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  1. Invertebrates and vegetation of field margins adjacent to crops subject to contrasting herbicide regimes in the Farm Scale Evaluations of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, D B; Bohan, D A; Haughton, A J; Hill, M O; Osborne, J L; Clark, S J; Perry, J N; Rothery, P; Scott, R J; Brooks, D R; Champion, G T; Hawes, C; Heard, M S; Firbank, L G

    2003-11-29

    The effects of management of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) crops on adjacent field margins were assessed for 59 maize, 66 beet and 67 spring oilseed rape sites. Fields were split into halves, one being sown with a GMHT crop and the other with the equivalent conventional non-GMHT crop. Margin vegetation was recorded in three components of the field margins. Most differences were in the tilled area, with fewer smaller effects mirroring them in the verge and boundary. In spring oilseed rape fields, the cover, flowering and seeding of plants were 25%, 44% and 39% lower, respectively, in the GMHT uncropped tilled margins. Similarly, for beet, flowering and seeding were 34% and 39% lower, respectively, in the GMHT margins. For maize, the effect was reversed, with plant cover and flowering 28% and 67% greater, respectively, in the GMHT half. Effects on butterflies mirrored these vegetation effects, with 24% fewer butterflies in margins of GMHT spring oilseed rape. The likely cause is the lower nectar supply in GMHT tilled margins and crop edges. Few large treatment differences were found for bees, gastropods or other invertebrates. Scorching of vegetation by herbicide-spray drift was on average 1.6% on verges beside conventional crops and 3.7% beside GMHT crops, the difference being significant for all three crops.

  2. Field and Forage Crop Pests. MEP 310.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Omar, D.; And Others

    As part of a cooperative extension service series by the University of Maryland, this publication introduces the identification and control of common agricultural pests that can be found in field and forage crops. The first of the five sections defines "pest" and "weed" and generally introduces different kinds of pests in the…

  3. A spatially based field specific crop recordkeeping system prototype ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results have shown that a record keeping system may link crop records to respective mapped crop fields in a GIS environment. This was then used to view crop field area, update new field data in the non spatial database and query and display field data for a specified period of interest. New data were added to their ...

  4. Crop improvement using life cycle datasets acquired under field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichi eMochida

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Crops are exposed to various environmental stresses in the field throughout their life cycle. Modern plant science has provided remarkable insights into the molecular networks of plant stress responses in laboratory conditions, but the responses of different crops to environmental stresses in the field need to be elucidated. Recent advances in omics analytical techniques and information technology have enabled us to integrate data from a spectrum of physiological metrics of field crops. The interdisciplinary efforts of plant science and data science enable us to explore factors that affect crop productivity and identify stress tolerance-related genes and alleles. Here, we describe recent advances in technologies that are key components for data driven crop design, such as population genomics, chronological omics analyses, and computer-aided molecular network prediction. Integration of the outcomes from these technologies will accelerate our understanding of crop phenology under practical field situations and identify key characteristics to represent crop stress status. These elements would help us to genetically engineer designed crops to prevent yield shortfalls because of environmental fluctuations due to future climate change.

  5. Agricultural field reclamation utilizing native grass crop production

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Cure

    2013-01-01

    Developing a method of agricultural field reclamation to native grasses in the Lower San Pedro Watershed could prove to be a valuable tool for educational and practical purposes. Agricultural field reclamation utilizing native grass crop production will address water table depletion, soil degradation and the economic viability of the communities within the watershed....

  6. Research fields, challenges and opportunities in European oilseed crops breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincourt Patrick

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to the geographical specialization in oilseed world production, Europe has a major role to play in winter oilseed rape and sunflower breeding. Mainly based on the most recen t results, this review aims to identify the main research and breeding targets for these two crops, as seen through publications, with an attempt to suggest what are opportunities and challenges in these research fields. Growing a healthy and yielding crop remains the key driver for agronomic production. However sustainability and environmental profiles of the cultivar are now entering the field of play: The sustainability concern invested the field of resistance to diseases. Nitrogen use efficiency became an important target for Brassica napus, and crop resilience toward drought stresses is the way chosen in Helianthus annuus breeding for yield improvement. Significant advances are underway for quality traits, but the uncertainty on nutritional and industrial demand may explain why the product diversification remains low.

  7. Field-based crop coefficients (Ke) for a maize crop under deficit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study presents crop coefficient (Kc) values ofTMVl-ST maize variety cultivated under deficit inigation scheduling in Mkoji sub-catchment, Tanzania. Field experiments consisting of eight (8) treatments were conducted in 2004 and 2005 irrig~tion seasons. The treatments variation was irrigation . intervals. The control ...

  8. Comparison of Selenium Treatments of Crops in the Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel

    1986-01-01

    Field experiments with spring and winter barley and ryegrass were carried out to compare the effect of fertilizers enriched with selenate or selenite with foliar application on the selenium (Se) concentrations in the crops. Application of about 20 g Se/ha given as selenate or about 100 g as selen......Field experiments with spring and winter barley and ryegrass were carried out to compare the effect of fertilizers enriched with selenate or selenite with foliar application on the selenium (Se) concentrations in the crops. Application of about 20 g Se/ha given as selenate or about 100 g...... not occur. The choice of method thus depends on the farming practice in the individual cases....

  9. The impact of mineral fertilization and atmospheric precipitation on yield of field crops on family farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munćan Mihajlo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The field crop production, as the most important branch of plant production of the Republic of Serbia, in the period 2002-2011, was carried out on an average of over 2.7 million hectares, 82.7% of which took place on the individual farms/family holdings. Hence, the subject of research in this paper covers yields of major field crops realized on family farms in the region of Vojvodina in the period 1972-2011. The main objective of the research is to study the interdependence of utilization of mineral fertilizers and atmospheric precipitation during the vegetation period and realized yields of major field crops on family farms in the observed period. The regression analysis was applied in order to verify dependencies and determine the form of dependence of achieved yields from examined variables. The results showed that the main limiting factors for obtaining high and stable yields of field crops is inadequate use of fertilizers and the lack of precipitation during the vegetation period.

  10. N{sub 2}O Emission from energy crop fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joergensen, B.J. [The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural Univ., Dept. of Agricultural Sciences, Section of Soil, Water and Plant Nutrition (Denmark); Nyholm Joergensen, R. [Research Centre Foulum, The Danish Inst. of Plant and Soil Science, Dept. of Soil Science (Denmark)

    1996-03-01

    The interest in N{sub 2}O emissions from soils with energy crops is a results of its properties as a greenhouse gas, since the global warming potential of N{sub 2}O per unit mass is about 320 times greater than CO{sub 2}. The contribution of N{sub 2}O from the soil to the atmosphere may increase due to agricultural management. Consequently, large N{sub 2}O emissions can lower the reduction of the greenhouse effect achieved by the substitution of fossil fuels by energy crops. For this reason it is crucial to find the crops for combustion with the lowest potential for emission of N{sub 2}O from the soil per produced energy unit. The aims of this study were to assess the annual N{sub 2}O flux from a Miscanthus `Giganteus` (M. `Giganteus`) and winter rye (Secale cereale) field, and to investigate the factors affecting the N{sub 2}O emission. To obtain these aims a method was developed for measurements in tall crops. The thesis contains a literature review on the N{sub 2}O emission from the soils, a section with development of the technique for N{sub 2}O flux measurements, and an experimental section. Finally, the thesis contains a section where the results are discussed in relation to the use of energy crops. In all the filed studies, the N{sub 2}O emission was measured by using a new developed closed-chamber technique. The main advantages of the chamber method were the ability to contain growing plants up to a height of 3 m, and the relatively large area (2X2m) covered by each other. Soils with annual and perennial crops can be expected to emit less then 3 kg N{sub 2}O ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. This amount corresponds to 960 kg CO{sub 2} ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} compared to a total CO{sub 2} reduction of 10 to 19 tons CO{sub 2} ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} using the energy crops as substituion for fossil fuels. An efficient way to reduce the N{sub 2}O emission is to exclude use of fertiliser but this also reduces the dry matter yield and consequently also the CO{sub 2} reduction

  11. Field high-throughput phenotyping: the new crop breeding frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araus, José Luis; Cairns, Jill E

    2014-01-01

    Constraints in field phenotyping capability limit our ability to dissect the genetics of quantitative traits, particularly those related to yield and stress tolerance (e.g., yield potential as well as increased drought, heat tolerance, and nutrient efficiency, etc.). The development of effective field-based high-throughput phenotyping platforms (HTPPs) remains a bottleneck for future breeding advances. However, progress in sensors, aeronautics, and high-performance computing are paving the way. Here, we review recent advances in field HTPPs, which should combine at an affordable cost, high capacity for data recording, scoring and processing, and non-invasive remote sensing methods, together with automated environmental data collection. Laboratory analyses of key plant parts may complement direct phenotyping under field conditions. Improvements in user-friendly data management together with a more powerful interpretation of results should increase the use of field HTPPs, therefore increasing the efficiency of crop genetic improvement to meet the needs of future generations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nutrient uptake and biomass accumulation for eleven different field crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. HAKALA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Oil hemp (Cannabis sativa L., quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd., false flax (Camelina sativa (L. Crantz, caraway (Carum carvi L., dyer’s woad (Isatis tinctoria L., nettle (Urtica dioica L., reed canary grass (RCG (Phalaris arundinacea L., buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench, linseed (Linum usitatissimum L., timothy (Phleum pratense L. and barley (Hordeum vulgare L. were grown under uniform conditions in pots containing well fertilised loam soil. Dry matter (DM accumulation was measured repeatedly, and contents of minerals N, P, K, Ca and Mg at maturity. Annual crops accumulated above-ground biomass faster than perennials, while perennials had higher DM accumulation rates below ground. Seeds had high concentrations of N and P, while green biomass had high concentrations of K and Ca. Stems and roots had low concentrations of minerals. Concentrations of K and P were high in quinoa and caraway, and that of P in buckwheat. Hemp and nettle had high Ca concentrations, and quinoa had high Mg concentration. N and P were efficiently harvested with seed, Ca and K with the whole biomass. Perennials could prevent soil erosion and add carbon to the soil in the long term, while annuals compete better with weeds and prevent erosion during early growth. Nutrient balances in a field could be modified and nutrient leaching reduced by careful selection of the crop and management practices.;

  13. 1978 Insect Pest Management Guide: Field and Forage Crops. Circular 899.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This circular lists suggested uses of insecticides for the control of field crop pests. Suggestions are given for selection, dosage and application of insecticides to control pests in field corn, alfalfa and clover, small grains, soybeans and grain sorghum. (CS)

  14. Nitrogen leaching: A crop rotation perspective on the effect of N surplus, field management and use of catch crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Notaris, Chiara; Rasmussen, Jim; Sørensen, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Components of the field nitrogen (N) balance (input and surplus) are often used to predict nitrate leaching from agricultural lands. However, management factors, such as use of catch crops, greatly affect the actual loss and are a key to reduce N leaching. The present study is based on the 4th cy...

  15. Subject-field components as integrated parts of LSP dictionaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Henning; Nielsen, Sandro

    2006-01-01

    the introduction of subject-field components in dictionaries. Dictionary functions are communication-orientated or cognition-orientated, and the lexicographers must identify the relevant functions and select and present the data so that the dictionary satisfies the needs of the users. The optimal dictionary...... contains aided fully integrated subject-field components that supplement and complement the data included in the articles....

  16. Effect of crop rotation on soil nutrient balance and weediness in soddy podzolic organic farming fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarina, Livija; Zarina, Liga

    2017-04-01

    The nutrient balance in different crop rotations under organic cropping system has been investigated in Latvia at the Institute of Agricultural Resources and Economics since 2006. Latvia is located in a humid and moderate climatic region where the rainfall exceeds evaporation (soil moisture coefficient > 1) and the soil moisture regime is characteristic with percolation. The average annual precipitation is 670-850 mm. The average temperature varies from -6.7° C in January to 16.5 °C in July. The growing season is 175 - 185 days. The most widespread are podzolic soils and mainly they are present in agricultural fields in all regions of Latvia. In a wider sense the goal of the soil management in organic farming is a creation of the biologically active flora and fauna in the soil by maintaining a high level of soil organic matter which is good for crops nutrient balance. Crop rotation is a central component of organic farming systems and has many benefits, including growth of soil microbial activity, which may increase nutrient availability. The aim of the present study was to calculate nutrient balance for each crop in the rotations and average in each rotation. Taking into account that crop rotations can limit build-up of weeds, additionally within the ERA-net CORE Organic Plus transnational programs supported project PRODIVA the information required for a better utilization of crop diversification for weed management in North European organic arable cropping systems was summarized. It was found that the nutrient balance was influenced by nutrients uptake by biomass of growing crops in crop rotation. The number of weeds in the organic farming fields with crop rotation is dependent on the cultivated crops and the succession of crops in the crop rotation.

  17. Effects of agricultural practices of three crops on the soil communities under Mediterranean conditions: field evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, Sara; José Cerejeira, Maria; Abreu, Manuela; Sousa, José Paulo

    2014-05-01

    Sustainable agricultural production relies on soil communities as the main actors in key soil processes necessary to maintain sustainable soil functioning. Soil biodiversity influences soil physical and chemical characteristics and thus the sustainability of crop and agro-ecosystems functioning. Agricultural practices (e.g.: soil tillage, pesticides and fertilizer applications, irrigation) may affects negatively or positively soil biodiversity and abundances by modifying the relationships between organisms in the soil ecosystem. The present study aimed to study the influence of agricultural practices of three crops (potato, onion and maize) under Mediterranean climate conditions on soil macro- and mesofauna during their entire crop cycles. Effects on soil communities were assessed at a higher tier of environmental risk assessment comprising field testing of indigenous edaphic communities in a selected study-site located in a major agriculture region of Central Portugal, Ribatejo e Oeste, neighbouring protected wetlands. A reference site near the agricultural field site was selected as a Control site to compare the terrestrial communities' composition and variation along the crop cycle. The field soil and Control site soil are sandy loam soils. Crops irrigation was performed by center-pivot (automated sprinkler that rotates in a half a circle area) and by sprinklers. Soil macro- and mesofauna were collected at both sites (field and Control) using two methodologies through pitfall trapping and soil sampling. The community of soil macro- and mesofauna of the three crops field varied versus control site along the crops cycles. Main differences were due to arachnids, coleopterans, ants and adult Diptera presence and abundance. The feeding activity of soil fauna between control site and crop areas varied only for potato and onion crops vs. control site but not among crops. Concentration of pesticides residues in soil did not cause apparent negative effects on the soil

  18. Nutrient deficiencies in export tree and food crops: literature review and field observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartemink, A.E.; Bourke, R.M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reviews nutrient deficiencies in agricultural crops of PNG using the literature of agronomic trials and field observations made throughout the country. Nutrient deficiencies have been investigated systematically since the mid-1950s, but research has mainly focused on export tree crops and

  19. Subsurface drainage to enable the cultivation of winter crops in consolidated paddy fields in Northern Iran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jafari-Talukolaee, Mehdi; Ritzema, Henk; Darzi-Naftchali, Abdullah; Shahnazari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Subsurface drainage is a prerequisite to grow winter crops in the consolidated paddy fields in Northern Iran. A four-year study (2011-2015) was conducted to quantify the effects of subsurface drainage on the saturated hydraulic conductivity, water table, drain discharge and winter crop yields.

  20. Improving crop condition monitoring at field scale by using optimal Landsat and MODIS images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satellite remote sensing data at coarse resolution (kilometers) have been widely used in monitoring crop condition for decades. However, crop condition monitoring at field scale requires high resolution data in both time and space. Although a large number of remote sensing instruments with different...

  1. Discrimination of wheat and oat crops using field hyperspectral remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Allison; Duchesne-Onoro, Rocio

    2017-04-01

    In this study we attempt to identify the most suitable spectral bands to discriminate among wheat and oat crops using field hyperspectral remote sensing. Discrimination of these crops using ordinary aerial or multispectral satellite imagery can be challenging. Even though multispectral images could have a high spatial resolution, their few wide spectral bands hinder crop discrimination. Therefore, both high spatial resolution and spectral resolution are necessary to accurately discriminate between visually similar crops. One field each of oats and spring wheat, each at least 10 acres in size, was selected in southeastern Wisconsin. Biweekly spectral readings were taken using a spectroradiometer during the growing season from May to July. In each field, seven 10 m x 10 m quadrants were randomly placed and in each quadrants five points were selected from which 20 radiometric readings were taken. Radiometric measurements taken at each sampling point were averaged to derive a single reflectance curve per sampling date, covering the spectral range of 300 nm to 2,500 nm. Each spectral curve was divided into hyperspectral bands each 3 nm wide. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to estimate how separable the two crops were. Results show that selected regions of the visible light and infrared radiation spectrum have the potential to discriminate between these crops. Crop discrimination is one of the first steps to support crop monitoring and agricultural surveys efforts.

  2. WATER REGIME OF SOME FIELD CROPS IN TRANSYLVANIA (1964-2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z NAGY

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available This study represents a synthesis of the results of 39 years of researches (1964-2002 regarding the irrigation depth of the principal field crops (wheat, maize, soybean, potato, sugar beet.

  3. Modelling soil properties in a crop field located in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogunovic, Igor; Pereira, Paulo; Millan, Mesic; Percin, Aleksandra; Zgorelec, Zeljka

    2016-04-01

    Development of tillage activities had negative effects on soil quality as destruction of soil horizons, compacting and aggregates destruction, increasing soil erosion and loss of organic matter. For a better management in order to mitigate the effects of intensive soil management in land degradation it is fundamental to map the spatial distribution of soil properties (Brevik et al., 2016). The understanding the distribution of the variables in space is very important for a sustainable management, in order to identify areas that need a potential intervention and decrease the economic losses (Galiati et al., 2016). The objective of this work is study the spatial distribution of some topsoil properties as clay, fine silt, coarse silt, fine sand, coarse sand, penetration resistance, moisture and organic matter in a crop field located in Croatia. A grid with 275x25 (625 m2) was designed and a total of 48 samples were collected. Previous to data modelling, data normality was checked using the Shapiro wilk-test. As in previous cases (Pereira et al., 2015), data did not followed the normal distribution, even after a logarithmic (Log), square-root, and box cox transformation. Thus, for modeling proposes, we used the log transformed data, since was the closest to the normality. In order to identify groups among the variables we applied a principal component analysis (PCA), based on the correlation matrix. On average clay content was 15.47% (±3.23), fine silt 24.24% (±4.08), coarse silt 35.34% (±3.12), fine sand 20.93% (±4.68), coarse sand 4.02% (±1.69), penetration resistance 0.66 MPa (±0.28), organic matter 1.51% (±0.25) and soil moisture 32.04% (±3.27). The results showed that the PCA identified three factors explained at least one of the variables. The first factor had high positive loadings in soil clay, fine silt and organic matter and a high negative loading in fine sand. The second factor had high positive loadings in coarse sand and moisture and a high

  4. Utilization of economical threshold in management of pest control in field crops

    OpenAIRE

    František KOCOUREK

    2013-01-01

    In the methodology, basic principles of expert system for decision about using of pesticides according to economic threshold are described. Decision about using of pesticides is based on analysis of economical parameters and evaluation of pesticide impact on the environment. Methods of construction of damage curves for pests and diseases of field crops are described. Damage curves are quantified for economically important diseases and pests of field crops and injury levels are specified for 7...

  5. Improving the efficiency of spatially selective operations for agricultural robotics in cropping field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cropping fields often have well-defined poor-performing patches due to spatial and temporal variability. In an attempt to increase crop performance on poor patches, spatially selective field operations may be performed by agricultural robotics to apply additional inputs with targeted requirements. This paper addresses the route planning problem for an agricultural robot that has to treat some poor-patches in a field with row crops, with respect to the minimization of the total non-working distance travelled during headland turnings and in-field travel distance. The traversal of patches in the field is expressed as the traversal of a mixed weighted graph, and then the problem of finding an optimal patch sequence is formulated as an asymmetric traveling salesman problem and solved by the partheno-genetic algorithm. The proposed method is applied on a cropping field located in Northwestern China. Research results show that by using optimum patch sequences, the total non-working distance travelled during headland turnings and in-field travel distance can be reduced. But the savings on the non-working distance inside the field interior depend on the size and location of patches in the field, and the introduction of agricultural robotics is beneficial to increase field efficiency.

  6. Improving the efficiency of spatially selective operations for agricultural robotics in cropping field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y. L.; Yi, S. P.

    2013-05-01

    Cropping fields often have well-defined poor-performing patches due to spatial and temporal variability. In an attempt to increase crop performance on poor patches, spatially selective field operations may be performed by agricultural robotics to apply additional inputs with targeted requirements. This paper addresses the route planning problem for an agricultural robot that has to treat some poor-patches in a field with row crops, with respect to the minimization of the total non-working distance travelled during headland turnings and in-field travel distance. The traversal of patches in the field is expressed as the traversal of a mixed weighted graph, and then the problem of finding an optimal patch sequence is formulated as an asymmetric traveling salesman problem and solved by the parthenogenetic algorithm. The proposed method is applied on a cropping field located in Northwestern China. Research results show that by using optimum patch sequences, the total non-working distance travelled during headland turnings and in-field travel distance can be reduced. But the savings on the non-working distance inside the field interior depend on the size and location of patches in the field, and the introduction of agricultural robotics is beneficial to increase field efficiency. (Author) 21 refs.

  7. Weed infestation of field crops in different soils in the protective zone of Roztocze National Park. Part II. Root crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Ziemińska-Smyk

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The study on weed infestation of root crops in different soils in the protective zone of Roztocze National Park was conducted in the years 1991-1995. As many as 240 phytosociological records, made with the use of Braun-Blanquet method, were taken in potato and sugar beet fields. The number of weed species in sugar beet and potato in the area depended on the soil and type of root crop. In the same environment conditions. the iiuinber of weed species was higher in potato than in sugar beet. The most difficult weed species iii all types of soil were: Chenopodium album, Stellaria media and Convolvulus arvensis. Podsolic soils were highly infested by two acidophylic species: Spergula arvensis and Raphanus raphanistum. Potato in loess soil and brown soil made of loamy sands were highly infested by Echinochloa crus-galli, Equisetum arvense and Galinsoga parviflora. Root crop plantations in brown soils formed from gaizes of granulometric loam texture and limestone soils were infested by: Galium aparine, Sonchus arvensis, Sinapis arvensis and Veronica persica.

  8. Automatic Rice Crop Height Measurement Using a Field Server and Digital Image Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Tanakorn Sritarapipat; Preesan Rakwatin; Teerasit Kasetkasem

    2014-01-01

    Rice crop height is an important agronomic trait linked to plant type and yield potential. This research developed an automatic image processing technique to detect rice crop height based on images taken by a digital camera attached to a field server. The camera acquires rice paddy images daily at a consistent time of day. The images include the rice plants and a marker bar used to provide a height reference. The rice crop height can be indirectly measured from the images by measuring the hei...

  9. Automatic Rice Crop Height Measurement Using a Field Server and Digital Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sritarapipat, Tanakorn; Rakwatin, Preesan; Kasetkasem, Teerasit

    2014-01-01

    Rice crop height is an important agronomic trait linked to plant type and yield potential. This research developed an automatic image processing technique to detect rice crop height based on images taken by a digital camera attached to a field server. The camera acquires rice paddy images daily at a consistent time of day. The images include the rice plants and a marker bar used to provide a height reference. The rice crop height can be indirectly measured from the images by measuring the height of the marker bar compared to the height of the initial marker bar. Four digital image processing steps are employed to automatically measure the rice crop height: band selection, filtering, thresholding, and height measurement. Band selection is used to remove redundant features. Filtering extracts significant features of the marker bar. The thresholding method is applied to separate objects and boundaries of the marker bar versus other areas. The marker bar is detected and compared with the initial marker bar to measure the rice crop height. Our experiment used a field server with a digital camera to continuously monitor a rice field located in Suphanburi Province, Thailand. The experimental results show that the proposed method measures rice crop height effectively, with no human intervention required. PMID:24451465

  10. Automatic Rice Crop Height Measurement Using a Field Server and Digital Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanakorn Sritarapipat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rice crop height is an important agronomic trait linked to plant type and yield potential. This research developed an automatic image processing technique to detect rice crop height based on images taken by a digital camera attached to a field server. The camera acquires rice paddy images daily at a consistent time of day. The images include the rice plants and a marker bar used to provide a height reference. The rice crop height can be indirectly measured from the images by measuring the height of the marker bar compared to the height of the initial marker bar. Four digital image processing steps are employed to automatically measure the rice crop height: band selection, filtering, thresholding, and height measurement. Band selection is used to remove redundant features. Filtering extracts significant features of the marker bar. The thresholding method is applied to separate objects and boundaries of the marker bar versus other areas. The marker bar is detected and compared with the initial marker bar to measure the rice crop height. Our experiment used a field server with a digital camera to continuously monitor a rice field located in Suphanburi Province, Thailand. The experimental results show that the proposed method measures rice crop height effectively, with no human intervention required.

  11. Automatic rice crop height measurement using a field server and digital image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sritarapipat, Tanakorn; Rakwatin, Preesan; Kasetkasem, Teerasit

    2014-01-07

    Rice crop height is an important agronomic trait linked to plant type and yield potential. This research developed an automatic image processing technique to detect rice crop height based on images taken by a digital camera attached to a field server. The camera acquires rice paddy images daily at a consistent time of day. The images include the rice plants and a marker bar used to provide a height reference. The rice crop height can be indirectly measured from the images by measuring the height of the marker bar compared to the height of the initial marker bar. Four digital image processing steps are employed to automatically measure the rice crop height: band selection, filtering, thresholding, and height measurement. Band selection is used to remove redundant features. Filtering extracts significant features of the marker bar. The thresholding method is applied to separate objects and boundaries of the marker bar versus other areas. The marker bar is detected and compared with the initial marker bar to measure the rice crop height. Our experiment used a field server with a digital camera to continuously monitor a rice field located in Suphanburi Province, Thailand. The experimental results show that the proposed method measures rice crop height effectively, with no human intervention required.

  12. Vertical Distribution of the Plant-Parasitic Nematode, Pratylenchus penetrans, Under Four Field Crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pudassaini, M.P.; Schomaker, C.H.; Been, T.H.; Moens, M.

    2006-01-01

    The vertical distribution of Pratylenchus penetrans was monitored in four fields cropped with maize, black salsify, carrot, or potato. Soil samples were collected at 21-day intervals from May 2002 until April 2003 from five plots (2 × 5 m(^2)) per field. Per plot, 15 cores were taken to a depth of

  13. Prevalence of termites and level of damage on major field crops and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (L.)) and rangelands was studied in five Kebele administrations (study sites) and on three farmers' fields in every Kebele, in Manasibu District, Wellega Zone of Oromiya Regional State. Termite samples were collected from infested crop fields and rangelands, identified to the genus level with keys to the Ethiopian termites, ...

  14. Prosocial Behavior and Subjective Insecurity in Violent Contexts: Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez, María Alejandra; Trujillo, Carlos Andres; Moros, Lina; Forero, Clemente

    2016-01-01

    Subjective insecurity is a key determinant of different forms of prosocial behavior. In Study 1, we used field experiments with farmers in Colombian villages exposed to different levels of violence to investigate how individual perceptions of insecurity affect cooperation, trust, reciprocity and altruism. To do so, we developed a cognitive-affective measure of subjective insecurity. We found that subjective insecurity has a negative effect on cooperation but influences trust and altruism positively. In Study 2, carried out three years after Study 1, we repeated the initial design with additional measures of victimization. Our goal was to relate subjective insecurity with actual victimization. The findings of Study 2 support the initial results, and are robust and consistent for cooperative behavior and trust when including victimization as a mediator. Different indicators of victimization are positively correlated with subjective insecurity and an aggregate index of victimization has a negative effect on cooperation but exerts a positive influence on trust. PMID:27472437

  15. Prosocial Behavior and Subjective Insecurity in Violent Contexts: Field Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez, María Alejandra; Trujillo, Carlos Andres; Moros, Lina; Forero, Clemente

    2016-01-01

    Subjective insecurity is a key determinant of different forms of prosocial behavior. In Study 1, we used field experiments with farmers in Colombian villages exposed to different levels of violence to investigate how individual perceptions of insecurity affect cooperation, trust, reciprocity and altruism. To do so, we developed a cognitive-affective measure of subjective insecurity. We found that subjective insecurity has a negative effect on cooperation but influences trust and altruism positively. In Study 2, carried out three years after Study 1, we repeated the initial design with additional measures of victimization. Our goal was to relate subjective insecurity with actual victimization. The findings of Study 2 support the initial results, and are robust and consistent for cooperative behavior and trust when including victimization as a mediator. Different indicators of victimization are positively correlated with subjective insecurity and an aggregate index of victimization has a negative effect on cooperation but exerts a positive influence on trust.

  16. Prosocial Behavior and Subjective Insecurity in Violent Contexts: Field Experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Alejandra Vélez

    Full Text Available Subjective insecurity is a key determinant of different forms of prosocial behavior. In Study 1, we used field experiments with farmers in Colombian villages exposed to different levels of violence to investigate how individual perceptions of insecurity affect cooperation, trust, reciprocity and altruism. To do so, we developed a cognitive-affective measure of subjective insecurity. We found that subjective insecurity has a negative effect on cooperation but influences trust and altruism positively. In Study 2, carried out three years after Study 1, we repeated the initial design with additional measures of victimization. Our goal was to relate subjective insecurity with actual victimization. The findings of Study 2 support the initial results, and are robust and consistent for cooperative behavior and trust when including victimization as a mediator. Different indicators of victimization are positively correlated with subjective insecurity and an aggregate index of victimization has a negative effect on cooperation but exerts a positive influence on trust.

  17. Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhiza in Field-Grown Crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Iver

    1986-01-01

    The importance of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) and P fertilizer for P nutrition and dry matter production in field peas (Pisum sativum L.) was studied in moderately P-deficient soil. Half of the experimental plots were fumigated to reduce the level of VAM infection. Shoots and 0 to 30 cm...... in fumigated plots, although both it and P uptake were increased by adding P fertilizer. The possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. A supplementary survey on infection development at five other field sites showed that peas are extensively colonized by VAM fungi, even in soils where a standard...

  18. Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhiza in Field-Grown Crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Iver

    1983-01-01

    The effect of inoculation with vesicular–arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on the growth of barley in the field was studied at two levels of soil P on plots fumigated with methyl bromide. During the vegetative phase, growth and P uptake was influenced only by soil P; P uptake in the period from earing...

  19. Assessing the environmental impacts of cropping systems and cover crops : Life cycle assessment of FAST, a long-term arable farming field experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prechsl, U E; Wittwer, R; van der Heijden, M.G.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/240923901; Luscher, G; Jeanneret, P; Nemecek, T

    2017-01-01

    To reduce environmental impacts of cropping systems, various management strategies are being discussed. Longterm field experiments are particularly suitable to directly compare different management strategies and to perform a comprehensive impact assessment. To identify the key drivers of several

  20. Ethics commentary: subjects of knowledge and control in field primatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, N M; Fuentes, A; White, F J

    2010-09-01

    Our primate kin are routinely displaced from their habitats, hunted for meat, captured for trade, housed in zoos, made to perform for our entertainment, and used as subjects in biomedical testing. They are also the subjects of research inquiries by field primatologists. In this article, we place primate field studies on a continuum of human and alloprimate relationships as a heuristic device to explore the unifying ethical implications of such inter-relationships, as well as address specific ethical challenges arising from common research protocols "in the field" (e.g. risks associated with habituation, disease transmission, invasive collection of biological samples, etc.). Additionally, we question the widespread deployment of conservation- and/or local economic development-based justifications for field-based primatological pursuits. Informed by decades of combined fieldwork experience in Indonesia and the Democratic Republic of Congo, we demonstrate the process by which the adherence to a particular ethical calculus can lead to unregulated and ethically problematic research agendas. In conclusion, we offer several suggestions to consider in the establishment of a formalized code of ethics for field primatology. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Remote Sensing for Field-Based Crop Phenotyping: Current Status and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guijun; Liu, Jiangang; Zhao, Chunjiang; Li, Zhenhong; Huang, Yanbo; Yu, Haiyang; Xu, Bo; Yang, Xiaodong; Zhu, Dongmei; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Ruyang; Feng, Haikuan; Zhao, Xiaoqing; Li, Zhenhai; Li, Heli; Yang, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Phenotyping plays an important role in crop science research; the accurate and rapid acquisition of phenotypic information of plants or cells in different environments is helpful for exploring the inheritance and expression patterns of the genome to determine the association of genomic and phenotypic information to increase the crop yield. Traditional methods for acquiring crop traits, such as plant height, leaf color, leaf area index (LAI), chlorophyll content, biomass and yield, rely on manual sampling, which is time-consuming and laborious. Unmanned aerial vehicle remote sensing platforms (UAV-RSPs) equipped with different sensors have recently become an important approach for fast and non-destructive high throughput phenotyping and have the advantage of flexible and convenient operation, on-demand access to data and high spatial resolution. UAV-RSPs are a powerful tool for studying phenomics and genomics. As the methods and applications for field phenotyping using UAVs to users who willing to derive phenotypic parameters from large fields and tests with the minimum effort on field work and getting highly reliable results are necessary, the current status and perspectives on the topic of UAV-RSPs for field-based phenotyping were reviewed based on the literature survey of crop phenotyping using UAV-RSPs in the Web of Science™ Core Collection database and cases study by NERCITA. The reference for the selection of UAV platforms and remote sensing sensors, the commonly adopted methods and typical applications for analyzing phenotypic traits by UAV-RSPs, and the challenge for crop phenotyping by UAV-RSPs were considered. The review can provide theoretical and technical support to promote the applications of UAV-RSPs for crop phenotyping. PMID:28713402

  2. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Remote Sensing for Field-Based Crop Phenotyping: Current Status and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guijun Yang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Phenotyping plays an important role in crop science research; the accurate and rapid acquisition of phenotypic information of plants or cells in different environments is helpful for exploring the inheritance and expression patterns of the genome to determine the association of genomic and phenotypic information to increase the crop yield. Traditional methods for acquiring crop traits, such as plant height, leaf color, leaf area index (LAI, chlorophyll content, biomass and yield, rely on manual sampling, which is time-consuming and laborious. Unmanned aerial vehicle remote sensing platforms (UAV-RSPs equipped with different sensors have recently become an important approach for fast and non-destructive high throughput phenotyping and have the advantage of flexible and convenient operation, on-demand access to data and high spatial resolution. UAV-RSPs are a powerful tool for studying phenomics and genomics. As the methods and applications for field phenotyping using UAVs to users who willing to derive phenotypic parameters from large fields and tests with the minimum effort on field work and getting highly reliable results are necessary, the current status and perspectives on the topic of UAV-RSPs for field-based phenotyping were reviewed based on the literature survey of crop phenotyping using UAV-RSPs in the Web of Science™ Core Collection database and cases study by NERCITA. The reference for the selection of UAV platforms and remote sensing sensors, the commonly adopted methods and typical applications for analyzing phenotypic traits by UAV-RSPs, and the challenge for crop phenotyping by UAV-RSPs were considered. The review can provide theoretical and technical support to promote the applications of UAV-RSPs for crop phenotyping.

  3. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Remote Sensing for Field-Based Crop Phenotyping: Current Status and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guijun; Liu, Jiangang; Zhao, Chunjiang; Li, Zhenhong; Huang, Yanbo; Yu, Haiyang; Xu, Bo; Yang, Xiaodong; Zhu, Dongmei; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Ruyang; Feng, Haikuan; Zhao, Xiaoqing; Li, Zhenhai; Li, Heli; Yang, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Phenotyping plays an important role in crop science research; the accurate and rapid acquisition of phenotypic information of plants or cells in different environments is helpful for exploring the inheritance and expression patterns of the genome to determine the association of genomic and phenotypic information to increase the crop yield. Traditional methods for acquiring crop traits, such as plant height, leaf color, leaf area index (LAI), chlorophyll content, biomass and yield, rely on manual sampling, which is time-consuming and laborious. Unmanned aerial vehicle remote sensing platforms (UAV-RSPs) equipped with different sensors have recently become an important approach for fast and non-destructive high throughput phenotyping and have the advantage of flexible and convenient operation, on-demand access to data and high spatial resolution. UAV-RSPs are a powerful tool for studying phenomics and genomics. As the methods and applications for field phenotyping using UAVs to users who willing to derive phenotypic parameters from large fields and tests with the minimum effort on field work and getting highly reliable results are necessary, the current status and perspectives on the topic of UAV-RSPs for field-based phenotyping were reviewed based on the literature survey of crop phenotyping using UAV-RSPs in the Web of Science™ Core Collection database and cases study by NERCITA. The reference for the selection of UAV platforms and remote sensing sensors, the commonly adopted methods and typical applications for analyzing phenotypic traits by UAV-RSPs, and the challenge for crop phenotyping by UAV-RSPs were considered. The review can provide theoretical and technical support to promote the applications of UAV-RSPs for crop phenotyping.

  4. Field-evolved insect resistance to Bt crops: definition, theory, and data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabashnik, Bruce E; Van Rensburg, J B J; Carrière, Yves

    2009-12-01

    Transgenic crops producing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins for insect pest control have been successful, but their efficacy is reduced when pests evolve resistance. Here we review the definition of field-evolved resistance, the relationship between resistance and field control problems, the theory underlying strategies for delaying resistance, and resistance monitoring methods. We also analyze resistance monitoring data from five continents reported in 41 studies that evaluate responses of field populations of 11 lepidopteran pests to four Bt toxins produced by Bt corn and cotton. After more than a decade since initial commercialization of Bt crops, most target pest populations remain susceptible, whereas field-evolved resistance has been documented in some populations of three noctuid moth species: Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) to Cry1F in Bt corn in Puerto Rico, Busseola fusca (Fuller) to CrylAb in Bt corn in South Africa, and Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) to CrylAc and Cry2Ab in Bt cotton in the southeastern United States. Field outcomes are consistent with predictions from theory, suggesting that factors delaying resistance include recessive inheritance of resistance, abundant refuges of non-Bt host plants, and two-toxin Bt crops deployed separately from one-toxin Bt crops. The insights gained from systematic analyses of resistance monitoring data may help to enhance the durability of transgenic insecticidal crops. We recommend continued use of the longstanding definition of resistance cited here and encourage discussions about which regulatory actions, if any, should be triggered by specific data on the magnitude, distribution, and impact of field-evolved resistance.

  5. High throughput phenotyping to accelerate crop breeding and monitoring of diseases in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakoor, Nadia; Lee, Scott; Mockler, Todd C

    2017-08-01

    Effective implementation of technology that facilitates accurate and high-throughput screening of thousands of field-grown lines is critical for accelerating crop improvement and breeding strategies for higher yield and disease tolerance. Progress in the development of field-based high throughput phenotyping methods has advanced considerably in the last 10 years through technological progress in sensor development and high-performance computing. Here, we review recent advances in high throughput field phenotyping technologies designed to inform the genetics of quantitative traits, including crop yield and disease tolerance. Successful application of phenotyping platforms to advance crop breeding and identify and monitor disease requires: (1) high resolution of imaging and environmental sensors; (2) quality data products that facilitate computer vision, machine learning and GIS; (3) capacity infrastructure for data management and analysis; and (4) automated environmental data collection. Accelerated breeding for agriculturally relevant crop traits is key to the development of improved varieties and is critically dependent on high-resolution, high-throughput field-scale phenotyping technologies that can efficiently discriminate better performing lines within a larger population and across multiple environments. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Low Energy Technology. A Unit of Instruction on Energy Conservation in Field Crop Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, George; Scanlon, Dennis C.

    This unit of instruction on energy conservation in field crop production was designed for use by agribusiness and natural resources teachers in Florida high schools and by agricultural extension agents as they work with adults and students. It is one of a series of 11 instructional units (see note) written to help teachers and agents to educate…

  7. Root characteristics of selected field crops: data from the Wageningen Rhizolab (1990-2002)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, A.L.; Groenwold, J.

    2005-01-01

    Since being built in 1990, the rhizotron facility in Wageningen, the Wageningen Rhizolab, has been used for experiments on crops (e.g. Alfalfa, Brussels sprouts, common velvet grass, field bean, fodder radish, leeks, lupins, maize, potato, beetroot, ryegrass, spinach, spring wheat, winter rye and

  8. Field performance of Solanum sisymbriifolium, a trap crop for potato cyst nematodes. II. Root characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, B.G.H.; Vos, J.; Stomph, T.J.; Nieuwburg, van J.G.W.; Putten, van der P.E.L.

    2007-01-01

    Hatching of potato cyst nematodes is induced by root exudates of Solanaceae, such as Solanum sisymbriifolium, and is therefore related to root length distribution of this crop. A mathematical model was derived to relate the hatching potential to root length density (RLD). A series of field

  9. A satellite based crop water stress index for irrigation scheduling in sugarcane fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veysi, Shadman; Naseri, Abd Ali; Hamzeh, Saeid; Bartholomeus, Harm

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the capability of crop water stress index (CWSI) based on satellite thermal infrared data for estimating water stress and irrigation scheduling in sugarcane fields was evaluated. For this purpose, eight Landsat 8 satellite images were acquired during the sugarcane growing season

  10. Analysis of the community compositions of rhizosphere fungi in soybeans continuous cropping fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Li; Cui, Jiaqi; Jie, Weiguang; Cai, Baiyan

    2015-11-01

    We used rhizosphere soil sampled from one field during zero year and two years of continuous cropping of high-protein soybean to analyze the taxonomic community compositions of fungi during periods of high-incidence of root rot. Our objectives were to identify the dominant pathogens in order to provide a theoretical basis for the study of pathogenesis as well as control tactics for soybean root rot induced by continuous cropping. A total of 17,801 modified internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences were obtained from three different soybean rhizosphere soil samples after zero year and 1 or 2 years of continuous cropping using 454 high-throughput sequencing. The dominant eumycote fungal were identified to be Ascomycota and Basidiomycota in the three soil samples. Continuous cropping of soybean affected the diversity of fungi in rhizosphere soils and increased the abundance of Thelebolus and Mortierellales significantly. Thanatephorus, Fusarium, and Alternaria were identified to be the dominant pathogenic fungal genera in rhizosphere soil from continuously cropped soybean fields. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Cosmic-ray neutron sensing for soil moisture measurements in cropped fields

    OpenAIRE

    Rivera Villarreyes, Carlos Andres

    2013-01-01

    This cumulative dissertation explored the use of the detection of natural background of fast neutrons, the so-called cosmic-ray neutron sensing (CRS) approach to measure field-scale soil moisture in cropped fields. Primary cosmic rays penetrate the top atmosphere and interact with atmospheric particles. Such interaction results on a cascade of high-energy neutrons, which continue traveling through the atmospheric column. Finally, neutrons penetrate the soil surface and a second cascade is pro...

  12. [Effects of winter cover crop on methane and nitrous oxide emission from paddy field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hai-ming; Tang, Wen-guang; Shuai, Xi-qiang; Yang, Guang-li; Tang, Hai-tao; Xiao, Xiao-Ping

    2010-12-01

    Static chamber-GC technique was employed to study the effects of different treatment winter cover crops, including no-tillage and directly sowing ryegrass (T1), no-tillage and directly sowing Chinese milk vetch (T2), tillage and transplanting rape (T3), no-tillage and directly sowing rape (T4), and fallowing (CK), on the CH4 and N2O emission from double cropping rice paddy field. During the growth period of test winter cover crops, the CH4 and N2O emission in treatments T1-T4 was significantly higher than that in CK (P cover crops returned to field, the CH4 emission from early and late rice fields in treatments T1, T2, T3, and T4 was larger than that in CK. In early rice field, treatments T1 and T2 had the largest CH4 emission (21.70 and 20.75 g x m(-2)); while in late rice field, treatments T3 and T4 had the largest one (58.90 and 54.51 g x m(-2) respectively). Treatments T1-T4 also had larger N2O emission from early and late rice fields than the CK did. The N2O emission from early rice field in treatments T1, T2, T3, and T4 was increased by 53.7%, 12.2%, 46.3%, and 29.3%, and that from late rice field in corresponding treatments was increased by 28.6%, 3.8%, 34.3%, and 27.6%, respectively, compared with CK.

  13. ETHEPHON SPRAYS AS A DEFOLIANT IN ‘NIAGARA ROSADA’ VINE SUBJECTED TO TWO CROP PRODUCTION PER YEAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    THIAGO VIEIRA DA COSTA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In climate region Cwa of the State of São Paulo the technique of double cropping the grapevine is possible, however, when it is time for the second pruning of the crop, most of the vine’s leaves are still in the plant, posing the problem that the use of ethephon as a defoliant could increase leaf senescence and improve the vine management. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of ethephon spray as a defoliant in the development and production of the ‘Niagara Rosada’ vine when subjected to double cropping, and the influence this bioactivator may have on carbohydrate reserves in the branch. The experiments were conducted in a commercial, non-irrigated area in agricultural years of 2011/2012 and 2012/2013. The length, diameter and total carbohydrate reserves of the branches, as well as bud break, number of clusters, crop production, length, width and mass of cluster, berry diameter, soluble solids and titratable acidity were evaluated. Ethephon treatments were applied at a concentration of 1,440 mg L-1 and 2,160 mg L-1 at 20 and 15 days before pruning. As a control, the vines were defoliated by hand at the time of pruning. A randomized block experimental design was used. Data was subjected to analysis of variance and means were compared by the Tukey test at 5% significance level. In conclusion, we propose that ethephon sprays promoted vine defoliation and improved the bud break, altered plant development and crop production. This was not due to increases in concentration of carbohydrate reserves in the branches, but due to a higher induction stimulus of bud break, which allowed the vines to express their higher yield capacity.

  14. Nutrient Status and Contamination Risks from Digested Pig Slurry Applied on a Vegetable Crops Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaohui; Hua, Yumei; Deng, Liangwei

    2016-01-01

    The effects of applied digested pig slurry on a vegetable crops field were studied. The study included a 3-year investigation on nutrient characteristics, heavy metals contamination and hygienic risks of a vegetable crops field in Wuhan, China. The results showed that, after anaerobic digestion, abundant N, P and K remained in the digested pig slurry while fecal coliforms, ascaris eggs, schistosoma eggs and hookworm eggs were highly reduced. High Cr, Zn and Cu contents in the digested pig slurry were found in spring. Digested pig slurry application to the vegetable crops field led to improved soil fertility. Plant-available P in the fertilized soils increased due to considerable increase in total P content and decrease in low-availability P fraction. The As content in the fertilized soils increased slightly but significantly (p = 0.003) compared with control. The Hg, Zn, Cr, Cd, Pb, and Cu contents in the fertilized soils did not exceed the maximum permissible contents for vegetable crops soils in China. However, high Zn accumulation should be of concern due to repeated applications of digested pig slurry. No fecal coliforms, ascaris eggs, schistosoma eggs or hookworm eggs were detected in the fertilized soils. PMID:27058548

  15. Nutrient Status and Contamination Risks from Digested Pig Slurry Applied on a Vegetable Crops Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohui Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of applied digested pig slurry on a vegetable crops field were studied. The study included a 3-year investigation on nutrient characteristics, heavy metals contamination and hygienic risks of a vegetable crops field in Wuhan, China. The results showed that, after anaerobic digestion, abundant N, P and K remained in the digested pig slurry while fecal coliforms, ascaris eggs, schistosoma eggs and hookworm eggs were highly reduced. High Cr, Zn and Cu contents in the digested pig slurry were found in spring. Digested pig slurry application to the vegetable crops field led to improved soil fertility. Plant-available P in the fertilized soils increased due to considerable increase in total P content and decrease in low-availability P fraction. The As content in the fertilized soils increased slightly but significantly (p = 0.003 compared with control. The Hg, Zn, Cr, Cd, Pb, and Cu contents in the fertilized soils did not exceed the maximum permissible contents for vegetable crops soils in China. However, high Zn accumulation should be of concern due to repeated applications of digested pig slurry. No fecal coliforms, ascaris eggs, schistosoma eggs or hookworm eggs were detected in the fertilized soils.

  16. Sugard sorghum yield (Sorghum saccharatum (L. Pers. subject to varietal characteristics and varying plant density in crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. Л. Курило

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The example of various varieties and hybrids of sugar sorghum illustrates the summary of study on assessing varying density of plants in crops on phonological cha­racteristics of sugar sorghum plants, carbohydrate composition of sorghum juice and yield of its plants. The completed study established that one hectare of sugar sorghum, subject to varietal characteristics and varying density of plants in crop, may provide the green weight of 40.83 до 106.87 t/ha at stem juice yield of 22,27 to 56,24 t/ha, which would contain 2.31 to 6.09 t/ha of total sugars suitable for bioethanol production in at the rate of 198.25 to 501.19 dal/ha. However, despite of higher estimate of total sugars yield and bioethanol at 300 thousand plants per ha density in crop, industrial plots would preferably have plant density in crops ranging within 200...250 thousand pieces per ha. Since higher density increases dry matter content of plants, consequentially, cellulose and lignin in stems, this may create preconditions for harvest losses due to stem lod­ ging Besides, 200 thousand plants per hectare enables to reach the highest level of photosynthesis net productivity which combines high intensity of the photosynthesis with photosynthetic activity of leaf surface.

  17. Crop Row Detection in Maize Fields Inspired on the Human Visual Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, J.; Pajares, G.; Montalvo, M.; Guerrero, J. M.; Guijarro, M.; Ribeiro, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a new method, oriented to image real-time processing, for identifying crop rows in maize fields in the images. The vision system is designed to be installed onboard a mobile agricultural vehicle, that is, submitted to gyros, vibrations, and undesired movements. The images are captured under image perspective, being affected by the above undesired effects. The image processing consists of two main processes: image segmentation and crop row detection. The first one applies a threshold to separate green plants or pixels (crops and weeds) from the rest (soil, stones, and others). It is based on a fuzzy clustering process, which allows obtaining the threshold to be applied during the normal operation process. The crop row detection applies a method based on image perspective projection that searches for maximum accumulation of segmented green pixels along straight alignments. They determine the expected crop lines in the images. The method is robust enough to work under the above-mentioned undesired effects. It is favorably compared against the well-tested Hough transformation for line detection. PMID:22623899

  18. Crop Row Detection in Maize Fields Inspired on the Human Visual Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Romeo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new method, oriented to image real-time processing, for identifying crop rows in maize fields in the images. The vision system is designed to be installed onboard a mobile agricultural vehicle, that is, submitted to gyros, vibrations, and undesired movements. The images are captured under image perspective, being affected by the above undesired effects. The image processing consists of two main processes: image segmentation and crop row detection. The first one applies a threshold to separate green plants or pixels (crops and weeds from the rest (soil, stones, and others. It is based on a fuzzy clustering process, which allows obtaining the threshold to be applied during the normal operation process. The crop row detection applies a method based on image perspective projection that searches for maximum accumulation of segmented green pixels along straight alignments. They determine the expected crop lines in the images. The method is robust enough to work under the above-mentioned undesired effects. It is favorably compared against the well-tested Hough transformation for line detection.

  19. Improving Resilience of Northern Field Crop Systems Using Inter-Seeded Red Clover: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Deen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In light of the environmental challenges ahead, resilience of the most abundant field crop production systems must be improved to guarantee yield stability with more efficient use of nitrogen inputs, soil and water resources. Along with genetic and agronomic innovations, diversification of northern agro-ecosystems using inter-seeded legumes provides further opportunities to improve land management practices that sustain crop yields and their resilience to biotic and abiotic stresses. Benefits of legume cover crops have been known for decades and red clover (Trifolium pratense is one of the most common and beneficial when frost-seeded under winter wheat in advance of maize in a rotation. However, its use has been declining mostly due to the use of synthetic fertilizers and herbicides, concerns over competition with the main crop and the inability to fully capture red clover benefits due to difficulties in the persistence of uniform stands. In this manuscript, we first review the environmental, agronomic, rotational and economical benefits associated with inter-seeded red clover. Red clover adaptation to a wide array of common wheat-based rotations, its potential to mitigate the effects of land degradation in a changing climate and its integration into sustainable food production systems are discussed. We then identify areas of research with significant potential to impact cropping system profitability and sustainability.

  20. Effect of rainfall timing and tillage on the transport of steroid hormones in runoff from manure amended row crop fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Sagor; Kranz, William L; Shapiro, Charles A; Snow, Daniel D; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L; Mamo, Mitiku; Tarkalson, David D; Zhang, Tian C; Shelton, David P; van Donk, Simon J; Mader, Terry L

    2017-02-15

    Runoff generated from livestock manure amended row crop fields is one of the major pathways of hormone transport to the aquatic environment. The study determined the effects of manure handling, tillage methods, and rainfall timing on the occurrence and transport of steroid hormones in runoff from the row crop field. Stockpiled and composted manure from hormone treated and untreated animals were applied to test plots and subjected to two rainfall simulation events 30days apart. During the two rainfall simulation events, detection of any steroid hormone or metabolites was identified in 8-86% of runoff samples from any tillage and manure treatment. The most commonly detected hormones were 17β-estradiol, estrone, estriol, testosterone, and α-zearalenol at concentrations ranging up to 100-200ngL -1 . Considering the maximum detected concentrations in runoff, no more than 10% of the applied hormone can be transported through the dissolved phase of runoff. Results from the study indicate that hormones can persist in soils receiving livestock manure over an extended period of time and the dissolved phase of hormone in runoff is not the preferred pathway of transport from the manure applied fields irrespective of tillage treatments and timing of rainfall. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Testing the Effect of Cropping Practices on Soil Erosion Rates - Application of Field Rainfall Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostál, Tomáš; Zumr, David; Krása, Josef; Kavka, Petr; Strouhal, Luděk

    2017-04-01

    C factor, the protection effect of the vegetation cover, is a key parameter which is introduced in the basic empirical soil erosion relationships (e.g. USLE). The C factor values for various crops in various grow stages are usually estimated based on the catalogue values. As these values often do not fit to the observed data from the plot experiments or do not represent actually grown crops, we decided to validate and extend the database. We present a methodology and primary results of tens of the field rainfall simulation experiments conducted on several agricultural crops with different BBCH. The rainfall simulations were done with the mobile field rainfall simulator of the Czech Technical University. The tested plots of the size 2 x 8,7 m were repeatedly exposed to the artificial rainfalls with intensity of 60 mm/h and duration of 30 to 60 minutes. The experiments were always performed twice on a bare soil and twice on the vegetated plots (to mimic dry and wet initial soil conditions). The tests were done on several slopes in the Czech Republic, the soils were mostly Cambisols with various organic matter content and stoniness. Based on the results we will be able to correct and validate the C factor values for the currently most widely grown crops in the conditions of the Central Europe. The presentation is funded by Ministry of Agriculture of the Czech Republic (research project QJ1530181) and an internal student CTU grant.

  2. Assessing Natural Isothiocyanate Air Emissions after Field Incorporation of Mustard Cover Crop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trott, Donna M.; LePage, Jane; Hebert, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    A regional air assessment was performed to characterize volatile natural isothiocyanate (NITC) compounds in air during soil incorporation of mustard cover crops in Washington State. Field air sampling and analytical methods were developed specific to three NITCs known to be present in air at appreciable concentrations during/after field incorporation. The maximum observed concentrations in air for the allyl, benzyl, and phenethyl isothiocyanates were respectively 188, 6.1, and 0.7 lg m-3 during mustard incorporation. Based on limited inhalation toxicity information, airborne NITC concentrations did not appear to pose an acute human inhalation exposure concern to field operators and bystanders.

  3. Effects of Monoculture, Crop Rotation, and Soil Moisture Content on Selected Soil Physicochemical and Microbial Parameters in Wheat Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Marais

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Different plants are known to have different soil microbial communities associated with them. Agricultural management practices such as fertiliser and pesticide addition, crop rotation, and grazing animals can lead to different microbial communities in the associated agricultural soils. Soil dilution plates, most-probable-number (MPN, community level physiological profiling (CLPP, and buried slide technique as well as some measured soil physicochemical parameters were used to determine changes during the growing season in the ecosystem profile in wheat fields subjected to wheat monoculture or wheat in annual rotation with medic/clover pasture. Statistical analyses showed that soil moisture had an over-riding effect on seasonal fluctuations in soil physicochemical and microbial populations. While within season soil microbial activity could be differentiated between wheat fields under rotational and monoculture management, these differences were not significant.

  4. Estimating Field Scale Crop Evapotranspiration using Landsat and MODIS Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, A.; Jin, Y.; Snyder, R. L.; Daniele, Z.; Gao, F.

    2016-12-01

    Irrigation accounts for 80% of human freshwater consumption, and most of it return to the atmosphere through Evapotranspiration (ET). Given the challenges of already-stressed water resources and ground water regulation in California, a cost-effective, timely, and consistent spatial estimate of crop ET, from the farm to watershed level, is becoming increasingly important. The Priestley-Taylor (PT) approach, calibrated with field data and driven by satellite observations, shows great promise for accurate ET estimates across diverse ecosystems. We here aim to improve the robustness of the PT approach in agricultural lands, to enable growers and farm managers to tailor irrigation management based on in-field spatial variability and in-season variation. We optimized the PT coefficients for each crop type with available ET measurements from eddy covariance towers and/or surface renewal stations at six crop fields (Alfalfa, Almond, Citrus, Corn, Pistachio and Rice) in California. Good agreement was found between satellite-based estimates and field measurements of net radiation, with a RMSE of less than 36 W m-2. The crop type specific optimization performed well, with a RMSE of 30 W m-2 and a correlation of 0.81 for predicted daily latent heat flux. The calibrated algorithm was used to estimate ET at 30 m resolution over the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta region for 2015 water year. It captures well the seasonal dynamics and spatial distribution of ET in Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. A continuous monitoring of the dynamics and spatial heterogeneity of canopy and consumptive water use at a field scale, will help the growers to be well prepared and informed to adaptively manage water, canopy, and grove density to maximize the yield with the least amount of water.

  5. Crop residue decomposition in no-tillage small-grain fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, J.L.; Schomberg, H.H.; Unger, P.W.; Cresap, J.

    1999-12-01

    Conservation tillage fields provide different environments for biological and chemical processes than tilled fields. Their understanding of decomposition does not adequately account for post-harvest residue distributions or field environment variability. The authors hypothesized that temperature and moisture could be used to normalize field environments to optimal conditions that produce maximum decomposition rates; and biomass density could be normalized based on the fraction of initial biomass remaining over time. Four small grains were grown at Bushland, TX, to produce high-, medium-, and low-biomass densities in 36 field subplots using different seeding rate, fertilizer, and irrigation on Pullman clay loam. During decomposition, differential irrigation increased environmental variability. Ash-free crop residue biomass was measured seven times during 14 mo. Climate indices related field to optimal conditions, based on the daily minimum of air temperature and precipitation coefficients. First-order decomposition coefficients, k, were determined by plot, using the cumulative climate index to represent time. Irrigation did not affect k, indicating that the moisture index accounted for irrigation effects; but crops had different coefficients. Initial biomass density was inversely related to k, indicating that climate-based indices inadequately normalized environments across density treatments. The k was correlated to initial biomass, fraction-standing initial biomass, and initial N concentration in standing biomass. Climate indices may allow normalization of field environments important to decomposition and other agroecosystem processes if density effects on atmosphere--soil-residue interactions can be better quantified.

  6. CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE FIELD CROPS YIELD IN TEISANI AREA HOUSEHOLDS, PRAHOVA COUNTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Elena ANGELESCU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper was to analyze the technological performance of the field crops on luvisoils in Teisani area, Prahova County, where corn and potato are cultivated for personal consumption and beet for animal nutrition. The cultivation of wheat and fodder plants has been an exception. Studies conducted have firstly referred to the introduction of crops in rotation system, through cooperation and exchange between households and within their own household for those with larger surfaces. To compare the productivity of crops, the yield energy value has been used as a measure unit, which facilitates the comparison. The yields was reduced up to the lower limit of crop potential because of monocultures and the lack of appropriate technologies, even for small farming machinery. The results showed that using improved technologies, in 2013 and 2014, the yields were significantly superior, the highest ones, for potatoes and alfalfa, the last one as jumper field. Introducing alfalfa in the crop rotation system has led to the potato yield doubling, but also of those of wheat, corn and beet. Using manure and organic material available and degradable in the form of compost made in their own household, to which are added small amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus, there were obtained average yields by 40% higher than the average of the experience and by 139%, i.e. 2.4 times higher than the unfertilized variant, very much used in the area. Therefore, it was demonstrated, that there are huge resources to produce agricultural products and primary food in the Teisani rural area. Small peasant households should be encouraged and financially supported to participate to food production both for their own consumption, but also for the market.

  7. Initial study - compilation and synthesis of knowledge about energy crops from field to energy production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Magnus; Bubholz, Monika; Forsberg, Maya; Myringer, Aase; Palm, Ola; Roennbaeck, Marie; Tullin, Claes

    2007-11-15

    Energy crops constitute an yet not fully utilised potential as fuel for heating and power production. As competition for biomass increases interest in agricultural fuels such as straw, energy grain, willow, reed canary grass and hemp is increasing. Exploiting the potential for energy crops as fuels will demand that cultivation and harvest be coordinated with transportation, storage and combustion of the crops. Together, Vaermeforsk and the Swedish Farmers' Foundation for Agricultural Research (SLF), have taken the initiative to a common research programme. The long-term aim of the programme is to increase production and utilisation of bioenergy from agriculture to combustion for heat and power production in Sweden. The vision is that during the course of the 2006 - 2009 programme, decisive steps will be taken towards a functioning market for biofuels for bioenergy from agriculture. This survey has compiled and synthesised available knowledge and experiences about energy crops from field to energy production. The aim has been to provide a snapshot of knowledge today, to identify knowledge gaps and to synthesise knowledge we have today into future research needs. A research plan proposal has been developed for the research programme

  8. Biochar application to temperate soils: effects on nutrient uptake and crop yield under field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Karer

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of biochar (BC application to fertile, non-acidic soils in temperate climate regions might not always be as evident as for highly weathered tropical soils. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of BC on soil characteristics, nutrient uptake and crop yield in field experiments on two temperate soils (Cambisol and Chernozem in Austria. Maize and wheat (Cambisol, and barley and sunflower (Chernozem were grown in successive vegetation periods following different BC application rates (0, 24 and 72 t ha-1 at the start of the experiment, supplemented with identical mineral N supply in 33 m² plots. BC treatments showed varying impacts on nutrient uptake of the investigated crops. The first growing season in the Chernozem region was affected by a prolonged drought period, which resulted in positive effects of BC on soil water-holding capacity (WHC and barley crop yield (+ 10% for the 72 t ha-1 BC + N treatment compared to a control with identical nutrient supply but without BC. However, maize and wheat grain yield decreased by 46 and 70%, respectively, after the highest BC application rate (72 t ha-1 in an additional treatment without supplementary N-fertilisation. Still, even with high BC application rates we did not observe any adverse effects on crop yield and nutrient uptake, as long as the soil was supplied with sufficient N according to local agricultural practice.

  9. Field controlled experiments of mercury accumulation in crops from air and soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu Zhenchuan [Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhang Xiaoshan, E-mail: zhangxsh@rcees.ac.cn [Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Wang Zhangwei, E-mail: wangzhw@rcees.ac.cn [Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Ci Zhijia [Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2011-10-15

    Field open top chambers (OTCs) and soil mercury (Hg) enriched experiments were employed to study the influence of Hg concentrations in air and soil on the Hg accumulation in the organs of maize (Zea mays L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Results showed that Hg concentrations in foliages were correlated significantly (p < 0.05) with air Hg concentrations but insignificantly correlated with soil Hg concentrations, indicating that Hg in crop foliages was mainly from air. Hg concentrations in roots were generally correlated with soil Hg concentrations (p < 0.05) but insignificantly correlated with air Hg concentrations, indicating that Hg in crop roots was mainly from soil. No significant correlations were found between Hg concentrations in stems and those in air and soil. However, Hg concentrations in upper stems were usually higher than those in bottom stems, implying air Hg might have stronger influence than soil Hg on stem Hg accumulation. - Highlights: > Hg accumulation in crop organs was studied by OTCs and soil Hg enriched experiments. > Hg accumulation in foliages and roots was mainly from air and soil, respectively. > Air Hg had stronger influence than soil Hg on stem Hg accumulation. > Foliar Hg concentrations showed the trend of increase over growth stages. - Capsule Mercury accumulated in the aboveground organs of crop was mainly from the air.

  10. Field-scale experiments reveal persistent yield gaps in low-input and organic cropping systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, Alexandra N; Snapp, Sieglinde S; Robertson, G Philip

    2017-01-31

    Knowledge of production-system performance is largely based on observations at the experimental plot scale. Although yield gaps between plot-scale and field-scale research are widely acknowledged, their extent and persistence have not been experimentally examined in a systematic manner. At a site in southwest Michigan, we conducted a 6-y experiment to test the accuracy with which plot-scale crop-yield results can inform field-scale conclusions. We compared conventional versus alternative, that is, reduced-input and biologically based-organic, management practices for a corn-soybean-wheat rotation in a randomized complete block-design experiment, using 27 commercial-size agricultural fields. Nearby plot-scale experiments (0.02-ha to 1.0-ha plots) provided a comparison of plot versus field performance. We found that plot-scale yields well matched field-scale yields for conventional management but not for alternative systems. For all three crops, at the plot scale, reduced-input and conventional managements produced similar yields; at the field scale, reduced-input yields were lower than conventional. For soybeans at the plot scale, biological and conventional managements produced similar yields; at the field scale, biological yielded less than conventional. For corn, biological management produced lower yields than conventional in both plot- and field-scale experiments. Wheat yields appeared to be less affected by the experimental scale than corn and soybean. Conventional management was more resilient to field-scale challenges than alternative practices, which were more dependent on timely management interventions; in particular, mechanical weed control. Results underscore the need for much wider adoption of field-scale experimentation when assessing new technologies and production-system performance, especially as related to closing yield gaps in organic farming and in low-resourced systems typical of much of the developing world.

  11. Long-term conventional and no-tillage effects on field hydrology and yields of a dryland crop rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semiarid dryland crop yields with no-till, NT, residue management are often greater than stubble-mulch, SM, tillage as a result of improved soil conditions and water conservation, but information on long-term tillage effects on field hydrology and sustained crop production are needed. Our objective ...

  12. Distribution pattern assessment of a dual-purpose disc agrochemical applicator for field crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Abubakar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A dual-purpose disc agrochemical applicator for field crops was developed to boost agricultural mechanization in crop production and also to overcome the safety concern of hazardous spray drift during agrochemical application by the field crop farmers. The dual purpose agrochemical applicator was mounted on a high clearance tractor and tested with respect to the granular fertilizer distribution patterns uniformity/liquid chemical uniformity of droplet sizes in spraying of the agrochemical. Results for NPK granular chemical indicated that, at low (50 kg/ha and high (150 kg/ha application rates with 550 rpm disc speed, distribution patterns skewed to the left whereas the distribution pattern at medium (100 kg/ha application rates was good flattop. Also at high application rate with 1000 rpm disc speed, mean distribution pattern became poor (W-shape. For the liquid chemical herbicide HC 48 amine liquid, the mean values of volume median diameter (VMD and number median diameter (NMD were 108 µm and 80 µm at 90 lt/ha application rate at 5000 rpm rotary disc speed, and also 344 and 222 µm at 30 lt/ha application rate with 2000 rpm rotary disc speed. The mean values of coefficient of uniformity for droplet sizes expressed as VMD/NMD found in this study were in the range of 1.35 to 1.55 for HC amine 48 liquid chemical.

  13. UAS imaging for automated crop lodging detection: a case study over an experimental maize field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Tianxing; Starek, Michael J.; Brewer, Michael J.; Masiane, Tiisetso; Murray, Seth C.

    2017-05-01

    Lodging has been recognized as one of the major destructive factors for crop quality and yield, particularly in corn. A variety of contributing causes, e.g. disease and/or pest, weather conditions, excessive nitrogen, and high plant density, may lead to lodging before harvesting season. Traditional lodging detection strategies mainly rely on ground data collection, which is insufficient in efficiency and accuracy. To address this problem, this research focuses on the use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) for automated detection of crop lodging. The study was conducted over an experimental corn field at the Texas A and M AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Corpus Christi, Texas, during the growing season of 2016. Nadir-view images of the corn field were taken by small UAS platforms equipped with consumer grade RGB and NIR cameras on a per week basis, enabling a timely observation of the plant growth. 3D structural information of the plants was reconstructed using structure-from-motion photogrammetry. The structural information was then applied to calculate crop height, and rates of growth. A lodging index for detecting corn lodging was proposed afterwards. Ground truth data of lodging was collected on a per row basis and used for fair assessment and tuning of the detection algorithm. Results show the UAS-measured height correlates well with the ground-measured height. More importantly, the lodging index can effectively reflect severity of corn lodging and yield after harvesting.

  14. Long-term behaviours of {sup 137}Cs in simulated crop fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, K. M.; Choi, Y. H.; Park, H. K.; Park, D. W.; Lee, W. Y. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-10-01

    In order to understand the long-term behaviour of {sup 137}Cs in crop fields, root uptake and underground distribution of {sup 137}Cs were investigated through a greenhouse experiment where {sup 137}Cs was mixed with topsoil in culture boxes and rice, soybean and Chinese cabbage were grown for 4 years. Soil-to-plant transfer factors of {sup 137}Cs for hulled rice, rice straw, soybean seed and Chinese cabbage reduced by factors of 3-10 depending on crops, and leaching of {sup 137}Cs from the rice culture box decreased by a factor of about 7, in 3 years. The {sup 137}Cs transfer factor for soybean seed were several times higher than that for hulled rice. The amount of {sup 137}Cs leaching during the growing season of rice was as low as 0.025% of applied activity even in the 1st year. The uniformity of {sup 137}Cs distribution in topsoil tended to improve year by year. The present results may be utilized as basic information for the environmental impact assessment and the counter-measure decision when crop fields are contaminated with {sup 137}Cs.

  15. A case study for assessment of microbial community dynamics in genetically modified Bt cotton crop fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Manisha; Bhatia, Ranjana; Pandey, Gunjan; Pandey, Janmejay; Paul, Debarati; Jain, Rakesh K

    2010-08-01

    Bt cotton was the first genetically modified crop approved for use in India. However, only a few studies have been conducted to assess the feasibility of its commercial application. Bt cotton is genetically modified to express a proteinaceous endotoxin (Cry) encoded by cry gene of Bacillus thuringiensis that has specific insecticidal activity against bollworms. Therefore, the amount of pesticides used for growing Bt cotton is postulated to be considerably low as compared to their non-Bt counterparts. Alternatively, it is also speculated that application of a genetically modified crop may alter the bio-geochemical balance of the agriculture field(s). Microbial community composition and dynamics is an important descriptor for assessment of such alterations. In the present study, we have assessed the culturable and non-culturable microbial diversities in Bt cotton and non-Bt cotton soils to determine the ecological consequences of application of Bt cotton. The analyses of microbial community structures indicated that cropping of Bt cotton did not adversely affect the diversity of the microbial communities.

  16. Erratum to: Estimating the crop response to fertilizer nitrogen residues in long-continued field experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens; Thomsen, Ingrid Kaag; Mattson, L

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the cumulated effect of long-continued nitrogen (N) inputs is important for both agronomic and environmental reasons. However, only little attention has been paid to estimate the crop response to mineral fertilizer N residues. Before interpreting estimates for the crop response...... the interaction using data from five long-continued field experiments on mineral and organic N input rates where the main plots were subdivided for incremental rates of mineral N fertilizer in the test year. The interaction between N applied in the past and in the test year significantly affected grain yield...... and N offtake when the residual effect originated from organic applications, but the interaction was not significant when mineral N fertilizer had been used in the past, making the residual effect of N applied in the past additive to the effect of N applied in the test year. The dry matter (DM) grain...

  17. Linking canopy reflectance to crop structure and photosynthesis to capture and interpret spatiotemporal dimensions of per-field photosynthetic productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wei; Jeong, Seungtaek; Ko, Jonghan; Tenhunen, John

    2017-03-01

    Nitrogen and water availability alter canopy structure and physiology, and thus crop growth, yielding large impacts on ecosystem-regulating/production provisions. However, to date, explicitly quantifying such impacts remains challenging partially due to lack of adequate methodology to capture spatial dimensions of ecosystem changes associated with nitrogen and water effects. A data fitting, where close-range remote-sensing measurements of vegetation indices derived from a handheld instrument and an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) system are linked to in situ leaf and canopy photosynthetic traits, was applied to capture and interpret inter- and intra-field variations in gross primary productivity (GPP) in lowland rice grown under flooded conditions (paddy rice, PD) subject to three nitrogen application rates and under rainfed conditions (RF) in an East Asian monsoon region of South Korea. Spatial variations (SVs) in both GPP and light use efficiency (LUEcabs) early in the growing season were enlarged by nitrogen addition. The nutritional effects narrowed over time. A shift in planting culture from flooded to rainfed conditions strengthened SVs in GPP and LUEcabs. Intervention of prolonged drought late in the growing season dramatically intensified SVs that were supposed to seasonally decrease. Nevertheless, nitrogen addition effects on SV of LUEcabs at the early growth stage made PD fields exert greater SVs than RF fields. SVs of GPP across PD and RF rice fields were likely related to leaf area index (LAI) development less than to LUEcabs, while numerical analysis suggested that considering strength in LUEcabs and its spatial variation for the same crop type tends to be vital for better evaluation in landscape/regional patterns of ecosystem photosynthetic productivity at critical phenology stages.

  18. Dynamics of verticillium species microsclerotia in field soils in response to fumigation, cropping patterns, and flooding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Dylan P G; Sandoya, German; Vallad, Gary E; Koike, Steven T; Xiao, Chang-Lin; Wu, Bo-Ming; Gurung, Suraj; Hayes, Ryan J; Subbarao, Krishna V

    2015-05-01

    Verticillium dahliae is a soilborne, economically significant fungal plant pathogen that persists in the soil for up to 14 years as melanized microsclerotia (ms). Similarly, V. longisporum is a very significant production constraint on members of the family Brassicaceae. Management of Verticillium wilt has relied on methods that reduce ms below crop-specific thresholds at which little or no disease develops. Methyl bromide, a broad-spectrum biocide, has been used as a preplant soil fumigant for over 50 years to reduce V. dahliae ms. However, reductions in the number of ms in the vertical and horizontal soil profiles and the rate at which soil recolonization occurs has not been studied. The dynamics of ms in soil before and after methyl bromide+chloropicrin fumigation were followed over 3 years in six 8-by-8-m sites in two fields. In separate fields, the dynamics of ms in the 60-cm-deep vertical soil profile pre- and postfumigation with methyl bromide+chloropicrin followed by various cropping patterns were studied over 4 years. Finally, ms densities were assessed in six 8-by-8-m sites in a separate field prior to and following a natural 6-week flood. Methyl bromide+chloripicrin significantly reduced but did not eliminate V. dahliae ms in either the vertical or horizontal soil profiles. In field studies, increases in ms were highly dependent upon the crop rotation pattern followed postfumigation. In the vertical soil profile, densities of ms were highest in the top 5 to 20 cm of soil but were consistently detected at 60-cm depths. Six weeks of natural flooding significantly reduced (on average, approximately 65% in the total viable counts of ms) but did not eliminate viable ms of V. longisporum.

  19. A METHOD TO ESTIMATE TEMPORAL INTERACTION IN A CONDITIONAL RANDOM FIELD BASED APPROACH FOR CROP RECOGNITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. A. Diaz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method to estimate the temporal interaction in a Conditional Random Field (CRF based approach for crop recognition from multitemporal remote sensing image sequences. This approach models the phenology of different crop types as a CRF. Interaction potentials are assumed to depend only on the class labels of an image site at two consecutive epochs. In the proposed method, the estimation of temporal interaction parameters is considered as an optimization problem, whose goal is to find the transition matrix that maximizes the CRF performance, upon a set of labelled data. The objective functions underlying the optimization procedure can be formulated in terms of different accuracy metrics, such as overall and average class accuracy per crop or phenological stages. To validate the proposed approach, experiments were carried out upon a dataset consisting of 12 co-registered LANDSAT images of a region in southeast of Brazil. Pattern Search was used as the optimization algorithm. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method was able to substantially outperform estimates related to joint or conditional class transition probabilities, which rely on training samples.

  20. Field research on the spectral properties of crops and soils, volume 1. [Purdue Agronomy Farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, M. E. (Principal Investigator); Biehl, L. L.; Robinson, B. F.

    1980-01-01

    The experiment design, data acquisition and preprocessing, data base management, analysis results and development of instrumentation for the AgRISTARS Supporting Research Project, Field Research task are described. Results of several investigations on the spectral reflectance of corn and soybean canopies as influenced by cultural practices, development stage and nitrogen nutrition are reported as well as results of analyses of the spectral properties of crop canopies as a function of canopy geometry, row orientation, sensor view angle and solar illumination angle are presented. The objectives, experiment designs and data acquired in 1980 for field research experiments are described. The development and performance characteristics of a prototype multiband radiometer, data logger, and aerial tower for field research are discussed.

  1. Eclipse effects on field crops and marine zooplankton: the 29 March 2006 total solar eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economou, G.; Christou, E. D.; Giannakourou, A.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Georgopoulos, D.; Kotoulas, V.; Lyra, D.; Tsakalis, N.; Tzortziou, M.; Vahamidis, P.; Papathanassiou, E.; Karamanos, A.

    2008-08-01

    Some effects in the biosphere from the Total Solar Eclipse of 29 March 2006 were investigated in field crops and marine zooplankton. Taking into account the decisive role of light on plant life and productivity, measurements of photosynthesis and stomatal behaviour were conducted on seven important field-grown cereal and leguminous crops. A drop in photosynthetic rates, by more than a factor of 5 in some cases, was observed, and the minimum values of photosynthetic rates ranged between 3.13 and 10.13 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1. The drop in solar irradiance and the increase in mesophyll CO2-concentration during the eclipse did not induce stomatal closure thus not blocking CO2 uptake by plants. Light effects on the photochemical phase of photosynthesis may be responsible for the observed depression in photosynthetic rates. Field studies addressing the migratory responses of marine zooplankton (micro-zooplankton (ciliates), and meso-zooplankton) due to the rapid changes in underwater light intensity were also performed. The light intensity attenuation was simulated with the use of accurate underwater radiative transfer modeling techniques. Ciliates, responded to the rapid decrease in light intensity during the eclipse adopting night-time behaviour. From the meso-zooplankton assemblage, various vertical migratory behaviours were adopted by different species.

  2. Eclipse effects on field crops and marine zooplankton: the 29 March 2006 total solar eclipse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Economou

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Some effects in the biosphere from the Total Solar Eclipse of 29 March 2006 were investigated in field crops and marine zooplankton. Taking into account the decisive role of light on plant life and productivity, measurements of photosynthesis and stomatal behaviour were conducted on seven important field-grown cereal and leguminous crops. A drop in photosynthetic rates, by more than a factor of 5 in some cases, was observed, and the minimum values of photosynthetic rates ranged between 3.13 and 10.13 μmol CO2 m−2 s−1. The drop in solar irradiance and the increase in mesophyll CO2-concentration during the eclipse did not induce stomatal closure thus not blocking CO2 uptake by plants. Light effects on the photochemical phase of photosynthesis may be responsible for the observed depression in photosynthetic rates. Field studies addressing the migratory responses of marine zooplankton (micro-zooplankton (ciliates, and meso-zooplankton due to the rapid changes in underwater light intensity were also performed. The light intensity attenuation was simulated with the use of accurate underwater radiative transfer modeling techniques. Ciliates, responded to the rapid decrease in light intensity during the eclipse adopting night-time behaviour. From the meso-zooplankton assemblage, various vertical migratory behaviours were adopted by different species.

  3. Building Exposure Maps Of Urban Infrastructure And Crop Fields In The Mekong River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, E.; Weichselbaum, J.; Gangkofner, U.; Miltzer, J.; Wali, A.

    2013-12-01

    In the frame of the Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) initiative for the Mekong river basin World Bank is collaborating with the Mekong River Commission and governmental organizations in Cambodia, Lao PDR, Thailand and Vietnam to build national and regional capacities for managing the risks associated with natural disasters, such as floods, flash floods and droughts. Within ‘eoworld', a joint initiative set up by ESA and World Bank to foster the use of Earth Observation (EO) for sustainable development work, a comprehensive database of elements at risk in the Lower Mekong river basin has been established by GeoVille, including urban infrastructure and crops (primarily rice paddies). In the long term, this exposure information shall be fed into an open-source multi- hazard modeling tool for risk assessment along the Mekong River, which then shall be used by national stakeholders as well as insurance and financial institutions for planning, disaster preparedness and emergency management. Earth Observation techniques can provide objective, synoptic and repetitive observations of elements at risk including buildings, infrastructure and crops. Through the fusion of satellite-based with in-situ data from field surveys and local knowledge (e.g. on building materials) features at risk can be characterised and mapped with high accuracy. Earth Observation data utilised comprise bi-weekly Envisat ASAR imagery programmed for a period of 9 months in 2011 to map the development of the rice cultivation area, identify predominant cropping systems (wet-season vs. dry season cultivation), crop cycles (single /double / triple crop per year), date of emergence/harvest and the distinction between rice planted under intensive (SRI) vs. regular rice cultivation techniques. Very High Resolution (VHR) optical data from SPOT, KOMPSAT and QuickBird were used for mapping of buildings and infrastructure, such as building footprints, residential / commercial areas, industrial

  4. Effects of winter cover crops residue returning on soil enzyme activities and soil microbial community in double-cropping rice fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai-Ming, Tang; Xiao-Ping, Xiao; Wen-Guang, Tang; Ye-Chun, Lin; Ke, Wang; Guang-Li, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Residue management in cropping systems is useful to improve soil quality. However, the studies on the effects of residue management on the enzyme activities and microbial community of soils in South China are few. Therefore, the effects of incorporating winter cover crop residue with a double-cropping rice (Oryza sativa L.) system on soil enzyme activities and microbial community in Southern China fields were studied. The experiment has conducted at the experimental station of the Institute of Soil and Fertilizer Research, Hunan Academy of Agricultural Science, China since winter 2004. Four winter cropping systems were used: rice-rice-ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.) (R-R-Ry), rice-rice-Chinese milk vetch (Astragalus sinicus L.) (R-R-Mv), rice-rice-rape (Brassica napus L.) (R-R-Ra) and rice-rice with winter fallow (R-R-Fa). The result indicated that the enzyme activities in the R-R-Ry, R-R-Mv and R-R-Ra systems were significantly higher (Pcover crops into rotations may increase enzyme activities and microbial community in soil and therefore improve soil quality.

  5. Pollination deficit in open-field tomato crops (Solanum lycopersicum L., Solanaceae in Rio de Janeiro state, Southeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Scaramussa Deprá

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available More than 70% of world’s crops benefit from biotic pollination, and bees are their main pollinators. Despite the fact that some of these insects have been broadly studied, understanding the interactions between plant crops and their pollinators with a local scale approach is necessary when aiming to apply proper protective and management measures to pollinators and their respective crops. In this context, we analyzed the pollination status of open-field tomato crops (Solanum lycopersicum L., regarding fruit-set, visitation rate and the quality of fruits. We recorded the formation of fruits through spontaneous self-pollination and open-pollination, and the occurrence of pollinators in 24 areas of open-field tomato crops. We performed experiments of apomixis, spontaneous self-pollination, manual cross pollination and supplemental cross pollination (simulating the pollinator behavior in a greenhouse. The fruit quality was evaluated according to circumference, weight, volume and number of seeds. Higher production of fruits after open-pollination compared to spontaneous self-pollination indicates the importance of pollinators to increment productivity of S. lycopersicum in the study area. The circumference and the number of seeds from tomatoes of the greenhouse plantation did not differ between spontaneous self-pollination and the manual cross pollination. In the open-field crops the number of seeds was higher for fruits resulting from open-pollination. Our results indicate that the importance of bees is mainly related to the increase in fruit production, thus incrementing the productivity of tomato crops.

  6. A High-Throughput, Field-Based Phenotyping Technology for Tall Biomass Crops1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in omics technologies have not been accompanied by equally efficient, cost-effective, and accurate phenotyping methods required to dissect the genetic architecture of complex traits. Even though high-throughput phenotyping platforms have been developed for controlled environments, field-based aerial and ground technologies have only been designed and deployed for short-stature crops. Therefore, we developed and tested Phenobot 1.0, an auto-steered and self-propelled field-based high-throughput phenotyping platform for tall dense canopy crops, such as sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). Phenobot 1.0 was equipped with laterally positioned and vertically stacked stereo RGB cameras. Images collected from 307 diverse sorghum lines were reconstructed in 3D for feature extraction. User interfaces were developed, and multiple algorithms were evaluated for their accuracy in estimating plant height and stem diameter. Tested feature extraction methods included the following: (1) User-interactive Individual Plant Height Extraction (UsIn-PHe) based on dense stereo three-dimensional reconstruction; (2) Automatic Hedge-based Plant Height Extraction (Auto-PHe) based on dense stereo 3D reconstruction; (3) User-interactive Dense Stereo Matching Stem Diameter Extraction; and (4) User-interactive Image Patch Stereo Matching Stem Diameter Extraction (IPaS-Di). Comparative genome-wide association analysis and ground-truth validation demonstrated that both UsIn-PHe and Auto-PHe were accurate methods to estimate plant height, while Auto-PHe had the additional advantage of being a completely automated process. For stem diameter, IPaS-Di generated the most accurate estimates of this biomass-related architectural trait. In summary, our technology was proven robust to obtain ground-based high-throughput plant architecture parameters of sorghum, a tall and densely planted crop species. PMID:28620124

  7. A High-Throughput, Field-Based Phenotyping Technology for Tall Biomass Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas Fernandez, Maria G; Bao, Yin; Tang, Lie; Schnable, Patrick S

    2017-08-01

    Recent advances in omics technologies have not been accompanied by equally efficient, cost-effective, and accurate phenotyping methods required to dissect the genetic architecture of complex traits. Even though high-throughput phenotyping platforms have been developed for controlled environments, field-based aerial and ground technologies have only been designed and deployed for short-stature crops. Therefore, we developed and tested Phenobot 1.0, an auto-steered and self-propelled field-based high-throughput phenotyping platform for tall dense canopy crops, such as sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). Phenobot 1.0 was equipped with laterally positioned and vertically stacked stereo RGB cameras. Images collected from 307 diverse sorghum lines were reconstructed in 3D for feature extraction. User interfaces were developed, and multiple algorithms were evaluated for their accuracy in estimating plant height and stem diameter. Tested feature extraction methods included the following: (1) User-interactive Individual Plant Height Extraction (UsIn-PHe) based on dense stereo three-dimensional reconstruction; (2) Automatic Hedge-based Plant Height Extraction (Auto-PHe) based on dense stereo 3D reconstruction; (3) User-interactive Dense Stereo Matching Stem Diameter Extraction; and (4) User-interactive Image Patch Stereo Matching Stem Diameter Extraction (IPaS-Di). Comparative genome-wide association analysis and ground-truth validation demonstrated that both UsIn-PHe and Auto-PHe were accurate methods to estimate plant height, while Auto-PHe had the additional advantage of being a completely automated process. For stem diameter, IPaS-Di generated the most accurate estimates of this biomass-related architectural trait. In summary, our technology was proven robust to obtain ground-based high-throughput plant architecture parameters of sorghum, a tall and densely planted crop species. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Cunaxidae (Acari: Prostigmata) diversity and population dynamics in garlic (Allium sativum) crop fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Recamier, B E; Vázquez, I M; Callejas-Chaveros, A; Estrada-Venegas, E G

    2013-10-01

    Agroecosystems are altered systems whose soil structure has changed affecting the dynamics of soil organisms. This paper aims at evaluation of the effects of garlic farming practices on phenology, richness, abundance, composition and diversity of soil-dwelling Cunaxidae. Ten pilot plots in Guanajuato State were sampled from August 2002 to July 2005, every month, 8 months per year. Ten soil samples (1 kg) were taken from each plot and extracted in Berlese-Tullgren funnels. A total of 108 cunaxids were found, belonging to 11 species. Neocunaxoides andrei was the most abundant, and Cunaxa evansi and Armascirus sp. were least abundant. Relative abundance was highest after harvesting and during plant growth, and lowest during planting. Dactyloscirus nicobarensis and D. candylus were present from planting to harvesting. According to Sörensen's similarity coefficient between cultivation stages, Cunaxidae communities were similar during plant growth and harvesting, sharing 80 % of the species. The highest abundance and diversity were found in 2004, during and after harvesting. Cunaxid species increased over 100 % from planting to the harvesting phase, suggesting that they play an important role in the soil agrosystems food web. Species composition and diversity in cunaxid communities present in garlic crop fields varied with agricultural phase, but little change was observed among the years studied. All species found in this study are new records for the state of Guanajuato and for the garlic crop fields.

  9. Cover crops as a gateway to greater conservation in Iowa?: Integrating crop models, field trials, economics and farmer perspectives regarding soil resilience in light of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch-McNally, G. E.; Basche, A.; Tyndall, J.; Arbuckle, J. G.; Miguez, F.; Bowman, T.

    2014-12-01

    Scientists predict a number of climate changes for the US Midwest with expected declines in crop productivity as well as eco-hydrological impacts. More frequent extreme rain events particularly in the spring may well increase saturated soils thus complicating agronomic interests and also exacerbate watershed scale impairments (e.g., sediment, nutrient loss). In order to build more resilient production systems in light of climate change, farmers will increasingly need to implement conservation practices (singularly or more likely in combination) that enable farmers to manage profitable businesses yet mitigate consequential environmental impacts that have both in-field and off-farm implications. Cover crops are empirically known to promote many aspects of soil and water health yet even the most aggressive recent estimates show that only 1-2% of the total acreage in Iowa have been planted to cover crops. In order to better understand why farmers are reluctant to adopt cover crops across Iowa we combined agronomic and financial data from long-term field trials, working farm trials and model simulations so as to present comprehensive data-driven information to farmers in focus group discussions in order to understand existing barriers, perceived benefits and responses to the information presented. Four focus groups (n=29) were conducted across Iowa in four geographic regions. Focus group discussions help explore the nuance of farmers' responses to modeling outputs and their real-life agronomic realities, thus shedding light on the social and psychological barriers with cover crop utilization. Among the key insights gained, comprehensive data-driven research can influence farmer perspectives on potential cover crop impacts to cash crop yields, experienced costs are potentially quite variable, and having field/farm benefits articulated in economic terms are extremely important when farmers weigh the opportunity costs associated with adopting new practices. Our work

  10. Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing (GANS) method for measurements of soil moisture in cropped fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres Rivera Villarreyes, Carlos; Baroni, Gabriele; Oswald, Sascha E.

    2013-04-01

    Measurement of soil moisture at the plot or hill-slope scale is an important link between local vadose zone hydrology and catchment hydrology. However, so far only few methods are on the way to close this gap between point measurements and remote sensing. This study evaluates the applicability of the Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing (GANS) for integral quantification of seasonal soil moisture in the root zone at the scale of a field or small watershed, making use of the crucial role of hydrogen as neutron moderator relative to other landscape materials. GANS measurements were performed at two locations in Germany under different vegetative situations and seasonal conditions. Ground albedo neutrons were measured at (i) a lowland Bornim farmland (Brandenburg) cropped with sunflower in 2011 and winter rye in 2012, and (ii) a mountainous farmland catchment (Schaefertal, Harz Mountains) since middle 2011. At both sites depth profiles of soil moisture were measured at several locations in parallel by frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) for comparison and calibration. Initially, calibration parameters derived from a previous study with corn cover were tested under sunflower and winter rye periods at the same farmland. GANS soil moisture based on these parameters showed a large discrepancy compared to classical soil moisture measurements. Therefore, two new calibration approaches and four different ways of integration the soil moisture profile to an integral value for GANS were evaluated in this study. This included different sets of calibration parameters based on different growing periods of sunflower. New calibration parameters showed a good agreement with FDR network during sunflower period (RMSE = 0.023 m3 m-3), but they underestimated soil moisture in the winter rye period. The GANS approach resulted to be highly affected by temporal changes of biomass and crop types which suggest the need of neutron corrections for long-term observations with crop rotation. Finally

  11. Incentive award 'Energy from the field' from dlz agrarmagazin and Bayer CropScience - award ceremony and short presentation of the awarded projects; Foerderpreis 'Energie vom Acker' von dlz agrarmagazin und Bayer CropScience - Preisverleihung und Kurzvorstellung der praemierten Projekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2007-07-01

    The incentive award Energy from the Field given by the dlz agrarmagazin, Munich, Deutscher Landwirtschaftsverlag and Bayer Crop Science Deutschland GmbH, Langenfeld supports junior staff in the field of agriculture at the development of forward-looking bioenergy projects. It wants to give an incentive to deal with the subject of successful concepts for renewable raw materials in the fields of agriculture and forest culture. (orig.)

  12. Genetic Diversity of Oilseed Rape Fields and Feral Populations in the Context of Coexistence with GM Crops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Bailleul

    Full Text Available Despite growing concern about transgenes escaping from fields, few studies have analysed the genetic diversity of crops in an agroecosystem over several years. Accurate information about the dynamics and relationship of the genetic diversity of crops in an agroecosystem is essential for risk assessment and policies concerning the containment of genetically modified crops and their coexistence with crops grown by conventional practices. Here, we analysed the genetic diversity of oilseed rape plants from fields and feral populations over 4 years in an agricultural landscape of 41 km2. We used exact compatibility and maximum likelihood assignment methods to assign these plants to cultivars. Even pure lines and hybrid cultivar seed lots contained several genotypes. The cultivar diversity in fields reflected the conventional view of agroecosystems quite well: that is, there was a succession of cultivars, some grown for longer than others because of their good performance, some used for one year and then abandoned, and others gradually adopted. Three types of field emerged: fields sown with a single cultivar, fields sown with two cultivars, and unassigned fields (too many cultivars or unassigned plants to reliably assign the field. Field plant diversity was higher than expected, indicating the persistence of cultivars that were grown for only one year. The cultivar composition of feral populations was similar to that of field plants, with an increasing number of cultivars each year. By using genetic tools, we found a link between the cultivars of field plants in a particular year and the cultivars of feral population plants in the following year. Feral populations on road verges were more diverse than those on path verges. All of these findings are discussed in terms of their consequences in the context of coexistence with genetically modified crops.

  13. Genetic Diversity of Oilseed Rape Fields and Feral Populations in the Context of Coexistence with GM Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailleul, Diane; Ollier, Sébastien; Lecomte, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Despite growing concern about transgenes escaping from fields, few studies have analysed the genetic diversity of crops in an agroecosystem over several years. Accurate information about the dynamics and relationship of the genetic diversity of crops in an agroecosystem is essential for risk assessment and policies concerning the containment of genetically modified crops and their coexistence with crops grown by conventional practices. Here, we analysed the genetic diversity of oilseed rape plants from fields and feral populations over 4 years in an agricultural landscape of 41 km2. We used exact compatibility and maximum likelihood assignment methods to assign these plants to cultivars. Even pure lines and hybrid cultivar seed lots contained several genotypes. The cultivar diversity in fields reflected the conventional view of agroecosystems quite well: that is, there was a succession of cultivars, some grown for longer than others because of their good performance, some used for one year and then abandoned, and others gradually adopted. Three types of field emerged: fields sown with a single cultivar, fields sown with two cultivars, and unassigned fields (too many cultivars or unassigned plants to reliably assign the field). Field plant diversity was higher than expected, indicating the persistence of cultivars that were grown for only one year. The cultivar composition of feral populations was similar to that of field plants, with an increasing number of cultivars each year. By using genetic tools, we found a link between the cultivars of field plants in a particular year and the cultivars of feral population plants in the following year. Feral populations on road verges were more diverse than those on path verges. All of these findings are discussed in terms of their consequences in the context of coexistence with genetically modified crops.

  14. Multisensor Capacitance Probes for Simultaneously Monitoring Rice Field Soil-Water- Crop-Ambient Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Brinkhoff

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Multisensor capacitance probes (MCPs have traditionally been used for soil moisture monitoring and irrigation scheduling. This paper presents a new application of these probes, namely the simultaneous monitoring of ponded water level, soil moisture, and temperature profile, conditions which are particularly important for rice crops in temperate growing regions and for rice grown with prolonged periods of drying. WiFi-based loggers are used to concurrently collect the data from the MCPs and ultrasonic distance sensors (giving an independent reading of water depth. Models are fit to MCP water depth vs volumetric water content (VWC characteristics from laboratory measurements, variability from probe-to-probe is assessed, and the methodology is verified using measurements from a rice field throughout a growing season. The root-mean-squared error of the water depth calculated from MCP VWC over the rice growing season was 6.6 mm. MCPs are used to simultaneously monitor ponded water depth, soil moisture content when ponded water is drained, and temperatures in root, water, crop and ambient zones. The insulation effect of ponded water against cold-temperature effects is demonstrated with low and high water levels. The developed approach offers advantages in gaining the full soil-plant-atmosphere continuum in a single robust sensor.

  15. Effects of winter cover crops straws incorporation on CH4 and N2O emission from double-cropping paddy fields in southern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Ming Tang

    Full Text Available Residue management in cropping systems is believed to improve soil quality. However, the effects of residue management on methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O emissions from paddy field in Southern China have not been well researched. The emissions of CH4 and N2O were investigated in double cropping rice (Oryza sativa L. systems with straw returning of different winter cover crops by using the static chamber-gas chromatography technique. A randomized block experiment with three replications was established in 2004 in Hunan Province, China, including rice-rice-ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L. (Ry-R-R, rice-rice-Chinese milk vetch (Astragalus sinicus L. (Mv-R-R and rice-rice with winter fallow (Fa-R-R. The results showed that straw returning of winter crops significantly increased the CH4 emission during both rice growing seasons when compared with Fa-R-R. Ry-R-R plots had the largest CH4 emissions during the early rice growing season with 14.235 and 15.906 g m(-2 in 2012 and 2013, respectively, when Ry-R-R plots had the largest CH4 emission during the later rice growing season with 35.673 and 38.606 g m(-2 in 2012 and 2013, respectively. The Ry-R-R and Mv-R-R also had larger N2O emissions than Fa-R-R in both rice seasons. When compared to Fa-R-R, total N2O emissions in the early rice growing season were increased by 0.05 g m(-2 in Ry-R-R and 0.063 g m(-2 in Mv-R-R in 2012, and by 0.058 g m(-2 in Ry-R-R and 0.068 g m(-2 in Mv-R-R in 2013, respectively. Similar result were obtained in the late rice growing season, and the total N2O emissions were increased by 0.104 g m(-2 in Ry-R-R and 0.073 g m(-2 in Mv-R-R in 2012, and by 0.108 g m(-2 in Ry-R-R and 0.076 g m(-2 in Mv-R-R in 2013, respectively. The global warming potentials (GWPs from paddy fields were ranked as Ry-R-R>Mv-R-R>Fa-R-R. As a result, straw returning of winter cover crops has significant effects on increase of CH4 and N2O emission from paddy field in double cropping rice system.

  16. Effects of winter cover crops straws incorporation on CH4 and N2O emission from double-cropping paddy fields in southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hai-Ming; Xiao, Xiao-Ping; Tang, Wen-Guang; Wang, Ke; Sun, Ji-Min; Li, Wei-Yan; Yang, Guang-Li

    2014-01-01

    Residue management in cropping systems is believed to improve soil quality. However, the effects of residue management on methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from paddy field in Southern China have not been well researched. The emissions of CH4 and N2O were investigated in double cropping rice (Oryza sativa L.) systems with straw returning of different winter cover crops by using the static chamber-gas chromatography technique. A randomized block experiment with three replications was established in 2004 in Hunan Province, China, including rice-rice-ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.) (Ry-R-R), rice-rice-Chinese milk vetch (Astragalus sinicus L.) (Mv-R-R) and rice-rice with winter fallow (Fa-R-R). The results showed that straw returning of winter crops significantly increased the CH4 emission during both rice growing seasons when compared with Fa-R-R. Ry-R-R plots had the largest CH4 emissions during the early rice growing season with 14.235 and 15.906 g m(-2) in 2012 and 2013, respectively, when Ry-R-R plots had the largest CH4 emission during the later rice growing season with 35.673 and 38.606 g m(-2) in 2012 and 2013, respectively. The Ry-R-R and Mv-R-R also had larger N2O emissions than Fa-R-R in both rice seasons. When compared to Fa-R-R, total N2O emissions in the early rice growing season were increased by 0.05 g m(-2) in Ry-R-R and 0.063 g m(-2) in Mv-R-R in 2012, and by 0.058 g m(-2) in Ry-R-R and 0.068 g m(-2) in Mv-R-R in 2013, respectively. Similar result were obtained in the late rice growing season, and the total N2O emissions were increased by 0.104 g m(-2) in Ry-R-R and 0.073 g m(-2) in Mv-R-R in 2012, and by 0.108 g m(-2) in Ry-R-R and 0.076 g m(-2) in Mv-R-R in 2013, respectively. The global warming potentials (GWPs) from paddy fields were ranked as Ry-R-R>Mv-R-R>Fa-R-R. As a result, straw returning of winter cover crops has significant effects on increase of CH4 and N2O emission from paddy field in double cropping rice system.

  17. Detecting Rice Phenology in Paddy Fields with Complex Cropping Pattern Using Time Series MODIS Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Kania Sari

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring paddy rice phenology and cropping schedules over wide areas is essential for many applications. Remote sensing provides a viable means to meet the requirement of improved regional-scale data set of paddy rice fields, such as phenological stages. A number of methods have been developed for detecting seasonal vegetation changes by using satellite images. Development of such methods to paddy fields with complex cropping pattern is still challenging. In this study, we developed a method for remotely determining phenological stages of paddy rice that uses time series of two vegetation indices (EVI and LSWI obtained from MODIS data. We ran the algorithm to determine the planting date, heading date, and harvesting date of paddy rice in 5 districts of West Java Province, using the 8-day composite MODIS Surface Reflectance products (500-m spatial resolution in 2004. Estimated harvesting dates were then used to calculate paddy rice harvested area. We validated the performance of the method against statistical data in 13 subdistricts. The root mean square errors of the estimated paddy rice harvested area against the statistical data were: 851 Ha for monthly data, 1227 Ha for quarterly data, and 2433 Ha for yearly data. Subdistrict-level comparisons of paddy rice harvested area between the MODIS estimation and statistical data showed moderate correlation, with coefficient of determination (r2 0.6, 0.7, and 0.6 for monthly, quarterly and yearly data, respectively. The results of this study indicated that the MODIS-based paddy rice phenological detection algorithm could potentially be applied at large spatial scales to monitor paddy rice agriculture on a timely and frequent basis.

  18. Yield and crop cycle time of peaches cultivated in subtropical climates and subjected to different pruning times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Augusto Ferraz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The cultivation of peaches in regions of subtropical and tropical climate is currently achieved through a set of practices such as using less demanding cultivars in cold conditions, applying plant growth regulators to break dormancy, and performing specific pruning, like production and renewal pruning. Research on the climate adaptation of cultivars is of great importance in establishing a crop in a given region. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the agronomic performance of three cultivars subjected to different production pruning times in Botucatu/SP, where 2-year old peach trees were evaluated, grown at a spacing of 6.0 x 4.0 meters. The experimental design was a split plot design with four blocks, using the cultivars Douradão, BRS Kampai and BRS Rubimel, and the subplots corresponded to pruning times in May, June, July and August. Ten plants were used per plot, with the four central plants considered useful and the remaining considered as margins. Pruning in June and July showed the best results in terms of percentage of fruit set and production. The cultivar BRS Rubimel showed the best percentage of fruit set when pruned in June (44.96%, and best fruit production when pruned in July (18.7 kg plant-1. Pruning in May anticipated the harvest of cultivar BRS Rubimel by 13 days whereas pruning carried out in July and August provided late harvests for cultivars Douradão and BRS Kampai.

  19. Nitrate leaching from organic arable crop rotations is mostly determined by autumn field management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askegaard, M; Olesen, Jørgen E; Rasmussen, Ilse Ankjær

    2011-01-01

    (coarse sand > loamy sand > sandy loam) and catch crops (without > with). Including a grass-clover green manure on 25% of the area did not increase N leaching compared with crop rotations without green manure. Also the application of animal manure did not influence N leaching, probably because even...... in Denmark (12 years in total). The experimental treatments were: (i) crop rotation, (ii) catch crop and (iii) animal manure. Nitrate leaching was estimated from measured soil nitrate concentration in ceramic suction cells and modelled drainage. There were significant effects on annual N leaching of location...... in the manured treatments the application rate was lower than crop demand. The results identify management of crop and soil during autumn as the main determinant of N leaching. Nitrate leaching was lowest for a catch crop soil cover during autumn and winter (avg. 20 kg N ha−1), a soil cover of weeds...

  20. Modeling surface energy fluxes from a patchwork of fields with different soils and crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Christian; Thieme, Christoph; Heinlein, Florian; Priesack, Eckart

    2017-04-01

    Agroecosystems are a dominant terrestrial land-use on planet earth and cover about 36% of the ice-free surface (12% pasture, 26% agriculture) [Foley2011]. Within this land use type, management practices vary strongly due to climate, cultural preferences, degree of industrialization, soil properties, crop rotations, field sizes, degree of land use sustainability, water availability, sowing and harvest dates, tillage, etc. These management practices influence abiotic environmental factors like water flow and heat transport within the ecosystem leading to changes of land surface fluxes. The relevance of vegetation (e.g. crops), ground cover, and soil properties to the moisture and energy exchanges between the land surface and the atmosphere is well known [McPherson 2007], but the impact of vegetation growth dynamics on energy fluxes is only partly understood [Gayler et al. 2014]. Thus, the structure of turbulence and the albedo evolve during the cropping period and large variations of heat can be measured on the field scale [Aubinet2012]. One issue of local distributed mixture of different land use is the measurement process which makes it challenging to evaluate simulations. Unfortunately, for meteorological flux-measurements like the Flux-Gradient or the Eddy Covariance (EC) method, comparability with simulations only exists in the ideal case, where fields have to be completely uniform in land use and flat within the reach of the footprint. Then a model with one specific land use would have the same underlying source area as the measurement. An elegant method to avoid the shortcoming of grid cell resolution is the so called mixed approach, which was recently implemented into the ecosystem model framework Expert-N [Biernath et al. 2013]. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of the characteristics of five managed field plots, planted with winter wheat, potato and maize on the near surface soil moistures and on the near surface energy flux exchanges of the

  1. Germination of grass seeds subjected to stationary magnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Florez Garcia, Mercedes; Martinez Ramirez, Elvira; Carbonell Padrino, Maria Victoria

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to determine and quantify the effect produced by a stationary magnetic field in germination of patrense seeds (Festuca arundinacea and Medicago sativa, L). Seeds were exposed to 250 mT during different periods of time: 10 minutes, 20 minutes, 1 hour, 24 hours or in a chronic way, doses (B1-B5). Parameters used were average germination time (AGT) and the necessary time for germination of 1, 10, 25, 50 and 75% of seeds (T1 - T7S). According to results obtai...

  2. Agricultural terminology in Russian language on the Institute of field and vegetable crops example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savin Dragana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary science demands that scientists are following domestic and foreign scientific and technical achievements through conference attendances and scientific and professional literature. Agricultural science is based on practical data, field experiments, but nevertheless it is essential to be up to date with the work of foreign researchers, scientific centers and institutions through their publications. The aim of this paper was to present a part of the agricultural lexicon (with the accent on the plant species names, as well as the general scientific and organizational terms with the equivalents in Russian - Serbian and Serbian - Russian, which is of the great importance in activities of Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops, presented through perennial practices of translation. Those terms are recognized as important and frequent, without wishing to go into professional divisions in agriculture as science. This paper is dedicated to the scientists who posses basic linguistic knowledge of Russian language and are starting to use Russian scientific and professional literature in agriculture, as well as students of Russian language for the purpose of establishing and widening linguistic fund.

  3. Five crop seasons' records of greenhouse gas fluxes from upland fields with repetitive applications of biochar and cattle manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Akira; Ikeya, Kosuke; Kanazaki, Naoya; Makabe, Shuhei; Sugiura, Yuki; Shibata, Akira

    2014-11-01

    The application of char to agricultural land is recognized as a potential way to sequester atmospheric carbon (C) assimilated by plants in soil, thus decelerating global warming. Such a process would also be expected to improve plant growth and the physical and chemical properties of soil. However, field investigations of the effects of continuous char application have not been reported. In the present study, the effects of repetitive bamboo char application on CO2, CH4, and N2O flux from soil, soil C content, and crop yield were investigated at two upland fields over five crop seasons. Three treatments: chemical fertilizer (CF) applied plots (Control plot); cattle manure (CM) (10 t ha(-1)) and CF applied plot (CM plot); and bamboo char (20 t ha(-1)), cattle manure (10 t ha(-1)), and CF applied plot (Char/CM plot), were arranged in each field. After three crop seasons, the fourth treatment with char was applied without CF (Char plot) was given to one of the fields. CM and/or char were applied every crop season. Gas fluxes were measured using the static chamber method. Seasonal variations in CO2 flux and total CO2 emissions were consistently similar between the CM and Char/CM plots and between the Char and Control plots. As such, the decomposition rate of bamboo char was quite small, and the positive or negative effect of char on CM decomposition was not significant in the fields. Soil C analysis provided confirmation of this. CM application enhanced N2O emission mainly in the summer crop season. The differences in total N2O emission between the Char/CM and CM plots as well as between the Char and Control plots were insignificant in most cases. Total CH4 flux was negligibly small in all cases. Although the yield of winter crop (broccoli) in the Char/CM plots was twice observed to be higher than that in the Control and CM plots at one of the fields, in general, the char application had no effect on overall crop yield. Thus, the repeated application of bamboo

  4. Impact of atmospheric effects on crop yield modelling in Cyprus using Landsat's satellite imagery and field spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadavid, G.; Hadjimitsis, D. G.

    2015-06-01

    Remote sensing, as the tool for spatially continuous measurements has become a trend for estimating Crop Yield since economically efficient agricultural management is highly dependent on detailed temporal and spatial knowledge of the processes affecting physiological crop development. This paper aims at examining the use of field spectroscopy along with Landsat's satellite imagery in order to test the accuracy of raw satellite data and the impact of atmospheric effects on determining crop yield derived from models using remotely sensed data. The spectroradiometric retrieved Vegetation Indices(VI) of Durum wheat, is directly compared to the corresponding VI of Landsat 7 ETM+ and 8 OLI, sourcing from both atmospherically corrected and not corrected satellite images in order to test the effects of atmosphere upon them. Vegetation Indices are vital in the procedure for estimating Crop Yield since they are used in stochastic or empirical models for describing or predicting crop yield. Leaf Area Index, which is also inferred using VI, is also compared to the real values of LAI that are measured using the SunScan instrument, during the satellite's overpass. Crop Yield is finally determined using the Cyprus Agricultural Research Institute's Crop Yield model for Durum wheat, adapted to satellite data, and is used to examine the impact of atmospheric effects. The results have prevailed that if crop yield models using remote sensing imagery, do not apply atmospheric effects algorithms, then there is statistically significant difference in the prediction from the real yield and hence a significant error regarding the model. The study's goal is to illustrate the need of atmospheric effects removal on remotely sensed data especially for models using satellite images.

  5. Field-scale and Regional Variability in Evapotranspiration over Crops in California using Eddy Covariance and Surface Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, E. R.; Clay, J. M.; Leinfelder-Miles, M.; Lambert, J. J.; Little, C.; Monteiro, R. O. C.; Monteiro, P. F. C.; Shapiro, K.; Rice, S.; Snyder, R. L.; Daniele, Z.; Paw U, K. T.

    2016-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) estimated using a single crop coefficient and a grass reference largely ignores variability due to heterogeneity in microclimate, soils, and crop management. We employ a relatively low cost energy balance residual method using surface renewal and eddy covariance measurements to continuously estimate half-hourly and daily ET across more than 15 fields and orchards spanning four crops and two regions of California. In the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, measurements were taken in corn, pasture, and alfalfa fields, with 4-5 stations in each crop type spread across the region. In the Southern San Joaquin Valley, measurements were taken in three different pistachio orchards, with one orchard having six stations instrumented to examine salinity-induced heterogeneity. We analyze field-scale and regional variability in ET and measured surface energy balance components. Cross comparisons between the eddy covariance and the surface renewal measurements confirm the robustness of the surface renewal method. A hybrid approach in which remotely sensed net radiation is combined with in situ measurements of sensible heat flux is also investigated. This work will provide ground-truth data for satellite and aerial-based ET estimates and will inform water management at the field and regional scales.

  6. Cultivos Tradicionales (Traditional Field Crops). Appropriate Technologies for Development. Peace Corps Information Collection & Exchange Manual Series No. M-35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, David

    Written in Spanish, this manual, which deals with traditional field crops, is primarily designed to help Peace Corps volunteers develop and strengthen their agricultural skills. The focus of the manual is on surveying and interpreting local agricultural environment and individual farm units, developing agricultural extension techniques and…

  7. Archaeobotanical reconstructions of field habitats and crops: the grange in Pomorzany near Kutno, 18th/19th c.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koszałka Joanna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of research of plant macrofossils from the grain deposit deriving from the 18th/19th centuries. The analysed material included 24760 diaspores representing 73 taxa. The majority were cultivated cereal crop species, and there was also abundance of accompanying segetal weed species. About 95% of the gathered crop material was Secale cereale. Another important crop was Hordeum vulgare and there were also some remains of Avena sativa, Triticum aestivum, Fagopyrum esculentum. Cannabis sativa and Linum usitatissimum were found as well. Weeds competing with these crops were, among others, the following species: Agrostemma githago, Raphanus raphanistrum, Apera spica-venti, Bromus secalinus, Centaurea cyanus, Spergula arvensis, Thlaspi arvense, Viola arvensis/tricolor, Fallopia convolvulus, Polygonum persicaria, Mentha arvensis, Anthemis arvensis, Papaver rhoeas, Rumex acetosella, Scleranthus annuus, Aphanes arvensis, Setaria pumila, Setaria viridis/verticilata. Extremely large presence of wild plant diaspores in the material allowed conducting economic and environmental interpretations. Reconstruction methods applied, used primarily in the case of macroremains from granaries, were fully applicable to the analysed plant residues. Weed species composition in the analysed material showed that they were mostly typical for the main winter crop. Some amount of species typical for other habitats were also found and they probably came from the near-by rye field. The presence of perennial diaspores indicated that the field was probably set aside

  8. Subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Vega Encabo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I claim that subjectivity is a way of being that is constituted through a set of practices in which the self is subject to the dangers of fictionalizing and plotting her life and self-image. I examine some ways of becoming subject through narratives and through theatrical performance before others. Through these practices, a real and active subjectivity is revealed, capable of self-knowledge and self-transformation. 

  9. Assessment of Field-Grown Cucurbit Crops and Weeds within Farms in South-West Nigeria for Viral Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Ibitaiyewa AYO-JOHN

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cucurbits are economic crops in Nigeria which serve as additional nutritional supplements and also good sources of income for farmers. Viral diseases are a worldwide problem of cucurbits and a major limiting factor for cucurbit production. A survey of farmer’s fields where cucurbit crops were grown was carried out to assess the incidence and severity of virus symptoms and viruses associated with the crops and weeds in selected locations in Ogun and Osun, in southwest Nigeria, in June, 2012. In all, 38 leaf samples were collected in Ogun state and 52 in Osun state from cucurbit crops and weeds. Leaf samples were tested against  Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV, Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV, Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV, Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV,Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV and Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV using Double Antibody Sandwich (DAS enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. All the fields surveyed had virus symptom incidences of 100% except for melon fields in Osun state with incidences of between 10 and 30%. In Ogun state, the occurrence of CMV was 5/31 (16.1% while MNSV was detected in Lagenaria siceraria and T. occidentalis and it occurred in 6.5% of the leaf samples. In Osun state, CMV was detected in watermelon, melon and weeds found in all locations surveyed. The occurrence of CMV was 9/38 (23.7% in the cucurbit crops and in 78.6% (11/14 of the weeds. PRSV and WMV also occurred in mixed infection with CMV in 7.1% respectively. CMV was the most widespread and prevalent virus infecting cucurbit crops and weeds.Cucurbits are economic crops in Nigeria which serve as additional nutritional supplements and also good sources of income for farmers. Viral diseases are a worldwide problem of cucurbits and a major limiting factor for cucurbit production. A survey of farmer’s fields where cucurbit crops were grown was carried out to assess the incidence and severity of virus symptoms and viruses associated with the crops

  10. Development of broomcorn varieties at Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops Novi Sad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikora Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Broomcorn breeding program at Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops Novi Sad has been in continuation since 1952. According to the demand of broomcorn and broom producers, in several cycles during this period, five generations of breeders have exploited wealthy genetic collection and created 11 broomcorn cultivars. In the beginning, the primary target was creation of European dwarf type cultivars. This phase has resulted in three cultivars 'Bački biser', 'Neoplanta' and 'Panonija'. Next phase, which was crowned with cultivars 'Sava', 'Tisa', 'Jumak' and 'Jantar', was focused on higher yield and better quality of broomcorn brushes. Contemporary cultivars 'Reform' and 'Neoplanta plus' which preserve good agro-technological traits of former cultivars, are selected to early maturity and fiber fineness. Selection of new cultivars 'Tan Sava' and 'No. 5' was concentrated on elimination of red coloration of panicles and even earlier maturity. Newly selected inbred lines tolerant to plant diseases and with positive panicle exertion are presently tested as parental lines in experimental hybrids. .

  11. New sugar beet hybrid varieties developed at Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops resistant to rhizomania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačev Lazar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhizomania is one of the most destructive sugar beet diseases that has been found and described so far. The disease has a complex character - it is caused by beet necrotic yellow veins virus (BNYVV transmitted by a parasitic fungus Polymyxa betae. When susceptible hybrids are grown on infected soil their root yield and sugar content can reduce by over 80%. Presently, the most efficient and economically most acceptable measure of controlling the disease is to develop and cultivate tolerant or resistant hybrid varieties. Using conventional breeding methods and different sources of disease resistance, breeders of Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops have developed two diploid hybrid varieties of sugar beet (Nora and Vera which were released by Varietal Release Committee of the Republic of Serbia in 2009. These varieties differ in quantitative genetic traits and depending on the source and type of resistance/tolerance, they can be cultivated on soils containing a very high level of rhizomania inoculum. Both hybrid cultivars have high genetic potentials for most important production traits.

  12. ECONOMIC IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF INTEGRATED CROP MANAGEMENT FARMER FIELD SCHOOL PROGRAM ON CORN PRODUCTION IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Ketut Kariyasa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Domestic supply of corn in Indonesia has not been able to meet demand satisfactorily due to demand rising faster than supply. Therefore, Indonesia has been continuously importing corn about of 10% of the total demand. To address this problem, the Indonesian government started to implement the Farmer Field School of Integrated Crop Management (ICM-FFS program on corn production since 2009. This study aimed to assess the impact of ICM-FFS on corn productivity, comparative and competitive advantages to produce corn as well as farmer’s income. The study found that ICM-FFS program could increase corn productivity by 30.95% of non ICM-FFS farms, of which 27.94% contributed by the difference in input use, while only 3.01% contributed by technological change. ICM-FFS farms were able to increase farmer’s income by 71.03% and social welfare by 94.69% compared to non ICMFFS farms. Through this program, Indonesia had higher comparative advantage in producing corn as an import substitute. The provision of competitive input and output markets, enhanced technical assistance to improve corn productivity and quality, and increasing attention on corn ICM-FFS development could be considered as policy directions to improve the next implementation strategies of corn production in Indonesia.

  13. Climate change and prolongation of growing season: changes in regional potential for field crop production in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. PELTONEN-SAINIO

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Climate change offers new opportunities for Finnish field crop production, which is currently limited by the short growing season. A warmer climate will extend the thermal growing season and the physiologically effective part of it. Winters will also become milder, enabling introduction of winter-sown crops to a greater extent than is possible today. With this study we aim to characterise the likely regional differences in capacity to grow different seed producing crops. Prolongation of the Finnish growing season was estimated using a 0.5º latitude × 0.5º longitude gridded dataset from the Finnish Meteorological Institute. The dataset comprised an average estimate from 19 global climate models of the response of Finnish climate to low (B1 and high (A2 scenarios of greenhouse gas and aerosol emissions for 30-year periods centred on 2025, 2055 and 2085 (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Growing season temperature sums that suit crop growth and are agronomically feasible in Finland are anticipated to increase by some 140 °Cd by 2025, 300 °Cd by 2055 and 470 °Cd by 2085 in scenario A2, when averaged over regions, and earlier sowing is expected to take place, but not later harvests. Accordingly, the extent of cultivable areas for the commonly grown major and minor crops will increase considerably. Due to the higher base temperature requirement for maize (Zea mays L. growth than for temperate crops, we estimate that silage maize could become a Finnish field crop for the most favourable growing regions only at the end of this century. Winters are getting milder, but it will take almost the whole century until winters such as those that are typical for southern Sweden and Denmark are experienced on a wide scale in Finland. It is possible that introduction of winter-sown crops (cereals and rapeseed will represent major risks due to fluctuating winter conditions, and this could delay their adaptation for many decades. Such risks need to be

  14. Field evaluation of Bt cotton crop impact on nontarget pests: cotton aphid and boll weevil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujii, E R; Togni, P H B; de A Ribeiro, P; de A Bernardes, T; Milane, P V G N; Paula, D P; Pires, C S S; Fontes, E M G

    2013-02-01

    Bt cotton plants expressing Cry1Ac protein have high specificity for the control of lepidopteran larvae. However, studies conducted in several countries have shown these plants have a differential impact on nontarget herbivores. The aim of this study was to compare the colonization rates and population abundance of the cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), in plots of Bt (Nuopal) and non-Bt cotton (Delta Opal) in an experimental field in Brasilia, DF, Brazil. No difference was observed in the preference and colonization by winged aphids to plants from the two treatments. There was no significant difference in abundance of wingless aphids or in the production of winged aphids between treatments. Apparently, the parameters that control factors such as fecundity, survival, and dispersal were similar on both Bt and non-Bt plants. Monitoring of plants for coccinellids, a specialist predator of aphids, and ants that act on the dispersal of aphids among plants showed no significant difference between Bt and non-Bt plants, supporting the inference above. Regarding the effect on boll weevil, there was also no significant difference between treatments in the total number of fruiting structures attacked in each plot, the percentage of fruiting structures attacked per plant or on the number of weevils emerging from fruits with boll weevil damage from egg-laying, when damaged fruit samples were held in the laboratory. Based on these results, we conclude that there is no impact of Bt cotton crop expressing Cry1Ac on the nontarget herbivores tested under field conditions.

  15. Comparison of GHG fluxes from conventional and energy crop production from adjacent fields in the UK, using novel technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, James Benjamin; Ineson, Phil; Toet, Sylvia; Stockdale, James; Vallack, Harry; Blei, Emanuel; Bentley, Mark; Howarth, Steve

    2016-04-01

    With combustion of fossil fuels driving anthropogenic climate change, allied to a diminishing global reserve of these resources it is vital for alternative sources of energy production to be investigated. One alternative is biomass; ethanol fermented from corn (Zea mays) or sugar cane (Saccharum spp.) has long been used as a petroleum substitute, and oilseed rape (OSR, Brassica napus) is the principal feedstock for biodiesel production in Germany, the third biggest producer of this fuel globally. Diverting food crops into energy production would seem counter-productive, given there exists genuine concern regarding our ability to meet future global food demand, thus attention has turned to utilising lignocellulosic material: woody tissue and non-food crop by-products such as corn stover. For this reason species such as the perennial grass Miscanthus (Miscanthus x giganteus) are being cultivated for energy production, and these are referred to as second generation energy crops. They are attractive since they do not deplete food supplies, have high yields, require less fertiliser input than annual arable crops, and can be grown on marginal agricultural land. To assess the effectiveness of a crop for bioenergy production, it is vital that accurate quantification of greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes is obtained for their cultivation in the field. We will present data from a series of studies investigating the GHG fluxes from the energy crops OSR and Miscanthus under various nutrient additions in a comparison with conventional arable cropping at the same site in the United Kingdom (UK). A combination of methods were employed to measure fluxes of CO2, CH4 and N2O from both soil and vegetation, at various temporal and spatial scales. Conventional manual chambers were deployed on a monthly regime to quantify soil GHG fluxes, and were supplemented with automated soil flux chambers measuring soil respiration at an hourly frequency. Additionally, two novel automated chamber systems

  16. Grain yield and crop N offtake in response to residual fertilizer N in long-term field experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens; Thomsen, Ingrid Kaag; Mattsson, L.

    2010-01-01

    in four long-term (>35 yr) field experiments, we measured the response of barley (grain yield and N offtake at crop maturity) to six rates (0, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 kg N/ha) of mineral fertilizer N (Nnew) applied in subplots replacing the customary long-term plot treatments of fertilizer inputs (Nprev......Organic inputs [e.g. animal manure (AM) and plant residues] contribute directly to the soil organic N pool, whereas mineral N fertilizer contributes indirectly by increasing the return of the crop residues and by microbial immobilization. To evaluate the residual effect of N treatments established...... significantly with previous mineral N fertilizer rate. The residual effect of mineral N fertilizer was negligible compared with the residual effect of N from AM and catch crop residues....

  17. [Effects of different multiple cropping systems on paddy field weed community under long term paddy-upland rotation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin-Juan; Huang, Guo-Qin; Xu, Ning; Wang, Shu-Bin

    2013-09-01

    Based on a long term field experiment, this paper studied the effects of different multiple cropping systems on the weed community composition and species diversity under paddy-upland rotation. The multiple cropping rotation systems could significantly decrease weed density and inhibited weed growth. Among the rotation systems, the milk vetch-early rice-late maize --> milk vetchearly maize intercropped with early soybean-late rice (CCSR) had the lowest weed species dominance, which inhibited the dominant weeds and decreased their damage. Under different multiple cropping systems, the main weed community was all composed of Monochoia vaginalis, Echinochloa crusgalli, and Sagittaria pygmae, and the similarity of weed community was higher, with the highest similarity appeared in milk vetch-early rice-late maize intercropped with late soybean --> milk vetch-early maize-late rice (CSCR) and in CCSR. In sum, the multiple cropping rotations in paddy field could inhibit weeds to a certain extent, but attentions should be paid to the damage of some less important weeds.

  18. Changes in soil carbon cycling accompanying conversion of row-crop fields to grazing dairy pastures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A.; Kramer, M. G.; Hill, N.; Machmuller, M. B.; Cyle, K.

    2011-12-01

    Increasingly, the dairy industry in the eastern US is transitioning from total confinement dairy systems (TCD) toward pasture-based, management intensive grazing dairy (MiGD) systems. This transition is driven by the fact that MiGDs require substantially less operating capital and are more economically efficient than TCD systems. Consequently, the impact of this transition and shift in land-use practice on carbon dynamics may be considerable. Land-use in a Management intensive Grazing Dairy (MiGD) system is fundamentally different than conventional confinement dairies and conventional no-till pastures. The forage system involves rotational grazing at optimal digestibility, when the plants are immature (~20-days) and consequently protein-rich. MiGD cows spend >90% of their time in the field and deposit > 90% of their waste directly to the soil surface. Thus, little above ground plant residues are directly returned to the soil, but rather substantial C inputs derive from bovine manure. We sampled a MiGD-chronosequence of row-crop to MiGD conversion established in 2007 in eastern Georgia. All soils across the MiGD-chronosequence, all occur in relative (40 km) close proximity to one another, are deep, well-drained, fine and fine sandy loam Ultisols formed on Coastal Plain sediments. Prior to MiGD established, the soils were farmed for > 50 yrs using conventional tillage techniques. Our current sampling to 1m depths captures fields at 0, 2, 3, and 5 yrs since conversion. Total soil carbon (C) and the carbon concentration of the clay fraction increased following conversion, with the greatest increases occurring between 3 and 5 yrs since conversion. These C increases were limited to the upper 40cm of the soil, with minimal change occurring at depth. Characterization of the protein and ligand content of these soils via 13C NMR and chemolytic techniques as a function of soil particle density and size is in progress and will be presented along with estimates of carbon

  19. Field observations on nitrogen catch crops. I. Potential and actual growth and nitrogen accumulation in relation to sowing date and crop species.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.; Putten, van der P.E.L.

    1997-01-01

    In temperate climates with a precipitation surplus during autumn and winter, nitrogen catch crops can help to reduce nitrogen losses from cropping systems by absorbing nitrogen from the soil and transfer it to a following main crop. The actual and potential accumulation of dry matter and nitrogen in

  20. Water footprint assessment for crop production based on field measurements: A case study of irrigated paddy rice in East China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinchun, Cao; Mengyang, Wu; Rui, Shu; La, Zhuo; Dan, Chen; Guangcheng, Shao; Xiangping, Guo; Weiguang, Wang; Shuhai, Tang

    2018-01-01

    Water footprint (WF) is a comprehensive measure of water consumption by human activities and can be used to assess the impact on both water volume and quality. This study aims to explore the feasibility of evaluating green, blue and grey WFs of crop production based on field measurements. The irrigated paddy rice grown in three different experimental sites in different typical irrigation districts in Huai'an, East China over 2011 to 2014 was taken as study case. With fixed irrigation and fertilization, on the basis of measuring field water and fertilizer balance at daily step, we calculated WF of crop production under different test treatments. Results show that crop water requirement of rice was measured as 667.1mm and 6.2% of the total nitrogen (T-N) was washed away from farmland accompany with drainage and percolation. Average annual WF of paddy rice during 2011-2014 in Huai'an was 1.760m3/kg (33.3% green, 25.8% blue and 40.9% grey). The level of WF and blue water proportion in different locations (irrigation districts) and different years changed slightly, while the proportion of green and grey WF changed with the variance of precipitation. Green water proportion was 25.1%, 34.2 and 44.2%, while 48.0%, 40.2% and 31.0% for grey water proportion under precipitation levels of 400, 600 and 800mm, respectively. The reduced grey WF was due to increased drainage. This study not only proved the feasibility of assessing WF of crop production with field experiments, but also provided a new method for WF calculation based on field water and fertilizer migration processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Habitat eradication and cropland intensification may reduce parasitoid diversity and natural pest control services in annual crop fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah K. Letourneau

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract California’s central coast differs from many agricultural areas in the U.S., which feature large tracts of monoculture production fields and relatively simple landscapes. Known as the nations salad bowl, and producing up to 90% of U.S. production of lettuces, broccoli and Brussels sprouts, this region is a mosaic of fresh vegetable fields, coastal meadow, chaparral shrubs, riparian and woodland habitat. We tested for relationships between the percent cover of crops, riparian and other natural landscape vegetation and the species richness of parasitic wasps and flies foraging in crops, such as broccoli, kale and cauliflower, and interpreted our results with respect to the decrease in natural habitat and increase in cropland cover prompted by a local microbial contamination event in 2006. Our key results are that: (1 as cropland cover in the landscape increased, fewer species of parasitoids were captured in the crop field, (2 parasitoid richness overall was positively associated with the amount of riparian and other natural vegetation in the surrounding 500m, (3 different groups of parasitoids were associated with unique types of natural vegetation, and (4 parasitism rates of sentinel cabbage aphid and cabbage looper pests were correlated with landscape vegetation features according to which parasitoids caused the mortality. Although individual species of parasitoids may thrive in landscapes that are predominantly short season crops, the robust associations found in this study across specialist and generalist parasitoids and different taxa (tachinid flies, ichneumon wasps, braconid wasps shows that recent food safety practices targeting removal of natural vegetation around vegetable fields in an attempt to eliminate wildlife may harm natural enemy communities and reduce ecosystem services. We argue that enhancing biological diversity is a key goal for transforming agroecosystems for future productivity, sustainability and public health.

  2. Critical loss radius in a Penning trap subject to multipole fields

    CERN Document Server

    Fajans, J; Robicheaux, F

    2008-01-01

    When particles in a Penning trap are subject to a magnetic multipole field, those beyond a critical radius will be lost. The critical radius depends on the history by which the field is applied, and can be much smaller if the particles are injected into a preexisting multipole than if the particles are subject to a ramped multipole. Both cases are relevant to ongoing experiments designed to trap antihydrogen.

  3. Field Phenotyping and Long-Term Platforms to Characterise How Crop Genotypes Interact with Soil Processes and the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy S. George

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Unsustainable agronomic practices and environmental change necessitate a revolution in agricultural production to ensure food security. A new generation of crops that yield more with fewer inputs and are adapted to more variable environments is needed. However, major changes in breeding programmes may be required to achieve this goal. By using the genetic variation in crop yield in specific target environments that vary in soil type, soil management, nutrient inputs and environmental stresses, robust traits suited to specific conditions can be identified. It is here that long-term experimental platforms and field phenotyping have an important role to play. In this review, we will provide information about some of the field-based platforms available and the cutting edge phenotyping systems at our disposal. We will also identify gaps in our field phenotyping resources that should be filled. We will go on to review the challenges in producing crop ideotypes for the dominant management systems for which we need sustainable solutions, and we discuss the potential impact of three-way interactions between genetics, environment and management. Finally, we will discuss the role that modelling can play in allowing us to fast-track some of these processes to allow us to make rapid gains in agricultural sustainability.

  4. Emerging Evidence from Single-Subject Research in the Field of Deaf-Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Amy T.; Davidson, Roseanna; Banda, Devender R.

    2007-01-01

    Professionals in the field of deaf-blindness are challenged to use instructional practices that have been tested using experimental methodology. Single-subject design has been examined as a form of research that assists in substantiating practice. In a review of the literature, the authors identified 54 single-subject studies from 1969 to 2006…

  5. Evaluation of fresh and preserved herbaceous field crops for biogas and ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakarinen, A.

    2012-07-01

    In the future, various forms of bioenergy will be increasingly required to replace fossil energy. Globally, transportation uses almost one third of fossil energy resources, and it is thus of great importance to find ethically, economically, and environmentally viable biofuels in near future. Fieldgrown biomass, including energy crops and crop residues, are alternatives to supplement other non-food biofuel raw materials. The aim of this work was to evaluate the potential of five crops, maize (Zea mays L.), fiber hemp (Cannabis sativa L.), faba bean (Vicia faba L.), white lupin (Lupinus albus L.), and Jerusalem artichoke (Heliantus tuborosus L.) cultivated in boreal conditions as raw materials for methane and ethanol. Climate, cultivation requirements, chemical composition, and recalcitrance are some of the parameters to be considered when choosing energy crops for cultivation and for efficient conversion into biofuels. Among the studied crops, protein-rich legumes (faba bean and white lupin) were attractive options for methane, while hemp and Jerusalem artichoke had high theoretical potential for ethanol. Maize was, however, equally suitable for production of both energy carriers. Preservation of crop materials is essential to preserve and supply biomass material throughout the year. Preservation can be also considered as a mild pretreatment prior to biofuel production. Ensiling was conducted on maize, hemp, and faba bean in this work and additionally hemp was preserved in alkali conditions. Ensiling was found to be most beneficial for hemp when converted to methane, increasing the methane yield by more than 50%, whereas preservation with urea increased the energy yield of hemp as ethanol by 39%. Maize, with a high content of water-soluble carbohydrates (20% of DM), required an acid additive in order to preserve the sugars. Interestingly, hydrothermal pretreatment for maize and hemp prior to methane production was less efficient than ensiling. Enzymatic hydrolysis

  6. Pesticides selectivity list to beneficial arthropods in four field vegetable crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautier, L; Jansen, J P; Mabon, N; Schiffers, B

    2007-01-01

    Selectivity of pesticides to beneficial arthropods is a key data for the implementation of IPM program. In the context of field vegetables crop, a set of 16 fungicides, 17 herbicides and 14 insecticides commonly used in Belgium were tested on 5 indicator species: the parasitic hymenoptera Aphidius rhopalosiphi (De Stefani-Perez) (Hym., Aphidiidae), the aphid foliage dwelling predators Adalia bipunctata (L.) (Col., Coccinellidae) and Episyrphus balteatus (Dipt., Syrphidae) and the ground-dwelling predators Aleochara bilineata (Col., Staphyllinidae) and Bembidion lampros (Col., Carabidae). Pesticides were tested according a testing scheme including a first assessment on inert substrate (glass plates for adults of A. rhopalosiphi, larvae of A. bipunctata and E. balteatus, sand on adults of A. bilineata and B. lampros) and, for product that were toxic, a second assessment on natural substrate (barley seedlings for A. rhopalosiphi, french bean plants for A. bipunctato and E. balteatus and two type of soil for 8. lampros and A. bilineato). The effects of the product were assessed on basis on mortality, except for A. bilineata (Onion fly pupae parasitism). According to the final results obtained at the end of this testing scheme, the product were listed in toxicity class: green list if effect < or =30%, yellow list 30% < effect < 60% and orange list 60% < effect < or =80%. Products with toxicity higher than 80% on plants or on soils, or that reduce parasitism more than 80% on soil were put in red list and are not recommended for IPM. Results showed that all fungicides and herbicides were included in the green list except tebuconazole and boscalid + pyraclostrobin that were labeled as yellow for A. bipunctata. In opposite, no foliar insecticide was totally selective for all beneficial tested. However some products are in green list for one or several species. Soil insecticides were all are very toxic for ground dwelling arthropods and classed in red list. All results

  7. Biowaste compost effects on productive and qualitative characteristics of some field crops and on soil fertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Fecondo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Biowaste compost exploitation is a way of recovering agricultural soil fertility that in these last decades decreased up to a desertification limit. In order to test compost efficacy on crop yield and soil fertility, in the period 2011-2013 at COTIR experimental farm, a trial comparing different amounts of compost on two crop rotations was carried out. Crop rotations tested were durum wheat-sunflower-durum wheat and tomato-durum wheat-pepper. Results showed that the use of 40 t ha–1 of compost increased wheat grain yield and protein content if compared to control and mineral fertilised treatment. Compost application at 40 t ha–1 increased also yield of pepper in the first two harvest times, while during the third harvest, which included green and red berries, (the yield was statistically different only if compared to control treatment. Moreover, compost improved soil fertility both in terms of organic matter and main nutritional elements, while a negative aspect of its use was the increase of soil electric conductivity, although no negative effect on crops yield were observed.

  8. Remote sensing for evaluating crop water stress at field scale using infrared thermography: Potentials and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over the past few decades, the competition for freshwater resources has substantially increased in arid/semi-arid areas, exacerbating the pressure on the largest user of water, namely agriculture, to consume less water. However, reducing crop consumptive water use or evapotranspiration through water...

  9. A model-data fusion analysis for examining the response of carbon exchange to environmental variation in crop field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokozawa, M.; Sakurai, G.; Ono, K.; Mano, M.; Miyata, A.

    2011-12-01

    Agricultural activities, cultivating crops, managing soil, harvesting and post-harvest treatments, are not only affected from the surrounding environment but also change the environment reversely. The changes in environment, temperature, radiation and precipitation, brings changes in crop productivity. On the other hand, the status of crops, i.e. the growth and phenological stage, change the exchange of energy, H2O and CO2 between crop vegetation surface and atmosphere. Conducting the stable agricultural harvests, reducing the Greenhouse Effect Gas (GHG) emission and enhancing carbon sequestration in soil are preferable as a win-win activity. We conducted model-data fusion analysis for examining the response of cropland-atmosphere carbon exchange to environmental variation. The used model consists of two sub models, paddy rice growth sub-model and soil decomposition sub-model. The crop growth sub-model mimics the rice plant growth processes including formation of reproductive organs as well as leaf expansion. The soil decomposition sub-model simulates the decomposition process of soil organic carbon. Assimilating the data on the time changes in CO2 flux measured by eddy covariance method, rice plant biomass, LAI and the final yield with the model, the parameters were calibrated using a stochastic optimization algorithm with a particle filter. The particle filter, which is one of Monte Carlo filters, enable us to evaluating time changes in parameters based on the observed data until the time and to make prediction of the system. Iterative filtering and prediction with changing parameters and/or boundary condition enable us to obtain time changes in parameters governing the crop production as well as carbon exchange. In this paper, we applied the model-data fusion analysis to the two datasets on paddy rice field sites in Japan: only a single rice cultivation, and a single rice and wheat cultivation. We focused on the parameters related to crop production as well as

  10. Nitrous oxide emission from wetland soil following single and seasonal split application of cattle manure to field tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill var. Heinz) and rape (Brassica napus, L. var. Giant) crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaka, Johnson; Nyamangara, Justice; Wuta, Menas

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of the contribution of manure applications to global atmospheric N2O loading is needed to evaluate agriculture's contribution to the global warming process. Two field experiments were carried out at Dufuya wetland (19°17'S; 29°21'E, 1260 m above sea level) to determine the effects of single and split manure applications on emissions of N2O from soil during the growing seasons of two rape and two tomato crops. Two field experiments were established. In the first experiment the manure was applied in three levels of 0, 15, and 30 Mg ha(-1) as a single application just before planting of the first tomato crop. In the second experiment the 15 and 30 Mg ha(-1) manure application rates were divided into four split applications of 3.75 and 7.5 Mg ha(-1) respectively, for each of the four cropping events. Single applications of 15 and 30 Mg ha(-1) manure once in four cropping events had higher emissions of N2O than those recorded on plots that received split applications of 3.75 and 7.5 Mg ha(-1) manure at least up to the second test crop. Thereafter N2O emissions on plots subjected to split applications of manure were higher or equal to those recorded in plots that received single basal applications of 30 Mg ha(-1) applied a week before planting the first crop. Seasonal split applications of manure to wetland vegetable crops can reduce emissions of N2O at least up to the second seasonal split application.

  11. Intensity of Ground Cover Crop Arachis pintoi, Rhizobium Inoculation and Phosphorus Application and Their Effects on Field Growth and Nutrient Status of Cocoa Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Bako Baon

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Arachis pintoiis potentially as a cover crop for cocoa (Theobroma cacaoL. farm, however information regarding its effect on the growth of cocoa plants in the field is very limited. The objective of this experiment is to investigate the combined influence of ground cover crop A. pintoi, rhizobial bacterial inoculation and phosphorus (P fertilizer on the growth of cocoa in the field and nutrient status. This experiment laid out in split-split plot design consisted of three levels of cover crop (without, A. pintoiand Calopogonium caeruleum, two levels of rhizobium inoculation (not inoculated and inoculated and two levels of phosphorus application (no P added and P added. The results showed that in field condition the presence of A. pintoias cover crop did not affect the growth of cocoa. On the other hand, C. caeruleumas cover crop tended to restrict cocoa growth compared to A. pintoi. Application of P increased leaf number of cocoa plant. Biomass production of A. pintoiwas 40% higher than C. caeruleum. Soil organic carbon and nitrogen contents were not affected by ground cover crops, though higher value (0.235% N and 1.63% organic C was obtained from combined treatments of inoculation and P addition or neither inoculation nor P addition. In the case of no rhizobium inoculation, soil N content in cocoa farm with A. pintoicover crop was lower than that of without cover crop or with C. caeruleum. Cover crop increased plant N content when there was no inoculation, on the other hand rhizobium inoculation decreased N content of cocoa tissue. Tissue P content of cocoa plant was not influenced by A. Pintoicover crop or by rhizobium inoculation, except that the P tissue content of cocoa was 28% higher when the cover crop was C. caeruleumand inoculated. Key words : Arachis pintoi, Theobroma cacao, Calopogonium caeruleum, rhizobium, nitrogen, phosphorus.

  12. Remaining visual field and preserved subjective visual functioning prevent mental distress in patients with visual field defects

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    Carolin eGall

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with visual field defects after visual pathway lesion may experience reduced vision-related quality of life (vrQoL. It has not been clarified how vrQoL impairments contribute to vision-related mental distress.Methods: 108 subjects with visual field defects caused by optic neuropathies (age M=57.6; SD=13.7 years answered the National Eye Institute Visual-Functioning Questionnaire (NEI-VFQ for vrQoL and the SF-12 Short Form Health Survey for health-related quality of life (hrQoL. A ten item composite of NEI-VFQ visual functioning and five items of mental health symptoms due to vision problems were subjected to Rasch analysis. The test battery comprised static and High Resolution Perimetry (HRP. Regression and path analysis were used to investigate associations between QoL, mental distress and perimetry results.Results: A higher level of visual functioning was associated with monocular impairment and a larger remaining visual field compared to binocular impairment. Subjective visual functioning but not visual field parameters predicted mental health symptoms due to vision problems which was the only variable associated with the SF-12 mental component score. The SF-12 physical component score was less strongly associated with mental health symptoms due to vision problems. Here, reaction time in HRP and mean threshold in perimetry were additional significant variables. Path analysis revealed a significant path of remaining visual field via visual functioning on mental health. Conclusions: Subjective consequences of visual impairments in everyday life impact mental health rather than objective visual function loss as measured by perimetry. Since a higher extent of vrQoL was related to lower levels of mental distress, the maintenance of vrQoL could reduce and prevent mental distress due to vision problems. Patients with persisting visual field defects may benefit from neuropsychological rehabilitation and supportive therapies.

  13. Crop and field boundary influences on the activity of a wide range of beneficial invertebrate groups on a split conventional/organic farm in northern England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, M D; Leifert, C

    2011-04-01

    Activity of 12 beneficial invertebrate groups was assessed in 2005 and 2006 on a farm in northern England split into conventional and organic management halves, using pitfall and pan traps set in both crops and field boundaries. Management, crop and boundary structure influences on invertebrate activity were assessed, as was the relationship between crop and boundary type. Classification of crop and boundary assemblages produced three and two groups, respectively, in both years. Organic arable crops had well-defined assemblages in both years; and, while grass and grass/clover fields were separated from conventional arable fields in 2005, there was mixing in 2006. One boundary group, in both years, was dominated by conventional arable fields with tall herbaceous boundary vegetation. The other group had more organic arable and grassy fields with shorter boundary vegetation. Redundancy analyses showed that a number of groups (Cantharidae, Coccinellidae, Syrphidae, Ichneumonidae, Braconidae, Proctotrupoidea, Lycosidae) were more active in organic arable fields with more Staphylinidae in conventional arable crops and no obvious trend with Carabidae, Hemiptera, Neuroptera and Linyphiidae. Activity of some groups, especially Coccinellidae, Syrphidae and parasitic wasps, was strongly related to weed cover. Staphylinidae were most active in tall herbaceous boundaries by conventional arable crops with more of a number of groups (Cantharidae, Coccinellidae, parasitic wasps) in short herbaceous boundaries by organic arable crops. Organic management produced most differences in aerially-dispersed invertebrates, and management had a profound effect on activity in field boundaries. Possible management prescriptions to increase invertebrate activity include changing sowing times, weed cover manipulation and field boundary and margin management.

  14. A Field Experiment on Enhancement of Crop Yield by Rice Straw and Corn Stalk-Derived Biochar in Northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Biochar, a green way to deal with burning and burying biomass, has attracted more attention in recent years. To fill the gap of the effects of different biochar on crop yield in Northern China, the first field experiment was conducted in farmland located in Hebei Province. Biochars derived from two kinds of feedstocks (rice straw and corn stalk were added into an Inceptisols area with different dosages (1 ton/ha, 2 ton/ha or 4 ton/ha in April 2014. The crop yields were collected for corn, peanut, and sweet potato during one crop season from spring to autumn 2014, and the wheat from winter 2014 to summer 2015, respectively. The results showed biochar amendment could enhance yields, and biochar from rice straw showed a more positive effect on the yield of corn, peanut, and winter wheat than corn stalk biochar. The dosage of biochar of 2 ton/ha or 1 ton/ha could enhance the yield by 5%–15% and biochar of 4 ton/ha could increase the yield by about 20%. The properties of N/P/K, CEC, and pH of soils amended with biochar were not changed, while biochar effects could be related to improvement of soil water content.

  15. Changes in field workability and drought risk from projected climate change drive spatially variable risks in Illinois cropping systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J Tomasek

    Full Text Available As weather patterns become more volatile and extreme, risks introduced by weather variability will become more critical to agricultural production. The availability of days suitable for field work is driven by soil temperature and moisture, both of which may be altered by climate change. We projected changes in Illinois season length, spring field workability, and summer drought risk under three different emissions scenarios (B1, A1B, and A2 down to the crop district scale. Across all scenarios, thermal time units increased in parallel with a longer frost-free season. An increase in late March and Early April field workability was consistent across scenarios, but a decline in overall April through May workable days was observed for many cases. In addition, summer drought metrics were projected to increase for most scenarios. These results highlight how the spatial and temporal variability in climate change may present unique challenges to mitigation and adaptation efforts.

  16. Changes in field workability and drought risk from projected climate change drive spatially variable risks in Illinois cropping systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasek, Bradley J; Williams, Martin M; Davis, Adam S

    2017-01-01

    As weather patterns become more volatile and extreme, risks introduced by weather variability will become more critical to agricultural production. The availability of days suitable for field work is driven by soil temperature and moisture, both of which may be altered by climate change. We projected changes in Illinois season length, spring field workability, and summer drought risk under three different emissions scenarios (B1, A1B, and A2) down to the crop district scale. Across all scenarios, thermal time units increased in parallel with a longer frost-free season. An increase in late March and Early April field workability was consistent across scenarios, but a decline in overall April through May workable days was observed for many cases. In addition, summer drought metrics were projected to increase for most scenarios. These results highlight how the spatial and temporal variability in climate change may present unique challenges to mitigation and adaptation efforts.

  17. Further spread of and domination by Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) biotype Q on field crops in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huipeng; Chu, Dong; Ge, Daqing; Wang, Shaoli; Wu, Qingjun; Xie, Wen; Jiao, Xiaoguo; Liu, Baiming; Yang, Xin; Yang, Nina; Su, Qi; Xu, Baoyun; Zhang, Youjun

    2011-06-01

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), causes severe crop losses to many crops. The worst of these losses are often associated with the invasion and establishment of biotypes B and Q of this pest. Previous research in 2007 showed that biotype Q occurred with other biotypes in most field populations in China. To determine the current status of the biotype composition in the field, an extensive survey covering mainly eastern parts of China was conducted in 2009. Using polymerase chain reaction primers specific for the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I of biotypes B and Q and gene sequencing, we determined the biotypes composition in 61 whitefly populations and their distribution across 19 provinces in China. Our research revealed that only biotypes B and Q have been found in the field in 2009 in China. Among them, biotype Q was dominant in 44 locations (100.0%) and biotype B was dominant in 17 locations (100.0%). The current survey indicates that biotype Q has rapidly displaced biotype B in most locations in China.

  18. Government regulation and public opposition create high additional costs for field trials with GM crops in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernauer, Thomas; Tribaldos, Theresa; Luginbühl, Carolin; Winzeler, Michael

    2011-12-01

    Field trials with GM crops are not only plant science experiments. They are also social experiments concerning the implications of government imposed regulatory constraints and public opposition for scientific activity. We assess these implications by estimating additional costs due to government regulation and public opposition in a recent set of field trials in Switzerland. We find that for every Euro spent on research, an additional 78 cents were spent on security, an additional 31 cents on biosafety, and an additional 17 cents on government regulatory supervision. Hence the total additional spending due to government regulation and public opposition was around 1.26 Euros for every Euro spent on the research per se. These estimates are conservative; they do not include additional costs that are hard to monetize (e.g. stakeholder information and dialogue activities, involvement of various government agencies). We conclude that further field experiments with GM crops in Switzerland are unlikely unless protected sites are set up to reduce these additional costs.

  19. Use of the crop maize to reduce yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus L. pressure in highly infested fields in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keller, Martina

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cyperus esculentus L. causes high yield losses in many crops worldwide. In Switzerland it was observed for the first time about 30 years ago. Since then it has become a serious weed in several regions - especially where vegetables are produced. Growing vegetables in heavily infested fields should be abandoned due to their low competitiveness and the lack of available, effective herbicides. Contrarily, in maize several herbicides with a partial effect on C. esculentus are registered. Thus, continuous cultivation of maize including the use of the most effective herbicides against C. esculentus could help reducing infestation levels in heavily infested fields. Field trials were carried out at two sites in maize during 2011 and 2012. Different herbicide combinations, hoeing and herbicide applications combined with hoeing were the applied treatments. Split application was compared with one single application of the same amount of product. The effect of an additional, late under leaf herbicide application was determined as well. Cyperus esculentus coverage was estimated in the fields in 2011. Plots were sampled in spring 2011, autumn 2011 and autumn 2012. The Number of C. esculentus sprouts germinated from the soil samples was determined under greenhouse conditions. The most effective herbicide combination of registered active ingredients was rimsulfuron and mesotrione. Smetolachlor was effective as well, especially if combined with mechanical weed control. Halosulfuron-methyl applied twice provided the best C. esculentus control. Split application tended to be more effective than a single application. Control of C. esculentus could be improved considerably with an additional herbicide application in late June (under leaf. The treatments with highest C. esculentus control determined in the field trials and combinations thereof are effective treatment options for C. esculentus control in maize. These findings indicate and confirm that maize cropped for

  20. Recognition and development of "educational technology" as a scientific field and school subject

    OpenAIRE

    Danilović Mirčeta S.

    2004-01-01

    The paper explores the process of development, establishment and recognition of "educational technology" as an independent scientific field and a separate teaching subject at universities. The paper points to: (a) the problems that this field deals with or should deal with, (b) knowledge needed for the profession of "educational technologist", (c) various scientific institutions across the world involved in educational technology, (d) scientific journals treating issues of modern educational ...

  1. Gain of electromagnetic radiation traveling in a semiconductor subjected to magnetic and ultrasonic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksanyan, A.G.; Boyakhchyan, G.P.; Mirzabekyan, E.G.

    1979-08-01

    A calculation is made of the gain experienced by an electromagnetic wave in a semiconductor subjected to magnetic field and ultrasonic fields. It is shown that the gain can be 1--500 for a wide range of the parameters. Analytic expressions are obtained for the frequency depencence of the real part of the high-frequency conductivity when the pump power, ultrasonic wavelength, and temperature of the semiconductor are varied.

  2. Vacuum arcing behavior between transverse magnetic field contacts subjected to variable axial magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Hui; Wang, Jianhua; Liu, Zhiyuan, E-mail: liuzy@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Geng, Yingsan; Wang, Zhenxing; Yan, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2016-06-15

    The objective of this work is to reveal the effects of an axial magnetic field (AMF) on the vacuum arc characteristics between transverse magnetic field (TMF) contacts. These vacuum arc characteristics include the vacuum arcing behavior and the arc voltage waveform. In the experiments, an external AMF was applied to a pair of TMF contacts. The external AMF flux density B{sub AMF} can be adjusted from 0 to 110 mT. The arc current in the tests varied over a range from 0 to 20 kA rms at 45 Hz. The contact material was CuCr25 (25% Cr). A high-speed charge-coupled device video camera was used to record the vacuum arc evolution. The experimental results show that the application of the AMF effectively reduces the TMF arc voltage noise component and reduces the formation of liquid metal drops between the contacts. The diffuse arc duration increases linearly with increasing AMF flux density, but it also decreases linearly with increasing arc current under application of the external AMF. The results also indicate that the diffuse arc duration before the current zero is usually more than 1 ms under the condition that the value of the AMF per kiloampere is more than 2.0 mT/kA. Finally, under application of the AMF, the arc column of the TMF contacts may constrict and remain in the center region without transverse rotation. Therefore, the combined TMF–AMF contacts should be designed such that they guarantee that the AMF is not so strong as to oppose transverse rotation of the arc column.

  3. Tile drain losses of nitrogen and phosphorus from fields under integrated and organic crop rotations. A four-year study on a clay soil in southwest Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Maria; Ulén, Barbro; Söderström, Mats; Roland, Björn; Delin, Karl; Helander, Carl-Anders

    2012-09-15

    In order to explore the influence of site-specific soil properties on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) losses between individual fields and crop sequences, 16 drained fields with clay soils were investigated in a four-year study. Mean total N (TN) loss was 6.6-11.1 from a conventional, 14.3-21.5 from an organic and 13.1-23.9 kg ha(-1) year(-1) from an integrated cropping system across a 4 year period, with 75% in nitrate form (NO(3)-N). Mean total P (TP) loss was 0.96-3.03, 0.99-4.63 and 0.76-2.67 kg ha(-1) year(-1), from the three systems respectively during the same period, with 25% in dissolved reactive form (DRP). Median N efficiency was calculated to be 70% including gains from estimated N fixation. According to principal component factor (PCA) analysis, field characteristics and cropping system were generally more important for losses of N and P than year. Accumulation of soil mineral N in the autumn and (estimated) N fixation was important for N leaching. No P fertilisers were used at the site in either cropping system. Total P concentration in drainage water from each of the fields was marginally significantly (ptopsoil (r=0.52), measured in hydrochloric acid extract (P-HCl). Mean DRP concentrations were significantly (ptopsoil (r=0.63). Good establishment of a crop with efficient nutrient uptake and good soil structure was general preconditions for low nutrient leaching. Incorporation of ley by tillage operations in the summer before autumn crop establishment and repeated operations in autumn as well, increased N leaching. Crop management in sequences with leguminous crops needs to be considered carefully when designing cropping systems high efficiency in N utilisation and low environmental impact. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Multichannel SQUID system for measurement of spinal cord evoked magnetic field for supine subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Y; Kawai, J; Miyamoto, M; Uehara, G; Ogata, H [Applied Electronics Laboratory, Kanazawa Institute of Technology, 3 Amaike, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-1331 (Japan); Kawabata, S [Section of Orthopaedic and Spinal Surgery, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8519 (Japan)

    2008-02-01

    A SQUID biomagnetometer system for cervical spinal cord evoked field (SCEF) was developed to investigate a non-invasive diagnosis of function of the spinal cord. The measurement system was characterized by a uniquely shaped cryostat designed for supine subjects. The cryostat has a vertical cylindrical main body whose dimensions are 500 mm in diameter and 940 mm in height and a horizontal protrusion from the side surface with 390 mm of length. The sensor array of 35 LTS-SQUID vector gradiometers directed vertically upward is installed in the end of the protruded part. Subjects lie on a bed in supine position with the head running off the edge of the bed and the back of the neck supported on the upper surface of the protruded part of the cryostat standing beside the bed. This structure readily enables the sensor array to approach close to the neck of the supine subject. The subjects can keep their posture stable during the measurement. We demonstrated the cervical SCEF was successfully detected from a healthy subject who was given electric stimulation to the median nerve at the wrist. The intensity of the evoked magnetic field was 40-70 fT in amplitude. The neural signal propagating along the spinal cord was magnetically observed from the investigation of the transition of the magnetic field distribution.

  5. TRANSFORMATION OF CONCEPT OF SUBJECTIVITY IN THE CONTEXTUAL FIELD OF BIOETHICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Alekseevna Nikulina

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In article the conceptual analysis of a phenomenon of subjectivity in the space of a modern bioethical reflection is given, the main transformations of subjectivity, adherent by a post-nonclassical paradigm and development of biotechnological activities are determined. Social and sociological loading of a concept "subjectivity" is connected with judgment of incorporated moral components. Proving the need of ethical parameterization of subjectivity for a bioethical discourse, the author opens the perspective of perfect social reality in a contextual field of bioethics, allocating the horizons of research of the bioethical plan of life of the subject. Valuable component of subjectivity defines bioethical measurement of human subjectivity that allows to consider the ethic and axiological beginning as a resource for formation of the integrative representations generating the basis of a new universal picture of the world. The author comes to a conclusion that valuable activity, a motivational and valuable orientation, a certain ethic and axiological position of the bioethical subject act also as the certain ideal positioning the plan like due and possible that is especially urgent during an era of biotechnological progress.

  6. Decreased functional diversity and biological pest control in conventional compared to organic crop fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Krauss

    Full Text Available Organic farming is one of the most successful agri-environmental schemes, as humans benefit from high quality food, farmers from higher prices for their products and it often successfully protects biodiversity. However there is little knowledge if organic farming also increases ecosystem services like pest control. We assessed 30 triticale fields (15 organic vs. 15 conventional and recorded vascular plants, pollinators, aphids and their predators. Further, five conventional fields which were treated with insecticides were compared with 10 non-treated conventional fields. Organic fields had five times higher plant species richness and about twenty times higher pollinator species richness compared to conventional fields. Abundance of pollinators was even more than one-hundred times higher on organic fields. In contrast, the abundance of cereal aphids was five times lower in organic fields, while predator abundances were three times higher and predator-prey ratios twenty times higher in organic fields, indicating a significantly higher potential for biological pest control in organic fields. Insecticide treatment in conventional fields had only a short-term effect on aphid densities while later in the season aphid abundances were even higher and predator abundances lower in treated compared to untreated conventional fields. Our data indicate that insecticide treatment kept aphid predators at low abundances throughout the season, thereby significantly reducing top-down control of aphid populations. Plant and pollinator species richness as well as predator abundances and predator-prey ratios were higher at field edges compared to field centres, highlighting the importance of field edges for ecosystem services. In conclusion organic farming increases biodiversity, including important functional groups like plants, pollinators and predators which enhance natural pest control. Preventative insecticide application in conventional fields has only short

  7. Decreased functional diversity and biological pest control in conventional compared to organic crop fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Jochen; Gallenberger, Iris; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf

    2011-01-01

    Organic farming is one of the most successful agri-environmental schemes, as humans benefit from high quality food, farmers from higher prices for their products and it often successfully protects biodiversity. However there is little knowledge if organic farming also increases ecosystem services like pest control. We assessed 30 triticale fields (15 organic vs. 15 conventional) and recorded vascular plants, pollinators, aphids and their predators. Further, five conventional fields which were treated with insecticides were compared with 10 non-treated conventional fields. Organic fields had five times higher plant species richness and about twenty times higher pollinator species richness compared to conventional fields. Abundance of pollinators was even more than one-hundred times higher on organic fields. In contrast, the abundance of cereal aphids was five times lower in organic fields, while predator abundances were three times higher and predator-prey ratios twenty times higher in organic fields, indicating a significantly higher potential for biological pest control in organic fields. Insecticide treatment in conventional fields had only a short-term effect on aphid densities while later in the season aphid abundances were even higher and predator abundances lower in treated compared to untreated conventional fields. Our data indicate that insecticide treatment kept aphid predators at low abundances throughout the season, thereby significantly reducing top-down control of aphid populations. Plant and pollinator species richness as well as predator abundances and predator-prey ratios were higher at field edges compared to field centres, highlighting the importance of field edges for ecosystem services. In conclusion organic farming increases biodiversity, including important functional groups like plants, pollinators and predators which enhance natural pest control. Preventative insecticide application in conventional fields has only short-term effects on aphid

  8. National-scale crop type mapping and area estimation using multi-resolution remote sensing and field survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, X. P.; Potapov, P.; Adusei, B.; King, L.; Khan, A.; Krylov, A.; Di Bella, C. M.; Pickens, A. H.; Stehman, S. V.; Hansen, M.

    2016-12-01

    Reliable and timely information on agricultural production is essential for ensuring world food security. Freely available medium-resolution satellite data (e.g. Landsat, Sentinel) offer the possibility of improved global agriculture monitoring. Here we develop and test a method for estimating in-season crop acreage using a probability sample of field visits and producing wall-to-wall crop type maps at national scales. The method is first illustrated for soybean cultivated area in the US for 2015. A stratified, two-stage cluster sampling design was used to collect field data to estimate national soybean area. The field-based estimate employed historical soybean extent maps from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Cropland Data Layer to delineate and stratify U.S. soybean growing regions. The estimated 2015 U.S. soybean cultivated area based on the field sample was 341,000 km2 with a standard error of 23,000 km2. This result is 1.0% lower than USDA's 2015 June survey estimate and 1.9% higher than USDA's 2016 January estimate. Our area estimate was derived in early September, about 2 months ahead of harvest. To map soybean cover, the Landsat image archive for the year 2015 growing season was processed using an active learning approach. Overall accuracy of the soybean map was 84%. The field-based sample estimated area was then used to calibrate the map such that the soybean acreage of the map derived through pixel counting matched the sample-based area estimate. The strength of the sample-based area estimation lies in the stratified design that takes advantage of the spatially explicit cropland layers to construct the strata. The success of the mapping was built upon an automated system which transforms Landsat images into standardized time-series metrics. The developed method produces reliable and timely information on soybean area in a cost-effective way and could be implemented in an operational mode. The approach has also been applied for other crops in

  9. Encouragement of Enzyme Reaction Utilizing Heat Generation from Ferromagnetic Particles Subjected to an AC Magnetic Field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Suzuki

    Full Text Available We propose a method of activating an enzyme utilizing heat generation from ferromagnetic particles under an ac magnetic field. We immobilize α-amylase on the surface of ferromagnetic particles and analyze its activity. We find that when α-amylase/ferromagnetic particle hybrids, that is, ferromagnetic particles, on which α-amylase molecules are immobilized, are subjected to an ac magnetic field, the particles generate heat and as a result, α-amylase on the particles is heated up and activated. We next prepare a solution, in which α-amylase/ferromagnetic particle hybrids and free, nonimmobilized chitinase are dispersed, and analyze their activities. We find that when the solution is subjected to an ac magnetic field, the activity of α-amylase immobilized on the particles increases, whereas that of free chitinase hardly changes; in other words, only α-amylase immobilized on the particles is selectively activated due to heat generation from the particles.

  10. Identification, distribution and incidence of viruses in field-grown cucurbit crops of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bananej

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A survey of viruses in the major cucurbit-growing areas of 17 provinces in Iran was conducted in 2005 and 2006. A total of 1699 leaf samples were collected from melon, squash, cucumber and watermelon plants showing various virus-like symptoms. Screening for 11 cucurbit viruses by double-antibody sandwich ELISA (DAS-ELISA or RT-PCR, found that 71% of the samples were infected by at least one virus, of which Cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus (CABYV was the most common overall, occurring in 49, 47, 40, and 33% of cucumber, squash, melon, and watermelon samples respectively. The second most common virus on melon and watermelon was Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV (incidence 30–33%; on cucumber, Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV(33%; and on squash, Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV(38%. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV and Zucchini yellow fl eck virus (ZYFV in Iran. Mixed infections occurred in 49% of symptomatic samples. Mixed infections were relatively frequent in squash (58% and melon (55%. The most frequent double infections were WMV+CABYV and ZYMV+CABYV in melon, squash and cucumber, followed by WMV+ZYMV. In watermelon, the most frequent double infection was WMV+ZYMV, followed by WMV+CABYV. The high frequency of CABYV, WMV and ZYMV in the samples assayed on all four cucurbit crops and in all areas surveyed, as well as the detection of Watermelon chlorotic stunt virus (WmCSV and Cucumber vein yellowing virus (CVYV in northern and southern Iran, suggest that these viruses represent a potential threat to cucurbit crops in Iran.

  11. Sampling Strategies for Evaluating the Rate of Adventitious Transgene Presence in Non-Genetically Modified Crop Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, David; Bancal, Rémi; Bensadoun, Arnaud; Monod, Hervé; Messéan, Antoine

    2017-09-01

    According to E.U. regulations, the maximum allowable rate of adventitious transgene presence in non-genetically modified (GM) crops is 0.9%. We compared four sampling methods for the detection of transgenic material in agricultural non-GM maize fields: random sampling, stratified sampling, random sampling + ratio reweighting, random sampling + regression reweighting. Random sampling involves simply sampling maize grains from different locations selected at random from the field concerned. The stratified and reweighting sampling methods make use of an auxiliary variable corresponding to the output of a gene-flow model (a zero-inflated Poisson model) simulating cross-pollination as a function of wind speed, wind direction, and distance to the closest GM maize field. With the stratified sampling method, an auxiliary variable is used to define several strata with contrasting transgene presence rates, and grains are then sampled at random from each stratum. With the two methods involving reweighting, grains are first sampled at random from various locations within the field, and the observations are then reweighted according to the auxiliary variable. Data collected from three maize fields were used to compare the four sampling methods, and the results were used to determine the extent to which transgene presence rate estimation was improved by the use of stratified and reweighting sampling methods. We found that transgene rate estimates were more accurate and that substantially smaller samples could be used with sampling strategies based on an auxiliary variable derived from a gene-flow model. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  12. Decomposition rate and enzymatic activity of composted municipal waste and poultry manure in the soil in a biofuel crops field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordovil, Cláudia Marques-Dos-Santos; de Varennes, Amarilis; Pinto, Renata Machado Dos Santos; Alves, Tiago Filipe; Mendes, Pedro; Sampaio, Sílvio César

    2017-05-01

    Biofuel crops are gaining importance because of the need to replace non-renewable sources. Also, due to the increasing amounts of wastes generated, there is the need to recycle them to the soil, both to fertilize crops and to improve soil physical properties through organic matter increase and microbiological changes in the rhizosphere. We therefore studied the influence of six biofuel crops (elephant grass, giant cane, sugarcane, blue gum, black cottonwood, willow) on the decomposition rate and enzymatic activity of composted municipal solid waste and poultry manure. Organic amendments were incubated in the field (litterbag method), buried near each plant or bare soil. Biomass decrease and dehydrogenase, urease and acid phosphatase level in amendments was monitored over a 180-day period. Soil under the litterbags was analysed for the same enzymatic activity and organic matter fractions (last sampling). After 365 days, a fractionation of organic matter was carried out in both amendments and soil under the litterbags. For compost, willow and sugarcane generally led to the greatest enzymatic activity, at the end of the experiment. For manure, dehydrogenase activity decreased sharply with time, the smallest value near sugarcane, while phosphatase and urease generally presented the highest values, at the beginning or after 90 days' incubation. Clustering showed that plant species could be grouped based on biomass and enzymes measured over time. Plant species influenced the decomposition rate and enzymatic activities of the organic amendments. Overall, mineralization of both amendments was associated with a greater urease activity in soils. Dehydrogenase activity in manure was closely associated with urease activity. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. The insulin-mediated modulation of visually evoked magnetic fields is reduced in obese subjects.

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    Martina Guthoff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin is an anorexigenic hormone that contributes to the termination of food intake in the postprandial state. An alteration in insulin action in the brain, named "cerebral insulin resistance", is responsible for overeating and the development of obesity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To analyze the direct effect of insulin on food-related neuronal activity we tested 10 lean and 10 obese subjects. We conducted a magnetencephalography study during a visual working memory task in both the basal state and after applying insulin or placebo spray intranasally to bypass the blood brain barrier. Food and non-food pictures were presented and subjects had to determine whether or not two consecutive pictures belonged to the same category. Intranasal insulin displayed no effect on blood glucose, insulin or C-peptide concentrations in the periphery; however, it led to an increase in the components of evoked fields related to identification and categorization of pictures (at around 170 ms post stimuli in the visual ventral stream in lean subjects when food pictures were presented. In contrast, insulin did not modulate food-related brain activity in obese subjects. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrated that intranasal insulin increases the cerebral processing of food pictures in lean whereas this was absent in obese subjects. This study further substantiates the presence of a "cerebral insulin resistance" in obese subjects and might be relevant in the pathogenesis of obesity.

  14. A draft genome of field pennycress (Thlaspi arvense) provides tools for the domestication of a new winter biofuel crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Kevin M; Fankhauser, Johnathon D; Wyse, Donald L; Marks, M David

    2015-04-01

    Field pennycress (Thlaspi arvense L.) is being domesticated as a new winter cover crop and biofuel species for the Midwestern United States that can be double-cropped between corn and soybeans. A genome sequence will enable the use of new technologies to make improvements in pennycress. To generate a draft genome, a hybrid sequencing approach was used to generate 47 Gb of DNA sequencing reads from both the Illumina and PacBio platforms. These reads were used to assemble 6,768 genomic scaffolds. The draft genome was annotated using the MAKER pipeline, which identified 27,390 predicted protein-coding genes, with almost all of these predicted peptides having significant sequence similarity to Arabidopsis proteins. A comprehensive analysis of pennycress gene homologues involved in glucosinolate biosynthesis, metabolism, and transport pathways revealed high sequence conservation compared with other Brassicaceae species, and helps validate the assembly of the pennycress gene space in this draft genome. Additional comparative genomic analyses indicate that the knowledge gained from years of basic Brassicaceae research will serve as a powerful tool for identifying gene targets whose manipulation can be predicted to result in improvements for pennycress. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  15. Duration of continuous cropping with straw return affects the composition and structure of soil bacterial communities in cotton fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Tan, Lanlan; Zhang, Fenghua; Gale, William Jeffrey; Cheng, Zhibo; Sang, Wen

    2017-12-11

    Salinized land in the China's Xinjiang Region is being reclaimed for continuous cotton production. The specific objectives of this field study were (i) to compare bacterial composition and diversity in unfarmed (i.e., unreclaimed) and continuously (5, 10, 15, and 20 years) cropped soils and (ii) to explore correlations between soil properties and the bacterial communities identified by Illumina MiSeq sequencing. The results showed that bacterial species richness and diversity increased for 10-15 years and then declined when salinized land was reclaimed for cotton production. Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were the dominant phyla in unfarmed soil. Continuous cropping reduced the abundance of Firmicutes but increased that of Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, and Actinobacteria. Cluster analyses showed that the greatest similarities in bacterial communities were between the 5- and 10-year treatments and between the 15- and 20-year treatments. Soil pH, electrical conductivity, alkali-hydrolyzable N, and available P were significantly correlated with bacterial community distribution. Overall, cotton production improved soil physicochemical properties and altered the structure and composition of soil bacterial communities compared with unfarmed soil. These positive effects began to decrease after 10-15 years of continuous cotton production.

  16. Effect of cover crops on greenhouse gas emissions in an irrigated field under integrated soil fertility management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardia, Guillermo; Abalos, Diego; García-Marco, Sonia; Quemada, Miguel; Alonso-Ayuso, María; Cárdenas, Laura M.; Dixon, Elizabeth R.; Vallejo, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Agronomical and environmental benefits are associated with replacing winter fallow by cover crops (CCs). Yet, the effect of this practice on nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions remains poorly understood. In this context, a field experiment was carried out under Mediterranean conditions to evaluate the effect of replacing the traditional winter fallow (F) by vetch (Vicia sativa L.; V) or barley (Hordeum vulgare L.; B) on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during the intercrop and the maize (Zea mays L.) cropping period. The maize was fertilized following integrated soil fertility management (ISFM) criteria. Maize nitrogen (N) uptake, soil mineral N concentrations, soil temperature and moisture, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and GHG fluxes were measured during the experiment. Our management (adjusted N synthetic rates due to ISFM) and pedo-climatic conditions resulted in low cumulative N2O emissions (0.57 to 0.75 kg N2O-N ha-1 yr-1), yield-scaled N2O emissions (3-6 g N2O-N kg aboveground N uptake-1) and N surplus (31 to 56 kg N ha-1) for all treatments. Although CCs increased N2O emissions during the intercrop period compared to F (1.6 and 2.6 times in B and V, respectively), the ISFM resulted in similar cumulative emissions for the CCs and F at the end of the maize cropping period. The higher C : N ratio of the B residue led to a greater proportion of N2O losses from the synthetic fertilizer in these plots when compared to V. No significant differences were observed in CH4 and CO2 fluxes at the end of the experiment. This study shows that the use of both legume and nonlegume CCs combined with ISFM could provide, in addition to the advantages reported in previous studies, an opportunity to maximize agronomic efficiency (lowering synthetic N requirements for the subsequent cash crop) without increasing cumulative or yield-scaled N2O losses.

  17. Measurements of potential differences in human subjects induced by motion in a superconducting magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frinak, S; Knight, R A; Liboff, A R

    1992-01-01

    We have attempted to measure the electromotive forces (emfs) induced in human beings moving at a constant speed in a highly dense magnetic field. Experiments were initially conducted on a set of models, and then directly on human subjects. The models consisted of single circular loops of Tygon tubing (I.D., 0.635 cm; O.D., 0.9525 cm) filled with normal saline solution, with circumferences of 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 cm. The models were connected to an amplifier via silver/silver-chloride electrodes. Each saline loop was mounted on a movable platform, with the plane of the loop perpendicular to the platform's axis; the platform was enabled to move at known constant speeds into and out of the bore of a 1.89-T magnet. The human subjects were then substituted for the saline loops, with the long axis parallel to the direction of motion, and with standard EKG electrodes placed at 180 degrees successively on the ankle, calf, lower thigh, upper thigh, chest, and head. In all cases, for human subjects and models, the peak induced voltage was directly proportional to the speed of movement and the square of the circumference of the bounded cross-sectional areas. Thus, for the saline loops, the correlation coefficient between induced voltage and circumference was .998, and for human subjects, .947. Under the loose assumption that for equal circumferences the bounded areas in human subjects were equal to those in the circular loops, the induced emfs in human subjects were consistently about 13% greater than those in the loops. At a mean speed of 1.18 m/s, the chest had a peak induced voltage of 260 mV, while the voltage at the ankle had a peak of 19.8 mV. The experimental data were used to estimate the corresponding induced-current density at the pericardium, 17 mA/m2. We conclude for a human subject moving at constant speed along the body's long axis into a magnetic field that Faraday's law is closely followed for various cross-sections of the body. Further, in those cases in

  18. Title, Description, and Subject are the Most Important Metadata Fields for Keyword Discoverability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Costello

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Yang, L. (2016. Metadata effectiveness in internet discovery: An analysis of digital collection metadata elements and internet search engine keywords. College & Research Libraries, 77(1, 7-19. http://doi.org/10.5860/crl.77.1.7 Objective – To determine which metadata elements best facilitate discovery of digital collections. Design – Case study. Setting – A public research university serving over 32,000 graduate and undergraduate students in the Southwestern United States of America. Subjects – A sample of 22,559 keyword searches leading to the institution’s digital repository between August 1, 2013, and July 31, 2014. Methods – The author used Google Analytics to analyze 73,341 visits to the institution’s digital repository. He determined that 22,559 of these visits were due to keyword searches. Using Random Integer Generator, the author identified a random sample of 378 keyword searches. The author then matched the keywords with the Dublin Core and VRA Core metadata elements on the landing page in the digital repository to determine which metadata field had drawn the keyword searcher to that particular page. Many of these keywords matched to more than one metadata field, so the author also analyzed the metadata elements that generated unique keyword hits and those fields that were frequently matched together. Main Results – Title was the most matched metadata field with 279 matched keywords from searches. Description and Subject were also significant fields with 208 and 79 matches respectively. Slightly more than half of the results, 195 keywords, matched the institutional repository in one field only. Both Title and Description had significant match rates both independently and in conjunction with other elements, but Subject keywords were the sole match in only three of the sampled cases. Conclusion – The Dublin Core elements of Title, Description, and Subject were the most frequently matched fields in keyword

  19. A spatial ecology study on the effects of field conditions and crop rotation on the incidence of Plectris aliena (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) grub damage to sweetpotato roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, Nancy L; Osborne, Jason; Abney, Mark R

    2013-10-01

    A farmscape study was conducted in commercial sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam) fields in Columbus County, NC, in 2010 and 2011 to investigate the effects of the following field conditions: soil drainage class, soil texture, field size, border habitat, land elevation, and the previous year's crop rotation on the incidence of damage caused by Plectris aliena Chapman (Coleoptera:Scarabaeidae) larval feeding. Soil drainage and crop rotation significantly affected the incidence of damage to roots, with well drained soils having a low estimated incidence of damaged roots (0.004) compared with all other drainage classes (0.009-0.011 incidence of damaged roots). Fields with soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merr] planted the preceding year had the highest incidence of root damage (0.15) compared with all other crops. The effects of border habitats, which were adjacent to grower fields where roots were sampled, showed that as the location of the roots was closer to borders of soybean (planted the year before) or grass fields, the chance of damage to roots decreased. Results indicate that growers can use crop rotation as a management technique and avoid planting sweetpotatoes the year after soybeans to reduce the incidence of P. aliena larval feeding on sweetpotato roots. Environmental conditions such as fields with poor drainage and certain border habitats may be avoided, or selected, by growers to reduce risk of damage to roots by P. aliena.

  20. Farm Crop Production Technology: Field and Forage Crop and Fruit and Vine Production Options. A Suggested 2-Year Post High School Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Division of Vocational and Technical Education, BAVT.

    Prepared by a junior college under contract with the Office of Education, the curriculum materials are designed to assist school administrators, advisory committees, supervisors, and teachers in developing or evaluating postsecondary programs in farm crop production technology. Information was gathered by visits to the important farm regions and…

  1. Droplet transport and coalescence kinetics in emulsions subjected to acoustic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangu, Gautam D; Feke, Donald L

    2007-11-01

    A method to aid the separation of the oil phase from aqueous emulsions using a low-intensity, resonant ultrasonic field has recently been developed. The density and compressibility difference between the dispersed and continuous phases within the emulsion results in a net force on the oil drops that pushes them toward the pressure antinodes of the standing-wave field, where coalescence subsequently occurs. A trajectory model is developed to predict the relative motion of drops subjected to the acoustic field. Such trajectories are sensitive to the physical properties and relative size of interacting drops, the initial configuration of the drops, and acoustic field parameters. Model predictions are validated by comparing experimentally observed trajectories with those predicted by the model. The modeling approach is then extended to determine the temporal evolution of the size of the region surrounding a target drop cleared by coalescence as a function of physical and acoustic field parameters. These results form the basis of a population balance model that attempts to track the size-evolution of a drop population coalescing under the influence of an acoustic field.

  2. Image-based high-throughput field phenotyping of crop roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucksch, Alexander; Burridge, James; York, Larry M; Das, Abhiram; Nord, Eric; Weitz, Joshua S; Lynch, Jonathan P

    2014-10-01

    Current plant phenotyping technologies to characterize agriculturally relevant traits have been primarily developed for use in laboratory and/or greenhouse conditions. In the case of root architectural traits, this limits phenotyping efforts, largely, to young plants grown in specialized containers and growth media. Hence, novel approaches are required to characterize mature root systems of older plants grown under actual soil conditions in the field. Imaging methods able to address the challenges associated with characterizing mature root systems are rare due, in part, to the greater complexity of mature root systems, including the larger size, overlap, and diversity of root components. Our imaging solution combines a field-imaging protocol and algorithmic approach to analyze mature root systems grown in the field. Via two case studies, we demonstrate how image analysis can be utilized to estimate localized root traits that reliably capture heritable architectural diversity as well as environmentally induced architectural variation of both monocot and dicot plants. In the first study, we show that our algorithms and traits (including 13 novel traits inaccessible to manual estimation) can differentiate nine maize (Zea mays) genotypes 8 weeks after planting. The second study focuses on a diversity panel of 188 cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) genotypes to identify which traits are sufficient to differentiate genotypes even when comparing plants whose harvesting date differs up to 14 d. Overall, we find that automatically derived traits can increase both the speed and reproducibility of the trait estimation pipeline under field conditions. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Systemic insecticides for control of black vine weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in container- and field-grown nursery crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reding, Michael E; Persad, Anand B

    2009-06-01

    Black vine weevils, Otiorhynchus sulcatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), are serious pests of container- and field-grown nursery crops. Management programs usually target the larval stage in container-grown plants and the adults in field-grown plants. We tested several new systemic insecticides for efficacy against black vine weevil in container-grown Sedum spp. and field-grown Taxus spp. In 2006 and 2007, clothianidin, dinotefuran, and chlorantraniliprole were applied as surface drenches to containerized Sedum plants, and suppression of larval densities and adult feeding were evaluated. Sedum leaf bioassays were used to further examine the influence of clothianidin, dinotefuran, and chlorantraniliprole on adult feeding. In 2006, pots were infested with adult black vine weevil 1 d after treating, and in 2007 pots were infested 1 or 43 d after treating. All three insecticides significantly reduced the numbers of larvae in 2006, but not in 2007, because of low numbers of larvae in the untreated control plants. Dinotefuran and clothianidin reduced feeding by adult black vine weevil on containerized Sedum plants, resulting in more blossoms, fewer damaged leaves, and a lower percentage of leaves damaged compared with control plants. In bioassays with detached leaves, all three insecticides reduced feeding compared with control plants. Efficacy and timing of clothianidin, imidacloprid, and acephate soil drenches and imidacloprid and acephate soil injections were evaluated for black vine weevil control over a 1-yr period in field-grown Taxus plants. All insecticide treatments significantly reduced the numbers of larvae in field-grown Taxus plants compared with control plants; and all but the spring acephate drench improved the appearance of the Taxus (foliar rating) plants compared with untreated plants. All of the tested insecticides showed potential for preventing infestations of black vine weevil larvae and reducing feeding by the adults in ornamental plants.

  4. Automatic extraction of plots from geo-registered UAS imagery of crop fields with complex planting schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearst, Anthony A.

    Complex planting schemes are common in experimental crop fields and can make it difficult to extract plots of interest from high-resolution imagery of the fields gathered by Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS). This prevents UAS imagery from being applied in High-Throughput Precision Phenotyping and other areas of agricultural research. If the imagery is accurately geo-registered, then it may be possible to extract plots from the imagery based on their map coordinates. To test this approach, a UAS was used to acquire visual imagery of 5 ha of soybean fields containing 6.0 m2 plots in a complex planting scheme. Sixteen artificial targets were setup in the fields before flights and different spatial configurations of 0 to 6 targets were used as Ground Control Points (GCPs) for geo-registration, resulting in a total of 175 geo-registered image mosaics with a broad range of geo-registration accuracies. Geo-registration accuracy was quantified based on the horizontal Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) of targets used as checkpoints. Twenty test plots were extracted from the geo-registered imagery. Plot extraction accuracy was quantified based on the percentage of the desired plot area that was extracted. It was found that using 4 GCPs along the perimeter of the field minimized the horizontal RMSE and enabled a plot extraction accuracy of at least 70%, with a mean plot extraction accuracy of 92%. Future work will focus on further enhancing the plot extraction accuracy through additional image processing techniques so that it becomes sufficiently accurate for all practical purposes in agricultural research and potentially other areas of research.

  5. Modeling of Mixed Crop Field Water Demand and a Smart Irrigation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray-Shyan Wu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Taiwan average annual rainfall is approximately 2500 mm. In particular, 80% of the rainfall occurs in summer, and most of the heavy rainfall is caused by typhoons. The situation is worsening as climate change results in uneven rainfall, both in spatial and temporal terms. Moreover, climate change has resulted the variations in the seasonal rainfall pattern of Taiwan, thereby aggravating the problem of drought and flooding. The irrigation water distribution system is mostly manually operated, which produces difficulty with regard to the accurate calculation of conveyance losses of channels and fields. Therefore, making agricultural water usage more efficient in the fields and increasing operational accuracy by using modern irrigation systems can ensure appropriate irrigation and sufficient yield during droughts. If agricultural water, which accounts for 70% of the nation’s total water usage, can be allocated more precisely and efficiently, it can improve the efficacy of water resource allocation. In this study, a system dynamic model was used to establish an irrigation water management model for a companion and intercropping field in Central Taiwan. Rainfall and irrigation water were considered for the water supply, and the model simulated two scenarios by reducing 30% and 50% of the planned irrigation water in year 2015. Results indicated that the field storage in the end block of the study area was lower than the wilting point under the 50% reduced irrigation water scenario. The original irrigation plan can be reduced to be more efficient in water usage, and a 50% reduction of irrigation can be applied as a solution of water shortage when drought occurs. However, every block should be irrigated in rotation, by adjusting all water gates more frequently to ensure that the downstream blocks can receive the allocated water to get through the drought event.

  6. Recognition and development of "educational technology" as a scientific field and school subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilović Mirčeta S.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the process of development, establishment and recognition of "educational technology" as an independent scientific field and a separate teaching subject at universities. The paper points to: (a the problems that this field deals with or should deal with, (b knowledge needed for the profession of "educational technologist", (c various scientific institutions across the world involved in educational technology, (d scientific journals treating issues of modern educational technology, (e the authors i.e. psychologists and educators who developed and formulated the basic principles of this scientific field, (f educational features and potentials of educational technologies. Emphasis is placed on the role and importance of AV technology in developing, establishing and recognition of educational technology, and it is also pointed out that AV technology i.e. AV teaching aids and a movement for visualization of teaching were its forerunners and crucial factors for its establishing and developing into an independent area of teaching i.e. school subject. In summary it is stressed that educational technology provides for the execution of instruction through emission transmission, selection, coding, decoding, reception, memorization transformation of all types of pieces of information in teaching.

  7. Assessment of soil nitrogen and related enzymes as influenced by the incorporation time of field pea cultivated as a catch crop in Alfisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowska-Długosz, Anna; Wilczewski, Edward

    2014-12-01

    The effect of the time of catch crop (field pea) incorporation [catch crop incorporated in the autumn (A) or in the spring (B) versus plots without a catch crop (C)] on the soil enzymes related to N transformation (urease - UR, protease - PRO, nitrate reductase - NR, arginine ammonification rate - AAR), the total N and mineral N as well as microbial biomass N (MBN) contents were investigated in a 3-year experiment. The catch crop was sown at the beginning of August and plowed in the autumn in 2008, 2009 and 2010 or left as mulch during the winter. Soil samples for microbial activity were taken from spring barley plots that were grown in 2009, 2010 and 2011 before sowing (March), during the tillering phase (May), shooting (June) and after the harvesting of spring barley (August). The use of catch crop significantly increased the soil mineral and MBN contents as well as the activities of PRO and NR as compared to the control soil. The spring incorporation of the field pea significantly increased the MBN content in contrast to the autumn application, while the activity of N-cycle enzymes were clearly unaffected (UR and AAR) regardless of the time of the incorporation of field pea or else the results were inconsistent (PRO and NR). When the catch crop was incorporated in the spring, a significantly higher content of mineral N as compared to autumn incorporation was noted on only two of the four sampling dates. The enzymatic activity (PRO and AAR) was about 1.3-2.8 times higher in May and June as compared with March and August. Both spring or autumn incorporation of catch crop can be a useful management practice to increase the soil mineral N content and enhance the soil biological activity.

  8. Effects of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizer on crop yields in a field pea-spring wheat-potato rotation system with calcareous soil in semi-arid environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C.A.; Zhang, S.; Hua, S.; Rao, X.

    2016-11-01

    The object of the present study was to investigate the yield-affecting mechanisms influenced by N and P applications in rainfed areas with calcareous soil. The experimental treatments were as follows: NF (no fertilizer), N (nitrogen), P (phosphorus), and NP (nitrogen plus phosphorus) in a field pea-spring wheat-potato cropping system. This study was conducted over six years (2003-2008) on China’s semi-arid Loess Plateau. The fertilizer treatments were found to decrease the soil water content more than the NF treatment in each of the growing seasons. The annual average yields of the field pea crops during the entire experimental period were 635, 677, 858, and 1117 kg/ha for the NF, N, P, and NP treatments, respectively. The annual average yields were 673, 547, 966, and 1056 kg/ha for the spring wheat crops for the NF, N, P, and NP treatments, respectively. Also, the annual average yields were 1476, 2120, 1480, and 2424 kg/ha for the potato crops for the NF, N, P, and NP treatments, respectively. In the second cycle of the three-year rotation, the pea and spring wheat yields in the P treatment were 1.2 and 2.8 times higher than that in the N treatment, respectively. Meanwhile, the potato crop yield in the N treatment was 3.1 times higher than that in the P treatment. In conclusion, the P fertilizer was found to increase the yields of the field pea and wheat crops, and the N fertilizer increased the potato crop yield in rainfed areas with calcareous soil. (Author)

  9. Can we use Electrical Resistivity Tomography to measure root zone moisture dynamics in fields with multiple crops?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garre, S.; Coteur, I.; Wongleecharoen, C.; Diels, J.; Vanderborght, J.

    2012-12-01

    Agriculture on shallow or steep soils in the humid tropics often leads to low resource use efficiency. Contour hedgerow intercropping systems have been proposed to reduce run-off and control soil erosion. However, competition for water and nutrients between crops and associated hedgerows may reduce the overall performance of contour hedgerow systems. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a valuable technique to assess the distribution and dynamics of soil moisture non-invasively. Root water uptake is a spatially variable and small-scale process, which requires at least decimeter resolution and a high sensitivity in order to be able to monitor changes in time and space. Careful experimental design is of uttermost importance in order to maximize the information content of the ERT survey and to gain insights in the possibilities and limitations of the survey. Virtual experiments in combination with absolute and spatial performance measures provide a way to optimize the information that can be retrieved from an ERT experiment. We used this approach to identify a suitable measurement methodology to monitor water fluxes in a contour hedgerow intercropping system in Ratchaburi province, Thailand. The virtual experiment showed that there are important differences between the tested measurement configurations. We saw that the optimal ERT array was capable of recognizing distinct water depletion zones under the different crops. However, sharp contrasts in the 1-D water depletion profile are smoothened. ERT measurements conducted in Thailand showed that the soils of our experimental plots were very heterogeneous both along the slope as with depth. This observation highlighted some constraints of the ERT method for soil moisture monitoring in the field, such as the difficulty to define a relationship between electrical conductivity and soil moisture in very heterogeneous soils. Nevertheless, the data indeed revealed contrasting water depletion patterns under monocropping

  10. Statistical Analysis of Long-Term Trend of Performance, Production and Cultivated Area of 17 Field Crops Khorasan Razavi Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Zareabyaneh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Any planning for the future requires estimates of future conditions. It is possible to study changes over time series. In this study, changes of production and cultivated area of 17 field crops of Khorasan Razavi province in a 25-year period were determined with Mann - Kendall test, Sen’s Estimator Slope and linear regression. Analysis of the three tests showed that performance of 76.5% from yield, 88.2% from area under cultivation and 55.8% from agricultural production were significant at the 0.01 and 0.05 level. On the other hand, trend of yields 58.8% was increase, 17.7% was reduced and 23.5% was no significant trend. Similarly, trend of 23.5% from area under cultivation was acreage, 64.7% was reduction, and 11.8% was no significant trend. For production variable, 29.4% was significantly increased and 29.4% was significant reduction. More detailed analysis showed that performance, production and area under cultivation of three crops of cotton, grain and tomatoes increased significantly. Results of all three methods showed the highest trend of negatively performance and area under cultivation variation is related to pea and melon respectively. Furthermore, most of the positive trend in production of tomatoes and grain, performance in onions, potatoes and tomatoes and area under cultivation in tomato observed. The results showed that linear trend and the nonparametric tests of important products of province: wheat, barley, sugar beet, cotton, melons, watermelons and tomatoes in 0.01 were significant. This result shows the importance of these yields in gross state province product.

  11. Carbon and nitrogen emissions from stored manure and cropped fields in irrigated mountain oases of Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Gebauer

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about gaseous carbon (C and nitrogen (N emissions from traditional terrace agriculture in irrigated high mountain agroecosystems of the subtropics. In an effort towards filling this knowledge gap measurements of carbon dioxide (CO_2, methane (CH_4, ammonia (NH_3 and dinitrous oxide (N_2O were taken with a mobile photoacoustic infrared multi-gas monitor on manure-filled PE-fibre storage bags and on flood-irrigated untilled and tilled fields in three mountain oases of the northen Omani Al Jabal al Akhdar mountains. During typical 9-11 day irrigation cycles of March, August and September 2006 soil volumetric moisture contents of fields dominated by fodder wheat, barley, oats and pomegranate ranged from 46-23%. While manure incorporation after application effectively reduced gaseous N losses, prolonged storage of manure in heaps or in PE-fibre bags caused large losses of C and N. Given the large irrigation-related turnover of organic C, sustainable agricultural productivity of oasis agriculture in Oman seems to require the integration of livestock which allows for several applications of manure per year at individual rates of 20 t dry matter ha^−1.

  12. Symbiotic N2 fixation in pea and field bean estimated by 15N fertilizer dilution in field experiments with barley as a reference crop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Erik Steen

    1986-01-01

    The total amount of nitrogen derived from symbiotic nitrogen fixation in two pea and one field bean cultivar, supplied with 50 kg N ha−1 at sowing (‘starter’-N), was estimated to 165, 136, and 186 kg N ha−1, respectively (three-year means). However, estimates varied considerably between the three...... years. At the full bloom/flat pod growth stage from 30 to 59 per cent of total N2 fixation had taken place. The proportion of total N derived from N2 fixation at maturity was higher in seeds than in vegetative plant parts and amounted to 59.5, 51.3 and 66.3 per cent of total above-ground plant N...... in the two pea cultivars and field bean, respectively (three-year means). The recovery of fertilizer N was 62.2, 70.2, 52.1, and 69.5 per cent in the two pea cultivars, field bean and barley, respectively. Growth analysis indicated that barley did not meet the claims for an ideal reference crop in the15N...

  13. Chaotic dynamics and basin erosion in nanomagnets subject to time-harmonic magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aquino, M., E-mail: daquino@uniparthenope.it [Engineering Department, University of Naples “Parthenope”, 80143 Naples (Italy); Quercia, A.; Serpico, C. [DIETI, University of Naples Federico II, 80125 Naples (Italy); Bertotti, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, 10135 Torino (Italy); Mayergoyz, I.D. [ECE Department and UMIACS, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Perna, S. [DIETI, University of Naples Federico II, 80125 Naples (Italy); Ansalone, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, 10135 Torino (Italy)

    2016-04-01

    Magnetization dynamics in uniformly magnetized particles subject to time-harmonic (AC) external fields is considered. The study is focused on the behavior of the AC-driven dynamics close to saddle equilibria. It happens that such dynamics has chaotic nature at moderately low power level, due to the heteroclinic tangle phenomenon which is produced by the combined effect of AC-excitations and saddle type dynamics. By using analytical theory for the threshold AC excitation amplitudes necessary to create the heteroclinic tangle together with numerical simulations, we quantify and show how the tangle produces the erosion of the safe basin around the stable equilibria.

  14. Photon-Fluence-Weighted let for Radiation Fields Subjected to Epidemiological Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Michiya

    2017-08-01

    In order to estimate the uncertainty of the radiation risk associated with the photon energy in epidemiological studies, photon-fluence-weighted LET values were quantified for photon radiation fields with the target organs and irradiation conditions taken into consideration. The photon fluences giving a unit absorbed dose to the target organ were estimated by using photon energy spectra together with the dose conversion coefficients given in ICRP Publication 116 for the target organs of the colon, bone marrow, stomach, lung, skin and breast with three irradiation geometries. As a result, it was demonstrated that the weighted LET values did not show a clear difference among the photon radiation fields subjected to epidemiological studies, regardless of the target organ and the irradiation geometry.

  15. Experiments with nano-scaled helium bubbles in water subjected to standing acoustic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cancelos, Silvina, E-mail: silvina.cancelos@upr.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, Mayagüez, PR 00681 (United States); Villamizar, Gabriel; Saavedra-Ruiz, Andres; Garcia-Rodriguez, William; Filoni, Pablo T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, Mayagüez, PR 00681 (United States); Marin, Carlos [Department of Engineering Science and Materials, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus and Institute for Functional Nanomaterials, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00931 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Cavitation activity increases with the presence of helium nanobubbles in water. • The antinode region of the standing acoustic field gets depleted of nanobubbles. • Nanobubbles behave as solid particles when subjected to a standing acoustic field. - Abstract: Understanding the stability of gas filled bubbles dispersed in water, and the features that due to their presence must been taken into account in multiphase flow research, is amongst the most recent and relevant issue in a number of technological, physical and biological fields. Cavitation experiments were designed and conducted using one high-Q acoustic resonator that is able to oscillate at very well controlled conditions, allowing for the characterization of the effect that helium nanobubbles dispersed in water have on the cavitation activity. An increase in the inertial cavitation activity that correlates directly to the presence of the nanobubbles at the antinode was found. The results seem to indicate that the nanobubbles grow under tension to collapse under the compression phase. By other side, they behave as rigid entities under the influence of standing acoustic fields, moving away from the antinode region.

  16. Changes in plant-parasitic nematode populations in pineapple fields following inter-cycle cover crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, M P; Schmitt, D P

    1996-12-01

    The use of plant-covers oat (Arena sativa L.), rhodesgrass (Chloris gayana Kunth), soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.), and marigold (Tagetes patula L.) during pineapple inter-cycle planting periods was investigated at two sites (Kunia and Whitmore, Oahu, HI) as a potential means to reduce population densities of Rotylenchulus reniformis, Helicotylenchus dihystera, and Paratylenchus spp. Clean fallow and fallow covered with pineapple-plant residues (mulch) were the controls without plant-cover. Regardless of treatments, population densities of R. reniformis declined with time at both sites to low residue levels by the end of the 6-month period. Treatment means of R. reniformis population densities in the plant-cover treatments were lower than the controls' (P = 0.05). The plant-cover treatments also effected higher rates of R. reniformis population decline at both sites during the period, being 2.0 to 2.2 times that of the mulch control and 1.2 to 1.4 times that of the fallow control. Plant-covers' effect on H. dihystera during the same period at both sites was variable, resulting in decreased, unchanged, or increased population densities. The change was especially obvious in the oat-cover treatment, where H. dihystera population densities increased 9 to 15-fold at both sites. Population of Paratylenchus spp. was absent or present at low levels at the sites throughout the period. Biological activities antagonistic to R. reniformis at Kunia were estimated at the end of 6 months by comparing the extent of nematode's reproduction (on cowpea seedlings) in the treatment soils that had been subjected to autoclaving or freezing temperature. Although higher indices of antagonistic activities were observed in soils with prior plant-cover treatments than in soils from the controls, none of the treatments resulted in conferring soils the increased ability to suppress re-introduced R. reniformis populations or enhance subsequent pineapple-plant growth.

  17. Cultures Traditionnelles de Plein Champ (Traditional Field Crops). Appropriate Technologies for Development. Peace Corps Information Collection & Exchange Reprint Series No. R-65.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, David

    Written in French, this manual, which deals with traditional field crops, is primarily designed to help Peace Corps volunteers develop and strengthen their agricultural skills. The focus of the manual is on surveying and interpreting local agricultural environment and individual farm units, developing agricultural extension techniques and…

  18. FIELD-A summary simulation model of the soil–crop system to analyse long-term resource interactions and use efficiencies at farm scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tittonell, P.A.; Corbeels, M.; Wijk, van M.T.; Giller, K.E.

    2010-01-01

    Resources for crop production are often scarce in smallholder farming systems in the tropics, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Decisions on the allocation of such resources are often made at farm rather than at field plot scale. To handle the uncertainty caused by both lack of data and

  19. Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhiza in Field-Grown Crops. I. Mycorrhizal Infection in Cereals and Peas at Various Times and Soil Depths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Iver; Nielsen, N.E.

    1983-01-01

    Development of infection by vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) was studied in some field-grown crops. An infection plateau was reached within the first month after seedling emergence of spring barley, oats and peas. During the rest of the growth period the proportion of root length infected...

  20. Energy potential, energy ratios, and the amount of net energy in Finnish field crop production; Peltobioenergian tuotanto Suomessa. Potentiaali, energiasuhteet ja nettoenergia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkola, H.

    2012-11-01

    Energy potential, energy ratios, and the amount of net energy in Finnish field crop production were studied in this thesis. Special attention was paid to indirect energy inputs and how to treat them in energy analysis. Manufacturing of machines and agrochemicals and production of seeds are examples of indirect energy inputs.The bioenergy potential of the Finnish field crop production could be as large as 12 - 22 TWh, or 3 - 5% of the total energy consumption in Finland in 2008. The major part of this energy would originate from straw and biomass like reed canary grass cultivated for energy use. However, only 0.5 TWh of the potential is utilized. The output/input energy ratios of the studied field crops varied from 3 to 18, being highest (18) for reed canary grass and second highest (7) for sugar beet and grass cultivated for silage. The energy ratio of cereals and oil seed crops varied from 3 to 5 if only the yield of seeds was considered. If the yield of straw and stems was also taken into account the energy ratios would have been almost twofold. The energy ratios for Finnish wheat and barley were as high as those gained in Italian and Spanish conditions, respectively. However, the energy ratios of maize, elephant grass and giant reed were even over 50 in Central and Southern Europe. Plants that use the C4 photosynthesis pathway and produce high biomass yields thrive best in warm and sunny climate conditions. They use nitrogen and water more sparingly than C3 plants typically thriving in the cooler part of the temperate zone. When evaluating energy ratios for field crops it should be kept in mind that the maximal energy potential of the energy crop is the heating value of the dry matter at the field gate. Transportation of the crop and production of liquid fuels and electricity from biomass lowers the energy ratio. A comparison of field energy crops to a reforested field suggested that fast growing trees, as hybrid aspen and silver birch, would yield almost as

  1. Fate of Clavibacter michiganensis ssp. sepedonicus, the causal organism of bacterial ring rot in potato, in weeds and field crops.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, van der J.M.; Beckhoven, van J.R.C.M.; Hukkanen, A.; Karjalainen, R.; Muller, P.

    2005-01-01

    Crops and weeds were tested for their ability to host Clavibacter michiganensis ssp. sepedonicus (Cms), the causal agent of bacterial ring rot in potato. Ten crops grown in rotation with potato in Europe, namely maize, wheat, barley, oat, bush bean, broad bean, rape, pea and onion and five cultivars

  2. Effect of fly ash on persistence, mobility and bio-efficacy of metribuzin and metsulfuron-methyl in crop fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neera; Bala Singh, Shashi; Raunaq; Das, T K

    2013-11-01

    Field evaluation of two fly ashes (40t/ha) on persistence, mobility and bioactivity of metribuzin and metsulfuron-methyl was studied in soybean and wheat crops, respectively. Metribuzin was applied as pre-emergence at 0.5kg/ha, while metsulfuron-methyl was applied post-emergence at 8g/ha. Results suggested that metribuzin in surface (0-15cm) soil of fly ash unamended plots reached below detectable limit in 60 days, while herbicide persisted till 112 days in surface soil of fly ash amended plots. No metribuzin leached down to subsurface (15-30cm) soil in fly ash amended plots, while traces of metribuzin (0.6-1.2μg/kg) were recovered in subsurface soil of fly ash unamended plot. Metsulfuron-methyl in surface soil persisted till 15 days in control and 20 days in fly ash amended plots and no metsulfuron-methyl leached down to subsurface soil. Fly ash amendment had no adverse effect on the bioactivity of herbicides and yield of soybean and wheat. The study suggested that fly ash amendment to soil can be exploited to retain applied herbicides in surface soil. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Electron emission from conductors subjected to intense, short-pulse electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpetti, R. D.; Goerz, D. A.; Bowen, P. R.; Hodgin, R. L.; Wong, K. C.; Champney, P. D'a.

    1987-06-01

    We studied electron emission from metal electrodes subjected to electric fields ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 MV/cm for pulse durations of 3 to 10 ns. We used two high-voltage pulsers for these tests; a 500 to 700 kV, 72 ohm pulser that generated a 3 ns Gaussian pulse; and a 2 MV, 60 ohm pulser that generated a 10 ns flat-top pulse with a 1-ns risetime. The high voltage levels allowed emission studies using electrode spacings of several millimeters to several centimeters. Our studies emphasized bare and anodized aluminum surface shaving surface finishes that ranged from rolled stock to machined finishes of 2 to 400 micron-in roughness. We also investigated polished stainless steel and brass. Emphasis was on first-shot performance with subsequent pulses applied to check for possible conditioning. The background pressure was typically .00005 Torr. Our studies showed that for 10 ns pulse lengths, anodized aluminum surfaces could hold off more than twice the electric field strength of bare aluminum surfaces without appreciable electron emission. Anodized surfaces performed well at 1.0 to 1.5 MV/cm, while bare surfaces emitted at 0.5 to 0.7 MV/cm. For the shorter, 3 ns pulse lengths, anodizing was less effective at improving suppression of electron emission, while surface finish became the important factor. Electrodes with surface finishes of 40 micro-in or better roughness performed well at field strengths of up to 2.4 MV/cm. The behavior of velvet cloth as an emitter was also investigated using the 3 ns pulser. We found that velvet would emit within 3 ns at field strengths approaching 100 kV/cm.

  4. Frequency of Verticillium Species in Commercial Spinach Fields and Transmission of V. dahliae from Spinach to Subsequent Lettuce Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, D P G; Gurung, S; Koike, S T; Klosterman, S J; Subbarao, K V

    2015-01-01

    Verticillium wilt caused by V. dahliae is a devastating disease of lettuce in California (CA). The disease is currently restricted to a small geographic area in central coastal CA, even though cropping patterns in other coastal lettuce production regions in the state are similar. Infested spinach seed has been implicated in the introduction of V. dahliae into lettuce fields but direct evidence linking this inoculum to wilt epidemics in lettuce is lacking. In this study, 100 commercial spinach fields in four coastal CA counties were surveyed to evaluate the frequency of Verticillium species recovered from spinach seedlings and the area under spinach production in each county was assessed. Regardless of the county, V. isaacii was the most frequently isolated species from spinach followed by V. dahliae and, less frequently, V. klebahnii. The frequency of recovery of Verticillium species was unrelated to the occurrence of Verticillium wilt on lettuce in the four counties but was related to the area under spinach production in individual counties. The transmission of V. dahliae from infested spinach seeds to lettuce was investigated in microplots. Verticillium wilt developed on lettuce following two or three plantings of Verticillium-infested spinach, in independent experiments. The pathogen recovered from the infected lettuce from microplots was confirmed as V. dahliae by polymerase chain reaction assays. In a greenhouse study, transmission of a green fluorescence protein-tagged mutant strain of V. dahliae from spinach to lettuce roots was demonstrated, after two cycles of incorporation of infected spinach residue into the soil. This study presents conclusive evidence that V. dahliae introduced via spinach seed can cause Verticillium wilt in lettuce.

  5. Availability of nitrogen in 15N-labelled mature pea residues to subsequent crops in the field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1994-01-01

    The availability of N in N-15-labelled mature pea (Pisum sativum L.) residues to subsequent autumn-sown or spring-sown crops was studied in two experiments in field microplots. The residues were incorporated in the soil in August or September. Winter barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and winter oilseed...... incorporation of the residues. At maturity, the pea residue N constituted barley......, oilseed rape and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was 14, 3 and 2% respectively; spring-sown barley, oilseed rape and wheat recovered only 6, 2 and 2% respectively. Similarly, the amount of non-labelled soil N accumulated was almost twice as high in autumn-sown crops as compared to spring-sown crops...

  6. A decision support system (GesCoN) for managing fertigation in open field vegetable crops. Part I-methodological approach and description of the software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, Antonio; Conversa, Giulia

    2015-01-01

    Reduced water availability and environmental pollution caused by nitrogen (N) losses have increased the need for rational management of irrigation and N fertilization in horticultural systems. Decision support systems (DSS) could be powerful tools to assist farmers to improve irrigation and N fertilization efficiency. Currently, fertilization by drip irrigation system (fertigation) is used for many vegetable crops around the world. The paper illustrates the theoretical basis, the methodological approach and the structure of a DSS called GesCoN for fertigation management in open field vegetable crops. The DSS is based on daily water and N balance, considering the water lost by evapotranspiration (ET) and the N content in the aerial part of the crop (N uptake) as subtraction and the availability of water and N in the wet soil volume most effected by roots as the positive part. For the water balance, reference ET can be estimated using the Penman-Monteith (PM) or the Priestley-Taylor and Hargreaves models, specifically calibrated under local conditions. Both single or dual Kc approach can be used to calculate crop ET. Rain runoff and deep percolation are considered to calculate the effective rainfall. The soil volume most affected by the roots, the wet soil under emitters and their interactions are modeled. Crop growth is modeled by a non-linear logistic function on the basis of thermal time, but the model takes into account thermal and water stresses and allows an in-season calibration through a dynamic adaptation of the growth rate to the specific genetic and environmental conditions. N crop demand is related to DM accumulation by the N critical curve. N mineralization from soil organic matter is daily estimated. The DSS helps users to evaluate the daily amount of water and N fertilizer that has to be applied in order to fulfill the water and N-crop requirements to achieve the maximum potential yield, while reducing the risk of nitrate outflows.

  7. Nitrogen Fertilizer Rate and Crop Management Effects on Nitrate Leaching from an Agricultural Field in Central Pennsylvania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H. Fox

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen pan lysimeters were installed at a depth of 1.2 m in a Hagerstown silt loam soil in a corn field in central Pennsylvania in 1988. In 1995, wick lysimeters were also installed at 1.2 m depth in the same access pits. Treatments have included N fertilizer rates, use of manure, crop rotation (continuous corn, corn-soybean, alfalfa-corn, and tillage (chisel plow-disk, no-till. The leachate data were used to evaluate a number of nitrate leaching models. Some of the highlights of the 11 years of results include the following: 1 growing corn without organic N inputs at the economic optimum N rate (EON resulted in NO3–-N concentrations of 15 to 20 mg l-1 in leachate; 2 use of manure or previous alfalfa crop as partial source of N also resulted in 15 to 20 mg l-1 of NO3–-N in leachate below corn at EON; 3 NO3–-N concentration in leachate below alfalfa was approximately 4 mg l-1; 4 NO3–-N concentration in leachate below soybeans following corn was influenced by fertilizer N rate applied to corn; 5 the mass of NO3–-N leached below corn at the EON rate averaged 90 kg N ha-1 (approx. 40% of fertilizer N applied at EON; 6 wick lysimeters collected approximately 100% of leachate vs. 40–50% collected by pan lysimeters. Coefficients of variation of the collected leachate volumes for both lysimeter types were similar; 7 tillage did not markedly affect nitrate leaching losses; 8 tested leaching models could accurately predict leachate volumes and could be calibrated to match nitrate leaching losses in calibration years, but only one model (SOILN accurately predicted nitrate leaching losses in the majority of validation treatment years. Apparent problems with tested models: there was difficulty estimating sizes of organic N pools and their transformation rates, and the models either did not include a macropore flow component or did not handle macropore flow well.

  8. The historical regional studies, local history and urban history: the demarcation of subject fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Koval’s’ka­Pavelko

    2014-05-01

    It is proved that combines subject field of urban history, historical regional studies and local history in terms of research into the history of urban settlements. In historical research focus of urban history is urban lifestyle that allows you to analyze the city in their integrity – both sociocultural phenomena with their own phases of development, in the broad political and ideological context. It is noted that the historical urban studies urbanization, which are connected with the adoption of urban lifestyles as a phenomenon of culture and modern civilization. Urbanization represented in two dimensions – dynamic and static. Since urbanization is a process that characterize the dynamic parameters (rates of urbanization, while urbanization is characterized by static parameters (the number and proportion of urban population, the number of urban settlements, its area, etc.. This feature of the urban historical approaches to the historical regional studies.

  9. N2O emission and CH4 uptake in arable fields managed under conventional and reduced tillage cropping systems in northern Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Nobuhisa; Tsuruta, Haruo; Sawamoto, Takuji; Nishimura, Seiichi; Yagi, Kazuyuki

    2004-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emission and methane (CH4) uptake were measured in an experimental long-term tillage field (Andosol) in Hokkaido, northern Japan, to assess their contributions to net global warming, associated with arable crop production. From May 2001 to August 2002, the field was cultivated with winter wheat, adzuki bean, sugar beet, potato, and cabbage, where the total N applied was 110, 40, 150, 60, and 220 kg N ha-1 yr-1, respectively. Under conventional tillage (CT) cropping systems, basal N fertilization and plowing for residue incorporation had little effect on N2O fluxes, but vigorous N2O emission was observed when rotary harrowing was used for incorporating N-rich cabbage residues into soil in summer. Also, high N2O emissions occurred when there was heavy rainfall after a large amount of N fertilizer had been applied to sugar beet and also when there was thawing of frozen soil and snow in the winter wheat treatment. Despite the differing N2O flux patterns among the crops, the annual N2O emissions from each crop were positively correlated with the total N applied as fertilizer. Under CT systems, across all five crops, the mean N2O emission factor (the percent ratio of N2O-N emitted out of total N applied as fertilizer) was 0.36%. Under reduced tillage (RT) cropping systems, where crop residues were left on the ground over winter, large quantities of N2O were emitted from adzuki bean and sugar beet residues when the frozen soil and snow thawed. Therefore, total N2O emissions from adzuki bean and sugar beet cultivated under RT systems were much greater than under CT systems. The rates of CH4 uptake by arable soils were less sensitive to crop type, field management practices, and fertilizer application rates, but the rates were strongly influenced by long-term tillage management. For fallow, winter wheat, adzuki bean, and sugar beet treatments, the CH4 uptake rates in the CT soils (1.36 kg CH4 ha-1 yr-1), which had a 20-year history of intensive plowing

  10. Outflow Characteristics of Total Nitrogen and Total Phosphorous of an Andisol Paddy Field in the Cool-temperate Zone during a Cropping Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuto, Matsuura; Eikichi, Shima; Nagamitsu, Maie

    We investigated the water budget and outflow characteristics of total phosphorous (T-P) and total nitrogen (T-N) of an irrigated paddy field on an Andisol in the cool-temperate zone area. Total effluent flux of water from the paddy field during one cropping period was 2192 mm, 1490 mm (ca. 70%) of which flowed out through the downward percolation. The net discharge of T-P and T-N from the paddy field during one cropping period was 0.47 kg/ha and 35.9 kg/ha, respectively, most of which flowed out through downward percolation. Amounts of T-P and T-N discharged through sublayer soil to the ground water with the downward water percolation corresponded to 23% and 80% of those leached out from the plow layer soil, respectively.

  11. Nutrient uptake by agricultural crops from biochar-amended soils: results from two field experiments in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karer, Jasmin; Zehetner, Franz; Kloss, Stefanie; Wimmer, Bernhard; Soja, Gerhard

    2013-04-01

    The use of biochar as soil amendment is considered as a promising agricultural soil management technique, combining carbon sequestration and soil fertility improvements. These expectations are largely founded on positive experiences with biochar applications to impoverished or degraded tropical soils. The validity of these results for soils in temperate climates needs confirmation from field experiments with typical soils representative for intensive agricultural production areas. Frequently biochar is mixed with other organic additives like compost. As these two materials interact with each other and each one may vary considerably in its basic characteristics, it is difficult to attribute the effects of the combined additive to one of its components and to a specific physico-chemical parameter. Therefore investigations of the amendment efficacy require the study of the pure components to characterize their specific behavior in soil. This is especially important for adsorption behavior of biochar for macro- and micronutrients because in soil there are multiple nutrient sinks that compete with plant roots for vital elements. Therefore this contribution presents results from a field amendment study with pure biochar that had the objective to characterize the macro- and microelement uptake of crops from different soils in two typical Austrian areas of agricultural production. At two locations in North and South-East Austria, two identical field experiments on different soils (Chernozem and Cambisol) were installed in 2011 with varying biochar additions (0, 30 and 90 t/ha) and two nitrogen levels. The biochar was a product from slow pyrolysis of wood (SC Romchar SRL). During the installation of the experiments, the biochar fraction of <2 mm was mixed with surface soil to a depth of 15 cm in plots of 33 m2 each (n=4). Barley (at the Chernozem soil) and maize (at the Cambisol) were cultivated according to standard agricultural practices. The highest crop yields at both

  12. The influence of nitrogen fertiliser rate and crop rotation on soil methane flux in rain-fed potato fields in Wuchuan County, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liwei [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); College of Agronomy, Shenyang Agricultural University, Shenyang 110866 (China); Wuchuan Scientific Observing and Experimental Station of Agro-Environment, Ministry of Agriculture Wuchuan 011700 (China); Pan, Zhihua, E-mail: panzhihua@cau.edu.cn [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Wuchuan Scientific Observing and Experimental Station of Agro-Environment, Ministry of Agriculture Wuchuan 011700 (China); Xu, Hui [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, Cheng [College of Agricultural and Biotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Gao, Lin [School of Resources and Environmental, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Zhao, Peiyi [Institute of Resources Environmental and Detection Technology, Inner Mongolia Academy of Agricultural and Animal Husbandry Sciences, Huhhot 010031 (China); Wuchuan Scientific Observing and Experimental Station of Agro-Environment, Ministry of Agriculture Wuchuan 011700 (China); Dong, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jingting; Cui, Guohui; Wang, Sen; Han, Guolin; Zhao, Hui [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Wuchuan Scientific Observing and Experimental Station of Agro-Environment, Ministry of Agriculture Wuchuan 011700 (China)

    2015-12-15

    As one of the important greenhouse gases, the characteristics and principles of methane exchange characteristics in cultivated lands have become hot topics in current climate change research. This study examines the influences of nitrogen fertilisation, temperature and soil water content on methane exchange characteristic and methane exchange functional gene-pmoA gene abundance based on experimental observations of methane exchange fluxes using the static chamber–gas chromatographic method and measurements of methanotroph gene copy numbers in three growing periods by real-time PCR in rain-fed potato fields. The results indicate that the rain-fed potato fields were a CH{sub 4} sink with an average annual methane absorption (negative emission) of 940.8 ± 103.2 g CH{sub 4}-C/ha/year. The cumulative methane absorption first exhibited flat and subsequently increasing trend with the increase of nitrogen fertilisation from 0 ~ 135 kg N·ha{sup −1}. Methane cumulative absorption significantly increased with the increase of temperature when temperatures were below 19.6 °C. Methane oxidation capacity (methanotroph pmoA gene copy numbers) showed an increasing and subsequently decreasing trend with the increase of soil moisture. Crop rotation was observed to increase the methane absorption in rain-fed potato fields and nearly one time higher than that under continuous cropping. A mechanism concept model of the methane exchange in rain-fed potato fields was advanced in this paper. - Highlights: • Rain-fed potato fields were a CH{sub 4} sink. • Increased nitrogen fertilisation and temperature led to higher CH{sub 4} absorption. • CH{sub 4} oxidation capacity showed a parabolic trend with soil moisture increased. • Crop rotation increased CH{sub 4} absorption one time higher than continuous cropping. • A mechanism concept model of the CH{sub 4} exchange in potato fields was advanced.

  13. Conducting drops subject to electric fields in 2D Stokes flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowdy, Darren

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a variety of problems of electrohydrodynamics involving conducting uncharged drops (or bubbles) in 2D Stokes flow. The assumption of an uncharged droplet implies that there is no net force on the bubble and, hence, that a solution to this 2D problem is not disqualified by a Stokes paradox' phenomenon. We first study the dynamics of conducting, incompressible bubbles subject to electric fields and ambient straining flows and then extend the scope to include compressible bubbles containing ideal gas. The free boundary problems are first studied using full numerical simulations based on a complex variable formulation coupled with conformal mapping theory. It is found that even under the combined effects of surface tension, electric field effects, compressibility and ambient strain flows, there exist equilibria for the bubble shape which are remarkably close to elliptical. Therefore, in each case, a simple model system of (at most two) non-linear, non-local ordinary differential equations is proposed which is found to approximate the dynamics up to equilibrium to high accuracy.

  14. Numerical simulation of cropping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Hutchinson, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Cropping is a cutting process whereby opposing aligned blades create a shearing failure by exerting opposing forces normal to the surfaces of a metal sheet or plate. Building on recent efforts to quantify cropping, this paper formulates a plane strain elastic-plastic model of a plate subject to s...

  15. Inundative Field Releases and Evaluation of Three Predators for Bemisia tabasi (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) Management in Three Vegetable Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), is a global pest on numerous crops, including vegetables. Weekly inundative releases of a coccinellid predator (Coccinella undecimpunctata L.), a mirid predator [Macrophillus caliginosus (Wagner)] and a neuropteran predator [Chrysoperla carnea S...

  16. Training compensatory viewing strategies : feasiblity and effect on practical fitness to drive in subjects with visual field defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coeckelbergh, Tanja R.M.; Brouwer, Wiebo H.; Cornelissen, Frans W.; Kooijman, Aart C.

    2002-01-01

    Fifty-one subjects with visual field defects were trained to use compensatory viewing strategies.The subjects were referred to the training program by an official driving examiner of the Dutch Central Bureau of Driving Licenses. Three training programs were compared: laboratory training, mobility

  17. Estimation of Winter Wheat Biomass and Yield by Combining the AquaCrop Model and Field Hyperspectral Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuliang Jin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of spatial and temporal variations in crop growth is important for crop management and stable crop production for the food security of a country. A combination of crop growth models and remote sensing data is a useful method for monitoring crop growth status and estimating crop yield. The objective of this study was to use spectral-based biomass values generated from spectral indices to calibrate the AquaCrop model using the particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm to improve biomass and yield estimations. Spectral reflectance and concurrent biomass and yield were measured at the Xiaotangshan experimental site in Beijing, China, during four winter wheat-growing seasons. The results showed that all of the measured spectral indices were correlated with biomass to varying degrees. The normalized difference matter index (NDMI was the best spectral index for estimating biomass, with the coefficient of determination (R2, root mean square error (RMSE, and relative RMSE (RRMSE values of 0.77, 1.80 ton/ha, and 25.75%, respectively. The data assimilation method (R2 = 0.83, RMSE = 1.65 ton/ha, and RRMSE = 23.60% achieved the most accurate biomass estimations compared with the spectral index method. The estimated yield was in good agreement with the measured yield (R2 = 0.82, RMSE = 0.55 ton/ha, and RRMSE = 8.77%. This study offers a new method for agricultural resource management through consistent assessments of winter wheat biomass and yield based on the AquaCrop model and remote sensing data.

  18. Specialists of social work as key subjects in the field of social work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Oresheta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the presented article an author is analyze social work as type of professional activity and is carried out the sociological analysis of specialists of social work as key subjects in the field of social work. As social work is important direction of activity in any state, it methodological bases, key tasks and main principles though are something alike, however differ depending on legal, organizational, financial possibilities of the state and necessities of clients. Specialists of social work provide realization of social work on national, regional and local levels on enterprises, in establishments, organizations of different pattern of ownership. Professional activity of specialists of social work in Ukraine must correspond the basic requirements and tasks, to certain in Order of Ministry of social policy of Ukraine from 25.05.2012 year «About assertion of new release of qualifying description of profession «Specialist on social work»». In the article is also analyses the short history and features of social work as the type of professional activity in Ukraine, professional requirements to the specialists of social work, their task, role and function are specified. It is set that a necessary condition for a capture this profession is social orientation of personality, presence of the proper social qualities, such as: humanism, goodwill, justice, to responsibility and others. One of entrance terms of efficiency of social work is the presence of skilled shots of the proper level. A considerable value for successful professionalism has an orientation of specialist of social work which plugs the system of values and motivation of him to activity. For a social worker as the professional an important place is occupied by the awareness of itself by the subject of professional activity, that is professional identity.

  19. Evaluating the relationship between biomass, percent groundcover and remote sensing indices across six winter cover crop fields in Maryland, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakara, Kusuma; Hively, W. Dean; McCarty, Greg W.

    2015-01-01

    Winter cover crops are an essential part of managing nutrient and sediment losses from agricultural lands. Cover crops lessen sedimentation by reducing erosion, and the accumulation of nitrogen in aboveground biomass results in reduced nutrient runoff. Winter cover crops are planted in the fall and are usually terminated in early spring, making them susceptible to senescence, frost burn, and leaf yellowing due to wintertime conditions. This study sought to determine to what extent remote sensing indices are capable of accurately estimating the percent groundcover and biomass of winter cover crops, and to analyze under what critical ranges these relationships are strong and under which conditions they break down. Cover crop growth on six fields planted to barley, rye, ryegrass, triticale or wheat was measured over the 2012–2013 winter growing season. Data collection included spectral reflectance measurements, aboveground biomass, and percent groundcover. Ten vegetation indices were evaluated using surface reflectance data from a 16-band CROPSCAN sensor. Restricting analysis to sampling dates before the onset of prolonged freezing temperatures and leaf yellowing resulted in increased estimation accuracy. There was a strong relationship between the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and percent groundcover (r2 = 0.93) suggesting that date restrictions effectively eliminate yellowing vegetation from analysis. The triangular vegetation index (TVI) was most accurate in estimating high ranges of biomass (r2 = 0.86), while NDVI did not experience a clustering of values in the low and medium biomass ranges but saturated in the higher range (>1500 kg/ha). The results of this study show that accounting for index saturation, senescence, and frost burn on leaves can greatly increase the accuracy of estimates of percent groundcover and biomass for winter cover crops.

  20. Evaluating the relationship between biomass, percent groundcover and remote sensing indices across six winter cover crop fields in Maryland, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakara, Kusuma; Hively, W. Dean; McCarty, Gregory W.

    2015-07-01

    Winter cover crops are an essential part of managing nutrient and sediment losses from agricultural lands. Cover crops lessen sedimentation by reducing erosion, and the accumulation of nitrogen in aboveground biomass results in reduced nutrient runoff. Winter cover crops are planted in the fall and are usually terminated in early spring, making them susceptible to senescence, frost burn, and leaf yellowing due to wintertime conditions. This study sought to determine to what extent remote sensing indices are capable of accurately estimating the percent groundcover and biomass of winter cover crops, and to analyze under what critical ranges these relationships are strong and under which conditions they break down. Cover crop growth on six fields planted to barley, rye, ryegrass, triticale or wheat was measured over the 2012-2013 winter growing season. Data collection included spectral reflectance measurements, aboveground biomass, and percent groundcover. Ten vegetation indices were evaluated using surface reflectance data from a 16-band CROPSCAN sensor. Restricting analysis to sampling dates before the onset of prolonged freezing temperatures and leaf yellowing resulted in increased estimation accuracy. There was a strong relationship between the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and percent groundcover (r2 = 0.93) suggesting that date restrictions effectively eliminate yellowing vegetation from analysis. The triangular vegetation index (TVI) was most accurate in estimating high ranges of biomass (r2 = 0.86), while NDVI did not experience a clustering of values in the low and medium biomass ranges but saturated in the higher range (>1500 kg/ha). The results of this study show that accounting for index saturation, senescence, and frost burn on leaves can greatly increase the accuracy of estimates of percent groundcover and biomass for winter cover crops.

  1. Limited fitness advantages of crop-weed hybrid progeny containing insect-resistant transgenes (Bt/CpTI in transgenic rice field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The spread of insect-resistance transgenes from genetically engineered (GE rice to its coexisting weedy rice (O. sativa f. spontanea populations via gene flow creates a major concern for commercial GE rice cultivation. Transgene flow to weedy rice seems unavoidable. Therefore, characterization of potential fitness effect brought by the transgenes is essential to assess environmental consequences caused by crop-weed transgene flow. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Field performance of fitness-related traits was assessed in advanced hybrid progeny of F(4 generation derived from a cross between an insect-resistant transgenic (Bt/CpTI rice line and a weedy strain. The performance of transgene-positive hybrid progeny was compared with the transgene-negative progeny and weedy parent in pure and mixed planting of transgenic and nontransgenic plants under environmental conditions with natural vs. low insect pressure. Results showed that under natural insect pressure the insect-resistant transgenes could effectively suppress target insects and bring significantly increased fitness to transgenic plants in pure planting, compared with nontransgenic plants (including weedy parent. In contrast, no significant differences in fitness were detected under low insect pressure. However, such increase in fitness was not detected in the mixed planting of transgenic and nontransgenic plants due to significantly reduced insect pressure. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Insect-resistance transgenes may have limited fitness advantages to hybrid progeny resulted from crop-weed transgene flow owning to the significantly reduced ambient target insect pressure when an insect-resistant GE crop is grown. Given that the extensive cultivation of an insect-resistant GE crop will ultimately reduce the target insect pressure, the rapid spread of insect-resistance transgenes in weedy populations in commercial GE crop fields may be not likely to happen.

  2. Recent German Educational Trends in the Information and Documentation Field: Integrating Subject Fields into Information Science Programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Thomas

    1987-01-01

    Describes curriculum development in West German information science programs that integrates subject specialty knowledge with information science and technology. An overview of the West German educational system is given and a program with subject specialties in chemistry and electrical engineering at the Fachhochschule Darmstadt is explained.…

  3. Pipelines subject to slow landslide movements: Structural modeling vs field measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruschi, R.; Glavina, S.; Spinazze, M.; Tomassini, D. [Snamprogetti S.p.A., Fano (Italy); Bonanni, S.; Cuscuna, S. [Snam S.p.A., Milan (Italy)

    1996-12-01

    In recent years finite element techniques have been increasingly used to investigate the behavior of buried pipelines subject to soil movements. The use of these tools provides a rational basis for the definition of minimum wall thickness requirements in landslide crossings. Furthermore the design of mitigation measures or monitoring systems which control the development of undesirable strains in the pipe wall over time, requires a detailed structural modeling. The scope of this paper is to discuss the use of dedicated structural modeling with relevant calibration to field measurements. The strain measurements used were regularly gathered from pipe sections, in two different sites over a period of time long enough to record changes of axial strain due to soil movement. Detailed structural modeling of pipeline layout in both sites and for operating conditions, is applied. Numerical simulations show the influence of the distribution of soil movement acting on the pipeline with regards to the state of strain which can be developed in certain locations. The role of soil nature and direction of relative movements in the definition of loads transferred to the pipeline, is also discussed.

  4. Analysis and categorization of information sources in the subject field of cynology

    OpenAIRE

    Bušková, Markéta

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this bachelor thesis, titled "Analysis and Categorization of Information Sources for the Field of Dog-breeding", is to map and analyze information sources relating to the field of dog-breeding, introduce dog-breeding as a field, compile an overview of current information sources for this field and focus on particularly defined groups of information sources.

  5. In-field masticatory muscle activity in subjects with pain-related TMD diagnoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, S.N.; McCall, W.; Dunford, R.; Nickel, J.C.; Iwasaki, L.R.; Crow, H.C.; Gonzalez, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Pain-related Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are the most prevalent conditions among TMDs. There is contrasting evidence available for association of pain-related TMD and masticatory muscle activity (MMA). The present investigation assesses the associations between MMA levels of masseter and temporalis muscles during awake and sleep among pain-related TMD diagnostic groups. Setting and Sample Population The department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, University at Buffalo. Twenty females and 6 males participated in this study. Material & Methods Using the Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC-TMD), participants were diagnostically categorized. Subjects used a custom monitoring system, which recorded in–field muscle activities. A factorial model tested for association between independent variable (muscle, time period, MMA level, diagnostic group) effects and the logarithm of MMA. Greenhouse–Geisser test was used to determine any statistically significant associations (p ≤ 0.003). Results No statistically significant association was found among four-way, three-way, and two-way analyses. However, among the main effects, range of magnitudes was the only variable to be statistically significant. Although the data suggest a trend of increased masseter MMA in the pain-related TMD diagnoses group both during awake and sleep time periods, such observation is not maintained for the temporalis muscle. In addition, temporalis MMA was found to be higher in the pain-related TMD diagnoses group only at extreme activity levels (<25% and ≥80% ranges). Conclusion This data support the association between masticatory muscle hyperactivity and painful-TMD conditions. PMID:25865542

  6. [Characterization of the leadership subject areas in the respiratory field in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Granda-Orive, J I; García-Río, F; Roig-Vázquez, F; Aleixandre-Benavent, R; Valderrama-Zurían, J C; Martínez-Albiach, J M; Callol-Sánchez, L

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the leading topics in respiratory system in Spain through a bibliometric analysis. For identify and characterize the performance of the different research topics in respiratory system in Spain, we compile the production using a journal that turn out representative of a broad group of researcher. In this sense the journal Archivos de Bronconeumología is the most important publication in Spanish language of this field. A total of 2198 articles published in Archivos Bronconeumología from 1970 to 2000 were analyzed. In each three decades, we did not found differences except in the productivity index in oncology in the eighty decade and in respiratory failure and sleep disturbance (RFSD) and oncology areas in the ninetieth decade and in the Price index (consumption indicators) in the diagnostic and therapeutic techniques area in seventy decade. When we compare the productivity index of each subject areas between decades, we found a significant production increase in the ninetieth decade in asthma, RFSD, tuberculosis, non tuberculosis infection, circulation, oncology, pleural disease and interstitial areas versus the same in seventy decade, and also, we found significant differences between ninetieth and eighty decades in the asthma, RFSD, non tuberculosis infection, circulation and pleural disease areas. Tuberculosis area maintains an insularity index higher than the other areas. We also found a progressive increase in the insularity index of RFSD, non tuberculosis infection, oncology and interstitial disease areas. In general all the indicators maintains stable although the more productivity topics were respiratory failure and sleep disturbances, and oncology. The productivity has increased in asthma, respiratory failure and sleep disturbances, tuberculosis, non - tuberculosis respiratory infections, oncology, pulmonary circulation, pleura and interstitial disease.

  7. Nitrogen turnover, crop use efficiency and soil fertility in a long-term field experiment amended with different qualities of urban and agricultural waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez Muñoz, Beatriz; Magid, Jakob; Jensen, Lars Stoumann

    2017-01-01

    Organic wastes contain significant amounts of organic matter and nutrients and their recycling into agriculture can potentially contribute to closing the natural ecological cycle. The aim of this study was to evaluate the improvement in overall soil fertility and soil nitrogen (N) supply capacity...... availability, crop uptake and NUE the most, while the most C-rich and high C:N organic wastes (cattle deep litter and household waste compost) had a negative effect on crop NUE over time....... in a long-term field experiment with repeated application of different urban and agricultural organic waste amendments. Soils from the CRUCIAL field experiment in Denmark, in which diverse types of urban (human urine, sewage sludge, composted household waste) and agricultural wastes (cattle slurry, farmyard...... manure and deep litter) have been applied annually for 11 years (at normal and accelerated rates), were used to estimate the effects of the different qualities of organic wastes on soil fertility, N turnover and crop N availability. Soil physical fertility parameters, such as water retention and total...

  8. The Diaporthe sojae species complex: phylogenetic re-assessment of pathogens associated with soybean, cucurbits and other field crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytopathogenic species of Diaporthe are associated with the serious diseases including seed decay, pod and stem blight and stem canker of soybean leading to considerable loss of crop production worldwide. Accurate identification of the species that cause these diseases has been difficult due to the...

  9. Field-based estimates of global warming potential in bioenergy systems of Hawaii: Crop choice and deficit irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Replacing fossil fuel with biofuel is environmentally viable only if the net greenhouse gas (GHG) footprint of the system is reduced. The effects of replacing annual arable crops with perennial bioenergy feedstocks on net GHG production and soil carbon (C) stock are critical to the system-level bal...

  10. Method for optimizing harvesting of crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    In order e.g. to optimize harvesting crops of the kind which may be self dried on a field prior to a harvesting step (116, 118), there is disclosed a method of providing a mobile unit (102) for working (114, 116, 118) the field with crops, equipping the mobile unit (102) with crop biomass measuring...... means (108) and with crop moisture content measurement means (106), measuring crop biomass (107a, 107b) and crop moisture content (109a, 109b) of the crop, providing a spatial crop biomass and crop moisture content characteristics map of the field based on the biomass data (107a, 107b) provided from...... moving the mobile unit on the field and the moisture content (109a, 109b), and determining an optimised drying time (104a, 104b) prior to the following harvesting step (116, 118) in response to the spatial crop biomass and crop moisture content characteristics map and in response to a weather forecast...

  11. Influences of Biodynamic and Conventional Farming Systems on Quality of Potato (Solanum Tuberosum L. Crops: Results from Multivariate Analyses of Two Long-Term Field Trials in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Kjellenberg

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to present results from two long term field experiments comparing potato samples from conventional farming systems with samples from biodynamic farming systems. The principal component analyses (PCA, consistently exhibited differences between potato samples from the two farming systems. According to the PCA, potato samples treated with inorganic fertilizers exhibited a variation positively related to amounts of crude protein, yield, cooking or tissue discoloration and extract decomposition. Potato samples treated according to biodynamic principles, with composted cow manure, were more positively related to traits such as Quality- and EAA-indices, dry matter content, taste quality, relative proportion of pure protein and biocrystallization value. Distinctions between years, crop rotation and cultivars used were sometimes more significant than differences between manuring systems. Grown after barley the potato crop exhibited better quality traits compared to when grown after ley in both the conventional and the biodynamic farming system.

  12. Can current crop models be used in the phenotyping era for predicting the genetic variability of yield of plants subjected to drought or high temperature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Boris; Tardieu, François

    2014-11-01

    A crop model with genetic inputs can potentially simulate yield for a large range of genotypes, sites, and years, thereby indicating where and when a given combination of alleles confers a positive effect. We discuss to what extent current crop models, developed for predicting the effects of climate or cultivation techniques on a reference genotype, are adequate for ranking yields of a large number of genotypes in climatic scenarios with water deficit or high temperatures. We compare here the algorithms involved in 19 crop models. Marked differences exist in the representation of the combined effects of temperature and water deficit on plant development, and in the coordination of these effects with biomass production. The current literature suggests that these differences have a small impact on the yield prediction of a reference genotype because errors on the effects of different traits compensate each other. We propose that they have a larger impact if the crop model is used in a genetic context, because the model has to account for the genetic variability of studied traits. Models with explicit genetic inputs will be increasingly feasible because model parameters corresponding to each genotype can now be measured in phenotyping platforms for large plant collections. This will in turn allow prediction of parameter values from the allelic composition of genotypes. It is therefore timely to adapt crop models to this new context to simulate the allelic effects in present or future climatic scenarios with water or heat stresses. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Climate Change Effects on Agricultural Production of Iran: II. Predicting Productivity of Field Crops and Adaptation Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Koocheki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Recent evidences confirm that during the next few decades, many agroclimatic indices of Iran would be affected by global climate change. Koocheki et al. using two General Circulation Models showed that the mean annual temperature of the country will increase between 3.5-4.5°C while mean precipitation will reduce by 7-15% to 2050. It is well established that crop growth and development would drastically affect by the future global warming and its consequences because yield determining processes such as photosynthesis and crop phenology are directly related to temperature. On the other hands, the combined effects of CO2 enrichment and temperature rise on crop growth are complicated and should be studied using crop simulation models. Furthermore, adapting to climatic variability will have a substantially greater effect in reducing impacts than willing mitigation. However, such impacts on crop productivity at national scale and adaptive measures for future conditions are rarely studied in Iran. In this research crop development and yield of wheat, corn, chickpea and sugar beet were simulated for the target year of 2050 and the results are compared with the current yield as the baseline. Materials and Methods Future climatic variables were predicted using A1f (business as usual scenario by GFDL general circulation model and the results were used as weather inputs in the SUCROS model which was previously validated against measured data of the four crops. To account for the effect of CO2 enrichment on crop growth the photosynthesis routine of the model was adopted for increased CO2 concentration using a scaling factor. Changes in developmental stages of each crop were estimated for the future conditions and the relation between duration of these stages and yield was determined. Predicted crop yields for the year 2050 were compared with the current potential yields considering some adaptation strategies. Results and Discussion Results

  14. Applied crop protection 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lise Nistrup; Nielsen, Bent Jørgen; Jensen, Peter Kryger

    This publication contains results from crop protection trials which were carried out at the Department of Agroecology within the area of agricultural crops. Most of the results come from field trials, but results from greenhouse and semi-field trials are also included. The report contains results...... that throw light upon: • Effects of new pesticides • Results of different control strategies, including how to control specific pests, as part of an integrated control strategy involving both cultivars and control thresholds • Results with pesticide resistance • Trial results from different cropping systems...

  15. CROP SPECIES RECOGNITION AND DISCRIMINATION PADDY-RICE-GROWINGFIELDS FROM REAPED-FIELDS BY THE RADAR VEGETATION INDEX (RVI OF ALOS-2/PALSAR2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yamada

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Japanese ALOS-2 satellite was launched on May 24th, 2014. It has the L-band SAR, PALSAR-2. Kim,Y. and van Zyl, J.J. proposed a kind of Radar Vegetation Index (RVI as RVI = 8 * σ0hv / (σ0hh + σ0vv + 2* σ0hv by L-band full-polarimetric radar data. Kim, Y. and Jackson, T.J., et al. applied the equation into rice and soybean by multi-frequency polarimetric scatterometer above 4.16 meters from the ground. Their report showed the L-band was the most promising wave length for estimating LAI and NDVI from RVI. The author tried to apply the analysis to the actual paddy field areas, both Inashiki region and Miyagi region in the eastern main island, “Honshu”, areas of Japan by ALOS-2/PALSAR-2 full-polarimetry data in the summer season, the main crop growing time, of 2015. Judging from conventional methods, it will be possible to discriminate paddy rice growing fields from reaped fields or the other crops growing fields by the PALSAR-2 data. But the RVI value is vaguely related to such land use or biomass at the present preliminary experiment. The continuous research by the additional PALSAR-2 full-polarimetry data should be desired.

  16. Crop Species Recognition and Discrimination Paddy-Rice from Reaped-Fields by the Radar Vegetation Index (rvi) of ALOS-2/PALSAR2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Y.

    2016-06-01

    The Japanese ALOS-2 satellite was launched on May 24th, 2014. It has the L-band SAR, PALSAR-2. Kim,Y. and van Zyl, J.J. proposed a kind of Radar Vegetation Index (RVI) as RVI = 8 * σ0hv / (σ0hh + σ0vv + 2* σ0hv) by L-band full-polarimetric radar data. Kim, Y. and Jackson, T.J., et al. applied the equation into rice and soybean by multi-frequency polarimetric scatterometer above 4.16 meters from the ground. Their report showed the L-band was the most promising wave length for estimating LAI and NDVI from RVI. The author tried to apply the analysis to the actual paddy field areas, both Inashiki region and Miyagi region in the eastern main island, "Honshu", areas of Japan by ALOS-2/PALSAR-2 full-polarimetry data in the summer season, the main crop growing time, of 2015. Judging from conventional methods, it will be possible to discriminate paddy rice growing fields from reaped fields or the other crops growing fields by the PALSAR-2 data. But the RVI value is vaguely related to such land use or biomass at the present preliminary experiment. The continuous research by the additional PALSAR-2 full-polarimetry data should be desired.

  17. The influence of nitrogen fertiliser rate and crop rotation on soil methane flux in rain-fed potato fields in Wuchuan County, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liwei; Pan, Zhihua; Xu, Hui; Wang, Cheng; Gao, Lin; Zhao, Peiyi; Dong, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jingting; Cui, Guohui; Wang, Sen; Han, Guolin; Zhao, Hui

    2015-12-15

    As one of the important greenhouse gases, the characteristics and principles of methane exchange characteristics in cultivated lands have become hot topics in current climate change research. This study examines the influences of nitrogen fertilisation, temperature and soil water content on methane exchange characteristic and methane exchange functional gene-pmoA gene abundance based on experimental observations of methane exchange fluxes using the static chamber-gas chromatographic method and measurements of methanotroph gene copy numbers in three growing periods by real-time PCR in rain-fed potato fields. The results indicate that the rain-fed potato fields were a CH4 sink with an average annual methane absorption (negative emission) of 940.8±103.2 g CH4-C/ha/year. The cumulative methane absorption first exhibited flat and subsequently increasing trend with the increase of nitrogen fertilisation from 0~135 kg N·ha(-1). Methane cumulative absorption significantly increased with the increase of temperature when temperatures were below 19.6 °C. Methane oxidation capacity (methanotroph pmoA gene copy numbers) showed an increasing and subsequently decreasing trend with the increase of soil moisture. Crop rotation was observed to increase the methane absorption in rain-fed potato fields and nearly one time higher than that under continuous cropping. A mechanism concept model of the methane exchange in rain-fed potato fields was advanced in this paper. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparing journals from different fields of Science and Social Science through a JCR Subject Categories Normalized Impact Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Dorta-Gonzalez, Pablo; Dorta-Gonzalez, Maria Isabel

    2013-01-01

    The journal Impact Factor (IF) is not comparable among fields of Science and Social Science because of systematic differences in publication and citation behaviour across disciplines. In this work, a decomposing of the field aggregate impact factor into five normally distributed variables is presented. Considering these factors, a Principal Component Analysis is employed to find the sources of the variance in the JCR subject categories of Science and Social Science. Although publication and c...

  19. Water liquid-vapor interface subjected to various electric fields: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikzad, Mohammadreza; Azimian, Ahmad Reza; Rezaei, Majid; Nikzad, Safoora

    2017-11-01

    Investigation of the effects of E-fields on the liquid-vapor interface is essential for the study of floating water bridge and wetting phenomena. The present study employs the molecular dynamics method to investigate the effects of parallel and perpendicular E-fields on the water liquid-vapor interface. For this purpose, density distribution, number of hydrogen bonds, molecular orientation, and surface tension are examined to gain a better understanding of the interface structure. Results indicate enhancements in parallel E-field decrease the interface width and number of hydrogen bonds, while the opposite holds true in the case of perpendicular E-fields. Moreover, perpendicular fields disturb the water structure at the interface. Given that water molecules tend to be parallel to the interface plane, it is observed that perpendicular E-fields fail to realign water molecules in the field direction while the parallel ones easily do so. It is also shown that surface tension rises with increasing strength of parallel E-fields, while it reduces in the case of perpendicular E-fields. Enhancement of surface tension in the parallel field direction demonstrates how the floating water bridge forms between the beakers. Finally, it is found that application of external E-fields to the liquid-vapor interface does not lead to uniform changes in surface tension and that the liquid-vapor interfacial tension term in Young's equation should be calculated near the triple-line of the droplet. This is attributed to the multi-directional nature of the droplet surface, indicating that no constant value can be assigned to a droplet's surface tension in the presence of large electric fields.

  20. Waterbird communities in rice fields subjected to different post-harvest treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, J.H.; Colwell, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    In California's Sacramento Valley, the potential value of rice fields as habitat for waterbirds may vary with harvest method, post-harvest treatment of rice straw (chopped, burned, plowed), and extent of flooding. Recent changes in rice harvesting methods (i.e., use of stripper-headers) and a legislative mandate to decrease burning of rice straw after harvest may alter habitat availability and use. Thus, we investigated species richness and community composition of nonbreeding waterbirds during October-March 1993-94 and 1994-95 in rice fields of the northern Sacramento Valley. Most (85-91% of land area) rice was conventionally harvested (i.e., cutter bar), and the remainder was stripped. Rice straw was left untreated in more than half of fields (52% in 1994 and 54% in 1995), especially in stripped fields (56-70%). In fields where farmers treated straw, the most common management methods were plowing (15-21%), burning (19-24%), and chopping (3-5%). Fields became increasingly wet from October through March as seasonal precipitation accumulated and farmers flooded fields to facilitate straw decomposition and provide habitat for ducks. Species richness of waterbirds was greater (P 0.23). Species richness in stripped fields probably was low because foraging opportunities were limited by tall dense straw, decreased grain density, and infrequent flooding. We recommend that land managers wishing to provide habitat for a diverse waterbird community harvest rice using conventional methods and flood fields shallowly.

  1. Nurse crop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne D. Shepperd; John R. Jones

    1985-01-01

    In forestry, a nurse crop generally is a crop of trees or shrubs that fosters the development of another tree species, usually by protecting the second species, during its youth, from frost, insolation, or wind (Ford-Robertson 1971). Aspen may be a nurse crop for shade-tolerant tree species that do not become established in full sunlight (e.g., Engelmann spruce)....

  2. Considerations of education in the field of biophotonics in engineering: the experience of the subject fundamentals of biophotonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    Education in the field of photonics is usually somehow complex due to the fact that most of the programs include just a few subjects on the field, apart from specific Master programs in Photonics. There are also specific doctorate programs dealing with photonics. Apart from the problems shared with photonics in education in general, biophotonics specifically needs an interdisciplinary approach between biomedical and technical or scientific fields. In this work, we present our education experience in teaching the subject Fundamentals of Biophotonics, intended preferentially to engineering Bachelor and Master degrees students, but also to science and medicine students. First it was necessary to join a teaching group coming from the scientific technical and medical fields, working together in the subject. This task was easier as our research group, the Applied Optical Techniques group, had previous contacts and experience in working with medicine professors and medical doctors at hospitals. The orientation of the subject, intended for both technical and medical students, has to be carefully selected. All this information could be employed by other education institutions willing to implement studies on biomedical optics.

  3. Emissions of CH4 and N2O under different tillage systems from double-cropped paddy fields in Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Lin; Bai, Xiao-Lin; Xue, Jian-Fu; Chen, Zhong-Du; Tang, Hai-Ming; Chen, Fu

    2013-01-01

    Understanding greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions is becoming increasingly important with the climate change. Most previous studies have focused on the assessment of soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential and GHG emissions from agriculture. However, specific experiments assessing tillage impacts on GHG emission from double-cropped paddy fields in Southern China are relatively scarce. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the effects of tillage systems on methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emission in a double rice (Oryza sativa L.) cropping system. The experiment was established in 2005 in Hunan Province, China. Three tillage treatments were laid out in a randomized complete block design: conventional tillage (CT), rotary tillage (RT) and no-till (NT). Fluxes of CH4 from different tillage treatments followed a similar trend during the two years, with a single peak emission for the early rice season and a double peak emission for the late rice season. Compared with other treatments, NT significantly reduced CH4 emission among the rice growing seasons (Pagriculture in double rice cropped regions.

  4. The Concept of Conversion Factors and Reference Crops for the Prediction of 137Cs Root Uptake: Field Verification in Post-Chernobyl Landscape, 30 Years after Nuclear Accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komissarova, Olga; Paramonova, Tatiana

    2017-04-01

    One of the notable lessons obtained from nuclear accidents could be revealing the general features of 137Cs root uptake by agricultural crops for prediction the radionuclide accumulation in plants and its further distribution via food chains. Transfer factors (TFs) (the ratio of 137Cs activities in vegetation and in soil) have become a basis for such assessment when the characteristics of radioactive contamination, soil properties and phylogenetic features of different plant taxons important for root uptake are known. For the sake of simplicity the concept of conversion factor (CF) was accepted by IAEA (2006) to obtain unknown value of TF from the TF value of the reference crop cultivated on the same soil. Cereals were selected like reference group of agricultural crops. Presuming TF for cereals equal 1, CFs for tubers and fodder leguminous are 4, for grasses - 4.5, for leafy vegetables - 9, ets. To verify TFs and corresponding CFs values under environmental conditions of post-Chernobyl agricultural landscape the study in the area of Plavsky radioactive hotspot (Tula region, Russia) was conducted. Nowadays, after 30 years after the Chernobyl accident ( the first half-life period of 137Cs), arable chernozems of the territory are still polluted at the level 126-282 kBq/m2. The main crops of field rotation: wheat and barley (cereals), potatoes (tubers), soybean (leguminous), amaranth (non-leafy vegetables), rape ("other crops"), as well as galega-bromegrass mixture (cultivated species of grasses) and pasture grasses of semi-natural dry and wet meadows have been studied. Accumulation parameters of 137Cs in aboveground biomass, belowground biomass and edible parts of the plants were examined separately. Experimentally obtained 137Cs TFs in cereals are 0.24-0.32 for total biomass, 0.07-0.14 for aerial parts, 0.54-0.64 for roots and 0.01-0.02 for grain. Thus, (i) 137Cs transfer in grain of wheat and barley is insignificant and (ii) corresponding TFs values in both crops

  5. High-density livestock operations, crop field application of manure, and risk of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection, Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Joan A.; Curriero, Frank C.; Cosgrove, Sara E.; Nachman, Keeve E.; Schwartz, Brian S.

    2015-01-01

    Context Nearly 80% of antibiotics in the United States are sold for use in livestock feeds. The manure produced by these livestock contains antibiotic-resistant bacteria, resistance genes, and antibiotics, and is subsequently applied to crop fields where it may put community members at risk for antibiotic-resistant infections. Objective To assess the association between individual exposure to swine and dairy/veal industrial agriculture and risk of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. Design, Setting, and Participants A population-based, nested case-control study of Geisinger primary care patients in Pennsylvania from 2005–2010. Incident MRSA cases were identified using electronic health records, classified as community-associated or healthcare-associated, and frequency-matched to randomly selected controls and patients with skin and soft tissue infection. Nutrient management plans were used to create two exposure variables: seasonal crop field manure application and number of livestock at the operation. In a sub-study we collected 200 isolates from patients stratified by location of diagnosis and proximity to livestock operations. Main outcome measures Community-associated MRSA, healthcare associated-MRSA, and skin and soft tissue infection status (with no history of MRSA) compared to controls. Results From 446,480 patients, 1539 community-associated MRSA, 1335 healthcare-associated MRSA, 2895 skin and soft tissue infection cases, and 2914 controls were included. After adjustment for MRSA risk factors, the highest quartile of swine crop field exposure was significantly associated with community-associated MRSA, healthcare-associated MRSA, and skin and soft tissue infection case status (adjusted odds ratio, 1.38 [95% CI, 1.13–1.69], 1.30 [95% CI, 1.05–1.61], and 1.37 [95% CI, 1.18–1.60], respectively); and there was a trend of increasing odds across quartiles for each outcome (all P for trend ≤0.01). There were similar but weaker

  6. High-density livestock operations, crop field application of manure, and risk of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Joan A; Curriero, Frank C; Cosgrove, Sara E; Nachman, Keeve E; Schwartz, Brian S

    2013-11-25

    Nearly 80% of antibiotics in the United States are sold for use in livestock feeds. The manure produced by these animals contains antibiotic-resistant bacteria, resistance genes, and antibiotics and is subsequently applied to crop fields, where it may put community members at risk for antibiotic-resistant infections. To assess the association between individual exposure to swine and dairy/veal industrial agriculture and risk of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. A population-based, nested case-control study of primary care patients from a single health care system in Pennsylvania from 2005 to 2010. Incident MRSA cases were identified using electronic health records, classified as community-associated MRSA or health care-associated MRSA, and frequency matched to randomly selected controls and patients with skin and soft-tissue infection. Nutrient management plans were used to create 2 exposure variables: seasonal crop field manure application and number of livestock animals at the operation. In a substudy, we collected 200 isolates from patients stratified by location of diagnosis and proximity to livestock operations. Community-associated MRSA, health care-associated MRSA, and skin and soft-tissue infection status (with no history of MRSA) compared with controls. From a total population of 446,480 patients, 1539 community-associated MRSA, 1335 health care-associated MRSA, 2895 skin and soft-tissue infection cases, and 2914 controls were included. After adjustment for MRSA risk factors, the highest quartile of swine crop field exposure was significantly associated with community-associated MRSA, health care-associated MRSA, and skin and soft-tissue infection case status (adjusted odds ratios, 1.38 [95% CI, 1.13-1.69], 1.30 [95% CI, 1.05-1.61], and 1.37 [95% CI, 1.18-1.60], respectively); and there was a trend of increasing odds across quartiles for each outcome (P ≤ .01 for trend in all comparisons). There were similar but weaker

  7. Synchronization of neuron population subject to steady DC electric field induced by magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kai; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile

    2013-06-01

    Electric fields, which are ubiquitous in the context of neurons, are induced either by external electromagnetic fields or by endogenous electric activities. Clinical evidences point out that magnetic stimulation can induce an electric field that modulates rhythmic activity of special brain tissue, which are associated with most brain functions, including normal and pathological physiological mechanisms. Recently, the studies about the relationship between clinical treatment for psychiatric disorders and magnetic stimulation have been investigated extensively. However, further development of these techniques is limited due to the lack of understanding of the underlying mechanisms supporting the interaction between the electric field induced by magnetic stimulus and brain tissue. In this paper, the effects of steady DC electric field induced by magnetic stimulation on the coherence of an interneuronal network are investigated. Different behaviors have been observed in the network with different topologies (i.e., random and small-world network, modular network). It is found that the coherence displays a peak or a plateau when the induced electric field varies between the parameter range we defined. The coherence of the neuronal systems depends extensively on the network structure and parameters. All these parameters play a key role in determining the range for the induced electric field to synchronize network activities. The presented results could have important implications for the scientific theoretical studies regarding the effects of magnetic stimulation on human brain.

  8. Field-Based Estimates of Global Warming Potential in Bioenergy Systems of Hawaii: Crop Choice and Deficit Irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, Meghan N; Crow, Susan E; Meki, Manyowa N; Kiniry, James R; Taylor, Andrew D; Ogoshi, Richard; Youkhana, Adel; Nakahata, Mae

    2017-01-01

    Replacing fossil fuel with biofuel is environmentally viable from a climate change perspective only if the net greenhouse gas (GHG) footprint of the system is reduced. The effects of replacing annual arable crops with perennial bioenergy feedstocks on net GHG production and soil carbon (C) stock are critical to the system-level balance. Here, we compared GHG flux, crop yield, root biomass, and soil C stock under two potential tropical, perennial grass biofuel feedstocks: conventional sugarcane and ratoon-harvested, zero-tillage napiergrass. Evaluations were conducted at two irrigation levels, 100% of plantation application and at a 50% deficit. Peaks and troughs of GHG emission followed agronomic events such as ratoon harvest of napiergrass and fertilization. Yet, net GHG flux was dominated by carbon dioxide (CO2), as methane was oxidized and nitrous oxide (N2O) emission was very low even following fertilization. High N2O fluxes that frequently negate other greenhouse gas benefits that come from replacing fossil fuels with agronomic forms of bioenergy were mitigated by efficient water and fertilizer management, including direct injection of fertilizer into buried irrigation lines. From soil intensively cultivated for a century in sugarcane, soil C stock and root biomass increased rapidly following cultivation in grasses selected for robust root systems and drought tolerance. The net soil C increase over the two-year crop cycle was three-fold greater than the annualized soil surface CO2 flux. Deficit irrigation reduced yield, but increased soil C accumulation as proportionately more photosynthetic resources were allocated belowground. In the first two years of cultivation napiergrass did not increase net greenhouse warming potential (GWP) compared to sugarcane, and has the advantage of multiple ratoon harvests per year and less negative effects of deficit irrigation to yield.

  9. Field-Based Estimates of Global Warming Potential in Bioenergy Systems of Hawaii: Crop Choice and Deficit Irrigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan N Pawlowski

    Full Text Available Replacing fossil fuel with biofuel is environmentally viable from a climate change perspective only if the net greenhouse gas (GHG footprint of the system is reduced. The effects of replacing annual arable crops with perennial bioenergy feedstocks on net GHG production and soil carbon (C stock are critical to the system-level balance. Here, we compared GHG flux, crop yield, root biomass, and soil C stock under two potential tropical, perennial grass biofuel feedstocks: conventional sugarcane and ratoon-harvested, zero-tillage napiergrass. Evaluations were conducted at two irrigation levels, 100% of plantation application and at a 50% deficit. Peaks and troughs of GHG emission followed agronomic events such as ratoon harvest of napiergrass and fertilization. Yet, net GHG flux was dominated by carbon dioxide (CO2, as methane was oxidized and nitrous oxide (N2O emission was very low even following fertilization. High N2O fluxes that frequently negate other greenhouse gas benefits that come from replacing fossil fuels with agronomic forms of bioenergy were mitigated by efficient water and fertilizer management, including direct injection of fertilizer into buried irrigation lines. From soil intensively cultivated for a century in sugarcane, soil C stock and root biomass increased rapidly following cultivation in grasses selected for robust root systems and drought tolerance. The net soil C increase over the two-year crop cycle was three-fold greater than the annualized soil surface CO2 flux. Deficit irrigation reduced yield, but increased soil C accumulation as proportionately more photosynthetic resources were allocated belowground. In the first two years of cultivation napiergrass did not increase net greenhouse warming potential (GWP compared to sugarcane, and has the advantage of multiple ratoon harvests per year and less negative effects of deficit irrigation to yield.

  10. Terrestrial 3D laser scanning to track the increase in canopy height of both monocot and dicot crop species under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedli, Michael; Kirchgessner, Norbert; Grieder, Christoph; Liebisch, Frank; Mannale, Michael; Walter, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth is a good indicator of crop performance and can be measured by different methods and on different spatial and temporal scales. In this study, we measured the canopy height growth of maize (Zea mays), soybean (Glycine max) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) under field conditions by terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). We tested the hypotheses whether such measurements are capable to elucidate (1) differences in architecture that exist between genotypes; (2) genotypic differences between canopy height growth during the season and (3) short-term growth fluctuations (within 24 h), which could e.g. indicate responses to rapidly fluctuating environmental conditions. The canopies were scanned with a commercially available 3D laser scanner and canopy height growth over time was analyzed with a novel and simple approach using spherical targets with fixed positions during the whole season. This way, a high precision of the measurement was obtained allowing for comparison of canopy parameters (e.g. canopy height growth) at subsequent time points. Three filtering approaches for canopy height calculation from TLS were evaluated and the most suitable approach was used for the subsequent analyses. For wheat, high coefficients of determination (R(2)) of the linear regression between manually measured and TLS-derived canopy height were achieved. The temporal resolution that can be achieved with our approach depends on the scanned crop. For maize, a temporal resolution of several hours can be achieved, whereas soybean is ideally scanned only once per day, after leaves have reached their most horizontal orientation. Additionally, we could show for maize that plant architectural traits are potentially detectable with our method. The TLS approach presented here allows for measuring canopy height growth of different crops under field conditions with a high temporal resolution, depending on crop species. This method will enable advances in automated phenotyping for breeding and

  11. Emissions of CH4 and N2O under Different Tillage Systems from Double-Cropped Paddy Fields in Southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Lin; Bai, Xiao-Lin; Xue, Jian-Fu; Chen, Zhong-Du; Tang, Hai-Ming; Chen, Fu

    2013-01-01

    Understanding greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions is becoming increasingly important with the climate change. Most previous studies have focused on the assessment of soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential and GHG emissions from agriculture. However, specific experiments assessing tillage impacts on GHG emission from double-cropped paddy fields in Southern China are relatively scarce. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the effects of tillage systems on methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emission in a double rice (Oryza sativa L.) cropping system. The experiment was established in 2005 in Hunan Province, China. Three tillage treatments were laid out in a randomized complete block design: conventional tillage (CT), rotary tillage (RT) and no-till (NT). Fluxes of CH4 from different tillage treatments followed a similar trend during the two years, with a single peak emission for the early rice season and a double peak emission for the late rice season. Compared with other treatments, NT significantly reduced CH4 emission among the rice growing seasons (P<0.05). However, much higher variations in N2O emission were observed across the rice growing seasons due to the vulnerability of N2O to external influences. The amount of CH4 emission in paddy fields was much higher relative to N2O emission. Conversion of CT to NT significantly reduced the cumulative CH4 emission for both rice seasons compared with other treatments (P<0.05). The mean value of global warming potentials (GWPs) of CH4 and N2O emissions over 100 years was in the order of NTcropped regions. PMID:23750250

  12. Are Adult Crambid Snout Moths (Crambinae) and Larval Stages of Lepidoptera Suitable Tools for an Environmental Monitoring of Transgenic Crops? - Implications of a Field Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Andreas; Dolek, Matthias; Theißen, Bernhard; Zapp, Andreas

    2011-08-10

    Butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) have been suggested for the environmental monitoring of genetically modified (GM) crops due to their suitability as ecological indicators, and because of the possible adverse impact of the cultivation of current transgenic crops. The German Association of Engineers (VDI) has developed guidelines for the standardized monitoring of Lepidoptera describing the use of light traps for adult moths, transect counts for adult butterflies, and visual search for larvae. The guidelines suggest recording adults of Crambid Snout Moths during transect counts in addition to butterflies, and present detailed protocols for the visual search of larvae. In a field survey in three regions of Germany, we tested the practicability and effort-benefit ratio of the latter two VDI approaches. Crambid Snout Moths turned out to be suitable and practical indicators, which can easily be recorded during transect counts. They were present in 57% of the studied field margins, contributing a substantial part to the overall Lepidoptera count, thus providing valuable additional information to the monitoring results. Visual search of larvae generated results in an adequate effort-benefit ratio when searching for lepidopteran larvae of common species feeding on nettles. Visual search for larvae living on host plants other than nettles was time-consuming and yielded much lower numbers of recorded larvae. Beating samples of bushes and trees yielded a higher number of species and individuals. This method is especially appropriate when hedgerows are sampled, and was judged to perform intermediate concerning the relationship between invested sampling effort and obtained results for lepidopteran larvae. In conclusion, transect counts of adult Crambid Moths and recording of lepidopteran larvae feeding on nettles are feasible additional modules for an environmental monitoring of GM crops. Monitoring larvae living on host plants other than nettles and beating samples of bushes

  13. Are Adult Crambid Snout Moths (Crambinae) and Larval Stages of Lepidoptera Suitable Tools for an Environmental Monitoring of Transgenic Crops? — Implications of a Field Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Andreas; Dolek, Matthias; Theißen, Bernhard; Zapp, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) have been suggested for the environmental monitoring of genetically modified (GM) crops due to their suitability as ecological indicators, and because of the possible adverse impact of the cultivation of current transgenic crops. The German Association of Engineers (VDI) has developed guidelines for the standardized monitoring of Lepidoptera describing the use of light traps for adult moths, transect counts for adult butterflies, and visual search for larvae. The guidelines suggest recording adults of Crambid Snout Moths during transect counts in addition to butterflies, and present detailed protocols for the visual search of larvae. In a field survey in three regions of Germany, we tested the practicability and effort-benefit ratio of the latter two VDI approaches. Crambid Snout Moths turned out to be suitable and practical indicators, which can easily be recorded during transect counts. They were present in 57% of the studied field margins, contributing a substantial part to the overall Lepidoptera count, thus providing valuable additional information to the monitoring results. Visual search of larvae generated results in an adequate effort-benefit ratio when searching for lepidopteran larvae of common species feeding on nettles. Visual search for larvae living on host plants other than nettles was time-consuming and yielded much lower numbers of recorded larvae. Beating samples of bushes and trees yielded a higher number of species and individuals. This method is especially appropriate when hedgerows are sampled, and was judged to perform intermediate concerning the relationship between invested sampling effort and obtained results for lepidopteran larvae. In conclusion, transect counts of adult Crambid Moths and recording of lepidopteran larvae feeding on nettles are feasible additional modules for an environmental monitoring of GM crops. Monitoring larvae living on host plants other than nettles and beating samples of bushes

  14. Are Adult Crambid Snout Moths (Crambinae and Larval Stages of Lepidoptera Suitable Tools for an Environmental Monitoring of Transgenic Crops? — Implications of a Field Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Lang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera have been suggested for the environmental monitoring of genetically modified (GM crops due to their suitability as ecological indicators, and because of the possible adverse impact of the cultivation of current transgenic crops. The German Association of Engineers (VDI has developed guidelines for the standardized monitoring of Lepidoptera describing the use of light traps for adult moths, transect counts for adult butterflies, and visual search for larvae. The guidelines suggest recording adults of Crambid Snout Moths during transect counts in addition to butterflies, and present detailed protocols for the visual search of larvae. In a field survey in three regions of Germany, we tested the practicability and effort-benefit ratio of the latter two VDI approaches. Crambid Snout Moths turned out to be suitable and practical indicators, which can easily be recorded during transect counts. They were present in 57% of the studied field margins, contributing a substantial part to the overall Lepidoptera count, thus providing valuable additional information to the monitoring results. Visual search of larvae generated results in an adequate effort-benefit ratio when searching for lepidopteran larvae of common species feeding on nettles. Visual search for larvae living on host plants other than nettles was time-consuming and yielded much lower numbers of recorded larvae. Beating samples of bushes and trees yielded a higher number of species and individuals. This method is especially appropriate when hedgerows are sampled, and was judged to perform intermediate concerning the relationship between invested sampling effort and obtained results for lepidopteran larvae. In conclusion, transect counts of adult Crambid Moths and recording of lepidopteran larvae feeding on nettles are feasible additional modules for an environmental monitoring of GM crops. Monitoring larvae living on host plants other than nettles and beating

  15. Emissions of CH4 and N2O under different tillage systems from double-cropped paddy fields in Southern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Lin Zhang

    Full Text Available Understanding greenhouse gases (GHG emissions is becoming increasingly important with the climate change. Most previous studies have focused on the assessment of soil organic carbon (SOC sequestration potential and GHG emissions from agriculture. However, specific experiments assessing tillage impacts on GHG emission from double-cropped paddy fields in Southern China are relatively scarce. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the effects of tillage systems on methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O emission in a double rice (Oryza sativa L. cropping system. The experiment was established in 2005 in Hunan Province, China. Three tillage treatments were laid out in a randomized complete block design: conventional tillage (CT, rotary tillage (RT and no-till (NT. Fluxes of CH4 from different tillage treatments followed a similar trend during the two years, with a single peak emission for the early rice season and a double peak emission for the late rice season. Compared with other treatments, NT significantly reduced CH4 emission among the rice growing seasons (P<0.05. However, much higher variations in N2O emission were observed across the rice growing seasons due to the vulnerability of N2O to external influences. The amount of CH4 emission in paddy fields was much higher relative to N2O emission. Conversion of CT to NT significantly reduced the cumulative CH4 emission for both rice seasons compared with other treatments (P<0.05. The mean value of global warming potentials (GWPs of CH4 and N2O emissions over 100 years was in the order of NTcropped regions.

  16. How Age of Transplants from In Vitro Derived Potato Plantlets Affects Crop Growth and Seed Tuber Yield After Field Transplanting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lommen, W.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    In vitro produced plantlets are used in potato seed systems for production of minitubers under protected conditions or for production of transplants to be transplanted to the field. Three field experiments were carried out to analyse how transplant age (Age) affected the field performance. In the

  17. Water flow patterns induced by bridge oscillation of magnetic fluid between two permanent magnets subjected to alternating magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudo, Seiichi, E-mail: sudo@akita-pu.ac.jp [Faculty of Systems Science and Technology, Akita Prefectural University, Ebinokuchi 84-4, Yurihonjo 015-0055 (Japan); Yamamoto, Kazuki [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Ishimoto, Yukitaka; Nix, Stephanie [Faculty of Systems Science and Technology, Akita Prefectural University, Ebinokuchi 84-4, Yurihonjo 015-0055 (Japan)

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes the characteristics of water flow induced by the bridge oscillation of magnetic fluid between two permanent magnets subject to an external alternating magnetic field. The magnetic fluid bridge is formed in the space between a pair of identical coaxial cylindrical permanent magnets submerged in water. The direction of alternating magnetic field is parallel /antiparallel to the magnetic field produced by two permanent magnets. The magnetic fluid bridge responds to the external alternating magnetic field with harmonic oscillation. The oscillation of magnetic fluid bridge generates water flow around the bridge. Water flow is visualized using a thin milk film at the container bottom. Water flows are observed with a high-speed video camera analysis system. The experimental results show that the flow pattern induced by the bridge oscillation depends on the Keulegan–Carpenter number.

  18. Subject, biopolitic and body: reflextions about care practices in the field of mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Silvina Bru

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We have done this paper in the context of a qualitative research. The objective is to explore the subjetivation ́s process in the field of mental health, starting from narratives of diferent social actors and laws in the context of the city of Mar del Plata. In this way it was possible carry out ten interviews with people with chronic mental illness. In the text we are going to try show some subjetivation ́s process in the field of mental health. In the first place, we are going to analyce the topics of our thesis. Then we are going to explain our theory perspective. And finally, we are going to think about the care practices built in the narratives. We think the practices are fundamental because they allow us to watch the subjetivation ́s process in the field of mental health.

  19. Mesocosm experiments to assess the transmission of Pandora neoaphidis within simple and mixed field margins and over the crop-margin interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baverstock, J; Torrance, M T; Clark, S J; Pell, J K

    2012-05-01

    Although considerable research on the development of agri-environment schemes has focussed on the value of managed field margins as reservoirs for arthropod natural enemies, their potential as reservoirs of entomopathogenic fungi has received less attention. Whether field margins that are most beneficial for arthropod natural enemies are the same as those for entomopathogenic fungi is unknown. Here, within glasshouse mesocosms, we assessed the reproductive success of the aphid-specific entomopathogenic fungus Pandora neoaphidis on aphids in a 'simple margin' containing one plant species and on the same species of aphid in a 'mixed margin' containing seven plant species. These assessments were done in the presence of Aphidius ervi, a hymenopteran parasitoid of aphids regarded as being a key species to conserve in agri-environment schemes in the UK. When only the plants initially infested with aphids were assessed, transmission of P. neoaphidis was significantly greater (p<0.001) in the mixed margin as was parasitisation by A. ervi (p<0.05). However, when all of the plants in the mesocosms were assessed, transmission of P. neoaphidis remained greater in the mixed margin (p<0.05) whereas parasitisation by A. ervi was greater in the simple margin (p<0.05). This difference may be due to aphid dispersal which was greater in the simple margin thereby benefitting the actively foraging parasitoid whereas clustering of aphids in the mixed margin benefited the passively dispersed fungus. In a second mesocosm experiment, the movement of P. neoaphidis over the crop-margin interface was similar to that of A. ervi despite the fungus only being passively dispersed in contrast to the actively foraging parasitoid. The results presented here indicate that, although the optimal plant composition of field margins may differ for P. neoaphidis and A. ervi, both species can co-exist and reproduce in field margins and will move over the crop-margin interface. Managed field margins that

  20. An analysis of university subjects from the field of adapted physical activity in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Baloun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The inclusion of students with special educational needs is a process, which faces many challenges. An essential condition for the success of inclusion is the competence of physical educators. We suggest that it is necessary to establish courses focused on adapted physical activity as part of the university education for physical education (PE teachers. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to analyze courses focused on adapted physical activity within teacher preparation programs. METHODS: We conducted quantitative and qualitative content analysis of subjects which was focused on adapted physical activity at selected public universities in the Czech Republic. In total, subjects from the six faculties met the conditions. RESULTS: The results show the lack of emphasis for this area in the current PE teacher preparations programs, which is one of basic requirements for success of the inclusion process.

  1. BIOGAS PRODUCTION FROM CATCH CROPS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molinuevo-Salces, Beatriz; Larsen, Søren U.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2014-01-01

    Catch crop cultivation combined with its use for biogas production would increase renewable energy production in the form of methane, without interfering with the production of food and fodder crops. The low biomass yield of catch crops is the main limiting factor for using these crops as co......-substrate in manure-based biogas plants and the profit obtained from the sale of biogas barely compensates for the harvest costs. A new agricultural strategy to harvest catch crops together with the residual straw of the main crop was investigated to increase the biomass and thereby the methane yield per hectare...... biomass. Leaving the straw on the field until harvest of the catch crop in the autumn could benefit biogas production due to the organic matter degradation of the straw taking place on the field during the autumn months. This new agricultural strategy may be a good alternative to achieve economically...

  2. Page 1 888 E C Subbarao field direction when it is subjected to a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Similarly, acoustic emission has been used to discriminate between domain switching and microcracking of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramics during the application of an a.c. electric field for over 10 cycles (Jiang et al 1994). While the above discussion emphasized the dimensional changes accompanying.

  3. Synergistic Effects of Agronet Covers and Companion Cropping on Reducing Whitefly Infestation and Improving Yield of Open Field-Grown Tomatoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Mutisya

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill are one of the biggest vegetable crops in the world, supplying a wide range of vitamins, minerals and fibre in human diets. In the tropics, tomatoes are predominantly grown under sub-optimal conditions by subsistence farmers, with exposure to biotic and abiotic stresses in the open field. Whitefly (Bemisia tabaci Gennadius is one of the major pests of the tomato, potentially causing up to 100% yield loss. To control whitefly, most growers indiscriminately use synthetic insecticides which negatively impact the environment, humans, and other natural pest management systems, while also increasing cost of production. This study sought to investigate the effectiveness of agronet covers and companion planting with aromatic basil (Ocimum basilicum L. as an alternative management strategy for whitefly in tomatoes and to evaluate the use of these treatments ontomato growth and yield. Two trials were conducted at the Horticulture Research and Training Field, Egerton University, Njoro, Kenya. Treatments comprised a combination of two factors, (1 growing environment (agronet and no agronet and (2 companion planting with a row of basil surrounding tomato plants, a row of basil in between adjacent rows of tomato, no companion planting. Agronet covers and companion cropping with a row of basil planted between adjacent tomato rows significantly lowered B. tabaci infestation in tomatoes by 68.7%. Better tomato yields were also recorded in treatments where the two treatments were used in combination. Higher yield (13.75 t/ha was obtained from tomatoes grown under agronet cover with a basil row planted in between adjacent rows of the tomato crop compared to 5.9 t/ha in the control. Non-marketable yield was also lowered to5.9 t/ha compared to 9.8 t/ha in the control following the use of the two treatments in combination. The results of this study demonstrate the potential viability of using companion cropping and agronet

  4. KOEFISIEN TANAMAN PADI SAWAH PADA SISTEM IRIGASI HEMAT AIR Crop Coefficient for Paddy Rice Field under Water Saving Irrigation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joko Sujono

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Traditional irrigation for paddy rice is the leading of consumer of water, about 80 % of the water resource availabilityused for irrigation purpose. This phenomenon is related to the way how to estimate the crop water requirement where crop coefficient for paddy rice (k (Prosida is always greater than one starting from planting up to nearly harvesting. In this research, a number of water saving irrigations (WSI systems for paddy rice cultivation using pots such asalternate wetting and drying (AWD, shallow water depth with wetting and drying (SWD, semi-dry cultivation (SDC, system of rice intensification (SRI, and  AWD with mulch (AWD-Mul were applied. The amount of irrigated water and when it should be irrigated depend on evapotranspiration rate, soil moisture condition and the WSI system used. For this purpose, daily measurement of the pot weight was carried out. Crop coefficient (k  is then caluculated as a cratio between crop and reference evapotranspiration computed using Penman-Montheit  method. Results show that up to 45 days after transplanting, the k of WSI treatments were around half of the k (Prosida values currently used for computing the water requirement, whereas at the productive stage the k of WSI systems were relatively equal (AWD, SDC to or greater (SRI, SWD than the k (Prosida. Based on the the k values, the AWD and the SDC systems could save much water compared to the SRI or the SWD. Water saving could be increased by applying the AWD with mulch. ABSTRAK Irigasi padi sawah dengan sistem tradisional merupakan sistem irigasi  yang boros air, hampir 80 % sumber air yang ada untuk irigasi. Hal ini tidak terlepas dari perhitungan kebutuhan air tanaman dengan nilai koefisien tanaman (k menurut Standar Perencanaan Irigasi (Prosida selalu lebih besar dari satu mulai dari tanam hingga menjelang panen.Dalam penelitian ini beberapa metoda budidaya padi hemat air seperti alternate wetting and drying (AWD, shallow water depth

  5. The effects of more extreme rainfall patterns on nitrogen leaching from a field crop system in the upper Midwest, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, L.; Hinckley, E. L. S.; Robertson, G. P.; Matson, P. A.

    2016-12-01

    As global surface temperatures rise, the proportion of total rainfall that falls in heavy storm events is increasing in many areas, in particular the US Midwest, a major agricultural region. These changes in rainfall patterns may have consequences for ecosystem nutrient losses, especially from agricultural ecosystems. We conducted a multi-year rainfall manipulation experiment to examine how more extreme rainfall patterns affect nitrogen (N) leaching from row-crop ecosystems in the upper Midwest, and to what extent tillage may moderate these effects. 5x5m rainout shelters were installed in April 2015 to impose control and extreme rainfall patterns in replicated plots under conventional tillage and no-till management at the Kellogg Biological Station LTER site. Plots exposed to the control rainfall treatment received ambient rainfall, and those exposed to the extreme rainfall treatment received the same total amount of water but applied once every 2 weeks, to simulate larger, less frequent storms. N leaching was calculated as the product of measured soil water N concentrations and modeled soil water drainage at 1.2m depth using HYDRUS-1D. Based on data to date, more N has been leached from both tilled and no-till soils exposed to the extreme rainfall treatment compared to the control rainfall treatment. Results thus far suggest that greater soil water drainage is a primary driver of this increase, and changes in within-system nitrogen cycling - such as net N mineralization and crop N uptake - may also play a role. The experiment is ongoing, and our results so far suggest that intensifying precipitation patterns may exacerbate N leaching from agricultural soils, with potentially negative consequences for receiving ground- and surface waters, as well as for farmers.

  6. ACCOUNTING INFORMATION INDISPENSABLE SOURCE FOR THE DISCOVERY OF TAX EVASION IN THE FIELD OF PRODUCTS SUBJECT TO EXCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorel MATEȘ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article aims to highlight the kinds of tax evasion methods in the field of products subject to excise duty and the role of the tax inspection in combating them. The research reveals which are the most common methods of tax evasion, but it tries to discern the probable developments of the process. The article has in view the inexorable reality, namely that the ingenuity method of tax fraud increases with the emergence of the new rules or barriers to the fraud. Following the research carried out we found that the tax evasion phenomenon in the field of products subject to excise duty has currently a significant impact in the economic and social Romanian reality. In order to reduce the tax evasion phenomenon in the field of products subject to excise duty, it must set up a mechanism for monitoring, oversight and fiscal control as well as the amendment of legislation, the tax evasion being mainly a consequence of the inaccuracies or imperfection of laws.

  7. Seismic Waves Scattering Impact through Tunnel Excavation on Adjacent Monuments Subjected to Far Field Earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghobakhloo E.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of the effect of seismic wave scattering has attracted extensive attention in the past couple of decades especially in infrastructures like tunnels. A seismic wave, meeting the tunnel, can generate scattering which, in most cases, may incur damages in adjacent structures. In this study, using Finite Element Method (FEM, the effect of seismic wave scattering in far field has been investigated. The twin tunnels of Shiraz subway system are selected as the case study in this research and three far field seismic waves were chosen for time history analyses. Investigating the normal mode (before tunnel construction in comparison to the excavation mode (after tunnel construction enables calculation of the effect of displacement in adjacent structures. The analysis results indicate there is a significant difference between before and after tunnel construction (P-value<0.05. Accordingly, the influence of constructing a tunnel on adjacent surface structures is very important for tunnel design.

  8. [Encountering the subject in the health field: a human care theory based on lived experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonarx, Nicolas; Desgroseilliers, Valérie

    2013-09-01

    Dominated by a bio-mechanistic paradigm, Western health systems are suffering from numerous problems. One such problem is the lack of consideration for lived experiences and the complexity and depth of meaning that characterize them. We accordingly emphasize in this text the importance of talking a deep look at the experiences of the cared-for Subject and changing the viewpoint on his or her problems. We defend this viewpoint with the help of a few ideas borrowed from Georges Canguilhem. We then refer to a socio-phenomenological approach inspired by the work of Alfred Schütz which allows us to better grasp people's lived experiences. We thus rehabilitate the Subject by proposing a human care theory that focuses on its' relationship(s) with the body, others, time and space, as well as on self-referent identity labels that give meaning to one's existence. This study is a theoretical reflection on human care that considers professional collaboration and interdisciplinarity, and that does not ignore the concrete practices of stakeholders and professionals.

  9. Radiation field control at the latest BWR plants -- design principle, operational experience and future subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Shunsuke [Energy Research Lab., Ibaraki (Japan); Ohsumi, Katsumi; Takashima, Yoshie [Hitachi Works, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    Improvements of operational procedures to control water chemistry, e.g., nickel/iron control, as well as application of hardware improvements for reducing radioactive corrosion products resulted in an extremely low occupational exposure of less than 0.5 man.Sv/yr without any serious impact on the radwaste system, for BWR plants involved in the Japanese Improvement and Standardization Program. Recently, {sup 60}C radioactively in the reactor water has been increasing due to less crud fixation on the two smooth surfaces of new type high performance fuels and to the pH drop caused by chromium oxide anions released from stainless steel structures and pipings. This increase must be limited by changes in water chemistry, e.g., applications of modified nickel/iron ratio control and weak alkali control. Controlled water chemistry to optimize three points, the plant radiation level and integrities of fuel and structural materials, is the primary future subject for BWR water chemistry.

  10. Formation of Plant Canopy Hierarchies and Consequences for Water Use: Insights From Field Experiments and Individual Based Modeling of Weed-Crop Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, A. G.; McDonald, A. J.; Riha, S. J.

    2008-12-01

    In an agricultural landscape, water use is tightly linked to the dynamics of canopy development. When weeds are present, the plant community may develop leaf area faster than crop monocultures and several hierarchies of plants may be formed. The position of each individual plant within these hierarchies depends on the spatial arrangement of the plants, the initial sizes, and the availability of resources as determined by management, soil properties, weather, and competition. Together, these factors establish a highly dynamic system with nonlinear responses to the availability of resources (e.g. soil water) that is reflected in high levels of site and regional variability in crop yield losses due to weed interference. We developed a spatially-explicit, individual based model of plant competition to evaluate dynamic outcomes of crop-weed interactions and implications for water use. The model simulates the growth of individual plants using the light interception algorithms of the forest model MAESTRA, and estimates photosynthesis through the Farquhar-vonCaemmerer method. Transpiration and photosynthesis are coupled through stomatal conductance. Maximum stomatal conductance is determined by the photosynthetic demand for CO2, but under water stress, actual transpiration per plant is used to estimate stomatal conductance and then the actual rate of photosynthesis. We also used a novel approach to estimate profile water uptake, scaling the root zone of influence (volume of soil exploited by each individual plant) to plant biomass. Additive field experiments with maize in monoculture and in combination with high-density stands of a common annual weed species (A. theophrasti M.) were established to test model performance. Despite exceptionally dry conditions in the field in some years, we found no evidence that the maize-weed mixtures had less total soil water or different rates of water extraction through the profile than the maize monocrop. Furthermore, time series

  11. Selection of hyperspectral narrowbands (HNBs) and composition of hyperspectral twoband vegetation indices (HVIs) for biophysical characterization and discrimination of crop types using field reflectance and Hyperion/EO-1 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thenkabail, P.S.; Mariotto, I.; Gumma, M.K.; Middleton, E.M.; Landis, D.R.; Huemmrich, K.F.

    2013-01-01

    The overarching goal of this study was to establish optimal hyperspectral vegetation indices (HVIs) and hyperspectral narrowbands (HNBs) that best characterize, classify, model, and map the world's main agricultural crops. The primary objectives were: (1) crop biophysical modeling through HNBs and HVIs, (2) accuracy assessment of crop type discrimination using Wilks' Lambda through a discriminant model, and (3) meta-analysis to select optimal HNBs and HVIs for applications related to agriculture. The study was conducted using two Earth Observing One (EO-1) Hyperion scenes and other surface hyperspectral data for the eight leading worldwide crops (wheat, corn, rice, barley, soybeans, pulses, cotton, and alfalfa) that occupy ~70% of all cropland areas globally. This study integrated data collected from multiple study areas in various agroecosystems of Africa, the Middle East, Central Asia, and India. Data were collected for the eight crop types in six distinct growth stages. These included (a) field spectroradiometer measurements (350-2500 nm) sampled at 1-nm discrete bandwidths, and (b) field biophysical variables (e.g., biomass, leaf area index) acquired to correspond with spectroradiometer measurements. The eight crops were described and classified using ~20 HNBs. The accuracy of classifying these 8 crops using HNBs was around 95%, which was ~ 25% better than the multi-spectral results possible from Landsat-7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper+ or EO-1's Advanced Land Imager. Further, based on this research and meta-analysis involving over 100 papers, the study established 33 optimal HNBs and an equal number of specific two-band normalized difference HVIs to best model and study specific biophysical and biochemical quantities of major agricultural crops of the world. Redundant bands identified in this study will help overcome the Hughes Phenomenon (or “the curse of high dimensionality”) in hyperspectral data for a particular application (e.g., biophysi- al

  12. Temporal reliability of ultra-high field resting-state MRI for single-subject sensorimotor and language mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Paulo; Seixas, Daniela; Castro, São Luís

    2016-11-15

    Resting-state fMRI is a well-suited technique to map functional networks in the brain because unlike task-based approaches it requires little collaboration from subjects. This is especially relevant in clinical settings where a number of subjects cannot comply with task demands. Previous studies using conventional scanner fields have shown that resting-state fMRI is able to map functional networks in single subjects, albeit with moderate temporal reliability. Ultra-high resolution (7T) imaging provides higher signal-to-noise ratio and better spatial resolution and is thus well suited to assess the temporal reliability of mapping results, and to determine if resting-state fMRI can be applied in clinical decision making including preoperative planning. We used resting-state fMRI at ultra-high resolution to examine whether the sensorimotor and language networks are reliable over time - same session and one week after. Resting-state networks were identified for all subjects and sessions with good accuracy. Both networks were well delimited within classical regions of interest. Mapping was temporally reliable at short and medium time-scales as demonstrated by high values of overlap in the same session and one week after for both networks. Results were stable independently of data quality metrics and physiological variables. Taken together, these findings provide strong support for the suitability of ultra-high field resting-state fMRI mapping at the single-subject level. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. An evaluation of the influence of a magnetic field on a human subject with the use of bio-impedance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papezova, S [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, CTU in Prague, Technicka 4, 166 07 Prague (Czech Republic); Papez, V, E-mail: stanislava.papezova@fs.cvut.c, E-mail: papez@feld.cvut.c [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, CTU in Prague, Technicka 2, 166 27 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2010-01-01

    The influence of a magnetic field on a living human organism was monitored using a bio-impedance evaluation of vasodilatation effects. A quantitative evaluation of the influence of a magnetic field on a human being was implemented by means of a quantitative evaluation of changes in the bio-impedance of the tissue. The pulse of the magnetic field was controlled by a pseudo-random impulse signal using a power switch that controlled the current of the applicator coil. The peak magnetic field flux density was approximately 60 mT. The bio-impedance was measured by a four-electrode method by means of a radiofrequency narrow band vector bioimpedance meter. Experiments were performed on the magnetic exposure of the forearm of an exposed human subject. During exposure to a magnetic field, the bio-impedance change signal level increases above the normal level, and reaches the maximum level after about 10 minutes. The maximum value is approximately 50 % higher than the normal level.

  14. Effect of sleep deprivation and driving duration on the useful visual field in younger and older subjects during simulator driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogé, Joceline; Pébayle, Thierry; El Hannachi, Saida; Muzet, Alain

    2003-06-01

    Nine older subjects (40-51 years) and 10 younger subjects (18-30 years) took part in two one-hour driving sessions. They performed a very monotonous task during which they had to follow a vehicle either after a complete night of sleep or after one night of sleep deprivation. While driving their useful visual field was assessed by introducing signals that would appear on the whole road scene. The analysis of the data indicates that the ability to process peripheral signals deteriorates with age, driving duration and sleep deprivation. However, the effects of these three variables on the peripheral visual ability are not similar in a dual task. The driver's useful visual field changes with age and prolongation of the monotonous driving activity according to a tunnel vision phenomenon. On the other hand, a sleep debt deteriorates the useful visual field according to a general interference phenomenon. These results are discussed in terms of decrease in the level of arousal and increase of fatigue.

  15. [Effects of different fertilization regimes on weed communities in wheat fields under rice-wheat cropping system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fang; Li, Yong; Li, Fen-hua; Sun, Guo-jun; Han, Min; Zhang, Hai-yan; Ji, Zhong; Wu, Chen-yu

    2016-01-01

    To reveal the effects of different fertilization regimes on weed communities in wheat fields under a rice-wheat rotation system, a survey was conducted before wheat harvest in 2014 after a 4-year long-term recurrent fertilization scheme. Weed species types, density, height and diversity index under different fertilization and straw-returning schemes in wheat fields were studied and complemented with a canonical correspondence analysis on weed community distribution and soil nutrient factors. Twenty weed species were recorded among 36 wheat fields belonging to 19 genera and 11 families. Beckmannia syzigachne, Hemistepta lyrata, Malachium aquaticum and Cnidium monnieri were widely distributed throughout the sampled area. Long-term fertilization appeared to reduce weed species richness and density, particularly for broadleaf weeds, but increased weed height. Diversity and evenness indices of weed communities were lower and dominance indices were higher in fields where chemical fertilizers were applied alone or combined with organic fertilizers, especially, where organic-inorganic compound fertilizer was used, in which it readily caused the outbreak of a dominant species and severe damage. Conversely, diversity and evenness indices of weed communities were higher and dominance indices were lower when the straw was returned to the field combined with chemical or organic fertilizers, in which weed community structures were complex and stable with lower weed density. Under these conditions weeds only caused slight reduction of wheat growth.

  16. Exploring the Usefulness of MISR-HR Products to Estimate Maize Crop Extent and Using Field Evidence to Evaluate the Results in South Africa's Free State Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraete, M. M.; Knox, N. M.; Hunt, L. A.; Kleyn, L.

    2014-12-01

    The MISR instrument on NASA's Terra platform has been operating for almost 15 years. Standard products are generated at a spatial resolution of 1.1 km or coarser, but a recently developed method to re-analyze the Level-1B2 data allows the retrieval of biogeophysical products at the native spatial resolution of the instrument (275 m). This development opens new opportunities to better address issues such as the management of agricultural production and food security. South African maize production is of great economic and social importance, not only nationally, but on the global market too, being one of the top ten maize producing countries. Seasonal maize production statistics are currently based on a combination of field measurements and estimates derived from manually digitizing high resolution imagery from the SPOT satellite. The field measurements are collected using the Producer Independent Crop Estimate System (PICES) developed by Crop Estimates Committee of the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. There is a strong desire to improve the quality of these statistics, to generate those earlier, and to automate the process to encompass larger areas. This paper will explore the feasibility of using the MISR-HR spectral and directional products, combined with the finer spatial resolution and the relatively frequent coverage afforded by that instrument, to address these needs. The study area is based in the Free State, South Africa, one of the primary maize growing areas in the country, and took place during the 2012-2013 summer growing season. The significance of the outcomes will be evaluated in the context of the 14+ years of available MISR data.

  17. Stability Evaluation of Volcanic Slope Subjected to Rainfall and Freeze-Thaw Action Based on Field Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Kawamura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rainfall-induced failures of natural and artificial slopes such as cut slopes, which are subjected to freezing and thawing, have been frequently reported in Hokkaido, Japan. In particular, many failures occur intensively from spring to summer seasons. Despite numerous field studies, explanation of their mechanical behavior based on in situ data has not yet been completely achieved due to the difficulty in grasping failure conditions. This study aims at clarifying the aspects of in-situ volcanic slopes subjected to rainfall and freeze-thaw action. The changes in soil moisture, pore pressure, deformations, and temperatures in the slope were investigated using soil moisture meters, tensiometers, thermocouple sensors, clinometers, settlement gauges, an anemovane, a snow gauge, and a rainfall gauge. The data generated from these measures indicated deformation in the slope examined mainly proceeded during the drainage process according to changes in soil moisture. Based on this data, a prediction method for failures is discussed in detail.

  18. Flow and heat transfer in gas turbine disk cavities subject to nonuniform external pressure field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, R.P.; Kim, Y.W.; Tong, T.W. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Injestion of hot gas from the main-stream gas path into turbine disk cavities, particularly the first-stage disk cavity, has become a serious concern for the next-generation industrial gas turbines featuring high rotor inlet temperature. Fluid temperature in the cavities increases further due to windage generated by fluid drag at the rotating and stationary surfaces. The resulting problem of rotor disk heat-up is exacerbated by the high disk rim temperature due to adverse (relatively flat) temperature profile of the mainstream gas in the annular flow passage of the turbine. A designer is concerned about the level of stresses in the turbine rotor disk and its durability, both of which are affected significantly by the disk temperature distribution. This distribution also plays a major role in the radial position of the blade tip and thus, in establishing the clearance between the tip and the shroud. To counteract mainstream gas ingestion as well as to cool the rotor and the stator disks, it is necessary to inject cooling air (bled from the compressor discharge) into the wheel space. Since this bleeding of compressor air imposes a penalty on the engine cycle performance, the designers of disk cavity cooling and sealing systems need to accomplish these tasks with the minimum possible amount of bleed air without risking disk failure. This requires detailed knowledge of the flow characteristics and convective heat transfer in the cavity. The flow in the wheel space between the rotor and stator disks is quite complex. It is usually turbulent and contains recirculation regions. Instabilities such as vortices oscillating in space have been observed in the flow. It becomes necessary to obtain both a qualitative understanding of the general pattern of the fluid motion as well as a quantitative map of the velocity and pressure fields.

  19. The problems of determining the competence of the subjects of the Russian Federation in the field of family protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Narutto

    2017-01-01

    the list of powers of authorities of subjects of the Russian Federation including those provided by protection and family support. The main problem of realization of the competence of subjects of the Russian Federation in the field of protection of the family the author is seen in the shortcomings of their legal definition, in securing for the subjects of authority without adequate financial support.

  20. Numerical Analysis of Dynamic Response of Corrugated Core Sandwich Panels Subjected to Near-Field Air Blast Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional fully coupled simulation is conducted to analyze the dynamic response of sandwich panels comprising equal thicknesses face sheets sandwiching a corrugated core when subjected to localized impulse created by the detonation of cylindrical explosive. A large number of computational cases have been calculated to comprehensively investigate the performance of sandwich panels under near-field air blast loading. Results show that the deformation/failure modes of panels depend strongly on stand-off distance. The beneficial FSI effect can be enhanced by decreasing the thickness of front face sheet. The core configuration has a negligible influence on the peak reflected pressure, but it has an effect on the deflection of a panel. It is found that the benefits of a sandwich panel over an equivalent weight solid plate to withstand near-field air blast loading are more evident at lower stand-off distance.

  1. Absolute and convective instabilities of a film flow down a vertical fiber subjected to a radial electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Chen, Xue; Ding, Zijing

    2018-01-01

    We consider the motion of a gravity-driven flow down a vertical fiber subjected to a radial electric field. This flow exhibits rich dynamics including the formation of droplets, or beads, driven by a Rayleigh-Plateau mechanism modified by the presence of gravity as well as the Maxwell stress at the interface. A spatiotemporal stability analysis is performed to investigate the effect of electric field on the absolute-convective instability (AI-CI) characteristics. We performed a numerical simulation on the nonlinear evolution of the film to examine the transition from CI to AI regime. The numerical results are in excellent agreement with the spatiotemporal stability analysis. The blowup behavior of nonlinear simulation predicts the formation of touchdown singularity of the interface due to the effect of electric field. We try to connect the blowup behavior with the AI-CI characteristics. It is found that the singularities mainly occur in the AI regime. The results indicate that the film may have a tendency to form very sharp tips due to the enhancement of the absolute instability induced by the electric field. We perform a theoretical analysis to study the behaviors of the singularities. The results show that there exists a self-similarity between the temporal and spatial distances from the singularities.

  2. 7 CFR 457.137 - Green pea crop insurance provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... practices. The cultural practices generally in use in the county for the crop to make normal progress toward... of the field, time to crop maturity, and marketing window, that replanting the insured crop will...

  3. Produtividade de híbridos de tomate submetidos ao cultivo superadensado Yield of tomato hybrids subjected to a super density cropping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Fernando Wamser

    2012-03-01

    plantas. A produtividade comercial de frutos no tomateiro superadensado tutorado em "V" foi 19,2% maior que o tomateiro superadensado tutorado verticalmente. A condução de uma haste por planta aumentou 10,4% a produtividade comercial de frutos em relação à condução de duas hastes por planta no tomateiro superadensado. O tomateiro superadensado proporcionou aumento da severidade foliar de pinta-preta, em relação à densidade tradicional de plantas.Farmers of Caçador, Santa Catarina State, Brazil, need experimental results of tomato super density cropping system, since the ecological conditions of this region permit them decide to adopt this system or not. The aim of this work was to evaluate the tomato super density cropping system with hybrids used in Caçador. Two experiments were carried out at Epagri, Experimental Station of Caçador, during the 2007/2008 and 2008/2009 harvest period. The treatments in 2007/2008 were the combination of two hybrids (Miramar and T92, two methods of staking (in vertical and "V" and two methods of training plants (one stem per plant in the spacing of 0.15 m between plants and two stems per plant in the spacing of 0.3 m between plants. In 2008/2009, the treatments were the combination of two hybrids (Paron and Plutão and two super density methods of training plants (one stem per plant in the spacing of 0.15 m between plants and two stems per plant in the spacing of 0.3 m between plants plus the traditional density and method of training plants (two stems per plant in the spacing of 0.6 m between plants. The experimental design was of randomized complete blocks with four replications in a split-split-plot, in 2007/2008, and a split-plot in the 2008/2009 season. All treatments had 44,444 stems/ha, except for the treatments with traditional methods of training plants (22,222 stems/ha. The variables analyzed were total, marketable and unmarketable yield, average mass of fruits, marketable and unmarketable percentage of fruits in

  4. Field accumulation risks of heavy metals in soil and vegetable crop irrigated with sewage water in western region of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkhair, Khaled S; Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel

    2016-01-01

    Wastewater irrigated fields can cause potential contamination with heavy metals to soil and groundwater, thus pose a threat to human beings . The current study was designed to investigate the potential human health risks associated with the consumption of okra vegetable crop contaminated with toxic heavy metals. The crop was grown on a soil irrigated with treated wastewater in the western region of Saudi Arabia during 2010 and 2011. The monitored heavy metals included Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn for their bioaccumulation factors to provide baseline data regarding environmental safety and the suitability of sewage irrigation in the future. The pollution load index (PLI), enrichment factor (EF) and contamination factor (CF) of these metals were calculated. The pollution load index of the studied soils indicated their level of metal contamination. The concentrations of Ni, Pb, Cd and Cr in the edible portions were above the safe limit in 90%, 28%, 83% and 63% of the samples, respectively. The heavy metals in the edible portions were as follows: Cr > Zn > Ni > Cd > Mn > Pb > Cu > Fe. The Health Risk Index (HRI) was >1 indicating a potential health risk. The EF values designated an enhanced bio-contamination compared to other reports from Saudi Arabia and other countries around the world. The results indicated a potential pathway of human exposure to slow poisoning by heavy metals due to the indirect utilization of vegetables grown on heavy metal-contaminated soil that was irrigated by contaminated water sources. The okra tested was not safe for human use, especially for direct consumption by human beings. The irrigation source was identified as the source of the soil pollution in this study.

  5. Field accumulation risks of heavy metals in soil and vegetable crop irrigated with sewage water in western region of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkhair, Khaled S.; Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel

    2015-01-01

    Wastewater irrigated fields can cause potential contamination with heavy metals to soil and groundwater, thus pose a threat to human beings . The current study was designed to investigate the potential human health risks associated with the consumption of okra vegetable crop contaminated with toxic heavy metals. The crop was grown on a soil irrigated with treated wastewater in the western region of Saudi Arabia during 2010 and 2011. The monitored heavy metals included Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn for their bioaccumulation factors to provide baseline data regarding environmental safety and the suitability of sewage irrigation in the future. The pollution load index (PLI), enrichment factor (EF) and contamination factor (CF) of these metals were calculated. The pollution load index of the studied soils indicated their level of metal contamination. The concentrations of Ni, Pb, Cd and Cr in the edible portions were above the safe limit in 90%, 28%, 83% and 63% of the samples, respectively. The heavy metals in the edible portions were as follows: Cr > Zn > Ni > Cd > Mn > Pb > Cu > Fe. The Health Risk Index (HRI) was >1 indicating a potential health risk. The EF values designated an enhanced bio-contamination compared to other reports from Saudi Arabia and other countries around the world. The results indicated a potential pathway of human exposure to slow poisoning by heavy metals due to the indirect utilization of vegetables grown on heavy metal-contaminated soil that was irrigated by contaminated water sources. The okra tested was not safe for human use, especially for direct consumption by human beings. The irrigation source was identified as the source of the soil pollution in this study. PMID:26858563

  6. The effects of PLA biodegradable and polypropylene nonwoven crop mulches on selected components of tomato grown in the field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zawiska Izabela

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of two years (2010-2011 of field studies using two types of nonwoven mulches (one biodegradable, polylactic acid PLA 54 g m-2, and traditional polypropylene PP 50 g m-2 on the yield and quality of tomato are presented. Seeds of tomato (‘Mundi’ F1 were sown in a greenhouse, in containers filled with perlite and sand, and then the plants at the cotyledon stage were replanted in multipot trays filled with substrate for vegetable plants. In the last week of May, seedlings were planted on mulches in the field at a spacing of 50 × 100 cm. The mulch was maintained throughout the growing season. A plot that remained unmulched served as the control. Tomatoes were harvested once a week. The fruits were evaluated for L-ascorbic acid, dry matter, soluble sugars and nitrate content. In 2011, the analysis of the plant material showed that the concentration of L-ascorbic acid was about 23% higher in the tomato fruits harvested from plants grown on biodegradable PLA 61 g m-2 mulch in comparison to the control. A similar effect was demonstrated for the soluble sugar concentration in 2011 for both types of nonwovens.

  7. Population Receptive Field Properties from fMRI and Electrocorticography in Striate and Extrastriate Cortex of the Same Subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Mark Harvey

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Population receptive field (pRF modelling reconstructs the properties of visually responsive neuronal populations, typically using fMRI in humans. However, fMRI is an indirect measure of neural activity. Electrocorticography (ECoG measures electrical activity directly in humans using subdural electrodes. Here, we model pRF properties using both fMRI and ECoG data from the same subject. Prior to clinical intervention, we recorded fMRI responses to visual field mapping stimuli to determine pRF properties and visual area layout. The same subject subsequently underwent surgery to implant subdural ECoG electrodes and was shown the same visual field mapping stimuli while recording ECoG signals. ECoG data were filtered into different spectral bands, which were analysed separately. ECoG electrodes were localised to V1, MT, LO2, and IPS visual areas. Gamma-band responses allowed pRF modelling in all electrodes, and beta-band responses could also be fit in V1. pRF sizes were similar between ECoG and fMRI models. V1 alpha-band amplitude was highest when the stimulus was in the inhibitory surround of the neural population, although this did not reduce the gamma signal below baseline. IPS, MT, and LO2 alpha amplitude was highest when a blank screen was displayed, which was also found in the IPS beta-band. ECoG recording produces comparable results to fMRI for pRF modelling, providing useful validation and extension of fMRI-based reconstruction of neural pRF properties. The fMRI signal cannot be explained by one ECoG spectral density band alone. Alpha band amplitudes reflect inhibitory signals in V1 and resting-state in extra-striate cortex. The same spectral band can reflect different functional processing depending on cortical location.

  8. Neonicotinoid insecticide residues in soil dust and associated parent soil in fields with a history of seed treatment use on crops in southwestern Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limay-Rios, Victor; Forero, Luis Gabriel; Xue, Yingen; Smith, Jocelyn; Baute, Tracey; Schaafsma, Arthur

    2016-02-01

    Using neonicotinoid insecticides as seed treatments is a common practice in field crop production. Exposure of nontarget organisms to neonicotinoids present in various environmental matrices is debated. In the present study, concentrations of neonicotinoid residues were measured in the top 5 cm of soil and overlying soil surface dust before planting in 25 commercial fields with a history of neonicotinoid seed treatment use in southwestern Ontario in 2013 and 2014 using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The mean total concentrations were 3.05 ng/g and 47.84 ng/g in 2013 and 5.59 ng/g and 71.17 ng/g in 2014 for parent soil and soil surface dust, respectively. When surface and parent soil residues were compared the mean concentration in surface dust was 15.6-fold and 12.7-fold higher than that in parent soil in 2013 and 2014, respectively. Pooled over years, the surface dust to parent soil ratio was 13.7, with mean concentrations of 4.36 ng/g and 59.86 ng/g for parent soil and surface dust, respectively. The present study's results will contribute important knowledge about the role these residues may play in the overall risk assessment currently under way for the source, transport, and impact of neonicotinoid insecticide residues in a maize ecosystem. © 2015 SETAC.

  9. Applying remote sensing expertise to crop improvement: progress and challenges to scale up high throughput field phenotyping from research to industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouache, David; Beauchêne, Katia; Mini, Agathe; Fournier, Antoine; de Solan, Benoit; Baret, Fred; Comar, Alexis

    2016-05-01

    Digital and image analysis technologies in greenhouses have become commonplace in plant science research and started to move into the plant breeding industry. However, the core of plant breeding work takes place in fields. We will present successive technological developments that have allowed the migration and application of remote sensing approaches at large into the field of crop genetics and physiology research, with a number of projects that have taken place in France. These projects have allowed us to develop combined sensor plus vector systems, from tractor mounted and UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) mounted spectroradiometry to autonomous vehicle mounted spectroradiometry, RGB (red-green-blue) imagery and Lidar. We have tested these systems for deciphering the genetics of complex plant improvement targets such as the robustness to nitrogen and water deficiency of wheat and maize. Our results from wheat experiments indicate that these systems can be used both to screen genetic diversity for nitrogen stress tolerance and to decipher the genetics behind this diversity. We will present our view on the next critical steps in terms of technology and data analysis that will be required to reach cost effective implementation in industrial plant breeding programs. If this can be achieved, these technologies will largely contribute to resolving the equation of increasing food supply in the resource limited world that lies ahead.

  10. Density and Seasonal Dynamics of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) Mediterranean on Common Crops and Weeds around Cotton Fields in Northern China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiao-ming; Yang, Nian-wan; Wan, Fang-hao

    2014-01-01

    The density seasonal dynamics of Bemisia tabaci MED were evaluated over two-years in a cotton-growing area in Langfang, Hebei Province, northern China on cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and six other, co-occurring common plants: common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.), piemarker (Abutilon...... appeared on weeds (the common ragweed and piemarker) about 10 days earlier than on cotton, or the other cultivated plants. The peak population densities were observed over a span of two to three weeks on cotton, starting in early (2010) or mid- (2011) August. The common ragweed growing adjacent to cotton...... supported the highest B. tabaci densities (no. on 100 cm2 leaf surface), 12-22 fold higher than on cotton itself. Sunflower supported more B. tabaci than the other plants, and about 1.5-2 fold higher than cotton did. Our results indicate that weeds (esp. the common ragweed) around cotton fields could...

  11. Projection pursuit nonparametric regression applied to field counts of the aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Homoptera: Aphididae) on tomato crops in greenhouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boll, R; Lapchin, L

    2002-04-01

    The number of plants that sampling requires in aphid population studies often exceeds one hundred. Thus, only quick and nondestructive methods can be used to sample this pest in a reasonable time interval. We propose a visual method for estimating the density of the aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Thomas) on tomato plants reared in greenhouses. After approximately 1min of visual observation plants can be assigned to abundance classes, the boundaries of which are roughly the powers of square root 10. Precise counts were collected simultaneously on sets of reference plants from the same greenhouse. Projection pursuit nonparametric regression was then used to provide unbiased estimates of aphid densities from the abundance classes and several easily gathered explanatory variables. The robustness of the method was evaluated by testing the models on the complementary data sets from plants in which the aphid densities were precisely counted. In both single and twin-row cultural conditions, for the reference and complementary data sets, the order of magnitude of the error was less than one class rank per plant. The investigation time was reduced by approximately 10-fold compared with the exact counting method. This easy-to-teach field method could be useful in large-scale population surveys and for optimizing integrated pest management strategies.

  12. Laboratory Population Parameters and Field Impact of the Larval Endoparasitoid Pseudapanteles dignus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) on its Host Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) in Tomato Crops in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves, Eliana L; Pereyra, Patricia C; Luna, María G; Medone, Paula; Sánchez, Norma E

    2015-08-01

    The tomato moth, Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), is a key pest of tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum L., crops in Central and South America. At present it is dispersing rapidly in Africa and Eurasian continents as an invasive pest, threatening worldwide tomato production. Pseudapanteles dignus (Muesebeck) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is an American endoparasitoid reported as the main natural enemy of T. absoluta in commercial tomato. To gain knowledge of the potential role of P. dignus in the biological control of this pest, we determined its population parameters in laboratory and the parasitoid's impact on T. absoluta in the field. In laboratory, lifetime fecundity was 193 eggs per female, and longevity was 24 and 26 d for female and male, respectively. The finite rate of increase (λ) was 1.15 per female per day and the intrinsic rate of natural increase (r(m)) was 0.14. The net reproductive rate (R(0)) was found to be 51.2, and generation time (T) 28.8 d. The time for doubling the population (DT) was 5 d. Furthermore, field parasitism of T. absoluta varied between 33 and 64% in the different years studied. Population parameters estimated in this study can be considered baseline information for a mass-rearing protocol of this parasitoid. Moreover, growth rates of P. dignus, particularly r(m), and its impact on field populations of T. absoluta indicated that this parasitoid is a valuable candidate for biological control of this pest. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Selection of Hyperspectral Narrowbands (HNBs) and Composition of Hyperspectral Twoband Vegetation Indices (HVIs) for Biophysical Characterization and Discrimination of Crop Types Using Field Reflectance and Hyperion-EO-1 Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thenkabail, Prasad S.; Mariotto, Isabella; Gumma, Murali Krishna; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Landis, David R.; Huemmrich, K. Fred

    2013-01-01

    The overarching goal of this study was to establish optimal hyperspectral vegetation indices (HVIs) and hyperspectral narrowbands (HNBs) that best characterize, classify, model, and map the world's main agricultural crops. The primary objectives were: (1) crop biophysical modeling through HNBs and HVIs, (2) accuracy assessment of crop type discrimination using Wilks' Lambda through a discriminant model, and (3) meta-analysis to select optimal HNBs and HVIs for applications related to agriculture. The study was conducted using two Earth Observing One (EO-1) Hyperion scenes and other surface hyperspectral data for the eight leading worldwide crops (wheat, corn, rice, barley, soybeans, pulses, cotton, and alfalfa) that occupy approx. 70% of all cropland areas globally. This study integrated data collected from multiple study areas in various agroecosystems of Africa, the Middle East, Central Asia, and India. Data were collected for the eight crop types in six distinct growth stages. These included (a) field spectroradiometer measurements (350-2500 nm) sampled at 1-nm discrete bandwidths, and (b) field biophysical variables (e.g., biomass, leaf area index) acquired to correspond with spectroradiometer measurements. The eight crops were described and classified using approx. 20 HNBs. The accuracy of classifying these 8 crops using HNBs was around 95%, which was approx. 25% better than the multi-spectral results possible from Landsat-7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper+ or EO-1's Advanced Land Imager. Further, based on this research and meta-analysis involving over 100 papers, the study established 33 optimal HNBs and an equal number of specific two-band normalized difference HVIs to best model and study specific biophysical and biochemical quantities of major agricultural crops of the world. Redundant bands identified in this study will help overcome the Hughes Phenomenon (or "the curse of high dimensionality") in hyperspectral data for a particular application (e

  14. Experimental and computational studies of water drops falling through model oil with surfactant and subjected to an electric field

    CERN Document Server

    Ervik, Åsmund; Munkejord, Svend Tollak; Müller, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    The behaviour of a single sub-millimetre-size water drop falling through a viscous oil while subjected to an electric field is of fundamental importance to industrial applications such as crude oil electrocoalescers. Detailed studies, both experimental and computational, have been performed previously, but an often challenging issue has been the characterization of the fluids. As numerous authors have noted, it is very difficult to have a perfectly clean water-oil system even for very pure model oils, and the presence of trace chemicals may significantly alter the interface behaviour. In this work, we consider a well- characterized water-oil system where controlled amounts of a surface active agent (Span 80) have been added to the oil. This addition dominates any trace contaminants in the oil, such that the interface behaviour can also be well-characterized. We present the results of experiments and corresponding two-phase- flow simulations of a falling water drop covered in surfactant and subjected to a mono...

  15. Conversion of equilibrium spin current into charge current through a quantum-dot spin valve subject to circularly polarized field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Feng, E-mail: bd10583@163.com [Department of Physics, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huaian 223003 (China); Gao, Ben-Ling; Hu, Guang [Department of Physics, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huaian 223003 (China); Gu, Yu [Department of Physics and Siyuan Laboratory, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Xu, Ning [The School of Mathematics and Physics, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Yancheng 224051 (China)

    2015-12-18

    We theoretically investigate the electron transport through a quantum-dot spin valve subject to a circularly polarized field. It is shown that the original equilibrium spin current arising from the spin Josephson effect can be converted to a charge current by the circularly polarized field. Numerical calculations demonstrate that the sign and the magnitude of the equilibrium spin current can both be deduced from the induced charge current. Moreover, the dependence of the induced charge current on the system parameters is also studied and the most important finding is that for most choices of the system parameters the induced charge current is large enough to be measured by present technology. Therefore, our findings offer a promising way to detect the equilibrium spin current in spin valve systems. - Highlights: • Equilibrium spin current can be converted to charge current with polarized light. • The equilibrium spin current can be deduced from the induced charge current. • The induced charge current is measurable in experiments.

  16. IPM of the southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) using trap and refuge crops within tomato fields in North Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Southern Green Stink Bug (SGSB), Nezara viridula (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) is a serious insect pest of tomatoes and numerous vegetable and fruit plants in north Florida. We evaluated three trap crops and three refuge crops to investigate their potential to be used for IPM (Integrated Pest Manag...

  17. Effects of tire rubber ash and zinc sulfate on crop productivity and cadmium accumulation in five rice cultivars under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahad, Shah; Hussain, Saddam; Khan, Fahad; Wu, Chao; Saud, Shah; Hassan, Shah; Ahmad, Naeem; Gang, Deng; Ullah, Abid; Huang, Jianliang

    2015-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is among the most widespread and toxic heavy metals becoming a severe threat to humans. A field study was conducted to examine the role of various zinc (Zn) fertilization treatments and cultivars on crop productivity and Zn and Cd concentrations in brown rice and rice straw. The Zn fertilization treatments included an unfertilized control, foliar applied Zn sulfate (ZnSO4) at panicle initiation stage, foliar applied ZnSO4 at milky stage, soil application of rubber ash, and soil-applied ZnSO4, while five rice cultivars were Swat-1, Shadab, Shua-92, Swat-2, and Sada Hayat. All the Zn fertilization treatments resulted in significantly higher number of panicles, number of spikelets per panicles, spikelet fertility, 1,000-grain weight, grain yield, brown rice and rice straw Zn concentrations, and significantly lower Cd concentrations. Soil application of rubber ash remained the best among all Zn fertilization treatments as it resulted in 73% higher grain yield and reduced Cd concentration by 51% as compared with control. Variations were also apparent among cultivars, and Shua-92 and Swat-2 performed better in terms of all studied attributes as compared with other cultivars. Conclusively, cultivar selection and Zn application are effective strategies to improve rice grain yield as well as quality. Rubber ash appeared a viable source of Zn having the ability to increase yield along with reducing Cd accumulation.

  18. Evaluation of subjective image quality in relation to diagnostic task for cone beam computed tomography with different fields of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofthag-Hansen, Sara; Thilander-Klang, Anne; Gröndahl, Kerstin

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate subjective image quality for two diagnostic tasks, periapical diagnosis and implant planning, for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) using different exposure parameters and fields of view (FOVs). Examinations were performed in posterior part of the jaws on a skull phantom with 3D Accuitomo (FOV 3 cm×4 cm) and 3D Accuitomo FPD (FOVs 4 cm×4 cm and 6 cm×6 cm). All combinations of 60, 65, 70, 75, 80 kV and 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 mA with a rotation of 180° and 360° were used. Dose-area product (DAP) value was determined for each combination. The images were presented, displaying the object in axial, cross-sectional and sagittal views, without scanning data in a random order for each FOV and jaw. Seven observers assessed image quality on a six-point rating scale. Intra-observer agreement was good (κw=0.76) and inter-observer agreement moderate (κw=0.52). Stepwise logistic regression showed kV, mA and diagnostic task to be the most important variables. Periapical diagnosis, regardless jaw, required higher exposure parameters compared to implant planning. Implant planning in the lower jaw required higher exposure parameters compared to upper jaw. Overall ranking of FOVs gave 4 cm×4 cm, 6 cm×6 cm followed by 3 cm×4 cm. This study has shown that exposure parameters should be adjusted according to diagnostic task. For this particular CBCT brand a rotation of 180° gave good subjective image quality, hence a substantial dose reduction can be achieved without loss of diagnostic information. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Subject-specific modulation of local field potential spectral power during brain-machine interface control in primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Kelvin; Dangi, Siddharth; Orsborn, Amy L.; Gastpar, Michael C.; Carmena, Jose M.

    2014-04-01

    Objective. Intracortical brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) have predominantly utilized spike activity as the control signal. However, an increasing number of studies have shown the utility of local field potentials (LFPs) for decoding motor related signals. Currently, it is unclear how well different LFP frequencies can serve as features for continuous, closed-loop BMI control. Approach. We demonstrate 2D continuous LFP-based BMI control using closed-loop decoder adaptation, which adapts decoder parameters to subject-specific LFP feature modulations during BMI control. We trained two macaque monkeys to control a 2D cursor in a center-out task by modulating LFP power in the 0-150 Hz range. Main results. While both monkeys attained control, they used different strategies involving different frequency bands. One monkey primarily utilized the low-frequency spectrum (0-80 Hz), which was highly correlated between channels, and obtained proficient performance even with a single channel. In contrast, the other monkey relied more on higher frequencies (80-150 Hz), which were less correlated between channels, and had greater difficulty with control as the number of channels decreased. We then restricted the monkeys to use only various sub-ranges (0-40, 40-80, and 80-150 Hz) of the 0-150 Hz band. Interestingly, although both monkeys performed better with some sub-ranges than others, they were able to achieve BMI control with all sub-ranges after decoder adaptation, demonstrating broad flexibility in the frequencies that could potentially be used for LFP-based BMI control. Significance. Overall, our results demonstrate proficient, continuous BMI control using LFPs and provide insight into the subject-specific spectral patterns of LFP activity modulated during control.

  20. Cropping systems and control of soil erosion in a Mediterranean environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Salvatore; Copani, Venera; Testa, Giorgio; Scalici, Giovanni

    2013-04-01

    The research has been carried out over the years 1996-2010 in an area of the internal hill of Sicily region (Enna, c.da Geracello, 550 m a. s. l. 37° 23' N. Lat, 14° 21' E. Long) in the center of Mediterranean Sea, mainly devoted to durum wheat cultivation, using the experimental plots, established in 1996 on a slope of 26-28%, equipped to determine surface runoff and soil losses. The establishment consists of twelve plots, having 40 m length and 8 m width. In order to study the effect of different field crop systems in controlling soil erosion in slopes subjected to water erosion, the following systems were studied: permanent crops, tilled annual crops, no-tilled annual crops, set-aside. The used crops were: durum wheat, faba bean, rapeseed, subterranean clover, Italian ryegrass, alfalfa, sweetvetch, moon trefoil, barley, sweet sorghum, sunflower. The results pointed out that the cropping systems with perennial crops allowed to keep low the soil loss, while annual crop rotation determined a high amount of soil loss. Sod seeding showed promising results also for annual crop rotations.

  1. Silicon Carbide (SiC) Device and Module Reliability, Performance of a Loop Heat Pipe Subjected to a Phase-Coupled Heat Input to an Acceleration Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    magnitude and direction, which are generated from a transitory and spatial acceleration vector field and their impact on the dynamical performance of two...Heat Input to an Acceleration Field Kirk L. Yerkes (AFRL/RQQI) and James D. Scofield (AFRL/RQQE) Flight Systems Integration Branch (AFRL/RQQI...CARBIDE (SiC) DEVICE AND MODULE RELIABILITY Performance of a Loop Heat Pipe Subjected to a Phase-Coupled Heat Input to an Acceleration Field 5a

  2. Adverse weather impacts on arable cropping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobin, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Damages due to extreme or adverse weather strongly depend on crop type, crop stage, soil conditions and management. The impact is largest during the sensitive periods of the farming calendar, and requires a modelling approach to capture the interactions between the crop, its environment and the occurrence of the meteorological event. The hypothesis is that extreme and adverse weather events can be quantified and subsequently incorporated in current crop models. Since crop development is driven by thermal time and photoperiod, a regional crop model was used to examine the likely frequency, magnitude and impacts of frost, drought, heat stress and waterlogging in relation to the cropping season and crop sensitive stages. Risk profiles and associated return levels were obtained by fitting generalized extreme value distributions to block maxima for air humidity, water balance and temperature variables. The risk profiles were subsequently confronted with yields and yield losses for the major arable crops in Belgium, notably winter wheat, winter barley, winter oilseed rape, sugar beet, potato and maize at the field (farm records) to regional scale (statistics). The average daily vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and reference evapotranspiration (ET0) during the growing season is significantly lower (p methodology of defining meteorological risks and subsequently relating the risk to the cropping calendar will be demonstrated for major arable crops in Belgium. Physically based crop models assist in understanding the links between adverse weather events, sensitive crop stages and crop damage. Financial support was obtained from Belspo under research contract SD/RI/03A.

  3. Method for optimizing harvesting of crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

      In order e.g. to optimize harvesting crops of the kind which may be self dried on a field prior to a harvesting step (116, 118), there is disclosed a method of providing a mobile unit (102) for working (114, 116, 118) the field with crops, equipping the mobile unit (102) with crop biomass...... measuring means (108) and with crop moisture content measurement means (106), measuring crop biomass (107a, 107b) and crop moisture content (109a, 109b) of the crop, providing a spatial crop biomass and crop moisture content characteristics map of the field  based on the biomass data (107a, 107b) provided...... from moving the mobile unit on the field and the moisture content (109a, 109b), and determining an optimised drying time (104a, 104b) prior to the following harvesting step (116, 118) in response to the spatial crop biomass and crop moisture content characteristics map and in response to a weather...

  4. Selectivity and stability of new herbicides and herbicide combinations for the seed yields of some field crops II. Effect at milk thistle (Silybum Marianum Gaertn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Delchev

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. During 2013 – 2015 on pellic vertisol soil type was conducted a field experiment. Under investigation was Bulgarian milk thistle cultivar Silmar (Silybum marianum Gaertn.. Factor A included the years of investigation. Factor B included no treated check, 6 soil-applied herbicides – Tendar EC, Sharpen 33 EC, Merlin flex 480 SC, Smerch 24 ЕC, Raft 400 SC, Eagle 75 DF and 5 foliar-applied herbicides – Kalin flo, Eclipse 70 DWG, Sultan 500 SC, Granstar super 50 SG, Starane 250 EK. Factor C included no treated check and 1 antigraminaceous herbicide – Tiger platinium 5 EC. All herbicides, herbicide combinations and herbicide tank-mixtures were applied in a working solution of 200 l/ha. Mixing of foliar-applied herbicides was done in the tank on the sprayer. Soil-applied herbicides were treated during the period after sowing before emergence. Foliar-applied herbicides were treated during rosette stage of the milk thistle. Tank mixtures of antigraminaceous herbicide Tiger platinum with foliar herbicides Kalin flo, Eclipse, Sultan, Granstar super and Starane leads to obtaining high seed yields of milk thistle. High yields seeds are also obtained by foliar treatment with Tiger platinum after soil-applied herbicides Raft, Sharpen and Eagle. The use of the soil-applied herbicides Smerch, Merlin flex and Tendar does not increase the seed yield due to its higher phytotoxicity against milk thistle. Herbicide Tendar and herbicide combination Tendar + Tiger platinum are the most unstable, followed by herbicide Merlin flex. Herbicide tank-mixtures Kalin flo + Tiger platinum and Eclipse + Tiger platinum and herbicide combination Raft + Tiger platinum are technologically the most valuable. They combine high seed yield with high stability with relation to different years. Single application of soil-applied or foliar-applied herbicides have low estimate; due to that they must be combined for full control of weeds in milk thistle crops.

  5. An assessment of fossil fuel energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions from farm field operations using a regional level crop and land use database for Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, J.A. [Private Consultant, Cambridge, ON (Canada); Kulshreshtha, S.N. [University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SA (Canada); McConkey, B.G. [Research Branch, AAFC, Swift Current, SA (Canada); Desjardins, R.L. [Research Branch, AAFC, C.E.F. Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2010-05-15

    The Canadian Economic and Emissions Model for Agriculture (CEEMA) is considered a potentially useful tool for investigating the impacts of biofuel feedstock production on rural land use. Fossil CO{sub 2} emissions from fieldwork in the CEEMA model were upgraded with the Fossil Fuel Farm Fieldwork Energy and Emissions (F4E2) simulation model. There was very close agreement between the two models at the national level, but differences between the two models at the regional scale and among the three major land uses illustrated the need to revise CEEMA. Emission coefficients from the F4E2 model will give the upgraded CEEMA a more realistic response to the energy requirements by specific field operations and to differences between the major forms of land cover (annuals and perennials). The highest fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emission intensity for fieldwork in 2001 was in Quebec at 0.19 t{l_brace}CO{sub 2}{r_brace}/ha, followed by Ontario at 0.17 t{l_brace}CO{sub 2}{r_brace}/ha, while the emission intensities were the lowest in Western Canada, at 0.12 t{l_brace}CO{sub 2}{r_brace}/ha. Fossil CO{sub 2} emissions from just annual crops in Canada was 0.16 t/ha and the emissions from just harvesting perennial forages was 0.07 t{l_brace}CO{sub 2}{r_brace}/ha. Fieldwork to maintain summerfallow emitted only 0.02 t{l_brace}CO{sub 2}{r_brace}/ha. (author)

  6. Use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for Improving Farm Scale Agricultural Water Management in Agriculture at a Farm Scale. A case study for field crops in the California's Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medellin-Azuara, J.; Morande, J. A.; Jin, Y.; Chen, Y.; Paw U, K. T.; Viers, J. H.

    2016-12-01

    Traditional methods for estimating consumptive water use as evapotranspiration (ET) for agriculture in areas with water limitations such as California have always been a challenge for farmers, water managers, researchers and government agencies. Direct measurement of evapotranspiration (ET) and crop water stress in agriculture can be a cumbersome and costly task. Furthermore, spatial variability of applied water and irrigation and stress level in crops, due to inherent heterogeneity in soil conditions, topography, management practices, and lack of uniformity in water applications may affect estimates water use efficiency and water balances. This situation difficult long-term management of agroecosystems. This paper presents a case study for various areas in California's Central Valley using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) for a late portion of the 2016 irrigation season These estimates are compared those obtained by direct measurement (from previously deployed stations), and energy balance approaches with remotely sensed data in a selection of field crop parcels. This research improves information on water use and site conditions in agriculture by enhancing remote sensing-based estimations through the use of higher resolution multi-spectral and thermal imagery captured by UAV. We assess whether more frequent information at higher spatial resolution from UAVs can improve estimations of overall ET through energy balance and imagery. Stress levels and ET are characterized spatially to examine irrigation practices and their performance to improve water use in the agroecosystem. Ground based data such as air and crop temperature and stem water potential is collected to validate UAV aerial measurements. Preliminary results show the potential of UAV technology to improve timing, resolution and accuracy in the ET estimation and assessment of crop stress at a farm scales. Side to side comparison with ground level stations employing surface renewal, eddy covariance and

  7. BoBB, software to assess soil erosion risk - introduction of the tool and its use to evaluate appropriate crops and farming practices on endangered field plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devátý, Jan; Dostál, Tomáš; Hösl, Rosemarie; Strauss, Peter; Novotný, Ivan

    2013-04-01

    200 records of soil erosion events. Because direct comparison between long-term average soil loss values and event-related damages is not possible a presumption has been used that causal storm event hits area approximately 1 km in diameter around the spot where damages were recorded and that the spot (field) with recorded erosion damage should always be evaluated as the most endangered one within its surroundings by different mathematical methods, if they operate properly. Characteristic slope profiles of all fields within the affected area were defined and soil erosion risk was determined using BoBB. Recent local conditions at the moment of event were defined using the database information for crop and management practices. Most endangered profiles locations were then compared with the actual damage record from the database. The presentation brings a schematic description of the BoBB principles itself, its GUI, input data and results of validation. Database of soil erosion damages is introduced and the summary of the comparison between the database, the soil-loss map and BoBB software outputs are presented. Acknowledgement: This paper has been supported by projects: MŠMT Mobility 7AMB12AT006, Ministry of the interior of the CR VG 20122015092, and NAZV QI91C008 TPEO.

  8. Panel Discussion: Cover Crops Used at Vallonia Nursery, Indiana Division of Forestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Hawkins

    2005-01-01

    The use of cover crops is one essential step in management of nursery soils. Cover crops serve many different purposes within the soil. First, cover crops help in reducing erosion by stabilizing soil. Second, cover crops can be used as a visual guide to nutrient deficiencies in fields prior to sowing seedling crops. Most important, cover crops build organic matter,...

  9. IMPORTANCE OF PREDECESSORS IN MODERN CROP ROTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrail Kundurdzhiev

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the peculiarities of modern systems of field crop rotations. A review is made of the criteria for selecting the precursors for basic cereals in arable crop rotations in Bulgaria. It reflects the results of years of comparative field trials with different combinations of factors - genotype-fertilization-predecessor. Conclusions are made on the impact of the predecessor on the energy productivity of crops.

  10. Variabilidade de nutrientes em plantas de milho cultivado em talhão manejado homogeneamente Corn plant nutrient variability in an homogeneously managed crop field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaqueu Fernando Montezano

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available O conhecimento da variabilidade da nutrição de plantas e da produtividade em áreas cultivadas pode fornecer importantes subsídios na racionalização do uso de insumos e auxiliar no manejo da fertilidade do solo. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a variabilidade da nutrição mineral de plantas de milho por meio do fracionamento de um talhão cultivado comercialmente em células de manejo e verificar as relações com a produtividade. O estudo foi realizado na Fazenda Alto Alegre, em Planaltina (GO, em área de 373 hectares de Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo Distroférrico, cultivado com milho na safra 2003/04. Traçado um polígono da área, procedeu-se sua divisão em 80 células de manejo de quatro hectares cada uma. A amostragem de folhas em cada célula seguiu uma diagonal com 12 pontos para compor uma amostra composta. Realizou-se a análise dos macro e micronutrientes nas folhas. A produtividade para cada célula foi obtida por meio de colhedora equipada com GPS. Na análise da variabilidade dos resultados foram considerados os parâmetros estatísticos descritivos. O teste ausência de correlação foi realizado com o nível de significância de 5%. A variabilidade da concentração dos nutrientes na folha indicadora do milho foi considerada baixa para N, P, K, S e Mg; e média para Ca, Cu, Fe, Mn e Zn. A variabilidade da produtividade de milho revelou diferenças de produção para cada célula analisada. Os coeficientes de correlação entre os nutrientes e a produtividade foram significativamente diferentes de zero (pThe knowledge of variability of plant nutrition and grain productivity in cultivated areas may provide important information for rational use of fertilizers and soil amendments. The objective of this case study was to determine the corn plant mineral nutrition variability through the fractionation of a commercial grown corn field into small management cells. The study was carried out at the farm Alto Alegre in

  11. Greenhouse Crop Production; A Student Handbook, Teacher Education Series, Volume 10 Number 3s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969

    This study guide, developed by the Department of Agricultural Education of The Pennsylvania State University and field-tested by 54 teachers, is for student use in a unit on greenhouse crop production. Learning objectives, key questions, vocabulary terms, subject matter, and references are included for each of these problem areas: (1) Occupational…

  12. Automatic image cropping for republishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatle, Phil

    2010-02-01

    Image cropping is an important aspect of creating aesthetically pleasing web pages and repurposing content for different web or printed output layouts. Cropping provides both the possibility of improving the composition of the image, and also the ability to change the aspect ratio of the image to suit the layout design needs of different document or web page formats. This paper presents a method for aesthetically cropping images on the basis of their content. Underlying the approach is a novel segmentation-based saliency method which identifies some regions as "distractions", as an alternative to the conventional "foreground" and "background" classifications. Distractions are a particular problem with typical consumer photos found on social networking websites such as FaceBook, Flickr etc. Automatic cropping is achieved by identifying the main subject area of the image and then using an optimization search to expand this to form an aesthetically pleasing crop. Evaluation of aesthetic functions like auto-crop is difficult as there is no single correct solution. A further contribution of this paper is an automated evaluation method which goes some way towards handling the complexity of aesthetic assessment. This allows crop algorithms to be easily evaluated against a large test set.

  13. Modeling perceptions of climatic risk in crop production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinmuth, Evelyn; Parker, Phillip; Aurbacher, Joachim; Högy, Petra; Dabbert, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    In agricultural production, land-use decisions are components of economic planning that result in the strategic allocation of fields. Climate variability represents an uncertainty factor in crop production. Considering yield impact, climatic influence is perceived during and evaluated at the end of crop production cycles. In practice, this information is then incorporated into planning for the upcoming season. This process contributes to attitudes toward climate-induced risk in crop production. In the literature, however, the subjective valuation of risk is modeled as a risk attitude toward variations in (monetary) outcomes. Consequently, climatic influence may be obscured by political and market influences so that risk perceptions during the production process are neglected. We present a utility concept that allows the inclusion of annual risk scores based on mid-season risk perceptions that are incorporated into field-planning decisions. This approach is exemplified and implemented for winter wheat production in the Kraichgau, a region in Southwest Germany, using the integrated bio-economic simulation model FarmActor and empirical data from the region. Survey results indicate that a profitability threshold for this crop, the level of "still-good yield" (sgy), is 69 dt ha-1 (regional mean Kraichgau sample) for a given season. This threshold governs the monitoring process and risk estimators. We tested the modeled estimators against simulation results using ten projected future weather time series for winter wheat production. The mid-season estimators generally proved to be effective. This approach can be used to improve the modeling of planning decisions by providing a more comprehensive evaluation of field-crop response to climatic changes from an economic risk point of view. The methodology further provides economic insight in an agrometeorological context where prices for crops or inputs are lacking, but farmer attitudes toward risk should still be included in

  14. Impact of cash cropping and perennial crops on food crop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    synergies or trade-offs between the two crops are scant to address the concerns that cash cropping can ..... production and productivity, we develop indices of intensity of PCC and enset cultivation. We define household i's ... study the impact of these indices on food crop production and productivity, we specify models for i.

  15. Salt resistant crop plants

    KAUST Repository

    Roy, Stuart J.

    2014-04-01

    Soil salinity is a major constraint to agriculture. To improve salinity tolerance of crops, various traits can be incorporated, including ion exclusion, osmotic tolerance and tissue tolerance. We review the roles of a range of genes involved in salt tolerance traits. Different tissues and cells are adapted for specific and often diverse function, so it is important to express the genes in specific cell-types and to pyramid a range of traits. Modern biotechnology (marker- assisted selection or genetic engineering) needs to be increasingly used to introduce the correct combination of genes into elite crop cultivars. Importantly, the effects of introduced genes need to be evaluated in the field to determine their effect on salinity tolerance and yield improvement.

  16. Salt resistant crop plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Stuart J; Negrão, Sónia; Tester, Mark

    2014-04-01

    Soil salinity is a major constraint to agriculture. To improve salinity tolerance of crops, various traits can be incorporated, including ion exclusion, osmotic tolerance and tissue tolerance. We review the roles of a range of genes involved in salt tolerance traits. Different tissues and cells are adapted for specific and often diverse function, so it is important to express the genes in specific cell-types and to pyramid a range of traits. Modern biotechnology (marker-assisted selection or genetic engineering) needs to be increasingly used to introduce the correct combination of genes into elite crop cultivars. Importantly, the effects of introduced genes need to be evaluated in the field to determine their effect on salinity tolerance and yield improvement. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetically Modified Herbicide-Tolerant Crops, Weeds, and Herbicides: Overview and Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonny, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops have been and continue to be a subject of controversy despite their rapid adoption by farmers where approved. For the last two decades, an important matter of debate has been their impact on pesticide use, particularly for herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops. Some claim that these crops bring about a decrease in herbicide use, while others claim the opposite. In fact, since 1996, most cultivated GMOs have been GMHT crops, which involve the use of an associated herbicide, generally glyphosate. In their very first years of adoption, HT crops often led to some decrease in herbicide use. However, the repetition of glyphosate-tolerant crops and of glyphosate only applications in the same fields without sufficient alternation and herbicide diversity has contributed to the appearance of glyphosate-resistant weeds. These weeds have resulted in a rise in the use of glyphosate and other herbicides. This article explores this situation and the impacts of herbicide-resistant weeds, using an interdisciplinary approach and drawing on recent data. The paper analyzes the spread of GMHT crops worldwide and their consequences on herbicide use in the USA in particular. It then addresses the global development of glyphosate-resistant weeds and their impact, particularly focusing on the USA. Finally, the last section explores how industry, farmers, and weed scientists are coping with the spread of resistant weeds. The concluding comments deal more widely with trends in GM crops.

  18. Genetically Modified Herbicide-Tolerant Crops, Weeds, and Herbicides: Overview and Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonny, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops have been and continue to be a subject of controversy despite their rapid adoption by farmers where approved. For the last two decades, an important matter of debate has been their impact on pesticide use, particularly for herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops. Some claim that these crops bring about a decrease in herbicide use, while others claim the opposite. In fact, since 1996, most cultivated GMOs have been GMHT crops, which involve the use of an associated herbicide, generally glyphosate. In their very first years of adoption, HT crops often led to some decrease in herbicide use. However, the repetition of glyphosate-tolerant crops and of glyphosate only applications in the same fields without sufficient alternation and herbicide diversity has contributed to the appearance of glyphosate-resistant weeds. These weeds have resulted in a rise in the use of glyphosate and other herbicides. This article explores this situation and the impacts of herbicide-resistant weeds, using an interdisciplinary approach and drawing on recent data. The paper analyzes the spread of GMHT crops worldwide and their consequences on herbicide use in the USA in particular. It then addresses the global development of glyphosate-resistant weeds and their impact, particularly focusing on the USA. Finally, the last section explores how industry, farmers, and weed scientists are coping with the spread of resistant weeds. The concluding comments deal more widely with trends in GM crops.

  19. Testing of Performance of Optical Fibers Under Irradiation in Intense Radiation Fields, When Subjected to Very High Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, Thomas [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Windl, Wolfgang [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Dickerson, Bryan [Luna Innovations, Inc. (United States)

    2013-01-03

    The primary objective of this project is to measure and model the performance of optical fibers in intense radiation fields when subjected to very high temperatures. This research will pave the way for fiber optic and optically based sensors under conditions expected in future high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Sensor life and signal-to-noise ratios are susceptible to attenuation of the light signal due to scattering and absorbance in the fibers. This project will provide an experimental and theoretical study of the darkening of optical fibers in high-radiation and high-temperature environments. Although optical fibers have been studied for moderate radiation fluence and flux levels, the results of irradiation at very high temperatures have not been published for extended in-core exposures. Several previous multi-scale modeling efforts have studied irradiation effects on the mechanical properties of materials. However, model-based prediction of irradiation-induced changes in silica's optical transport properties has only recently started to receive attention due to possible applications as optical transmission components in fusion reactors. Nearly all damage-modeling studies have been performed in the molecular-dynamics domain, limited to very short times and small systems. Extended-time modeling, however, is crucial to predicting the long-term effects of irradiation at high temperatures, since the experimental testing may not encompass the displacement rate that the fibers will encounter if they are deployed in the VHTR. The project team will pursue such extended-time modeling, including the effects of the ambient and recrystallization. The process will be based on kinetic MC modeling using the concept of amorphous material consisting of building blocks of defect-pairs or clusters, which has been successfully applied to kinetic modeling in amorphized and recrystallized silicon. Using this procedure, the team will model compensation for rate effects, and

  20. Crop-insurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, van der S.

    1945-01-01

    Crop insurance was fairly new in the Netherlands but there was no legal objection or limitation to particular crops. If a crop were insured, it was important that the whole area of the crop were insured. Speculative insurance seemed preferable to mutual insurance.

    Crop insurance covered all risks

  1. Sediment and particulate phosphorus characteristics in grassed waterways from row crop corn and alfalfa fields collected using manual University of Exeter and automatic sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phosphorus (P) export from agricultural lands above known threshold levels results in adverse impacts to receiving water quality. Phosphorus loss occurs in dissolved and sediment-bound, or particulate P (PP), forms, with the latter often dominating losses from row-cropped systems. To target practice...

  2. Growth response of maize plants (Zea mays L.) to wheat and lentil pre-cropping and to indigenous mycorrhizal in field soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almaca, A.; Ortas, I.

    2010-07-01

    The presence of indigenous mycorrhizal fungi may have significant effects on the growth and on the root morphology of plants, under arid and semi arid soil conditions. Lentil and wheat are the traditional crops grown in Southeastern Turkey. In this study soil samples from the Harran plain were collected from the 0-15 cm surface layer under wheat or lentil crop residues and used in a pot experiment carried out under greenhouse conditions with four levels of P fertilization: 0, 20, 40 and 80 mg kg{sup -}1 soil as Ca(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}){sub 2}. Half of the soil batches were submitted to a heating treatment (80 degree centigrade, 2 h). The maize variety PX-9540 was grown in the pots for 57 days. At harvest, plant dry weight, root length, P and Zn concentrations in plant tissues were measured and the extent of root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) was determined. Results showed that maize plants grown in soils where lentil had been previously cultivated grew better than those grown after wheat cultivation. In both cases, P concentration in plant tissues increased with increased P fertilization. There were no significant differences in root AMF colonization between soils with different crop sequences, nor with soils submitted to high temperature. Previous crops had a significant influence on the growth of plants that could be related to differences in the indigenous mycorrhizas inoculum potential and efficacy that can promote P uptake and benefit plant growth. (Author) 29 refs.

  3. Genetically Modified Crops and Food Security

    OpenAIRE

    Qaim, Matin; Kouser, Shahzad

    2013-01-01

    The role of genetically modified (GM) crops for food security is the subject of public controversy. GM crops could contribute to food production increases and higher food availability. There may also be impacts on food quality and nutrient composition. Finally, growing GM crops may influence farmers’ income and thus their economic access to food. Smallholder farmers make up a large proportion of the undernourished people worldwide. Our study focuses on this latter aspect and provides the firs...

  4. Self-organization of topological defects for a triangular-lattice magnetic dots array subject to a perpendicular magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Khymyn

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The regular array of magnetic particles (magnetic dots of the form of a two-dimensional triangular lattice in the presence of external magnetic field demonstrates complicated magnetic structures. The magnetic symmetry of the ground state for such a system is lower than that for the underlying lattice. Long range dipole-dipole interaction leads to a specific antiferromagnetic order in small fields, whereas a set of linear topological defects appears with the growth of the magnetic field. Self-organization of such defects determines the magnetization process for a system within a wide range of external magnetic fields.

  5. Influences of Biodynamic and Conventional Farming Systems on Quality of Potato (Solanum TuberosumL.) Crops: Results from Multivariate Analyses of Two Long-Term Field Trials in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellenberg, Lars; Granstedt, Artur

    2015-09-15

    The aim of this paper was to present results from two long term field experiments comparing potato samples from conventional farming systems with samples from biodynamic farming systems. The principal component analyses (PCA), consistently exhibited differences between potato samples from the two farming systems. According to the PCA, potato samples treated with inorganic fertilizers exhibited a variation positively related to amounts of crude protein, yield, cooking or tissue discoloration and extract decomposition. Potato samples treated according to biodynamic principles, with composted cow manure, were more positively related to traits such as Quality- and EAA-indices, dry matter content, taste quality, relative proportion of pure protein and biocrystallization value. Distinctions between years, crop rotation and cultivars used were sometimes more significant than differences between manuring systems. Grown after barley the potato crop exhibited better quality traits compared to when grown after ley in both the conventional and the biodynamic farming system.

  6. Transition of equilibrium stochastic to unidirectional velocity vectors in a nanowire subjected to a towering electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Vijay K.; Chek, Desmond C. Y.; Tan, Michael L. P.; Hashim, Abdul Manaf

    2010-12-01

    The equilibrium Fermi-Dirac distribution is revealed to transform to an asymmetric distribution in a very high electric field where the energy gained (or lost) in a mean free path is of paramount importance. The equilibrium stochastic velocity vectors randomly oriented in and opposite to the quasifree direction of a nanowire are shown to streamline in the presence of an extremely high electric field. The complete velocity-field characteristics are acquired. The ultimate directed drift velocity in a towering field is shown to be limited to the appropriately averaged Fermi velocity in the strongly degenerate limit where only half of the quantum states are accessible to electrons. This unidirectional velocity does not sensitively depend on the low-field Ohmic mobility. The emission of a quantum in the form of a phonon or photon lowers the saturation velocity from its ultimate unidirectional limit.

  7. GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOOD CROPS AND PUBLIC HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Chaparro Giraldo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The progress made in plant biotechnology has provided an opportunity to new food crops being developed having desirable traits for improving crop yield, reducing the use of agrochemicals and adding nutritional properties to staple crops. However, genetically modified (GM crops have become a subject of intense debate in which opponents argue that GM crops represent a threat to individual freedom, the environment, public health and traditional economies. Despite the advances in food crop agriculture, the current world situation is still characterised by massive hunger and chronic malnutrition, representing a major public health problem. Biofortified GM crops have been considered an important and complementary strategy for delivering naturally-fortified staple foods to malnourished populations. Expert advice and public concern have led to designing strategies for assessing the potential risks involved in cultivating and consuming GM crops. The present critical review was aimed at expressing some conflicting points of view about the potential risks of GM crops for public health. It was concluded that GM food crops are no more risky than those genetically modified by conventional methods and that these GM crops might contribute towards reducing the amount of malnourished people around the world. However, all this needs to be complemented by effective political action aimed at increasing the income of people living below the poverty-line.

  8. GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOOD CROPS AND PUBLIC HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acosta Orlando

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The progress made in plant biotechnology has provided an opportunity to new food crops being developed having desirable traits for improving crop yield, reducing the use of agrochemicals and adding nutritional properties to staple crops. However, genetically modified (GM crops have become a subject of intense debate in which opponents argue that GM crops represent a threat to individual freedom, the environment, public health and traditional economies. Despite the advances in food crop agriculture, the current world situation is still characterised by massive hunger and chronic malnutrition, representing a major public health problem. Biofortified GM crops have been considered an important and complementary strategy for delivering naturally-fortified staple foods to malnourished populations. Expert advice and public concern have led to designing strategies for assessing the potential risks involved in cultivating and consuming GM crops. The present critical review was aimed at expressing some conflicting points of view about the potential risks of GM crops for public health. It was concluded that GM food crops are no more risky than those genetically modified by conventional methods and that these GM crops might contribute towards reducing the amount of malnourished people around the world. However, all this needs to be complemented by effective political action aimed at increasing the income of people living below the poverty-line.

  9. Quantum systems subjected to periodic and quasiperiodic external fields; Sistemas quanticos sujeitos a campos externos periodicos e quaseperiodicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hey, Heyder

    1996-12-31

    We have study three quantum systems under time dependent external fields. The first one is an harmonic oscillator and the external field is quasiperiodic. We prove that the autocorrelation spectrum is absolutely transient continuous covering the real line on the resonant case or pure point under supplementary diophantine conditions. The second one refers to the spin tunneling. We show that an external periodic field may causes a blocking of spin tunneling. The last problem concerns to the resonances of the Floquet spectrum on the non-perturbative region of parameters for the model of an atom with one bound state under an external periodic field. The problems of Quantum Chaology and Quantum Stability are the predominant points of view in this work. (author) 59 refs., 15 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. System of fermions confined in a harmonic potential and subject to a magnetic field or a rotational motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naïdja, H.; Bencheikh, K.; Bartel, J.; Quentin, P.

    2011-05-01

    Making use of the Bloch density matrix technique, we derive exact analytical expressions for the density profile in Fourier space, for the current density and the so-called integrated current for fermionic systems confined by a two-dimensional harmonic oscillator, in the presence of a magnetic field or in a rotating trap of arbitrary strength. We present numerical, illustrative examples with or without magnetic field (with or without rotation).

  11. SUBJECT INDEX

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subject Index. Variation of surface electric field during geomagnetic disturbed period at Maitri, Antarctica. 1721. Geomorphology. A simple depression-filling method for raster and irregular elevation datasets. 1653. Decision Support System integrated with Geographic. Information System to target restoration actions in water-.

  12. Can satellites help organic crop certification?

    OpenAIRE

    Denis, Antoine; Desclee, Baudouin; Migdall, Silke; Hanssen, Herbert; Bach, Heike; Ott, Pierre; Tychon, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Organic agriculture, while producing healthy food and contributing to protect the environment, needs to be certified in order to meet the consumers confidence. The objective of this study was to investigate how earth observation techniques could enhance the crop certification process and in particular the possibility to discriminate organic and conventional fields. These different crop management methods results in crop biophysical differences which are supposed to be observable by earth obse...

  13. Explaining participation differentials in Dutch higher education : the impact of subjective success probabilities on level choice and field choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolsma, J.; Need, A.; Jong, U. de

    2010-01-01

    In this article we examine whether subjective estimates of success probabilities explain the effect of social origin, sex, and ethnicity on students’ choices between different school tracks in Dutch higher education. The educational options analysed differ in level (i.e. university versus

  14. Connecting Biochemical Photosynthesis Models with Crop Models to Support Crop Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Alex; Song, Youhong; van Oosterom, Erik J; Hammer, Graeme L

    2016-01-01

    The next advance in field crop productivity will likely need to come from improving crop use efficiency of resources (e.g., light, water, and nitrogen), aspects of which are closely linked with overall crop photosynthetic efficiency. Progress in genetic manipulation of photosynthesis is confounded by uncertainties of consequences at crop level because of difficulties connecting across scales. Crop growth and development simulation models that integrate across biological levels of organization and use a gene-to-phenotype modeling approach may present a way forward. There has been a long history of development of crop models capable of simulating dynamics of crop physiological attributes. Many crop models incorporate canopy photosynthesis (source) as a key driver for crop growth, while others derive crop growth from the balance between source- and sink-limitations. Modeling leaf photosynthesis has progressed from empirical modeling via light response curves to a more mechanistic basis, having clearer links to the underlying biochemical processes of photosynthesis. Cross-scale modeling that connects models at the biochemical and crop levels and utilizes developments in upscaling leaf-level models to canopy models has the potential to bridge the gap between photosynthetic manipulation at the biochemical level and its consequences on crop productivity. Here we review approaches to this emerging cross-scale modeling framework and reinforce the need for connections across levels of modeling. Further, we propose strategies for connecting biochemical models of photosynthesis into the cross-scale modeling framework to support crop improvement through photosynthetic manipulation.

  15. Connecting Biochemical Photosynthesis Models with Crop Models to Support Crop Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Alex; Song, Youhong; van Oosterom, Erik J.; Hammer, Graeme L.

    2016-01-01

    The next advance in field crop productivity will likely need to come from improving crop use efficiency of resources (e.g., light, water, and nitrogen), aspects of which are closely linked with overall crop photosynthetic efficiency. Progress in genetic manipulation of photosynthesis is confounded by uncertainties of consequences at crop level because of difficulties connecting across scales. Crop growth and development simulation models that integrate across biological levels of organization and use a gene-to-phenotype modeling approach may present a way forward. There has been a long history of development of crop models capable of simulating dynamics of crop physiological attributes. Many crop models incorporate canopy photosynthesis (source) as a key driver for crop growth, while others derive crop growth from the balance between source- and sink-limitations. Modeling leaf photosynthesis has progressed from empirical modeling via light response curves to a more mechanistic basis, having clearer links to the underlying biochemical processes of photosynthesis. Cross-scale modeling that connects models at the biochemical and crop levels and utilizes developments in upscaling leaf-level models to canopy models has the potential to bridge the gap between photosynthetic manipulation at the biochemical level and its consequences on crop productivity. Here we review approaches to this emerging cross-scale modeling framework and reinforce the need for connections across levels of modeling. Further, we propose strategies for connecting biochemical models of photosynthesis into the cross-scale modeling framework to support crop improvement through photosynthetic manipulation. PMID:27790232

  16. Synthesis of Vaermeforsk's research programme 'Crops from field to energy'; Syntes av Vaermeforsks forskningsprogram 'Groedor fraan aaker till energi'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bubholz, Monika; Forsberg, Maya; Gunnarsson, Carina; Roennbaeck, Marie; Olsson, Johanna

    2010-06-15

    Vaermeforsk and the Swedish Farmers' Foundation for Agricultural Research (SLF), have jointly run the research programme 'Crops from field to energy'. The long-term aim of the programme is to increase production and utilization of bioenergy from agriculture for combustion and heat and power production in Sweden. About 20 projects have studied different parts of the chain from cultivation, harvest and storage to combustion and recycling of ash to farmland for agricultural fuels (straw, hemp, Reed Canary Grass and short rotation willow crops (Salix)). The aim of this report has been to compile and synthesise progress made during the programme and realization of its aims, as well as to identify the need of further research. The most important progress and conclusions made during the programme are: Cultivation - More knowledge and concrete advice concerning planting and growth of Salix, as well as on suitable length of harvest season, which enables planting cost reductions and increased yields. Increased knowledge on cultivation of Reed Canary Grass and combined cultivation with leguminous plants. Harvest and logistics - Comparisons and costs for different alternatives for harvest, handling and logistics has been produced for all of the agricultural fuels, both via theoretical and practical efforts, which can serve as a basis for direct measures as well as continued research. Processing/combustion/ash - It is possible to produce briquettes made from Reed Canary Grass and peat. New knowledge on combustion of Reed Canary Grass with different boilers is produced. It is now recommended as a fuel for co-combustion with wood and peat in large scale plants. Recommendations on co-combustion of Reed Canary Grass and Salix with peat have also been put forward, based on combustion tests. Experience from Denmark on large scale combustion of straw and production of high quality straw has been compiled. Additional costs that may arise when using agricultural fuels

  17. A descriptive roadmap: how to design for SWB? Interpreting design results in the field of subjective well-being

    OpenAIRE

    STEVENS, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Today’s public discourse on the design of care centers for the elderly population is increasingly emphasizing the importance of subjective well-being (SWB) and the value that architecture and interior architecture can have in this context. A design exercise was formulated for 10 groups of 4 master students in interior architecture in which they had to rethink the design of the communal space system of an existing residential care center (RCC) with the purpose of augmenting the living experien...

  18. African Crop Science Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Crop Science Journal, a quarterly publication, publishes original research papers dealing with all aspects of crop agronomy, production, genetics and breeding, germplasm, crop protection, post harvest systems and utilisation, agro-forestry, crop-animal interactions, information science, environmental science ...

  19. Kenaf and cowpea as sugarcane cover crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of cover crops during the fallow period prior to planting sugarcane has the potential to influence not only the following sugarcane crop, but the economics of the production system as a whole. Typically, a Louisiana sugarcane field is replanted every four years due to declining yields, and,...

  20. Effects of Radiation Heat Transfer on Entropy Generation at Thermosolutal Convection in a Square Cavity Subjected to a Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammar Ben Brahim

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Thermosolutal convection in a square cavity filled with a binary perfect gas mixture and submitted to an oriented magnetic field taking into account the effect of radiation heat transfer is numerically investigated. The cavity is heated and cooled along the active walls whereas the two other walls are adiabatic and insulated. Entropy generation due to heat and mass transfer, fluid friction and magnetic effect has been determined for laminar flow by solving numerically: The continuity, momentum energy and mass balance equations, using a Control Volume Finite-Element Method. The structure of the studied flows depends on five dimensionless parameters which are: The Grashof number, the buoyancy ratio, the Hartman number, the inclination angle of the magnetic field and the radiation parameter.

  1. Periodicity of crossover currents in a Rutherford-type cable subjected to a time-dependent magnetic field. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhmetov, A.; Devred, A. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Ogitsu, T. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States)]|[National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1993-09-01

    The behavior Of Rutherford-type cables under a time-dependent magnetic field is studied. Existing models are extended describing the currents flowing through the resistive contacts at the crossovers between the cable strands by considering crossover current distributions which are not uniform along the cable axis. The generalized system of equations are applied to a few cases of practical interest and show that, if not uniform, the crossover current distribution is periodic, with a period equal to the cable pitch length.

  2. Impact of cash cropping and perennial crops on food crop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increased crop production and sale of part of production during the main harvest season led households to ... Ethiopia, crop income accounts for the largest share of total income, 71%, followed by share of off-farm ... and Olinto (2001), in Colombia, off-farm employment contributes a significant share. (45%) to household ...

  3. Crop responses to climatic variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porter, John R.; Semenov, Mikhail A.

    2005-01-01

    production. However, crops can respond nonlinearly to changes in their growing conditions, exhibit threshold responses and are subject to combinations of stress factors that affect their growth, development and yield. Thus, climate variability and changes in the frequency of extreme events are important...... sufficient importance when assessing the impact of climate change for food and this is addressed. Using simulation models of wheat, the concentration of grain protein is shown to respond to changes in the mean and variability of temperature and precipitation events. The paper concludes with discussion...... resolution. This paper demonstrates the impacts of climate variability for crop production in a number of crops. Increasing temperature and precipitation variability increases the risks to yield, as shown via computer simulation and experimental studies. The issue of food quality has not been given...

  4. Plant communities of cultivated fields of the Podlaski Przełom Bugu mesoregion part vi. communities of root crops on compact soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Rzymowska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of plant communities accompanying root crops on compact soils is presented in the paper. It is the next part of the review of plant communities of agrocenoses of the Podlaski Przełom Bugu (Podlasie Bug Gorge mesoregion. The studied phytocoenoses were identified on the basis of 103 phytosociological relevés, made according to the Braun-Blanquet method. In the studied agrocenoses, plots of the associations Lamio-Veronicetum politae, Galinsogo-Setarietum and Oxalido-Chenopodietum polyspermi from the Polygono-Chenopodion polyspermi alliance were noted. Small patches of Lamio-Veronicetum and Oxalido-Chenopodietum were rarely noted in the studied area due to a small proportion of suitable habitats. In the area of Podlaski Przełom Bugu mesoregion, phytocoenoses of Oxalido-Chenopodietum developed in the river valleys on fertile muds and black soils. Typical plots of Galinsogo-Setarietum distinguishable by the mass occurrence of Galinsoga parviflora were only observed in the vicinity of farm buildings. Intermediate communities between Panico-Setarion and Polygono-Chenopodion polyspermi as well as phytocoenoces of Echinochloo-Setarietum typicum - subvariant with Veronica persica and Echinochloo-Setarietum fumarietosum - were also quite frequently noted in root crops on compact soils.

  5. Plant communities of cultivated fields of the Podlaski Przełom Bugu mesoregion. Part 5. Root crop communities of light soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Rzymowska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This present paper, focused on root crop communities of light soils, is a part of the wide range characteristics of segetal communities of the Podlaski Przełom Bugu (Podlasie Bug River Gorge mesoregion. On the basis of 160 phytosociological relevés made according to the Braun-Blanquet method, phytocenoses representing the Panico-Setarion alliance were distinguished. Most often, patches of the association Echinochloo-Setarietum were recorded in the study area. Heterogeneous habitat conditions affect its floristic diversity. Two subassociations of the phytocenosis, divided according to the species composition into 9 lower syntaxa, were identified on light soils. The following subassociations were distinguished: Echinochloo-Setarietum setarietosum glaucae in a typical variant and a variant with Juncus bufonius, both with subvariants with Digitaria ischaemum, as well as a typical variant of Echinochloo-Setarietum typicum, a variant with Juncus bufonius and a subvariant with Oxalis stricta in the typical and wet variant. Another association found in root crops on light soils of the Podlaski Przełom Bugu mesoregion is Digitarietum ischaemi. Its patches were observed in cultivations on light, acidic, poor soils. The characteristic feature of this community is the occurrence of numerous acidophilous species. In habitat conditions typical for the Podlaski Przełom Bugu mesoregion, Digitarietum ischaemi is differentiated into the typical and wet variant. Quite frequent patches of the Setaria pumila-Setaria viridis community were noted in intermediate habitat conditions, between those characteristic for Digitarietum ischaemi and Echinochloo-Setarietum.

  6. Monitoring Crop Phenology and Growth Stages from Space: Opportunities and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, F.; Anderson, M. C.; Mladenova, I. E.; Kustas, W. P.; Alfieri, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    Crop growth stages in concert with weather and soil moisture conditions can have a significant impact on crop yields. In the U.S., crop growth stages and conditions are reported by farmers at the county level. These reports are somewhat subjective and fluctuate between different reporters, locations and times. Remote sensing data provide an alternative approach to monitoring crop growth over large areas in a more consistent and quantitative way. In the recent years, remote sensing data have been used to detect vegetation phenology at 1-km spatial resolution globally. However, agricultural applications at field scale require finer spatial resolution remote sensing data. Landsat (30-m) data have been successfully used for agricultural applications. There are many medium resolution sensors available today or in near future. These include Landsat, SPOT, RapidEye, ASTER and future Sentinel-2 etc. Approaches have been developed in the past several years to integrate remote sensing data from different sensors which may have different sensor characteristics, and spatial and temporal resolutions. This allows us opportunities today to map crop growth stages and conditions using dense time-series remote sensing at field scales. However, remotely sensed phenology (or phenological metrics) is normally derived based on the mathematical functions of the time-series data. The phenological metrics are determined by either identifying inflection (curvature) points or some pre-defined thresholds in the remote sensing phenology algorithms. Furthermore, physiological crop growth stages may not be directly correlated to the remotely sensed phenology. The relationship between remotely sensed phenology and crop growth stages is likely to vary for specific crop types and varieties, growing stages, conditions and even locations. In this presentation, we will examine the relationship between remotely sensed phenology and crop growth stages using in-situ measurements from Fluxnet sites and

  7. Investigation on Indoor Air Pollution and Childhood Allergies in Households in Six Chinese Cities by Subjective Survey and Field Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinhua; Li, Nianping; Lv, Yang; Liu, Jing; Xie, Jingchao; Zhang, Huibo

    2017-08-29

    Greater attention is currently being paid to the relationship between indoor environment and childhood allergies, however, the lack of reliable data and the disparity among different areas hinders reliable assessment of the relationship. This study focuses on the effect of indoor pollution on Chinese schoolchildren and the relationship between specific household and health problems suffered. The epidemiological questionnaire survey and the field measurement of the indoor thermal environment and primary air pollutants including CO₂, fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ), chemical pollutants and fungi were performed in six Chinese cities. A total of 912 questionnaires were eligible for statistical analyses and sixty houses with schoolchildren aged 9-12 were selected for field investigation. Compared with Chinese national standards, inappropriate indoor relative humidity (70%), CO₂ concentration exceeding 1000 ppm and high PM 2.5 levels were found in some monitored houses. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and dibutyl phthalate (DBP) were the most frequently detected semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in house dust. Cladosporium , Aspergillus and Penicillium were detected in both indoor air and house dust. This study indicates that a thermal environment with CO₂ exceeding 1000 ppm, DEHP and DBP exceeding 1000 μg/g, and high level of PM 2.5 , Cladosporium , Aspergillus and Penicillium increases the risk of children's allergies.

  8. Flows and torques in Brownian ferrofluids subjected to rotating uniform magnetic fields in a cylindrical and annular geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres-Diaz, I.; Cortes, A.; Rinaldi, C., E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, Puerto Rico 00681-9000 (United States); Cedeño-Mattei, Y. [Department of Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, Puerto Rico 00681-9019 (United States); Perales-Perez, O. [Department of Engineering Science and Materials, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, Puerto Rico 00681-9044 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Ferrofluid flow in cylindrical and annular geometries under the influence of a uniform rotating magnetic field was studied experimentally using aqueous ferrofluids consisting of low concentrations (<0.01 v/v) of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with Brownian relaxation to test the ferrohydrodynamic equations, elucidate the existence of couple stresses, and determine the value of the spin viscosity in these fluids. An ultrasound technique was used to measure bulk velocity profiles in the spin-up (cylindrical) and annular geometries, varying the intensity and frequency of the rotating magnetic field generated by a two pole stator winding. Additionally, torque measurements in the cylindrical geometry were made. Results show rigid-body like velocity profiles in the bulk, and no dependence on the axial direction. Experimental velocity profiles were in quantitative agreement with the predictions of the spin diffusion theory, with a value of the spin viscosity of ∼10{sup −8} kg m/s, two orders of magnitude larger than the value estimated earlier for iron oxide based ferrofluids, and 12 orders of magnitude larger than estimated using dimensional arguments valid in the infinite dilution limit. These results provide further evidence of the existence of couple stresses in ferrofluids and their role in driving the spin-up flow phenomenon.

  9. Validation of Crop Weather Models for'Crop Assessment arid Yield ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information gatheringfor early warning and crop assessment in Tanzania is based on physical inspection of standing crop in sample jields. This process is subject to human error, inadequate and is also time con- suming. Recent developments in computer simulation have paved the way for more efficient methods of.

  10. 數位學習領域主題分析之研究 Subject Analysis on the Field of E-Learning Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Fu Lee

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available 近年來數位化資訊技術應用於教與學情況已成為趨勢,各國紛紛將數位學習的推動列為國家重要政策,對數位學習領域之研究發展極為重視。本研究採廣義數位學習定義之檢索策略,蒐集2000~2009年間合計2,125篇數位學習領域SSCI期刊文獻,以自動化內容探勘工具CATAR進行剖析,再分別以共現字及書目對進行研究主題分析,藉此歸納數位學習領域的研究主題架構。本研究歸納結果,除幫助研究人員檢視自己的領域專長、掌握數位學習各研究主題發展脈絡、做為學者專家選定研究主題之參考,更有助於瞭解國際間數位學習領域的研究發展現況。With the digital development and the global trend of information technology applying teaching and learning in recent years, every country around the world regards the promotion of e-learning as a very important policy of the country. They lay special emphasis on the development of the subject research in e-learning. The present study adopts the search strategy of generalized definition of e-learning and collects 2,125 SSCI periodical literature in total on e-learning field from the years of 2000 till 2009. They are analyzed with automatic context exploration tool CATAR to proceed to dissection. Then they are respectively analyzed with co-occurrence words and bibliographic coupling to proceed to the research subject analysis. Thus it can integrate the frames of research subjects of e-learning field. Not only can the results of the present study help the researchers to look into their own field specialty, to master the development situation of research subject dimensions and to make reference to the scholars and experts to determine their research subjects, but it can also help understand the research development status of international e-learning field.

  11. Balanço de energia na cultura de pepineiro em ambiente natural e protegido Energy balance in cucumber crop in greenhouse and field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EMERSON GALVANI

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se, diariamente, neste trabalho, o saldo de radiação (SR, o fluxo de calor no solo (G, o fluxo de calor latente de evaporação (LE e o fluxo de calor sensível (H ao longo do ciclo da cultura de pepineiro cultivado dentro e fora de casa de vegetação em ciclo de outono-inverno e primavera-verão. O SR e o G foram quantificados e o LE e o H estimados em dois níveis distintos pelo método da razão de Bowen. Os resultados mostram que a maior parte da energia disponível foi utilizada no fluxo de calor latente de evaporação e que os componentes do balanço de energia apresentaram-se mais consistentes em níveis próximos ao dossel da cultura e em ambiente protegido.The net radiation balance (SR, the flow of heat in the soil (G, the flow of latent heat of evaporation (LE and the flow of sensitive heat (H were evaluated daily along the cycle of the cucumber crop cultivated inside and outside greenhouse in the autumn-winter and spring-summer cycles. SR and G were quantified and LE and H were estimated at two different levels by the method of Bowen ratio. The results showed that most of the available energy was used in the flow of latent heat of evaporation and that the components of the energy balance were more consistent in levels close to the dossel of the crop and in the greenhouse.

  12. Longitudinal Seismic Behavior of a Single-Tower Cable-Stayed Bridge Subjected to Near-Field Earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Yi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cable-stayed bridges are quite sensitive to large amplitude oscillations from earthquakes and seismic damage was observed for Shipshaw Bridge and Chi-Lu Bridge during past earthquakes. In order to investigate seismic damage of cable-stayed bridges, a 1 : 20 scale model of a single-tower cable-stayed bridge with A-shaped tower was designed, constructed, and tested on shake tables at Tongji University, China. One typical near-field ground motion was used to excite the model from low to high intensity. Test result showed that severe structural damage occurred at the tower of the model including parallel concrete cracks from bottom to nearly half height of the tower, concrete spalling, and exposed bars at top tower 0.2 m above the section where two skewed legs intersect. Posttest analysis was conducted and compared with test results. It is revealed that the numerical model was able to simulate the seismic damage of the test model by modeling nonlinearity of different components for cable-stayed bridges, namely, the tower, bents, superstructure, cables, and bearings. Numerical analysis also revealed that cable relaxation, which was detected during the test, had limited influence on the overall seismic response of the bridge with maximum error of 12%.

  13. Topography Mediates the Influence of Cover Crops on Soil Nitrate Levels in Row Crop Agricultural Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladoni, Moslem; Kravchenko, Alexandra N; Robertson, G Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Supplying adequate amounts of soil N for plant growth during the growing season and across large agricultural fields is a challenge for conservational agricultural systems with cover crops. Knowledge about cover crop effects on N comes mostly from small, flat research plots and performance of cover crops across topographically diverse agricultural land is poorly understood. Our objective was to assess effects of both leguminous (red clover) and non-leguminous (winter rye) cover crops on potentially mineralizable N (PMN) and [Formula: see text] levels across a topographically diverse landscape. We studied conventional, low-input, and organic managements in corn-soybean-wheat rotation. The rotations of low-input and organic managements included rye and red clover cover crops. The managements were implemented in twenty large undulating fields in Southwest Michigan starting from 2006. The data collection and analysis were conducted during three growing seasons of 2011, 2012 and 2013. Observational micro-plots with and without cover crops were laid within each field on three contrasting topographical positions of depression, slope and summit. Soil samples were collected 4-5 times during each growing season and analyzed for [Formula: see text] and PMN. The results showed that all three managements were similar in their temporal and spatial distributions of NO3-N. Red clover cover crop increased [Formula: see text] by 35% on depression, 20% on slope and 32% on summit positions. Rye cover crop had a significant 15% negative effect on [Formula: see text] in topographical depressions but not in slope and summit positions. The magnitude of the cover crop effects on soil mineral nitrogen across topographically diverse fields was associated with the amount of cover crop growth and residue production. The results emphasize the potential environmental and economic benefits that can be generated by implementing site-specific topography-driven cover crop management in row-crop

  14. A description of a staff development program: Preparing the elementary school classroom teacher to lead environmental field trips and to use an integrated subject approach to environmental education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egana, John Joseph

    This study of the Field Trip Specialist Program (FTS) described how a professional development plan fostered change in the traditional roles of third and fourth grade teachers. Teachers that volunteered were prepared to become interpretive guides for their class on environmental field trips, integrate their basic subject areas lessons into an environmental science context, and develop their self-perception as professional educators. This qualitative study made use of quantitative data and drew on information collected over four years from surveys, interviews, classroom observations, field trip and workshop observations, focus groups, journals and assessments performed in Florida. The FTS Program attracted teachers who thought it was important for all students to understand environmental issues, and these teachers believed in integrated instruction. These beliefs were inconsistent with many aspects of school culture. FTS invited the participation of these teachers and encouraged them to take control of the program by serving as instructors and program developers. Teachers described themselves as prepared to deliver the FTS Program with a high level of motivation and relevance. They also credited the program as beneficial in preparation for the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Tests (FCAT). Teachers reported that their responsibility as field trip leaders was the primary factor motivating them to provide conscientious presentation of pre- and post-field trip lessons and thorough integration of environmental topics in basic subject area instruction. Despite the impact of the field trip leadership factor, I could not find another program in the State of Florida that required teachers to lead their own field trips. Other influential factors specific to this program were: Voluntary participation, on-site field instruction, peer instructors and program developers, high quality and task specific materials, and pre- and post-assessments for students. Factors were identified

  15. Interaction Between Livestock And Crop Farming In Northern Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study looked at the role of livestock and its interaction with crop production in an integrated crop-livestock farming system in Katsina State. Field data were collected through household survey of 120 respondent located in six villages in Katsina State. The result shows that there was a high level of crop-livestock ...

  16. Simulating Effects of Drainage Design Parameters on Optimum Crop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agricultural water management system aims to provide crop water requirements to sustain optimum yield. Some of the factors influencing optimum crop yield are drainage design parameters in water-logged soils. Hence, the impact of drainage design parameters on optimum crop yield was examined. Field experimentation ...

  17. Effects of night time road traffic noise—an overview of laboratory and field studies on noise dose and subjective noise sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öhrström, E.; Rylander, R.; Björkman, M.

    1988-12-01

    This paper presents an overview of research on sleep and noise at the Department of Environmental Hygiene, University of Gothenburg. Different methods were developed to study primary and after effects of night time road traffic noise on sleep. Three one-week laboratory experiments were undertaken to study the relevance of different noise descriptors— Leq, maximum peak noise level and number of events with high peak noise levels—for sleep disturbance effects. The noise exposure was either single noise evenys or a continuous, even road traffic noise. It was concluded that Leq was not related to sleep disturbance effects. Peak noise levels were significantly related to subjective sleep quality and body movements. Results from a third continuing study showed that there is a threshold for effects of the number of single noise events on sleep quality. Habituation to noise among subjects with differing noise sensitivity was studied in a two-week experiment. A significant noise effect on subjective sleep quality was found among sensitive subjects only. No habituation was seen for the negative influence of noise on sleep quality, mood and performance. Long-term effects of road traffic noise were also investigated in a field survey among 106 individuals. This study revealed the presence of a decrease in sleep quality as well as psycho-social effects on tiredness and mood, together with increased reports of headaches and nervous stomach. As in the laboratory study, sensitive individuals were more affected by noise than less sensitive individuals.

  18. Effects of Break Crops on Yield and Grain Protein Concentration of Barley in a Boreal Climate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Zou

    Full Text Available Rotation with dicotyledonous crops to break cereal monoculture has proven to be beneficial to successive cereals. In two fields where the soil had been subjected to prolonged, continuous cereal production, two 3-year rotation trials were established. In the first year, faba bean, turnip rape and barley were grown, as first crops, in large blocks and their residues tilled into the soil after harvest. In the following year, barley, buckwheat, caraway, faba bean, hemp and white lupin were sown, as second crops, in each block and incorporated either at flowering stage (except barley or after harvest. In the third year, barley was grown in all plots and its yield and grain protein concentration were determined. Mineral N in the plough layer was determined two months after incorporation of crops and again before sowing barley in the following year. The effect of faba bean and turnip rape on improving barley yields and grain protein concentration was still detectable two years after they were grown. The yield response of barley was not sensitive to the growth stage of second crops when they were incorporated, but was to different second crops, showing clear benefits averaging 6-7% after white lupin, faba bean and hemp but no benefit from caraway or buckwheat. The effect of increased N in the plough layer derived from rotation crops on barley yields was minor. Incorporation of plants at flowering stage slightly increased third-year barley grain protein concentration but posed a great potential for N loss compared with incorporation of crop residues after harvest, showing the value of either delayed incorporation or using catch crops.

  19. Effects of Break Crops on Yield and Grain Protein Concentration of Barley in a Boreal Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ling; Yli-Halla, Markku; Stoddard, Frederick L; Mäkelä, Pirjo S A

    2015-01-01

    Rotation with dicotyledonous crops to break cereal monoculture has proven to be beneficial to successive cereals. In two fields where the soil had been subjected to prolonged, continuous cereal production, two 3-year rotation trials were established. In the first year, faba bean, turnip rape and barley were grown, as first crops, in large blocks and their residues tilled into the soil after harvest. In the following year, barley, buckwheat, caraway, faba bean, hemp and white lupin were sown, as second crops, in each block and incorporated either at flowering stage (except barley) or after harvest. In the third year, barley was grown in all plots and its yield and grain protein concentration were determined. Mineral N in the plough layer was determined two months after incorporation of crops and again before sowing barley in the following year. The effect of faba bean and turnip rape on improving barley yields and grain protein concentration was still detectable two years after they were grown. The yield response of barley was not sensitive to the growth stage of second crops when they were incorporated, but was to different second crops, showing clear benefits averaging 6-7% after white lupin, faba bean and hemp but no benefit from caraway or buckwheat. The effect of increased N in the plough layer derived from rotation crops on barley yields was minor. Incorporation of plants at flowering stage slightly increased third-year barley grain protein concentration but posed a great potential for N loss compared with incorporation of crop residues after harvest, showing the value of either delayed incorporation or using catch crops.

  20. Impact of climate change on crop yield and role of model for achieving food security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj

    2016-08-01

    In recent times, several studies around the globe indicate that climatic changes are likely to impact the food production and poses serious challenge to food security. In the face of climate change, agricultural systems need to adapt measures for not only increasing food supply catering to the growing population worldwide with changing dietary patterns but also to negate the negative environmental impacts on the earth. Crop simulation models are the primary tools available to assess the potential consequences of climate change on crop production and informative adaptive strategies in agriculture risk management. In consideration with the important issue, this is an attempt to provide a review on the relationship between climate change impacts and crop production. It also emphasizes the role of crop simulation models in achieving food security. Significant progress has been made in understanding the potential consequences of environment-related temperature and precipitation effect on agricultural production during the last half century. Increased CO2 fertilization has enhanced the potential impacts of climate change, but its feasibility is still in doubt and debates among researchers. To assess the potential consequences of climate change on agriculture, different crop simulation models have been developed, to provide informative strategies to avoid risks and understand the physical and biological processes. Furthermore, they can help in crop improvement programmes by identifying appropriate future crop management practises and recognizing the traits having the greatest impact on yield. Nonetheless, climate change assessment through model is subjected to a range of uncertainties. The prediction uncertainty can be reduced by using multimodel, incorporating crop modelling with plant physiology, biochemistry and gene-based modelling. For devloping new model, there is a need to generate and compile high-quality field data for model testing. Therefore, assessment of

  1. Mapping 3D breast lesions from full-field digital mammograms using subject-specific finite element models

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, E.; Oliver, A.; Diaz, O.; Diez, Y.; Gubern-Mérida, A.; Martí, R.; Martí, J.

    2017-03-01

    Patient-specific finite element (FE) models of the breast have received increasing attention due to the potential capability of fusing images from different modalities. During the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to X-ray mammography registration procedure, the FE model is compressed mimicking the mammographic acquisition. Subsequently, suspicious lesions in the MRI volume can be projected into the 2D mammographic space. However, most registration algorithms do not provide the reverse information, avoiding to obtain the 3D geometrical information from the lesions localized in the mammograms. In this work we introduce a fast method to localize the 3D position of the lesion within the MRI, using both cranio-caudal (CC) and medio-lateral oblique (MLO) mammographic projections, indexing the tetrahedral elements of the biomechanical model by means of an uniform grid. For each marked lesion in the Full-Field Digital Mammogram (FFDM), the X-ray path from source to the marker is calculated. Barycentric coordinates are computed in the tetrahedrons traversed by the ray. The list of elements and coordinates allows to localize two curves within the MRI and the closest point between both curves is taken as the 3D position of the lesion. The registration errors obtained in the mammographic space are 9.89 +/- 3.72 mm in CC- and 8.04 +/- 4.68 mm in MLO-projection and the error in the 3D MRI space is equal to 10.29 +/- 3.99 mm. Regarding the uniform grid, it is computed spending between 0.1 and 0.7 seconds. The average time spent to compute the 3D location of a lesion is about 8 ms.

  2. Rainfed intensive crop systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jørgen E

    2014-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the importance of intensive cropping systems in contributing to the world supply of food and feed. The impact of climate change on intensive crop production systems is also discussed....

  3. Stable isotope evidences for identifying crop water uptake in a typical winter wheat-summer maize rotation field in the North China Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Li, Fadong; Ai, Zhipin; Li, Jing; Gu, Congke

    2017-11-09

    Better managing agricultural water resources, which are increasingly stressed by climate change and anthropogenic activities, is difficult, particularly because of variations in water uptake patterns associated with crop type and growth stage. Thus, the stable isotopes δ18O and δ2H were employed to investigate the water uptake patterns of a summer maize (Zea mays L.) and winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) rotation system in the North China Plain. Based on the soil water content, soil layers were divided into four groups (0-20cm, 20-40cm, 40-120cm, and 120-200cm) using a hierarchical cluster analysis. The main soil layer of water uptake for summer maize was from 0-20cm at the trefoil (77.8%) and jointing (48.6%) stages to 20-40cm at the booting (33.6%) and heading (32.6%) stages, became 40-120cm at the silking (32.0%) and milking (36.7%) stages, and then returned to 0-20cm at the mature (35.0%) and harvest (52.4%) stages. Winter wheat most absorbed water from the 0-20cm soil water at the wintering (86.6%), seedling (83.7%), jointing (45.2%), booting (51.4%), heading (28.8%), and mature (67.8%) stages, but it was 20-40cm at the flowering (34.8%) and milking (25.2%) stages. The dry root weight density was positively correlated with the contributions of the water uptake for winter wheat. However, no similar correlation was found in summer maize. Regression analysis indicated that the soil volumetric water content (SVWC) was negatively correlated with the contribution of the water uptake (CWU) for summer maize (CWU=-0.91×SVWC+57.75) and winter wheat (CWU=-2.03×SVWC+92.73). These different responses to water uptake contributions suggested that a traditional irrigation event should be postponed from the booting to flowering stage of winter wheat. This study provides insights into crop water uptake and agricultural water management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Liquid-solid phase transition of physical hydrogels subject to an externally applied electro-chemo-mechanical coupled field with mobile ionic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Li, Hua

    2017-08-09

    In this study, a model was multiphysically developed for the simulation of the phase transition of physical hydrogels between liquid solution and solid gel states, subject to an electro-chemo-mechanically coupled field, with the effect of the mobile ionic species in the solution. The present model consists of the governing equations for the equilibrium of forces and the conservation of mass, Maxwell's equations, and an evolution equation for the interface. Based on the second law of thermodynamics, the constitutive equations are formulated from the energy viewpoint, including a novel formulation of free energy with the effect of crosslink density. The present model may be reduced to Suo's non-equilibrium thermodynamic theory if the interface is ignored when only a single phase exists. It may also be reduced to Dolbow's model for gel-gel phase transition when the electric field is ignored. Therefore, the present model becomes more generalized since it is able to represent both the bulk phase and the interface behaviors, and the mechanical field is simultaneously coupled with both the electric and chemical fields. In the first case study, the system at equilibrium state was numerically investigated for analysis of the influences of the electrical and chemical potentials as well as the mechanical pressure externally imposed on the boundary of the system domain. The second case study presents a spherically symmetrical solution-gel phase transition at non-equilibrium states, with the emphasis on the evolution of both the interface and electrochemical potentials.

  5. Amelioration of drought-induced negative responses by elevated CO2 in field grown short rotation coppice mulberry (Morus spp.), a potential bio-energy tree crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, Kalva Madhana; Reddy, Kanubothula Sitarami; Reddy, Attipalli Ramachandra

    2017-05-01

    Present study describes the responses of short rotation coppice (SRC) mulberry, a potential bio-energy tree, grown under interactive environment of elevated CO2 (E) and water stress (WS). Growth in E stimulated photosynthetic performance in well-watered (WW) as well as during WS with significant increases in light-saturated photosynthetic rates (A Sat), water use efficiency (WUEi), intercellular [CO2], and photosystem-II efficiency (F V/F M and ∆F/F M') with concomitant reduction in stomatal conductance (g s) and transpiration (E) compared to ambient CO2 (A) grown plants. Reduced levels of proline, H2O2, and malondialdehyde (MDA) and higher contents of antioxidants including ascorbic acid and total phenolics in WW and WS in E plants clearly demonstrated lesser oxidative damage. Further, A plants showed higher transcript abundance and antioxidant enzyme activities under WW as well as during initial stages of WS (15 days). However, with increasing drought imposition (30 days), A plants showed down regulation of antioxidant systems compared to their respective E plants. These results clearly demonstrated that future increased atmospheric CO2 enhances the photosynthetic potential and also mitigate the drought-induced oxidative stress in SRC mulberry. In conclusion, mulberry is a potential bio-energy tree crop which is best suitable for short rotation coppice forestry-based mitigation of increased [CO2] levels even under intermittent drought conditions, projected to prevail in the fast-changing global climate.

  6. Tillage and cover cropping effects on soil properties and crop production in Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cover crops (CCs) have been heralded for their potential to improve soil properties, retain nutrients in the field, and increase subsequent crop yields yet support for these claims within the state of Illinois remains limited. We assessed the effects of integrating five sets of CCs into a corn-soybe...

  7. Crop residue management in arable cropping systems under a temperate climate. Part 2: Soil physical properties and crop production. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiel, MP.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Residues of previous crops provide a valuable amount of organic matter that can be used either to restore soil fertility or for external use. A better understanding of the impact of crop residue management on the soil-water-plant system is needed in order to manage agricultural land sustainably. This review focuses on soil physical aspects related to crop residue management, and specifically on the link between soil structure and hydraulic properties and its impact on crop production. Literature. Conservation practices, including crop residue retention and non-conventional tillage, can enhance soil health by improving aggregate stability. In this case, water infiltration is facilitated, resulting in an increase in plant water availability. Conservation practices, however, do not systematically lead to higher water availability for the plant. The influence of crop residue management on crop production is still unclear; in some cases, crop production is enhanced by residue retention, but in others crop residues can reduce crop yield. Conclusions. In this review we discuss the diverse and contrasting effects of crop residue management on soil physical properties and crop production under a temperate climate. The review highlights the importance of environmental factors such as soil type and local climatic conditions, highlighting the need to perform field studies on crop residue management and relate them to specific pedo-climatic contexts.

  8. Arrangement of experiments for simulating the effects of elevated temperatures and elevated CO2 levels on field-sown crops in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. HAKALA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The experimental plants: spring wheat, winter wheat, spring barley, meadow fescue, potato, strawberry and black currant were sown or planted directly in the field, part of which was covered by an automatically controlled greenhouse to elevate the temperature by 3°C. The temperature of the other part of the field (open field was not elevated, but the field was covered with the same plastic film as the greenhouse to achieve radiation and rainfall conditions comparable to those in the greenhouse. To elevate the CO2 concentrations, four open top chambers (OTC were built for the greenhouse, and four for the open field. Two of these, both in the greenhouse and in the open field, were supplied with pure CO2 to elevate their CO2 level to 700 ppm. The temperatures inside the greenhouse followed accurately the desired level. The relative humidity was somewhat higher in the greenhouse and in the OTC:s than in the open field, especially after the modifications in the ventilation of the greenhouse and in the OTC:s in 1994. Because the OTC:s were large (3 m in diameter, the temperatures inside them differed very little from the surrounding air temperature. The short-term variation in the CO2 concentrations in the OTC:s with elevated CO2 was, however, quite high. The control of the CO2 concentrations improved each year from 1992 to 1994, as the CO2 supplying system was modified. The effects of the experimental conditions on plant growth and phenology are discussed.;

  9. Ecoinformatics reveals effects of crop rotational histories on cotton yield.

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    Matthew H Meisner

    Full Text Available Crop rotation has been practiced for centuries in an effort to improve agricultural yield. However, the directions, magnitudes, and mechanisms of the yield effects of various crop rotations remain poorly understood in many systems. In order to better understand how crop rotation influences cotton yield, we used hierarchical Bayesian models to analyze a large ecoinformatics database consisting of records of commercial cotton crops grown in California's San Joaquin Valley. We identified several crops that, when grown in a field the year before a cotton crop, were associated with increased or decreased cotton yield. Furthermore, there was a negative association between the effect of the prior year's crop on June densities of the pest Lygus hesperus and the effect of the prior year's crop on cotton yield. This suggested that some crops may enhance L. hesperus densities in the surrounding agricultural landscape, because residual L. hesperus populations from the previous year cannot continuously inhabit a focal field and attack a subsequent cotton crop. In addition, we found that cotton yield declined approximately 2.4% for each additional year in which cotton was grown consecutively in a field prior to the focal cotton crop. Because L. hesperus is quite mobile, the effects of crop rotation on L. hesperus would likely not be revealed by small plot experimentation. These results provide an example of how ecoinformatics datasets, which capture the true spatial scale of commercial agriculture, can be used to enhance agricultural productivity.

  10. Profiling crop pollinators: life history traits predict habitat use and crop visitation by Mediterranean wild bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanty, Gideon; Mandelik, Yael

    2015-04-01

    Wild pollinators, bees in particular, may greatly contribute to crop pollination and provide a safety net against declines in commercial pollinators. However, the identity, life history traits, and environmental sensitivities of main crop pollinator species.have received limited attention. These are crucial for predicting pollination services of different communities and for developing management practices that enhance crop pollinators. We sampled wild bees in three crop systems (almond, confection sunflower, and seed watermelon) in a mosaic Israeli Mediterranean landscape. Bees were sampled in field/orchard edges and interiors, and in seminatural scrub surrounding the fields/orchards. We also analyzed land cover at 50-2500 m radii around fields/orchards. We used this data to distinguish crop from non-crop pollinators based on a set of life history traits (nesting, lecty, sociality, body size) linked to habitat preference and crop visitation. Bee abundance and species richness decreased from the surrounding seminatural habitat to the field/orchard interior, especially across the seminatural habitat-field edge ecotone. Thus, although rich bee communities were found near fields, only small fractions crossed the ecotone and visited crop flowers in substantial numbers. The bee assemblage in agricultural fields/orchards and on crop flowers was dominated by ground-nesting bees of the tribe Halictini, which tend to nest within fields. Bees' habitat preferences were determined mainly by nesting guild, whereas crop visitation was determined mainly by sociality. Lecty and body size also affected both measures. The percentage of surrounding seminatural habitat at 250-2500 m radii had a positive effect on wild bee diversity in field edges, for all bee guilds, while at 50-100 m radii, only aboveground nesters were positively affected. In sum, we found that crop and non-crop pollinators are distinguished by behavioral and morphological traits. Hence, analysis of life

  11. Subjective alcohol responses in a cross-sectional, field-based study of adolescents and young adults: Effects of age, drinking level, and dependence/consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treloar, Hayley; Celio, Mark A; Lisman, Stephen A; Miranda, Robert; Spear, Linda P

    2017-01-01

    Adolescents are physically, cognitively, socially, and emotionally different than adults in ways that may partially explain why alcohol misuse typically develops during this period. Ample animal-science evidence and nascent ecological evidence points toward developmentally limited differences in sensitivity to alcohol's stimulatory and sedative effects. Field-based research methods were used to test for such age-related differences in a sample of adolescents through young adults. Potential moderating influences of estimated blood alcohol content (eBAC), as well as typical consumption and level of dependence/consequences were explored. Subjective alcohol responses were collected from 1,364 participants, aged 17 to 32 years, recruited outside of venues where drinking takes place in a small metropolitan bar district. Self-reports of stimulatory response to alcohol were age-related, such that younger participants reported increased subjective stimulation at the time of data collection relative to older participants. Age-related differences in stimulatory responses were more pronounced at lower eBACs and among younger participants who typically drank more heavily. Stimulatory responses generally diminished among older than younger participants, although individuals with greater dependence/consequences consistently reported greater stimulation from drinking. Contrastingly, age, typical consumption, and dependence/consequences were not related to sedation in this sample. This research provides cross-sectional evidence to support age-, consumption-, and dependence/consequences-related differences in stimulatory alcohol responses among adolescents and young adults assessed within a bar-area context. While cross-sectional, the results of this field-based study provide support for the theory that addiction liability is developmentally linked and associated, in part, with age-related differences in subjective alcohol responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All

  12. Selectivity and stability of new herbicides and herbicide combinations for the seed yields of some field crops I. Effect at Coriander (Coriandrum Sativum L.

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    G. Delchev

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. . The research was conducted during 2013 – 2015 on pellic vertisol soil type. Under investigation was Bulgarian coriander cultivar Lozen 1 (Coriandrum sativum L.. The purpose of the investigation was to establish the selectivity and stability of some herbicides, herbicide combinations and herbicide tank mixtures on the coriander. Factor A included the years of investigation. Factor B included no treated check, 6 soil-applied herbicides – Tendar EC, Silba SC, Sharpen 33 EC, Merlin flex 480 SC, Smerch 24 ЕC, Raft 400 SC and 5 foliar-applied herbicides – Kalin flo, Eclipse 70 DWG, Sultan 500 SC, Corrida 75 DWG, Lontrel 300 EC. Factor C included no treated check and 1 antigraminaceous herbicide – Tiger platinium 5 EC. Soil-applied herbicides were treated during the period after sowing before emergence. Foliar-applied herbicides were treated during rosette stage of the coriander. It is found that tank mixtures of Tiger platinum with foliar herbicides Kalin flo, Eclipse, Sultan, Corrida and Lontrel lead to obtaining of high seed yields. High yields of coriander seeds also are obtained by foliar treatment with antigraminaceous herbicide Tiger platinum after soil-applied herbicides Raft, Smerch, Sharpen, Silba and Tendar. The use of the soil-applied herbicide Merlin flex does not increase the seed yield, due to its higher phytotoxicity on coriander. The most unstable are herbicide Merlin flex and herbicide combination Merlin flex + Tiger platinum. Technologically the most valuable are herbicide combination Raft + Tiger platinum and herbicide tankmixture Kalin flo + Tiger platinum. Self-use of soil-applied or foliar-applied herbicides have low estimate due to they must to combine for full control of weeds in coriander crops.

  13. The impacts of conservation agriculture on crop yield in China depend on specific practices, crops and cropping regions

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    Chengyan Zheng

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available For smooth and wide application of conservation agriculture (CA, remaining uncertainties about its impacts on crop yield need to be reduced. Based on previous field experiments in China, a meta-analysis was performed to quantify the actual impacts of CA practices (NT: no/reduced-tillage only, CTSR: conventional tillage with straw retention, NTSR: NT with straw retention on crop yields as compared to conventional tillage without straw retention (CT. Although CA practices increased crop yield by 4.6% on average, there were large variations in their impacts. For each CA practice, CTSR and NTSR significantly increased crop yield by 4.9% and 6.3%, respectively, compared to CT. However, no significant effect was found for NT. Among ecological areas, significant positive effects of CA practices were found in areas with an annual precipitation below 600 mm. Similar effects were found in areas with annual mean air temperature above 5 °C. For cropping regions, CA increased crop yield by 6.4% and 5.5% compared to CT in Northwest and South China, respectively, whereas no significant effects were found in the North China and Northeast China regions. Among crops, the positive effects of CA practices were significantly higher in maize (7.5% and rice (4.1% than in wheat (2.9%. NT likely decreased wheat yield. Our results indicate that there are great differences in the impacts of CA practices on crop yield, owing to regional variation in climate and crop types. CA will most likely increase maize yield but reduce wheat yield. It is strongly recommended to apply CA with crop straw retention in maize cropping areas and seasons with a warm and dry climate pattern.

  14. Switchgrass a valuable biomass crop for energy

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The demand of renewable energies is growing steadily both from policy and from industry which seeks environmentally friendly feed stocks. The recent policies enacted by the EU, USA and other industrialized countries foresee an increased interest in the cultivation of energy crops; there is clear evidence that switchgrass is one of the most promising biomass crop for energy production and bio-based economy and compounds. Switchgrass: A Valuable Biomass Crop for Energy provides a comprehensive guide to  switchgrass in terms of agricultural practices, potential use and markets, and environmental and social benefits. Considering this potential energy source from its biology, breed and crop physiology to its growth and management to the economical, social and environmental impacts, Switchgrass: A Valuable Biomass Crop for Energy brings together chapters from a range of experts in the field, including a foreword from Kenneth P. Vogel, to collect and present the environmental benefits and characteristics of this a ...

  15. Evaluation of FOCUS surface water pesticide concentration predictions and risk assessment of field-measured pesticide mixtures-a crop-based approach under Mediterranean conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ana Santos; Daam, Michiel A; Cerejeira, Maria José

    2017-07-01

    FOCUS models are used in the European regulatory risk assessment (RA) to predict individual pesticide concentrations in edge-of-field surface waters. The scenarios used in higher tier FOCUS simulations were mainly based on Central/North European, and work is needed to underpin the validity of simulated exposure profiles for Mediterranean agroecosystems. In addition, the RA of chemicals are traditionally evaluated on the basis of single substances although freshwater life is generally exposed to a multitude of pesticides. In the present study, we monitored 19 pesticides in surface waters of five locations in the Portuguese 'Lezíria do Tejo' agricultural area. FOCUS step 3 simulations were performed for the South European scenarios to estimate predicted environmental concentrations (PECs). We verified that 44% of the PECs underestimated the measured environmental concentrations (MEC) of the pesticides, showing a non-compliance with the field data. Risk was assessed by comparing the environmental quality standards (EQS) and regulatory acceptable concentrations with their respective MECs. Risk of mixtures was demonstrated in 100% of the samples with insecticides accounting for 60% of the total risk identified. The overall link between the RA and the actual situation in the field must be considerably strengthened, and field studies on pesticide exposure and effects should be carried out to assist the improvement of predictive approaches used for regulatory purposes.

  16. Effects of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR and cover crops on seed germination and early establishment of field dodder (Cuscuta campestris Yunk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarić-Krsmanović Marija

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Several bacterial cultures: Bacillus licheniformis (MO1, B. pumilus (MO2, and B. amyloliquefaciens (MO3, isolated from manure; B. megatherium ZP6 (MO4 isolated from maize rhizosphere; Azotobacter chroococcum Ps1 (MO5 and Pseudomonas fluorescens (MO6, were used to test the influence of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR on seed germination and germination rate of field dodder (Cuscuta campestris Yunk.. Also, to examine the effect of host seeds on germination and initial growth of seedlings of field dodder plants in the dark and under white light, the seeds of four host plants were used (watermelon, red clover, alfalfa and sugar beet. Germinated seeds were counted daily over a ten-day period and the length of seedlings was measured on the final day. The results show that treatments MO3, MO4 and MO6 had inhibitory effects (15%, 65% and 52%, respectively, while treatments MO1, MO2 and MO5 had stimulating effects (3%, 3% and 19%, respectively on seed germination of field dodder. The data for host seeds show that light was a significant initial factor (83-95%, control 95% for stimulating seed germination of field dodder plants, apart from host presence (73-79%, control 80%.

  17. The Crop Journal: A new scientific journal for the global crop science community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Wan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available As global population increases and demands for food supplies become greater, we face great challenges in providing more products and in larger quantities from less arable land. Crop science has gained increasing importance in meeting these challenges and results of scientific research must be communicated worldwide on a regular basis. In many countries, however, crop scientists have to publish the results of their investigations in national journals with heterogeneous contents and in their native languages. As a consequence, valuable work often remains unknown to scientists elsewhere. As a big country with a large number of crop scientists, China has a wide range of climatic and ecological environments, diverse plant species and cropping systems, and different regional needs for food supplies, which justify the recent decision by the Crop Science Society of China and the Institute of Crop Science within the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, to launch a new communication channel, The Crop Journal. The goal of The Crop Journal is to meet an urgent need for a major Asia-based journal that covers the diverse fields of crop science. Our aim is to create a vital and thought-provoking journal that will highlight state-of-the-art original work and reviews by high-profile crop scientists and investigative groups throughout the world — a journal that will respond to the needs of specialists in strategic crop research. We will work with scientific and publishing colleagues worldwide, using The Plant Journal and Crop Science as models, to establish The Crop Journal as a broadly based high quality journal and a premier forum for issues in crop science. The Crop Journal will cover a wide range of topics, including crop genetics, breeding, agronomy, crop physiology, germplasm resources, grain chemistry, grain storage and processing, crop management practices, crop biotechnology, and biomathematics. The journal also encourages the submission of review

  18. Movement behaviour of the carabid beetle Pterostichus melanarius in crops and at a habitat interface explains patterns of population redistribution in the field.

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    Bas Allema

    Full Text Available Animals may respond to habitat quality and habitat edges and these responses may affect their distribution between habitats. We studied the movement behaviour of a ground-dwelling generalist predator, the carabid beetle Pterostichus melanarius (Illiger. We performed a mark-recapture experiment in two adjacent habitats; a large plot with oilseed radish (Raphanus sativus and a plot with rye (Secale cereale. We used model selection to identify a minimal model representing the mark-recapture data, and determine whether habitat-specific motility and boundary behaviour affected population redistribution. We determined movement characteristics of P. melanarius in laboratory arenas with the same plant species using video recording. Both the field and arena results showed preference behaviour of P. melanarius at the habitat interface. In the field, significantly more beetles moved from rye to oilseed radish than from radish to rye. In the arena, habitat entry was more frequent into oilseed radish than into rye. In the field, movement was best described by a Fokker-Planck diffusion model that contained preference behaviour at the interface and did not account for habitat specific motility. Likewise, motility calculated from movement data using the Patlak model was not different between habitats in the arena studies. Motility (m2 d-1 calculated from behavioural data resulted in estimates that were similar to those determined in the field. Thus individual behaviour explained population redistribution in the field qualitatively as well as quantitatively. The findings provide a basis for evaluating movement within and across habitats in complex agricultural landscapes with multiple habitats and habitat interfaces.

  19. Biosolarization in garlic crop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabeiro, Concepcion; Andres, Manuela; Wic, Consuelo

    2014-05-01

    One of the most important limitations of garlic cultivation is the presence of various soil pathogens. Fusarium proliferatum and Sclerotinium cepivorum and nematode Ditilenchus dipsaci cause such problems that prevent the repetition of the crop in the same field for at least 5 -8 years or soil disinfection is necessary. Chemical disinfection treatments have an uncertain future, in the European Union are reviewing their use, due to the effect on the non-pathogenic soil fauna. This situation causes a itinerant cultivation to avoid the limitations imposed by soil diseases, thereby increasing production costs. The Santa Monica Cooperative (Albacete, Spain) requested advice on possible alternative techniques, solarization and biosolarization. For which a trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness on the riverside area of the municipality. This place has recently authorized irrigation, which would allow the repeated cultivation of garlic if the incidence of soil diseases and the consequent soil fatigue could be avoided. Additionally, this work will serve to promote the cultivation of organic garlic. Last, but not least, the biosolarization technique allows to use waste from wineries, oil mills and mushroom crops. (Bello et al. 2003). The essay should serve as demonstrative proof for farmers' cooperative members. The specific objective for this first year is to assess, the effect on the global soil biota, on the final garlic production and quality and the effect of biosolarization to control soil pathogens. The trial is set on a cooperative's plot previously cultivated with corn. 5 treatments were set, defined by different amounts of organic matter applied, 7.5, 5, 2.5 kg m -2, a solarized with no organic matter, and a control without any treatment. The plot has inground sprinkler for full coverage with four sprinkler lines demarcating the five bands of differential treatment, randomly arranged. Organic matter was incorporated the August 14, 2013, then thoroughly

  20. Effect of Mixed Systems on Crop Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senturklu, Songul; Landblom, Douglas; Cihacek, Larry; Brevik, Eric

    2017-04-01

    The goals of this non-irrigated research has been to determine the effect of mixed systems integration on crop, soil, and beef cattle production in the northern Great Plains region of the United States. Over a 5-year period, growing spring wheat (HRSW-C) continuously year after year was compared to a 5-year crop rotation that included spring wheat (HRSW-R), cover crop (dual crop consisting of winter triticale/hairy vetch seeded in the fall and harvested for hay followed by a 7-species cover crop that was seeded in June after hay harvest), forage corn, field pea/barley, and sunflower. Control 5-year HRSW yield was 2690 kg/ha compared to 2757 kg/ha for HRSW grown in rotation. Available soil nitrogen (N) is often the most important limitation for crop production. Expensive fertilizer inputs were reduced in this study due to the mixed system's complementarity in which the rotation system that included beef cattle grazing sustained N availability and increased nutrient cycling, which had a positive effect on all crops grown in the rotation. Growing HRSW continuously requires less intensive management and in this research was 14.5% less profitable. Whereas, when crop management increased and complementing crops were grown in rotation to produce crops and provide feed for grazing livestock, soil nutrient cycling improved. Increased nutrient cycling increased crop rotation yields and yearling beef cattle steers that grazing annual forages in the rotation gain more body weight than similar steers grazing NGP native range. Results of this long-term research will be presented in a PICO format for participant discussion.

  1. Putting mechanisms into crop production models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boote, Kenneth J; Jones, James W; White, Jeffrey W; Asseng, Senthold; Lizaso, Jon I

    2013-09-01

    Crop growth models dynamically simulate processes of C, N and water balance on daily or hourly time-steps to predict crop growth and development and at season-end, final yield. Their ability to integrate effects of genetics, environment and crop management have led to applications ranging from understanding gene function to predicting potential impacts of climate change. The history of crop models is reviewed briefly, and their level of mechanistic detail for assimilation and respiration, ranging from hourly leaf-to-canopy assimilation to daily radiation-use efficiency is discussed. Crop models have improved steadily over the past 30-40 years, but much work remains. Improvements are needed for the prediction of transpiration response to elevated CO₂ and high temperature effects on phenology and reproductive fertility, and simulation of root growth and nutrient uptake under stressful edaphic conditions. Mechanistic improvements are needed to better connect crop growth to genetics and to soil fertility, soil waterlogging and pest damage. Because crop models integrate multiple processes and consider impacts of environment and management, they have excellent potential for linking research from genomics and allied disciplines to crop responses at the field scale, thus providing a valuable tool for deciphering genotype by environment by management effects. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Energy crops in rotation. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zegada-Lizarazu, Walter; Monti, Andrea [Department of Agroenvironmental Science and Technology, University of Bologna, Viale G. Fanin, 44 - 40127, Bologna (Italy)

    2011-01-15

    The area under energy crops has increased tenfold over the last 10 years, and there is large consensus that the demand for energy crops will further increase rapidly to cover several millions of hectares in the near future. Information about rotational systems and effects of energy crops should be therefore given top priority. Literature is poor and fragmentary on this topic, especially about rotations in which all crops are exclusively dedicated to energy end uses. Well-planned crop rotations, as compared to continuous monoculture systems, can be expected to reduce the dependence on external inputs through promoting nutrient cycling efficiency, effective use of natural resources, especially water, maintenance of the long-term productivity of the land, control of diseases and pests, and consequently increasing crop yields and sustainability of production systems. The result of all these advantages is widely known as crop sequencing effect, which is due to the additional and positive consequences on soil physical-chemical and biological properties arising from specific crops grown in the same field year after year. In this context, the present review discusses the potential of several rotations with energy crops and their possibilities of being included alongside traditional agriculture systems across different agro-climatic zones within the European Union. Possible rotations dedicated exclusively to the production of biomass for bioenergy are also discussed, as rotations including only energy crops could become common around bio-refineries or power plants. Such rotations, however, show some limitations related to the control of diseases and to the narrow range of available species with high production potential that could be included in a rotation of such characteristics. The information on best-known energy crops such as rapeseed (Brassica napus) and sunflower (Helianthus annuus) suggests that conventional crops can benefit from the introduction of energy crops in

  3. The Impact of Multifunctional Crop Rotation on the Yield of Milk Thistle Fruits in the Years 2012 – 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav HABÁN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Milk thistle can be an annual, rarely a biennial medicinal plant. Polyfactorial field experiment was established during the vegetation period of the years 2012–2015. Three evaluated factors were as follows: crop residues – intercrop – fertilization. Milk thistle was integrated to four crop rotation design with following order of crops: 1. common pea 2. winter wheat 3. milk thistle 4. maize. Milk thistle was subjected to the experimental treatments as follows: 1. K – straw of forecrop removed from the field, R – straw incorporated into soil, 2. M – white mustard as a freezing-out intercrop, B – no intercrop, 3. O – no fertilization, F – with fertilization, 4. experimental year (2012, 2013, 2014, 2015. The recalculated yield of Silybi mariani fructus ranged in the amount from 297 kg*ha-1 (RMO treatment – with crop residues, with intercrop and without the use of fertilizers, year 2015 to 745 kg*ha-1 (KMF treatment – without crop residues, with intercrop and the use of fertilizers, year 2013. Statistical testing of individual factors found highly significant effect of year and highly significant effect of fertilization, and statistically inconclusive effect of sowing intercrop and ploughing crop residues. In the experiment was found a statistically significant difference between yield on the treatments without fertilization and the use of mineral fertilizers.

  4. State of immune system of patients with infectious-allergic asthma subjected to transcerebral exposure to UHF electron field (27, 12 MHz)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogolyubov, V.M.; Malyavin, A.G.; Pershin, S.B.; Shubina, A.V.; Kubli, S.Kh.; Myshelova, K.P.

    An attempt was made to affect immunologic reactions in infectious-allergic asthma patients by subjecting them to transcerebral exposure to UHF electric field. Seventy-six patients, aged 23 to 69 years with varying duration of the disease, were studied. The treatment consisted of 25 exposures lasting from 5 to 15 min; a sham exposure was used on ten patients serving as controls. In all, 55/66 patients experienced clinical improvement lasting 6 to 12 months; only 2/10 control patients had any improvement. After the exposure, the level of T-lymphocytes increased along with blood histamine level; no significant changes were observed in case of B-lymphocytes. This immunologic correction was most effective in patients with atopy, with decreased levels of T-lymphocytes and elevated levels of B-lymphocytes. 12 references.

  5. Dedicated biomass crops can enhance biodiversity in the arable landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughton, Alison J; Bohan, David A; Clark, Suzanne J; Mallott, Mark D; Mallott, Victoria; Sage, Rufus; Karp, Angela

    2016-11-01

    Suggestions that novel, non-food, dedicated biomass crops used to produce bioenergy may provide opportunities to diversify and reinstate biodiversity in intensively managed farmland have not yet been fully tested at the landscape scale. Using two of the largest, currently available landscape-scale biodiversity data sets from arable and biomass bioenergy crops, we take a taxonomic and functional trait approach to quantify and contrast the consequences for biodiversity indicators of adopting dedicated biomass crops on land previously cultivated under annual, rotational arable cropping. The abundance and community compositions of biodiversity indicators in fields of break and cereal crops changed when planted with the dedicated biomass crops, miscanthus and short rotation coppiced (SRC) willow. Weed biomass was consistently greater in the two dedicated biomass crops than in cereals, and invertebrate abundance was similarly consistently higher than in break crops. Using canonical variates analysis, we identified distinct plant and invertebrate taxa and trait-based communities in miscanthus and SRC willows, whereas break and cereal crops tended to form a single, composite community. Seedbanks were shown to reflect the longer term effects of crop management. Our study suggests that miscanthus and SRC willows, and the management associated with perennial cropping, would support significant amounts of biodiversity when compared with annual arable crops. We recommend the strategic planting of these perennial, dedicated biomass crops in arable farmland to increase landscape heterogeneity and enhance ecosystem function, and simultaneously work towards striking a balance between energy and food security.

  6. Effects of exposure to electromagnetic fields emitted by GSM 900 and WCDMA mobile phones on cognitive function in young male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Cornelia; Dorn, Hans; Bahr, Achim; Hansen, Marie-Luise; Peter, Anita; Bajbouj, Malek; Danker-Hopfe, Heidi

    2011-04-01

    Results of studies on the possible effects of electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones on cognitive functions are contradictory, therefore, possible effects of long-term (7 h 15 min) electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure to handset-like signals of Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) 900 and Wideband Code-Division Multiple Access (WCDMA) on attention and working memory were studied. The sample comprised 30 healthy male subjects (mean ± SD: 25.3 ± 2.6 years), who were tested on nine study days in which they were exposed to three exposure conditions (sham, GSM 900 and WCDMA) in a randomly assigned and balanced order. All tests were presented twice (morning and afternoon) on each study day within a fixed timeframe. Univariate comparisons revealed significant changes when subjects were exposed to GSM 900 compared to sham, only in the vigilance test. In the WCDMA exposure condition, one parameter in the vigilance and one in the test on divided attention were altered compared to sham. Performance in the selective attention test and the n-back task was not affected by GSM 900 or WCDMA exposure. Time-of-day effects were evident for the tests on divided and selective attention, as well as for working memory. After correction for multiple testing, only time-of-day effects remained significant in two tests, resulting in faster reactions in the afternoon trials. The results of the present study do not provide any evidence of an EMF effect on human cognition, but they underline the necessity to control for time of day. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Carbon footprints of crops from organic and conventional arable crop rotations – using a life cycle assessment approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Marie Trydeman; Meyer-Aurich, A; Olesen, Jørgen E

    2014-01-01

    . The results showed significantly lower carbon footprint of the crops from the ‘Biogas’ rotation (assuming that biogas replaces fossil gas) whereas the remaining crop rotations had comparable carbon footprints per kg cash crop. The study showed considerable contributions caused by the green manure crop (grass...... organic arable crop rotations with different sources of N supply. Data from long-term field experiments at three different locations in Denmark were used to analyse three different organic cropping systems (‘Slurry’, ‘Biogas’ and ‘Mulching’), one conventional cropping system (‘Conventional’) and a “No...... input” system as reference systems. The ‘Slurry’ and ‘Conventional’ rotations received slurry and mineral fertilizer, respectively, whereas the ‘No input’ was unfertilized. The ‘Mulching’ and ‘Biogas’ rotations had one year of grass-clover instead of a faba bean crop. The grass-clover biomass...

  8. Real-time balanced turbo field echo cine-magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of tongue movements during deglutition in subjects with anterior open bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Erol; Sayin, Mehmet Ozgür; Karaçay, Seniz; Bulakbaşi, Nail

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate tongue movements in subjects with anterior dental open bites during deglutition by using real-time balanced turbo field echo cine-magnetic resonance imaging. The study included 28 subjects. Two groups were formed according to the presence of anterior open bite (at least 2 mm). The open-bite group (OBG) consisted of 18 patients (14 girls, 4 boys) with a mean age of 14.5 +/- 2.7 years. The control group (CG) consisted of 10 patients (5 girls, 5 boys) with a mean age of 14.5 +/- 2.6 years. We evaluated deglutition during 3 stages: oral (stage 1), pharyngeal (stage 2), and esophageal stage (3). Results indicated that (1) in the OBG, from stage 2 to stage 3, the anterior portion of the tongue dorsum was elevated [corrected] whereas its midportion was lowered [corrected]; (2) in the CG, its posterior portion was lowered [corrected] from stage 2 to stage 3; (3) in the CG, the tongue tip was positioned more posteriorly [corrected] at stage 2 than at stage 1; (4) in the OBG, the tongue tip moved more anteriorly in all stages of deglutition than in the CG. Compensatory tongue functions occur in patients with anterior dental open bites. Dynamic MRI is a promising tool for evaluating swallowing patterns in these patients.

  9. Evaluation of crop residue retention, compost and inorganic fertilizer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil fertility depletion is a serious problem in the highlands of Ethiopia. A field experiment was conducted for two consecutive cropping seasons (2009-2010) on farmers' fields in Degem Wereda, North Shewa, Oromiya Regional State. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of crop residue, compost, inorganic ...

  10. Spatial distribution of nematodes at organic and conventional crop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An overview of the spatial distribution of nematodes can help the design of targeted, site-specific management strategies. This paper assessed and compared the spatial distribution of nematode population in an organic crop field and a conventional crop field using Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) and ordinary Kriging ...

  11. Do cover crop mixtures have the same ability to suppress weeds as competitive monoculture cover crops?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brust, Jochen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of farmers use cover crop mixtures instead of monoculture cover crops to improve soil and crop quality. However, only little information is available about the weed suppression ability of cover crop mixtures. Therefore, two field experiments were conducted in Baden-Württemberg between 2010 and 2012, to compare growth and weed suppression of monoculture cover crops and cover crop mixtures. In the first experiment, heterogeneous results between yellow mustard and the cover crop mixture occurred. For further research, a field experiment was conducted in 2012 to compare monocultures of yellow mustard and hemp with three cover crop mixtures. The evaluated mixtures were: “MELO”: for soil melioration; “BETA”: includes only plant species with no close relation to main cash crops in Central Europe and “GPS”: for usage as energy substrate in spring. Yellow mustard, MELO, BETA and GPS covered 90% of the soil in less than 42 days and were able to reduce photosynthetically active radiation (PAR on soil surface by more than 96% after 52 days. Hemp covered 90% of the soil after 47 days and reduced PAR by 91% after 52 days. Eight weeks after planting, only BETA showed similar growth to yellow mustard which produced the highest dry matter. The GPS mixture had comparatively poor growth, while MELO produced similar dry matter to hemp. Yellow mustard, MELO and BETA reduced weed growth by 96% compared with a no cover crop control, while hemp and GPS reduced weeds by 85% and 79%. In spring, weed dry matter was reduced by more than 94% in plots with yellow mustard and all mixtures, while in hemp plots weeds were only reduced by 71%. The results suggest that the tested cover crop mixtures offer similar weed suppression ability until spring as the monoculture of the competitive yellow mustard.

  12. A semi-quantitative approach for modelling crop response to soil fertility: Evaluation of the AquaCrop procedure

    OpenAIRE

    Van Gaelen, Hanne; Tsegay, Alemtsehay; Delbecque, Nele; Shrestha, Nirman; Garcia, Magali; Fajardo, Hector; Miranda, Roberto; Vanuytrecht, Eline; Abrha, Berhanu; Diels, Jan; Raes, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Most crop models make use of a nutrient balance approach for modelling crop response to soil fertility. To counter the vast input data requirements that are typical of these models, the crop water productivity model AquaCrop adopts a semi-quantitative approach. Instead of providing nutrient levels, users of the model provide the soil fertility level as a model input. This level is expressed in terms of the expected impact on crop biomass production, which can be observed in the field or obtai...

  13. Tracing Crop Nitrogen Dynamics on the Field-Scale by Combining Multisensoral EO Data with an Integrated Process Model- A Validation Experiment for Cereals in Southern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hank, Tobias B.; Bach, Heike; Danner, Martin; Hodrius, Martina; Mauser, Wolfram

    2016-08-01

    Nitrogen, being the basic element for the construction of plant proteins and pigments, is one of the most important production factors for agricultural cultivation. High resolution and near real-time information on nitrogen status in the soil thus is of highest interest for economically and ecologically optimized fertilizer planning and application. Unfortunately, nitrogen storage in the soil column cannot be directly observed with Earth Observation (EO) instruments. Advanced EO supported process modelling approaches therefore must be applied that allow tracing the spatiotemporal dynamics of nitrogen transformation, translocation and transport in the soil and in the canopy. Before these models can be applied as decision support tools for smart farming, they must be carefully parameterized and validated. This study applies an advanced land surface process model (PROMET) to selected winter cereal fields in Southern Germany and correlates the model outputs to destructively sampled nitrogen data from the growing season of 2015 (17 sampling dates, 8 sample locations). The spatial parametrization of the process model thereby is supported by assimilating eight satellite images (5 times Landsat 8 OLI and 3 times RapidEye). It was found that the model is capable of realistically tracing the temporal and spatial dynamics of aboveground nitrogen uptake and allocation (R2 = 0.84, RMSE 31.3 kg ha-1).

  14. [Effects of combined applications of pig manure and chemical fertilizers on CH4 and N2O emissions and their global warming potentials in paddy fields with double-rice cropping].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Shen, Jian-Lin; Zheng, Liang; Liu, Jie-Yun; Qin, Hong-Ling; Li, Yong; Wu, Jin-Shui

    2014-08-01

    A field experiment was carried out to study the effects of combined applications of pig manure and chemical fertilizers on CH4 and N2O emissions, which were measured using the static chamber/gas chromatography method, and their global warming potentials in typical paddy fields with double-rice cropping in Hunan province. The results showed that the combined applications of pig manure and chemical fertilizers did not change the seasonal patterns of CH4 and N2O emissions from paddy soils, but significantly changed the magnitudes of CH4 and N2O fluxes in rice growing seasons as compared with sole application of chemical fertilizers. During the two rice growing seasons, the cumulative CH4 emissions for the pig manure and chemical nitrogen (N) fertilizer each contributing to 50% of the total applied N (1/2N + PM) treatment were higher than those for the treatments of no N fertilizer (ON), half amount of chemical N fertilizer (1/2N) and 100% chemical N fertilizer (N) by 54.83%, 33.85% and 43.30%, respectively (P global warming potential (GWP) in both rice growing seasons, which contributed more than 99% to the integrated GWP of CH4 and N2O emissions for all the four treatments. Both GWP and yield-scaled GWP for the treatment of 1/2N + PM were significantly higher than the other three treatments. The yield-scaled GWP for the treatment of 1/2N + PM was higher than those for the N, 1/2N and ON treatments by 58.21%, 26.82% and 20. 63%, respectively. Therefore, combined applications of pig manure and chemical fertilizers in paddy fields would increase the GWP of CH4 and N2O emissions during rice growing seasons and this effect should be considered in regional greenhouse gases emissions inventory.

  15. N2O and CH4-emissions from energy crops - Can the use of organic fertilizers in form of biogas digestate be considered as a real alternative? Results from a three and a half year multi-site field study of energy crops fertilized with biogas digestate in so

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintze, Gawan

    2016-04-01

    Gawan Heintze1,2, Matthias Drösler1, Ulrike Hagemann3and Jürgen Augustin3 1University of Applied Sciences Weihenstephan-Triesdorf, Chair of Vegetation Ecology, Weihenstephaner Berg 4, 85354 Freising, Germany 2Technische Universität München, Chair of Plant Nutrition, Emil-Ramann-Str. 2, 85354 Freising, Germany 3Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Eberswalder Straße 84, 15374 Müncheberg, Germany Together with industrial process-related emissions (8.1%) the actual GHG emissions from agriculture (7.5% - 70 million tones (Mt) of carbon dioxide (CO2)-equivalents) representing after energy-related emissions from combustion processes of fossil fuels (83.7%) the second largest budget of the Germany-wide total emissions per year. To reduce the EU's CO2 emissions by 20% by 2020 the cultivation of energy crops for biogas production, ideally coupled to a subsequent return of the resulting residues in form of biogas digestate is intended as one key element in the pathway of renewable energy production. Despite an increasing cultivation of energy crops for the production of biogas aiming to reduce the overall climate impact of the agricultural sector, it is still largely unknown how the application of ammonia-rich organic digestate effects field N2O emissions. Therefore, the collaborative research project "potential for reducing the release of climate-relevant trace gases in the cultivation of energy crops for the production of biogas" was launched. The main objective of the study was to determine an improved process understanding and to quantify the influence of mineral nitrogen fertilization, biogas digestate application, crop type and crop rotation, to gain precise and generalizable statements on the exchange of trace gases like nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) on the resulting climate impact. Gas fluxes of N2O and CH4 were measured for three and a half years on two differently managed sites in maize monoculture with different applied organic

  16. Winter cover crops decrease weediness in organic cropping systems

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Helena; Talgre, Liina; Eremeev, Vyacheslav; Alaru, Maarika; Maeorg, Erkki; Luik, Anne

    2017-01-01

    By inserting cover crops into organic cropping systems, the number and biomass of weeds decreased. Winter cover crops clearly have a suppressive effect on weeds by providing competition for light, water and space.

  17. Pendulous Crop in Broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PD Ebling

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPendulous crop is a physiological disorder, which etiology is still unknown and it is characterized by abnormal dilation of the crop of poultry. This article aims at reporting a case of high incidence of pendulous crop in male and female broilers Cobb 500, as well as to discuss its possible causes and consequences. In an experiment with broilers performed at the experimental facilities of Laboratório de Ensino Zootécnico of UFRGS, a high incidence (9.5% of pendulous crop was observed. Genetic predisposition is the most frequently documented and accepted cause of that condition. Despite presenting the same live weight as normal broilers, birds with pendulous crop had lower carcass weight due to dehydration and malnourishment, and should be culled after diagnosis. Therefore, further studies on the origin and control of this physiological disorder are warranted.

  18. Does Subjective Rating Reflect Behavioural Coding? Personality in 2 Month-Old Dog Puppies: An Open-Field Test and Adjective-Based Questionnaire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanis Barnard

    Full Text Available A number of studies have recently investigated personality traits in non-human species, with the dog gaining popularity as a subject species for research in this area. Recent research has shown the consistency of personality traits across both context and time for adult dogs, both when using questionnaire based methods of investigation and behavioural analyses of the dogs' behaviour. However, only a few studies have assessed the correspondence between these two methods, with results varying considerably across studies. Furthermore, most studies have focused on adult dogs, despite the fact that an understanding of personality traits in young puppies may be important for research focusing on the genetic basis of personality traits. In the current study, we sought to evaluate the correspondence between a questionnaire based method and the in depth analyses of the behaviour of 2-month old puppies in an open-field test in which a number of both social and non-social stimuli were presented to the subjects. We further evaluated consistency of traits over time by re-testing a subset of puppies. The correspondence between methods was high and test- retest consistency (for the main trait was also good using both evaluation methods. Results showed clear factors referring to the two main personality traits 'extroversion,' (i.e. the enthusiastic, exuberant approach to the stimuli and 'neuroticism,' (i.e. the more cautious and fearful approach to the stimuli, potentially similar to the shyness-boldness dimension found in previous studies. Furthermore, both methods identified an 'amicability' dimension, expressing the positive interactions the pups directed at the humans stranger, and a 'reservedness' dimension which identified pups who largely chose not to interact with the stimuli, and were defined as quiet and not nosey in the questionnaire.

  19. Does Subjective Rating Reflect Behavioural Coding? Personality in 2 Month-Old Dog Puppies: An Open-Field Test and Adjective-Based Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passalacqua, Chiara; Beghelli, Valentina; Capra, Alexa; Normando, Simona; Pelosi, Annalisa; Valsecchi, Paola

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have recently investigated personality traits in non-human species, with the dog gaining popularity as a subject species for research in this area. Recent research has shown the consistency of personality traits across both context and time for adult dogs, both when using questionnaire based methods of investigation and behavioural analyses of the dogs’ behaviour. However, only a few studies have assessed the correspondence between these two methods, with results varying considerably across studies. Furthermore, most studies have focused on adult dogs, despite the fact that an understanding of personality traits in young puppies may be important for research focusing on the genetic basis of personality traits. In the current study, we sought to evaluate the correspondence between a questionnaire based method and the in depth analyses of the behaviour of 2-month old puppies in an open-field test in which a number of both social and non-social stimuli were presented to the subjects. We further evaluated consistency of traits over time by re-testing a subset of puppies. The correspondence between methods was high and test- retest consistency (for the main trait) was also good using both evaluation methods. Results showed clear factors referring to the two main personality traits ‘extroversion,’ (i.e. the enthusiastic, exuberant approach to the stimuli) and ‘neuroticism,’ (i.e. the more cautious and fearful approach to the stimuli), potentially similar to the shyness-boldness dimension found in previous studies. Furthermore, both methods identified an ‘amicability’ dimension, expressing the positive interactions the pups directed at the humans stranger, and a ‘reservedness’ dimension which identified pups who largely chose not to interact with the stimuli, and were defined as quiet and not nosey in the questionnaire. PMID:26977588

  20. Weed management in Solanaceae crops in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, M Júlia

    2008-01-01

    Portugal has very good climatic-edafic conditions for Solanaceae crops, regarding to either yield quality or quantity. Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Miller.), potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) and pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) are the most social-economically important Solanaceae and aubergine (Solanum melongena L.) area of cultivation is increasing. Tomato is cultivated for fresh consumption and, primarily, for industrial processing. Is one of the most profitable vegetable crop and the main vegetable for industry. Potato is the annual vegetable crop with the largest cultivated area. Pepper is one of the main crops for vegetable frozen industry. Tomato, pepper and aubergine are cultivated in the field (outdoor) in Spring-Summer season. In greenhouses, they're also grown during other months and, at the southmost region (Algarve), during the whole year. Potato is cultivated almost the whole year through. Weed management is essential to achieve yield rentability and, for crops growing in the field, herbicides play an important role, due to their efficacy or inherent limitations of other control measures. This paper presents the state of art, in Portugal, regarding to some cultural and social-economical aspects of these crops (e.g., cultivated areas, productions, main producer regions), main weeds, weed control methods and, in particular, registered herbicides, with indication of their usage conditions (application timings and spectrum of weeds controlled) according to the principles of Good Plant Protection Practice and Integrated Weed Management.

  1. Genome Engineering of Crops with Designer Nucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun J. Curtin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the field of genome engineering indicate that it will soon be routine to make site-directed modifications to the genomes of crop species, including targeted mutations, gene insertions, and gene replacements. This new technology will be used to help elucidate gene function and develop new and valuable traits. Key to enabling site-directed genome modifications are sequence-specific nucleases that generate targeted double-stranded DNA breaks in genes of interest. To date, three different sequence-specific nuclease systems have been used in crop plants: zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs, and LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases, also termed “meganucleases.” In this review, we report on the current state of genome engineering in crop plants, comparing the different nuclease and gene delivery systems. We also consider some of the limitations that nuclease-mediated crop improvement technologies may encounter.

  2. Automatic brain cropping and atlas slice matching using a PCNN and a generalized invariant Hough transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swathanthira Kumar, M. M.; Sullivan, John M., Jr.

    2007-03-01

    Medical research is dominated by animal models, especially rats and mice. Within a species most laboratory subjects exhibit little variation in brain anatomy. This uniformity of features is used to crop regions of interest based upon a known, cropped brain atlas. For any study involving N subjects, image registration or alignment to an atlas is required to construct a composite result. A highly resolved stack of T2 weighted MRI anatomy images of a Sprague-Dawley rat was registered and cropped to a known segmented atlas. This registered MRI volume was used as the reference atlas. A Pulse Coupled Neural Network (PCNN) was used to separate brain tissue from surrounding structures, such as cranium and muscle. Each iteration of the PCNN produces binary images of increasing area as the intensity spectrum is increased. A rapid filtering algorithm is applied that breaks narrow passages connecting larger segmented areas. A Generalized Invariant Hough Transform is applied subsequently to each PCNN segmented area to identify which segmented reference slice it matches. This process is repeated for multiple slices within each subject. Since we have apriori knowledge of the image ordering and fields of view this information provides initial estimates for subsequent registration codes. This process of subject slice extraction to PCNN mask creations and GIHT matching with known atlas locations is fully automatic.

  3. Soil and water quality implications of production of herbaceous and woody energy crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Lindberg, J.E. [Oak Ridge Inst. of Science and Education, TN (United States); Green, T.H. [Alabama A and M Univ., Normal, AL (United States). Dept. of Plant and Soil Science] [and others

    1997-10-01

    Field-scale studies in three physiographic regions of the Tennessee Valley in the Southeastern US are being used to address the environmental effects of producing biomass energy crops on former agricultural lands. Comparison of erosion, surface water quality and quantity, and subsurface movement of water and nutrients from woody crops, switchgrass and agricultural crops began with crop establishment in 1994. Nutrient cycling, soil physical changes, and productivity of the different crops are also being monitored at the three sites.

  4. Effects of initial-fixed charge density on pH-sensitive hydrogels subjected to coupled pH and electric field stimuli: a meshless analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, T Y; Li, Hua; Yew, Y K; Lam, K Y

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, we study the effects of initial fixed-charge density on the response behavior of pH-sensitive hydrogels subjected to coupled stimuli, namely, solution pH and externally applied electric field. This is the first instance in which a coupled stimuli numerical analysis has been carried out for these polymer gels, which are used as active sensing/actuating elements in advanced biomicroelectromechanical systems devices. In this work, a chemo-electro-mechanical formulation, termed the multi-effect-coupling pH-stimulus (MECpH) model, is first presented. This mathematical model takes into account the ionic species diffusion, electric potential coupling, and large mechanical deformation. In addition, a correlation between the diffusive hydrogen ions and fixed-charge groups on the hydrogel polymeric chains is established based on the Langmuir absorption isotherm, and incorporated accordingly into the MECpH model. To solve the resulting highly nonlinear and highly coupled partial differential equations of this mathematical model, the Hermite-Cloud method, a novel true meshless technique, is employed. To demonstrate the accuracy and robustness the MECpH model, computed numerical results are compared with experimental data available from literature. Following this validation, several numerical studies are carried out to investigate the effects of initial fixed-charge density on the volumetric variations of these pH-stimulus-responsive hydrogels when immersed in buffered solutions.

  5. A generic data schema for crop experiment data in food security research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, S.J.C.; Kraalingen, van D.W.G.; Boogaard, H.L.; Wit, de A.J.W.; Franke, G.J.; Porter, C.; Athanasiadis, L.N.

    2012-01-01

    In agricultural research targeted at food security, crop experiments in fields are a crucial source of information for statistical or model based analyses or purely a system description. In these crop experiments or field trials, crop responses are investigated to a change a management or in

  6. Incorporating Primary Literature in Undergraduate Crop Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lori K.; Simmons, Steve R.

    2006-01-01

    Primary literature is an underutilized learning resource for undergraduate courses in crop science. Reading assignments from scientific journals were utilized in an undergraduate University of Minnesota crop physiology course at Southwest Minnesota State University from 2002 to 2004. The subjects of the articles corresponded to the lecture topics.…

  7. A Decision Support System (GesCoN for Managing Fertigation in Vegetable Crops. Part II – Model calibration and validation under different environmental growing conditions on field grown tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia eConversa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The GesCoN model was evaluated for its capability to simulate growth, nitrogen uptake and productivity of open field tomato grown under different environmental and cultural conditions. Five datasets collected from experimental trials carried out in Foggia (IT were used for calibration and 13 datasets collected from trials conducted in Foggia, Perugia (IT and Florida (USA were used for validation. The goodness of fitting was performed by comparing the observed and simulated shoot dry weight (SDW and N crop uptake during crop seasons, total dry weight (TDW, N uptake and fresh yield (TFY. In SDW model calibration, the relative RMSE values fell within the good 10 to 15% range, percent BIAS (PBIAS ranged between -11.5% and 7.4%. The Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE was very close to the optimal value 1. In the N uptake calibration RRMSE and PBIAS were very low(7%, and -1.78, respectively and NSE close to 1. The validation of SDW (RRMSE=16.7%; NSE=0.96 and N uptake (RRMSE=16.8%; NSE=0.96 showed the good accuracy of GesCoN. A model under- or overestimation of the SDW and N uptake occurred when higher or a lower N rates and/or a more or less efficient system were used compared to the calibration trial. The in-season adjustment, using the SDWcheck procedure, greatly improved model simulations both in the calibration and in the validation phases. The TFY prediction was quite good except in Florida, where a large overestimation (+16% was linked to a different harvest index (0.53 compared the cultivars used for model calibration and validation in Italian areas. The soil water content at the 10-30 cm depth appears to be well simulated by the software, and the GesCoN proved to be able to adaptively control potential yield and DW accumulation under limited N soil availability scenarios and consequently to modify fertilizer application. The DSSwell simulate SDW accumulation and N uptake of different tomato genotypes grown under Mediterranean and subtropical

  8. Mapping Cropping Practices of a Sugarcane-Based Cropping System in Kenya Using Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty Mulianga

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the recent past, there has been a growing concern on the need for mapping cropping practices in order to improve decision-making in the agricultural sector. We developed an original method for mapping cropping practices: crop type and harvest mode, in a sugarcane landscape of western Kenya using remote sensing data. At local scale, a temporal series of 15-m resolution Landsat 8 images was obtained for Kibos sugar management zone over 20 dates (April 2013 to March 2014 to characterize cropping practices. To map the crop type and harvest mode we used ground survey and factory data over 1280 fields, digitized field boundaries, and spectral indices (the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI and the Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI were computed for all Landsat images. The results showed NDVI classified crop type at 83.3% accuracy, while NDWI classified harvest mode at 90% accuracy. The crop map will inform better planning decisions for the sugar industry operations, while the harvest mode map will be used to plan for sensitizations forums on best management and environmental practices.

  9. Remote sensing to monitor cover crop adoption in southeastern Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hively, Wells; Sjoerd Duiker,; Greg McCarty,; Prabhakara, Kusuma

    2015-01-01

    In the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, winter cereal cover crops are often planted in rotation with summer crops to reduce the loss of nutrients and sediment from agricultural systems. Cover crops can also improve soil health, control weeds and pests, supplement forage needs, and support resilient cropping systems. In southeastern Pennsylvania, cover crops can be successfully established following corn (Zea mays L.) silage harvest and are strongly promoted for use in this niche. They are also planted following corn grain, soybean (Glycine max L.), and vegetable harvest. In Pennsylvania, the use of winter cover crops for agricultural conservation has been supported through a combination of outreach, regulation, and incentives. On-farm implementation is thought to be increasing, but the actual extent of cover crops is not well quantified. Satellite imagery can be used to map green winter cover crop vegetation on agricultural fields and, when integrated with additional remote sensing data products, can be used to evaluate wintertime vegetative groundcover following specific summer crops. This study used Landsat and SPOT (System Probatoire d’ Observation de la Terre) satellite imagery, in combination with the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service Cropland Data Layer, to evaluate the extent and amount of green wintertime vegetation on agricultural fields in four Pennsylvania counties (Berks, Lebanon, Lancaster, and York) from 2010 to 2013. In December of 2010, a windshield survey was conducted to collect baseline data on winter cover crop implementation, with particular focus on identifying corn harvested for silage (expected earlier harvest date and lower levels of crop residue), versus for grain (expected later harvest date and higher levels of crop residue). Satellite spectral indices were successfully used to detect both the amount of green vegetative groundcover and the amount of crop residue on the surveyed fields. Analysis of wintertime satellite imagery

  10. Estimating Crop Coefficients Using Remote Sensing-Based Vegetation Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Hubbard

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Crop coefficient (Kc-based estimation of crop evapotranspiration is one of the most commonly used methods for irrigation water management. However, uncertainties of the generalized dual crop coefficient (Kc method of the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations Irrigation and Drainage Paper No. 56 can contribute to crop evapotranspiration estimates that are substantially different from actual crop evapotranspiration. Similarities between the crop coefficient curve and a satellite-derived vegetation index showed potential for modeling a crop coefficient as a function of the vegetation index. Therefore, the possibility of directly estimating the crop coefficient from satellite reflectance of a crop was investigated. The Kc data used in developing the relationship with NDVI were derived from back-calculations of the FAO-56 dual crop coefficients procedure using field data obtained during 2007 from representative US cropping systems in the High Plains from AmeriFlux sites. A simple linear regression model ( is developed to establish a general relationship between a normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI from a moderate resolution satellite data (MODIS and the crop coefficient (Kc calculated from the flux data measured for different crops and cropping practices using AmeriFlux towers. There was a strong linear correlation between the NDVI-estimated Kc and the measured Kc with an r2 of 0.91 and 0.90, while the root-mean-square error (RMSE for Kc in 2006 and 2007 were 0.16 and 0.19, respectively. The procedure for quantifying crop coefficients from NDVI data presented in this paper should be useful in other regions of the globe to understand regional irrigation water consumption.

  11. Development of an unmanned agricultural robotics system for measuring crop conditions for precision aerial application

    Science.gov (United States)

    An Unmanned Agricultural Robotics System (UARS) is acquired, rebuilt with desired hardware, and operated in both classrooms and field. The UARS includes crop height sensor, crop canopy analyzer, normalized difference vegetative index (NDVI) sensor, multispectral camera, and hyperspectral radiometer...

  12. Osmolyte accumulation: can it really help increase crop yield under drought conditions?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Serraj, R; Sinclair, T. R

    2002-01-01

    ...‐assisted selection or genetic engineering, to generate drought‐tolerant crops. However, field studies examining the association between OA and crop yield have tended to show no consistent benefit. The few, often...

  13. Cereal Crops Research Unit

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The mission of the Cereal Crops Research Unit is to 1) conduct basic research to identify and understand the biological processes affecting the growth, development...

  14. Perspectives on genetically modified crops and food detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Hui; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops are a major product of the global food industry. From 1996 to 2014, 357 GM crops were approved and the global value of the GM crop market reached 35% of the global commercial seed market in 2014. However, the rapid growth of the GM crop-based industry has also created controversies in many regions, including the European Union, Egypt, and Taiwan. The effective detection and regulation of GM crops/foods are necessary to reduce the impact of these controversies. In this review, the status of GM crops and the technology for their detection are discussed. As the primary gap in GM crop regulation exists in the application of detection technology to field regulation, efforts should be made to develop an integrated, standardized, and high-throughput GM crop detection system. We propose the development of an integrated GM crop detection system, to be used in combination with a standardized international database, a decision support system, high-throughput DNA analysis, and automated sample processing. By integrating these technologies, we hope that the proposed GM crop detection system will provide a method to facilitate comprehensive GM crop regulation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Perspectives on genetically modified crops and food detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hui Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetically modified (GM crops are a major product of the global food industry. From 1996 to 2014, 357 GM crops were approved and the global value of the GM crop market reached 35% of the global commercial seed market in 2014. However, the rapid growth of the GM crop-based industry has also created controversies in many regions, including the European Union, Egypt, and Taiwan. The effective detection and regulation of GM crops/foods are necessary to reduce the impact of these controversies. In this review, the status of GM crops and the technology for their detection are discussed. As the primary gap in GM crop regulation exists in the application of detection technology to field regulation, efforts should be made to develop an integrated, standardized, and high-throughput GM crop detection system. We propose the development of an integrated GM crop detection system, to be used in combination with a standardized international database, a decision support system, high-throughput DNA analysis, and automated sample processing. By integrating these technologies, we hope that the proposed GM crop detection system will provide a method to facilitate comprehensive GM crop regulation.

  16. Radioactivity in food crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

    1983-05-01

    Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

  17. ROLE OF ALLELOPATHY IN THE STIMULATORY AND INHIBITORY EFFECTS OF HAIRY VETCH COVER CROP RESIDUE IN NO-TILLAGE SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTION SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cover crops can provide multiple benefits to sustainable cropping systems including building soil organic matter, controlling soil and nutrient losses from fields, moderating radiation and moisture exchange, releasing nutrients for subsequent crops, and suppressing weed and pest populations. Many o...

  18. Effect of organic and conventional crop rotation, fertilization, and crop protection practices on metal contents in wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Julia; Sanderson, Roy; Cakmak, Ismail; Ozturk, Levent; Shotton, Peter; Carmichael, Andrew; Haghighi, Reza Sadrabadi; Tetard-Jones, Catherine; Volakakis, Nikos; Eyre, Mick; Leifert, Carlo

    2011-05-11

    The effects of organic versus conventional crop management practices (crop rotation, crop protection, and fertility management strategies) on wheat yields and grain metal (Al, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) concentrations were investigated in a long-term field trial. The interactions between crop management practices and the season that the crop was grown were investigated using univariate and redundancy analysis approaches. Grain yields were highest where conventional fertility management and crop protection practices were used, but growing wheat after a previous crop of grass/clover was shown to partially compensate for yield reductions due to the use of organic fertility management. All metals except for Pb were significantly affected by crop management practices and the year that the wheat was grown. Grain Cd and Cu levels were higher on average when conventional fertility management practices were used. Al and Cu were higher on average when conventional crop protection practices were used. The results demonstrate that there is potential to manage metal concentrations in the diet by adopting specific crop management practices shown to affect crop uptake of metals.

  19. [Review of Crop Canopy Spectral Information Detection Technology and Methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiao-rong; Gao, Jun-feng; Xie, Chuan-qi; Zhu, Feng-le; Huang, Ling-xia; He, Yong

    2015-07-01

    Compared with the traditional chemical methods and the subjective visual ways for measuring plant physiology information indicators, the assessments of crop canopy information through spectral radiometer are more simple, rapid and accurate. The applications of different types of spectral radiometer, especially for international general used Cropscan multispectral radiometer, for predicting crop canopy leaf area index under different growth stage, biomass, nitrogen, chlorophyll and yield, and monitoring plant diseases and insect pests were summarized based on crop group information acquisition methods in recent years. The varity of vegetation indices (VIs) were concluded after comparing regression coefficients of related models among different crops. In general, the correlation coefficients of mathematical models were high and it can realize the crop detection of various kinds of physiological information. Besides, the combination of multispectral radiometer and other sensors can provide useful information to evaluate the status of crops growth, which is very important in practice.

  20. Biotechnology: herbicide-resistant crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic, herbicide-resistant (HR) crops are planted on about 80% of the land covered by transgenic crops. More than 90% of HR crios are glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, the others being resistant to glufosinate. The wide-scale adoption of HR crops, largely for economic reasons, has been the mos...

  1. Effects of fertilizer types and different companion crops on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A field experiment was conducted in 2002 and 2003 cropping seasons, at the University of Ibadan Teaching and Research Farm to evaluate the effects of fertilizer types and different companion crops on the performance of sweet potato. The results obtained showed that the growth and yield of sweet potato were ...

  2. Evapotranspiration and Crop Coefficients of Grain Legumes in Semi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Crop evapotranspiration (ETc) is a very important parameter in irrigation management. It can be either directly measured using water balance approach or estimated. A field experiment was carried out at Hudeiba Research Station farm in Sudan to determine crop evapotranspiration (ETc) and coefficients (kc) for faba bean ...

  3. Spatial sampling of weather data for regional crop yield simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bussel, van L.G.J.; Ewert, Frank; Zhao, Gang; Hoffmann, Holger; Enders, Andreas; Wallach, Daniel; Asseng, Senthold; Baigorria, G.A.; Basso, Bruno; Biernath, Christian; Cammarano, Davide; Chryssanthacopoulos, James; Constantin, Julie; Elliott, Joshua; Glotter, Michael; Heinlein, Florian; Kersebaum, Kurt Christian; Klein, Christian; Nendel, Claas; Priesack, Eckart; Raynal, Hélène; Romero, Consuelo C.; Rötter, R.P.; Specka, Xenia; Tao, Fulu

    2016-01-01

    Field-scale crop models are increasingly applied at spatio-temporal scales that range from regions to the globe and from decades up to 100 years. Sufficiently detailed data to capture the prevailing spatio-temporal heterogeneity in weather, soil, and management conditions as needed by crop models

  4. Assessment of commercialization of food crops among farming ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed the commercialization of food crops among farming household in Osun state by administering questionnaires to 99 food crop farmers. Furthermore, descriptive statistics, Household Commercialization Index (HCl) and Linear Regression analysis were used for data analysis. Results of field data analyses ...

  5. Analysis of growth dynamics of Mediterranean bioenergy crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Archontoulis, S.V.

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the rapidly growing bioenergy production worldwide, there is lack of field experience and experimental data on the cultivation of bioenergy crops. This study aims to advance crop management operations and modelling studies by providing essential information on phenology, agronomy and

  6. Influence of Seedbed type and Crop Density on the yield ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field experiments were conducted at the Teaching and Research Farm of the University of Ibadan during 1999 and 2000 second cropping seasons (August - October) to assess the effects of two seedbed types (raised seedbed and no tillage) and four crop densities (4,000,000; 1,000,000; 444,444 and 250,000 plants ha-1 ...

  7. From research to action: enhancing crop yield through wild pollinators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garibaldi, A.; Carvalheiro, L.G.; Leonhardt, S.D.; Aizen, M.A.; Blaauw, B.R.; Isaacs, R.; Kuhlman, M.; Kleijn, D.; Klein, A.M.; Kremen, C.; Morandin, L.; Scheper, J.A.; Winfree, R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence highlights the value of wild-insect species richness and abundance for crop pollination worldwide. Yet, deliberate physical importation of single species (eg European honey bees) into crop fields for pollination remains the mainstream management approach, and implementation of

  8. Salt Affected Soils Evaluation and Reclamative Approaches for Crop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, a field experiment was conducted on salt (saline) affected soils during the cropping seasons of 2004/2005 and 2005/2006 to evaluate the soil properties, determine their effects on two test crop performances, and its reclaim ability under three different approaches. Reclamative approaches were employed not ...

  9. evaluation of selected legume cover crops for biomass

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The growth and development of eighteen legume cover crop species were evaluated at the University of Ilorin. Teaching and Research Farm (8" 29'N, 4" 3515) in the southern Guinea savanna zone during the i993 - 1996 cropping seasons. Field establishment, ground cover. abOVe ground biomass production. and seed ...

  10. Managing cover crops on strawberry furrow bottoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bare furrows in strawberry fields with plastic mulch covered beds can lead to lots of soil erosion and runoff during winter rainy periods. This article describes how growers can plant and manage cover crops in these furrows to minimize runoff and soil erosion. This is based on on-going research at...

  11. Spatial methods for deriving crop rotation history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Warrant, George W.; Trippe, Kristin M.; Whittaker, Gerald W.; Anderson, Nicole P.; Sullivan, Clare S.

    2017-08-01

    Benefits of converting 11 years of remote sensing classification data into cropping history of agricultural fields included measuring lengths of rotation cycles and identifying specific sequences of intervening crops grown between final years of old grass seed stands and establishment of new ones. Spatial and non-spatial methods were complementary. Individual-year classification errors were often correctable in spreadsheet-based non-spatial analysis, whereas their presence in spatial data generally led to exclusion of fields from further analysis. Markov-model testing of non-spatial data revealed that year-to-year cropping sequences did not match average frequencies for transitions among crops grown in western Oregon, implying that rotations into new grass seed stands were influenced by growers' desires to achieve specific objectives. Moran's I spatial analysis of length of time between consecutive grass seed stands revealed that clustering of fields was relatively uncommon, with high and low value clusters only accounting for 7.1 and 6.2% of fields.

  12. Unique cover crops for Louisiana sugarcane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisiana sugarcane production practices provide a tremendous opportunity for the use of cover crops following the final sugarcane harvest in the fall of one year and prior to replanting sugarcane during the summer of the next year. A Louisiana sugarcane field is typically replanted every four years...

  13. Influence of cover crops on arthropods, free-living nematodes, and yield in a succeeding no-till soybean crop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Production practices that incorporate fall-planted cover crops into no-till agronomic crop rotations have become increasingly popular across the Northeastern United States for weed suppression and enhancing environmental stewardship. Field experiments were conducted in 2011 and 2012 to investigate e...

  14. 75 FR 59057 - Common Crop Insurance Regulations, Cotton Crop Insurance Provisions and Macadamia Nut Crop...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... Insurance Corporation 7 CFR Part 457 RIN 0563-AB96 Common Crop Insurance Regulations, Cotton Crop Insurance Provisions and Macadamia Nut Crop Insurance Provisions; Correction AGENCY: Federal Crop Insurance Corporation... make corrections relating to the insurance of cotton and macadamia nuts that published March 30, 2010...

  15. Frost Damage Detection in Sugarcane Crop Using Modis Images and Srtm Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudorff, B.; Alves de Aguiar, D.; Adami, M.

    2011-12-01

    Brazil is the largest world producer of sugarcane which is used to produce almost equal proportions of either sugar (food) or ethanol (biofuel). In recent years sugarcane crop production has increased fast to meet the growing market demand for sugar and ethanol. This increase has been mainly due to expansion in crop area, but sugarcane production is also subjected to several factors that influence both the agricultural crop yield (tons of stalks/ha) and the industrial yield (kg of sugar/ton of stalks). Sugarcane is a semi-perennial crop that experiences major growth during spring and summer seasons with large demands for water and high temperatures to produce good stalk formation (crop yield). The harvest is performed mainly during fall and winter seasons when water availability and temperature should be low in order to accumulate sucrose in the stalks (industrial yield). These favorable climatic conditions for sugarcane crop are found in several regions in Brazil, particularly in São Paulo state, which is the major sugarcane producer in Brazil being responsible for almost 60% of its production. Despite the favorable climate in São Paulo state there is a certain probability of frost occurrence from time to time that has a negative impact on sugarcane crop, particularly on industrial yield, reducing the amount of sugar in the stalks; having consequences on price increase and product shortage. To evaluate the impact of frost on sugarcane crop, in the field, on a state level, is not a trivial task; however, this information is relevant due to its direct impact on the consumer market. Remote sensing images allow a synoptic view and present great potential to monitor large sugarcane plantations as has been done since 2003 in São Paulo state by the Canasat Project with Landsat type images (http://www.dsr.inpe.br/laf/canasat/en/). Images acquired from sensors with high temporal resolution such as MODIS (Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) present the

  16. The California Biomass Crop Adoption Model estimates biofuel feedstock crop production across diverse agro-ecological zones within the state, under different future climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaffka, S.; Jenner, M.; Bucaram, S.; George, N.

    2012-12-01

    Both regulators and businesses need realistic estimates for the potential production of biomass feedstocks for biofuels and bioproducts. This includes the need to understand how climate change will affect mid-tem and longer-term crop performance and relative advantage. The California Biomass Crop Adoption Model is a partial mathematical programming optimization model that estimates the profit level needed for new crop adoption, and the crop(s) displaced when a biomass feedstock crop is added to the state's diverse set of cropping systems, in diverse regions of the state. Both yield and crop price, as elements of profit, can be varied. Crop adoption is tested against current farmer preferences derived from analysis of 10 years crop production data for all crops produced in California, collected by the California Department of Pesticide Regulation. Analysis of this extensive data set resulted in 45 distinctive, representative farming systems distributed across the state's diverse agro-ecological regions. Estimated yields and water use are derived from field trials combined with crop simulation, reported elsewhere. Crop simulation is carried out under different weather and climate assumptions. Besides crop adoption and displacement, crop resource use is also accounted, derived from partial budgets used for each crop's cost of production. Systematically increasing biofuel crop price identified areas of the state where different types of crops were most likely to be adopted. Oilseed crops like canola that can be used for biodiesel production had the greatest potential to be grown in the Sacramento Valley and other northern regions, while sugar beets (for ethanol) had the greatest potential in the northern San Joaquin Valley region, and sweet sorghum in the southern San Joaquin Valley. Up to approximately 10% of existing annual cropland in California was available for new crop adoption. New crops are adopted if the entire cropping system becomes more profitable. In

  17. Crop Depredation by Birds in Deccan Plateau, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Ashokrao Kale

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extent of crop depredation in agricultural fields of groundnut, pearl millet, peas, sorghum and sunflower was assessed in Pune, Akola and Amravati, the three productive districts of Maharashtra, India. The study included interviews with the farmers, identification of the bird species responsible for the crop depredation and actual field assessment of damage. The problem of crop depredation is severe for the crops mostly during harvesting season. Most farmers were not satisfied with the conventional bird repelling techniques. A maximum depredation was observed by Sorghum crops by house sparrows Passer domesticus, baya weavers Ploceus philippinus, and rose-ringed parakeets Psittacula krameri, accounting to 52% of the total damage. Blue rock pigeons Columba livia damaged 42% of the peas crop (chick peas and pigeon peas, while house sparrows and baya weaver damaged the groundnut crop by 26% in the sampling plots. House sparrow Passer domesticus and baya weaver Ploceus philippinus damaged the groundnut crop in the sampling plots just after the sowing period. The sustainable solution for reducing crop depredation is a need for the farmers and also such techniques will help avoid direct or indirect effects of use of lethal bird control techniques on bird species.

  18. Tropical annual cropping systems: Ant ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, C. Ronald; Risch, Stephen J.

    1983-01-01

    The ecological role of ants in tropical annual cropping systems is discussed in general and with respect to a specific Mexican agroecosystem Generally, the potential positive contributions of ants to crop yields result from their impact on soil structure, nutrient cycling, and reduction of insect and weed pests In annual wet lowland fields in eastern Mexico, the ant community is simple and dominated by the aggressive fire ant, Solenopsis geminata. The influence of vegetation structure and composition on the ant community and, specifically, on the foraging behavior of S geminata is discussed

  19. GHG AND AEROSOL EMISSION FROM FIRE PIXEL DURING CROP RESIDUE BURNING UNDER RICE AND WHEAT CROPPING SYSTEMS IN NORTH-WEST INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Acharya

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Emission of smoke and aerosol from open field burning of crop residue is a long-standing subject matter of atmospheric pollution. In this study, we proposed a new approach of estimating fuel load in the fire pixels and corresponding emissions of selected GHGs and aerosols i.e. CO2, CO, NO2, SO2, and total particulate matter (TPM due to burning of crop residue under rice and wheat cropping systems in Punjab in north-west India from 2002 to 2012. In contrasts to the conventional method that uses RPR ratio to estimate the biomass, fuel load in the fire pixels was estimated as a function of enhanced vegetation index (EVI. MODIS fire products were used to detect the fire pixels during harvesting seasons of rice and wheat. Based on the field measurements, fuel load in the fire pixels were modelled as a function of average EVI using second order polynomial regression. Average EVI for rice and wheat crops that were extracted through Fourier transformation were computed from MODIS time series 16 day EVI composites. About 23 % of net shown area (NSA during rice and 11 % during wheat harvesting seasons are affected by field burning. The computed average fuel loads are 11.32 t/ha (±17.4 during rice and 10.89 t/ha (±8.7 during wheat harvesting seasons. Calculated average total emissions of CO2, CO, NO2, SO2 and TPM were 8108.41, 657.85, 8.10, 4.10, and 133.21 Gg during rice straw burning and 6896.85, 625.09, 1.42, 1.77, and 57.55 Gg during wheat burning. Comparison of estimated values shows better agreement with the previous concurrent estimations. The method, however, shows its efficiency parallel to the conventional method of estimation of fuel load and related pollutant emissions.

  20. Transfer of radionuclides by crops. Differences in crops species and radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Shigeo; Sumiya, Misako; Ohmomo, Yoichiro; Umebayashi, Masanao.

    1988-03-01

    Transfer coefficient defined as the ratio of radionuclide concentration in crops to that in soil is a key parameter to assess the concentration of the nuclide in crops in the fields. This coefficient fluctuates by several factors such as plant species, kinds of radionuclides, properties of soils and conditions of plant husbandary. In order to estimate the variations specifically by plant species and kinds of radionuclides, transfer rates of some radionuclides from culture solution to the edible parts were measured on crops such as rice plant, spinach, soybean, cucumber, eggplant and radish. Results obtained are summarized below; 1) The orders of transfer rates are /sup 65/Zn > /sup 54/Mn > /sup 137/Cs/similar to//sup 60/Co > /sup 85/ Sr > /sup 131/I. 2) Differences of transfer rates are 2 to 3 orders of magnitude among crops and/or radionuclides.

  1. Addressing crop interactions within cropping systems in LCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goglio, Pietro; Brankatschk, Gerhard; Knudsen, Marie Trydeman

    2018-01-01

    management and emissions, and (3) functional unit issues. The LCA approaches presented are as follows: cropping system, allocation approaches, crop-by-crop approach, and combined approaches. The various approaches are described together with their advantages and disadvantages, applicability......, and cannot be applied for intercropping and agroforestry systems. The allocation approaches take into account the cropping system effects by establishing a mathematical relationship between crops present in the cropping systems. The model for integrative life-cycle assessment in agriculture (MiLA) approach...

  2. Genetically modified crops and food security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaim, Matin; Kouser, Shahzad

    2013-01-01

    The role of genetically modified (GM) crops for food security is the subject of public controversy. GM crops could contribute to food production increases and higher food availability. There may also be impacts on food quality and nutrient composition. Finally, growing GM crops may influence farmers' income and thus their economic access to food. Smallholder farmers make up a large proportion of the undernourished people worldwide. Our study focuses on this latter aspect and provides the first ex post analysis of food security impacts of GM crops at the micro level. We use comprehensive panel data collected over several years from farm households in India, where insect-resistant GM cotton has been widely adopted. Controlling for other factors, the adoption of GM cotton has significantly improved calorie consumption and dietary quality, resulting from increased family incomes. This technology has reduced food insecurity by 15-20% among cotton-producing households. GM crops alone will not solve the hunger problem, but they can be an important component in a broader food security strategy.

  3. Genetically modified crops and food security.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matin Qaim

    Full Text Available The role of genetically modified (GM crops for food security is the subject of public controversy. GM crops could contribute to food production increases and higher food availability. There may also be impacts on food quality and nutrient composition. Finally, growing GM crops may influence farmers' income and thus their economic access to food. Smallholder farmers make up a large proportion of the undernourished people worldwide. Our study focuses on this latter aspect and provides the first ex post analysis of food security impacts of GM crops at the micro level. We use comprehensive panel data collected over several years from farm households in India, where insect-resistant GM cotton has been widely adopted. Controlling for other factors, the adoption of GM cotton has significantly improved calorie consumption and dietary quality, resulting from increased family incomes. This technology has reduced food insecurity by 15-20% among cotton-producing households. GM crops alone will not solve the hunger problem, but they can be an important component in a broader food security strategy.

  4. Plant biotechnology: transgenic crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewry, Peter R; Jones, Huw D; Halford, Nigel G

    2008-01-01

    Transgenesis is an important adjunct to classical plant breeding, in that it allows the targeted manipulation of specific characters using genes from a range of sources. The current status of crop transformation is reviewed, including methods of gene transfer, the selection of transformed plants and control of transgene expression. The application of genetic modification technology to specific traits is then discussed, including input traits relating to crop production (herbicide tolerance and resistance to insects, pathogens and abiotic stresses) and output traits relating to the composition and quality of the harvested organs. The latter include improving the nutritional quality for consumers as well as the improvement of functional properties for food processing.

  5. Crop stress detection and classification using hyperspectral remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irby, Jon Trenton

    Agricultural production has observed many changes in technology over the last 20 years. Producers are able to utilize technologies such as site-specific applicators and remotely sensed data to assist with decision making for best management practices which can improve crop production and provide protection to the environment. It is known that plant stress can interfere with photosynthetic reactions within the plant and/or the physical structure of the plant. Common types of stress associated with agricultural crops include herbicide induced stress, nutrient stress, and drought stress from lack of water. Herbicide induced crop stress is not a new problem. However, with increased acreage being planting in varieties/hybrids that contain herbicide resistant traits, herbicide injury to non-target crops will continue to be problematic for producers. With rapid adoption of herbicide-tolerant cropping systems, it is likely that herbicide induced stress will continue to be a major concern. To date, commercially available herbicide-tolerant varieties/hybrids contain traits which allow herbicides like glyphosate and glufosinate-ammonium to be applied as a broadcast application during the growing season. Both glyphosate and glufosinate-ammonium are broad spectrum herbicides which have activity on a large number of plant species, including major crops like non-transgenic soybean, corn, and cotton. Therefore, it is possible for crop stress from herbicide applications to occur in neighboring fields that contain susceptible crop varieties/hybrids. Nutrient and moisture stress as well as stress caused by herbicide applications can interact to influence yields in agricultural fields. If remotely sensed data can be used to accurately identify specific levels of crop stress, it is possible that producers can use this information to better assist them in crop management to maximize yields and protect their investments. This research was conducted to evaluate classification of specific

  6. Assessing the MODIS Crop Detection Algorithm for Soybean Crop Area Mapping and Expansion in the Mato Grosso State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anibal Gusso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Estimations of crop area were made based on the temporal profiles of the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI obtained from moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS images. Evaluation of the ability of the MODIS crop detection algorithm (MCDA to estimate soybean crop areas was performed for fields in the Mato Grosso state, Brazil. Using the MCDA approach, soybean crop area estimations can be provided for December (first forecast using images from the sowing period and for February (second forecast using images from the sowing period and the maximum crop development period. The area estimates were compared to official agricultural statistics from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE and from the National Company of Food Supply (CONAB at different crop levels from 2000/2001 to 2010/2011. At the municipality level, the estimates were highly correlated, with R2=0.97 and RMSD = 13,142 ha. The MCDA was validated using field campaign data from the 2006/2007 crop year. The overall map accuracy was 88.25%, and the Kappa Index of Agreement was 0.765. By using pre-defined parameters, MCDA is able to provide the evolution of annual soybean maps, forecast of soybean cropping areas, and the crop area expansion in the Mato Grosso state.

  7. Prospects of genetic modified maize crop in Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sunny t

    2016-04-13

    Apr 13, 2016 ... Confined field trials. Mozambique Maize/Drought tolerance ... aims to explore the constraints, benefits, risk to human ... BENEFITS OF GM MAIZE CROP. Genetic ... edible vaccines are exemplified by varieties of rice, maize ...

  8. 7 CFR 457.155 - Processing bean crop insurance provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... accept such production so it is not harvested. Good farming practices. The cultural practices generally..., moisture availability, condition of the field, time to crop maturity, and marketing window, that replanting...

  9. Soil Chemistry Factors Confounding Crop Salinity Tolerance—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pichu Rengasamy

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The yield response of various crops to salinity under field conditions is affected by soil processes and environmental conditions. The composition of dissolved ions depend on soil chemical processes such as cation or anion exchange, oxidation-reduction reactions, ion adsorption, chemical speciation, complex formation, mineral weathering, solubility, and precipitation. The nature of cations and anions determine soil pH, which in turn affects crop growth. While the ionic composition of soil solution determine the osmotic and ion specific effects on crops, the exchangeable ions indirectly affect the crop growth by influencing soil strength, water and air movement, waterlogging, and soil crusting. This review mainly focuses on the soil chemistry processes that frustrate crop salinity tolerance which partly explain the poor results under field conditions of salt tolerant genotypes selected in the laboratory.

  10. Cover crops support ecological intensification of arable cropping systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittwer, Raphaël A; Dorn, Brigitte; Jossi, Werner; van der Heijden, Marcel G A

    2017-02-03

    A major challenge for agriculture is to enhance productivity with minimum impact on the environment. Several studies indicate that cover crops could replace anthropogenic inputs and enhance crop productivity. However, so far, it is unclear if cover crop effects vary between different cropping systems, and direct comparisons among major arable production systems are rare. Here we compared the short-term effects of various cover crops on crop yield, nitrogen uptake, and weed infestation in four arable production systems (conventional cropping with intensive tillage and no-tillage; organic cropping with intensive tillage and reduced tillage). We hypothesized that cover cropping effects increase with decreasing management intensity. Our study demonstrated that cover crop effects on crop yield were highest in the organic system with reduced tillage (+24%), intermediate in the organic system with tillage (+13%) and in the conventional system with no tillage (+8%) and lowest in the conventional system with tillage (+2%). Our results indicate that cover crops are essential to maintaining a certain yield level when soil tillage intensity is reduced (e.g. under conservation agriculture), or when production is converted to organic agriculture. Thus, the inclusion of cover crops provides additional opportunities to increase the yield of lower intensity production systems and contribute to ecological intensification.

  11. Cover crops support ecological intensification of arable cropping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittwer, Raphaël A.; Dorn, Brigitte; Jossi, Werner; van der Heijden, Marcel G. A.

    2017-02-01

    A major challenge for agriculture is to enhance productivity with minimum impact on the environment. Several studies indicate that cover crops could replace anthropogenic inputs and enhance crop productivity. However, so far, it is unclear if cover crop effects vary between different cropping systems, and direct comparisons among major arable production systems are rare. Here we compared the short-term effects of various cover crops on crop yield, nitrogen uptake, and weed infestation in four arable production systems (conventional cropping with intensive tillage and no-tillage; organic cropping with intensive tillage and reduced tillage). We hypothesized that cover cropping effects increase with decreasing management intensity. Our study demonstrated that cover crop effects on crop yield were highest in the organic system with reduced tillage (+24%), intermediate in the organic system with tillage (+13%) and in the conventional system with no tillage (+8%) and lowest in the conventional system with tillage (+2%). Our results indicate that cover crops are essential to maintaining a certain yield level when soil tillage intensity is reduced (e.g. under conservation agriculture), or when production is converted to organic agriculture. Thus, the inclusion of cover crops provides additional opportunities to increase the yield of lower intensity production systems and contribute to ecological intensification.

  12. The Potential Research of Catch Crop in Decrease Soil Nitrate Under Greenhouse Vegetable Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YIN Xing

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to clarify the impact of catch crops on greenhouse vegetable soil nitrate, explore the mechanism of barrier and controll soil nitrogen leaching losses in greenhouse, and provide a theoretical basis for control nitrogen leaching and prevention of groundwater pollution, this study selected the traditional greenhouse vegetable rotation system in North China plain as research subjects, using field situ remediation technologies on deep-root planting catch crops in the vegetable fallow period by sweet corn, Achyranthes bidentata and white Chrysanthemum. The results showed that: nitrogen content and nitrogen uptake of sweet corn and sweet corn with Achyranthes bidentata intercropping were the highest, respectively 20.11 t·hm-2, 19.62 t·hm-2 and 240.34 kg·hm-2, 287.56 kg·hm-2, significantly higher than white Chrysanthemum. The density of root length and root dry weight decreased with soil depth in the profiles, root length density was demonstrated in order as: intercropping sweet corn> sweet corn> white Chrysanthemum> intercropping Achyranthes bidentata blume. The reduction of NO3--N of sweet corn reached 907.87 kg·hm-2 in soil profile 0~200 cm, significantly higher than sweet corn and hyssop intercropping and white Chrysanthemums. In the interim period of vegetable crop rotation, planting catch crops could effectively reduce nitrate accumulation in the soil, control the soil profile nitrate leaching down.

  13. Checklist for the crop weeds of Paraguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Egea, Juana; Mereles, Fátima; Peña-Chocarro, María Del Carmen; Céspedes, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Paraguay, a country whose economy is based mainly on agriculture and livestock for export, has experienced a major expansion in mechanized crops during the last few decades. Despite being heavily dependent on agriculture, Paraguay has very limited research on crop weeds, in spite of these having a high economic impact on production. This work aims to update and enhance the knowledgebase on the most common weeds affecting productive fields throughout the different ecoregions of Paraguay. We present here the first checklist of crop weeds for the country, which includes a total of 256 taxa (189 species, 10 subspecies, 54 varieties and 3 forms), with the most species-rich families being Poaceae and Asteraceae followed by Malvaceae, Amaranthaceae, Fabaceae and Solanaceae. The list includes three new records for the country. Synonyms, distribution details within Paraguay, habit and a voucher specimen are provided for each taxon.

  14. Checklist for the crop weeds of Paraguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana De Egea

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Paraguay, a country whose economy is based mainly on agriculture and livestock for export, has experienced a major expansion in mechanized crops during the last few decades. Despite being heavily dependent on agriculture, Paraguay has very limited research on crop weeds, in spite of these having a high economic impact on production. This work aims to update and enhance the knowledgebase on the most common weeds affecting productive fields throughout the different ecoregions of Paraguay. We present here the first checklist of crop weeds for the country, which includes a total of 256 taxa (189 species, 10 subspecies, 54 varieties and 3 forms, with the most species-rich families being Poaceae and Asteraceae followed by Malvaceae, Amaranthaceae, Fabaceae and Solanaceae. The list includes three new records for the country. Synonyms, distribution details within Paraguay, habit and a voucher specimen are provided for each taxon.

  15. Enhancing crop innate immunity: new promising trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin-Yao eHuang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Plants are constantly exposed to potentially pathogenic microbes present in their surrounding environment. Due to the activation of the pattern-triggered immunity (PTI response that largely relies on accurate detection of pathogen- or microbe-associated molecular patterns by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs, plants are resistant to the majority of potential pathogens. However, adapted pathogens may avoid recognition or repress plant PTI and resulting diseases significantly affect crop yield worldwide. PTI provides protection against a wide range of pathogens. Reinforcement of PTI through genetic engineering may thus generate crops with broad-spectrum field resistance. In this review, new approaches based on fundamental discoveries in PTI to improve crop immunity are discussed. Notably, we highlight recent studies describing the interfamily transfer of PRRs or key regulators of PTI signalling.

  16. Implementation of project based learning on the Prakerin subject of vocational high school students of the building engineering to enhance employment skill readiness of graduates in the construction services field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugandi, Machmud

    2017-09-01

    Implementation of the Prakerin subject in the field of Building Engineering study program in vocational high school (VHS) are facing many issues associated to non-compliance unit of work in the industry and the expected competencies in learning at school. Project Based Learning (PBL) is an appropriate model learning used for Prakerin subject to increase student competence as the extension of the Prakerin implementation in the construction industry services. Assignments based on the selected project during their practical industry work were given to be completed by student. VHS students in particular field of Building Engineering study program who has been completed Prakerin subject will have a better job readiness, and therefore they will have an understanding on the knowledge, skills, and attitudes and good vision on the construction project in accordance with their experience during Prakerin work in the industry.

  17. Benchmark study on glyphosate-resistant cropping systems in the United States. Part 7: Effects of weed management strategy (grower practices versus academic recommendations) on the weed soil seedbank over 6 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, David J; Young, Bryan G; Owen, Micheal D K; Gage, Karla L; Matthews, Joseph L; Jordan, David L; Shaw, David R; Weller, Stephen C; Wilson, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    Shifts in weed species composition and richness resulting from near-exclusive reliance on herbicides in glyphosate-resistant (GR) cropping systems has necessitated the implementation of alternative weed management tactics to reduce selection pressures of herbicides. We contrasted the response of the weed soil seedbank to effects of weed management strategy, comparing grower practices with academic recommendations for best management practices (BMPs) over 6 years and across five weed hardiness zones in the US Midwest at sites subject to GR cropping systems. Total weed population density and species richness varied according to cropping system, location and prior year's crop, but less so to weed management strategy. The seedbank population density for 11 of the 14 most frequent weed species was affected by weed management strategy either alone or in an interaction with hardiness zone or year, or both. In only 29% of comparisons was weed population density lower following academic recommendations, and this depended upon prior crop and cropping system. The population density of high-risk weed species was reduced by academic recommendations, but only in two of six years and under continuous GR maize. Overall, the weed population density was decreasing in field halves subject to the BMPs in the academic recommendations relative to grower practices. The soil seedbank is slow to respond to academic recommendations to mitigate glyphosate-resistant weeds, but represents a biological legacy that growers need to keep in mind even when management practices reduce emerged field weed population densities. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Impacts of crop rotations on soil organic carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobin, Anne; Vos, Johan; Joris, Ingeborg; Van De Vreken, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Agricultural land use and crop rotations can greatly affect the amount of carbon sequestered in the soil. We developed a framework for modelling the impacts of crop rotations on soil carbon sequestration at the field scale with test case Flanders. A crop rotation geo-database was constructed covering 10 years of crop rotation in Flanders using the IACS parcel registration (Integrated Administration and Control System) to elicit the most common crop rotation on major soil types in Flanders. In order to simulate the impact of crop cover on carbon sequestration, the Roth-C model was adapted to Flanders' environment and coupled to common crop rotations extracted from the IACS geodatabases and statistical databases on crop yield. Crop allometric models were used to calculate crop residues from common crops in Flanders and subsequently derive stable organic matter fluxes to the soil (REGSOM). The REGSOM model was coupled to Roth-C model was run for 30 years and for all combinations of seven main arable crops, two common catch crops and two common dosages of organic manure. The common crops are winter wheat, winter barley, sugar beet, potato, grain maize, silage maize and winter rapeseed; the catch crops are yellow mustard and Italian ryegrass; the manure dosages are 35 ton/ha cattle slurry and 22 ton/ha pig slurry. Four common soils were simulated: sand, loam, sandy loam and clay. In total more than 2.4 million simulations were made with monthly output of carbon content for 30 years. Results demonstrate that crop cover dynamics influence carbon sequestration for a very large percentage. For the same rotations carbon sequestration is highest on clay soils and lowest on sandy soils. Crop residues of grain maize and winter wheat followed by catch crops contribute largely to the total carbon sequestered. This implies that agricultural policies that impact on agricultural land management influence soil carbon sequestration for a large percentage. The framework is therefore

  19. Expanding subjectivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda; Soldz, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A major theme in recent psychoanalytic thinking concerns the use of therapist subjectivity, especially “countertransference,” in understanding patients. This thinking converges with and expands developments in qualitative research regarding the use of researcher subjectivity as a tool to understa...

  20. Performance evaluation of selected crop yield-water use models for wheat crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Igbadun

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Crop yield-water use models that provide useful information about the exact form of crop response to different amounts of water used by the crop throughout its growth stages and those that provide adequate information for decisions on optimal use of water in the farm were evaluated. Three crop yield models: Jensen (1968, Minhas et al., (1974 and Bras and Cordova (1981 additive type models were studied. Wheat (Triticum aestivum was planted at the Institute for Agricultural Research Farm during the 1995/96 and 1996/97 irrigation seasons of November to March. The data collected from the field experiments during the 1995/96 planting season were used to calibrate the models and their stress sensitivity factors estimated for four selected growth stages of the wheat crop. The ability of the model to predict grain yield of wheat with the estimated stress sensitivity factors was evaluated by comparing predicted grain yields by each model with those obtained in the field during the 1996/97 season. The three models performed fairly well in predicting grain yields, as the predicted results were not significantly different from the field measured grain yield at 5% level of significance.

  1. Biotechnology Towards Energy Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaritopoulou, Theoni; Roka, Loukia; Alexopoulou, Efi; Christou, Myrsini; Rigas, Stamatis; Haralampidis, Kosmas; Milioni, Dimitra

    2016-03-01

    New crops are gradually establishing along with cultivation systems to reduce reliance on depleting fossil fuel reserves and sustain better adaptation to climate change. These biological assets could be efficiently exploited as bioenergy feedstocks. Bioenergy crops are versatile renewable sources with the potential to alternatively contribute on a daily basis towards the coverage of modern society's energy demands. Biotechnology may facilitate the breeding of elite energy crop genotypes, better suited for bio-processing and subsequent use that will improve efficiency, further reduce costs, and enhance the environmental benefits of biofuels. Innovative molecular techniques may improve a broad range of important features including biomass yield, product quality and resistance to biotic factors like pests or microbial diseases or environmental cues such as drought, salinity, freezing injury or heat shock. The current review intends to assess the capacity of biotechnological applications to develop a beneficial bioenergy pipeline extending from feedstock development to sustainable biofuel production and provide examples of the current state of the art on future energy crops.

  2. Mycorrhiza and crop production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayman, D.S.

    1980-10-09

    This article describes recent research with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza, a symbiotic fungus-root association. The suggestion that the symbiotic association may be harnessed to achieve more economical use of phosphate fertilizers is discussed and the results from various test crops are given.

  3. Crop Biometric Maps: The Key to Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Rovira-Más

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The sustainability of agricultural production in the twenty-first century, both in industrialized and developing countries, benefits from the integration of farm management with information technology such that individual plants, rows, or subfields may be endowed with a singular “identity.” This approach approximates the nature of agricultural processes to the engineering of industrial processes. In order to cope with the vast variability of nature and the uncertainties of agricultural production, the concept of crop biometrics is defined as the scientific analysis of agricultural observations confined to spaces of reduced dimensions and known position with the purpose of building prediction models. This article develops the idea of crop biometrics by setting its principles, discussing the selection and quantization of biometric traits, and analyzing the mathematical relationships among measured and predicted traits. Crop biometric maps were applied to the case of a wine-production vineyard, in which vegetation amount, relative altitude in the field, soil compaction, berry size, grape yield, juice pH, and grape sugar content were selected as biometric traits. The enological potential of grapes was assessed with a quality-index map defined as a combination of titratable acidity, sugar content, and must pH. Prediction models for yield and quality were developed for high and low resolution maps, showing the great potential of crop biometric maps as a strategic tool for vineyard growers as well as for crop managers in general, due to the wide versatility of the methodology proposed.

  4. Crop biometric maps: the key to prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira-Más, Francisco; Sáiz-Rubio, Verónica

    2013-09-23

    The sustainability of agricultural production in the twenty-first century, both in industrialized and developing countries, benefits from the integration of farm management with information technology such that individual plants, rows, or subfields may be endowed with a singular "identity." This approach approximates the nature of agricultural processes to the engineering of industrial processes. In order to cope with the vast variability of nature and the uncertainties of agricultural production, the concept of crop biometrics is defined as the scientific analysis of agricultural observations confined to spaces of reduced dimensions and known position with the purpose of building prediction models. This article develops the idea of crop biometrics by setting its principles, discussing the selection and quantization of biometric traits, and analyzing the mathematical relationships among measured and predicted traits. Crop biometric maps were applied to the case of a wine-production vineyard, in which vegetation amount, relative altitude in the field, soil compaction, berry size, grape yield, juice pH, and grape sugar content were selected as biometric traits. The enological potential of grapes was assessed with a quality-index map defined as a combination of titratable acidity, sugar content, and must pH. Prediction models for yield and quality were developed for high and low resolution maps, showing the great potential of crop biometric maps as a strategic tool for vineyard growers as well as for crop managers in general, due to the wide versatility of the methodology proposed.

  5. Short communication. Persistence of point crop yield subjective estimates

    OpenAIRE

    Clop i Gallart, Maria Mercè; Juárez Rubio, Francisco

    2006-01-01

    En este trabajo se investiga la persistencia de las estimaciones puntuales subjetivas de rendimientos en cultivos anua- les realizadas por un amplio grupo de agricultores. La persistencia en el tiempo es una condición necesaria para la co- herencia y la confiabilidad de las estimaciones subjetivas de variables aleatorias. Los sujetos entrevistados estimaron valores puntuales de rendimientos de cultivos anuales (rendimientos medio, mayor, mínimo y más frecuente). Se han encontrado ...

  6. Estimating Crop Cover Fraction from Digital Color Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakus, P.; Karabork, H.

    2017-11-01

    The use of automated methods to estimate crop cover fraction from digital color images has increased in recent years. Crop cover fraction can determine accurate, fast and inexpensive with this methods. A digital color images was acquired over each of the 30 sample fields in 2014 year at 2-3 week intervals. Study area has 15 sunflower fields and 15 corn fields. Digital color images were collected during 4 months, namely over the course of the growing season from sowing until harvesting to determine crop cover fraction. We used two approach to estimate crop cover fraction. In first method, the images were transformed from the RGB (red, green, blue) color space to the HSI (hue, intensity, saturation) color space. We used an object-based image analysis approach to classify the images into green vegetation and the other materials. In the second method, The Green Crop Tracker is less labor and time intensive than the object-based classification approach, is a viable alternative to ground-based methods. By comparing object-based classification method and Green Crop Tracker software 2014 growing season, results were obtained: There were high correlations between the estimations obtained by object-based classification method and Green Crop Tracker software (for 2014 R2 = 0.89). The relationship between two methods for 2014-23 sunflower field was calculated R2 = 0.97.

  7. Metagenome-wide association study and machine learning prediction of bulk soil microbiome and crop productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areas within an agricultural field in the same season often differ in crop productivity despite having the same cropping history, crop genotype, and management practices. One hypothesis is that abiotic or biotic factors in the soils differ between areas resulting in these productivity differences. I...

  8. Integration of annual and perennial cover crops for improving soil health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annual and perennial cover crops in rotation provide environmental services and benefit soil health. Environmentally, cover crops can fill gaps in the rotation where the field may otherwise be fallow, thereby reducing soil erosion. Additionally, using cover crops as a nutrient capture tool can red...

  9. Soil Fertility and Crop Management Research on Cool-season Food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    arietinum L.) and lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) are important cool-season food legumes (CSFL) of low-input 'break' crops in the highlands of. Ethiopia. These crops are very useful in a crop rotation system that is dominated by cereals. Faba bean, chickpea, field pea and lentil cover 27,. 13, 16 and 6% of the total pulse area ...

  10. No-till snap bean performance and weed response following rye and vetch cover crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall-planted cover crops offer many benefits including weed suppressive residues in spring sown crops when controlled and left on the soil surface. However, vegetable growers have been slow to adapt direct seeding (no-till) into cover crop residues. Field studies were conducted in 2009 and 2010 near...

  11. Economic significance of Viroids in vegetable and fruit crops (Book Chapter)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crop losses due to viroid infection occur in vegetable and field crops worldwide. In addition to potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd), several viroids in the family Pospiviroidae infect these crops and economic losses range from minimal to severe depending upon the viroid/host combination, the host c...

  12. Using the GENESYS model quantifying the effect of cropping systems on gene escape from GM rape varieties to evaluate and design cropping systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colbach Nathalie

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene flow in rapeseed is a process taking place both in space and over the years and cannot be studied exclusively by field trials. Consequently, the GENESYS model was developed to quantify the effects of cropping systems on transgene escape from rapeseed crops to rapeseed volunteers in neighbour plots and in the subsequent crops. In the present work, this model was used to evaluate the risk of rape harvest contamination by extraneous genes in various farming systems in case of co-existing GM, conventional and organic crops. When 50 % of the rape varieties in the region were transgenic, the rate of GM seeds in non-GM crop harvests on farms with large fields was lower than the 0.9 % purity threshold proposed by the EC for rape crop production (food and feed harvests, but on farms with smaller fields, the threshold was exceeded. Harvest impurity increased in organic farms, mainly because of their small field size. The model was then used to evaluate the consequences of changes in farming practices and to identify those changes reducing harvest contamination. The effects of these changes depended on the field pattern and farming system. The most efficient practices in limiting harvest impurity comprised improved set-aside management by sowing a cover crop in spring on all set-aside fields in the region, permanently banning rape crops and set-aside around seed production fields and (for non-GM farmers clustering farm fields to reduce gene inflow from neighbour fields.

  13. Governing the GM crop revolution

    OpenAIRE

    Paarlberg, Robert L.

    2000-01-01

    Will developing countries adopt policies that promote the planting of genetically modified (GM) crops, or will they select policies that slow the spread of the GM crop revolution? The evidence so far is mixed. In some prominent countries such as China, policies are in place that encourage the independent development and planting of GM crops. Yet in a number of other equally prominent countries the planting of GM crops is not yet officially approved. The inclination of developing countries to ...

  14. Vehicle based laser range finding in crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Detlef; Adamek, Rolf; Horn, Hans-Juergen

    2009-01-01

    Laser rangefinders and laser scanners are widely used for industrial purposes and for remote sensing. In agriculture information about crop parameters like volume, height, and density can support the optimisation of production processes. In scientific papers the measurement of these parameters by low cost laser rangefinders with one echo has been presented for short ranges. Because the cross section area of the beam increases with the measuring range, it can be expected that laser rangefinders will have a reduced measuring accuracy in small sized crops and when measuring far distances. These problems are caused by target areas smaller than the beam and by the beam striking the edges of crop objects. Lab tests under defined conditions and a real field test were performed to assess the measuring properties under such difficult conditions of a chosen low cost sensor. Based on lab tests it was shown that the accuracy was reduced, but the successful use of the sensor under field conditions demonstrated the potential to meet the demands for agricultural applications, Insights resulting from investigations made in the paper contribute to facilitating the choice or the development of laser rangefinder sensors for vehicle based measurement of crop parameters for optimisation of production processes.

  15. A multi-adaptive framework for the crop choice in paludicultural cropping systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Silvestri

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The conventional cultivation of drained peatland causes peat oxidation, soil subsidence, nutrient loss, increasing greenhouse gas emissions and biodiversity reduction. Paludiculture has been identified as an alternative management strategy consisting in the cultivation of biomass on wet and rewetted peatlands. This strategy can save these habitats and restore the ecosystem services provided by the peatlands both on the local and global scale. This paper illustrates the most important features to optimise the crop choice phase which is the crucial point for the success of paludiculture systems. A multi-adaptive framework was proposed. It was based on four points that should be checked to identify suitable crops for paludicultural cropping system: biological traits, biomass production, attitude to cultivation and biomass quality. The main agronomic implications were explored with the help of some results from a plurennial open-field experimentation carried out in a paludicultural system set up in the Massaciuccoli Lake Basin (Tuscany, Italy and a complete example of the method application was provided. The tested crops were Arundo donax L., Miscanthus×giganteus Greef et Deuter, Phragmites australis L., Populus×canadensis Moench. and Salix alba L. The results showed a different level of suitability ascribable to the different plant species proving that the proposed framework can discriminate the behaviour of tested crops. Phragmites australis L. was the most suitable crop whereas Populus×canadensis Moench and Miscanthus×giganteus Greef et Deuter (in the case of biogas conversion occupied the last positions in the ranking.

  16. Using genetically modified tomato crop plants with purple leaves for absolute weed/crop classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lati, Ran N; Filin, Sagi; Aly, Radi; Lande, Tal; Levin, Ilan; Eizenberg, Hanan

    2014-07-01

    Weed/crop classification is considered the main problem in developing precise weed-management methodologies, because both crops and weeds share similar hues. Great effort has been invested in the development of classification models, most based on expensive sensors and complicated algorithms. However, satisfactory results are not consistently obtained due to imaging conditions in the field. We report on an innovative approach that combines advances in genetic engineering and robust image-processing methods to detect weeds and distinguish them from crop plants by manipulating the crop's leaf color. We demonstrate this on genetically modified tomato (germplasm AN-113) which expresses a purple leaf color. An autonomous weed/crop classification is performed using an invariant-hue transformation that is applied to images acquired by a standard consumer camera (visible wavelength) and handles variations in illumination intensities. The integration of these methodologies is simple and effective, and classification results were accurate and stable under a wide range of imaging conditions. Using this approach, we simplify the most complicated stage in image-based weed/crop classification models. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Using cereal rye (catch crop) and dehydrogenase activity as indicators of the residual fertility effects of anaerobic soil disinfestation and other biological soil management practices following field tomato production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) and other biological soil management practices employing carbon-rich and/or biologically-active ingredients help contribute to overall soil suppressiveness in crop disease management. However, their roles in soil fertility tended to be overshadowed by disease cont...

  18. Controlled delivery of 1-MCP from R1, R2-B-methylene cyclopropane complexes: an effective approach to be used both in closed environments and open crop fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    1-methylcycloprene (1-MCP) is a synthetic plant growth regulator used for the confined treatment of perishable agricultural commodities, such as fruits, flowers and vegetables, to retard ripening and thus prolong shelf-life. Previous investigations have shown that 1-MCP protects crops from yield los...

  19. Using optical full-field measurement based on digital image correlation to measure strain on a tree subjected to mechanical load

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sebera, V.; Praus, L.; Tippner, J.; Kunecký, Jiří; Čepela, J.; Wimmer, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 4 (2014), s. 1173-1184 ISSN 0931-1890 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : digital image correlation * tree biomechanics * strain * pulling test * arboriculture * nondestructive Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 1.651, year: 2014

  20. The operationalization of "fields" as WoS subject categories (WCs) in evaluative bibliometrics: The cases of "library and information science" and "science & technology studies"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leydesdorff, L.; Bornmann, L.

    Normalization of citation scores using reference sets based on Web of Science subject categories (WCs) has become an established (“best”) practice in evaluative bibliometrics. For example, the Times Higher Education World University Rankings are, among other things, based on this operationalization.

  1. Contrasting weed species composition in perennial alfalfas and six annual crops: implications for integrated weed management

    OpenAIRE

    Meiss, Helmut; Médiène, Safia; Waldhardt, Rainer; Caneill, Jacques; Munier-Jolain, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Weed communities are most strongly affected by the characteristics and management of the current crop. Crop rotation may thus be used to prevent the repeated selection of particular weed species. While weed communities are frequently compared among annual crops, little is known about the differences between annual and perennial crops that may be included in the rotations. Moreover, nearly all existing studies (17 articles reviewed) are based on local field experiments ...

  2. CROPS : high tech agricultural robots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bontsema, J.; Hemming, J.; Pekkeriet, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    In the EU-funded CROPS (Clever Robots for Crops) project high tech robots are developed for site-specific spraying and selective harvesting of fruit and fruit vegetables. The harvesting robots are being designed to harvest high-value crops such as greenhouse vegetables, fruits in orchards and grapes

  3. [Ecological effects of cover crops].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaobing; Song, Chunyu; Herbert, Stephen J; Xing, Baoshan

    2002-03-01

    This paper reviewed the effects of cover crops in reducing soil loss, surface runoff, NO3- leaching and water pollution, and elucidated roles of cover crops in controlling pest insects, weeds and diseases, and increasing soil nutrients. The potential roles and appropriate application of cover crops in sustainable development of agriculture were also discussed.

  4. Water and salt balances of two shallow groundwater cropping ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evidence suggests that, in general, subjective rather than objective irrigation scheduling decisions are adopted by farmers. Irrigators have 'calibrated' themselves with years of experience to irrigate subjectively according to perceived crop water requirements. This study aimed to determine the associated benefits of ...

  5. IMPORTANCE OF MAIZE CROPPING

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Dhary Yousif EL-JUBOURI

    2012-01-01

    The Corn, wheat and rice together are the main crops. It is a plant that responds well to chemical and organic fertilization and the irrigation. But compliance is sensitive to optimum sowing time and integrated control of weeds, pests and diseases (2). The maize is the most important plant product, from the point of view commercially and is used primarily as fodder. The maize is an important source of vegetable oil and has many applications in industry, the manufacture of diverse items: cosme...

  6. Replacing fallow by cover crops: economic sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, José Luis; Garrido, Alberto; Quemada, Miguel

    2013-04-01

    Replacing fallow by cover crops in intensive fertilized systems has been demonstrated as an efficient tool for reducing nitrate leaching. However, despite the evident environmental services provided and the range of agronomic benefits documented in the literature, farmers' adoption of this new technology is still limited because they are either unwilling or unable, although adoption reluctance is frequently rooted in low economic profitability, low water se efficiency or poor knowledge. Economic analyses permit a comparison between the profit that farmers obtain from agricultural products and the cost of adopting specific agricultural techniques. The goal of this study was to evaluate the economic impact of replacing the usual winter fallow with cover crops (barley (Hordeum vulgare L., cv. Vanessa), vetch (Vicia villosa L., cv. Vereda) and rapeseed (Brassica napus L., cv. Licapo)) in irrigated maize systems and variable Mediterranean weather conditions using stochastic Monte-Carlo simulations of key farms' financial performance indicators. The three scenarios studied for each cover crop were: i) just leaving the cover crop residue in the ground, ii) leaving the cover crop residue but reduce following maize fertilization according to the N available from the previous cover crop and iii) selling the cover crop residue for animal feeding. All the scenarios were compared with respect to a typical maize-fallow rotation. With observed data from six different years and in various field trials, looking for different weather conditions, probability distribution functions of maize yield, cover crop biomass production and N fertilizer saving was fitted. Based in statistical sources maize grain price, different forage prices and the cost of fertilizer were fitted to probability distribution functions too. As result, introducing a cover crop involved extra costs with respect to fallow as the initial investment, because new seed, herbicide or extra field operations. Additional

  7. Wigner-transform phase-space densities of a two-dimensional harmonically confined charged quantum gas subjected to a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencheikh, K.; Nieto, L. M.

    2008-11-01

    Closed form analytical expressions are obtained for the Wigner transform of the Bloch density matrix and for the Wigner phase-space density of a two-dimensional harmonically trapped charged quantum gas in a uniform magnetic field of arbitrary strength, at zero and nonzero temperatures. An exact analytic expression is also obtained for the autocorrelation function. The strong magnetic field case, where only few Landau levels are occupied, is also examined, and useful approximate expressions for the spatial and momentum densities are given.

  8. The Operationalization of "Fields" as WoS Subject Categories (WCs) in Evaluative Bibliometrics: The cases of "Library and Information Science" and "Science & Technology Studies"

    OpenAIRE

    Leydesdorff, Loet; Bornmann, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Normalization of citation scores using reference sets based on Web-of-Science Subject Categories (WCs) has become an established ("best") practice in evaluative bibliometrics. For example, the Times Higher Education World University Rankings are, among other things, based on this operationalization. However, WCs were developed decades ago for the purpose of information retrieval and evolved incrementally with the database; the classification is machine-based and partially manually corrected. ...

  9. Flower volatiles, crop varieties and bee responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn K Klatt

    Full Text Available Pollination contributes to an estimated one third of global food production, through both the improvement of the yield and the quality of crops. Volatile compounds emitted by crop flowers mediate plant-pollinator interactions, but differences between crop varieties are still little explored. We investigated whether the visitation of crop flowers is determined by variety-specific flower volatiles using strawberry varieties (Fragaria x ananassa Duchesne and how this affects the pollination services of the wild bee Osmia bicornis L. Flower volatile compounds of three strawberry varieties were measured via headspace collection. Gas chromatography showed that the three strawberry varieties produced the same volatile compounds but with quantitative differences of the total amount of volatiles and between distinct compounds. Electroantennographic recordings showed that inexperienced females of Osmia bicornis had higher antennal responses to all volatile compounds than to controls of air and paraffin oil, however responses differed between compounds. The variety Sonata was found to emit a total higher level of volatiles and also higher levels of most of the compounds that evoked antennal responses compared with the other varieties Honeoye and Darselect. Sonata also received more flower visits from Osmia bicornis females under field conditions, compared with Honeoye. Our results suggest that differences in the emission of flower volatile compounds among strawberry varieties mediate their attractiveness to females of Osmia bicornis. Since quality and quantity of marketable fruits depend on optimal pollination, a better understanding of the role of flower volatiles in crop production is required and should be considered more closely in crop-variety breeding.

  10. Historical patterns and drivers of global crop water demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, D.; Lobell, D. B.; Sheffield, J.

    2015-12-01

    With climate change expected to subject staple crops in major growing regions to increased heat exposure, a critical question for agriculture and global food security is the degree to which crop water demand is also likely to change. Recent work has explored the relationship between extreme temperatures and crop water demand, finding that vapor pressure deficit (VPD), through its dependence on both temperature and humidity, provides a very good meteorological predictor of water stress. However, assessing crop water demand solely through atmospheric conditions ignores the roles of radiation and transpiration efficiency, which are increased through elevated CO2. We provide a 60-year global assessment of crop water demand in the world's major growing areas, comparing trends and drivers across key growing regions. We find that an atmospheric-based demand measure can differ significantly from that of a crop-specific sink-based approach that incorporates radiation and CO2 effects, sometimes enough to reverse the sign of historical trends. We also find that these changes differ significantly by region, and that multi-decadal trends can mask large decadal swings. To our knowledge, our work is the first to use global meteorological datasets in a global analysis of crop water demand, and should serve as a valuable reference for future work examining the interaction of hydrological, temperature, and CO2 changes on crop yields.

  11. Transfer functions of laminar premixed flames subjected to forcing by acoustic waves, AC electric fields, and non-thermal plasma discharges

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna

    2016-06-23

    The responses of laminar methane-air flames to forcing by acoustic waves, AC electric fields, and nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) glow discharges are reported here. The experimental setup consists of an axisymmetric burner with a nozzle made from a quartz tube. Three different flame geometries have been studied: conical, M-shaped and V-shaped flames. A central stainless steel rod is used as a cathode for the electric field and plasma excitations. The acoustic forcing is obtained with a loudspeaker located at the bottom part of the burner. For forcing by AC electric fields, a metallic grid is placed above the rod and connected to an AC power supply. Plasma forcing is obtained by applying high-voltage pulses of 10-ns duration applied at 10 kHz, between the rod and an annular stainless steel ring, placed at the outlet of the quartz tube. The chemiluminescence of CH is used to determine the heat release rate fluctuations. For forcing by acoustic waves and plasma, the geometry of the flame plays a key role in the response of the combustion, while the flame shape does not affect the response of the combustion to electric field forcing. The flame response to acoustic forcing of about 10% of the incoming flow is similar to those obtained in the literature. The flames are found to be responsive to an AC electric field across the whole range of frequencies studied. A forcing mechanism, based on the generation of ionic wind, is proposed. The gain of the transfer function obtained for plasma forcing is found to be up to 5 times higher than for acoustic forcing. A possible mechanism of plasma forcing is introduced.

  12. Intragenesis and cisgenesis as alternatives to transgenic crop development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, Inger; Wendt, Toni; Holm, Preben Bach

    2013-01-01

    One of the major concerns of the general public about transgenic crops relates to the mixing of genetic materials between species that cannot hybridize by natural means. To meet this concern, the two transformation concepts cisgenesis and intragenesis were developed as alternatives to transgenesis...... from cisgenesis by allowing use of new gene combinations created by in vitro rearrangements of functional genetic elements. Several surveys show higher public acceptance of intragenic/cisgenic crops compared to transgenic crops. Thus, although the intragenic and cisgenic concepts were introduced...... internationally only 9 and 7 years ago, several different traits in a variety of crops have currently been modified according to these concepts. Five of these crops are now in field trials and two have pending applications for deregulation. Currently, intragenic/cisgenic plants are regulated as transgenic plants...

  13. Team-up Crop Diversification and Weed Management: PRODIVA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerowitt, B.; Melander, B.; Krawczyk, R.

    2015-01-01

    The research-network PRODIVA focuses on a better utilization of crop diversification for weed management in North European arable cropping systems. The goal is to maintain diverse arable weed vegetation that is manageable in the long-term and could fulfil other necessary systemfunctions including...... in organic agriculture. Regional fields will be surveyed for weeds to safeguard the relevance of the experimental research. Current cropping practices and their influence on weed pressure and weed diversity will be identified. The project will involve relevant stakeholders from the participating countries...... the results. Neither are crop diversification methods restricted to Organic Farming, nor can IWM (Integrated Weed Management) be successfully implemented without respecting the role of weeds in agro-ecosystems. The project “PRODIVA - Crop diversification and weeds“ is supported within the ERA-net CORE Organic...

  14. Improvement of Selenium Status of Pasture Crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel

    1984-01-01

    Selenium was applied to pasture crops in a field experiment (1) by foliar application of 10 g Se/ha as selenite in the spring, (2) or by 5 g Se/ha in the spring plus 5 g in early August, (3) as selenite-enriched calcium ammonium nitrate (CAN) at 4 g Se/ha after each cut, and (4) as 4 g Se after...

  15. 75 FR 65423 - Crop Assistance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ..., for a producer ] in a disaster county as of October 22, 2010. Subsequent crops, replacement crops.... Replacement crop means the planting or approved prevented planting of any crop for harvest following the... cotton, soybeans, or sweet potatoes not in a recognized double- cropping sequence. Replacement crops are...

  16. Regulating innovative crop technologies in Canada: the case of regulating genetically modified crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Stuart; McHughen, Alan

    2008-04-01

    The advent of genetically modified crops in the late 1980s triggered a regulatory response to the relatively new field of plant genetic engineering. Over a 7-year period, a new regulatory framework was created, based on scientific principles that focused on risk mitigation. The process was transparent and deliberately sought the input of those involved in crop development from non-governmental organizations, industry, academia and federal research laboratories. The resulting regulations have now been in place for over a decade, and the resilience of the risk-mitigating regulations is evident as there has been no documented case of damage to either environment or human health.

  17. Crop yield, root growth, and nutrient dynamics in a conventional and three organic cropping systems with different levels of external inputs and N re-cycling through fertility building crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup-Kristensen, Kristian; Dresbøll, Dorte Bodin; Kristensen, Hanne Lakkenborg

    2012-01-01

    of the organic rotation, both relying on green manures and catch crops grown during the autumn after the main crop as their main source of soil fertility, and the O3 system further leaving rows of the green manures to grow as intercrops between vegetable rows to improve the conditions for biodiversity......, it is not always obvious that these goals are reached. As an example, strong dependence on import of manure is often seen in current organic production, especially in systems producing high value crops such as vegetable crops. The aim of the present study was to test novel approaches to organic rotations, designed...... among crop species, but on average the organic crops yielded c. 82% of conventional yields in all three organic systems, when calculated based on the area actually grown with the main crops. In the O3 system some of the area of the vegetable fields was allocated to intercrops, so vegetable yields...

  18. Robust extrapolation scheme for fast estimation of 3D Ising field partition functions: application to within subject fMRI data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risser, L.; Vincent, T.; Ciuciu, Ph. [NeuroSpin CEA, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Risser, L.; Vincent, T. [Laboratoire de Neuroimagerie Assistee par Ordinateur (LNAO) CEA - DSV/I2BM/NEUROSPIN (France); Risser, L. [Institut de mecanique des fluides de Toulouse (IMFT), CNRS: UMR5502 - Universite Paul Sabatier - Toulouse III - Institut National Polytechnique de Toulouse - INPT (France); Idier, J. [Institut de Recherche en Communications et en Cybernetique de Nantes (IRCCyN) CNRS - UMR6597 - Universite de Nantes - ecole Centrale de Nantes - Ecole des Mines de Nantes - Ecole Polytechnique de l' Universite de Nantes (France)

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, we present a first numerical scheme to estimate Partition Functions (PF) of 3D Ising fields. Our strategy is applied to the context of the joint detection-estimation of brain activity from functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) data, where the goal is to automatically recover activated regions and estimate region-dependent, hemodynamic filters. For any region, a specific binary Markov random field may embody spatial correlation over the hidden states of the voxels by modeling whether they are activated or not. To make this spatial regularization fully adaptive, our approach is first based upon it, classical path-sampling method to approximate a small subset of reference PFs corresponding to pre-specified regions. Then, file proposed extrapolation method allows its to approximate the PFs associated with the Ising fields defined over the remaining brain regions. In comparison with preexisting approaches, our method is robust; to topological inhomogeneities in the definition of the reference regions. As a result, it strongly alleviates the computational burden and makes spatially adaptive regularization of whole brain fMRI datasets feasible. (authors)

  19. Influence of crop management practices on bean foliage arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, J L; Picanço, M C; Pereira, E J G; Silva, A A; Jakelaitis, A; Pereira, R R; Xavier, V M

    2010-12-01

    Crop management practices can affect the population of phytophagous pest species and beneficial arthropods with consequences for integrated pest management. In this study, we determined the effect of no-tillage and crop residue management on the arthropod community associated with the canopy of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Abundance and species composition of herbivorous, detritivorous, predaceous and parasitoid arthropods were recorded during the growing seasons of 2003 and 2004 in Coimbra County, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Arthropod diversity and guild composition were similar among crop management systems, but their abundance was higher under no-tillage relative to conventional cultivation and where residues from the preceding crop were maintained in the field. Thirty-four arthropod species were recorded, and those most representative of the impact of the crop management practices were Hypogastrura springtails, Empoasca kraemeri and Circulifer leafhoppers, and Solenopsis ants. The infestation levels of major insect-pests, especially leafhoppers (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), was on average seven-fold lower under no-tillage with retention of crop residues relative to the conventional system with removal of residues, whereas the abundance of predatory ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and springtails (Collembola: Hypogastruridae) were, respectively, about seven- and 15-fold higher in that treatment. Importantly, a significant trophic interaction among crop residues, detritivores, predators and herbivores was observed. Plots managed with no-tillage and retention of crop residues had the highest bean yield, while those with conventional cultivation and removal of the crop residues yielded significantly less beans. This research shows that cropping systems that include zero tillage and crop residue retention can reduce infestation by foliar insect-pests and increase abundance of predators and detritivores, thus having direct consequences for insect pest management.

  20. GEOGLAM Crop Monitor Assessment Tool: Developing Monthly Crop Condition Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaughey, K.; Becker Reshef, I.; Barker, B.; Humber, M. L.; Nordling, J.; Justice, C. O.; Deshayes, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) developed the Global Agricultural Monitoring initiative (GEOGLAM) to improve existing agricultural information through a network of international partnerships, data sharing, and operational research. This presentation will discuss the Crop Monitor component of GEOGLAM, which provides the Agricultural Market Information System (AMIS) with an international, multi-source, and transparent consensus assessment of crop growing conditions, status, and agro-climatic conditions likely to impact global production. This activity covers the four primary crop types (wheat, maize, rice, and soybean) within the main agricultural producing regions of the AMIS countries. These assessments have been produced operationally since September 2013 and are published in the AMIS Market Monitor Bulletin. The Crop Monitor reports provide cartographic and textual summaries of crop conditions as of the 28th of each month, according to crop type. This presentation will focus on the building of international networks, data collection, and data dissemination.

  1. Assessing cover crop management under actual and climate change conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Ayuso, María; Quemada, Miguel; Vanclooster, Marnik; Ruiz-Ramos, Margarita; Rodriguez, Alfredo; Gabriel, José Luis

    2017-10-22

    The termination date is recognized as a key management factor to enhance cover crops for multiple benefits and to avoid competition with the following cash crop. However, the optimum date depends on annual meteorological conditions, and climate variability induces uncertainty in a decision that needs to be taken every year. One of the most important cover crop benefits is reducing nitrate leaching, a major concern for irrigated agricultural systems and highly affected by the termination date. This study aimed to determine the effects of cover crops and their termination date on the water and N balances of an irrigated Mediterranean agroecosystem under present and future climate conditions. For that purpose, two field experiments were used for inverse calibration and validation of the WAVE model (Water and Agrochemicals in the soil and Vadose Environment), based on continuous soil water content data, soil nitrogen content and crop measurements. The calibrated and validated model was subsequently used in advanced scenario analysis under present and climate change conditions. Under present conditions, a late termination date increased cover crop biomass and subsequently soil water and N depletion. Hence, preemptive competition risk with the main crop was enhanced, but a reduction of nitrate leaching also occurred. The hypothetical planting date of the following cash crop was also an important tool to reduce preemptive competition. Under climate change conditions, the simulations showed that the termination date will be even more important to reduce preemptive competition and nitrate leaching. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of seasonal forecast use on agricultural income in a system with varying crop costs and returns: an empirically-grounded simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunda, T.; Bazuin, J. T.; Nay, J.; Yeung, K. L.

    2017-03-01

    Access to seasonal climate forecasts can benefit farmers by allowing them to make more informed decisions about their farming practices. However, it is unclear whether farmers realize these benefits when crop choices available to farmers have different and variable costs and returns; multiple countries have programs that incentivize production of certain crops while other crops are subject to market fluctuations. We hypothesize that the benefits of forecasts on farmer livelihoods will be moderated by the combined impact of differing crop economics and changing climate. Drawing upon methods and insights from both physical and social sciences, we develop a model of farmer decision-making to evaluate this hypothesis. The model dynamics are explored using empirical data from Sri Lanka; primary sources include survey and interview information as well as game-based experiments conducted with farmers in the field. Our simulations show that a farmer using seasonal forecasts has more diversified crop selections, which drive increases in average agricultural income. Increases in income are particularly notable under a drier climate scenario, when a farmer using seasonal forecasts is more likely to plant onions, a crop with higher possible returns. Our results indicate that, when water resources are scarce (i.e. drier climate scenario), farmer incomes could become stratified, potentially compounding existing disparities in farmers’ financial and technical abilities to use forecasts to inform their crop selections. This analysis highlights that while programs that promote production of certain crops may ensure food security in the short-term, the long-term implications of these dynamics need careful evaluation.

  3. Reform's stunted crop

    OpenAIRE

    Orden, David

    2002-01-01

    Congress is on the verge of finalizing a new long-term farm bill to replace legislation passed in 1996. The earlier legislation, when it was enacted, received attention for ist potential to end farm subsidies as they had been known. If Congress had adhered to the 1996 law, both the level and year-to-year variability of previous farm support outlays would have been reduced. Instead, when a three-year run of high crop prices collapsed in 1998, lawmakers began appropriating extra support payment...

  4. Interactions between Bt crops and aquatic ecosystems: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Hermoine J; Bøhn, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    The term Bt crops collectively refers to crops that have been genetically modified to include a gene (or genes) sourced from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) bacteria. These genes confer the ability to produce proteins toxic to certain insect pests. The interaction between Bt crops and adjacent aquatic ecosystems has received limited attention in research and risk assessment, despite the fact that some Bt crops have been in commercial use for 20 yr. Reports of effects on aquatic organisms such as Daphnia magna, Elliptio complanata, and Chironomus dilutus suggest that some aquatic species may be negatively affected, whereas other reports suggest that the decreased use of insecticides precipitated by Bt crops may benefit aquatic communities. The present study reviews the literature regarding entry routes and exposure pathways by which aquatic organisms may be exposed to Bt crop material, as well as feeding trials and field surveys that have investigated the effects of Bt-expressing plant material on such organisms. The present review also discusses how Bt crop development has moved past single-gene events, toward multigene stacked varieties that often contain herbicide resistance genes in addition to multiple Bt genes, and how their use (in conjunction with co-technology such as glyphosate/Roundup) may impact and interact with aquatic ecosystems. Lastly, suggestions for further research in this field are provided. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2891-2902. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  5. Key factors influencing the potential of catch crops for methane production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molinuevo-Salces, Beatriz; Fernandez-Varela, Raquel; Uellendahl, Hinrich

    2014-01-01

    studied for 14 different catch crops species, with 19 samples harvested in 2010 and 36 harvested in 2011. Principal component analysis was applied to the data to identify the variables characterizing the potential for the different catch crops species for methane production. Two principal components......Catch crops are grown in crop rotation primarily for soil stabilization. The excess biomass of catch crops was investigated for its potential as feedstock for biogas production. Ten variables affecting catch crop growth and methane potential were evaluated. Field trials and methane potential were...... explained up to 84.6% and 71.6% of the total variation for 2010 and 2011 samples, respectively. Specific methane yield, climate conditions (rainfall and temperature) and total nitrogen in the biomass were the variables classifying the different catch crops. Catch crops in the Brassicaceae and Graminaceae...

  6. Effects of irrigation on crops and soils with Raft River geothermal water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley, N.E.; Schmitt, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    The Raft River Irrigation Experiment investigated the suitability of using energy-expended geothermal water for irrigation of selected field-grown crops. Crop and soil behavior on plots sprinkled or surface irrigated with geothermal water was compared to crop and soil behavior on plots receiving water from shallow irrigation wells and the Raft River. In addition, selected crops were produced, using both geothermal irrigation water and special management techniques. Crops irrigated with geothermal water exhibited growth rates, yields, and nutritional values similar to comparison crops. Cereal grains and surface-irrigated forage crops did not exhibit elevated fluoride levels or accumulations of heavy metals. However, forage crops sprinkled with geothermal water did accumulate fluorides, and leaching experiments indicate that new soils receiving geothermal water may experience increased salinity, exchangeable sodium, and decreased permeability. Soil productivity may be maintained by leaching irrigations.

  7. Photoelastic method to quantitatively visualise the evolution of whole-field stress in 3D printed models subject to continuous loading processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Yang; Ren, Zhangyu; Wang, Li; Mao, Lingtao; Chiang, Fu-Pen

    2018-01-01

    The combination of three-dimensional (3D) printing techniques and photoelastic testing is a promising way to quantitatively determine the continuous whole-field stress distributions in solids that are characterized by complex structures. However, photoelastic testing produces wrapped isoclinic and isochromatic phase maps, and unwrapping these maps has always been a significant challenge. To realize the visualization and transparentization of the stress fields in complex structures, we report a new approach to quantify the continuous evolution of the whole-field stress in photosensitive material that is applicable to the fabrication of complex structures using 3D printing technology. The stress fringe orders are determined by analyzing a series of continuous frames extracted from a video recording of the fringe changes over the entire loading process. The integer portion of the fringe orders at a specific point on the model can be determined by counting the valleys of the light intensity change curve over the whole loading process, and the fractional portion can be calculated based on the cosine function between the light intensity and retardation. This method allows the fringe orders to be determined from the video itself, which significantly improves characterization accuracy and simplifies the experimental operation over the entire processes. To validate the proposed method, we compare the results of the theoretical calculations to those of experiments based on the diametric compression of a circular disc prepared by a 3D printer with photosensitive resin. The results indicate that the method can accurately determine the stress fringe order, except for points where the deformation is too large to differentiate the fringes pertaining to photoplasticity.

  8. Soil properties, crop production and greenhouse gas emissions in organic and conventional cropping systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chirinda, Ngonidzashe; Olesen, Jørgen E; Porter, John Roy

    2010-01-01

    : total soil organic carbon (SOC), total N, microbial biomass N (MBN), potentially mineralizable N (PMN), and levels of potential ammonium oxidation (PAO) and denitrifying enzyme activity (DEA). In situ measurements of soil heterotrophic carbon dioxide (CO2) respiration and nitrous oxide emissions were...... crops, respectively. Nevertheless, SOC levels in 2008 were similar across systems. The cumulative soil respiration for the period February to August 2008 ranged between 2 and 3 t CO2–C ha−1 and was correlated (r = 0.95) with average C inputs. In the organic cropping systems, pig slurry application...... and inclusion of catch crops generally increased soil respiration, PMN and PAO. At field capacity, relative gas diffusivity at 0–5 cm depth was >50% higher in the organic than the inorganic fertilizer-based system (P

  9. Genetically modified (GM) crops: milestones and new advances in crop improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamthan, Ayushi; Chaudhuri, Abira; Kamthan, Mohan; Datta, Asis

    2016-09-01

    New advances in crop genetic engineering can significantly pace up the development of genetically improved varieties with enhanced yield, nutrition and tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Genetically modified (GM) crops can act as powerful complement to the crops produced by laborious and time consuming conventional breeding methods to meet the worldwide demand for quality foods. GM crops can help fight malnutrition due to enhanced yield, nutritional quality and increased resistance to various biotic and abiotic stresses. However, several biosafety issues and public concerns are associated with cultivation of GM crops developed by transgenesis, i.e., introduction of genes from distantly related organism. To meet these concerns, researchers have developed alternative concepts o