and the Wound Healing Scale (WHS). A critical appraisal of the literature was undertaken to examine the purpose and methods for the development of each instrument, the extent to which the instruments have been validated to date, the practicality of their use, and the work that remains to be done to establish their suitability for clinical and/or research purposes. All of these instruments have been developed to describe and evaluate change in pressure ulcer status over time with the exception of the WHS, which was developed as an alternative to reverse staging. More of the validation parameters have been addressed for the PSST and the Sessing scale than for the PUSH Tool, the SWHT, and the WHS. All of the instruments can be completed within approximately 5 minutes except the PSST, which requires 10 to 15 minutes to complete. For all instruments, experience with wounds and training in the use of the instrument are required to improve reliability. For each of the measurement instruments, suggestions are made that would complete necessary validation procedures and thus prepare the instruments for clinical and/or research purposes.

  9. Temporal integration and instrumental conditioned reinforcement

    OpenAIRE

    Thrailkill, Eric A.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    Stimuli associated with primary reinforcement for instrumental behavior are widely believed to acquire the capacity to function as conditioned reinforcers via Pavlovian conditioning. Some Pavlovian conditioning studies suggest that animals learn the important temporal relations between stimuli and integrate such temporal information over separate experiences to form a temporal map. The present experiment examined whether Pavlovian conditioning can establish a positive instrumental conditioned...

  10. An instrumental approach to deception in bargaining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Lukas Frederik

    2011-01-01

    Deception is often described as a form of unethical behavior, yet it is frequently used in bargaining. This raises the question why people use deception in bargaining. In this dissertation an instrumental approach to deception is presented to help answer this question. In an instrumental approach,

  11. Adaptive Instruments for Students with Physical Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Alice-Ann

    2012-01-01

    The main adaptations that will be made for music students with physical disabilities are those that make the classroom accessible and those that make classroom instruments accessible. There are a number of principles to guide one when selecting instruments for students with physical disabilities. These principles can assist one in determining the…

  12. Measuring the instrument function of radiometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winston, R. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Littlejohn, R.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The instrument function is a function of position and angle, the knowledge of which allows one to compute the response of a radiometer to an incident wave field in any state of coherence. The instrument function of a given radiometer need not be calculated; instead, it may be measured by calibration with incident plane waves.

  13. Musical instruments from the Mayan culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizo, Isabel Elena Romero; Redondo, Jose de Jesus Negrete; Paulin, Pablo Roberto Lizana

    2002-11-01

    This research work presents different kinds of sound generation instruments from the Mayan culture together with the Pablo Castellanos and Arturo Chamorro classification. It has to be noted that most of these musical instruments, whistles and noise generators are lost and some of them can only be seen on codex and museums. (To be presented in Spanish.)

  14. Layout and packaging of the MOPITT instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, John P.; Caldwell, Dwight; Drummond, James R.; Colley, Roger

    2002-02-01

    The Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere (MOPITT) instrument is one of five instruments flying on NASA's Terra (formerly EOS-AM1) spacecraft that was launched in December 1999. This paper describes the MOPITT instrument mechanical configuration and how it was derived based on system considerations and spacecraft interfaces. These system level considerations include contamination control, EMC/EMI, thermal, optical and structural behavior. The key spacecraft interfaces include mechanical mounting, optical field-of-view (FOV), and thermal transfer. In addition, a detailed discussion is provided for the cryogenic region of the instrument that contains detectors, cold optics, warm optics, and active coolers. Special test fixtures were designed and incorporated in this region of the instrument to permit cooling of the detectors during ambient atmospheric conditions. Some of these test fixtures were designed to fly due to the difficulty in removing them. This utility of operating the instrument's cryogenic detectors within the laboratory environment was extremely beneficial during the instrument optical alignment, EMC testing, and special optical system tests. Final configuring (or closeout) of the instrument's cryogenic region for flight was performed to balance contamination and EMC risks. On-orbit data about the effectiveness of this closeout is provided.

  15. 49 CFR 572.77 - Instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Instrumentation. (a)(1) Test probe. For the head, thorax, and knee impact test, use a test probe that is rigid, of... thorax assembly may be instrumented either with a Type A or Type B accelerometer. (i) Type A... acceleration Class 60 Thorax acceleration Class 180 Femur-force Class 600 The mountings for sensing devices...

  16. 32 CFR 22.610 - Award instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Award instruments. 22.610 Section 22.610 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS DoD GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS-AWARD AND ADMINISTRATION Award § 22.610 Award instruments. (a) Each...

  17. Why Do They Choose Their Instruments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantero, Irene Martínez; Jauset-Berrocal, Jordi-Angel

    2017-01-01

    Motivation is a key word in the arts and, especially, in music since it conveys collective, as well as individual, feelings. The beginning of musical instrument learning should be based on the student's musical interest but, due to the casual and improvised nature of everyday situations in which the choice of a musical instrument takes place, tend…

  18. New Scientific Instruments Manufactured by Shimadzu Corporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhomlinov, A.B.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The review of new models of scientific instruments manufactured by Japanese corporation SHIMADZU has been made. Lliquid and gas chromatographs, mass spectrometers, LCMS and GCMS, IR range spectrophotometer, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometers, particle size analyzer, micro hardness tester have been considered. The special attention has been paid to extention of analytical possibilities related to technical features of instruments.

  19. The Choice of Innovation Policy Instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrás, Susana; Edquist, Charles

    associated issues), and to elaborate a set of criteria for the selection and design of the instruments in relation to the formulation of innovation policy. The article argues that innovation policy instruments must be designed and combined into mixes in ways that address the problems of the innovation system...

  20. INSTRUMENTALISM IN SCIENCE: COMMENTS AND CRITICISMS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    (462, 542) suggest. As earlier observed, instrumentalism relates closely to pragmatism. And this methodological viewpoint often contrasts with scientific realism, which defines theories as specially being more or less true. However, instrumentalism is more of a pragmatic approach to science, information and theories than an.

  1. A test instrument for palliative care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriaansen, M.J.M.; Achterberg, T. van

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a methodological study concerning the development of a test instrument that can be used for measuring the effects of a course in palliative care on registered nurses and licensed practical nurses. This test instrument is comprised of two parts: an expertise and insight test

  2. 47 CFR 73.688 - Indicating instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... instrument is the transmission line meter used for determining the output power by the direct method, the... without the transmission line meter. (2) If conditions beyond the control of the licensee prevent the... instruments as are necessary for the proper adjustment, operation, and maintenance of the visual transmitting...

  3. 76 FR 1063 - Modifications of Debt Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-07

    ... debt instrument will be recharacterized as an instrument or property right that is not debt. The... the addition or deletion of a co-obligor, all relevant factors (for example, creditor rights or... Administration for comment on its impact on small business. Drafting Information The principal author of these...

  4. The 4MOST instrument concept overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haynes, Roger; Barden, Samuel; de Jong, Roelof; Schnurr, Olivier; Bellido, Olga; Walcher, Jakob; Haynes, Dionne; Winkler, Roland; Bauer, Svend-Marian; Dionies, Frank; Saviauk, Allar; Chiappini, Cristina; Schwope, Axel; Brynnel, Joar; Steinmetz, Matthias; McMahon, Richard; Feltzing, Sofia; Francois, Patrick; Trager, Scott; Parry, Ian; Irwin, Mike; Walton, Nicholas; King, David; Sun, David; Gonzalez-Solares, Eduaro; Tosh, Ian; Dalton, Gavin; Middleton, Kevin; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Jagourel, Pascal; Mignot, Shan; Cohen, Mathieu; Amans, Jean-Philippe; Royer, Frederic; Sartoretti, Paola; Pragt, Johan; Gerlofsma, Gerrit; Roelfsema, Ronald; Navarro, Ramon; Thimm, Guido; Seifert, Walter; Christlieb, Norbert; Mandel, Holger; Trifonov, Trifon; Xu, Wenli; Lang-Bardl, Florian; Muschielok, Bernard; Schlichter, Jörg; Hess, Hans-Joachim; Grupp, Frank; Boehringer, Hans; Boller, Thomas; Dwelly, Tom; Bender, Ralf; Rosati, Piero; Iwert, Olaf; Finger, Gert; Lizon L'Allemand, Jean-Louis; Saunders, Will; Sheinis, Andrew; Frost, Gabriella; Farrell, Tony; Waller, Lewis; Depagne, Eric; Laurent, Florence; Caillier, Patrick; Kosmalski, Johan; Richard, Johan; Bacon, Roland; Ansorge, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The 4MOST[1] instrument is a concept for a wide-field, fibre-fed high multiplex spectroscopic instrument facility on the ESO VISTA telescope designed to perform a massive (initially >25x106 spectra in 5 years) combined all-sky public survey. The main science drivers are: Gaia follow up of

  5. Guitar as the Preferred Musical Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelayo, Jose Maria G., III; Mallari, Shedy Dee C.; Pelayo, Jose Juancho S.

    2015-01-01

    The Guitar is a very popular instrument that is commonly used by many musicians. This study focused on the factors that made the guitar more appealing to the youth in comparison to other instruments. A semi structured, open ended questionnaire was used to collect the data essential for this study. 50 male and 50 female college students were…

  6. Instrumentally Rational Myopic Planning | Andreou | Philosophical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    I challenge the view that, in cases where time for deliberation is not an issue, instrumental rationality precludes myopic planning. I show where there is room for instrumentally rational myopic planning, and then argue that such planning is possible not only in theory, it is something human beings can and do engage in.

  7. The Treatment Validity of Autism Screening Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livanis, Andrew; Mouzakitis, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Treatment validity is a frequently neglected topic of screening instruments used to identify autism spectrum disorders. Treatment validity, however, should represent an important aspect of these instruments to link the resulting data to the selection of interventions as well as make decisions about treatment length and intensity. Research…

  8. 40 CFR 201.22 - Measurement instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Measurement instrumentation. 201.22 Section 201.22 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT... Criteria § 201.22 Measurement instrumentation. (a) A sound level meter or alternate sound level measurement...

  9. DARE: a dedicated aerosols retrieval instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Court, A.J.; Smorenburg, K.; Courrèges-Lacoste, G.B.; Visser, H.; Leeuw, G. de; Decae, R.

    2004-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing of aerosols is a largely unresolved problem. A dedicated instrument aimed at aerosols would be able to reduce the large uncertainties connected to this kind of remote sensing. TNO is performing a study of a space based instrument for aerosol measurements, together with the

  10. The nonlinear physics of musical instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, N. H.

    1999-05-01

    Musical instruments are often thought of as linear harmonic systems, and a first-order description of their operation can indeed be given on this basis, once we recognise a few inharmonic exceptions such as drums and bells. A closer examination, however, shows that the reality is very different from this. Sustained-tone instruments, such as violins, flutes and trumpets, have resonators that are only approximately harmonic, and their operation and harmonic sound spectrum both rely upon the extreme nonlinearity of their driving mechanisms. Such instruments might be described as `essentially nonlinear'. In impulsively excited instruments, such as pianos, guitars, gongs and cymbals, however, the nonlinearity is `incidental', although it may produce striking aural results, including transitions to chaotic behaviour. This paper reviews the basic physics of a wide variety of musical instruments and investigates the role of nonlinearity in their operation.

  11. Instrumental Divergence and the Value of Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Prachi; Liljeholm, Mimi

    2016-11-04

    A critical aspect of flexible choice is that alternative actions yield distinct consequences: Only when available action alternatives produce distinct outcome states does discrimination and selection between actions allow an agent to flexibly obtain the currently most desired outcome. Here, we use instrumental divergence - the degree to which alternative actions differ with respect to their outcome probability distributions - as an index of flexible instrumental control, and assess the influence of this novel decision variable on choice preference. In Experiment 1, when other decision variables, such as expected value and outcome entropy, were held constant, we found a significant preference for high instrumental divergence. In Experiment 2, we used an "auto- vs. self-play" manipulation to eliminate outcome diversity as a source of behavioral preferences, and to contrast flexible instrumental control with the complete absence of voluntary choice. Our results suggest that flexible instrumental control over decision outcomes may have intrinsic value.

  12. Endotoxins in surgical instruments of hip arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vania Regina Goveia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To investigate endotoxins in sterilized surgical instruments used in hip arthroplasties. METHOD A descriptive exploratory study conducted in a public teaching hospital. Six types of surgical instruments were selected, namely: acetabulum rasp, femoral rasp, femoral head remover, chisel box, flexible bone reamer and femoral head test. The selection was based on the analysis of the difficulty in removing bone and blood residues during cleaning. The sample was made up of 60 surgical instruments, which were tested for endotoxins in three different stages. The EndosafeTM Gel-Clot LAL (Limulus Amebocyte Lysate method was used. RESULT There was consistent gel formation with positive analysis in eight instruments, corresponding to 13.3%, being four femoral rasps and four bone reamers. CONCLUSION Endotoxins in quantity ≥0.125 UE/mL were detected in 13.3% of the instruments tested.

  13. An Overview of Particulate Matter Measurement Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Simões Amaral

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review article presents an overview of instruments available on the market for measurement of particulate matter. The main instruments and methods of measuring concentration (gravimetric, optical, and microbalance and size distribution Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS, Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI, and others were described and compared. The aim of this work was to help researchers choose the most suitable equipment to measure particulate matter. When choosing a measuring instrument, a researcher must clearly define the purpose of the study and determine whether it meets the main specifications of the equipment. ELPI and SMPS are the suitable devices for measuring fine particles; the ELPI works in real time. In health-related studies, a Diffusion Charger is the instrument that best characterizes the surface of ultrafine particles. Several methods and different particle measuring instruments should be used to confirm the values obtained during sampling.

  14. The development of an instrument to assess chemistry perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Raymond R.

    The instrument, developed in this study, attempted to correct the deficiencies of previous instruments. Statements of belief and opinion can be validly included under the construct of chemistry perceptions. Further, statements that might be better characterized as science attitudes, math attitudes, or attitudes toward a specific course or program were not included. Eliminating statements of math anxiety and test anxiety insured that responses to statements of anxiety were perceptions of anxiety solely related to chemistry. The results of the expert judges' responses to the Validation of Proposed Perception Statements forms were detailed to establish construct and content validity. The nature of Likert scale construction and calculation of internal consistency also supported the validity of the instrument. A pilot Chemistry Perception Questionnaire (CPQ) was then constructed based on agreement of the appropriate subscale and mean importance of the perception statements. The pilot CPQ results were subjected to an item analysis based on three sets of statistics: the frequency of each response and the percentage of respondents making each response for each perception statement, the mean and standard deviations for each item, and the item discrimination index which correlated the item scores with the subscale scores. With no zero or negative correlations to the subscale scores, it was not necessary to replace any of the perception statements contained in the pilot instrument. Therefore, the piloted Chemistry Perception Questionnaire became the final instrument. Factor analysis confirmed the multidimensionality of the instrument. The instrument was administered twice with a separation interval of approximately one month in order to perform a test-retest reliability analysis. One hundred and forty-one pairs were matched and results detailed. The correlation between forms, for the total instrument, was 0.9342. The mean coefficient alpha, for the total instrument, was 0

  15. Sample Analysis at Mars Instrument Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benna, Mehdi; Nolan, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars Instrument Simulator (SAMSIM) is a numerical model dedicated to plan and validate operations of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on the surface of Mars. The SAM instrument suite, currently operating on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), is an analytical laboratory designed to investigate the chemical and isotopic composition of the atmosphere and volatiles extracted from solid samples. SAMSIM was developed using Matlab and Simulink libraries of MathWorks Inc. to provide MSL mission planners with accurate predictions of the instrument electrical, thermal, mechanical, and fluid responses to scripted commands. This tool is a first example of a multi-purpose, full-scale numerical modeling of a flight instrument with the purpose of supplementing or even eliminating entirely the need for a hardware engineer model during instrument development and operation. SAMSIM simulates the complex interactions that occur between the instrument Command and Data Handling unit (C&DH) and all subsystems during the execution of experiment sequences. A typical SAM experiment takes many hours to complete and involves hundreds of components. During the simulation, the electrical, mechanical, thermal, and gas dynamics states of each hardware component are accurately modeled and propagated within the simulation environment at faster than real time. This allows the simulation, in just a few minutes, of experiment sequences that takes many hours to execute on the real instrument. The SAMSIM model is divided into five distinct but interacting modules: software, mechanical, thermal, gas flow, and electrical modules. The software module simulates the instrument C&DH by executing a customized version of the instrument flight software in a Matlab environment. The inputs and outputs to this synthetic C&DH are mapped to virtual sensors and command lines that mimic in their structure and connectivity the layout of the instrument harnesses. This module executes

  16. Aquarius Instrument and Salinity Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vine, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    Aquarius has been designed to map the surface salinity field of the global ocean from space a parameter important for understanding ocean circulation and its relationship to climate and the global water cycle. Salinity is measured remotely from space by measuring the thermal emission from the ocean surface. This is done at the low frequency end of the microwave spectrum (e.g. 1.4 GHz) where the emission is sufficiently sensitive to changes in salinity to be detected with sophisticated radiometers. The goal is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean by providing maps on a monthly basis with a spatial resolution of 150 km and an accuracy of 0.2 psu. These are challenging requirements that have led to some unique features of the instrument. These include: a) The addition of a co-located scatterometer to help provide a correction for roughness; b) The addition of a polarimetric channel (third Stokes parameter) to the radiometer to help correct for Faraday rotation; c) Asun-synchronous orbit with a 6 pm ascending equatorial crossing to minimize Faraday rotation and with the antennas looking away from the sun toward the nighttime side to minimize contamination by radiation from the sun; and d) An antenna designed to limit side lobes in the direction of rays from the sun. In addition, achieving the accuracy goal of 0.2 psu requires averaging over one month and to do this requires a highly stable radiometer. Aquarius has three separate radiometers that image in pushbroom fashion with the three antenna beams looking across track. The antenna is a 2.5-m diameter, offset parabolic reflector with three feed horns and the three beams are arranged to image with the boresight aligned to look across track, roughly perpendicular to the spacecraft heading and pointing away from the Sun. The three beams point at angles of theta = 25.8 deg., 33.8 deg. and 40.3 deg. with respect to the spacecraft

  17. Intraoral Pressure in Ethnic Wind Instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Goss, Clinton F

    2013-01-01

    High intraoral pressure generated when playing some wind instruments has been linked to a variety of health issues. Prior research has focused on Western classical instruments, but no work has been published on ethnic wind instruments. This study measured intraoral pressure when playing six classes of ethnic wind instruments (N = 149): Native American flutes (n = 71) and smaller samples of ethnic duct flutes, reed instruments, reedpipes, overtone whistles, and overtone flutes. Results are presented in the context of a survey of prior studies, providing a composite view of the intraoral pressure requirements of a broad range of wind instruments. Mean intraoral pressure was 8.37 mBar across all ethnic wind instruments and 5.21 +/- 2.16 mBar for Native American flutes. The range of pressure in Native American flutes closely matches pressure reported in other studies for normal speech, and the maximum intraoral pressure, 20.55 mBar, is below the highest subglottal pressure reported in other studies during singing...

  18. How To Control Color Appearance With Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Margaret E.

    1980-05-01

    Colorimetry, as defined by the International Commission on Illumination, is the measurement of colors, made possible by the properties of the eye and based on a set of conventions. Instrumentation for measuring object color, therefore, must be based on a human observer. The intent is to design an instrument that in effect responds as a person would, so that research development, production control and quality control areas have some means of assessing the acceptability of the appearance of a product. Investigations of a human observer's psychological response to color, and the manner in which visual observations are made, give the instrument designer and manufacturer data necessary to answer two questions: a. How can we put numbers (instrument read-out) on a perception that occurs in the brain of the observer? b. What can we learn from examination of a visual observing situation that will guide us in our design of an instrumental simulation of this situation? Involving as it does our own daily, almost unconscious, practice of making judgments concerning the things we see, the design and manufacture of color measurement instruments is an exceedingly interesting field. The advances being made concurrently today in research concerning human color vision and in optical and electronic technology will make possible increasingly useful instrumentation for quality control of product color.

  19. Instrumentation for bedside analysis of swallowing disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Catiuscia S S; Nunes, Luiz G Q; Melo, Pedro L

    2010-01-01

    Disordered swallowing, or dysphagia, is a common problem seen in patients undergoing treatment for cancer, stroke and neurodegenerative illnesses. This disease is associated with aspiration-induced chest infections. The methods currently used for diagnosis, however, are qualitative or based on expensive equipment. Swallowing accelerometry is a promising low-cost, quantitative and noninvasive tool for the evaluation of swallowing. This work describes the design and application of a bedside instrument able to evaluate swallowing mechanisms and to identify patients at risk of aspiration. Three-axis swallowing accelerometry was used to measure the neck vibrations associated with deglutition, providing analog signals to a virtual instrument developed in LabVIEW environment. In vivo tests in normal subjects as well as tests with disphagic patients showed that the system was able to easily and non-invasively detect changes in the swallowing acceleration pattern associated with increasing values of water volume (p disphagia. We concluded that the developed system could be a useful tool for the objective bedside evaluation of patients at risk of aspiration.

  20. Overview of intercalibration of satellite instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, G.; Hewison, T.J.; Fox, N.; Wu, X.; Xiong, X.; Blackwell, W.J.

    2013-01-01

    Inter-calibration of satellite instruments is critical for detection and quantification of changes in the Earth’s environment, weather forecasting, understanding climate processes, and monitoring climate and land cover change. These applications use data from many satellites; for the data to be inter-operable, the instruments must be cross-calibrated. To meet the stringent needs of such applications requires that instruments provide reliable, accurate, and consistent measurements over time. Robust techniques are required to ensure that observations from different instruments can be normalized to a common scale that the community agrees on. The long-term reliability of this process needs to be sustained in accordance with established reference standards and best practices. Furthermore, establishing physical meaning to the information through robust Système International d'unités (SI) traceable Calibration and Validation (Cal/Val) is essential to fully understand the parameters under observation. The processes of calibration, correction, stability monitoring, and quality assurance need to be underpinned and evidenced by comparison with “peer instruments” and, ideally, highly calibrated in-orbit reference instruments. Inter-calibration between instruments is a central pillar of the Cal/Val strategies of many national and international satellite remote sensing organizations. Inter-calibration techniques as outlined in this paper not only provide a practical means of identifying and correcting relative biases in radiometric calibration between instruments but also enable potential data gaps between measurement records in a critical time series to be bridged. Use of a robust set of internationally agreed upon and coordinated inter-calibration techniques will lead to significant improvement in the consistency between satellite instruments and facilitate accurate monitoring of the Earth’s climate at uncertainty levels needed to detect and attribute the mechanisms

  1. The LUVOIR architecture "A" coronagraph instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueyo, L.; Zimmerman, N.; Bolcar, M.; Groff, T.; Stark, C.; Ruane, G.; Jewell, J.; Soummer, R.; St. Laurent, K.; Wang, J.; Redding, D.; Mazoyer, J.; Fogarty, K.; Juanola-Parramon, Roser; Domagal-Goldman, S.; Roberge, A.; Guyon, O.; Mandell, A.

    2017-09-01

    In preparation for the Astro 2020 Decadal Survey NASA has commissioned the study four flagship missions spanning to a wide range of observable wavelengths: the Origins Space Telescope (OST, formerly the Far-Infrared Surveyor), Lynx (formerly the X-ray Surveyor), the Large UV/Optical/Infrared Surveyor (LUVOIR) and the Habitable Exoplanet Imager (HabEx). One of the key scientific objectives of the latter two is the detection and characterization of the earth-like planets around nearby stars using the direct imaging technique (along with a broad range of investigations regarding the architecture of and atmospheric composition exoplanetary systems using this technique). As a consequence dedicated exoplanet instruments are being studied for these mission concepts. This paper discusses the design of the coronagraph instrument for the architecture "A" (15 meters aperture) of LUVOIR. The material presented in this paper is aimed at providing an overview of the LUVOIR coronagraph instrument. It is the result of four months of discussions with various community stakeholders (scientists and technologists) regarding the instrument's basic parameters followed by meticulous design work by the the GSFC Instrument Design Laboratory team. In the first section we review the main science drivers, presents the overall parameters of the instrument (general architecture and backend instrument) and delve into the details of the currently envisioned coronagraph masks along with a description of the wavefront control architecture. Throughout the manuscript we describe the trades we made during the design process. Because the vocation of this study is to provide a baseline design for the most ambitious earth-like finding instrument that could be possibly launched into the 2030's, we have designed an complex system privileged that meets the ambitious science goals out team was chartered by the LUVOIR STDT exoplanet Working Group. However in an effort to minimize technological risk we tried

  2. A systematic review of instrumental variable analyses using geographic region as an instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertosick, Emily A; Assel, Melissa; Vickers, Andrew J

    2017-10-13

    Instrumental variables analysis is a methodology to mitigate the effects of measured and unmeasured confounding in observational studies of treatment effects. Geographic area is increasingly used as an instrument. We conducted a literature review to determine the properties of geographic area in studies of cancer treatments. We identified cancer studies performed in the United States which incorporated instrumental variable analysis with area-wide treatment rate within a geographic region as the instrument. We assessed the degree of treatment variability between geographic regions, assessed balance of measured confounders afforded by geographic area and compared the results of instrumental variable analysis to those of multivariable methods. Geographic region as an instrument was relatively common, with 22 eligible studies identified, many of which were published in high-impact journals. Treatment rates did not vary greatly by geographic region. Covariates were not balanced by the instrument in the majority of studies. Eight out of eleven studies found statistically significant effects of treatment on multivariable analysis but not for instrumental variables, with the central estimates of the instrumental variables analysis generally being closer to the null. We recommend caution and an investigation of IV assumptions when considering the use of geographic region as an instrument in observational studies of cancer treatments. The value of geographic region as an instrument should be critically evaluated in other areas of medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis on detection accuracy of binocular photoelectric instrument optical axis parallelism digital calibration instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Jia-ju; Yin, Jian-ling; Wu, Dong-sheng; Liu, Jie; Chen, Yu-dan

    2017-11-01

    Low-light level night vision device and thermal infrared imaging binocular photoelectric instrument are used widely. The maladjustment of binocular instrument ocular axises parallelism will cause the observer the symptom such as dizziness, nausea, when use for a long time. Binocular photoelectric equipment digital calibration instrument is developed for detecting ocular axises parallelism. And the quantitative value of optical axis deviation can be quantitatively measured. As a testing instrument, the precision must be much higher than the standard of test instrument. Analyzes the factors that influence the accuracy of detection. Factors exist in each testing process link which affect the precision of the detecting instrument. They can be divided into two categories, one category is factors which directly affect the position of reticle image, the other category is factors which affect the calculation the center of reticle image. And the Synthesize error is calculated out. And further distribute the errors reasonably to ensure the accuracy of calibration instruments.

  4. Wireless Instrumentation Use on Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the results of a study on the use of wireless instrumentation and sensors on future launch vehicles. The use of wireless technologies would if feasible would allow for fewer wires, and allow for more flexibility. However, it was generally concluded that wireless solutions are not currently ready to replace wired technologies for launch vehicles. The recommendations of the study were to continue to use wired sensors as the primary choice for vehicle instrumentation, and to continue to assess needs and use wireless instrumentation where appropriate. The future work includes support efforts for wireless technologies, and continue to monitor the development of wireless solutions.

  5. Instrumentness for Creativity - Mediation, Materiality & Metonymy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Olav Wedege; Breinbjerg, Morten; Pold, Søren

    2007-01-01

    We introduce the concept instrumentness as a quality of human-computer interfaces. Instrumentness points to the way musical instruments are controlled and conceptualized through values such as virtuosity and playability, which are important for computer-mediated creative work supporting development...... as central strategies for computer mediated creativity. The paper is contributing to an investigation of the aesthetics of use in relation to software, pointing to alternative values, differing from traditional usability, which are also relevant in creative work outside art and music composition....

  6. Background instrumental music and serial recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittono, H

    1997-06-01

    Although speech and vocal music are consistently shown to impair serial recall for visually presented items, instrumental music does not always produce a significant disruption. This study investigated the features of instrumental music that would modulate the disruption in serial recall. 24 students were presented sequences of nine digits and required to recall the digits in order of presentation. Instrumental music as played either forward or backward during the task. Forward music caused significantly more disruption than did silence, whereas the reversed music did not. Some higher-order factor may be at work in the effect of background music on serial recall.

  7. Enhanced mission performance from autonomous instrument guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Jørgensen, Peter Siegbjørn; Betto, Maurizio

    2006-01-01

    examples of such autonomous space instrumentation. With its full autonomy, this star tracker is capable of providing, in real-time, the absolute orientation with respect to the celestial reference frame with an accuracy of a few arc seconds. This high accuracy along with the robust operations, low weight...... and power consumption makes the mu ASC an ideal instrument for small, high yielding satellite missions. The ASC has hitherto been used by the satellite AOCS and the high accuracy scientific instrument for attitude recovery (among others onboard ORSTED, CHAMP, and GRACE), and satellite high accuracy target...

  8. Particle size distribution instrument. Topical report 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okhuysen, W.; Gassaway, J.D.

    1995-04-01

    The development of an instrument to measure the concentration of particles in gas is described in this report. An in situ instrument was designed and constructed which sizes individual particles and counts the number of occurrences for several size classes. Although this instrument was designed to detect the size distribution of slag and seed particles generated at an experimental coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic power facility, it can be used as a nonintrusive diagnostic tool for other hostile industrial processes involving the formation and growth of particulates. Two of the techniques developed are extensions of the widely used crossed beam velocimeter, providing simultaneous measurement of the size distribution and velocity of articles.

  9. Improved acoustic instrumentation of the SIMPLE detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felizardo, M. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Instituto de Telecomunicacoes, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal); Martins, R.C. [Instituto de Telecomunicacoes, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Ramos, A.R. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal); Morlat, T. [Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal); Girard, T.A. [Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal)], E-mail: criodets@cii.fc.ul.pt; Giuliani, F. [Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal); Limagne, D. [INSP - UMR 7588 CNRS, Universite Paris 7 and 6, 75251 Paris (France); Waysand, G. [Laboratoire Souterrain a Bas Bruit, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, 84400 Rustrel-Pays d' Apt (France); Marques, J.G. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2008-01-21

    The application of Superheated Droplet Detectors in dark matter searches by the SIMPLE project uses an acoustic instrumentation sensitive to the shock wave generated by the bubble nucleation of the refrigerant droplets. Previous instrumentation has been unable to distinguish between true nucleation and background noise events in the device, in particular microleaks associated with the escape of overpressuring nitrogen gas into the surrounding water bath. We here describe the development of an improved instrumentation which is shown to provide this discrimination capacity through a reduced noise level of the transducer amplification circuitry.

  10. Removing The Instrument Function From Fluorescence Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Andrew F.

    1989-05-01

    The spectrum acquired at the sample phototnultiplier tube of a fluorescence spectrophotometer is a product of the sample spectrum and the instrument function. The determination of the instrument function and its removal from the acquired spectrum is often critical to the accurate determination of the physical properties of the sample. Methods are discussed for the determination and removal of the instrument function from excitation and emission spectra. Methods considered include quantum counters and ratio circuits for excitation correction, and emission correction against calibrated excitation systems, calibrated tungsten lamps, and NBS standard quinine sulfate.

  11. Novel Instrumentation for Rocket Propulsion Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the proposed SBIR Phase I program is to develop novel laser-based instruments that provide rapid, in situ, simultaneous measurements of gas...

  12. Novel Instrumentation for Rocket Propulsion Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the proposed SBIR Phase II program is to develop, deploy and deliver novel laser-based instruments that provide rapid, in situ, simultaneous...

  13. Instrumenting Beliefs in Threshold Public Goods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Angela C M; Spraggon, John M; Denny, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the causal impact of beliefs on contributions in Threshold Public Goods (TPGs) is particularly important since the social optimum can be supported as a Nash Equilibrium and best-response contributions are a function of beliefs. Unfortunately, investigations of the impact of beliefs on behavior are plagued with endogeneity concerns. We create a set of instruments by cleanly and exogenously manipulating beliefs without deception. Tests indicate that the instruments are valid and relevant. Perhaps surprisingly, we fail to find evidence that beliefs are endogenous in either the one-shot or repeated-decision settings. TPG allocations are determined by a base contribution and beliefs in a one shot-setting. In the repeated-decision environment, once we instrument for first-round allocations, we find that second-round allocations are driven equally by beliefs and history. Moreover, we find that failing to instrument prior decisions overstates their importance.

  14. Management Approach for Earth Venture Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Diane L.; Dutta, Sanghamitra

    2013-01-01

    The Earth Venture Instrument (EVI) element of the Earth Venture Program calls for developing instruments for participation on a NASA-arranged spaceflight mission of opportunity to conduct innovative, integrated, hypothesis or scientific question-driven approaches to pressing Earth system science issues. This paper discusses the EVI element and the management approach being used to manage both an instrument development activity as well as the host accommodations activity. In particular the focus will be on the approach being used for the first EVI (EVI-1) selected instrument, Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO), which will be hosted on a commercial GEO satellite and some of the challenges encountered to date and corresponding mitigations that are associated with the management structure for the TEMPO Mission and the architecture of EVI.

  15. 14 CFR 25.1305 - Powerplant instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... instruments are required: (1) A carburetor air temperature indicator for each engine. (2) A cylinder head..., whose operation is initiated by a power output measuring system; or (ii) A total engine piston...

  16. The SINQ instrument control software system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heer, H.; Könnecke, M.; Maden, D.

    The spallation neutron source SINQ at Villigen, Switzerland, is a continuous source with a flux of about 10 14 n/s cm 2. Nine neutron-scattering instruments will come into operation within the first year, seven of them are situated at neutron guides. The electronics and software required for the various instruments are standardized as far as possible. The SINQ instrument control software (SICS) is implemented as a client server system. The SICS server is implemented in ANSI-C on a digital Unix platform and uses only Posix compliant system calls for maximum portability. Clients provide the user interface, which may be either of the traditional command line type or a more modern graphical user interface. Communication with the front-end electronics is via the TCP/IP internet protocol. Measured data are stored in the NeXus format, a common data exchange format for neutron scattering and X-ray instruments.

  17. Instrumentation Methodology for Automobile Crash Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-01

    Principal characteristics of existing data acquisition practices and instrumentation methodologies have been reviewed to identify differences which are responsible for difficulties in comparing and interpreting structural crash test data. Recommendat...

  18. Overview of LINAC4 Beam Instrumentation Software

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, L K; Guerrero, A; Kolad, B; Ludwig, M; Raich, U; Roncarolo, F

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of results from the recent Linac4 commissioning with H- beam at CERN. It covers beam instrumentation systems acquiring beam intensity, position, transverse and longitudinal profile and transverse emittance

  19. Instrumentation & Data Acquisition System (D AS) Engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Markus Deon

    2015-01-01

    The primary job of an Instrumentation and Data Acquisition System (DAS) Engineer is to properly measure physical phenomenon of hardware using appropriate instrumentation and DAS equipment designed to record data during a specified test of the hardware. A DAS system includes a CPU or processor, a data storage device such as a hard drive, a data communication bus such as Universal Serial Bus, software to control the DAS system processes like calibrations, recording of data and processing of data. It also includes signal conditioning amplifiers, and certain sensors for specified measurements. My internship responsibilities have included testing and adjusting Pacific Instruments Model 9355 signal conditioning amplifiers, writing and performing checkout procedures, writing and performing calibration procedures while learning the basics of instrumentation.

  20. Musical intonation of wind instruments and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendri, G.; Valdan, M.; Gratton, L. M.; Oss, S.

    2015-05-01

    Wind musical instruments are affected in their intonation by temperature. We show how to account for these effects in a simple experiment, and provide results in languages accessible to both physics and music professionals.

  1. Continuing Education Instrumentation Training in Clinical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Jacqueline; Frankel, Saundra

    1980-01-01

    Describes the continuing education program for clinical chemistry instrumentation training established at The College of Staten Island, New York. A course consisting of 14 sessions is outlined and discussed. (CS)

  2. The Journey to Fielded BioInstrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jr., R M

    2005-02-24

    Over the last ten years, a team at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory created fieldable instruments that performed identification/quantification via bioassays. These instruments have been based on molecular surface-recognition assays, such as immunoassays, and on nucleic-acid-based assays, such as the polymerase chain reaction. In 1996, we participated in the Joint Field Trials 3, employing both immunoassays as well as the polymerase chair reaction. In 1998, we participated in the Joint Field Trials 4, using only the real-time polymerase chain reaction, as implemented on a 10-chamber instrument. Our hand-held, real-time PCR instrument, known as HANAA has been commercialized as the Bioseeq{reg_sign}, by Smiths Detection. More recently, teams from LLNL have built and fielded an autonomous pathogen detection system (APDS).

  3. HNX/DragonTIGER Instrument Development Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Precisely identifying the species of cosmic-ray nuclei detected by a satellite or balloon instrument requires the use of several complementary detector systems. In...

  4. Instrument või museaal? / Risto Lehiste

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lehiste, Risto

    2010-01-01

    Muuseumide ning ühiskonna suhtumisest vanadesse muusikainstrumentidesse. Seoses Eesti Teatri- ja Muusikamuuseumis 30. septembril 2010 toimunud seminariga "Instrument või museaal? Ajalooliste pillide restaureerimine ning kasutamine muuseumis"

  5. Special Issue--Using Career Assessment Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, Laurie; And Others, Eds.

    1991-01-01

    This special issue includes the following: "Introduction"; "Interest Inventories: Which One, Why, and for Whom?"; "Recent Reports from the Committee to Screen Career Guidance Instruments"; "Assessment of Career Specialty Interests in Business and Medicine"; "Using Career Interest Inventories with…

  6. Reducing robotic prostatectomy costs by minimizing instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delto, Joan C; Wayne, George; Yanes, Rafael; Nieder, Alan M; Bhandari, Akshay

    2015-05-01

    Since the introduction of robotic surgery for radical prostatectomy, the cost-benefit of this technology has been under scrutiny. While robotic surgery professes to offer multiple advantages, including reduced blood loss, reduced length of stay, and expedient recovery, the associated costs tend to be significantly higher, secondary to the fixed cost of the robot as well as the variable costs associated with instrumentation. This study provides a simple framework for the careful consideration of costs during the selection of equipment and materials. Two experienced robotic surgeons at our institution as well as several at other institutions were queried about their preferred instrument usage for robot-assisted prostatectomy. Costs of instruments and materials were obtained and clustered by type and price. A minimal set of instruments was identified and compared against alternative instrumentation. A retrospective review of 125 patients who underwent robotically assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy for prostate cancer at our institution was performed to compare estimated blood loss (EBL), operative times, and intraoperative complications for both surgeons. Our surgeons now conceptualize instrument costs as proportional changes to the cost of the baseline minimal combination. Robotic costs at our institution were reduced by eliminating an energy source like the Ligasure or vessel sealer, exploiting instrument versatility, and utilizing inexpensive tools such as Hem-o-lok clips. Such modifications reduced surgeon 1's cost of instrumentation to ∼40% less compared with surgeon 2 and up to 32% less than instrumentation used by surgeons at other institutions. Surgeon 1's combination may not be optimal for all robotic surgeons; however, it establishes a minimally viable toolbox for our institution through a rudimentary cost analysis. A similar analysis may aid others in better conceptualizing long-term costs not as nominal, often unwieldy prices, but as percent changes in

  7. Principles of Space Plasma Wave Instrument Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    1998-01-01

    Space plasma waves span the frequency range from somewhat below the ion cyclotron frequency to well above the electron cyclotron frequency and plasma frequency. Because of the large frequency range involved, the design of space plasma wave instrumentation presents many interesting challenges. This chapter discusses the principles of space plasma wave instrument design. The topics covered include: performance requirements, electric antennas, magnetic antennas, and signal processing. Where appropriate, comments are made on the likely direction of future developments.

  8. Malware Instrumentation Application to Regin Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Matthieu Kaczmarek

    2015-01-01

    The complexity of the Regin malware underlines the importance of reverse engineering in modern incident response. The present study shows that such complexity can be overcome: substantial information about adversary tactics, techniques and procedures is obtained from reverse engineering. An introduction to the Regin development framework is provided along with instrumentation guidelines. Such instrumentation enables experimentation with malware modules. So analysis can derectly leverage m...

  9. Solar oscillations instrumentation and measurement theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appourchaux, T.

    1988-01-01

    Solar-oscillation instruments are reviewed. Common characteristics include detecting solar radial velocities on Fraunhofer lines with a 2-point measuring technique, high spectral resolution and stability, etc. The choice of the spectral line for getting a high signal to solar noise ratio is addressed. Velocity imaging of solar oscillations modes is detailed, including spatial sampling and span, highest observable degree. Applications of these different analyses is applied to existing or future helioseismology instruments.

  10. Mechanical engineers' handbook, design, instrumentation, and controls

    CERN Document Server

    Kutz, Myer

    2015-01-01

    Full coverage of electronics, MEMS, and instrumentation andcontrol in mechanical engineering This second volume of Mechanical Engineers' Handbookcovers electronics, MEMS, and instrumentation and control, givingyou accessible and in-depth access to the topics you'll encounterin the discipline: computer-aided design, product design formanufacturing and assembly, design optimization, total qualitymanagement in mechanical system design, reliability in themechanical design process for sustainability, life-cycle design,design for remanufacturing processes, signal processing, dataacquisition and dis

  11. Policy Instruments for Water Quality Protection

    OpenAIRE

    James Shortle; Horan, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    We examine policy instruments for ambient water quality protection. One objective is to illustrate the unique and complex informational challenges that must be addressed in constructing instruments that are effective and efficient for point and nonpoint sources. A second objective is to describe developments in real-world policies. Crucial to solving contemporary water quality challenges and improving the efficiency of water quality protection are reducing nonpoint pollution and efficiently i...

  12. Instrumentation related complications in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballas, Efstathios; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Karamanis, Eirineos; Mimidis, George; Tolis, Konstantinos; Soultanis, Konstantinos; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2012-01-01

    Spinal instrumentation constructs are frequently necessary for the surgical management of patients with variable spinal pathology. However, surgical complications may appear. These should be detected early and managed to achieve recovery and good functional outcome for the patient. This article provides an in-depth analysis of the most common instrumentation-related complications of spine surgery as well as a diagnostic plan and treatment options for the management of these challenging entities once they occur.

  13. Essentials of nuclear medicine physics and instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Powsner, Rachel A; Powsner, Edward R

    2013-01-01

    An excellent introduction to the basic concepts of nuclear medicine physics This Third Edition of Essentials of Nuclear Medicine Physics and Instrumentation expands the finely developed illustrated review and introductory guide to nuclear medicine physics and instrumentation. Along with simple, progressive, highly illustrated topics, the authors present nuclear medicine-related physics and engineering concepts clearly and concisely. Included in the text are introductory chapters on relevant atomic structure, methods of radionuclide production, and the interaction of radiation with matter. Fu

  14. Instrumentation and test gear circuits manual

    CERN Document Server

    Marston, R M

    2013-01-01

    Instrumentation and Test Gear Circuits Manual provides diagrams, graphs, tables, and discussions of several types of practical circuits. The practical circuits covered in this book include attenuators, bridges, scope trace doublers, timebases, and digital frequency meters. Chapter 1 discusses the basic instrumentation and test gear principles. Chapter 2 deals with the design of passive attenuators, and Chapter 3 with passive and active filter circuits. The subsequent chapters tackle 'bridge' circuits, analogue and digital metering techniques and circuitry, signal and waveform generation, and p

  15. Planning instruments to control urban growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Gertrud; Nielsen, Thomas Alexander Sick

    2010-01-01

    It is challenging to plan and control urban development in peri-urban areas. But if no planning is done, the result will often be unsustainable, including widespread, dispersed and uncoordinated urban growth. Spatial planning based on zoning remains the most important planning instrument and its...... success depend on regional coordination. Incentive based instruments may contrbute to growth management, but only few examples are available and their effects on urban growth patterns yet to be seen....

  16. Designing special test instruments for preventive maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, C E; Baker, L S

    1979-01-01

    Periodic performance testing of biomedical equipment can be made considerably more efficient by careful design of test procedures and by fabrication of special test instruments which are designed for those procedures. The design philosophy behind such procedures and instruments and its applicability to a wide variety of biomedical devices is discussed. As a practical example, an ECG machine/patient monitor test system is described and construction details are given.

  17. Surgical instrument similarity metrics and tray analysis for multi-sensor instrument identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Bernhard; Schellenberg, Tobias; Franke, Stefan; Dänzer, Stefan; Neumuth, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    A robust identification of the instrument currently used by the surgeon is crucial for the automatic modeling and analysis of surgical procedures. Various approaches for intra-operative surgical instrument identification have been presented, mostly based on radio-frequency identification (RFID) or endoscopic video analysis. A novel approach is to identify the instruments on the instrument table of the scrub nurse with a combination of video and weight information. In a previous article, we successfully followed this approach and applied it to multiple instances of an ear, nose and throat (ENT) procedure and the surgical tray used therein. In this article, we present a metric for the suitability of the instruments of a surgical tray for identification by video and weight analysis and apply it to twelve trays of four different surgical domains (abdominal surgery, neurosurgery, orthopedics and urology). The used trays were digitized at the central sterile services department of the hospital. The results illustrate that surgical trays differ in their suitability for the approach. In general, additional weight information can significantly contribute to the successful identification of surgical instruments. Additionally, for ten different surgical instruments, ten exemplars of each instrument were tested for their weight differences. The samples indicate high weight variability in instruments with identical brand and model number. The results present a new metric for approaches aiming towards intra-operative surgical instrument detection and imply consequences for algorithms exploiting video and weight information for identification purposes.

  18. Temporal integration and instrumental conditioned reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrailkill, Eric A; Shahan, Timothy A

    2014-09-01

    Stimuli associated with primary reinforcement for instrumental behavior are widely believed to acquire the capacity to function as conditioned reinforcers via Pavlovian conditioning. Some Pavlovian conditioning studies suggest that animals learn the important temporal relations between stimuli and integrate such temporal information over separate experiences to form a temporal map. The present experiment examined whether Pavlovian conditioning can establish a positive instrumental conditioned reinforcer through such temporal integration. Two groups of rats received either delay or trace appetitive conditioning in which a neutral stimulus predicted response-independent food deliveries (CS1→US). Both groups then experienced one session of backward second-order conditioning of the training CS1 and a novel CS2 (CS1-CS2 pairing). Finally, the ability of CS2 to function as a conditioned reinforcer for a new instrumental response (leverpressing) was assessed. Consistent with the previous demonstrations of temporal integration in fear conditioning, a CS2 previously trained in a trace-conditioning protocol served as a better instrumental conditioned reinforcer after backward second-order conditioning than did a CS2 previously trained in a delay protocol. These results suggest that an instrumental conditioned reinforcer can be established via temporal integration and raise challenges for existing quantitative accounts of instrumental conditioned reinforcement.

  19. Influence of musical instruments on tooth positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, E

    1981-08-01

    A 2-year longitudinal investigation was conducted at five New York City junior high schools on 11- to 13-year-old children starting instrumental music education to determine what tooth movement, if any, resulted from the playing of certain musical instruments. Questionnaires, interviews, oral examinations, and dental casts were used at the start of instrumental study, after one year, and then after a second year. Statistically significant anterior tooth movements occurred in an overwhelming majority of the instrumentalists, while negligible movements were recorded for the controls over this period. As a result of this study, certain recommendations can be made by dentists when they are asked to suggest instruments which are dentally suited for children. In most cases they can suggest more than one instrument which would be of benefit dentally to the individual child, especially in the increase or reduction of overjet and overbite. The playing of the correct musical instrument can serve as an adjunct to the dentist or orthodontist in trying to accomplish certain tooth movements.

  20. Instrumental variable methods for causal inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiocchi, Michael; Cheng, Jing; Small, Dylan S

    2014-06-15

    A goal of many health studies is to determine the causal effect of a treatment or intervention on health outcomes. Often, it is not ethically or practically possible to conduct a perfectly randomized experiment, and instead, an observational study must be used. A major challenge to the validity of observational studies is the possibility of unmeasured confounding (i.e., unmeasured ways in which the treatment and control groups differ before treatment administration, which also affect the outcome). Instrumental variables analysis is a method for controlling for unmeasured confounding. This type of analysis requires the measurement of a valid instrumental variable, which is a variable that (i) is independent of the unmeasured confounding; (ii) affects the treatment; and (iii) affects the outcome only indirectly through its effect on the treatment. This tutorial discusses the types of causal effects that can be estimated by instrumental variables analysis; the assumptions needed for instrumental variables analysis to provide valid estimates of causal effects and sensitivity analysis for those assumptions; methods of estimation of causal effects using instrumental variables; and sources of instrumental variables in health studies. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Dermatologic Surgical Instruments: A History and Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Sumul A; Kampp, Jeremy T

    2017-01-01

    Dermatologic surgery requires precision and accuracy given the delicate nature of procedures performed. The use of the most appropriate instrument for each action helps optimize both functionality and cosmetic outcome. To review the history of surgical instruments used in dermatology, with a focus on mechanism and evolution to the instruments that are used in current practice. A comprehensive literature search was conducted via textbook and journal research for historic references while review of current references was conducted online using multiple search engines and PubMed. There are a number of articles that review instruments in dermatology, but this article adds a unique perspective in classifying their evolution, while also presenting them as levers that serve to increase human dexterity during the course of surgery. Surgical instruments allow fine manipulation of tissue, which in turn produces optimal outcomes. Surgical tools have been around since the dawn of man, and their evolution parallels the extent to which human civilization has specialized over time. This article describes the evolution of instruments from the general surgical armamentaria to the specialized tools that are used today.

  2. Monitoring Earth's Shortwave Reflectance: GEO Instrument Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brageot, Emily; Mercury, Michael; Green, Robert; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Gerwe, David

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a GEO instrument concept dedicated to monitoring the Earth's global spectral reflectance with a high revisit rate. Based on our measurement goals, the ideal instrument needs to be highly sensitive (SNR greater than 100) and to achieve global coverage with spectral sampling (less than or equal to 10nm) and spatial sampling (less than or equal to 1km) over a large bandwidth (380-2510 nm) with a revisit time (greater than or equal to greater than or equal to 3x/day) sufficient to fully measure the spectral-radiometric-spatial evolution of clouds and confounding factor during daytime. After a brief study of existing instruments and their capabilities, we choose to use a GEO constellation of up to 6 satellites as a platform for this instrument concept in order to achieve the revisit time requirement with a single launch. We derive the main parameters of the instrument and show the above requirements can be fulfilled while retaining an instrument architecture as compact as possible by controlling the telescope aperture size and using a passively cooled detector.

  3. Thermo Scientific Sulfur Dioxide Analyzer Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springston, S. R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The Sulfur Dioxide Analyzer measures sulfur dioxide based on absorbance of UV light at one wavelength by SO2 molecules which then decay to a lower energy state by emitting UV light at a longer wavelength. Specifically, SO2 + hυ1 →SO2 *→SO2 + hυ2 The emitted light is proportional to the concentration of SO2 in the optical cell. External communication with the analyzer is available through an Ethernet port configured through the instrument network of the AOS systems. The Model 43i-TLE is part of the i-series of Thermo Scientific instruments. The i-series instruments are designed to interface with external computers through the proprietary Thermo Scientific iPort Software. However, this software is somewhat cumbersome and inflexible. BNL has written an interface program in National Instruments LabView that both controls the Model 43i-TLE Analyzer AND queries the unit for all measurement and housekeeping data. The LabView vi (the software program written by BNL) ingests all raw data from the instrument and outputs raw data files in a uniform data format similar to other instruments in the AOS and described more fully in Section 6.0 below.

  4. Robotic-surgical instrument wrist pose estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabel, Stephan; Baek, Kyungim; Berkelman, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Lightweight Surgery Robot from the University of Hawaii includes two teleoperated instruments and one endoscope manipulator which act in accord to perform assisted interventional medicine. The relative positions and orientations of the robotic instruments and endoscope must be known to the teleoperation system so that the directions of the instrument motions can be controlled to correspond closely to the directions of the motions of the master manipulators, as seen by the the endoscope and displayed to the surgeon. If the manipulator bases are mounted in known locations and all manipulator joint variables are known, then the necessary coordinate transformations between the master and slave manipulators can be easily computed. The versatility and ease of use of the system can be increased, however, by allowing the endoscope or instrument manipulator bases to be moved to arbitrary positions and orientations without reinitializing each manipulator or remeasuring their relative positions. The aim of this work is to find the pose of the instrument end effectors using the video image from the endoscope camera. The P3P pose estimation algorithm is used with a Levenberg-Marquardt optimization to ensure convergence. The correct transformations between the master and slave coordinate frames can then be calculated and updated when the bases of the endoscope or instrument manipulators are moved to new, unknown, positions at any time before or during surgical procedures.

  5. Increased Science Instrumentation Funding Strengthens Mars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Lee D.; Graff, T. G.

    2012-01-01

    As the strategic knowledge gaps mature for the exploration of Mars, Mars sample return (MSR), and Phobos/Deimos missions, one approach that becomes more probable involves smaller science instrumentation and integrated science suites. Recent technological advances provide the foundation for a significant evolution of instrumentation; however, the funding support is currently too small to fully utilize these advances. We propose that an increase in funding for instrumentation development occur in the near-term so that these foundational technologies can be applied. These instruments would directly address the significant knowledge gaps for humans to Mars orbit, humans to the Martian surface, and humans to Phobos/ Deimos. They would also address the topics covered by the Decadal Survey and the Mars scientific goals, objectives, investigations and priorities as stated by the MEPAG. We argue that an increase of science instrumentation funding would be of great benefit to the Mars program as well as the potential for human exploration of the Mars system. If the total non-Earth-related planetary science instrumentation budget were increased 100% it would not add an appreciable amount to the overall NASA budget and would provide the real potential for future breakthroughs. If such an approach were implemented in the near-term, NASA would benefit greatly in terms of science knowledge of the Mars, Phobos/Deimos system, exploration risk mitigation, technology development, and public interest.

  6. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future June 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  7. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future January 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liljegren, JC

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  8. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future October 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JC Liljegren

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  9. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future March 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  10. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future February 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development

  11. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future May 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  12. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future July 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of ACRF instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) SBIR instrument development.

  13. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - March 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JW Voyles

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  14. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - February 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JW Voyles

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  15. Comparing a disease-specific and a generic health-related quality of life instrument in subjects with asthma from the general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rochat Thierry

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few epidemiologic studies have assessed health-related quality of life (HRQL of asthma patients from a general population and it is unclear which instrument is best suitable for this purpose. We investigated the validity of the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ and the SF-36 completed by individuals with asthma from the population-based SAPALDIA (Swiss study on air pollution and lung diseases in adults cohort. Methods The study included 258 participants with a physician-diagnosed asthma who had completed the AQLQ and SF-36. We assessed floor and ceiling effects, internal consistency reliability and cross-sectional validity with a priori hypotheses that correlations between the specific HRQL domains (e.g. "symptoms" or "physical functioning" and the corresponding external validation measures (respiratory symptoms, need for doctor visits, limitation in activities due to asthma and lung function would capture similar aspects and be correlated moderately (≥ 0.3 to strongly (≥ 0.5, whereas non-corresponding domains be correlated weakly with each other ( Results The AQLQ showed pronounced ceiling effects with all median domain scores above 6 (scores varied from 1–7. For the SF-36, ceiling effects were present in 5 out of 8 domains. Cronbach's alpha was >0.7 for all AQLQ and SF-36 domains. Correlations between the AQLQ domains "respiratory symptoms", "activity limitation" and "environmental exposure", and the validation measures ranged from 0.29–0.57. Correlations between the "emotional function" domain and the validation measures were also in this range (0.31–0.55 and not as low as we hypothesized. For the SF-36, correlations between "physical functioning" and "role physical", and the validation measures ranged from 0.25–0.56, whereas "role emotional" and "mental health" correlated with these measures from 0.01–0.23. Conclusion The AQLQ and the SF-36 showed fairly good internal consistency. Both instruments

  16. The observatories and instruments of Tycho Brahe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfschmidt, Gudrun

    Tycho Brahe (1546-1601) was the most important observational astronomer until the invention of the telescope in 1608. By construction new instruments and devising new observing methods, Tycho succeeded in significantly increasing measurement accuracy: He increased the size of his instruments (e.g. a large wooden quadrant of diameter 5.4 m and a mural quadrant); he used metal and masonry rather than wood; he modified construction techniques to achieve greater stability; to provide shelter from the wind, his instruments were in subterranean nooks; his instruments were permanently and solidly mounted; for better angular readings, he developed new subdivisions and diopters (Tycho used transversals to obtain the greatest possible angular resolution readings. His instrumental sights (diopters) were specially designed to minimize errors); he carefully analysed all the errors (Tycho's aim was to reduce thethe uncertainty to less than one minute of arc); he used fundamental stars for the first time; he preferred measuring equatorial coordinates directly instead of using the zodiacal system, i.e. using the equatorial armillary sphere instead of the zodiacal armillary sphere; he tried a new measuring method with clocks and his mural quadrant (1582) for determining the right ascension; he took atmospheric refraction into account. Most of his high-accuracy instruments have been distroyed. Only two sextants, made by Jost Bürgi and Erasmus Habermel around 1600, still exist in the Narodny Technicky Muzeum (NTM) [National Technical Museum] in Prague. A model of the wooden quadrant is in the old observatory in Copenhagen, in the round tower. But we have good descriptions of the instruments (half circles of 2.3 m radius, quadrants up to 2 m radius including the mural quadrant, sextants up to 1.6 m, armillary spheres of 1.5 m radius and the great equatorial armillary sphere of 2.7 m, triquetrum and celestial globe of 1.5 m) in Tycho's book Astronomiae instauratae mechanica

  17. Application of Fiber Optic Instrumentation (Validation des systemes d’instrumentation a fibres optiques)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    fibres optiques ) This AGARDograph has been sponsored by SCI-228, the Flight Test Technology Task Group of the Systems Concepts and Integration...Series – Volume 22 SCI-228 Application of Fiber Optic Instrumentation (Validation des systèmes d’instrumentation à fibres optiques ) This...capability to air, surface, and ground-based NATO systems. RTO-AG-160-V22 v Validation des systèmes d’instrumentation à fibres optiques (RTO AG-160 Vol

  18. Software for simulation and design of neutron scattering instrumentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mads

    designed using the software. The Union components uses a new approach to simulation of samples in McStas. The properties of a sample are split into geometrical and material, simplifying user input, and allowing the construction of complicated geometries such as sample environments. Multiple scattering...... from conventional choices. Simulation of neutron scattering instrumentation is used when designing instrumentation, but also to understand instrumental effects on the measured scattering data. The Monte Carlo ray-tracing package McStas is among the most popular, capable of simulating the path of each...... neutron through the instrument using an easy to learn language. The subject of the defended thesis is contributions to the McStas language in the form of the software package guide_bot and the Union components.The guide_bot package simplifies the process of optimizing neutron guides by writing the Mc...

  19. Remote Instrumentation for eScience and Related Aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Lawenda, Marcin; Meyer, Norbert; Pugliese, Roberto; Węglarz, Jan; Zappatore, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    Making scientific instruments a manageable resource over distributed computing infrastructures such as the grid has been a key focal point of e-science research in recent years. It is now known by the generic term ‘remote instrumentation’, and is the subject of this useful volume that covers a range of perspectives on the topic reflected by the contributions to the 2010 workshop on remote instrumentation held in Poznań, Poland. E-science itself is a complex set of disciplines requiring computationally intensive distributed operations, high-speed networking, and collaborative working tools. As such, it is most often (and correctly) associated with grid- and cloud-computing infrastructures and middleware. The contributions to this publication consider broader aspects of the theme of remote instrumentation applied to e-science, as well as exploring related technologies that enable the implementation of truly distributed and coordinated laboratories. Among the topics discussed are remote instrumentation and ...

  20. Instrumentation Automation for Concrete Structures. Report 4. Demonstration of Instrumentation Automation Techniques at Beaver Dam, Eureka Springs, Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-01

    and Rehabilitation (REMR) reports entitled ’Instrumentation Automation for Concrete Structures .’ As a demonstration installation of the instruments...instrumentation for older concrete structures . Improvement of data acquisition instrumentation and implementation of the benefits of these improvements was the...safety of our concrete structures . Keywords: Computers, Crack measurement, Dam safety, Data acquisition, Installation techniques, Instrumentation automation.

  1. Effect of Instrumentation Length and Instrumentation Systems: Hand Versus Rotary Files on Apical Crack Formation - An In vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devale, Madhuri R; Mahesh, M C; Bhandary, Shreetha

    2017-01-01

    Stresses generated during root canal instrumentation have been reported to cause apical cracks. The smaller, less pronounced defects like cracks can later propagate into vertical root fracture, when the tooth is subjected to repeated stresses from endodontic or restorative procedures. This study evaluated occurrence of apical cracks with stainless steel hand files, rotary NiTi RaCe and K3 files at two different instrumentation lengths. In the present in vitro study, 60 mandibular premolars were mounted in resin blocks with simulated periodontal ligament. Apical 3 mm of the root surfaces were exposed and stained using India ink. Preoperative images of root apices were obtained at 100x using stereomicroscope. The teeth were divided into six groups of 10 each. First two groups were instrumented with stainless steel files, next two groups with rotary NiTi RaCe files and the last two groups with rotary NiTi K3 files. The instrumentation was carried out till the apical foramen (Working Length-WL) and 1 mm short of the apical foramen (WL-1) with each file system. After root canal instrumentation, postoperative images of root apices were obtained. Preoperative and postoperative images were compared and the occurrence of cracks was recorded. Descriptive statistical analysis and Chi-square tests were used to analyze the results. Apical root cracks were seen in 30%, 35% and 20% of teeth instrumented with K-files, RaCe files and K3 files respectively. There was no statistical significance among three instrumentation systems in the formation of apical cracks (p=0.563). Apical cracks were seen in 40% and 20% of teeth instrumented with K-files; 60% and 10% of teeth with RaCe files and 40% and 0% of teeth with K3 files at WL and WL-1 respectively. For groups instrumented with hand files there was no statistical significance in number of cracks at WL and WL-1 (p=0.628). But for teeth instrumented with RaCe files and K3 files significantly more number of cracks were seen at WL than

  2. Astrbiology Science and Technology for Instrument Development (ASTID) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Activities advance the development of scientific instruments or instrument components to the point where the instruments could credibly be proposed in response to...

  3. Are developing countries ready for first world waste policy instruments?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Godfrey, Linda K

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The findings of on-going research conducted within South Africa on waste policy instruments shows that while typical command-and-control instruments lack effective monitoring and enforcement, alternative policy instruments such as economic...

  4. The effects of alcohol on pilot performance during instrument flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    Sixteen instrument-rated pilots, eight of whom were very experienced professional aviators, flew instrument landing system approaches in a Cessna 172 under simulated instrument flight conditions while sober and while under the influence of 40, 80, an...

  5. Large Instrument Development for Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, J. Richard; Warnick, Karl F.; Jeffs, Brian D.; Norrod, Roger D.; Lockman, Felix J.; Cordes, James M.; Giovanelli, Riccardo

    2009-03-01

    This white paper offers cautionary observations about the planning and development of new, large radio astronomy instruments. Complexity is a strong cost driver so every effort should be made to assign differing science requirements to different instruments and probably different sites. The appeal of shared resources is generally not realized in practice and can often be counterproductive. Instrument optimization is much more difficult with longer lists of requirements, and the development process is longer and less efficient. More complex instruments are necessarily further behind the technology state of the art because of longer development times. Including technology R&D in the construction phase of projects is a growing trend that leads to higher risks, cost overruns, schedule delays, and project de-scoping. There are no technology breakthroughs just over the horizon that will suddenly bring down the cost of collecting area. Advances come largely through careful attention to detail in the adoption of new technology provided by industry and the commercial market. Radio astronomy instrumentation has a very bright future, but a vigorous long-term R&D program not tied directly to specific projects needs to be restored, fostered, and preserved.

  6. DEVELOPING EVALUATION INSTRUMENT FOR MATHEMATICS EDUCATIONAL SOFTWARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Setyaningrum

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The rapid increase and availability of mathematics software, either for classroom or individual learning activities, presents a challenge for teachers. It has been argued that many products are limited in quality. Some of the more commonly used software products have been criticized for poor content, activities which fail to address some learning issues, poor graphics presentation, inadequate documentation, and other technical problems. The challenge for schools is to ensure that the educational software used in classrooms is appropriate and effective in supporting intended outcomes and goals. This paper aimed to develop instrument for evaluating mathematics educational software in order to help teachers in selecting the appropriate software. The instrument considers the notion of educational including content, teaching and learning skill, interaction, and feedback and error correction; and technical aspects of educational software including design, clarity, assessment and documentation, cost and hardware and software interdependence. The instrument use a checklist approach, the easier and effective methods in assessing the quality of educational software, thus the user needs to put tick in each criteria. The criteria in this instrument are adapted and extended from standard evaluation instrument in several references.   Keywords: mathematics educational software, educational aspect, technical aspect.

  7. Standard practice for instrumented indentation testing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice defines the basic steps of Instrumented Indentation Testing (IIT) and establishes the requirements, accuracies, and capabilities needed by an instrument to successfully perform the test and produce the data that can be used for the determination of indentation hardness and other material characteristics. IIT is a mechanical test that measures the response of a material to the imposed stress and strain of a shaped indenter by forcing the indenter into a material and monitoring the force on, and displacement of, the indenter as a function of time during the full loading-unloading test cycle. 1.2 The operational features of an IIT instrument, as well as requirements for Instrument Verification Annex A1), Standardized Reference Blocks (Annex A2) and Indenter Requirements (Annex A3) are defined. This practice is not intended to be a complete purchase specification for an IIT instrument. 1.3 With the exception of the non-mandatory Appendix X4, this practice does not define the analysis necessary...

  8. Spring/dimple instrument tube restraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMario, Edmund E.; Lawson, Charles N.

    1993-01-01

    A nuclear fuel assembly for a pressurized water nuclear reactor has a spring and dimple structure formed in a non-radioactive insert tube placed in the top of a sensor receiving instrumentation tube thimble disposed in the fuel assembly and attached at a top nozzle, a bottom nozzle, and intermediate grids. The instrumentation tube thimble is open at the top, where the sensor or its connection extends through the cooling water for coupling to a sensor signal processor. The spring and dimple insert tube is mounted within the instrumentation tube thimble and extends downwardly adjacent the top. The springs and dimples restrain the sensor and its connections against lateral displacement causing impact with the instrumentation tube thimble due to the strong axial flow of cooling water. The instrumentation tube has a stainless steel outer sleeve and a zirconium alloy inner sleeve below the insert tube adjacent the top. The insert tube is relatively non-radioactivated inconel alloy. The opposed springs and dimples are formed on diametrically opposite inner walls of the insert tube, the springs being formed as spaced axial cuts in the insert tube, with a web of the insert tube between the cuts bowed radially inwardly for forming the spring, and the dimples being formed as radially inward protrusions opposed to the springs.

  9. Vertebral Compression Fractures after Lumbar Instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granville, Michelle; Berti, Aldo; Jacobson, Robert E

    2017-09-29

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is primarily found in an older population. This is a similar demographic group that develops both osteoporosis and vertebral compression fractures (VCF). This report reviewed a series of patients treated for VCF that had previous lumbar surgery for symptomatic spinal stenosis. Patients that only underwent laminectomy or fusion without instrumentation had a similar distribution of VCF as the non-surgical population in the mid-thoracic, or lower thoracic and upper lumbar spine. However, in the patients that had previous short-segment spinal instrumentation, fractures were found to be located more commonly in the mid-lumbar spine or sacrum adjacent to or within one or two spinal segments of the spinal instrumentation. Adjacent-level fractures that occur due to vertebral osteoporosis after long spinal segment instrumentation has been discussed in the literature. The purpose of this report is to highlight the previously unreported finding of frequent lumbar and sacral osteoporotic fractures in post-lumbar instrumentation surgery patients. Important additional factors found were lack of preventative medical treatment for osteoporosis, and secondary effects related to inactivity, especially during the first year after surgery.

  10. Instruments to assess stigmatization in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Dimitre; Szepietowski, Jacek C

    2017-11-03

    Stigmatization is the assignment of negative perceptions to an individual because of a perceived difference from the population at large. Skin conditions are frequently the reason of social rejection with a consequent negative influence on the personal and social life of patients. The aim of the current study was to review the available instruments that can be successfully utilized to measure the stigmatization level among dermatological patients. We performed our search on PubMed up to November 2016 and utilized combinations of key phrases containing such words as stigmatization, skin, dermatology, names of various skin conditions (psoriasis, vitiligo, acne, etc.), measurement. The search found a considerable number of articles - 548. After filtering them through a precise selection process, 58 articles remained. We concentrated only on the methodological aspects to assess stigmatization in various dermatoses. The review ascertained that there exist numerous instruments in the form of questionnaires. They were utilized in various researches in order to assess the stigmatization level in patients with skin problems. We divided them into two main groups: dermatology specific instruments (6 questionnaires) and dermatosis/disease specific ones (8 questionnaires). It is recommended to use dermatology-specific instruments to compare the stigmatization level in various skin conditions. They can be utilized as well as a first line tools to study the feeling of stigmatization in specific skin diseases; however, where it is possible, they should be supplemented with the disease-specific instrument for deeper analysis of both qualities of life and stigmatization.

  11. Electronic Imaging in Astronomy Detectors and Instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    McLean, Ian

    2008-01-01

    The second edition of Electronic Imaging in Astronomy: Detectors and Instrumentation describes the remarkable developments that have taken place in astronomical detectors and instrumentation in recent years – from the invention of the charge-coupled device (CCD) in 1970 to the current era of very large telescopes, such as the Keck 10-meter telescopes in Hawaii with their laser guide-star adaptive optics which rival the image quality of the Hubble Space Telescope. Authored by one of the world’s foremost experts on the design and development of electronic imaging systems for astronomy, this book has been written on several levels to appeal to a broad readership. Mathematical expositions are designed to encourage a wider audience, especially among the growing community of amateur astronomers with small telescopes with CCD cameras. The book can be used at the college level for an introductory course on modern astronomical detectors and instruments, and as a supplement for a practical or laboratory class.

  12. HPS instrument calibration laboratory accreditation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, F.X; Eisenhower, E.H.; Swinth, K.L.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an accurate overview of the development and structure of the program established by the Health Physics Society (HPS) for accrediting instrument calibration laboratories relative to their ability to accurately calibrate portable health physics instrumentation. The purpose of the program is to provide radiation protection professionals more meaningful direct and indirect access to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) national standards, thus introducing a means for improving the uniformity, accuracy, and quality of ionizing radiation field measurements. The process is designed to recognize and document the continuing capability of each accredited laboratory to accurately perform instrument calibration. There is no intent to monitor the laboratory to the extent that each calibration can be guaranteed by the program; this responsibility rests solely with the accredited laboratory.

  13. Instrumental Variables in the Long Run

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casey, Gregory; Klemp, Marc Patrick Brag

    2017-01-01

    In the study of long-run economic growth, it is common to use historical or geographical variables as instruments for contemporary endogenous regressors. We study the interpretation of these conventional instrumental variable (IV) regressions in a general, yet simple, framework. Our aim...... is to estimate the long-run causal effect of changes in the endogenous explanatory variable. We find that conventional IV regressions generally cannot recover this parameter of interest. To estimate this parameter, therefore, we develop an augmented IV estimator that combines the conventional regression...... with a separate regression estimating the degree of persistence in the endogenous regressor. Importantly, our estimator can overcome a particular violation of the exclusion restriction that can arise when there is a time gap between the instrument and the endogenous explanatory variable. We apply our results...

  14. Computational and instrumental methods in EPR

    CERN Document Server

    Bender, Christopher J

    2006-01-01

    Computational and Instrumental Methods in EPR Prof. Bender, Fordham University Prof. Lawrence J. Berliner, University of Denver Electron magnetic resonance has been greatly facilitated by the introduction of advances in instrumentation and better computational tools, such as the increasingly widespread use of the density matrix formalism. This volume is devoted to both instrumentation and computation aspects of EPR, while addressing applications such as spin relaxation time measurements, the measurement of hyperfine interaction parameters, and the recovery of Mn(II) spin Hamiltonian parameters via spectral simulation. Key features: Microwave Amplitude Modulation Technique to Measure Spin-Lattice (T1) and Spin-Spin (T2) Relaxation Times Improvement in the Measurement of Spin-Lattice Relaxation Time in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Quantitative Measurement of Magnetic Hyperfine Parameters and the Physical Organic Chemistry of Supramolecular Systems New Methods of Simulation of Mn(II) EPR Spectra: Single Cryst...

  15. Thermal Vacuum Chamber Repressurization with Instrument Purging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woronowicz, Michael

    2017-01-01

    At the end of James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) OTIS (Optical Telescope Element-OTE-Integrated Science Instrument Module-ISIM) cryogenic vacuum testing in NASA Johnson Space Centers (JSCs) thermal vacuum (TV) Chamber A, contamination control (CC) engineers are mooting the idea that chamber particulate material stirred up by the repressurization process may be kept from falling into the ISIM interior to some degree by activating instrument purge flows over some initial period before opening the chamber valves. This memo describes development of a series of models designed to describe this process. These are strung together in tandem to estimate overpressure evolution from which net outflow velocity behavior may be obtained. Creeping flow assumptions are then used to determine the maximum particle size that may be kept suspended above the ISIM aperture, keeping smaller particles from settling within the instrument module.

  16. Instrumentation to Enhance Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; J. E. Daw; S. C. Taylor

    2009-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to prove new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors has been completed. Based on this review, recommendations are made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR and a strategy has been developed for obtaining these sensors. Progress toward implementing this strategy is reported in this document. It is anticipated that this report will be updated on an annual basis.

  17. Evaluating the effectiveness of impact assessment instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cashmore, Matthew; Richardson, Tim; Hilding-Ryedvik, Tuija

    2010-01-01

    to sharpen effectiveness evaluation theory for impact assessment instruments this article critically examines the neglected issue of their political constitution. Analytical examples are used to concretely explore the nature and significance of the politicisation of impact assessment. It is argued...... that raising awareness about the political character of impact assessment instruments, in itself, is a vital step in advancing effectiveness evaluation theory. Broader theoretical lessons on the framing of evaluation research are also drawn from the political analysis. We conclude that, at least within......The central role of impact assessment instruments globally in policy integration initiatives has been cemented in recent years. Associated with this trend, but also reflecting political emphasis on greater accountability in certain policy sectors and a renewed focus on economic competitiveness...

  18. First Experience with the LHC Cryogenic Instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Vauthier, N; Balle, Ch; Casas-Cubillos, J; Ciechanowski, M; Fernandez-Penacoba, G; Fortescue-Beck, E; Gomes, P; Jeanmonod, N; Lopez-Lorente, A; Suraci, A

    2008-01-01

    The LHC under commissioning at CERN will be the world's largest superconducting accelerator and therefore makes extensive use of cryogenic instruments. These instruments are installed in the tunnel and therefore have to withstand the LHC environment that imposes radiation-tolerant design and construction. Most of the instruments require individual calibration; some of them exhibit several variants as concerns measuring span; all relevant data are therefore stored in an Oracle® database. Those data are used for the various quality assurance procedures defined for installation and commissioning, as well as for generating tables used by the control system to configure automatically the input/output channels. This paper describes the commissioning of the sensors and the corresponding electronics, the first measurement results during the cool-down of one machine sector; it discusses the different encountered problems and their corresponding solutions.

  19. Pulse energy measurement at the SXR instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Stefan; Brown, Garth; Dakovski, Georgi; Hill, Bruce; Holmes, Michael; Loos, Jennifer; Maida, Ricardo; Paiser, Ernesto; Schlotter, William; Turner, Joshua J; Wallace, Alex; Jastrow, Ulf; Kreis, Svea; Sorokin, Andrey A; Tiedtke, Kai

    2015-05-01

    A gas monitor detector was implemented and characterized at the Soft X-ray Research (SXR) instrument to measure the average, absolute and pulse-resolved photon flux of the LCLS beam in the energy range between 280 and 2000 eV. The detector is placed after the monochromator and addresses the need to provide reliable absolute pulse energy as well as pulse-resolved measurements for the various experiments at this instrument. This detector provides a reliable non-invasive measurement for determining flux levels on the samples in the downstream experimental chamber and for optimizing signal levels of secondary detectors and for the essential need of data normalization. The design, integration into the instrument and operation are described, and examples of its performance are given.

  20. GUPPI: Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Scott M.; Demorest, P.; Ford, J.; McCullough, R.; Ray, J.; DuPlain, R.; Brandt, P.

    2009-12-01

    The high precision radio pulsar timing required for gravitational wave detection experiments (like NANOGrav) and gravitational theory or neutron star equation-of-state tests demands that pulse phase be measured to precisions of 0.01% of the pulse period, or tens to hundreds of nano-seconds for millisecond pulsars (MSPs). This requirement means high precision instrumentation. At NRAO we are developing a state-of-the-art pulsar backend called GUPPI for these scientific problems. GUPPI provides wide bandwidth (up to 800 MHz), high dynamic range (8-bit sampling), substantially improved interference resistance (compared to all other GBT pulsar instruments), and full polarization capabilities. Currently it is being commissioned as a fully supported facility instrument for the GBT in a digital filterbank (i.e. incoherent dedispersion) mode. Within the next six months full coherent dedispersion capabilities are planned.

  1. Cross-instrument Analysis Correlation Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-06-28

    This program has been designed to assist with the tracking of a sample from one analytical instrument to another such as SEM, microscopes, micro x-ray diffraction and other instruments where particular positions/locations on the sample are examined, photographed, etc. The software is designed to easily enter the position of fiducials and locations of interest such that in a future session in the same of different instrument the positions of interest can be re-found through using the known location fiducials in the current and reference session to transform the point into the current sessions coordinate system. The software is dialog box driven guiding the user through the necessary data entry and program choices. Information is stored in a series of text based extensible markup language (XML) files.

  2. Malware Instrumentation Application to Regin Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Kaczmarek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the Regin malware underlines the importance of reverse engineering in modern incident response. The present study shows that such complexity can be overcome: substantial information about adversary tactics, techniques and procedures is obtained from reverse engineering. An introduction to the Regin development framework is provided along with instrumentation guidelines. Such instrumentation enables experimentation with malware modules. So analysis can derectly leverage malware’s own code without the need to program an analysis toolkit. As an application of the presented instrumentation, the underlying botnet architecture is analysed. Finally conclusions from different perspectives are provided: defense, attack and counter intelligence.

  3. [Interventions during labor for reducing instrumental deliveries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, T; Meunier, E

    2008-12-01

    Several interventions have been demonstrated, with high evidence levels (EL), to be associated with reduced instrumental deliveries and should therefore be undertaken during labor for increasing spontaneous vaginal deliveries. Using a partogram (EL1) and continuous support during labor and childbirth (EL1) lead to fewer operative vaginal deliveries. Systematic early amniotomy increases the frequency of fetal heart rate abnormalities (EL2) without decreasing the incidence of instrumental deliveries (EL1) and should thus be avoided. Early oxytocin in dysfunctional labor (EL2) and manual rotation of posterior and transverse presentations (EL3) may reduce operative vaginal deliveries. Even without epidural analgesia, any upright or lateral positions compared to supine or lithotomy positions do not reduce instrumental deliveries (EL2). Epidural analgesia alters significantly instrumental delivery rates and therefore patient management in the labor ward. Indeed, when used with high concentration of local anesthetic, epidural analgesia is associated with increased operative vaginal deliveries (EL1), at least in part because of increased posterior presentations (EL2). However, the effect of epidural analgesia on instrumental delivery rates closely depends from the type of anesthetic and concentrations used. This effect is reduced when low concentrations of local anesthetic are used in combination with fat-soluble morphinated agent (EL1). Finally, for nulliparous women with continuous epidural analgesia, unless irresistible urge to push or medical indication to shorten second stage of labor, delayed pushing is associated with reduced difficult instrumental deliveries (EL1). Fundal pressure maneuvers should be prohibited because of their inefficiency (EL2) and dangerousness (EL4).

  4. Pragmatic electrical engineering systems and instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Eccles, William

    2011-01-01

    Pragmatic Electrical Engineering: Systems and Instruments is about some of the non-energy parts of electrical systems, the parts that control things and measure physical parameters. The primary topics are control systems and their characterization, instrumentation, signals, and electromagnetic compatibility. This text features a large number of completely worked examples to aid the reader in understanding how the various principles fit together.While electric engineers may find this material useful as a review, engineers in other fields can use this short lecture text as a modest introduction

  5. WFIRST: Coronagraph Instrument Description and Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerking, Margaret A.; Zhao, Feng; Demers, Richard; Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Rhodes, Jason; Trauger, John; Moustakas, Leonidas; Mennesson, Bertrand

    2018-01-01

    The WFIRST coronagraph instrument (CGI) will be the first in-space coronagraph using active wavefront control with an expected instrumental raw contrast of 3*10^-9 at 150 milliarcseconds in the V band. The CGI will be capable of directly imaging and spectrally characterizing mature exoplanets in reflected light for the first time. We present the CGI design architecture, its requirements and expected performance based on laboratory results demonstrated in the High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) that simulates in-space conditions as well as detailed integrated modeling including the WFIRST telescope predicted performance.

  6. UARS science instruments are shut down

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo Simarski, Lynn

    NASA turned off the science instruments aboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite on June 2 after the primary solar array drive failed and its backup stopped. The array is now "parked" in a position that allows it to generate power for control and communication, but not enough to run the instruments, according to John Donley, NASA deputy project manager, Earth Science Mission Operations."We have a very serious problem," said Robert J. McNeal, UARS program scientist, adding that he was nonetheless "optimistic" that it could be diagnosed and overcome.

  7. Systematic Error Mitigation for the PIXIE Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, Alan; Fixsen, Dale J.; Nagler, Peter; Tucker, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The Primordial Ination Explorer (PIXIE) uses a nulling Fourier Transform Spectrometer to measure the absoluteintensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diuse astrophysical foregrounds.PIXIE will search for the signature of primordial ination and will characterize distortions from a blackbodyspectrum, both to precision of a few parts per billion. Rigorous control of potential instrumental eects isrequired to take advantage of the raw sensitivity. PIXIE employs a highly symmetric design using multipledierential nulling to reduce the instrumental signature to negligible levels. We discuss the systematic errorbudget and mitigation strategies for the PIXIE mission.

  8. Using Binary Code Instrumentation in Computer Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius POPA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper approaches the low-level details of the code generated by compilers whose format permits outside actions. Binary code modifications are manually done when the internal format is known and understood, or automatically by certain tools developed to process the binary code. The binary code instrumentation goals may be various from security increasing and bug fixing to development of malicious software. The paper highlights the binary code instrumentation techniques by code injection to increase the security and reliability of a software application. Also, the paper offers examples for binary code formats understanding and how the binary code injection may be applied.

  9. Terra and Aqua MODIS Instrument Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, X.; Angal, A.; Wu, A.; Barnes, W.; Salomonson, V.

    2016-01-01

    Since launch, Terra and Aqua MODIS have produced an unprecedentedly large amount of high quality data products and supported a broad range of applications by the remote sensing science community and users worldwide. Constant and dedicated efforts have been made to continue instrument normal operation, to monitor and characterize changes in sensor responses, and to update calibration parameters to maintain the quality of MODIS data products. This paper provides an overview of instrument operation and calibration activities, and performance. On-orbit changes in sensor responses are illustrated. Also discussed are challenging issues, calibration strategies, and future efforts.

  10. Thermo Scientific Ozone Analyzer Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springston, S. R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The primary measurement output from the Thermo Scientific Ozone Analyzer is the concentration of the analyte (O3) reported at 1-s resolution in units of ppbv in ambient air. Note that because of internal pneumatic switching limitations the instrument only makes an independent measurement every 4 seconds. Thus, the same concentration number is repeated roughly 4 times at the uniform, monotonic 1-s time base used in the AOS systems. Accompanying instrument outputs include sample temperatures, flows, chamber pressure, lamp intensities and a multiplicity of housekeeping information. There is also a field for operator comments made at any time while data is being collected.

  11. Accelerator Technology: Beam Instrumentation and Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, R; Schmickler, H

    2013-01-01

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Accelerators and Colliders' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the the Section '8.6 Beam Instrumentation and Diagnostics' of the Chapter '8 Accelerator Technology' with the content: 8.6 Beam Instrumentation and Diagnostics 8.6.1 Beam Position Measurement 8.6.2 Beam Current and Intensity Measurement 8.6.3 Diagnostics of Transverse Beam Motion 8.6.4 Beam Profile Measurements 8.6.5 Beam Loss Monitoring 8.6.6 Short Bunch Length Diagnostics

  12. Portable SERS Instrument for Explosives Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    instrument. Figure 2. Photograph of the portable Raman instrument in the trunk of a rental car at ALAAP. The laser (blue) is sitting on top of the...di scret e artifac t s and / or e levated baselines . caus ing mi s interpretati on of the c hromat og rams. All of these ma t e ri a l s mus t be...nd nd nd nd nd nd nd 3 nd nd GW-18-001 201 57 258 220 185 62 247 261 196 71 267 141 37 178 GW-18-001- Top 178 24 202 209 153 29 182 184 163 31 194 nr

  13. The DESI Experiment Part II: Instrument Design

    OpenAIRE

    DESI Collaboration; Aghamousa, Amir; Aguilar, Jessica; Ahlen, Steve; Alam, Shadab; Allen, Lori E.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Annis, James; Bailey, Stephen; Balland, Christophe; Ballester, Otger; Baltay, Charles; Beaufore, Lucas; Bebek, Chris; Beers, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    DESI (Dark Energy Spectropic Instrument) is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment that will study baryon acoustic oscillations and the growth of structure through redshift-space distortions with a wide-area galaxy and quasar redshift survey. The DESI instrument is a robotically-actuated, fiber-fed spectrograph capable of taking up to 5,000 simultaneous spectra over a wavelength range from 360 nm to 980 nm. The fibers feed ten three-arm spectrographs with resolution $R= \\lambda/\\Delta...

  14. Beyond the dichotomy of instrumentality and non-instrumentality of knowledge production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basu, S.; Jongerden, J.P.; Ruivenkamp, G.T.P.

    2017-01-01

    A change in the discourse on knowledge production as a shift from the non-instrumentality to the instrumentality approach has been identified and, moreover, generally been regarded as an inevitable, unilinear transition. In this article, we question this assumption by questioning some of the key

  15. Sex-Types and Instrument Selection: The Effect of Gender Schemas on Fifth Graders' Instrument Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedenfeld, Laura M.

    2012-01-01

    Since the mid-1970s, music education researchers studied and followed musicians' and non-musicians' views of music instrument gender stereotypes and associations. To understand instrument gender stereotypes, one must first understand the difference between sex and gender and gender's role in society. This research aims to study the views of…

  16. Elizabethan Instrument Makers - The Origins of the London Trade in Precision Instrument Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'E Turner, Gerard

    2001-01-01

    Europe in the sixteenth century experienced a period of unprecedented vitality and innovation in the spheres of science and commerce. The Americas had been discovered and the colonizing nations had an urgent need for mathematical instruments for navigation and surveying. In 1540 the Elizabethan age saw the establishment of the precision instrument-making trade in London, a trade that would become world-famous in the succeeding two centuries. The mathematical instruments needed by astronomers, navigators, and surveyors owe much of their development to the work of the Flemish mathematician and astronomer, Gemma Frisius, and to the map and globe maker, Gerard Mercator, both of whom studied at Louvain. However it was Thomas Gemini who is credited with starting the London trade in 1540: his reputation came from making the plates for his own printing of the Anatomy of Vesalius, and the astrolabs he made and presented to Edward VI and Elizabeth I, which survive today. He was followed by Humphrey Cole, and other makers whose instruments have survived, including Ryther, Knyvyn, and Whitwell. This book first describes the context in which the Elizabethan trade began, and the influence of the instruments taken to Florence by Sir Robert Dudley in 1606. The second part catalogues in detail every surviving instrument from this period, signed and unsigned, that has been traced. The catalogue is accompanied by fine photographs which illustrate both the instruments and the techniques used to identify unsigned instruments.

  17. Simple many-instruments robust standard errors through concentrated instrumental variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, Paul; Wansbeek, Tom

    2016-01-01

    In a weak and many instruments setting, 2SLS can be severely biased towards OLS and the standard errors can be way too small. LIML is an attractive alternative, especially when the many-instruments robust (MIR) standard errors are used as proposed by Bekker (1994). In this note we present an

  18. About You and Your Friends: An Instrument of the PRIME Instrument Battery. Technical Report No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agard, Judith A.; And Others

    This technical report is one of a series concerning the instrumentation for Project PRIME, which investigated the relationship of regular and special education classroom environments to student characteristics. About You and Your Friends (AYYF) is a self-report inventory of the affective characteristics of students. The instrument is suitable for…

  19. Risk factors for supplementary posterior instrumentation after anterolateral decompression and instrumentation in thoracolumbar burst fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchon, Patrick W; He, Wenzhuan; Dahdaleh, Nader S; Moritani, Toshio

    2014-11-01

    In spite of the established benefits of anterolateral decompression and instrumentation (ALDI) for thoracolumbar burst fractures (TLBF), the indications for supplementary posterior instrumentation remain unclear. A retrospective review of clinical and radiographic data of a prospective cohort of 73 patients who underwent ALDI for TLBF from T12 to L4. The mean age of the cohort was 42 ± 15 years, with 49 males and 24 females. Forty-six patients had neurological deficit, and 27 were intact. Owing to symptomatic settling, supplemental posterior instrumentation was performed in 7 out of 73 patients. The age of patients requiring supplemental posterior instrumentation (59 ± 14 years) exceeded that of patients who did not (41 ± 16, p=0.004). Otherwise, the patients who required posterior instrumentation were comparable to those treated with ALDI in terms of body mass index (BMI), American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scores on admission and follow-up, residual spinal canal, and local kyphosis on admission and follow-up. The posterior ligamentous complex (PLC) integrity was assessed in 38 patients in whom the MRI scans were retrievable, 31 successfully treated with ALDI, and all 7 undergoing supplementary posterior instrumentation. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that there was no difference in the incidence of PLC disruption between the 2 groups (p=0.257). Secondary supplemental posterior instrumentation was deemed necessary in 10% of cases following ALDI. Age was the only significant risk factor predicating supplemental posterior instrumentation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Laboratory Instrumentation: An Exploration of the Impact of Instrumentation on Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Don L.; Brown, Eric C.; Shadle, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Academic programs generally work to make their laboratory curriculum both as instrumentation rich and up to date as possible. However, little is known about the relationship between the use of instrumentation in the curriculum and student learning. As part of our department's ongoing assessment efforts, a project was designed to probe this…

  1. An Optional Instrument for European Insurance Contract Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandeep Lakhan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The Principles of European Insurance Contract Law, also referred tousing the acronym PEICL, were published in September 2009. They are the result of ten years of academic work undertaken by the"Restatement of European Insurance Contract Law" Project Group. In the time since its establishment in 1999, the project has been transformed from being a stand-alone project to a part of the CoPECL (Common Principles of European Insurance Contract Law network, drafting a specific part of the Common Frame of Reference. Having continually worked under the guiding principle that "the law of insurance [in Europe] must be one," it now represents a serious option for providing Europe with a single legal framework for insurance contracts. Despite the European Council's proclamations that the Common Frame of Reference will remain a non-binding instrument, the implementation of one or more optional instruments in the future does not appear to beimprobable considering recent developments. The possibility of anoptional instrument has been expressed more than once by the European Commission in its Action Plan and Communication on European Contract Law. Other indications in favour of an optional instrument include the European Parliament's repeated references to the Common Frame of Reference as providing, at the very least, a model for a futureoptional instrument, as well as the EESC's earlier proposal of anoptional instrument as an alternative to standardising insurancecontract law. The preparation by the EESC of another (own-initiative opinion on European contract law is underway, and its presentation is anticipated in 2010. Hence, the optional instrument is evidently the subject of serious political deliberation. Using Article 1:102, the Principles of European Insurance Contract Law represent a prototype for such an instrument.

  2. An Optional Instrument for European Insurance Contract Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Heiss

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The Principles of European Insurance Contract Law, also referred tousing the acronym PEICL, were published in September 2009. They are the result of ten years of academic work undertaken by the"Restatement of European Insurance Contract Law" Project Group. In the time since its establishment in 1999, the project has been transformed from being a stand-alone project to a part of the CoPECL (Common Principles of European Insurance Contract Law network, drafting a specific part of the Common Frame of Reference. Having continually worked under the guiding principle that "the law of insurance [in Europe] must be one," it now represents a serious option for providing Europe with a single legal framework for insurance contracts.Despite the European Council's proclamations that the Common Frame of Reference will remain a non-binding instrument, the implementation of one or more optional instruments in the future does not appear to beimprobable considering recent developments. The possibility of anoptional instrument has been expressed more than once by the European Commission in its Action Plan and Communication on European Contract Law. Other indications in favour of an optional instrument include the European Parliament's repeated references to the Common Frame of Reference as providing, at the very least, a model for a futureoptional instrument, as well as the EESC's earlier proposal of anoptional instrument as an alternative to standardising insurancecontract law. The preparation by the EESC of another (own-initiative opinion on European contract law is underway, and its presentation is anticipated in 2010. Hence, the optional instrument is evidently the subject of serious political deliberation. Using Article 1:102, the Principles of European Insurance Contract Law represent a prototype for such an instrument.

  3. Instrumental traditions and theories of light the uses of instruments in the optical revolution

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xiang

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of the optical revolution in the context of early 19th century Britain. Far from merely involving the replacement of one optical theory by another, the revolution also involved substantial changes in instruments and the practices that surrounded them. People's judgements about classification, explanation and evaluation were affected by the way they used such optical instruments as spectroscopes, telescopes, polarisers, photometers, gratings, prisms and apertures. There were two instrumental traditions in this historical period, each of which nurtured a body of practice that exemplified how optical instruments should be operated, and especially how the eye should be used. These traditions functioned just like paradigms, shaping perspectives and even world views. Readership: Scholars and graduate students in the history of science, history of instrument, philosophy of science and science studies. Can also be used as a textbook in graduate courses on 19th century physics.

  4. A novel instrument for logging nearwork distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Tsz-wing; Flitcroft, Daniel I; Wallman, Josh; Lee, Tat Hing; Zheng, Yongping; Lam, Carly Siu-yin; Kee, Chea-su

    2011-03-01

    To validate a novel ultrasonic sensor for logging reading distances. In addition, this device was used to compare the habitual reading distances between low and high myopes. First, the stability and sensitivity of the ultrasonic device were determined by repeated measures using artificial targets. Then, thirty Hong Kong Chinese (20-30 years) were recruited, of whom fifteen were considered to be high myopes (mean ± S.D. = -8.7 ± 0.5 D) and 15 to be low to non-myopes (mean ± S.D. = -2.0 ± 0.2 D). Each subject read a newspaper with their habitual visual aid continuously for 10 min in two sessions at their preferred working distance(s). The reading distances were recorded continuously using a novel nearwork analyzer. The modal working distance was considered as the 'habitual' reading distance. In addition, habitual reading distance was reported orally by each subject. The nearwork analyzer gave accurate and repeatable measurements over a range of distances and angles. Using this instrument, high myopes were found to have a significantly shorter reading distance than low myopes or non-myopes (mean ± S.D. = 35.9 ± 9.8 cm vs 50.9 ± 24.8 cm; two-sample t-test, p = 0.04, df = 18). The reading distances reported orally by the subjects were not correlated with those recorded by the nearwork analyzer. The nearwork analyzer was found to be an effective tool for measuring nearwork reading distance in a small group of emmetropic and myopic adults over a 10 min interval. Differences between the reading distance between high myopes and low/non-myopes was detected by the device. Further study is needed to determine if a closer working distance is a cause or effect of myopia development. © 2011 The College of Optometrists.

  5. First light with ISO and its instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-12-01

    geometry (i.e. the position of the instrument's entrance slit with respect to the telescope) with the star Gamma Draconis as the target. This detection was achieved with an 11 x 11 point raster map and with the spectrometer set at a wavelength of 3.08 microns. The measured flux appears to be within 10% of pre-launch predictions. Spectral scans of internal wavelength calibrators made during the first check-out show good performance of all scanner mechanisms. For reasons of ISO schedule constraints, SWS - unlike the other instruments - has not yet had the opportunity to make spectral observations of astronomical sources. This will start in the next few days and all indications are that they will be successful. Following these very successful detections of first light in the instruments, work is continuing on the detailed calibration and performance verification of ISO and its four scientific instruments. It is planned to organise a Press Conference around the end of January 1996 to present initial results. Note to Editors: Colour pictures are available upon request. Please send a fax to ESA Public Relations, Paris (+33.1.53.69.76.90) making reference to this press release. The four instruments on-board ISO were built by international consortia of scientific institutes and industry, with each consortium being led by a single Principal Investigator. The Principal Investigators are : Catherine Cesarsky (CEA, Saclay, France) for ISOCAM; Peter Clegg (QMW, London, United Kingdom) for LWS; Thijs de Graauw (SRON, Groningen, the Netherlands) for SWS; and Dietrich Lemke (MPIA, Heidelberg, Germany) for ISOPHOT. Note: ESA press releases can be received automatically by sending an electronic mail message via Internet to "LISTSERV@esoc.esa.de" (do not type the quotes). The body of the message (not the subject line) should just contain one line with the words "subscribe ESAPRESS first_name last_name" (do not type the quotes) where "first_name" and "last_name" is your personal name, i

  6. Biomedical Instruments for Fetal and Neonatal Surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolfe, P [Oxford BioHorizons Ltd. (United Kingdom); Scopesi, F [Gaslini Institute, University of Genoa (Italy); Serra, G [Gaslini Institute, University of Genoa (Italy)

    2006-10-15

    Specialised instruments have been developed to aid the care of the fetus and the newborn baby. Miniature sensors using optical, electrical, chemical, mechanical and magnetic principles have been produced for capturing key measurands. These include temperature, pressure, flow and dimension, as well as several specific molecules such as glucose, oxygen and carbon dioxide. During pregnancy ultrasound imaging and blood flow techniques provide valuable information concerning fetal abnormalities, fetal growth, fetal breathing and fetal heart rate. Signal processing and pattern recognition can be useful for deriving indicators of fetal distress and clinical status, based on biopotentials as well as ultrasound signals. Fetal pH measurement is a critical requirement during labour and delivery. The intensive care of ill preterm babies involves provision of an optimal thermal environment and respiratory support. Monitoring of blood gas and acid-base status is essential, and this involves both blood sampling for in vitro analysis as well as the use of invasive or non-invasive sensors. For the future it will be vital that the technologies used are subjected to controlled trials to establish benefit or otherwise.

  7. Freeform and advanced optics for ELT instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyl, Roland

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we share some recent work performed at REOSC in the domain of advanced optics for space and that is also directly applicable to astronomical instrumentation, e.g. for the Extremely Large Telescopes (ELT), the construction of which has already started. We present firstly the results of some design investigations performed on Three Mirror Anastigmat (TMA) imaging optics when using freeform optical surfaces clearly showing gain in performance (WFE, distortion, … ) or compactness of the optics. We separate smart freeform from more aggressive freeform offering increased level of gain in design performances. Secondly we present our development in freeform and direct off-axis high performance optical manufacturing capabilities and the industrialization efforts conducted in the frame of the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) primary mirror segments. A third subject is the demonstration of an extreme freeform surface manufacturing with the prototyping of a huge 500 mm aperture, 90° deviation angle, F/2.5 high output NA Off Axis Parabola (OAP), a unique achievement aimed to confirm the viability of potential new design opportunities involving such type of extreme optics. Finally we present in this paper our technology development on polishing layer for SiC material, named R-SiC, a polishing layer that reduces costs, risks and schedule for advanced SiC optics manufacturing for Vis and IR applications.

  8. Calibration of areal surface topography measuring instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seewig, J.; Eifler, M.

    2017-06-01

    The ISO standards which are related to the calibration of areal surface topography measuring instruments are the ISO 25178-6xx series which defines the relevant metrological characteristics for the calibration of different measuring principles and the ISO 25178-7xx series which defines the actual calibration procedures. As the field of areal measurement is however not yet fully standardized, there are still open questions to be addressed which are subject to current research. Based on this, selected research results of the authors in this area are presented. This includes the design and fabrication of areal material measures. For this topic, two examples are presented with the direct laser writing of a stepless material measure for the calibration of the height axis which is based on the Abbott- Curve and the manufacturing of a Siemens star for the determination of the lateral resolution limit. Based on these results, as well a new definition for the resolution criterion, the small scale fidelity, which is still under discussion, is presented. Additionally, a software solution for automated calibration procedures is outlined.

  9. Biomedical Instruments for Fetal and Neonatal Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, P.; Scopesi, F.; Serra, G.

    2006-10-01

    Specialised instruments have been developed to aid the care of the fetus and the newborn baby. Miniature sensors using optical, electrical, chemical, mechanical and magnetic principles have been produced for capturing key measurands. These include temperature, pressure, flow and dimension, as well as several specific molecules such as glucose, oxygen and carbon dioxide. During pregnancy ultrasound imaging and blood flow techniques provide valuable information concerning fetal abnormalities, fetal growth, fetal breathing and fetal heart rate. Signal processing and pattern recognition can be useful for deriving indicators of fetal distress and clinical status, based on biopotentials as well as ultrasound signals. Fetal pH measurement is a critical requirement during labour and delivery. The intensive care of ill preterm babies involves provision of an optimal thermal environment and respiratory support. Monitoring of blood gas and acid-base status is essential, and this involves both blood sampling for in vitro analysis as well as the use of invasive or non-invasive sensors. For the future it will be vital that the technologies used are subjected to controlled trials to establish benefit or otherwise.

  10. From instrumentalism to realism in accounting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Enachi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available How, by their nature, the humans cannot have perfect knowledge, the only absolute thing is relativity, this being present in all their actions. In accounting, given its subject matter, it can talk of the relativity of the values that characterize the events in the life of an organization, this being caused by a wide variety of factors. In a previous article (Enachi, 2012 was identified a particular paradigm with visible effects in accounting practice, more precisely, it was talked about the transition from instrumentalism to realism in accounting. This paper supports the previous assertions and after explaining the accounting implications of the two fundamentally different approaches tries to provide solutions for bringing accounting closer to reality. A literature review is conducted to identify the limits that accounting presents in its attempt to capture the truth and the factors responsible for these limits. The main conclusion is that the quality of the professional judgments exercised in creating and implementing a system for accounting representation of reality, although partially controlled, is essential in increasing the reliability of the information provided by accounting.

  11. Safeguards instrument to monitor spent reactor fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, N.; Dowdy, E. J.; Holt, D. M.; Stump, C.

    1981-10-01

    A hand held instrument for monitoring irradiated nuclear fuel inventories located in water filled storage ponds has been developed. This instrument provides sufficient precise qualitative and quantitative information to be useful as a confirmatory technique to International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors, and is believed to be of potential use to nuclear fuel managers and to operators of spent fuel storage facilities, both at reactor and away from reactor, and to operators of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Because the Cerenkov radiation glow can barely be seen by the unaided eye under darkened conditions, a night vision device is incorporated to aid the operator in locating the fuel assembly to be measured. Beam splitting optics placed in front of the image intensifier and a preset aperture select a predetermined portion of the observed scene for measurement of the light intensity using a photomultiplier (PM) tube and digital readout. The PM tube gain is adjusted by use of an internal optical reference source, providing long term repeatability and instrument to instrument consistency. Interchangeable lenses accommodate various viewing and measuring conditions.

  12. Instrumentation between science, state and industry

    CERN Document Server

    Shinn, Terry

    2001-01-01

    these. In this book, we appropriate their conception of research-technology, and ex­ tend it to many other phenomena which are less stable and less localized in time and space than the Zeeman/Cotton situation. In the following pages, we use the concept for instances where research activities are orientated primarily toward technologies which facilitate both the production of scientific knowledge and the production of other goods. In particular, we use the tenn for instances where instruments and meth­ ods· traverse numerous geographic and institutional boundaries; that is, fields dis­ tinctly different and distant from the instruments' and methods' initial focus. We suggest that instruments such as the ultra-centrifuge, and the trajectories of the men who devise such artefacts, diverge in an interesting way from other fonns of artefacts and careers in science, metrology and engineering with which students of science and technology are more familiar. The instrument systems developed by re­ search-technolo...

  13. Networks as Policy Instruments for Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, Pieter J.; Geerling-Eiff, Florentien

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to compare the effectiveness of facilitated networks to other policy instruments for agricultural innovation. Design/ methodology/ approach: In an exploratory study of the Dutch agricultural policy context, we conducted semi-structured interviews with ten experts on networks and innovation. Policy…

  14. Instrumentation system for improvement of temperature sensor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As a result of some intensive research on improvement of the measurement and instrumentation techniques with thermistors, an electronic circuit is developed that is reducing considerably the thermistor non-linearity, its self-heating effect and is increasing its sensitivity in a wider temperature range of measurements and ...

  15. Instrumentation for multi-detector arrays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... The new generation of detector arrays require complex instrumentation and data acquisition system to ensure increased reliability of operation, high degree of integration, software control and faster data handling capability. The main features of some of the existing multi-detector arrays like MSU 4 array, ...

  16. Predictors of Instrumental Music Teacher Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Robert Louis, III

    2012-01-01

    Previous research studies related to teacher quality have found that teacher attrition rates are at an all-time high. Although much research has been conducted in the area of job satisfaction within the general teaching population, few studies of job satisfaction exist for instrumental music teachers. The purpose of this correlational study was to…

  17. Surface Plasmon Resonance: Methods and Instrumentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooyman, R.P.H.; Lindon, John C.

    1999-01-01

    In view of its simple instrumentation and its high surface sensitivity, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and, more recently, SPR microscopy gains an increasing significance to numerous problems concerned with the study of interactions occurring near to or at surfaces. Applications can be found in the

  18. Instrumentation for Power System Disturbance Monitoring, Data ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, the level of instrumentation for power system disturbance monitoring, data acquisition and control in Nigerian Electric Power System; National Electric Power Authority (NEPA) is presented. The need for accurate power system disturbance monitoring is highlighted. A feature of an adequate monitoring, data ...

  19. Anodic Stripping Voltammetry: An Instrumental Analysis Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Joseph

    1983-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to acquaint students with the theory and applications of anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) as well as such ASV problems as contamination associated with trace analysis. The experimental procedure, instrumentation, and materials discussed are designed to minimize cost and keep procedures as simple as possible. (JM)

  20. Avionics Instrument Systems Specialist (AFSC 32551).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lawrence B.; Crowcroft, Robert A.

    This six-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for avionics instrument systems specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are career field familiarization (career field progression and training, security, occupational safety and health, and career field reference material);…

  1. Instrumented impact testing at high velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfosse, Daniel; Pageau, Gilles; Bennett, Roger; Poursartip, Anoush

    Impact loading of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic CFRP) aircraft parts is a major concern. Birds or hailstones striking an aircraft generally have a low mass and a high velocity, whereas typically instrumented impact experiments are performed with a high mass and a low velocity. Our aim has been to build an instrumented impact facility with a low-mass projectile capable of simulating these impact events, since there is evidence that a low-velocity impact will not always result in the same amount or even type of damage as a high-velocity impact. This paper provides a detailed description of the instrumented low-mass impact facility at The University of British Columbia (UBC). A gas gun is used to accelerate the instrumented projectile to impact velocities as high as 50 m/s, corresponding to an energy level of 350 J. The contact force during the impact event is measured by an incorporated load cell. The necessary mathematical operations to determine the real load-displacement curves are outlined, and the results of some impact events at different velocities are shown.

  2. SNS Vacuum Instrumentation and Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Y. Tang; L. A. Smart; H. C. Hseuh; P. S. Marroquin; L. R. Dalesio; S. A. Lewis; C. A. Lionberger; K. Kishiyama; D. P. Gurd; M. Hechler; W. Schneider

    2001-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) vacuum instrumentation and control systems are being designed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator facility (TJNAF) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Each participating lab is responsible for a different section of the machine: LBNL for the Front-End section, LANL for the warm LINAC section, TJNAF for the cold LINAC section and BNL for the Ring and transfer line sections. The vacuum instrumentation and control systems are scheduled to be installed and be in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2004 or 2005. Although the requirements vary for different sections of the machine, a collaborative effort has been made to standardize vacuum instrumentation components and the global control system interfaces. This paper summarizes the design of each sub-section of vacuum instrumentation and control system and discusses SNS standards for Ion Pump and Gauge controllers, Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) interfaces, Ladder Logic programming and the SNS global control system interfaces.

  3. The XGS instrument on-board THESEUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuschino, F.; Campana, R.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Amati, L.; Fiorini, M.; Uslenghi, M.; Baldazzi, G.; Evangelista, Y.; Elmi, I.; Feroci, M.; Frontera, F.; Rachevski, A.; Rignanese, L. P.; Vacchi, A.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Rashevskaya, I.; Bellutti, P.; Piemonte, C.

    2016-10-01

    Consolidated techniques used for space-borne X-ray and gamma-ray instruments are based on the use of scintillators coupled to Silicon photo-detectors. This technology associated with modern very low noise read-out electronics allows the design of innovative architectures able to reduce drastically the system complexity and power consumption, also with a moderate-to-high number of channels. These detector architectures can be exploited in the design of space instrumentation for gamma-spectroscopy with the benefit of possible smart background rejection strategies. We describe a detector prototype with 3D imaging capabilities to be employed in future gamma-ray and particle space missions in the 0.002-100 MeV energy range. The instrument is based on a stack of scintillating bars read out by Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) at both ends. The spatial segmentation and the crystal double-side readout allow a 3D position reconstruction with ∼3 mm accuracy within the full active volume, using a 2D readout along the two external faces of the detector. Furthermore, one of the side of SDDs can be used simultaneously to detect X-rays in the 2-30 keV energy range. The characteristics of this instrument make it suitable in next generation gamma-ray and particle space missions for Earth or outer space observations, and it will be briefly illustrated.

  4. Technical memorandum: instrumentation for APT and LTPP

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steyn, WJvdM

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available project should still be identified to ensure that parameters are not just monitored for the sake of monitoring them. A standard checklist can be used to ensure that relevant parameters are monitored using appropriate sensors and instruments; A variety...

  5. Economic instruments and marine litter control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhuis, F.H.; Papyrakis, E.; Boteler, B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive up-to-date review of the literature on the economic instruments that can reduce marine litter. We assess their cost of implementation, level of effectiveness as well as indirect environmental and socio-economic effects (externalities) that may arise as a result of

  6. OMPS Limb Profiler Instrument Performance Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaross, Glen R.; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Chen, Grace; Kowitt, Mark; Haken, Michael; Chen, Zhong; Xu, Philippe; Warner, Jeremy; Kelly, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Following the successful launch of the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) spacecraft, the NASA OMPS Limb team began an evaluation of instrument and data product performance. The focus of this paper is the instrument performance in relation to the original design criteria. Performance that is closer to expectations increases the likelihood that limb scatter measurements by SNPP OMPS and successor instruments can form the basis for accurate long-term monitoring of ozone vertical profiles. The team finds that the Limb instrument operates mostly as designed and basic performance meets or exceeds the original design criteria. Internally scattered stray light and sensor pointing knowledge are two design challenges with the potential to seriously degrade performance. A thorough prelaunch characterization of stray light supports software corrections that are accurate to within 1% in radiances up to 60 km for the wavelengths used in deriving ozone. Residual stray light errors at 1000nm, which is useful in retrievals of stratospheric aerosols, currently exceed 10%. Height registration errors in the range of 1 km to 2 km have been observed that cannot be fully explained by known error sources. An unexpected thermal sensitivity of the sensor also causes wavelengths and pointing to shift each orbit in the northern hemisphere. Spectral shifts of as much as 0.5nm in the ultraviolet and 5 nm in the visible, and up to 0.3 km shifts in registered height, must be corrected in ground processing.

  7. Apparatus and method of navigating an instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, N.H.; Den Heeten, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    An apparatus to be used with navigating an instrument in a vascular tree of a patient, comprises a patient's examination table, a C-arm, mounted to which is an X-ray source and an image recorder for registering first X-ray images of the patient, obtained by the use of the X-ray source, and a

  8. Pulse energy measurement at the SXR instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, Stefan, E-mail: smoeller@slac.stanford.edu; Brown, Garth; Dakovski, Georgi; Hill, Bruce; Holmes, Michael; Loos, Jennifer; Maida, Ricardo; Paiser, Ernesto; Schlotter, William; Turner, Joshua J.; Wallace, Alex [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Jastrow, Ulf; Kreis, Svea [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Sorokin, Andrey A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Polytekhnicheskaya 26, 194021 St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Tiedtke, Kai [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-04-14

    A gas monitor detector was implemented and characterized at the Soft X-ray Research instrument (SXR) to measure the average, absolute and pulse-resolved photon flux of the LCLS beam in the energy range between 280 and 2000 eV. A gas monitor detector was implemented and characterized at the Soft X-ray Research (SXR) instrument to measure the average, absolute and pulse-resolved photon flux of the LCLS beam in the energy range between 280 and 2000 eV. The detector is placed after the monochromator and addresses the need to provide reliable absolute pulse energy as well as pulse-resolved measurements for the various experiments at this instrument. This detector provides a reliable non-invasive measurement for determining flux levels on the samples in the downstream experimental chamber and for optimizing signal levels of secondary detectors and for the essential need of data normalization. The design, integration into the instrument and operation are described, and examples of its performance are given.

  9. Advanced Instrumentation for Positron Emission Tomography [PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.

    1985-04-01

    This paper summarizes the physical processes and medical science goals that underlay modern instrumentation design for Positron Emission Tomography. The paper discusses design factors such as detector material, crystalphototube coupling, shielding geometry, sampling motion, electronics design, time-of-flight, and the interrelationships with quantitative accuracy, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, maximum data rates, and cost.

  10. THE CHARACTERISTICS OF EEC PET INSTRUMENTATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PAANS, AMJ

    1991-01-01

    As a result of a Guide-Questionnaire distributed among all European PET centers an inventory of the European PET instrumentation has become available in a data base. An overview and analysis of the European PET equipment, cyclotrons, scanners and software, together with some global information on

  11. Instrumented techniques in tool - and object perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Mette

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to report from a study of the role of instrumented techniques in the students? learning process. The paper analyses an episode from a case study of students solving differential equations in a CAS environment. The analysis demonstrates how tasks can be designed with the aim...

  12. Robotics-Instrumentation and Control in Robotics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 3. Robotics - Instrumentation and Control in Robotics. J R Vengateswaran. General Article Volume 5 Issue 3 March 2000 pp 66-76. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/005/03/0066-0076 ...

  13. Academic Evaluation: Universal Instrument? Tool for Development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Mariela; Gras, Natalia; Sutz, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Research agendas and academic evaluation are inevitably linked. By means of economic incentives, promotion, research funding, and reputation academic evaluation is a powerful influence on the production of knowledge; moreover, it is often conceived as a universal instrument without consideration of the context in which it is applied. Evaluation…

  14. Cooling the dark energy camera instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, R.L.; Cease, H.; /Fermilab; DePoy, D.; /Ohio State U.; Diehl, H.T.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; /Fermilab; Kuhlmann, S.; /Ohio State U.; Onal, Birce; Stefanik, A.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    DECam, camera for the Dark Energy Survey (DES), is undergoing general design and component testing. For an overview see DePoy, et al in these proceedings. For a description of the imager, see Cease, et al in these proceedings. The CCD instrument will be mounted at the prime focus of the CTIO Blanco 4m telescope. The instrument temperature will be 173K with a heat load of 113W. In similar applications, cooling CCD instruments at the prime focus has been accomplished by three general methods. Liquid nitrogen reservoirs have been constructed to operate in any orientation, pulse tube cryocoolers have been used when tilt angles are limited and Joule-Thompson or Stirling cryocoolers have been used with smaller heat loads. Gifford-MacMahon cooling has been used at the Cassegrain but not at the prime focus. For DES, the combined requirements of high heat load, temperature stability, low vibration, operation in any orientation, liquid nitrogen cost and limited space available led to the design of a pumped, closed loop, circulating nitrogen system. At zenith the instrument will be twelve meters above the pump/cryocooler station. This cooling system expected to have a 10,000 hour maintenance interval. This paper will describe the engineering basis including the thermal model, unbalanced forces, cooldown time, the single and two-phase flow model.

  15. Instrument Development for Nanomaterial Risk Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brossell, D.

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials are a growing source for innovation. However, the very properties that make them so effective for their desired purpose might also render them more hazardous towards humans and the environment. Adequate risk assessment tools are often missing, partly due to instrumental gaps in

  16. Radiometric calibration of the gome-2 instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otter, G.C.J.; Dijkhuizen, N.; Vosteen, L.L.A.; Brinkers, S.; Gür, B.; Kenter, P.

    2017-01-01

    The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2(GOME-2) represents one of the European instruments carried on board the MetOp satellite within the ESA’s “Living Planet Program”. Consisting of three flight models (FM’s) it is intended to provide long-term monitoring of atmospheric ozone and other trace

  17. Planetary imaging with amateur astronomical instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanasopoulos, k.; Giannaris, G.

    2017-09-01

    Planetary imaging can be varied by the types and size of instruments and processing. With basic amateur telescopes and software, can be captured images of our planetary system, mainly Jupiter, Saturn and Mars, but also solar eclipses, solar flares, and many more. Planetary photos can be useful for professional astronomers, and how amateur astronomers can play a role on that field.

  18. Analysis and design of instrumented subsurface mooring

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Sakhardande, R.N.; Nayak, B.U.; Somanatha, G.S.

    be simplified. The objective of the present study is to design and analyse single point subsurface instrumented mooring system under a three dimensional current profile. A software 'SUBAM' is developed in FORTRAN-77 and it is applied to analyse a shallow water...

  19. Exoplanetary Science: Instrumentation, Observations, and Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElwain, Michael

    2011-01-01

    More than 700 exoplanets have been discovered and studied using indirect techniques, leading our field into the exciting new era of comparative exoplanetology. However, the direct detection of exoplanetary systems still remains at the sensitivity limits of both ground- and space-based observatories. The development of new technologies for adaptive optics systems and high contrast instruments continues to increase the ability to directly study exoplanets. The scientific impact of these developments has promising prospects for both short and long timescales. In my talk, I will discuss recent highlights from the SEEDS survey and the current instrumentation in use at the Subaru telescope. SEEDS is a high contrast imaging strategic observing program with 120 nights of time allocated at the NAOJ's flagship optical and infrared telescope. I will also describe new instrumentation I designed to improve the SEEDS capabilities and efficiency. Finally, I will briefly discuss the conceptual design of a transiting planet camera to fly as a potential second generation instrument on-board NASA's SOFIA observatory.

  20. Assessment for Learning Instrumentation in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akib, Erwin; Ghafar, Mohamad Najib Abdul

    2015-01-01

    This study explains assessment for learning instrumentation, especially in higher education. The population of this study was 100 lecturers of the Muhammadiyah Makassar University, Indonesia. A total of 50 items from six construct were analyzed and used to determine the reliability and validity of the questionnaire. The result shows that the…

  1. Early Grade Writing Assessment: An Instrument Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Juan E.

    2017-01-01

    The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization promoted the creation of a model instrument for individual assessment of students' foundational writing skills in the Spanish language that was based on a literature review and existing writing tools and assessments. The purpose of the "Early Grade Writing Assessment"…

  2. Penetrating eye injuries from writing instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly SP

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Simon P Kelly, Graham MB ReevesThe Royal Bolton Hospital, Bolton, UKPurpose: To consider the potential for ocular injury from writing implements by presenting four such cases, and to consider the incidence of such eye injuries from analysis of a national trauma database.Methods: The Home and Leisure Accident Surveillance System was searched for records of eye injuries from writing instruments to provide UK estimates of such injuries. Four patients with ocular penetrating injury from pens or pencils (especially when caused by children, and examined by the authors, are described which illustrate mechanisms of injury.Results: It is estimated that around 748 ocular pen injuries and 892 ocular pencil injuries of undetermined severity occurred annually in the UK during the database surveillance period 2000–2002. No eye injuries from swords, including toy swords and fencing foils, were reported.Conclusion: Ocular perforation sometimes occur from writing instruments that are thrown in the community, especially by children. Implications for policy and prevention are discussed. Non-specialists should have a low threshold for referring patients with eye injuries if suspicious of ocular penetration, even where caused by everyday objects, such as writing instruments.Keywords: eye injury, eye, children, mechanism, writing instruments, prevention

  3. The MMT-POL Instrument Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, C.; Packham, C.; Jones, T. J.; Varosi, F.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Dewahl, K.; Krejny, M.

    2011-07-01

    Instrument control system (ICS) suites are a continually evolving class of software packages that are highly dependent upon the design choices and application programming interfaces (APIs) of the observatory control system (OCS), as well as the hardware choices for motors and electronics. We present the ICS for MMT-POL, a 1-5 μm polarimeter for the MMT telescope, in the context of being a transitional step between the software packages developed for facility class instruments at the University of Florida (UF), such as Flamingos-II and CanariCam, and in preparation for 30 m-class instruments. Our goals for improving ICS suites are to make them (a) portable (compile once, run anywhere), (b) highly modular and extensible (through the re-use of common libraries), (c) multi-threaded (to allow multiple tasks to be performed in parallel), (d) smart, and (e) easy to use and maintain. An ICS should also be well-defined and use mature languages (we choose Java and Python) and common standards (such as XML and the FITS file format). We also note that as hardware moves away from serial communications to ethernet, the use of TCP sockets makes communication faster and easier. Below, we present our design choices for the MMT-POL ICS and discuss our reasons for these choices and potential issues that must be addressed for future ICS suites ready for thirty meter class instruments.

  4. CHEOPS: status summary of the instrument development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, T.; Broeg, C.; Fortier, A.; Cessa, V.; Malvasio, L.; Piazza, D.; Benz, W.; Thomas, N.; Magrin, D.; Viotto, V.; Bergomi, M.; Ragazzoni, R.; Pagano, I.; Peter, G.; Buder, M.; Plesseria, J. Y.; Steller, M.; Ottensamer, R.; Ehrenreich, D.; Van Damme, C.; Isaak, K.; Ratti, F.; Rando, N.; Ngan, I.

    2016-07-01

    CHEOPS (CHaracterizing ExOPlanets Satellite) is the first ESA Small Mission as part of the ESA Cosmic Vision program 2015-2025. The mission was formally adopted in early February 2014 with a planned launch readiness end of 2017. The mission lead is performed in a partnership between Switzerland, led by the University of Bern, and the European Space Agency with important contributions from Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. The mission is dedicated to searching for exoplanetary transits by performing ultrahigh precision photometry on bright starts already known to host planets whose mass has been already estimated through ground based observations. The instrument is an optical Ritchey-Chretien telescope of 30 cm clear aperture using a single CCD detector. The optical system is designed to image a de-focused PSF onto the focal plane with very stringent stability and straylight rejection requirements providing a FoV of 0.32 degrees full cone. The system design is adapted to meet the top-level science requirements, which ask for a photometric precision of 20ppm, in 6 hours integration time, on transit measurements of G5 dwarf stars with V-band magnitudes in the range 6≤V≤9 mag. Additionally they ask for a photometric precision of 85 ppm in 3 hours integration time of Neptune-size planets transiting K-type dwarf stars with V-band magnitudes as faint as V=12 mag. Given the demanding schedule and cost constrains, the mission relies mostly on components with flight heritage for the platform as well as for the payload components. Nevertheless, several new developments are integrated into the design as for example the telescope structure and the very low noise, high stability CCD front end electronics. The instrument and mission have gone through critical design review in fall 2015 / spring 2016. This paper describes the current instrument and mission design with a focus on the instrument. It outlines the

  5. DASI: Distributed Arrays of Small Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J. C.

    2004-12-01

    The NAS Solar and Space Physics Decadal Survey has recommended that the next major ground-based instrumentation initiative for space science research be the deployment of widely-distributed arrays of small instrumentation. Such arrays will provide continuous real-time observations of Earthspace with the resolution needed resolve mesoscale phenomena and their dynamic evolution. Ground-based arrays will address the need for observations to support the next generation of space weather data-assimilation models and will push our understanding of the physical processes which interconnect the spheres of Earthspace to a new level. It is envisioned that DASI instrumentation will provide real-time data for a wide variety of research, applications, and educational users. Infrastructure issues including instrument design and deployment, communications, and data distribution will be important aspects of a DASI plan. In order to provide a strong foundation for future initiatives addressing the DASI goals, the NAS Committee on Solar and Space Physics (CSSP) has undertaken a study of the scientific need for such arrays, the infrastructure needed to support and utilize them, and an implementation plan for their deployment. Community input was solicited in the spring of 2004 and a working group meeting was held at the NAS Woods Hole facilities in June, 2004 to discuss a science plan for DASI and to address issues for inclusion in a DASI report. The focus of the CSSP report is the compelling science which will be enabled by the development of arrays of small instruments. The current status and an outline of the DASI science report will be reviewed.

  6. Instrumentation for the Characterization of Inflatable Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Gregory T.; Cassell, Alan M.; Johnson, R. Keith

    2012-01-01

    Current entry, descent, and landing technologies are not practical for heavy payloads due to mass and volume constraints dictated by limitations imposed by launch vehicle fairings. Therefore, new technologies are now being explored to provide a mass- and volume-efficient solution for heavy payload capabilities, including Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators (IAD) [1]. Consideration of IADs for space applications has prompted the development of instrumentation systems for integration with flexible structures to characterize system response to flight-like environment testing. This development opportunity faces many challenges specific to inflatable structures in extreme environments, including but not limited to physical flexibility, packaging, temperature, structural integration and data acquisition [2]. In the spring of 2012, two large scale Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators (HIAD) will be tested in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex s 40 by 80 wind tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The test series will characterize the performance of a 3.0 m and 6.0 m HIAD at various angles of attack and levels of inflation during flight-like loading. To analyze the performance of these inflatable test articles as they undergo aerodynamic loading, many instrumentation systems have been researched and developed. These systems will utilize new experimental sensing systems developed by the HIAD ground test campaign instrumentation team, in addition to traditional wind tunnel sensing techniques in an effort to improve test article characterization and model validation. During the 2012 test series the instrumentation systems will target inflatable aeroshell static and dynamic deformation, structural strap loading, surface pressure distribution, localized skin deflection, and torus inflation pressure. This paper will offer an overview of inflatable structure instrumentation, and provide detail into the design and implementation of the sensors systems that will

  7. 78 FR 52974 - Keithley Instruments; Solon, Ohio; Notice of Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ... of Investigation on the basis that the subject worker group was eligible to apply for TAA under TA-W... Employment and Training Administration Keithley Instruments; Solon, Ohio; Notice of Investigation Pursuant to Section 221 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended, an investigation was initiated on June 25, 2013 in...

  8. Applications of Calendar Instruments in Social Surveys: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glasner, T.J.; Vaart, van der W.

    2009-01-01

    Retrospective reports in survey interviews and questionnaires are subject to many types of recall error, which affect completeness, consistency, and dating accuracy. Concerns about this problem have led to the development of so-called calendar instruments, or timeline techniques. These aided recall

  9. Hardness and elasticity of abrasive particles measured by instrumented indentation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hvizdoš, P.; Zeleňák, Michal; Hloch, Sergej

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2016), s. 869-871 ISSN 1805-0476 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : abrasive * garnet * hardness * elasticity * instrumental indentation Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools http://www.mmscience.eu/content/file/archives/MM_Science_201601.pdf

  10. Hybrid Instrumentation in Lumbar Spinal Fusion: A Biomechanical Evaluation of Three Different Instrumentation Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obid, Peter; Danyali, Reza; Kueny, Rebecca; Huber, Gerd; Reichl, Michael; Richter, Alexander; Niemeyer, Thomas; Morlock, Michael; Püschel, Klaus; Übeyli, Hüseyin

    2017-02-01

    Ex vivo human cadaveric study. The development or progression of adjacent segment disease (ASD) after spine stabilization and fusion is a major problem in spine surgery. Apart from optimal balancing of the sagittal profile, dynamic instrumentation is often suggested to prevent or impede ASD. Hybrid instrumentation is used to gain stabilization while allowing motion to avoid hypermobility in the adjacent segment. In this biomechanical study, the effects of two different hybrid instrumentations on human cadaver spines were evaluated and compared with a rigid instrumentation. Eighteen human cadaver spines (T11-L5) were subdivided into three groups: rigid, dynamic, and hook comprising six spines each. Clinical parameters and initial mechanical characteristics were consistent among groups. All specimens received rigid fixation from L3-L5 followed by application of a free bending load of extension and flexion. The range of motion (ROM) for every segment was evaluated. For the rigid group, further rigid fixation from L1-L5 was applied. A dynamic Elaspine system (Spinelab AG, Winterthur, Switzerland) was applied from L1 to L3 for the dynamic group, and the hook group was instrumented with additional laminar hooks at L1-L3. ROM was then evaluated again. There was no significant difference in ROM among the three instrumentation techniques. Based on this data, the intended advantage of a hybrid or dynamic instrumentation might not be achieved.

  11. 46 CFR 67.243 - Requirements for instruments subordinating mortgages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for instruments subordinating mortgages. 67... MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS DOCUMENTATION OF VESSELS Filing and Recording of Instruments-Mortgages, Preferred Mortgages, and Related Instruments § 67.243 Requirements for instruments subordinating mortgages. An...

  12. Ultrasonics: a novel approach for retrieval of separated instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhina, Harleen; Hans, Manoj Kumar; Chander, Subhash

    2015-01-01

    An instrument fracture within the root canal interferes and hinders the outcome of the successful root canal treatment. Fracture of endodontic instrument often results from incorrect use or overuse. This article reports a case of retrieval of separated endodontic instrument with help of ultrasonic and discusses the factors influencing the removal of fractured instrument.

  13. 47 CFR 73.1215 - Specifications for indicating instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specifications for indicating instruments. 73... indicating instruments. The following requirements and specifications shall apply to indicating instruments used by broadcast stations: (a) Linear scale instruments: (1) Length of scale shall not be less than 2...

  14. 14 CFR 25.1303 - Flight and navigation instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight and navigation instruments. 25.1303... navigation instruments. (a) The following flight and navigation instruments must be installed so that the instrument is visible from each pilot station: (1) A free air temperature indicator or an air-temperature...

  15. 14 CFR 29.1303 - Flight and navigation instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight and navigation instruments. 29.1303... navigation instruments. The following are required flight and navigational instruments: (a) An airspeed... on rotorcraft with a third attitude instrument system that— (1) Is usable through flight attitudes of...

  16. 21 CFR 870.4500 - Cardiovascular surgical instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiovascular surgical instruments. 870.4500 Section 870.4500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... surgical instruments. (a) Identification. Cardiovascular surgical instruments are surgical instruments that...

  17. 10 CFR 35.61 - Calibration of survey instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calibration of survey instruments. 35.61 Section 35.61... § 35.61 Calibration of survey instruments. (a) A licensee shall calibrate the survey instruments used... or decade that will be used to show compliance; and (3) Conspicuously note on the instrument the date...

  18. An Employment Interview Instrument for Special Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebmeier, Howard; Beutel, Jennifer L.; Dugan, Erin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and field test an employment screening instrument for special education teachers. The instrument developed demonstrated good reliability and concurrent validity. Both principals and special education administrators could effectively use the instrument. The instrument shows promise for helping administrators…

  19. 49 CFR 572.200 - Instrumentation and test conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Instrumentation and test conditions. 572.200... Side Impact Crash Test Dummy, Small Adult Female § 572.200 Instrumentation and test conditions. (a) The...) Instrumentation and sensors conform to the Recommended Practice SAE J-211 (March 1995), Instrumentation for Impact...

  20. 49 CFR 572.116 - Instrumentation and test conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Instrumentation and test conditions. 572.116... Impact Hybrid Dummy 50th Percentile Male § 572.116 Instrumentation and test conditions. (a) The test...) Instrumentation and sensors used must conform to SAE Recommended Practice J211, March 1995, “Instrumentation for...

  1. Photogrammetry of the Map Instrument in a Cryogenic Vacuum Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M.; Packard, E.; Pazar, R.

    2000-01-01

    MAP Instrument requirements dictated that the instruments Focal Plane Assembly (FPA) and Thermal Reflector System (TRS) maintain a high degree of structural integrity at operational temperatures (photogrammetry camera. This paper will discuss MAP's Instrument requirements, how those requirements were verified using photogrammetry, and the test setup used to provide the environment and camera movement needed to verify the instrument's requirements.

  2. A framework for assessing Health Economic Evaluation (HEE quality appraisal instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langer Astrid

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health economic evaluations support the health care decision-making process by providing information on costs and consequences of health interventions. The quality of such studies is assessed by health economic evaluation (HEE quality appraisal instruments. At present, there is no instrument for measuring and improving the quality of such HEE quality appraisal instruments. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to establish a framework for assessing the quality of HEE quality appraisal instruments to support and improve their quality, and to apply this framework to those HEE quality appraisal instruments which have been subject to more scrutiny than others, in order to test the framework and to demonstrate the shortcomings of existing HEE quality appraisal instruments. Methods To develop the quality assessment framework for HEE quality appraisal instruments, the experiences of using appraisal tools for clinical guidelines are used. Based on a deductive iterative process, clinical guideline appraisal instruments identified through literature search are reviewed, consolidated, and adapted to produce the final quality assessment framework for HEE quality appraisal instruments. Results The final quality assessment framework for HEE quality appraisal instruments consists of 36 items organized within 7 dimensions, each of which captures a specific domain of quality. Applying the quality assessment framework to four existing HEE quality appraisal instruments, it is found that these four quality appraisal instruments are of variable quality. Conclusions The framework described in this study should be regarded as a starting point for appraising the quality of HEE quality appraisal instruments. This framework can be used by HEE quality appraisal instrument producers to support and improve the quality and acceptance of existing and future HEE quality appraisal instruments. By applying this framework, users of HEE quality appraisal

  3. A critical appraisal of instruments to measure outcomes of interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, Matthew; Davidson, Megan

    2015-04-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is believed to prepare health professional graduates for successful collaborative practice. A range of instruments have been developed to measure the outcomes of IPE. An understanding of the psychometric properties of these instruments is important if they are to be used to measure the effectiveness of IPE. This review set out to identify instruments available to measure outcomes of IPE and collaborative practice in pre-qualification health professional students and to critically appraise the psychometric properties of validity, responsiveness and reliability against contemporary standards for instrument design. Instruments were selected from a pool of extant instruments and subjected to critical appraisal to determine whether they satisfied inclusion criteria. The qualitative and psychometric attributes of the included instruments were appraised using a checklist developed for this review. Nine instruments were critically appraised, including the widely adopted Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) and the Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS). Validity evidence for instruments was predominantly based on test content and internal structure. Ceiling effects and lack of scale width contribute to the inability of some instruments to detect change in variables of interest. Limited reliability data were reported for two instruments. Scale development and scoring protocols were generally reported by instrument developers, but the inconsistent application of scoring protocols for some instruments was apparent. A number of instruments have been developed to measure outcomes of IPE in pre-qualification health professional students. Based on reported validity evidence and reliability data, the psychometric integrity of these instruments is limited. The theoretical test construction paradigm on which instruments have been developed may be contributing to the failure of some instruments to detect change in

  4. Instrumented balance and walking assessments in persons with multiple sclerosis show strong test-retest reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Jordan J; Bruetsch, Adam P; Lynch, Sharon G; Horak, Fay B; Huisinga, Jessie M

    2017-05-22

    There is a need for objective movement assessment for clinical research trials aimed at improving gait and balance in persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). Wireless inertial sensors can accurately measure numerous walking and balance parameters but these measures require evaluation of reliability in PwMS. The current study determined the test-retest reliability of wireless inertial sensor measures obtained during an instrumented standing balance test and an instrumented Timed Up and Go test in PwMS. Fifteen PwMS and 15 healthy control subjects (HC) performed an instrumented standing balance and instrumented Timed Up and Go (TUG) test on two separate days. Ten instrumented standing balance measures and 18 instrumented TUG measures were computed from the wireless sensor data. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated to determine test-retest reliability of all instrumented standing balance and instrumented TUG measures. Correlations were evaluated between the instrumented standing balance and instrumented TUG measures and self-reported walking and balance performance, fall history, and clinical disability. For both groups, ICCs for instrumented standing balance measures were best for spatio-temporal measures, while frequency measures were less reliable. All instrumented TUG measures exhibited good to excellent (ICCs > 0.60) test-retest reliability in PwMS and in HC. There were no correlations between self-report walking and balance scores and instrumented TUG or instrumented standing balance metrics, but there were correlations between instrumented TUG and instrumented standing balance metrics and fall history and clinical disability status. Measures from the instrumented standing balance and instrumented TUG tests exhibit good to excellent reliability, demonstrating their potential as objective assessments for clinical trials. A subset of the most reliable measures is recommended for measuring walking and balance in clinical settings.

  5. Reliability of the Respiratory Movement Measuring Instrument, RMMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsén, Monika Fagevik; Romberg, Karin

    2010-09-01

    A new instrument to measure breathing movements, Respiratory Movement Measuring Instrument (RMMI), has been developed. There is still a lack of knowledge about the reliability of the instrument. The aim was to investigate reliability of the RMMI. In this trial, RMMI (ReMo Inc. Keldnaholt, Reykjavik, Iceland) was used. Inter- and intrarater reliability was performed on 30 volunteers who were tested three times in the supine position. Two of the tests were performed by one of the authors and the third test by the other. Intrasubject reliability was tested on 10 volunteers 12 times randomly during 1 h. Intra-instrument reliability was performed by measuring 12 solid surfaces where the instrument was placed horizontally against a couch or vertically against a chair. Intra-rater reliability: The correlations were moderate to strong (r = 0.54-0.94) except for the left lower thoracic position r = 0.35. Inter-rater reliability: The correlations were strong (r = 0.71-0.99) except for the left lower thoracic position r = 0.35. The strongest correlations were seen on the tests on abdominal breathing movements. Intra subject reliability: The over-all difference within and between the participants and test was non-significant (P = 0.98). The average difference between the tests was 1.4 mm. Intra instrument: The differences between the measurements were small (mean 0.15 mm). The over-all difference was non-significant (P = 0.79). The RMMI is a reliable instrument and usable in both clinical practice and research.

  6. Using instruments to understand argument structure: Evidence for gradient representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissman, Lilia; Rawlins, Kyle; Landau, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    The arguments of a verb are commonly assumed to correspond to the event participants specified by the verb. That is, drink has two arguments because drink specifies two participants: someone who drinks and something that gets drunk. This correspondence does not appear to hold, however, in the case of instrumental participants, e.g. John drank the soda with a straw. Verbs such as slice and write have been argued to specify an instrumental participant, even though instruments do not pattern like arguments given other criteria. In this paper, we investigated how instrumental verbs are represented, testing the hypothesis that verbs such as slice encode three participants in the same way that dative verbs such as lend encode three participants. In two experiments English-speakers reported their judgments about the number of participants specified by a verb, e.g., that drink specifies two participants. These judgments indicate that slice does not encode three distinct arguments. Nonetheless, some verbs were systematically more likely to elicit the judgment that the instrument is specified by the verb, a pattern that held across individual subjects. To account for these findings, we propose that instruments are not independent verbal arguments but are represented in a gradient away: an instrument may be a more or less salient part of the force exerted by an agent. These results inform our understanding of the relationship between argument structure and event representation, raising questions concerning the role of arguments in language processing and learning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - January 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JW Voyles

    2009-03-02

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  8. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information October 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JW Voyles

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  9. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information December 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JW Voyles

    2010-12-30

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  10. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - December 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JW Voyles

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  11. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future March 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JW Voyles

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  12. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future February 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JW Voyles

    2009-02-15

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  13. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - November 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JW Voyles

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  14. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information January 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JW Voyles

    2010-02-28

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  15. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - September 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JW Voyles

    2008-10-15

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  16. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - July 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JW Voyles

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  17. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - August 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JW Voyles

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  18. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - April 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JW Voyles

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  19. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - October 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JW Voyles

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  20. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - June 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JW Voyles

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  1. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - May 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JW Voyles

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  2. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future September 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JC Liljegren

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in blue text.

  3. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future August 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JC Liljegren

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in blue text.

  4. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future July 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JC Liljegren

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in blue text.

  5. ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report August 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-09-28

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  6. ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report September 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-10-18

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  7. ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report July 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-08-18

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  8. Quality of Life Instrument for Youths with Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    de Sá Novato, Tatiana; Alves Grossi, Sonia Aurora; Kimura,Miako

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to make the Quality of Life Instrument for Youths with Type 1 Diabetes available, considering that there are no specific instruments to evaluate the Health Related Quality of Life of Youths with type 1 Diabetes in Brazil This instrument is derived from the American instrument “Diabetes Quality of Life for Youths”. The methods recommended in literature were used for the adaptation to the Brazilian culture and validation. The instrument includes 50 items distributed in ...

  9. ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report May 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-06-21

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  10. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information April 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-05-15

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  11. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information February 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-03-25

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  12. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information March 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-04-19

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  13. ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report June 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-07-13

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  14. Radiation Budget Instrument (RBI) for JPSS-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Elena; Priestley, Kory; Dunn, Barry; Cageao, Richard; Barki, Anum; Osmundsen, Jim; Turczynski, Craig; Abedin, Nurul

    2015-01-01

    Radiation Budget Instrument (RBI) will be one of five instruments flying aboard the JPSS-2 spacecraft, a polar-orbiting sun-synchronous satellite in Low Earth Orbit. RBI is a passive remote sensing instrument that will follow the successful legacy of the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments to make measurement of Earth's short and longwave radiation budget. The goal of RBI is to provide an independent measurement of the broadband reflected solar radiance and Earth's emitted thermal radiance by using three spectral bands (Shortwave, Longwave, and Total) that will have the same overlapped point spread function (PSF) footprint on Earth. To ensure precise NIST-traceable calibration in space the RBI sensor is designed to use a visible calibration target (VCT), a solar calibration target (SCT), and an infrared calibration target (ICT) containing phase change cells (PCC) to enable on-board temperature calibration. The VCT is a thermally controlled integrating sphere with space grade Spectralon covering the inner surface. Two sides of the sphere will have fiber-coupled laser diodes in the UV to IR wavelength region. An electrical substitution radiometer on the integrating sphere will monitor the long term stability of the sources and the possible degradation of the Spectralon in space. In addition the radiometric calibration operations will use the Spectralon diffusers of the SCT to provide accurate measurements of Solar degradation. All those stable on-orbit references will ensure that calibration stability is maintained over the RBI sensor lifetime. For the preflight calibration the RBI will view five calibration sources - two integrating spheres and three CrIS (Cross-track Infrared Sounder ) -like blackbodies whose outputs will be validated with NIST calibration approach. Thermopile are the selected detectors for the RBI. The sensor has a requirement to perform lunar calibration in addition to solar calibration in space in a way similar to CERES

  15. Emotional support, instrumental support, and gambling participation among Filipino Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Isok; Kim, Wooksoo; Nochajski, Thomas H

    2014-08-01

    Using representative survey data of Filipino Americans in Honolulu and San Francisco (SF) (N = 2,259), we examined the roles of emotional support and instrumental support on gambling participation. With considerable difference in gambling environments between two regions, we conducted two sets of hierarchical regression analyses for Honolulu sample, which has restricted gambling laws, and SF sample, which has legal gambling environment, and compared the effects of two types of social support on gambling participation. The results indicated that emotional support was positively and instrumental support was negatively associated with gambling participation among Filipino Americans in Honolulu. However, neither type of social support was significantly associated with gambling participation among Filipino Americans living in SF. This study highlights the differing roles and effects of instrumental and emotional support on gambling where gambling is restricted. It also suggests that gambling behaviors of Filipino Americans are subject to situation- and environment-specific factors.

  16. Introducing the B I P (Biomedical Instrumentation Package). Many Important Electronic Functions in One Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biomedical Interdisciplinary Curriculum Project, Berkeley, CA.

    Described are the use and purposes of the Biomedical Instrumentation Package (BIP) in science classrooms. Science activities are suggested and equipment use is described. A sample laboratory activity, which includes materials, procedure, and discussion, is provided. (SA)

  17. Verification of the Indicating Measuring Instruments Taking into Account their Instrumental Measurement Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakharov Igor

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The specific features of the measuring instruments verification based on the results of their calibration are considered. It is noted that, in contrast to the verification procedure used in the legal metrology, the verification procedure for calibrated measuring instruments has to take into account the uncertainty of measurements into account. In this regard, a large number of measuring instruments, considered as those that are in compliance after verification in the legal metrology, turns out to be not in compliance after calibration. In this case, it is necessary to evaluate the probability of compliance of indicating measuring instruments. The procedure of compliance probability determination on the basis of the Monte Carlo method is considered. An example of calibration of a Vernier caliper is given.

  18. Verification of the Indicating Measuring Instruments Taking into Account their Instrumental Measurement Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Igor; Neyezhmakov, Pavel; Botsiura, Olesia

    2017-12-01

    The specific features of the measuring instruments verification based on the results of their calibration are considered. It is noted that, in contrast to the verification procedure used in the legal metrology, the verification procedure for calibrated measuring instruments has to take into account the uncertainty of measurements into account. In this regard, a large number of measuring instruments, considered as those that are in compliance after verification in the legal metrology, turns out to be not in compliance after calibration. In this case, it is necessary to evaluate the probability of compliance of indicating measuring instruments. The procedure of compliance probability determination on the basis of the Monte Carlo method is considered. An example of calibration of a Vernier caliper is given.

  19. Helium and Sulfur Hexafluoride in Musical Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forinash, Kyle; Dixon, Cory L.

    2014-11-01

    The effects of inhaled helium on the human voice were investigated in a recent article in The Physics Teacher.1 As mentioned in that article, demonstrations of the effect are a popular classroom activity. If the number of YouTube videos is any indication, the effects of sulfur hexafluoride on the human voice are equally popular. However, there appears to be little information available on the effects of either of these gases on musical instruments.2 We describe here the results of a student project that involved measuring the frequency shifts in an organ pipe, a trumpet, and a trombone as the result of filling the instruments with these two gases. The project was one of several possible end-of-semester projects required in an elective science of sound course for non-science majors.

  20. Instrumentation of the ESRF medical imaging facility

    CERN Document Server

    Elleaume, H; Berkvens, P; Berruyer, G; Brochard, T; Dabin, Y; Domínguez, M C; Draperi, A; Fiedler, S; Goujon, G; Le Duc, G; Mattenet, M; Nemoz, C; Pérez, M; Renier, M; Schulze, C; Spanne, P; Suortti, P; Thomlinson, W; Estève, F; Bertrand, B; Le Bas, J F

    1999-01-01

    At the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) a beamport has been instrumented for medical research programs. Two facilities have been constructed for alternative operation. The first one is devoted to medical imaging and is focused on intravenous coronary angiography and computed tomography (CT). The second facility is dedicated to pre-clinical microbeam radiotherapy (MRT). This paper describes the instrumentation for the imaging facility. Two monochromators have been designed, both are based on bent silicon crystals in the Laue geometry. A versatile scanning device has been built for pre-alignment and scanning of the patient through the X-ray beam in radiography or CT modes. An intrinsic germanium detector is used together with large dynamic range electronics (16 bits) to acquire the data. The beamline is now at the end of its commissioning phase; intravenous coronary angiography is intended to start in 1999 with patients and the CT pre-clinical program is underway on small animals. The first in viv...