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Sample records for subject ejection tower

  1. Ejection Tower Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Ejection Tower Facility's mission is to test and evaluate new ejection seat technology being researched and developed for future defense forces. The captive and...

  2. Performance Evaluation on Transmission Tower-Line System with Passive Friction Dampers Subjected to Wind Excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The vibration control and performance evaluation on a transmission-tower line system by using friction dampers subjected to wind excitations are carried out in this study. The three-dimensional finite element (FE model of a transmission tower is firstly constructed. A two-dimensional lumped mass model of a transmission tower is developed for dynamic analysis. The analytical model of transmission tower-line system is proposed by taking the dynamic interaction between the tower and the transmission lines into consideration. The mechanical model of passive friction damper is presented by involving the effects of damper axial stiffness. The equation of motion of the transmission tower-line system incorporated with the friction dampers disturbed by wind excitations is established. A real transmission tower-line system is taken as an example to examine the feasibility and reliability of the proposed control approach. An extensive parameter study is carried out to find the optimal parameters of friction damper and to assess the effects of slipping force axial stiffness and hysteresis loop on control performance. The work on an example structure indicates that the application of friction dampers with optimal parameters could significantly reduce wind-induced responses of the transmission tower-line system.

  3. Seismic Response of Power Transmission Tower-Line System Subjected to Spatially Varying Ground Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Tian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of power transmission tower-line system subjected to spatially varying base excitations is studied in this paper. The transmission towers are modeled by beam elements while the transmission lines are modeled by cable elements that account for the nonlinear geometry of the cables. The real multistation data from SMART-1 are used to analyze the system response subjected to spatially varying ground motions. The seismic input waves for vertical and horizontal ground motions are also generated based on the Code for Design of Seismic of Electrical Installations. Both the incoherency of seismic waves and wave travel effects are accounted for. The nonlinear time history analytical method is used in the analysis. The effects of boundary conditions, ground motion spatial variations, the incident angle of the seismic wave, coherency loss, and wave travel on the system are investigated. The results show that the uniform ground motion at all supports of system does not provide the most critical case for the response calculations.

  4. Investigation on occupant ejection in high severity rear impact based on post mortem human subject sled tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Philippe; Luet, Carole; Potier, Pascal; Vallancien, Guy

    2011-11-01

    Occupant protection in rear impact involves two competing challenges. On one hand, allowing a deformation of the seat would act as an energy absorber in low severity impacts and would consequently decrease the risk of neck injuries. However, on the other hand, large deformations of the seat may increase the likelihood of occupant ejection in high severity cases. Green et al. 1987 analyzed a total of 919 accidents in Great Britain. They found that occupant ejection resulted in a risk of severe injuries and fatalities between 3.6 and 4.5 times higher than those cases where no ejection was observed. The sample included single front, side and rear impacts as well as multiple impacts and rollover. The rate of belt use in the sample was 50%. While this analysis included all forms of impact scenarios, nevertheless, it highlights the relative injury severity of occupant ejection. Extensive literature search has found no full-scale rear impact tests involving Post Mortem Human Subjects (PMHS) conducted in a laboratory environment and resulting in ejection. This paper describes a total of 10 sled tests conducted on 3 belted PMHS using a simplified seat design composed of rigid plates assembled such that the angular and linear stiffness of the seatback (including the foam) was modeled. The initial angular position and the range of motion of the seatback, the size of the PMHS, the slack length of the seatbelt, the angular stiffness of the seatback, and the use of headrest were varied in the test matrix while the pulse was kept constant (triangular acceleration with a peak of 17 G at 30 ms and a duration of 95 ms). In the test series, the tests were not run randomly but the likelihood of occupant ejection was increased systematically until ejection occurred. PMHS seat ejection was observed only for the 95th percentile, initially positioned with a seatback angle relative to the vertical equal to 22°, a range of seatback angular motion equal to 44° and no headrest. Repeating

  5. Assessment of pre-ejection period in ambulatory subjects using seismocardiogram in a wearable blood pressure monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guanqun Zhang; Cottrell, Amber C; Henry, Isaac C; McCombie, Devin B

    2016-08-01

    The ability to monitor arterial blood pressure continuously with unobtrusive body worn sensors may provide a unique and potentially valuable assessment of a patient's cardiovascular health. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) offers an attractive method to continuously monitoring blood pressure. However, PWV technologies based on timing measurements between the ECG and a distal PPG suffer from inaccuracies on mobile patients due to the confounding influence of pre-ejection period (PEP). In this paper, we presented a wearable, continuous blood pressure monitor (ViSi Mobile) that can measure and track changes in PEP. PEP is determined from precordial vibrations captured by an accelerometer coupled to the patient's sternum. The performance of the PEP measurements was evaluated on test subjects with postural change and patient activity. Results showed potential to improve cNIBP accuracy in active patients.

  6. Longitudinal Seismic Behavior of a Single-Tower Cable-Stayed Bridge Subjected to Near-Field Earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Yi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cable-stayed bridges are quite sensitive to large amplitude oscillations from earthquakes and seismic damage was observed for Shipshaw Bridge and Chi-Lu Bridge during past earthquakes. In order to investigate seismic damage of cable-stayed bridges, a 1 : 20 scale model of a single-tower cable-stayed bridge with A-shaped tower was designed, constructed, and tested on shake tables at Tongji University, China. One typical near-field ground motion was used to excite the model from low to high intensity. Test result showed that severe structural damage occurred at the tower of the model including parallel concrete cracks from bottom to nearly half height of the tower, concrete spalling, and exposed bars at top tower 0.2 m above the section where two skewed legs intersect. Posttest analysis was conducted and compared with test results. It is revealed that the numerical model was able to simulate the seismic damage of the test model by modeling nonlinearity of different components for cable-stayed bridges, namely, the tower, bents, superstructure, cables, and bearings. Numerical analysis also revealed that cable relaxation, which was detected during the test, had limited influence on the overall seismic response of the bridge with maximum error of 12%.

  7. EFFECT OF THE FILL VENTILATION WINDOW ON PERFORMANCE OF A NATURAL DRAFT COOLING TOWER SUBJECTED TO CROSS-WINDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Dobrego

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Various aerodynamic design elements and technics (wind deflectors, wind walls, etc. are utilized for improvement of the thermal efficiency of the natural draft cooling towers, particularly in conditions of cross wind. One of the technical methods, proposed by engineers of Belarus Academy of Sciences, is installation of the ventilation window in the center of the fill. This method is substantiated by the fact that the flow of cooling gas obtains maximum temperature and humidity near the center of the under-fill space of cooling tower and, as a consequence, performs minimal heat exchange. The influence of the fill ventilation window and wind deflectors in the inlet windows of the cooling tower on its thermal performance in condition of cross-wind is investigated in the paper numerically. The cooling tower of the “Woo-Jin” power plant (China 150 m of the height and 114 m of the base diameter was taken as a prototype. The analogy (equivalence between the heat and mass transfer was taken into consideration, which enabled us to consider single-phase flow and perform complicated 3D simulation by using modern personal computers. Heat transfer coefficient for the fill and its hydrodynamic resistance were defined by using actual data on total flow rate in the cooling tower. The numerical model and computational methods were tested and verified in numerous previous works. The non-linear dependence of the thermal performance of the cooling tower on wind velocity (with the minimum in vicinity of Ucr ~ 8 m/s for the simulated system was demonstrated. Calculations show that in the condition of the average wind speed the fill ventilation window doesn’t improve, but slightly decrease (by 3–7 % performance of the cooling tower. Situation changes in the condition of strong winds Ucw > 12 m/s, which are not typical for Belarus. Utilization of airflow deflectors at the inlet windows of cooling tower, conversely, increases thermal performance of the

  8. Attempting to train a digital human model to reproduce human subject reach capabilities in an ejection seat aircraft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zehner, G.F.; Hudson, J.A.; Oudenhuijzen, A.

    2006-01-01

    From 1997 through 2002, the Air Force Research Lab and TNO Defence, Security and Safety (Business Unit Human Factors) were involved in a series of tests to quantify the accuracy of five Human Modeling Systems (HMSs) in determining accommodation limits of ejection seat aircraft. The results of these

  9. Convection towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1994-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode.

  10. Water tower

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1970-01-01

    The water tower, being built on the highest point of the site, 460.5 m above the sea level. The tank will hold 750 m3 of water, and the tower will be topped by a knob which can serve as a geological survey reference mark.

  11. Transition of equilibrium stochastic to unidirectional velocity vectors in a nanowire subjected to a towering electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Vijay K.; Chek, Desmond C. Y.; Tan, Michael L. P.; Hashim, Abdul Manaf

    2010-12-01

    The equilibrium Fermi-Dirac distribution is revealed to transform to an asymmetric distribution in a very high electric field where the energy gained (or lost) in a mean free path is of paramount importance. The equilibrium stochastic velocity vectors randomly oriented in and opposite to the quasifree direction of a nanowire are shown to streamline in the presence of an extremely high electric field. The complete velocity-field characteristics are acquired. The ultimate directed drift velocity in a towering field is shown to be limited to the appropriately averaged Fermi velocity in the strongly degenerate limit where only half of the quantum states are accessible to electrons. This unidirectional velocity does not sensitively depend on the low-field Ohmic mobility. The emission of a quantum in the form of a phonon or photon lowers the saturation velocity from its ultimate unidirectional limit.

  12. Tower counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Carol Ann; Johnson, D.H.; Shrier, Brianna M.; O'Neal, Jennifer S.; Knutzen, John A.; Augerot, Xanthippe; O'Neal, Thomas A.; Pearsons, Todd N.

    2007-01-01

    Counting towers provide an accurate, low-cost, low-maintenance, low-technology, and easily mobilized escapement estimation program compared to other methods (e.g., weirs, hydroacoustics, mark-recapture, and aerial surveys) (Thompson 1962; Siebel 1967; Cousens et al. 1982; Symons and Waldichuk 1984; Anderson 2000; Alaska Department of Fish and Game 2003). Counting tower data has been found to be consistent with that of digital video counts (Edwards 2005). Counting towers do not interfere with natural fish migration patterns, nor are fish handled or stressed; however, their use is generally limited to clear rivers that meet specific site selection criteria. The data provided by counting tower sampling allow fishery managers to determine reproductive population size, estimate total return (escapement + catch) and its uncertainty, evaluate population productivity and trends, set harvest rates, determine spawning escapement goals, and forecast future returns (Alaska Department of Fish and Game 1974-2000 and 1975-2004). The number of spawning fish is determined by subtracting subsistence, sport-caught fish, and prespawn mortality from the total estimated escapement. The methods outlined in this protocol for tower counts can be used to provide reasonable estimates ( plus or minus 6%-10%) of reproductive salmon population size and run timing in clear rivers. 

  13. Comprehensive Echocardiographic and Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Evaluation Differentiates Among Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction Patients, Hypertensive Patients, and Healthy Control Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordi, Ify R; Singh, Satnam; Rudd, Amelia; Srinivasan, Janaki; Frenneaux, Michael; Tzemos, Nikolaos; Dawson, Dana K

    2017-08-11

    The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of a comprehensive imaging protocol including echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance in the diagnosis and differentiation of hypertensive heart disease and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Hypertension is present in up to 90% of patients with HFpEF and is a major etiological component. Despite current recommendations and diagnostic criteria for HFpEF, no noninvasive imaging technique has as yet shown the ability to identify any structural differences between patients with hypertensive heart disease and HFpEF. We conducted a prospective cross-sectional study of 112 well-characterized patients (62 with HFpEF, 22 with hypertension, and 28 healthy control subjects). All patients underwent cardiopulmonary exercise and biomarker testing and an imaging protocol including echocardiography with speckle-tracking analysis and cardiac magnetic resonance including T1 mapping pre- and post-contrast. Echocardiographic global longitudinal strain (GLS) and extracellular volume (ECV) measured by cardiac magnetic resonance were the only variables able to independently stratify among the 3 groups of patients. ECV was the best technique for differentiation between hypertensive heart disease and HFpEF (ECV area under the curve: 0.88; GLS area under the curve: 0.78; p ECV, an optimal cutoff of 31.2% gave 100% sensitivity and 75% specificity. ECV was significantly higher and GLS was significantly reduced in subjects with reduced exercise capacity (lower peak oxygen consumption and higher minute ventilation-carbon dioxide production) (p ECV and GLS). Both GLS and ECV are able to independently discriminate between hypertensive heart disease and HFpEF and identify patients with prognostically significant functional limitation. ECV is the best diagnostic discriminatory marker of HFpEF and could be used as a surrogate endpoint for therapeutic studies. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology

  14. Comparison of Left Ventricular Relaxation and Left Atrial Function in Patients With Heart Failure and Preserved Ejection Fraction Versus Patients With Systemic Hypertension and Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okura, Hiroyuki; Kataoka, Toru; Yoshida, Kiyoshi

    2016-10-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) may be characterized as impaired left ventricular (LV) relaxation and/or left atrial (LA) function, both of which are age and gender dependent. The aim of this study was to investigate LV relaxation and the LA function in HFpEF. A total of 71 HFpEF (mean age 73 years, 38 men) were studied. Late transmitral flow velocity (A), late mitral annular velocity (a'), and early mitral annular velocity (e') were measured and compared with age- and gender-matched normal control subjects (CTL; n = 71) and hypertensive patients (HT; n = 71). To clarify prognostic impact of the LA function, cardiac event-free survival was compared between high a' (≥7.9 cm/s, n = 36) and low a' (heart failure. In both HFpEF and HT groups, e' was significantly and similarly decreased compared with CTL group (p = 0.005). Although A was similar among the 3 groups, a' was significantly lower in HFpEF group than in HT and CTL groups (7.9 ± 2.1 vs 9.0 ± 1.9 vs 9.3 ± 1.96 cm/s, p <0.0001). HFpEF with low a' showed significantly lower cardiac event-free survival than HFpEF with high a' (log rank, p = 0.02). By multivariate Cox proportional analysis, low a' was the only independent predictor of cardiac events (hazard ratio 2.896, 95% confidence interval 1.004 to 8.355, p = 0.049). Both LV relaxation and LA function are impaired in HFpEF. Impaired LA function may be associated with worse prognosis in HFpEF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of a gas on the ejection of particles from the free surface of a sample subjected to a shock wave with various intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogorodnikov, V. A., E-mail: root@gdd.vniief.ru; Mikhailov, A. L.; Sasik, V. S.; Erunov, S. V.; Syrunin, M. A.; Fedorov, A. V.; Nevmerzhitskii, N. V.; Kulakov, E. V.; Kleshchevnikov, O. A.; Antipov, M. V.; Yurtov, I. V.; Rudnev, A. V.; Chapaev, A. V.; Pupkov, A. S.; Sen’kovskii, E. D.; Sotskov, E. A.; Glushikhin, V. V.; Kalashnik, I. A.; Finyushin, S. A.; Chudakov, E. A. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center All-Russia Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) (Russian Federation); and others

    2016-08-15

    In view of the possible effect of contamination of a plasma by metal particles on the operation of a number of facilities or on the detection of the motion of liners by Doppler methods, a particular attention has been recently focused on the problem of the ejection of particles from the shock-loaded free surface of a sample or on the “dusting” problem. Most information concerns the dusting source associated with the roughness of the surface, manufacturing technology, and the defectiveness and aging of a material. Factors affecting this process such as the profile and amplitude of the pressure on the front of the shock wave arriving at the free surface of the sample, the presence of the gas in front of the free surface, and the pressure in this gas are less studied.

  16. Buoyant guyed tower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGillivray, T.L.; Coull, T.B.

    1986-07-08

    This patent describes an apparatus for supporting an offshore drilling and production platform comprising: a tower adapted to be mounted in an operative, generally upright position of the sea bottom and to extend upwardly to a location above the mean water level of the sea, the upper end of the tower adapted to be coupled to the platform in supporting relationship thereof; and a plurality of guy lines coupled to the tower near the upper end thereof and adapted to extend outwardly and downwardly therefrom in a number of different directions, the lower ends of the guy lines adapted to be anchored in the sea bottom; the tower having a plurality of legs, each of the legs being tubular and having a buoyant chamber for exerting a buoyant resorting force on the tower when the tower is in the operative position; there being a number of tubular piles extending into and through each leg, each pile being secured at its upper end to the corresponding leg near the upper end of the leg, each pile extending outwardly and downwardly from the lower end of the corresponding leg, whereby the lower ends of the piles can extend into the sea bottom when the tower is in the operative position; each pile adapted to receive a well extending downwardly from the platform when the platform is mounted on and supported by the upper end of the tower, each well adapted to extend into the sea bottom for production of resources from a location below the sea bottom.

  17. Confusion at the Tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Loretta F.

    2014-01-01

    This study will explore the omission of the Tower of Babel narrative from middle and secondary school world history, world studies, and world geography textbooks and will consider what might be learned from inclusion of the story in the curriculum. A total of 17 textbooks are analyzed. The Tower of Babel narrative is examined within the context of…

  18. Wind tower service lift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliphant, David; Quilter, Jared; Andersen, Todd; Conroy, Thomas

    2011-09-13

    An apparatus used for maintaining a wind tower structure wherein the wind tower structure may have a plurality of legs and may be configured to support a wind turbine above the ground in a better position to interface with winds. The lift structure may be configured for carrying objects and have a guide system and drive system for mechanically communicating with a primary cable, rail or other first elongate member attached to the wind tower structure. The drive system and guide system may transmit forces that move the lift relative to the cable and thereby relative to the wind tower structure. A control interface may be included for controlling the amount and direction of the power into the guide system and drive system thereby causing the guide system and drive system to move the lift relative to said first elongate member such that said lift moves relative to said wind tower structure.

  19. Cooling tower waste reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, S.J.; Celeste, J.; Chine, R.; Scott, C.

    1998-05-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the two main cooling tower systems (central and northwest) were upgraded during the summer of 1997 to reduce the generation of hazardous waste. In 1996, these two tower systems generated approximately 135,400 lbs (61,400 kg) of hazardous sludge, which is more than 90 percent of the hazardous waste for the site annually. At both, wet decks (cascade reservoirs) were covered to block sunlight. Covering the cascade reservoirs reduced the amount of chemical conditioners (e.g. algaecide and biocide), required and in turn the amount of waste generated was reduced. Additionally, at the northwest cooling tower system, a sand filtration system was installed to allow cyclical filtering and backflushing, and new pumps, piping, and spray nozzles were installed to increase agitation. the appurtenance upgrade increased the efficiency of the cooling towers. The sand filtration system at the northwest cooling tower system enables operators to continuously maintain the cooling tower water quality without taking the towers out of service. Operational costs (including waste handling and disposal) and maintenance activities are compared for the cooling towers before and after upgrades. Additionally, the effectiveness of the sand filter system in conjunction with the wet deck covers (northwest cooling tower system), versus the cascade reservoir covers alone (south cooling tower south) is discussed. the overall expected return on investment is calculated to be in excess of 250 percent. this upgrade has been incorporated into the 1998 DOE complex-wide water conservation project being led by Sandia National Laboratory/Albuquerque.

  20. Indoor Ground Ejection Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This climate controlled facility is used to evaluate air stores and equipment to determine ejection velocities, store pitch rates, and arming wire and device system...

  1. Good towers of function Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Nhut

    of the project is to find good and optimal towers. Using the theory of Drinfeld modules and computer algebraic techniques, some new examples of good towers are obtained. We analyse towers of Drinfeld modular curves describing certain equivalence classes of rank 2 Drinfeld modules. Using rank 3 Drinfeld modules...... further examples of good towers are produced....

  2. Evaluation of ejection safety for the joint helmet-mounted cueing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnaba, James M.; Kirk, William K.

    1999-07-01

    Aircrew safety is paramount in the design of a helmet-mounted display (HMD). For the tactical aircrew, ensuring a successful ejection presents significant design challenges. The Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing System (JHMCS) Integrated Product Team (IPT) has been evaluating Vision Systems International's HMD design for aircrew protection in this environment. The JHMCS IPT has developed a set of test objectives in concert with acquisition reform to demonstrate ejection compatibility of the JHMCS. This testing series will be discussed, and will include windblast, ejection tower, and sled and in-flight ejection testing, findings and design impacts. JHMCS performance parameters evaluated include structural integrity, facial and head protection, neck tensile loads, ejection seat and crew equipment compatibility, and mechanical functionality. The design environment for the JHMCS currently is both small and large, male and female aircrew withstanding a successful 450-knot ejection in any of four current USAF & USN tactical aircraft platforms.

  3. Evaluation of the pharmacoDYNAMIC effects of riociguat in subjects with pulmonary hypertension and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction : Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascherbauer, Julia; Grünig, Ekkehard; Halank, Michael; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Kammerlander, Andreas A; Pretsch, Ingrid; Steringer-Mascherbauer, Regina; Ulrich, Silvia; Lang, Irene M; Wargenau, Manfred; Frey, Reiner; Bonderman, Diana

    2016-12-01

    The presence of pulmonary hypertension (PH) severely aggravates the clinical course of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) resulting in substantial morbidity and mortality. So far, neither established heart failure therapies nor pulmonary vasodilators have proven to be effective for this condition. Riociguat (Adempas®, BAY 63-2521), a stimulator of soluble guanylate cyclase, is a novel pulmonary and systemic vasodilator that has been approved for the treatment of precapillary forms of PH. With regard to postcapillary PH, the DILATE-1 study was a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled single-dose study in subjects with PH associated with HFPEF. Although there was no significant change in the primary outcome measure, peak decrease in mean pulmonary artery pressure with riociguat versus placebo, riociguat significantly increased stroke volume without changing heart rate, pulmonary artery wedge pressure, transpulmonary pressure gradient or pulmonary vascular resistance. The present study is designed to test the efficacy of long-term treatment with riociguat in patients with PH associated with HFPEF. The DYNAMIC study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, multicenter clinical phase IIb trial evaluating the efficacy, safety and kinetics of riociguat in PH-HFPEF patients. The drug will be given over 26 weeks to evaluate the effects of riociguat versus placebo. The primary efficacy variable will be the change from baseline in cardiac output at rest, measured by right heart catheter after 26 weeks of study drug treatment. Additional efficacy variables will be changes from baseline in further hemodynamic parameters, changes in left and right atrial area, right ventricular volume, as well as right ventricular ejection fraction measured by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and changes from baseline in World Health Organization (WHO) class and N‑terminal prohormone B‑type natriuretic peptide (NT

  4. Subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Vega Encabo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I claim that subjectivity is a way of being that is constituted through a set of practices in which the self is subject to the dangers of fictionalizing and plotting her life and self-image. I examine some ways of becoming subject through narratives and through theatrical performance before others. Through these practices, a real and active subjectivity is revealed, capable of self-knowledge and self-transformation. 

  5. Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Kunow, H; Linker, J. A; Schwenn, R; Steiger, R

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that the Sun gravitationally controls the orbits of planets and minor bodies. Much less known, however, is the domain of plasma fields and charged particles in which the Sun governs a heliosphere out to a distance of about 15 billion kilometers. What forces activates the Sun to maintain this power? Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and their descendants are the troops serving the Sun during high solar activity periods. This volume offers a comprehensive and integrated overview of our present knowledge and understanding of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and their descendants, Interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs). It results from a series of workshops held between 2000 and 2004. An international team of about sixty experimenters involved e.g. in the SOHO, ULYSSES, VOYAGER, PIONEER, HELIOS, WIND, IMP, and ACE missions, ground observers, and theoreticians worked jointly on interpreting the observations and developing new models for CME initiations, development, and interplanetary propagation. The book provides...

  6. TacTowers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludvigsen, Martin; Fogtmann, Maiken Hillerup; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2010-01-01

    The interactive training equipment, TacTower, is aimed at supporting multiple elite athletes, such as handball players in training their micro-tactical skills in close-contact situations. It focuses on psychomotor abilities and trains the skills involved in reading the opponents’ actions...

  7. Talking Towers, Making Withs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, J. L.

    The notion of a linguistic "register" is useful in posing questions about how the ways language is used differ from one kind of human activity to another. This paper analyzes a videotaped segment of male grade 4/5 students (n=3) who are talking as they work to build a tower from plastic drinking straws and pins. Discussion of the…

  8. A drilling rig tower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mironov, A.A.; Barashkov, V.A.; Bulgakov, E.S.; Kuldoshin, I.P.; Lebedev, A.I.; Papin, N.M.; Rebrik, B.M.; Sirotkin, N.V.

    1981-05-23

    Presentation is made of a drilling rig tower, comprising a gantry, a support shaft with a bracing strut and drawings out, and turn buckles. In order to increase the reliability of the tower in operation, to decrease the over all dimensions in a transport position, and to decrease the amount of time taken to transfer the tower from an operational position into a transportable one, and vice versa, the tower is equipped with a rotary frame made in the form of a triangular prism, whose lateral edges are connected by hinges: the first one with the lower part of the support shaft, the second with the gantry, and the third one to the upper part of the support shaft by means of the drawings out. The large boundary of the rotary frame is connected by a hinge to the support shaft by means of a bracing strut, which is equipped with a slide block connected to it by a hinge, and the rotary frame has a guide for the slide block reinforced to it on the large boundary. Besides this, the lateral edge of the rotary frame is connected to the gantry by means of turn buckles.

  9. TacTower

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Majken Kirkegaard; Jürgensen, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Learning from the multiplayer interaction in sports, we describe our project TacTower; a flexible system for professional elite handball players to train game perception and kinesthetic em- pathy. The design is founded in ideas of Collective Interaction and qualities that is inherent in sport...

  10. Cell Towers and Songbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosterman, Michelle; Mesa, Jennifer; Milton, Katie

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how our common addiction to cell phones was used to launch a discussion about their use, impacts on the environment, and connections to issues of civic concern. By encouraging middle school science students to adopt the perspectives of special-interest groups debating communication tower restrictions designed to protect…

  11. Acoustic correlates of Georgian ejectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Tamra M.

    2002-05-01

    In this paper we present results from acoustic analysis of Georgian ejectives. Georgian, a language of the Kartvelian (South Caucasian) family, has a three-way opposition for voiced, voiceless aspirated and ejective stops. There have not been many acoustic studies of ejectives; those studies that discuss ejectives, such as by Lindau [J. Phonetics 12, 147-155 (1984)], report cross-linguistic variation in timing between oral and glottal releases and the onset of a following vowel. In this paper we investigate acoustic correlates of Georgian ejectives and examine how these correlates are realized in two-member ejective clusters. Additionally, correlates of Georgian ejectives are compared to findings from previous studies and discussed in relation to cross-linguistic tendencies and variation. Data consist of field recordings of three native Georgian speakers producing single ejectives and ejective clusters in word-initial and word-medial (intervocalic) positions at a normal rate of speech. Acoustic analysis was completed using spectrograms and waveforms. Results indicate that, while there is variation within and among speakers, characteristics correlated with singleton Georgian ejectives include relative burst amplitude, noise quality following oral release, long, positive voice onset time, and a short period of creaky voice at the onset of a following vowel. Some of these characteristics differ from those of ejective clusters.

  12. Solar tower enhanced natural draft dry cooling tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huiqiang; Xu, Yan; Acosta-Iborra, Alberto; Santana, Domingo

    2017-06-01

    Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) plants are located in desert areas where the Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) value is very high. Since water resource is scarcely available, mechanical draft cooing technology is commonly used, with power consumption of mechanical fans being approximately 2% of the total power generated. Today, there is only one solar power plant (Khi Solar One in South Africa) uses a condenser installed in a Natural Draft Cooling (NDC) tower that avoids the windage loss of water occurring in wet cooling towers. Although, Khi Solar One is a cavity receiver power tower, the receivers can be hung onto the NDC tower. This paper looks at a novel integration of a NDC tower into an external molten salt receiver of a solar power plant, which is one of a largest commercial molten salt tower in China, with 100MWe power capacity. In this configuration study, the NDC tower surrounds the concrete tower of the receiver concentrically. In this way, the receiver concrete tower is the central support of the NDC tower, which consists of cable networks that are fixed to the concrete tower and suspended at a certain height over the floor. The cable networks support the shell of the NDC tower. To perform a preliminary analysis of the behavior of this novel configuration, two cases of numerical simulation in three dimensional (3D) models have been solved using the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code, ANSYS Fluent 6.3. The results show that the integration of the NDC tower into an external central receiver tower is feasible. Additionally, the total heat transfer rate is not reduced but slightly increases when the molten salt receiver is in operation because of the additional natural draft induced by the high temperature of the receiver.

  13. Good Towers of Function Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassa, Alp; Beelen, Peter; Nguyen, Nhut

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we will give an overview of known and new techniques on how one can obtain explicit equations for candidates of good towers of function fields. The techniques are founded in modular theory (both the classical modular theory and the Drinfeld modular theory). In the classical modular...... setup, optimal towers can be obtained, while in the Drinfeld modular setup, good towers over any non-prime field may be found. We illustrate the theory with several examples, thus explaining some known towers as well as giving new examples of good explicitly defined towers of function fields....

  14. FLORIDA TOWER FOOTPRINT EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WATSON,T.B.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; HENDREY, G.; LEWIN, K.; NAGY, J.; LECLERC, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Florida Footprint experiments were a series of field programs in which perfluorocarbon tracers were released in different configurations centered on a flux tower to generate a data set that can be used to test transport and dispersion models. These models are used to determine the sources of the CO{sub 2} that cause the fluxes measured at eddy covariance towers. Experiments were conducted in a managed slash pine forest, 10 km northeast of Gainesville, Florida, in 2002, 2004, and 2006 and in atmospheric conditions that ranged from well mixed, to very stable, including the transition period between convective conditions at midday to stable conditions after sun set. There were a total of 15 experiments. The characteristics of the PFTs, details of sampling and analysis methods, quality control measures, and analytical statistics including confidence limits are presented. Details of the field programs including tracer release rates, tracer source configurations, and configuration of the samplers are discussed. The result of this experiment is a high quality, well documented tracer and meteorological data set that can be used to improve and validate canopy dispersion models.

  15. Digital Recovery Sequencer - Advanced Concept Ejection Seats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ross, David A; Cotter, Lee; Culhane, David; Press, Matthew J

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Concept Ejection Seat (ACES) currently uses the Analog Sequencer, designed in the 1960's and 1970's with analog technology, to control ejection event timing and ejection mode selection...

  16. Cooling towers principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, G B; Osborn, Peter D

    1990-01-01

    Cooling Towers: Principles and Practice, Third Edition, aims to provide the reader with a better understanding of the theory and practice, so that installations are correctly designed and operated. As with all branches of engineering, new technology calls for a level of technical knowledge which becomes progressively higher; this new edition seeks to ensure that the principles and practice of cooling towers are set against a background of up-to-date technology. The book is organized into three sections. Section A on cooling tower practice covers topics such as the design and operation of c

  17. Coronal Mass Ejections: Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F. Webb

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Solar eruptive phenomena embrace a variety of eruptions, including flares, solar energetic particles, and radio bursts. Since the vast majority of these are associated with the eruption, development, and evolution of coronal mass ejections (CMEs, we focus on CME observations in this review. CMEs are a key aspect of coronal and interplanetary dynamics. They inject large quantities of mass and magnetic flux into the heliosphere, causing major transient disturbances. CMEs can drive interplanetary shocks, a key source of solar energetic particles and are known to be the major contributor to severe space weather at the Earth. Studies over the past decade using the data sets from (among others the SOHO, TRACE, Wind, ACE, STEREO, and SDO spacecraft, along with ground-based instruments, have improved our knowledge of the origins and development of CMEs at the Sun and how they contribute to space weather at Earth. SOHO, launched in 1995, has provided us with almost continuous coverage of the solar corona over more than a complete solar cycle, and the heliospheric imagers SMEI (2003 – 2011 and the HIs (operating since early 2007 have provided us with the capability to image and track CMEs continually across the inner heliosphere. We review some key coronal properties of CMEs, their source regions and their propagation through the solar wind. The LASCO coronagraphs routinely observe CMEs launched along the Sun-Earth line as halo-like brightenings. STEREO also permits observing Earth-directed CMEs from three different viewpoints of increasing azimuthal separation, thereby enabling the estimation of their three-dimensional properties. These are important not only for space weather prediction purposes, but also for understanding the development and internal structure of CMEs since we view their source regions on the solar disk and can measure their in-situ characteristics along their axes. Included in our discussion of the recent developments in CME

  18. Kinematic response of the spine during simulated aircraft ejections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damon, Andrew M; Lessley, David J; Salzar, Robert S; Bass, Cameron R; Shen, Francis H; Paskoff, Glenn R; Shender, Barry S

    2010-05-01

    Military aviators are susceptible to spinal injuries during high-speed ejection scenarios. These injuries commonly arise as a result of strains induced by extreme flexion or compression of the spinal column. This study characterizes the vertebral motion of two postmortem human surrogates (PMHS) during a simulated catapult phase of ejection on a horizontal decelerator sled. During testing, the PMHS were restrained supinely to a mock ejection seat and subjected to a horizontal deceleration profile directed along the local z-axis. Two midsized males (175.3 cm, 77.1 kg; 185.4 cm, 72.6 kg) were tested. High-rate motion capture equipment was used to measure the three-dimensional displacement of the head, vertebrae, and pelvis during the ejection event. The two PMHS showed generally similar kinematic motion. Head injury criterion (HIC) results were well below injury threshold levels for both specimens. The specimens both showed compression of the spine, with a reduction in length of 23.9 mm and 45.7 mm. Post-test autopsies revealed fractures in the C5, T1, and L1 vertebrae. This paper provides an analysis of spinal motion during an aircraft ejection.The injuries observed in the test subjects were consistent with those seen in epidemiological studies. Future studies should examine the effects of gender, muscle tensing, out-of-position (of head from neutral position) occupants, and external forces (e.g., windblast) on spinal kinematics during aircraft ejection.

  19. FROM THE PACKED TOWERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valderi D. Leite

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available About 245 thousand tones of municipal solid w aste are collected daily in Brazil. Nearly 32 thousand tones of the collected amount are treated in sanitary landfill, which generates biogas and leachate as byproduct. The leachate resulting from sanitary landfill contains high concentration of carbonaceous and nitrogenized material. The crucial question is that the biodegradation of the carbonaceous material is difficult as long as the nitrogenized material is presen t in the form of ammoniacal nitrogen (NH 4 + , which compromises performance of biological tr eatment process. Therefore, a physical and chemical treatment of the leachate should be done before its biological treatment, especially for reduction of ammoniacal nitr ogen concentration and for propitiating the realization of application of biological treatment. The treatment of leachate requires specific consideration, which is not needed fo r other types of waste. In the specific case in this study, where ammoniacal nitrogen concentration was about 2,200 mgN L -1 and the BOD 5 /COD ratio was 0.3, the study of ammonia stripping process was performed. Ammonia stripping process was studied in pack ed towers of 35 L capacity each and the parameters investigated were pH, ratio of contact area/leach volume and the aeration time. One of the parameters that influenced most in efficiency of ammonia stripping process was pH of the leachate since it contributes in conversion of ammoniacal nitrogen from NH 4 + to NH 3 .

  20. Yorkshire Main Colliery winding tower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucher, J.K.G.

    1981-11-01

    Yorkshire Main Colliery was sunk in 1909 and the steam winding system installed at that time had reached the end of its economic life. Further development planned for the near future required deepening the shafts into new seams of coal and increasing the coal winding capacity. A new tower-mounted electric winder was therefore installed at No. 2 shaft, and a ground-mounted electric winder and new headgear at No. 1 shaft. The work was substantially completed in 1979. The paper concerns the civil engineering works and covers the initial brief and investigations, design and construction of the tower. Both design and construction were much influenced by the need to maintain full production at the colliery throughout the construction period. This winding tower is the first new one in Britain for 16 years and the first in the current programme for new tower winders.

  1. 45-FOOT HIGH DROP TOWER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Drop Tower is used to simulate and measure the impact shocks that are exerted on parachute loads when they hit the ground. It is also used for HSL static lift to...

  2. Allegheny County Cell Tower Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset portrays cell tower locations as points in Allegheny County. The dataset is based on outbuilding codes in the Property Assessment Parcel Database used...

  3. Classic Tower of Hanoi, Planning Skills, and the Indian Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandar, R; Tripathi, R; Bharath, S; Kumar, K

    2015-09-01

    Elderly populations are vulnerable to age-related cognitive decline. Planning, a frontal lobe function, is reported to be affected in the elderly population. There is a paucity of studies which assessed planning skills in the elderly Indian population. The present study aimed to examine the utility of the classic Tower of Hanoi in the assessment of planning skills of elderly Indian subjects. A total of 215 (60 of whom were females, all aged 55-80 years) cognitively normal elders and 24 patients with mild Alzheimer's disease were recruited. All subjects provided informed consent and their planning skills were assessed using the classic Tower of Hanoi. Performance at each level was measured by the total time taken to solve, number of moves to solve, and the number of rule violations. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was exploratively performed to test the utility of the Tower of Hanoi in differentiating patients with mild Alzheimer's disease from those who were cognitively normal. Performance measures of cognitively normal group steeply worsened with increasing complexity. With receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, patients with mild Alzheimer's disease were poorly differentiated from cognitively normal group according to their Tower of Hanoi performance. The Tower of Hanoi test is of limited value for the assessment of planning skills in the Indian elderly population. There is a need to modify and develop a suitable neuropsychology tool to assess the planning skills of elderly Indian subjects and further validate it.

  4. Droplet ejection and sliding on a flapping film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Doughramaji, Nicole; Betz, Amy Rachel; Derby, Melanie M.

    2017-03-01

    Water recovery and subsequent reuse are required for human consumption as well as industrial, and agriculture applications. Moist air streams, such as cooling tower plumes and fog, represent opportunities for water harvesting. In this work, we investigate a flapping mechanism to increase droplet shedding on thin, hydrophobic films for two vibrational cases (e.g., ± 9 mm and 11 Hz; ± 2 mm and 100 Hz). Two main mechanisms removed water droplets from the flapping film: vibrational-induced coalescence/sliding and droplet ejection from the surface. Vibrations mobilized droplets on the flapping film, increasing the probability of coalescence with neighboring droplets leading to faster droplet growth. Droplet departure sizes of 1-2 mm were observed for flapping films, compared to 3-4 mm on stationary films, which solely relied on gravity for droplet removal. Additionally, flapping films exhibited lower percentage area coverage by water after a few seconds. The second removal mechanism, droplet ejection was analyzed with respect to surface wave formation and inertia. Smaller droplets (e.g., 1-mm diameter) were ejected at a higher frequency which is associated with a higher acceleration. Kinetic energy of the water was the largest contributor to energy required to flap the film, and low energy inputs (i.e., 3.3 W/m2) were possible. Additionally, self-flapping films could enable novel water collection and condensation with minimal energy input.

  5. Droplet ejection and sliding on a flapping film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Chen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Water recovery and subsequent reuse are required for human consumption as well as industrial, and agriculture applications. Moist air streams, such as cooling tower plumes and fog, represent opportunities for water harvesting. In this work, we investigate a flapping mechanism to increase droplet shedding on thin, hydrophobic films for two vibrational cases (e.g., ± 9 mm and 11 Hz; ± 2 mm and 100 Hz. Two main mechanisms removed water droplets from the flapping film: vibrational-induced coalescence/sliding and droplet ejection from the surface. Vibrations mobilized droplets on the flapping film, increasing the probability of coalescence with neighboring droplets leading to faster droplet growth. Droplet departure sizes of 1–2 mm were observed for flapping films, compared to 3–4 mm on stationary films, which solely relied on gravity for droplet removal. Additionally, flapping films exhibited lower percentage area coverage by water after a few seconds. The second removal mechanism, droplet ejection was analyzed with respect to surface wave formation and inertia. Smaller droplets (e.g., 1-mm diameter were ejected at a higher frequency which is associated with a higher acceleration. Kinetic energy of the water was the largest contributor to energy required to flap the film, and low energy inputs (i.e., 3.3 W/m2 were possible. Additionally, self-flapping films could enable novel water collection and condensation with minimal energy input.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF METHODS FOR STABILITY ANALYSIS OF TOWER CRANES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinel'shchikov Aleksey Vladimirovich

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Tower cranes are one of the main tools for execution of reloading works during construction. Design of tower cranes is carried out in accordance with RD 22-166-86 “Construction of tower cranes. Rules of analysis”, according to which to ensure stability it is required not to exceed the overturning moment upper limit. The calculation of these moments is carried out with the use of empirical coefficients and quite time-consuming. Moreover, normative methodology only considers the static position of the crane and does not take into account the presence of dynamic transients due to crane functioning (lifting and swinging of the load, boom turning and the presence of the dynamic external load (e.g. from wind for different orientations of the crane. This paper proposes a method of determining the stability coefficient of the crane based on acting reaction forces at the support points - the points of contact of wheels with the crane rail track, which allows us, at the design stage, to investigate stability of tower crane under variable external loads and operating conditions. Subject: the safety of tower cranes operation with regard to compliance with regulatory requirements of ensuring their stability both at the design stage and at the operational stage. Research objectives: increasing the safety of operation of tower cranes on the basis of improving methodology of their design to ensure static and dynamic stability. Materials and methods: analysis and synthesis of the regulatory framework and modern research works on provision of safe operation of tower cranes, the method of numerical simulation. Results: we proposed the formula for analysis of stability of tower cranes using the resulting reaction forces at the supports of the crane at the point of contact of the wheel with the rail track.

  7. A multipurpose satellite ejection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michael B.

    1987-01-01

    A design is presented for a pneumatic ejection system capable of ejecting a spin stabilized satellite from the cargo bay of space vehicles. This system was orginally designed for use on the Spacelab 6 shuttle mission, but is now being considered for use with expendable rockets for launching satellites. The ejection system was designed to launch a 150 lb satellite at an initial ejection velocity of 32 ft/sec with a spin rate of 30 rev/min. The ejection system consists of a pneumatic cylinder, satellite retaining mechanism, and bearing assembly to allow the satellite to rotate during the spin up phase. As the cylinder is pressurized rapidly causing movement of the actuation piston, the mechanism automatically releases the spinning satellite by retracting a pneumatic locking pin and three spring loaded holddown pins. When the piston reaches the end of its stroke, it encounters a crushable aluminum honeycomb shock absorber which decelerates the piston and retaining mechanism. The assembly is designed for multiple uses except for the crushable shock absorber and pyrotechnic valves. The advantage of the design is discussed and patent no. and date given.

  8. Tower Temperature and Humidity Sensors (TWR) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, DR

    2010-02-01

    Three tall towers are installed at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility: a 60-meter triangular tower at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF), a 21-meter walkup scaffolding tower at the SGP Okmulgee forest site (E21), and a 40-meter triangular tower at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site. The towers are used for meteorological, radiological, and other measurements.

  9. Deployable tensegrity towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinaud, Jean-Paul

    The design of a complete tensegrity system involves the analysis of static equilibria, the mechanical properties of the configuration, the deployment of the structure, and the regulation and dynamics of the system. This dissertation will explore these steps for two different types of structures. The first structure is the traditional Snelson Tower, where struts are disjointed, and is referred to as a Class 1 tensegrity. The second structure of interest is referred to as a Class 2 structure, where two struts come in contact at a joint. The first part of the thesis involves the dynamics of these tensegrity structures. Two complete nonlinear formulations for the dynamics of tensegrity systems are derived. In addition, a general formulation for the statics for an arbitrary tensegrity structure resulted from one of the dynamic formulations and is presented with symmetric and nonsymmetric tensegrity configurations. The second part of the thesis involves statics. The analysis of static equilibria and the implementation of this analysis into an open loop control law that will deploy the tensegrity structures along an equilibrium manifold are derived. The analysis of small stable tensegrity units allow for a modular design, where a collection of these units can be assembled into a larger structure that obeys the same control laws for deployment concepts. In addition, a loaded structure is analyzed to determine the optimal number of units required to obtain a minimal mass configuration. The third part of the thesis involves laboratory hardware that demonstrates the practical use of the methodology presented. A Class 2 symmetric structure is constructed, deployed, and stowed using the analysis from part two. In addition, the static equilibria of a Class 1 structure is computed to obtain nonsymmetric reconfigurations. The final part of the thesis involves the attenuation of white noise disturbances acting on nodes of both structures. The structures are simulated using linear

  10. Development of solar tower observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfschmidt, Gudrun

    Because the horizontal solar telescope, the Snow Telescope in Yerkes Observatory, was affected by air-currents from the warmed-up soil, George Ellery Hale had the idea of a tower telescope. In 1904, the 60-foot tower in Mt. Wilson was ready, in 1908 the 150-foot tower was built with the help of the Carnegie foundation. After World War I, Germany made heavy efforts to regain its former strong position in the field of science. Already in December 1919 - after the spectacular result of the English eclipse expedition in October 1919 - Erwin Finlay-Freundlich started a successful fund raising (“Einstein-Stiftungrdquo;) among German industrialists. The company Zeiss in Jena was responsible for the instrumentation of the 20-m solar tower, built in 1920-22. The optical design of the Einstein Tower in respect to light intensity surpassed even the Mt. Wilson solar observatory. Also abroad solar tower observatories were built in the 1920s: Utrecht,The Netherlands (1922), Canberra, Australia (1924), Arcetri, Italy (1926), Pasadena, California (1926) and Tokyo, Japan (1928). In the thirties, solar physics became important because of the solar maximum in 1938 and the new observational possibilities created by Bernard Lyot. At the end of the 1930s, Karl-Otto Kiepenheuer proposed to establish a solar tower observatory on Wendelstein in order to improve the predictions of radio interference by observing sunspots. By stressing the importance of the solar research for war efforts, Otto Heckmann of Göttingen observatory finally succeeded in winning the “Reichsluftfahrtministerium” to finance several solar observatories, like Wendelstein, Hainberg/Göttingen, Kanzelhöhe/Villach, and Schauinsland/Freiburg. Solar astronomy profited by the foundation of the new observatories - four of them existed still after the war. Abroad only the solar observatories of Oxford (1935) and the 50 foot tower of the McMath-Hulbert Observatory, University of Michigan (1936) should be mentioned. Only

  11. Coronal Mass Ejections An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    In times of growing technological sophistication and of our dependence on electronic technology, we are all affected by space weather. In its most extreme form, space weather can disrupt communications, damage and destroy spacecraft and power stations, and increase radiation exposure to astronauts and airline passengers. Major space weather events, called geomagnetic storms, are large disruptions in the Earth’s magnetic field brought about by the arrival of enormous magnetized plasma clouds from the Sun. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) contain billions of tons of plasma and hurtle through space at speeds of several million miles per hour. Understanding coronal mass ejections and their impact on the Earth is of great interest to both the scientific and technological communities. This book provides an introduction to coronal mass ejections, including a history of their observation and scientific revelations, instruments and theory behind their detection and measurement, and the status quo of theories describing...

  12. Project & intervention on the bell tower of Monza cathedral, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Modena

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available After painstaking investigations carried out since 1994, the bell tower of the San Giovanni Battista Cathedral in Monza (Milan has recently been subject to conservation interventions. Severe deterioration phenomena were detected involving the global stability of the tower but particularly related with the properties and behaviour of the materials. The intervention has therefore been designed on the basis of a complex process of knowledge, carried out by means of in situ and laboratory experiments and tests which led the restorers to decide on minimum repair and strengthening techniques aimed at solving the specific structural deficiencies while showing the maximum respect for the historic identity of the building.

  13. A modular interpretation of various cubic towers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anbar Meidl, Nurdagül; Bassa, Alp; Beelen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In this article we give a Drinfeld modular interpretation for various towers of function fields meeting Zink's bound.......In this article we give a Drinfeld modular interpretation for various towers of function fields meeting Zink's bound....

  14. Modelling of Bending of Windturbine Tower

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kurt

    1997-01-01

    Describes a model of a windturbine tower's transverse oscillation depending of turbulence in the wind.......Describes a model of a windturbine tower's transverse oscillation depending of turbulence in the wind....

  15. The solar towers of Chankillo

    OpenAIRE

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2012-01-01

    An ancient solar observatory is composed by thirteen towers lined on a hill of a coastal desert of Peru. This is the Chankillo observatory. Here we discuss it, showing some simulations of the local sun direction. An analysis of the behaviour of shadows is also proposed.

  16. Coronal Mass Ejections travel time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Carlos Roberto; Souza de Mendonça, Rafael Rodrigues; Dal Lago, Alisson; Echer, Ezequiel

    2017-10-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the main source of intense geomagnetic storms when they are earthward directed. Studying their travel time is a key-point to understand when the disturbance will be observed at Earth. In this work, we study the CME that originated the interplanetary disturbance observed on 2013/10/02. According to the observations, the CME that caused the interplanetary disturbance was ejected on 2013/09/29. We obtained the CME speed and estimate of the time of arrival at the Lagrangian Point L1 using the concept of expansion speed. We found that observed and estimated times of arrival of the shock differ between 2 and 23 hours depending on method used to estimate the radial speed.

  17. Lil HAL: digital kneeboard for ejection seat aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Vince

    2004-09-01

    In the last few years, airlines, commercial air carriers and the military have begun to introduce electronic tools into the cockpit to replace paper versions of flight publications, flight plans, departure and approach plates, maps, etc. These devices have varied from the common laptop to the smaller pen-tablet type computers. In some instances these devices have been connected to aircraft data buses to collect maintenance data, fault codes and other useful information. None of these devices, however, have been found satisfactory in ejection seat aircraft due to their size, weight, and dynamic characteristics when subjected to the inertial and aerodynamic forces that occur during an ejection. This paper describes an electronic digital kneeboard suitable for use in an ejection seat aircraft. The kneeboard consists of a look at helmet-mounted display, a small streamlined kneeboard input device, a carry-on/carry-off computer and its associated support interfaces.

  18. Aerodynamic Forces Experienced during Ejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    Ligaments- medial collateral tear-dislocation Menisci-medlal meniscus tear e Frequency: 44% e Mechanism: The function of the ligament Is to prevent abnormal...side if neceseesary and Identify by block number) Ejection F -4 Aircraft Acceleration (abrupt Windblast Injury Biomechanical data Long bones 20...distal end of the tibia and the medial malleolus on one side, and the distal end of the fllbua and the medial mallelous on the other. The malleoli are of

  19. An Optimal Unramified Tower of Function Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efficient construction of long AG--codes resulting from optimal towers of function fields is known to be difficult. In the following a tower which is both optimal and unramified, that is a tower in which all places are unramified after some level, is investigated in the hope that its simple...

  20. Composition of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurbuchen, T. H.; Weberg, M.; von Steiger, R.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Lepri, S. T.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the physical origin of plasmas that are ejected from the solar corona. To address this issue, we perform a comprehensive analysis of the elemental composition of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) using recently released elemental composition data for Fe, Mg, Si, S, C, N, Ne, and He as compared to O and H. We find that ICMEs exhibit a systematic abundance increase of elements with first ionization potential (FIP) less than 10 electronvolts, as well as a significant increase of Ne as compared to quasi-stationary solar wind. ICME plasmas have a stronger FIP effect than slow wind, which indicates either that an FIP process is active during the ICME ejection or that a different type of solar plasma is injected into ICMEs. The observed FIP fractionation is largest during times when the Fe ionic charge states are elevated above Q (sub Fe) is greater than 12.0. For ICMEs with elevated charge states, the FIP effect is enhanced by 70 percent over that of the slow wind. We argue that the compositionally hot parts of ICMEs are active region loops that do not normally have access to the heliosphere through the processes that give rise to solar wind. We also discuss the implications of this result for solar energetic particles accelerated during solar eruptions and for the origin of the slow wind itself.

  1. Cooling tower selection and installation factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bristowe, K.

    1981-02-01

    Conserving and recycling water in industrial plants cooling towers are discussed. The fundamental principles of a cooling tower are explained by considering a droplet of water inside a cooling tower. The need for correct wet bulb selection for a given re-cooled water temperature in order to choose the proper cooling tower size is discussed. Site considerations, which are mainly dependent on the piping requirements and pump placements, are presented. Benefits of various types of pack and maintenance for cooling towers are discussed. (MCW)

  2. Hybrid Tower, Designing Soft Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette; Tamke, Martin; Holden Deleuran, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the research project Hybrid Tower, an interdisciplinary collaboration between CITA—Centre for IT and Architecture, KET—Department for Structural Design and Technology, Fibrenamics, Universidade do Minho Guimarães, AFF a. ferreira & filhos, sa, Caldas de Vizela, Portugal...... and Essener Labor für Leichte Flächentragwerke, Universität Duisburg-Essen. Hybrid Tower is a hybrid structural system combining bending active compression members and tensile members for architectural design. The paper presents two central investigations: (1) the creation of new design methods that embed...... predictions about the inherent interdependency and material dependent performance of the hybrid structure and (2) the inter-scalar design strategies for specification and fabrication. The first investigation focuses on the design pipelines developed between the implementation of realtime physics...

  3. Factors affecting ejection risk in rollover crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, James R; Cormier, Joseph M; Bain, Charles E; Wirth, Jeffrey L; Bonugli, Enrique B; Watson, Richard A

    2012-01-01

    Ejection greatly increases the risk of injury and fatality in a rollover crash. The purpose of this study was to determine the crash, vehicle, and occupant characteristics that affect the risk of ejection in rollovers. Information from real world rollover crashes occurring from 2000 - 2010 was obtained from the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) in order to analyze the effect of the following parameters on ejection risk: seatbelt use, rollover severity, vehicle type, seating position, roof crush, side curtain airbag deployment, glazing type, and occupant age, gender, and size. Seatbelt use was found to reduce the risk of partial ejection and virtually eliminate the risk of complete ejection. For belted occupants, the risk of partial ejection risk was significantly increased in rollover crashes involving more roof inversions, light trucks and vans (LTVs), and larger occupants. For unbelted occupants, the risk of complete ejection was significantly increased in rollover crashes involving more roof inversions, LTVs, far side occupants, and higher levels of roof crush. Roof crush was not a significant predictor of ejection after normalizing for rollover severity. Curtain airbag deployment was associated with reduced rates of partial and complete ejection, but the effect was not statistically significant, perhaps due to the small sample size (n = 89 raw cases with curtain deployments). A much greater proportion of occupants who were ejected in spite of curtain airbag deployment passed through the sunroof and other portals as opposed to the adjacent side window compared to occupants who were ejected in rollovers without a curtain airbag deployment. The primary factors that reduce ejection risk in rollover crashes are, in generally decreasing order of importance: seatbelt use, fewer roof inversions, passenger car body type, curtain airbag deployment, near side seating position, and small occupant size.

  4. Optimasi Penempatan Group Tower Crane pada Proyek Pembangunan My Tower Surabaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Puguh Septiawan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Tower Crane adalah alat yang digunakan untuk mengangkut material secara vertikal dan horizontal ke suatu tempat yang tinggi pada ruang gerak yang terbatas. Pada saat pemilihan tower crane sebagai alat pengangkatan yang akan digunakan, ada beberapa pertimbangan yang perlu diperhatikan, yaitu kondisi lapangan yang tidak luas, ketinggian tidak terjangkau oleh alat lain, dan pergerakan alat tidak perlu. Pertimbangan ini harus direncanakan sebelum proyek dimulai karena tower crane diletakkan di tempat yang tetap selama proyek berlangsung, tower crane harus dapat memenuhi kebutuhan pemindahan material sesuai dengan daya jangkau yang ditetapkan. Pada konstruksi proyek yang besar, seperti pada proyek My Tower Surabaya, tower crane bekerja lebih ekstra terutama ketika tower crane tunggal tidak bisa melayani keseluruhan pekerjaan pengangkatan dari semua titik persediaan dan titik kebutuhan, maka perlu digunakan lebih dari satu tower crane, atau biasa disebut group tower crane. Dengan adanya lebih dari satu tower crane bukan berarti semua masalah pekerjaan pengangkatan bisa teratasi, karena pada proyek yang memiliki lahan yang kurang luas, semakin banyak tower crane menyebabkan sering terjadinya tabrakan ataupun tumpang tindih antar tower crane. Dari permasalahan tersebut perlu adanya pengoptimalan lokasi untuk group tower crane. Lokasi yang optimal adalah lokasi yang memiliki konflik indeks dan keseimbangan beban kerja antar tower crane terkecil. Karena tower crane yang digunakan lebih dari satu maka penempatan tower crane harus sesuai pada titik yang optimal. Dalam perhitungan untuk mendapatkan hasil yang optimal pada penempatan tower crane direncanakan menggunakan 3 skenario. Dari hasil penelitian ini dapat disimpulkan bahwa skenario 3 adalah skenario yang paling optimal dibandingkan skenario 1 dan skenario 2, karena skenario 3 memiliki nilai konflik indeks (NC terkecil yaitu 6 dan keseimbangan beban kerja (σ terkecil yaitu 2,249 jam serta dengan biaya

  5. Optimal Inflatable Space Towers of High Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    Author provides theory and computations for building inflatable space towers up to a hundred km in height. These towers can be used for tourism; scientific observation of space, earth's surface, weather, top atmosphere, as well as for radio, television, and communication transmissions. These towers can also be used to launch space ships and Earth satellites. These projects are not expensive and do not require rockets. They require thin strong films composed from artificial fibers and fabricated by current industry. Towers can be built using present technology. Towers can be used (for tourism, communication, etc.) during the construction process and provide self-financing for further construction. The tower design does not require work at high altitudes; all construction can be done at the earth's surface. The transport system for this tower consists a small engine (used only for friction compensation) located at the earth's surface. The tower is separated into sections and has special protection mechanism in case of a damage. Problems involving security, control, repair, and stability of the proposed towers are addressed in subsequent publications. The author is prepared to discuss these and other problems with serious organizations desiring to research and develop these projects.

  6. Mechanisms of Effort Intolerance in Patients With Heart Failure and Borderline Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topilsky, Yan; Rozenbaum, Zach; Khoury, Shafik; Pressman, Gregg S; Gura, Yaniv; Sherez, Jack; Man, Avi; Shimiaie, Jason; Edwards, Sanford; Berookhim, Joshua; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Halkin, Amir; Biner, Simon; Keren, Gad; Aviram, Galit

    2017-02-01

    Combining echocardiography and cardiopulmonary stress testing allows noninvasive assessment of hemodynamics, and oxygen extraction (A-VO2 difference). We evaluated mechanisms of effort intolerance in patients with heart failure with borderline (40% to 49%) left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) (HF and Borderline Ejection fraction). We included 89 consecutive patients with HF and Borderline Ejection fraction (n = 25; 63.6 ± 14 years, 64% men), control subjects (n = 22), patients with HF with preserved EF (n = 26; EF ≥50%), and patients with HF with reduced EF (n = 16; Borderline Ejection fraction than in all the other types of HF. In multivariable analysis heart rate response (p Borderline Ejection fraction but peak EF was not. In HF and Borderline Ejection fraction exercise intolerance is predominantly due to chronotropic incompetence, peripheral factors, and limited stroke volume reserve, which are related to right ventricle dysfunction and functional MR but not to left ventricular ejection fraction. Combined testing can be helpful in determining mechanisms of exercise intolerance in HF and Borderline Ejection fraction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Flux Accretion and Coronal Mass Ejection Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Brian

    2017-08-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the primary drivers of severe space weather disturbances in the heliosphere. The equations of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) have been used to model the onset and, in some cases, the subsequent acceleration of ejections. Both observations and numerical modeling, however, suggest that magnetic reconnection likely plays a major role in most, if not all, fast CMEs. Here, we theoretically investigate the dynamical effects of accretion of magnetic flux onto a rising ejection by reconnection involving the ejection's background field. This reconnection alters the magnetic structure of the ejection and its environment, thereby modifying forces acting during the eruption, generically leading to faster acceleration of the CME. Our ultimate aim is to characterize changes in CME acceleration in terms of observable properties of magnetic reconnection, such as the amount of reconnected flux, deduced from observations of flare ribbons and photospheric magnetic fields.

  8. An Optimal Unramified Tower of Function Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, Kristian

    2008-01-01

    Efficient construction of long algebraic geometric--codes resulting from optimal towers of function fields is known to be difficult. In the following a tower which is both optimal and unramified after its third level, is investigated in the hope that its simple ramification structure can be explo...

  9. Wind turbine tower for storing hydrogen and energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingersh, Lee Jay [Westminster, CO

    2008-12-30

    A wind turbine tower assembly for storing compressed gas such as hydrogen. The tower assembly includes a wind turbine having a rotor, a generator driven by the rotor, and a nacelle housing the generator. The tower assembly includes a foundation and a tubular tower with one end mounted to the foundation and another end attached to the nacelle. The tower includes an in-tower storage configured for storing a pressurized gas and defined at least in part by inner surfaces of the tower wall. In one embodiment, the tower wall is steel and has a circular cross section. The in-tower storage may be defined by first and second end caps welded to the inner surface of the tower wall or by an end cap near the top of the tower and by a sealing element attached to the tower wall adjacent the foundation, with the sealing element abutting the foundation.

  10. Carbon Nanotube Tower-Based Supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A supercapacitor system, including (i) first and second, spaced apart planar collectors, (ii) first and second arrays of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) towers or single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) towers, serving as electrodes, that extend between the first and second collectors where the nanotube towers are grown directly on the collector surfaces without deposition of a catalyst and without deposition of a binder material on the collector surfaces, and (iii) a porous separator module having a transverse area that is substantially the same as the transverse area of at least one electrode, where (iv) at least one nanotube tower is functionalized to permit or encourage the tower to behave as a hydrophilic structure, with increased surface wettability.

  11. Mechanical Properties of UHPFRC Joint for FORIDA Wind Turbine Tower

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil Verner

    FORIDA Development, Vestas and Aalborg University are currently undertaking the project “FORIDA Hybrid Towers – The towers for next generation of wind turbines”, aiming to develop a new wind turbine tower structure (The FORIDA Tower) for very tall turbines. The tower is going to be a hybrid of ma...... of materials combining steel and Ultra High Performance Fibre Reinforced Concrete (UHPFRC), applied as precast units. The FORIDA Tower is competitive regarding price, design, flexibility and durability....

  12. Augmented Reality Tower Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisman, Ronald J.; Brown, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Augmented Reality technology may help improve Air Traffic Control Tower efficiency and safety during low-visibility conditions. This paper presents the assessments of five off-duty controllers who shadow-controlled' with an augmented reality prototype in their own facility. Initial studies indicated unanimous agreement that this technology is potentially beneficial, though the prototype used in the study was not adequate for operational use. Some controllers agreed that augmented reality technology improved situational awareness, had potential to benefit clearance, control, and coordination tasks and duties and could be very useful for acquiring aircraft and weather information, particularly aircraft location, heading, and identification. The strongest objections to the prototype used in this study were directed at aircraft registration errors, unacceptable optical transparency, insufficient display performance in sunlight, inadequate representation of the static environment and insufficient symbology.

  13. Development of Active Learning Curriculum for CASPER's Microgravity Drop Tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Reyes, Jorge; Wang, Li; York, Judy; Matthews, Lorin; Laufer, Rene; Cook, Mike; Schmoke, Jimmy; Hyde, Truell

    2016-10-01

    As CASPER's new drop tower comes on line, plans for correlated educational research curricula are underway. CASPER's educational research team is working on developing curricula specific to the CASPER drop tower, modeled on a contest currently in use by (BEST) Robotics Inc. within central Texas independent school districts. The curricula integrates age specific use of computer programming software packages such as ``Scratch'' with industry standard communication protocols and augmented reality applications. Content is constructed around an earth and space science framework, covering subjects such as stars and galaxies, matter and energy, fusion and fission at a middle school level. CASPER faculty are partnering with the Region 12 Service Center; this combination provides a wide range of expertise that includes professional development, pedagogical methods, computational thinking in addition to microgravity and space science research expertise. The details of this work will be presented and samples of the manner in which it is impacting the CASPER research and educational outreach partnership will be discussed.

  14. Dynamics of polymer ejection from capsid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linna, R. P.; Moisio, J. E.; Suhonen, P. M.; Kaski, K.

    2014-05-01

    Polymer ejection from a capsid through a nanoscale pore is an important biological process with relevance to modern biotechnology. Here, we study generic capsid ejection using Langevin dynamics. We show that even when the ejection takes place within the drift-dominated region there is a very high probability for the ejection process not to be completed. Introducing a small aligning force at the pore entrance enhances ejection dramatically. Such a pore asymmetry is a candidate for a mechanism by which viral ejection is completed. By detailed high-resolution simulations we show that such capsid ejection is an out-of-equilibrium process that shares many common features with the much studied driven polymer translocation through a pore in a wall or a membrane. We find that the ejection times scale with polymer length, τ ˜Nα. We show that for the pore without the asymmetry the previous predictions corroborated by Monte Carlo simulations do not hold. For the pore with the asymmetry the scaling exponent varies with the initial monomer density (monomers per capsid volume) ρ inside the capsid. For very low densities ρ ≤0.002 the polymer is only weakly confined by the capsid, and we measure α =1.33, which is close to α =1.4 obtained for polymer translocation. At intermediate densities the scaling exponents α =1.25 and 1.21 for ρ =0.01 and 0.02, respectively. These scalings are in accord with a crude derivation for the lower limit α =1.2. For the asymmetrical pore precise scaling breaks down, when the density exceeds the value for complete confinement by the capsid, ρ ⪆0.25. The high-resolution data show that the capsid ejection for both pores, analogously to polymer translocation, can be characterized as a multiplicative stochastic process that is dominated by small-scale transitions.

  15. MODELLING AND ANALYSIS OF TOWER INTERVENTION EQUIPMENT OF OIL & GAS WELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César A. Chagoyén-Méndez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the modeling and analysis of one tower Workover Rig belonging to a maintenance facility for oil and gas wells is presented. When performing the maintenance of this tower, it is detected that one of the elements of the structure has some deformation. It was decided not to put it into operation and submit it to research. The modeling of invariants as well as ways of modeling soil structure interaction is discussed. It was necessary to determine the material properties with the performing of test of some samples taken on two components of the tower. The structural behavior of the tower to operating loads are then studied, proving that the effect of the deformed element in the structure is not significant for the stresses to which are subject.

  16. Space weather and coronal mass ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Space weather has attracted a lot of attention in recent times. Severe space weather can disrupt spacecraft, and on Earth can be the cause of power outages and power station failure. It also presents a radiation hazard for airline passengers and astronauts. These ""magnetic storms"" are most commonly caused by coronal mass ejections, or CMES, which are large eruptions of plasma and magnetic field from the Sun that can reach speeds of several thousand km/s. In this SpringerBrief, Space Weather and Coronal Mass Ejections, author Timothy Howard briefly introduces the coronal mass ejection, its sc

  17. Statistics Analysis Measures Painting of Cooling Tower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zacharopoulou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study refers to the cooling tower of Megalopolis (construction 1975 and protection from corrosive environment. The maintenance of the cooling tower took place in 2008. The cooling tower was badly damaged from corrosion of reinforcement. The parabolic cooling towers (factory of electrical power are a typical example of construction, which has a special aggressive environment. The protection of cooling towers is usually achieved through organic coatings. Because of the different environmental impacts on the internal and external side of the cooling tower, a different system of paint application is required. The present study refers to the damages caused by corrosion process. The corrosive environments, the application of this painting, the quality control process, the measures and statistics analysis, and the results were discussed in this study. In the process of quality control the following measurements were taken into consideration: (1 examination of the adhesion with the cross-cut test, (2 examination of the film thickness, and (3 controlling of the pull-off resistance for concrete substrates and paintings. Finally, this study refers to the correlations of measurements, analysis of failures in relation to the quality of repair, and rehabilitation of the cooling tower. Also this study made a first attempt to apply the specific corrosion inhibitors in such a large structure.

  18. Asbestos in cooling-tower waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, B.A.G.

    1977-12-01

    Fill material in natural- or mechanical-draft cooling towers can be manufactured from a variety of materials, including asbestos cement or asbestos paper. To aid in the environmental impact assessment of cooling towers containing these asbestos types of fill, information on these materials was obtained from cooling-tower vendors and users. Samples of makeup, basin, and blowdown waters at a number of operating cooling towers were obtained, and identification and enumeration of asbestos in the samples were performed by transmission electron microscopy, selected-area electron diffraction, and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis. Asbestos fibers were detected in cooling-tower water at 10 of the 18 sites sampled in the study. At all but three sites, the fibers were detected in cooling-tower basin or blowdown samples, with no fibers detected in the makeup water. The fibers were identified as chrysotile at all sites except one. Concentrations were on the order of 10/sup 6/ to 10/sup 8/ fibers/liter of water, with mass concentrations between <0.1 ..mu..g/liter to 37 ..mu..g/liter. The maximum concentrations of asbestos fibers in air near ground due to drift from cooling towers were estimated (using models) to be on the order of asbestos concentrations reported for ambient air up to distances of 4 km downwind of the towers. The human health hazard due to abestos in drinking-water supplies is not clear. Based on current information, the concentrations of asbestos in natural waters after mixing with cooling-tower blowdown containing 10/sup 6/ to 10/sup 8/ fibers/liter will pose little health risk. These conclusions may need to be revised if future epidemiological studies so indicate.

  19. The Tower as a Metaphor and Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Ole Verner

    2007-01-01

     Abstract: The tower as an architectonic object is not only about scale, it is also about concept. In 1933, at the national showcase for the modernistic movement in Aalborg, Denmark the exhibition tower became a manifest and a landmark. The tower was inspired by the Russian constructivist Vladimir...... generates a plethora of emotions, experiences and narratives. The loops were used as introduction to an experimental workshop in "experience design" SCI-FI Scenarios at the Department of Architecture & Design at Aalborg University in 2007. The intention of the workshop was to show how art can help produce...

  20. Modelling the ejection friction in injection moulding =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Mario Simoes

    The quality of parts produced by injection moulding may be affected during the ejection stage of the moulding cycle. At this stage the parts are mechanically forced to separate from the moulding surfaces. The ejection force depends on the shrinkage of the polymer onto the core and on the friction properties of the contacting surfaces at the moment of extraction. As during moulding there is a replication of the part on the mould surface the ejection process is also dependent on the plastic deformation of the moulded material. Ejection takes place in a very short time, hence the static coefficient of friction must be considered for modelling the ejection process. To understand the contribution of the mechanisms involved in friction during the ejection stage, a mixed approach was developed: analytical simulation for the ploughing component, numerical simulation for the deformation mechanism, and an experimental inference for the adhesion. The study was based on the observation of three materials that are commonly used in injection mouldings: polypropylene, polycarbonate and a blend of polycarbonate/acrylonitrile- butadiene. The friction behaviour was studied with two testing methods: a prototype tester that is fitted to a universal testing machine, and an instrumented mould for the characterization of the friction force. The relevance of roughness, temperature and contact pressure on friction was evidenced, on the actual value of the static coefficient of friction that applies in the demoulding of thermoplastic mouldings.

  1. Optimasi Penempatan Group Tower Crane pada Proyek Pembangunan My Tower Surabaya

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Puguh Septiawan; Cahyono Bintang Nurcahyo

    2017-01-01

    Tower Crane adalah alat yang digunakan untuk mengangkut material secara vertikal dan horizontal ke suatu tempat yang tinggi pada ruang gerak yang terbatas. Pada saat pemilihan tower crane sebagai alat pengangkatan yang akan digunakan, ada beberapa pertimbangan yang perlu diperhatikan, yaitu kondisi lapangan yang tidak luas, ketinggian tidak terjangkau oleh alat lain, dan pergerakan alat tidak perlu. Pertimbangan ini harus direncanakan sebelum proyek dimulai karena tower crane diletakkan di te...

  2. Effects of variation in posture and respiration on RSA and pre-ejection period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtveen, J.H.; Groot, P.F.C.; de Geus, J.C.N.

    2005-01-01

    The extent to which variation in posture and respiration can confound pre-ejection period and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) as indices of cardiac sympatho-vagal activity was examined. Within-subjects changes in these measures were assessed in 36 subjects during different postures and (paced)

  3. Control tower to surgical theater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buccioli Matteo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The main social priority is to reduce public debt and to streamline national health service (NHS costs. Consequently, health managers need to acquire operating methods within their managerial structures so that all available resources are better planned in terms of effectiveness and efficiency, without compromising patient safety. In order to identify the information categories needed to know the whole surgical process is necessary to divide these in two main categories, supply and demand. Demand Information Group (DIG contains the information that identify patients and its needs in terms of care. Instead Supply Information Group (SIG contains information about hospital resources in order to cover the supply. The surgical process analyzed in terms such as industrial production process has the goal of produce the “health product for the patient” and its central part is performed in the operating room by a surgical team. This does not mean that the precedent and subsequent phases of the operating room have minor importance, in fact to obtain a high quality “health product” and reduce to a minimum the clinical risks related to the patient it is necessary that each phase of the process is carried out in the right way. The implementation of a Control Tower Approach allows for the management of productive process, able to guide hospital managers to identify the best strategies and to improve the risk management of patient safety in response to the guidelines of the World Health Organization.

  4. Wind towers architecture, climate and sustainability

    CERN Document Server

    Bahadori, Mehdi N; Sayigh, Ali

    2014-01-01

    This book offers a holistic treatment of wind towers, from their underlying scientific principles to design and operation. Includes suggestions for optimization based on the authors' own research findings from recent analytical studies.

  5. Exposure level from selected base station tower around Kuala Nerus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of the tower, tilt and direction of the antennas fixed on the top of the tower, the number of antennas on single tower, the type of radiation pattern, the direction of main beam of radiation, the feeding power and the operating frequency. Keywords: base station tower; exposure level; radiofrequency; electromagnetic radiation ...

  6. Biofouling control of industrial seawater cooling towers

    KAUST Repository

    Albloushi, Mohammed

    2017-11-01

    The use of seawater in cooling towers for industrial applications has much merit in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries due to the scarcity and availability of fresh water. Seawater make-up in cooling towers is deemed the most feasible because of its unlimited supply in coastal areas. Such latent-heat removal with seawater in cooling towers is several folds more efficient than sensible heat extraction via heat exchangers. Operational challenges such as scaling, corrosion, and biofouling are a major challenge in conventional cooling towers, where the latter is also a major issue in seawater cooling towers. Biofouling can significantly hamper the efficiency of cooling towers. The most popular methods used in cooling treatment to control biofouling are disinfection by chlorination. However, the disadvantages of chlorination are formation of harmful disinfection byproducts in the presence of high organic loading and safety concerns in the storage of chlorine gas. In this study, the research focuses on biofouling control in seawater cooling towers by investigating two different approaches. The first strategy addresses the use of alternative oxidants (i.e. ozone micro-bubbles and chlorine dioxide) in treatment of cooling towers. The second strategy investigates removing nutrients in seawater using granular activated carbon filter column and ultrafiltration to prevent the growth of microorganisms. Laboratory bench-scale tests in terms of temperature, cycle of concentration, dosage, etc. indicated that, at lower oxidant dosages (total residual oxidant (TRO) equivalent = 0.1 mg/l Cl2), chlorine dioxide had a better disinfection effect than chlorine and ozone. The performance of oxidizing biocides at pilot scale, operating at assorted conditions, showed that for the disinfectants tested, ozone could remove 95 % bioactivity of total number of bacteria and algae followed by chlorine dioxide at 85%, while conventional chlorine dosing only gave 60% reduction in bioactivities

  7. Right Ventricular Ejection Fraction Is Incremental to Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction for the Prediction of Future Arrhythmic Events in Patients With Systolic Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Yoko; Jolly, Umjeet; Heydari, Bobak; Peng, Mingkai; Almehmadi, Fahad; Zahrani, Mohammed; Bokhari, Mahmoud; Stirrat, John; Lydell, Carmen P; Howarth, Andrew G; Yee, Raymond; White, James A

    2017-01-01

    Left ventricular ejection fraction remains the primary risk stratification tool used in the selection of patients for implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy. However, this solitary marker fails to identify a substantial portion of patients experiencing sudden cardiac arrest. In this study, we examined the incremental value of considering right ventricular ejection fraction for the prediction of future arrhythmic events in patients with systolic dysfunction using the gold standard of cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Three hundred fourteen consecutive patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy or nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy undergoing cardiovascular magnetic resonance were followed for the primary outcome of sudden cardiac arrest or appropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy. Blinded quantification of left ventricular and right ventricular (RV) volumes was performed from standard cine imaging. Quantification of fibrosis from late gadolinium enhancement imaging was incrementally performed. RV dysfunction was defined as right ventricular ejection fraction ≤45%. Among all patients (164 ischemic cardiomyopathy, 150 nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy), the mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 32±12% (range, 6-54%) with mean right ventricular ejection fraction of 48±15% (range, 7-78%). At a median of 773 days, 49 patients (15.6%) experienced the primary outcome (9 sudden cardiac arrest, 40 appropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapies). RV dysfunction was independently predictive of the primary outcome (hazard ratio=2.98; P=0.002). Among those with a left ventricular ejection fraction >35% (N=121; mean left ventricular ejection fraction, 45±6%), RV dysfunction provided an adjusted hazard ratio of 4.2 (P=0.02). RV dysfunction is a strong, independent predictor of arrhythmic events. Among patients with mild to moderate LV dysfunction, a cohort greatly contributing to global sudden cardiac arrest burden, this marker

  8. Adiabatic Rearrangement of Hollow PV Towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Hendricks

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabatic heating from deep moist convection in the hurricane eyewall produces a towering annular structure of elevated potential vorticity (PV. This structure has been referred to as a hollow PV tower. The sign reversal of the radial gradient of PV satisfies the Charney-Stern necessary condition for combined barotropic-baroclinic instability. For thin enough annular structures, small perturbations grow exponentially, extract energy from the mean flow, and lead to hollow tower breakdown, with significant vortex structural and intensity change. The three-dimensional adiabatic rearrangements of two prototypical hurricane-like hollow PV towers (one thick and one thin are examined in an idealized framework. For both hollow towers, dynamic instability causes air parcels with high PV to be mixed into the eye preferentially at lower levels, where unstable PV wave growth rates are the largest. Little or no mixing is found to occur at upper levels. The mixing at lower and middle levels is most rapid for the breakdown of the thin hollow tower, consistent with previous barotropic results. For both hollow towers, this advective rearrangement of PV affects the tropical cyclone structure and intensity in a number of ways. First, the minimum central pressure and maximum azimuthal mean velocity simultaneously decrease, consistent with previous barotropic results. Secondly, isosurfaces of absolute angular momentum preferentially shift inward at low levels, implying an adiabatic mechanism by which hurricane eyewall tilt can form. Thirdly, a PV bridge, similar to that previously found in full-physics hurricane simulations, develops as a result of mixing at the isentropic levels where unstable PV waves grow most rapidly. Finally, the balanced mass field resulting from the PV rearrangement is warmer in the eye between 900 and 700 hPa. The location of this warming is consistent with observed warm anomalies in the eye, indicating that in certain instances the hurricane

  9. Tower Based Load Measurements for Individual Pitch Control and Tower Damping of Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A. A.; Hugues-Salas, O.; Savini, B.; Keogh, W.

    2016-09-01

    The cost of IPC has hindered adoption outside of Europe despite significant loading advantages for large wind turbines. In this work we presented a method for applying individual pitch control (including for higher-harmonics) using tower-top strain gauge feedback instead of blade-root strain gauge feedback. Tower-top strain gauges offer hardware savings of approximately 50% in addition to the possibility of easier access for maintenance and installation and requiring a less specialised skill-set than that required for applying strain gauges to composite blade roots. A further advantage is the possibility of using the same tower-top sensor array for tower damping control. This method is made possible by including a second order IPC loop in addition to the tower damping loop to reduce the typically dominating 3P content in tower-top load measurements. High-fidelity Bladed simulations show that the resulting turbine spectral characteristics from tower-top feedback IPC and from the combination of tower-top IPC and damping loops largely match those of blade-root feedback IPC and nacelle- velocity feedback damping. Lifetime weighted fatigue analysis shows that the methods allows load reductions within 2.5% of traditional methods.

  10. Fluid Friction and Fungal Spore Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Joerg; Seminara, Agnese; Roper, Marcus; Pringle, Anne; Brenner, Michael

    2009-11-01

    A wide range of fungal species in the phylum Ascomycota uses the forcible ejection of microscopic spores to disperse and to cover new territory, triggered by the breakdown of osmolytes in the sack containing the spores (the ascus). The spores experience very high aerodynamic drag due to their small size and need to attain high velocities to leave the boundary layer of still air around the fruiting body. Here we address the efficiency of conversion of osmotic pressure to the kinetic energy of the spore, and in particular its dependence on the design of the ascus and the hole (the so-called apical ring) from where the spores leave the ascus. We present a fluid mechanical model of the ejection process, which predicts that the hole the apical ring should have specific properties, in order to minimize frictional and pressure losses and maximize the ejection velocity. We compare these predictions to measurements of apical ring properties across the phylum.

  11. Prolonged vortex formation during the ejection period in the left ventricle with low ejection fraction: a study by vector flow mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Nobuaki; Itatani, Keiichi; Kimura, Koichi; Ebihara, Aya; Negishi, Kazuaki; Uno, Kansei; Miyaji, Kagami; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Takenaka, Katsu

    2014-07-01

    Vortex formation in the left ventricle (LV) can be visualized by novel vector flow mapping (VFM) based on color Doppler and speckle tracking data. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a vortex during the ejection period using VFM. Color Doppler images were obtained to produce VFM images in 80 subjects (20 normal, 29 with dilated cardiomyopathy, and 31 with old myocardial infarction). The duration of the LV vortex was measured and expressed as the ratio to the ejection time (VTRe). The VTRe showed significant correlations with EDV (ρ = 0.672, p vortex existed for only a limited time during the early ejection period. In contrast, the lower the EF was, the longer the vortex remained during systole. Evaluation of vortices by VFM may noninvasively provide novel insights into the pathophysiology of impaired cardiac function.

  12. Aerodynamical errors on tower mounted wind speed measurements due to the presence of the tower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, H. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology; Dahlberg, J.Aa. [Aeronautical Research Inst. of Sweden, Bromma (Sweden)

    1996-12-01

    Field measurements of wind speed from two lattice towers showed large differences for wind directions where the anemometers of both towers should be unaffected by any upstream obstacle. The wind speed was measured by cup anemometers mounted on booms along the side of the tower. A simple wind tunnel test indicates that the boom, for the studied conditions, could cause minor flow disturbances. A theoretical study, by means of simple 2D flow modelling of the flow around the mast, demonstrates that the tower itself could cause large wind flow disturbances. A theoretical study, based on simple treatment of the physics of motion of a cup anemometer, demonstrates that a cup anemometer is sensitive to velocity gradients across the cups and responds clearly to velocity gradients in the vicinity of the tower. Comparison of the results from the theoretical study and field tests show promising agreement. 2 refs, 8 figs

  13. The Drop Tower Bremen -An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kampen, Peter; Könemann, Thorben; Rath, Hans J.

    The Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM) was founded in 1985 as an institute of the University of Bremen, which focuses on research on gravitational and space-related phenomena. In 1988, the construction of ZARM`s drop tower began. Since its inau-guration in September 1990, the eye-catching Drop Tower Bremen with a height of 146m and its characteristic glass roof has become twice a landmark on the campus of the University of Bremen and the emblem of the technology park Bremen. As such an outstanding symbol of space science in Bremen the drop tower provides an european unique facility for experiments under conditions of high-quality weightlessness with residual gravitational accelerations in the microgravity regime. The period of maximum 4.74s of each freely falling experiment at the Drop Tower Bremen is only limited by the height of the drop tower vacuum tube, which was fully manufactured of steal and enclosed by an outer concrete shell. Thus, the pure free fall height of each microgravity drop experiment is approximately 110m. By using the later in-stalled catapult system established in 2004 ZARM`s short-term microgravity laboratory is able to nearly double the time of free fall. This world-wide inimitable capsule catapult system meets scientists` demand of extending the period of weightlessness. During the catapult operation the experiment capsule performs a vertical parabolic flight within the drop tower vacuum tube. In this way the time of microgravity can be extended to slightly over 9s. Either in the drop or in the catapult operation routine the repetition rates of microgravity experiments at ZARM`s drop tower facility are the same, generally up to 3 times per day. In comparison to orbital platforms the ground-based laboratory Drop Tower Bremen represents an economic alternative with a permanent access to weightlessness on earth. Moreover, the exceptional high quality of weightlessness in order of 1e-6 g (in the frequency range below 100

  14. Wet cooling towers: rule-of-thumb design and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leeper, Stephen A. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1981-07-01

    A survey of wet cooling tower literature was performed to develop a simplified method of cooling tower design and simulation for use in power plant cycle optimization. The theory of heat exchange in wet cooling towers is briefly summarized. The Merkel equation (the fundamental equation of heat transfer in wet cooling towers) is presented and discussed. The cooling tower fill constant (Ka) is defined and values derived. A rule-of-thumb method for the optimized design of cooling towers is presented. The rule-of-thumb design method provides information useful in power plant cycle optimization, including tower dimensions, water consumption rate, exit air temperature, power requirements and construction cost. In addition, a method for simulation of cooling tower performance at various operating conditions is presented. This information is also useful in power plant cycle evaluation. Using the information presented, it will be possible to incorporate wet cooling tower design and simulation into a procedure to evaluate and optimize power plant cycles.

  15. Damping of wind turbine tower vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Mark Laier; Pedersen, Mikkel Melters

    Damping of wind turbine vibrations by supplemental dampers is a key ingredient for the continuous use of monopiles as support for offshore wind turbines. The present thesis consists of an extended summary with four parts and appended papers [P1-P4] concerning novel strategies for damping of tower...... in a stroke amplifying brace, which amplifies the displacement across the damper and thus reduces the desired level of damper force. For optimal damping of the two lowest tower modes, a novel toggle-brace concept for amplifying the bending deformation of the tower is presented. Numerical examples illustrate...... that a minimum of three braces in a symmetric circumferential configuration are needed to introduce homogeneous damping in the two lowest vibration modes, independent of the rotor direction. A novel hybrid viscous damper concept is described in the second part. The hybriddamper consists of a viscous dash...

  16. Engineering photochemical smog through convection towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, S.; Prueitt, M.L.; Bossert, J.E.; Mroz, E.J.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Jacobson, M.Z.; Turco, R.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Dept.

    1995-02-01

    Reverse convection towers have attracted attention as a medium for cleansing modern cities. Evaporation of an aqueous mist injected at the tower opening could generate electrical power by creating descent, and simultaneously scavenge unsightly and unhealthful particulates. The study offered here assesses the influence to tower water droplets on the photochemical component of Los Angeles type smog. The primary radical chain initiator OH is likely removed into aqueous phases well within the residence time of air in the tower, and then reacts away rapidly. Organics do not dissolve, but nighttime hydrolysis of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} depletes the nitrogen oxides. A lack of HOx would slow hydrocarbon oxidation and so also ozone production. Lowering of NOx would also alter ozone production rates, but the direction is uncertain. SO{sub 2} is available in sufficient quantities in some urban areas to react with stable oxidants, and if seawater were the source of the mist, the high pH would lead to fast sulfur oxidation kinetics. With an accommodation coefficient of 10{sup {minus}3}, however, ozone may not enter the aqueous phase efficiently. Even if ozone is destroyed or its production suppressed, photochemical recovery times are on the order of hours, so that tower processing must be centered on a narrow midday time window. The cost of building the number of structures necessary for this brief turnover could be prohibitive. The increase in humidity accompanying mist evaporation could be controlled with condensers, but might otherwise counteract visibility enhancements by recreating aqueous aerosols. Quantification of the divergent forcings convection towers must exert upon the cityscape would call for coupled three dimensional modeling of transport, microphysics, and photochemistry. 112 refs.

  17. Ejection of stars with relativistic velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryomova, G.; Dryomov, V.; Tutukov, A.

    We present the results of numerical simulations performed in terms of modified Hills' scenario involving two supermassive black holes (SMBHs). In contrast to the classic Hills scenario (Hills 1988), here one component of the ordinary stellar binary system is replaced with a SMBH that provides a kinetic resource for ejecting a star (the secondary component of the binary) with relativistic velocity (RVS). We examine the conditions that favor relativistic ejections of stars, depending on the pericentric approach, the mass ratio of two SMBHs, and the orbital configuration of the binary system. Applying the simple criteria helped us to sort out the results of numerical simulations by the outcome: conservation of the orbital configuration of the binary system, dynamic recapture of the star by the central SMBH, emission of hypervelocity stars (HVSs), and RVS ejection. In the framework of N-body simulations we estimate the probability for a star to survive in the cross-field of two SMBHs during the ejection with relativistic velocity, and discuss the probability of the detection of RVSs in our Galaxy in the cases where such stars are generated in distant interacting galaxies undergoing a merger of their central parts occupied by SMBHs.

  18. Comparative Numerical Analysis Of Advertising Board Tower Using Adina And Autodesk Robot Structural Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Major Maciej

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the subject of comparative stress and displacement analysis for different computer aided design program environments is discussed. For the purposes of analysis ADINA and Autodesk ROBOT program were used. In both programs an advertising board tower was modeled. Static analysis was adopted for the computations. Obtained results allowed showing small differences and limitations between those two environments.

  19. 2D study of wind forces around multiple cooling towers using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    A comprehensive numerical study for the determination of wind pressure coefficients on multiple cooling towers by simulating turbulence using Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes .... An iterative numerical computational algorithm to design a plate or shell element subjected to membrane and flexural forces, which are based ...

  20. Preoperative ejection fraction as a predictor of survival after coronary artery bypass grafting: comparison with a matched general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martens Elisabeth J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preoperative left ventricular dysfunction is an established risk factor for early and late mortality after revascularization. This retrospective analysis demonstrates the effects of preoperative ejection fraction on the short-term and long-term survival of patients after coronary artery bypass grafting. Methods Early and late mortality were determined retrospectively in 10 626 consecutive patients who underwent isolated coronary bypass between January 1998 and December 2007. The subjects were divided into 3 groups according to their preoperative ejection fraction. Expected survival was estimated by comparison with a general Dutch population group described in the database of the Dutch Central Bureau for Statistics. For each of our groups with a known preoperative ejection fraction, a general Dutch population group was matched for age, sex, and year of operation. Results and Discussion One hundred twenty-two patients were lost to follow-up. In 219 patients, the preoperative ejection fraction could not be retrieved. In the remaining patients (n = 10 285, the results of multivariate logistic regression and Cox regression analysis identified the ejection fraction as a predictor of early and late mortality. When we compared long-term survival and expected survival, we found a relatively poorer outcome in all subjects with an ejection fraction of 50%, long-term survival exceeded expected survival. Conclusions The severity of left ventricular dysfunction was associated with poor survival. Compared with the survival of the matched general population, our coronary bypass patients had a worse outcome only if their preoperative ejection fraction was

  1. SSMIR (Solid State Memory Instrumentation Recorder): A new approach to acquiring data during an aircraft seat/sled ejection sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, D. M.

    1985-04-01

    The current state of ejection seat/sled testing employs an Aydin/Vector Co., pulse code modulation/telemetry instrumentation package. While this system meets all channel/data rate requirements and has proven itself in field testing, some major deficiencies exist. Data turnaround is one drawback; up to several weeks are normally required to process and print out the results from any sled shot. A second major deficiency is the amount of data dropout that can occur. In an ejection seat test, orientation of the skull antenna or misalignment of sending and receiving antennas can result in loss of data. Current technology in data storage media and high speed controllers provides backup mode for data integrity and also permits faster data reduction. This paper summarizes an electrical/mechanical packaging design of a software controlled, nonvolatile data recording system which uses 8 megabits of bubble memory to provide 24 sec of data storage in parallel to the PCM/TM transmission. Preliminary laboratory bench testing of the Solid State Memory Instrumentation (SSMI) Recorder indicates that the bubble memory can withstand the high vibration g loads (20 Gs up to 2000 Hz) and environmental temperatures (85 C) encountered in ejection seat testing. Laboratory shock testing (ejection seat trainer) to 5 Gs has also been successful along with tower testing at the Naval Air Development Center to 25 Gs.

  2. Long-term behaviour of towers & fabric structures. The bell tower of Monza cathedral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigia Binda

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available After the collapse of some heavy buildings and towers in Italy and elsewhere, the hypothesis of possible continuous damage to these structures due to the dead and cyclic loads (wind, temperature variations, etc. has been formulated by the authors. The long term behaviour of historic masonry has also been detected by laboratory creep and cyclic tests. The results indicate that a laboratory and on site investigation together with analytical modelling are important peculiarly for tall bell-towers. The application of these procedures on the Bell-Tower of the Cathedral of Monza is here reported and discussed.

  3. Comparison among different retrofitting strategies for the vulnerability reduction of masonry bell towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Gabriele; Shehu, Rafael; Valente, Marco

    2017-11-01

    This paper investigates the effectiveness of reducing the seismic vulnerability of masonry towers by means of innovative and traditional strengthening techniques. The followed strategy for providing the optimal retrofitting for masonry towers subjected to seismic risk relies on preventing active failure mechanisms. These vulnerable mechanisms are pre-assigned failure patterns based on the crack patterns experienced during the past seismic events. An upper bound limit analysis strategy is found suitable to be applied for simplified tower models in their present state and the proposed retrofitted ones. Taking into consideration the variability of geometrical features and the uncertainty of the strengthening techniques, Monte Carlo simulations are implemented into the limit analysis. In this framework a wide range of idealized cases are covered by the conducted analyses. The retrofitting strategies aim to increase the shear strength and the overturning load carrying capacity in order to reduce vulnerability. This methodology gives the possibility to use different materials which can fulfill the structural implementability requirements.

  4. Towards Determination of Visual Requirements for Augmented Reality Displays and Virtual Environments for the Airport Tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    The visual requirements for augmented reality or virtual environments displays that might be used in real or virtual towers are reviewed with respect to similar displays already used in aircraft. As an example of the type of human performance studies needed to determine the useful specifications of augmented reality displays, an optical see-through display was used in an ATC Tower simulation. Three different binocular fields of view (14deg, 28deg, and 47deg) were examined to determine their effect on subjects ability to detect aircraft maneuvering and landing. The results suggest that binocular fields of view much greater than 47deg are unlikely to dramatically improve search performance and that partial binocular overlap is a feasible display technique for augmented reality Tower applications.

  5. Study on Seismic Control of Power Transmission Tower-Line Coupled System under Multicomponent Excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Tian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The seismic control of power transmission tower-line coupled system subjected to multicomponent excitations is studied in this paper. The schematic of tuned mass damper is introduced, and equations of motion of a system with tuned mass damper under multi-component excitations are proposed. Three-dimensional finite tower-line system models are created based on practical engineering in studying the response of this system without and with control. The time domain analysis takes into account geometric nonlinearity due to finite deformation. The optimal design of the transmission tower-line system with tuned mass damper is obtained according to different mass ratio. The effects of wave travel, coherency loss, and different site conditions on the system without and with control are investigated, respectively.

  6. Lifting system and apparatus for constructing wind turbine towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Tracy; Schrader, Terry; Goldhardt, James; Lott, James

    2011-02-01

    The disclosed invention is utilized for mounting a wind turbine and blade assembly on the upper end of a wind turbine tower. The invention generally includes a frame or truss that is pivotally secured to the top bay assembly of the tower. A transverse beam is connected to the frame or truss and extends fore of the tower when the frame or truss is in a first position and generally above the tower when in a second position. When in the first position, a wind turbine or blade assembly can be hoisted to the top of the tower. The wind turbine or blade assembly is then moved into position for mounting to the tower as the frame or truss is pivoted to a second position. When the turbine and blade assembly are secured to the tower, the frame or truss is disconnected from the tower and lowered to the ground.

  7. Low-cost Triangular Lattice Towers for Small Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Ram Chandra

    This thesis focuses on the study of low-cost steel and bamboo triangular lattice towers for small wind turbines. The core objective is to determine the material properties of bamboo and assess the feasibility of bamboo towers. Using the experimentally determined buckling resistance, elastic modulus, and Poisson's ratio, a 12 m high triangular lattice tower for a 500W wind turbine has been modeled as a tripod to formulate the analytical solutions for the stresses and tower deflections, which enables design of the tower based on buckling strength of tower legs. The tripod formulation combines the imposed loads, the base distance between the legs and tower height, and cross-sectional dimensions of the tower legs. The tripod model was used as a reference for the initial design of the bamboo tower and extended to finite element analysis. A 12 m high steel lattice tower was also designed for the same turbine to serve as a comparison to the bamboo tower. The primary result of this work indicates that bamboo is a valid structural material. The commercial software package ANSYS APDL was used to carry out the tower analysis, evaluate the validity of the tripod model, and extend the analysis for the tower design. For this purpose, a 12 m high steel lattice tower for a 500 W wind turbine was examined. Comparison of finite element analysis and analytical solution has shown that tripod model can be accurately used in the design of lattice towers. The tower designs were based on the loads and safety requirements of international standard for small wind turbine safety, IEC 61400-2. For connecting the bamboo sections in the lattice tower, a steel-bamboo adhesive joint combined with conventional lashing has been proposed. Also, considering the low durability of bamboo, periodic replacement of tower members has been proposed. The result of this study has established that bamboo could be used to construct cost-effective and lightweight lattice towers for wind turbines of 500 Watt

  8. The Exact Limit of Some Cubic Towers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anbar Meidl, Nurdagül; Beelen, Peter; Nguyen, Nhut

    2017-01-01

    Recently, a new explicit tower of function fields was introduced by Bassa, Beelen, Garcia and Stichtenoth (BBGS). This resulted in currently the best known lower bound for Ihara’s constant in the case of non-prime finite fields. In particular over cubic fields, the tower’s limit is at least as good...

  9. X-ray Observations at Gaisberg Tower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasan Hettiarachchi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the occurrence of X-rays at ground level due to cloud-to-ground flashes of upward-initiated lightning from Gaisberg Tower, in Austria, which is located at an altitude of 1300 m. This is the first observation of X-ray emissions from upward lightning from a tower top located at high altitude. Measurements were carried out using scintillation detectors installed close to the tower top in two phases from 2011 to 2015. X-rays were recorded in three subsequent strokes of three flashes out of the total of 108 flashes recorded in the system during both phases. In contrast to the observations from downward natural or triggered lightning, X-rays were observed only within 10 µs before the subsequent return stroke. This shows that X-rays were emitted when the dart leader was in the vicinity of the tower top, hence during the most intense phase of the dart leader. Both the detected energy and the fluence of X-rays are far lower compared to X-rays from downward natural or rocket-triggered lightning. In addition to the above 108 flashes, an interesting observation of X-rays produced by a nearby downward flash is also presented. The shorter length of dart-leader channels in Gaisberg is suggested as a possible cause of this apparently weaker X-ray production.

  10. 76 FR 490 - Marking Meteorological Evaluation Towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... this section directs the FAA to ``develop plans and policy for the use of the navigable airspace and... bands of aviation orange and white paint for skeletal framework of storage tanks and similar structures, and towers that have cables attached. The FAA also recommends spherical and/or flag markers be used in...

  11. Balsa Tower Walls Brave "Big Buster"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granlund, George

    2008-01-01

    Like many technology teachers, the author, a technology education teacher at Arthur Hill High School in Saginaw, Michigan, tries to stretch his budget by "milking" each student activity for maximum benefit. In the technology department, they use balsa wood towers to teach the basics of structural engineering. To get the most from their materials,…

  12. Penilaian Indikator K3l Pada Penggunaan Tower Crane

    OpenAIRE

    Vernatha, Christian Adie; Tanos, Bryan; Alifen, Ratna Setiawardani

    2016-01-01

    Tower crane merupakan alat berat yang sangat bermanfaat dan mampu menggantikan peran manusia karena fungsinya untuk mengangkut dan memindahkan material baik vertikal maupun horizontal. Salah satu aspek yang sangat penting dan perlu diperhatikan dalam menggunakan tower crane adalah Keselamatan dan Kesehatan Kerja dan Lingkungan (K3L). Banyak peraturan yang mengatur tentang penggunaan tower crane khususnya mengenai K3L. Model pengukuran tingkat keselamatan dalam penggunaan tower crane yang tela...

  13. Real-time observations of single bacteriophage lambda DNA ejections in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Paul; Han, Lin; Winther, Tabita; Phillips, Rob

    2007-09-11

    The physical, chemical, and structural features of bacteriophage genome release have been the subject of much recent attention. Many theoretical and experimental studies have centered on the internal forces driving the ejection process. Recently, Mangenot et al. [Mangenot S, Hochrein M, Rädler J, Letellier L (2005) Curr Biol 15:430-435.] reported fluorescence microscopy of phage T5 ejections, which proceeded stepwise between DNA nicks, reaching a translocation speed of 75 kbp/s or higher. It is still unknown how high the speed actually is. This paper reports real-time measurements of ejection from phage lambda, revealing how the speed depends on key physical parameters such as genome length and ionic state of the buffer. Except for a pause before DNA is finally released, the entire 48.5-kbp genome is translocated in approximately 1.5 s without interruption, reaching a speed of 60 kbp/s. The process gives insights particularly into the effects of two parameters: a shorter genome length results in lower speed but a shorter total time, and the presence of divalent magnesium ions (replacing sodium) reduces the pressure, increasing ejection time to 8-11 s. Pressure caused by DNA-DNA interactions within the head affects the initiation of ejection, but the close packing is also the dominant source of friction: more tightly packed phages initiate ejection earlier, but with a lower initial speed. The details of ejection revealed in this study are probably generic features of DNA translocation in bacteriophages and have implications for the dynamics of DNA in other biological systems.

  14. Snowfall observations from natural-draft cooling tower plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, M L; Seymour, D E; Smith, M E; Reeves, R W; Frankenberg, T T

    1976-09-24

    During the winter of 1975-1976, snowfall from the plumes of large natural-draft cooling towers of power plants has been observed. Snow accumulations up to 2.5 centimeters have been found on the ground at extended distances from the cooling towers, and visibility has been restricted to less than 1600 meters in the tower plume near ground level.

  15. Role of osmotic and hydrostatic pressures in bacteriophage genome ejection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemay, S.G.; Panja, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370992105; Molineux, I.J.

    2013-01-01

    A critical step in the bacteriophage life cycle is genome ejection into host bacteria. The ejection process for double-stranded DNA phages has been studied thoroughly in vitro, where after triggering with the cellular receptor the genome ejects into a buffer. The experimental data have been

  16. Influence of edge conditions on material ejection from periodic grooves in laser shock-loaded tin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rességuier, T. de; Roland, C. [Institut PPRIME, UPR 3346, CNRS, ENSMA, Université de Poitiers, 1 ave. Clément Ader, 86961 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Prudhomme, G.; Lescoute, E.; Mercier, P. [CEA, DAM, DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France); Loison, D. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, CNRS, Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes (France)

    2016-05-14

    In a material subjected to high dynamic compression, the breakout of a shock wave at a rough free surface can lead to the ejection of high velocity debris. Anticipating the ballistic properties of such debris is a key safety issue in many applications involving shock loading, including pyrotechnics and inertial confinement fusion experiments. In this paper, we use laser driven shocks to investigate particle ejection from calibrated grooves of micrometric dimensions and approximately sinusoidal profile in tin samples, with various boundary conditions at the groove edges, including single groove and periodic patterns. Fast transverse shadowgraphy provides ejection velocities after shock breakout. They are found to depend not only on the groove depth and wavelength, as predicted theoretically and already observed in the past, but also, unexpectedly, on the edge conditions, with a jet tip velocity significantly lower in the case of a single groove than behind a periodic pattern.

  17. Coagulation chemistries for silica removal from cooling tower water.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyman, May Devan; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Stewart, Tom

    2010-02-01

    The formation of silica scale is a problem for thermoelectric power generating facilities, and this study investigated the potential for removal of silica by means of chemical coagulation from source water before it is subjected to mineral concentration in cooling towers. In Phase I, a screening of many typical as well as novel coagulants was carried out using concentrated cooling tower water, with and without flocculation aids, at concentrations typical for water purification with limited results. In Phase II, it was decided that treatment of source or make up water was more appropriate, and that higher dosing with coagulants delivered promising results. In fact, the less exotic coagulants proved to be more efficacious for reasons not yet fully determined. Some analysis was made of the molecular nature of the precipitated floc, which may aid in process improvements. In Phase III, more detailed study of process conditions for aluminum chloride coagulation was undertaken. Lime-soda water softening and the precipitation of magnesium hydroxide were shown to be too limited in terms of effectiveness, speed, and energy consumption to be considered further for the present application. In Phase IV, sodium aluminate emerged as an effective coagulant for silica, and the most attractive of those tested to date because of its availability, ease of use, and low requirement for additional chemicals. Some process optimization was performed for coagulant concentration and operational pH. It is concluded that silica coagulation with simple aluminum-based agents is effective, simple, and compatible with other industrial processes.

  18. Ejection-collision orbits in the RTBP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollé, Mercè; Rodríguez, Òscar; Soler, Jaume

    2018-02-01

    In this paper we analyse the ejection-collision (EC) orbits of the planar restricted three body problem. Being μ ∈ (0, 0.5] the mass parameter, and taking the big (small) primary with mass 1 - μ (μ), an EC orbit will be an orbit that ejects from the big primary, does an excursion and collides with it. As it is well known, for any value of the mass parameter μ ∈ (0, 0.5] and sufficiently restricted Hill regions (that is, for big enough values of the Jacobi constant C), there are exactly four EC orbits. We check their existence and extend numerically these four orbits for μ ∈ (0, 0.5] and for smaller values of the Jacobi constant. We introduce the concept of n-ejection-collision orbits (n-EC orbits) and we explore them numerically for μ ∈ (0, 0.5] and values of the Jacobi constant such that the Hill bounded possible region of motion contains the big primary and does not contain the small one. We study the cases 1 ≤ n ≤ 10 and we analyse the continuation of families of such n-EC orbits, varying the energy, as well as the bifurcations that appear.

  19. The Drop Tower Bremen -Experiment Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könemann, Thorben; von Kampen, Peter; Rath, Hans J.

    The idea behind the drop tower facility of the Center of Applied Space Technology and Micro-gravity (ZARM) in Bremen is to provide an inimitable technical opportunity of a daily access to short-term weightlessness on earth. In this way ZARM`s european unique ground-based microgravity laboratory displays an excellent economic alternative for research in space-related conditions at low costs comparable to orbital platforms. Many national and international ex-perimentalists motivated by these prospects decide to benefit from the high-quality and easy accessible microgravity environment only provided by the Drop Tower Bremen. Corresponding experiments in reduced gravity could open new perspectives of investigation methods and give scientists an impressive potential for a future technology and multidisciplinary applications on different research fields like Fundamental Physics, Astrophysics, Fluid Dynamics, Combus-tion, Material Science, Chemistry and Biology. Generally, realizing microgravity experiments at ZARM`s drop tower facility meet new requirements of the experimental hardware and may lead to some technical constraints in the setups. In any case the ZARM Drop Tower Operation and Service Company (ZARM FAB mbH) maintaining the drop tower facility is prepared to as-sist experimentalists by offering own air-conditioned laboratories, clean rooms, workshops and consulting engineers, as well as scientific personal. Furthermore, ZARM`s on-site apartment can be used for accommodations during the experiment campaigns. In terms of approaching drop tower experimenting, consulting of experimentalists is mandatory to successfully accomplish the pursued drop or catapult capsule experiment. For this purpose there will be a lot of expertise and help given by ZARM FAB mbH in strong cooperation to-gether with the experimentalists. However, in comparison to standard laboratory setups the drop or catapult capsule setup seems to be completely different at first view. While defining a

  20. An automatic and effective approach in identifying tower cranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bo; Niu, Zheng; Wang, Li; Liu, Yaqi

    2012-04-01

    A method which can distinguish tower cranes from other objects in an image is proposed in this paper. It synthesizes the advantages of both morphological theory and geometrical characters to identify tower cranes accurately. The algorithm uses morphological theory to remove noise and segment images. Moreover, geometrical characters are adopted to extract tower cranes with thresholds. To test the algorithm's practical applicability, we apply it to another image to check the result. The experiments show that the approach can locate the position of tower cranes precisely and calculate the number of cranes at 100% accuracy rate. It can be applied to identifying tower cranes in small regions.

  1. Radio Transmitters and Tower Locations, Layer includes all towers identified visually and include cellular and other communication towers., Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Noble County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Radio Transmitters and Tower Locations dataset current as of 2008. Layer includes all towers identified visually and include cellular and other communication towers..

  2. Study on Tower Models for EHV Transmission Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Bao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lightning outage accident is one of the main factors that threat seriously the safe and reliable operation of power system. So it is very important to establish reasonable transmission tower model and evaluate the impulse response characteristic of lightning wave traveling on the transmission tower properly for determining reliable lightning protection performance. With the help of Electromagnetic Transient Program (EMTP, six 500kV tower models are built. Aiming at one line to one transformer operating mode of 500kV substation, the intruding wave overvoltage under different tower models is calculated. The effect of tower model on intruding overvoltage has been studied. The results show that different tower models can result in great differences to the calculation results. Hence, reasonable selection of the tower model in the calculation of back- strike intruding wave is very important.

  3. The IFSI Experimental Gravitation Group drop tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iafolla, Valerio; Fiorenza, Emiliano; Lefevre, Carlo; Nozzoli, Sergio; Peron, Roberto; Reale, Andrea; Santoli, Francesco

    The Experimental Gravitation Group of Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (IFSI-INAF) has recently completed the development of a drop tower in its laboratories. This new facility is used in the context of the wide range of activities of the Group, in particular for testing high-sensitivity accelerometers and gradiometers. These instruments will be mainly operated in free fall conditions and this facility will be used for simulating these conditions. The tower has an height of 10 m (7-8 m effective fall height). Its capabilities include a magnetic release mechanism, a (variable acceleration) recovery system and will include a telemetry system. Following a description of the facility, the main foreseen uses will be discussed, among them: tests of accelerometer working position stability, release transient effects, capability of test mass initial attitude and angular velocity control, repeatability.

  4. Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-10-20

    This technology evaluation assesses side stream filtration options for cooling towers, with an objective to assess key attributes that optimize energy and water savings along with providing information on specific technology and implementation options. This information can be used to assist Federal sites to determine which options may be most appropriate for their applications. This evaluation provides an overview of the characterization of side stream filtration technology, describes typical applications, and details specific types of filtration technology.

  5. The Architecture Of Towers In Uzbekistan Heritage

    OpenAIRE

    Yaxyayev Abdulla Abdujabbamp1072rovich

    2015-01-01

    In the town planning since the ancient periods emphasizing to the vertical elements had the certain role. Thats why the gates of the city the buildings on the main square were built with high and gigantic form. The zikkurat on the silhouettes of the city and other settlements and other structures like the tower form the balance of the composition. Today in the architecture are given the great importance the creation of vertical compositions for leaving of the biodiversity. The purpose of this...

  6. INTEGRATED TWIN TOWERS DAN ISLAMISASI ILMU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syaifuddin Syaifuddin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows some idea as follows: First, integrated design of the Twin Towers as the changing action from IAIN to UIN Sunan Ampel. The religion and general knowledge’s position of Twin Towers’ integrated design is not mixed into one, but it works individually, and at the certain time are united in mutual dialogue. Second, Islamize design is done in order to criticize the general knowledge which has western sources and are secular, materialistic, and individualistic. In the process to Islamize the knowledge, Islamic knowledge tries to intervene the general knowledge in order to filter it so the knowledge will be Islamized. Consequently, to Islamize knowledge is to give an Islamic concept into general knowledge. Third, there are the similarities and differences between integrated design knowledge based on Islamic knowledge and integrated Twin Towers. The difference is in its epistemology process. The similarity is in the curriculum (ontology and objective (axiology. In the curriculum, the examined knowledge is religion and general knowledge. While the objective, Islamize knowledge and integrated Twin Towers aims to integrate religion and general knowledge, to dialogue, to communicate, and to synergy, so it can be a knowledge which is intact-integral-integrative.

  7. European dry cooling tower operating experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeSteese, J.G.; Simhan, K.

    1976-03-01

    Interviews were held with representatives of major plants and equipment manufacturers to obtain current information on operating experience with dry cooling towers in Europe. The report documents the objectives, background, and organizational details of the study, and presents an itemized account of contacts made to obtain information. Plant selection was based on a merit index involving thermal capacity and length of service. A questionnaire was used to organize operational data, when available, into nine major categories of experience. Information was also solicited concerning the use of codes and standards to ensure the achievement of cooling tower performance. Several plant operators provided finned-tube samples for metallographic analysis. Additionally, information on both operating experience and developing technology was supplied by European technical societies and research establishments. Information obtained from these contacts provides an updated and representative sample of European experience with dry cooling towers, which supplements some of the detailed reviews already available in the literature. In addition, the study presents categorized operating experience with installations which have not been reviewed so extensively, but nevertheless, have significant operational histories when ranked by the merit index. The contacts and interviews reported in the survey occurred between late March and October 1975. The study was motivated by the expressed interest of U.S. utility industry representatives who expect European experience to provide a basis of confidence that dry cooling is a reliable technology, applicable when necessary, to U.S. operating requirements.

  8. Ideal geometries in the military architecture of F. di Giorgio Martini. The defence system fortress-tower of Cagli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Clini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available  The subject of the military architecture was widely studied and analyzed by the architect Francesco di Giorgio Martini (1439-1501, who created important defensive works in the duchy of Montefeltro. A defensive line connects a series of medieval villages of the Marches: b Between the Martini’s fortifications, Cagli has still a fortified tower perfectly preserved and some traces of the fortress. The analysis conducted on them involves the information inferable by the essay, by historical surveys and the recent laser scanner survey. The aim of the research was to identify the generating geometry of the architecture: taking the precepts of Vitruvius, in the Renaissance period geometry was synonymous with proportion, order and symmetry. Two are subjects: the first one is the in-depth knowledge of the tower through the digital data obtained from the point cloud, the other one is the reconstruction of a global image of the complex tower-fortress.

  9. Subject Index

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ray. Spectrometer (SOXS) Mission ... Luminosity Dependent Study of the High Mass X-ray Binary Pulsar 4U 0114 + 65 with ASCA (U. Mukherjee & B. ... Magnetic Source Regions of Coronal Mass Ejections (Brigitte Schmieder), 139. North–South ...

  10. Acoustic emission monitoring of medieval towers considered as sensitive earthquake receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpinteri, A.; Lacidogna, G.; Niccolini, G.

    2007-04-01

    Many ancient masonry towers are present in Italian territory. In some cases these structures are at risk on account of the intensity of the stresses they are subjected to due to the high level of regional seismicity. In order to preserve this inestimable cultural heritage, a sound safety assessment should take into account the evolution of damage phenomena. In this connection, acoustic emission (AE) monitoring can be highly effective. This study concerns the structural stability of three medieval towers rising in the centre of Alba, a characteristic town in Piedmont (Italy). During the monitoring period a correlation between peaks of AE activity in the masonry of these towers and regional seismicity was found. Earthquakes always affect structural stability. Besides that, the towers behaved as sensitive earthquake receptors. Here a method to correlate bursts of AE activity in a masonry building and regional seismicity is proposed. In particular, this method permits to identify the premonitory signals that precede a catastrophic event on a structure, since, in most cases, these warning signs can be captured well in advance.

  11. Acoustic emission monitoring of medieval towers considered as sensitive earthquake receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Carpinteri

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Many ancient masonry towers are present in Italian territory. In some cases these structures are at risk on account of the intensity of the stresses they are subjected to due to the high level of regional seismicity. In order to preserve this inestimable cultural heritage, a sound safety assessment should take into account the evolution of damage phenomena. In this connection, acoustic emission (AE monitoring can be highly effective. This study concerns the structural stability of three medieval towers rising in the centre of Alba, a characteristic town in Piedmont (Italy. During the monitoring period a correlation between peaks of AE activity in the masonry of these towers and regional seismicity was found. Earthquakes always affect structural stability. Besides that, the towers behaved as sensitive earthquake receptors. Here a method to correlate bursts of AE activity in a masonry building and regional seismicity is proposed. In particular, this method permits to identify the premonitory signals that precede a catastrophic event on a structure, since, in most cases, these warning signs can be captured well in advance.

  12. Assessment of actual operation of a hoisting tower during examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorokhov, E.V.; Kushchenko, V.N.

    1982-04-01

    This paper evaluates factors which influence operation of hoisting towers in underground coal mines after modernization. The evaluation is based on the results of analyses carried out by the Makeevka Engineering and Building Institute. Emergency loading of the hoisting tower structure has a pulse character. Pulses act on the construction at the points at which bearings of the headgear sheaves are placed. Loading is characterized by pulse increase of forces in the hoisting cable until the breaking point is reached. A method of determining parameters of pulse forces acting on a hoisting tower is given. Designing mine hoisting towers takes into consideration the following stages: tower loading during normal operational conditions, emergency loading corresponding to various emergency situations, calculation of static and dynamic loads. Effects of hoist operation and hoist modernization on loading of hoisting tower steel construction are discussed.

  13. Ejection experience in Serbian air force, 1990-2010

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlović Miroslav; Pejović Janko; Mladenović Jovan; Čekanac Radovan; Jovanović Dalibor; Karkalić Radovan; Ranđelović Danijela

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim. Ejection injuries are the problem for air forces. The present risk for injuries is still too high, approximately 30-50%. This study was an effort to determine factors responsible for and contributing to injuries in the Serbian Air Force (SAF) in the last two decades. Methods. All ejection cases in the SAF between 1990 and 2010 were analyzed. The collected data were: aircraft type, ejection seat generation, pilots ´ age and experience, causes...

  14. Review of New Concepts, Ideas and Innovations in Space Towers

    OpenAIRE

    Krinker, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Under Space Tower the author understands structures having height from 100 km to the geosynchronous orbit and supported by surface of Earths. The classical Space Elevator is not included in space towers. That has three main identifiers which distingue from Space Tower: Space Elevator has part over Geosynchronous Orbit (GSO) and all installation supported only the centrifugal force of Earth, immobile cable connected to surface of Earth, no pressure on the surface. A lot of new concepts, ideas ...

  15. Optimal Electrostatic Space Tower (Mast, New Space Elevator)

    OpenAIRE

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Author offers and researched the new and revolutionary inflatable electrostatic AB space towers (mast, new space elevator) up to one hundred twenty thousands kilometers (or more) in height. The main innovation is filling the tower by electron gas, which can create pressure up one atmosphere, has negligible small weight and surprising properties. The suggested mast has following advantages in comparison with conventional space elevator: 1. Electrostatic AB tower may be built from Earth surface...

  16. Research of Embedded Tower Crane Monitoring System Based on FCS

    OpenAIRE

    Xijian Zheng; Jinbao Zeng; Hong Zhang; Zhengyi Xie

    2013-01-01

    To compensate for the lack of traditional safety limit device of tower crane, a design scheme of embedded tower crane intelligent monitoring system based on Fieldbus Control System was proposed. By this, online collection and transmission of tower crane real-time conditions were achieved, which could effectively improve the reliability and anti-interference of the system. Embedded development technology was used to build ARM-based master control platform. Embedded Linux cross-compiler envir...

  17. Model Pengukuran Tingkat Keselamatan Kerja Penggunaan Tower Crane

    OpenAIRE

    Kwan, Michelle; Anggrawan, Irvan; Alifen, Ratna Setiawardani

    2014-01-01

    Tower crane sering digunakan sebagai alat pemindah material secara vertical maupun horizontal pada proyek bangunan bertingkat. Kecelakaan kerja tower crane sering terjadi akibat perilaku yang tidak aman (unsafe act) dan kondisi yang tidak aman (unsafe condition) sehingga diperlukan suatu penerapan keselamatan kerja. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk membuat sebuah model pengukuran tingkat keselamatan kerja tower crane dalam bentuk program komputer. Data untuk penelitian ini diperoleh dari pengis...

  18. Technical Evaluation of Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-10-01

    Cooling towers are an integral component of many refrigeration systems, providing comfort or process cooling across a broad range of applications. Cooling towers represent the point in a cooling system where heat is dissipated to the atmosphere through evaporation. Cooling towers are commonly used in industrial applications and in large commercial buildings to release waste heat extracted from a process or building system through evaporation of water.

  19. Vortex-augmented cooling tower-windmill combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Jr., John E.

    1985-01-01

    A cooling tower for cooling large quantities of effluent water from a production facility by utilizing natural wind forces includes the use of a series of helically directed air inlet passages extending outwardly from the base of the tower to introduce air from any direction in a swirling vortical pattern while the force of the draft created in the tower makes it possible to place conventional power generating windmills in the air passages to provide power as a by-product.

  20. Space probe/satellite ejection apparatus for spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyly, H. M.; Miller, C. D.; Cloyd, R. A.; Heller, C. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An ejection apparatus for spinning and propelling objects for ejection from a spacecraft at a desired velocity and rotational speed is discussed. The apparatus includes a launch cradle on which the space object to be ejected rests. The cradle is rotatably supported by a central hub secured to the upper end of the pneumatic cylinder piston shaft. Release mechanisms consisting of a retractable pin and locking lug is utilized to hold the cradle and object to be ejected. The release mechanism has a fixed barrier member which holds the retractable pin in engagement with the locking lug until release by upward movement of the launch cradle beyond the barrier height.

  1. Girassol, Riser Towers for ultra deep water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rougier, Regis

    1999-07-01

    This is a brief presentation of the technical concept developed by ALTO MAR GIRASSOL (AMG) for the Girassol umbilical and flowlines system. In 1998 AMG was awarded a contract by Elf Exploration Angola for the engineering, procurement, construction and installation (EPCI) of the umbilical and flowline system. The technical concept is based around the use of sealine bundles and self-supporting hybrid riser towers which carry the production, water injection, gas injection, gas lift and service lines. The items discussed are: (1) selected field layout, (2) seabed flowlines, hybrid riser system, umbilicals, export lines, installation plan and overall project schedule.

  2. The Architecture Of Towers In Uzbekistan Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaxyayev Abdulla Abdujabbamp1072rovich

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the town planning since the ancient periods emphasizing to the vertical elements had the certain role. Thats why the gates of the city the buildings on the main square were built with high and gigantic form. The zikkurat on the silhouettes of the city and other settlements and other structures like the tower form the balance of the composition. Today in the architecture are given the great importance the creation of vertical compositions for leaving of the biodiversity. The purpose of this article consists of the appearance of the vertical compositions and researching development of laws in the town planning.

  3. GPM GROUND VALIDATION METEOROLOGICAL TOWER ENVIRONMENT CANADA GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Meteorological Tower Environment Canada GCPEx dataset provides temperature, relative humidity, 10 m winds, pressure and solar radiation...

  4. Kirke Hyllinge and Snesere - Romanesque Twin Towers Recently Excavated

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rensbro, Henriette; Vedsø, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    Mirator, 2015. Co-author: Mogens Vedsø. Romanesque twin towers in Danish village churches have long tradition of research. Two recent excavations in Kirke Hyllinge and Snesere have revealed archaeological traces of rectangular towers which in this article are compared to other examples from Denmark....... Kirke Hyllinge church is an outstanding example of twin towers due to the length of the west-section of 16 meters. The only parallel is a planned three-aisled village church in the other end of the country. While for Snesere church the main question is the design of the top section, whether...... it was a twin tower or not....

  5. The bipolar ejection in MWC560

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, O. E.; Tomov, T.; Munari, U.; Brandi, E.; Garcia, L.; Georgiev, L.; Barba, R.

    1998-11-01

    The symbiotic binary MWC560 is a very peculiar system. Consisting of a M giant and a magnetic white dwarf companion, its behaviour resembles only that of CH Cyg. The massive and fast outflows and jets, the rapid variations in brightness with a time scale of the order of twenty minutes, and the alternance between low and high activity phases, are phenomena which only could be caused by the presence of the magnetic white dwarf secondary (Mikolajewski et al. 1997). The spectrum is clearly dominated by narrow emission lines of singly ionized metals and by the Balmer lines, which show variable profiles, consisting of a strong emission component and complex absorption profiles displaying two kinds of components: a broad component with velocities of the order of -300 Km/s, always present, and violet shifted components, with velocities between -300 Km/s and -7000 Km/s, produced by the discrete ejection of material along the line of sight (Tomov et al. 1990, 1992). The radial velocities of the narrow emission lines do not show any change, and so do the velocities of the absorption lines of the M giant, supporting then the idea of face-on location for the orbital plane of the system (Tomov & Kolev 1997). The emission of the Balmer lines could be formed in an accretion disk and/or envelope around the hot companion, and the violet-shifted absorption components would be caused by the bipolar ejection of highly collimated jets by the magnetized white dwarf (Tomov & Kolev 1997). Probable spectral signatures of this bipolar ejection were previously presented (Tomov et al 1997). We are presenting here a clear evidence of the presence of the corresponding red-shifted jets, signatures of which are seen in the behaviour of the red wing of the H alpha emission profiles, mirroring the strongly violet-shifted absorption components when present. We show high resolution H alpha profiles secured between 1993 and 1998 with the Rozhen (Bulgaria) 2-m, the Asiago (Italy) 1.82-m, the San Pedro

  6. The development of a ball vibration absorber for the use on towers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pirner, Miroš; Fischer, Ondřej

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 133 (2000), s. 91-98 ISSN 0304-3622 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GV103/96/K034 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : TV towers * wind-excited vibrations * vibration absorbers * pendulum and ball absorber Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering http://www.iass-structures.org/index.cfm/journal.issue?iID=33

  7. Acoustic emission monitoring of medieval towers considered as sensitive earthquake receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Carpinteri, A.; Lacidogna, G.; Niccolini, G.

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Many ancient masonry towers are present in Italian territory. In some cases these structures are at risk on account of the intensity of the stresses they are subjected to due to the high level of regional seismicity. In order to preserve this inestimable cultural heritage, a sound safety assessment should take into account the evolution of damage phenomena. In this connection, acoustic emission (AE) monitoring can be highly effective. This study concerns the structura...

  8. A long-duration active region: Evolution and quadrature observations of ejective events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremades, H.; Mandrini, C. H.; Fuentes, M. C. López; Merenda, L.; Cabello, I.; López, F. M.; Poisson, M.

    2017-10-01

    Unknown aspects of the initiation, evolution, and associated phenomena of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), together with their capability of perturbing the fragile technological equilibrium on which nowadays society depends, turn them a compelling subject of study. While space weather forecasts are thus far not able to predict when and where in the Sun will the next CME take place, various CME triggering mechanisms have been proposed, without reaching consensus on which is the predominant one. To improve our knowledge in these respects, we investigate a long-duration active region throughout its life, from birth until decay along five solar rotations, in connection with its production of ejective events. We benefit from the wealth of solar remote-sensing data with improved temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution provided by the ground-breaking space missions STEREO, SDO, and SOHO. During the investigated time interval, which covers the months July - November 2010, the STEREO spacecraft were nearly 180 degrees apart, allowing for the uninterrupted tracking of the active region and its ensuing CMEs. The ejective aspect is examined from multi-viewpoint coronagraphic images, while the dynamics of the active region photospheric magnetic field are inspected by means of SDO/HMI data for specific subintervals of interest. The ultimate goal of this work in progress is to identify common patterns in the ejective aspect that can be connected with the active region characteristics.

  9. Modeling observations of solar coronal mass ejections with heliospheric imagers verified with the eliophysics System Observatory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Möstl, C.; Isavnin, A.; Boakes, P. D.; Kilpua, E. K. J.; Davies, J. A.; Harrison, R. A.; Barnes, D.; Krupař, Vratislav; Eastwood, J.; Good, S. W.; Forsyth, R. J.; Bothmer, V.; Reiss, M. A.; Amerstorfer, T.; Winslow, R. M.; Anderson, B.J.; Philpott, L. C.; Rodriguez, L.; Rouillard, A. P.; Gallagher, P.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Zhang, T. L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 7 (2017), s. 955-970 ISSN 1539-4956 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ17-06818Y Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : space weather * coronal mass ejections * STEREO * heliospheric imagers * Heliophysics System Observatory * heliophysics Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017SW001614/full

  10. Prefrontal EEG correlation during Tower of Hanoi and WCST performance: effect of emotional visual stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Díaz, Marina; Hernández-González, Marisela; Guevara, Miguel Angel; Amezcua, Claudia; Ågmo, Anders

    2012-10-01

    Emotional stimuli elicit changes in the electroencephalographic (EEG) activity of several brain structures. Prefrontal cortex is involved in the processing of emotional stimuli and executive functions. The correlation analysis of EEG provides information about the functional coupling between areas. It is reasonable to expect that emotional activation will modify prefrontal coupling during the performance of executive tasks such as Tower of Hanoi or Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). Determine whether the prefrontal EEG correlation during the performance of the Tower of Hanoi and WCST is affected by previous exposure to videos with sexual or aggressive content. Prefrontal EEG coupling was determined by the Pearson correlation. Valence and general arousal were evaluated by the Self-Assessment Manikin Scale and sexual arousal with a Sexual Arousal Scale. Computerized versions of the Towers of Hanoi and WCST provided data on prefrontal executive functions. EEG from the left and right prefrontal zones was recorded during the performance of the Tower of Hanoi and WCST immediately after the subjects were exposed to one of the videos (neutral, aggressive, and erotic). There was no difference between videos in the task performance parameters. Only the erotic video produced an increased prefrontal coupling in the slow bands (delta and theta) during the performance of the Tower of Hanoi, whereas a decreased coupling in the delta, theta, and alpha bands was observed during the WCST. Prefrontal coupling was changed after exposure to the erotic video, and it is likely that enhanced sexual arousal was the main cause of this change. The correlation patterns obtained could be associated with particular cognitive strategies or to functional adaptations while being sexually aroused. The results of this study may contribute to an understanding of the central nervous mechanisms underlying the cognitive effects of sexual arousal. © 2012 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  11. Left ventricular ejection time, not heart rate, is an independent correlate of aortic pulse wave velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Paolo; Palombo, Carlo; Salvi, Giovanni Matteo; Labat, Carlos; Parati, Gianfranco; Benetos, Athanase

    2013-12-01

    Several studies showed a positive association between heart rate and pulse wave velocity, a sensitive marker of arterial stiffness. However, no study involving a large population has specifically addressed the dependence of pulse wave velocity on different components of the cardiac cycle. The aim of this study was to explore in subjects of different age the link between pulse wave velocity with heart period (the reciprocal of heart rate) and the temporal components of the cardiac cycle such as left ventricular ejection time and diastolic time. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was assessed in 3,020 untreated subjects (1,107 men). Heart period, left ventricular ejection time, diastolic time, and early-systolic dP/dt were determined by carotid pulse wave analysis with high-fidelity applanation tonometry. An inverse association was found between pulse wave velocity and left ventricular ejection time at all ages (heart period was also found, with the exception of the youngest subjects (P = 0.20). A significant positive correlation was also found between pulse wave velocity and dP/dt (P heart period no longer became significant. Our data demonstrate that pulse wave velocity is more closely related to left ventricular systolic function than to heart period. This may have methodological and pathophysiological implications.

  12. On Modeling of Ejection Process in a Training Combat Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głowiński, Sebastian; Krzyżyński, Tomasz

    2011-09-01

    The paper deals with modeling and simulation of motion trajectory of an ejection seat in the training-combat aircraft TS-11 "Iskra". The ejection seat and its operation are characterized. Mathematical and computer models are elaborated with the help of MATLAB-Simulink applications. Additionally, simulations are conducted for various velocities of the aircraft.

  13. Fighter Pilot Ejection Study as an Educational Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Garry; Jovanoski, Zlatko

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we apply the well-known equations of projectile motion to the case of a fighter pilot ejecting from an aircraft, the aim being to establish under what conditions there is danger of impact with the rear vertical stabilizer. The drag force on the pilot after ejection is assumed to vary as the velocity squared and the aircraft motion…

  14. Fast ejection chain algorithms for vehicle routing with time windows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sontrop, Herman; Blesa, M.J.; Blum, C.; van der Horn, Pieter; Uetz, Marc Jochen; Roli, A.; Sampels, M.

    This paper introduces a new algorithm, based on the concept of ejection chains, to effectively target vehicle routing problems with time window constraints (VRPTW). Ejection chains create powerful compound moves within Local Search algorithms. Their potential to yield state of the art algorithms has

  15. Tower d’Alun Hoddinott, ou la tentative de créer un opéra populaire Tower by Alun Hoddinott: An Attempt at Creating a Popular Opera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Héberlé

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to deal with Opera Box’s recent attempt at creating a contemporary popular opera. The plot and subject of Tower, Alun Hoddinott’s latest opera, are based on the real sequel of events which led the minors of Tower Colliery to buy out their pit. The project of this opera was launched by Opera Box, a mid-scale touring opera company, whose main purpose is to make opera popular through performances of famous works and workshops. With Tower, they have decided for the first time to stage a new opera whose premiere was on October 23, 1999 at Swansea Grand Theatre. All the ingredients are there to make the opera successful. Although the aim of the enterprise is to create a popular opera, this does not mean that the composer and the librettist have not made a real opera. On the contrary, music is there to serve the drama and the music presents all the qualities one should expect from a contemporary composer whose style is not devoid of references to tonality. Added to this, we should bear in mind that both the efficiency of the libretto and the traditional symbolical use of the singers’ tessituras contribute to make of Tower an opera which respects the main features of the genre. In spite of all its musical and dramatic qualities, there have been few performances of Tower and Opera Box has never succeeded in securing any staging of it in London.

  16. Wind-induced Vibrations in the European Court Towers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jannick B.; Brincker, Rune; Andersen, Ken G.

    2012-01-01

    Issues regarding occupancy comfort in vibration-sensitive structures are the motivation of this study concerning windinduced vibrations in the European Court Towers in Luxembourg. In one of the two identical towers tuned liquid dampers (TLD) have been installed. Recent studies investigate the cha...

  17. The Sun Tower: An Inquiry Tool for a Dynamic Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Dan; Sissom, Betty; Camden, Linda

    2000-01-01

    Explains the use of a Sun Tower in different activities at elementary grade levels while addressing national and state science standards. Shows the movement and motion of the sun in the sky. Introduces an activity that includes the sun tower in which students observe the changes of shadows every half hour. (YDS)

  18. 36 CFR 7.30 - Devils Tower National Monument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Devils Tower National Monument. 7.30 Section 7.30 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.30 Devils Tower National Monument. (a...

  19. Ejection experience in Serbian air force, 1990-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Ejection injuries are the problem for air forces. The present risk for injuries is still too high, approximately 30-50%. This study was an effort to determine factors responsible for and contributing to injuries in the Serbian Air Force (SAF in the last two decades. Methods. All ejection cases in the SAF between 1990 and 2010 were analyzed. The collected data were: aircraft type, ejection seat generation, pilots ´ age and experience, causes of ejection, aeronautical parameters, the condition of aircraft control and types of injuries. For ease of comparison the U.S. Air Force Safety Regulation was used to define of major injuries: hospitalization for 5 days or more, loss of consciousness for over 5 min, bone fracture, joint dislocation, injury to any internal organ, any third-degree burn, or second-degree burn over 5% of the body surface area. Results. There were 52 ejections (51 pilots and 1 mechanic on 44 airplanes. The ejected persons were from 22 to 46 years, average 32 years. Major injuries were present in 25.49% cases. Of all the ejected pilots 9.61% had fractures of thoracic spine, 11.53% fractures of legs, 3.48% fractures of arms. Of all major injuries, fractures of thoracic spine were 38.46%. None of the pilots had experienced ejection previously. Conclusion. Our results suggest to obligatory take preventive measures: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scan must be included in the standard pilot selection procedure and procedure after ejection. Physical conditioning of pilots has to be improved. Training on ejection trainer has to be accomplished, too.

  20. Ejection experience in Serbian Air Force, 1990-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlović, Miroslav; Pejović, Janko; Mladenović, Jovan; Cekanac, Radovan; Jovanović, Dalibor; Karkalić, Radovan; Randjelović, Danijela; Djurdjević, Slavisa

    2014-06-01

    Ejection injuries are the problem for air forces. The present risk for injuries is still too high, approximately 30-50%. The aim of this study was to determine factors responsible for and contributing to injuries in the Serbian Air Force (SAF) in the last two decades. All ejection cases in the SAF between 1990 and 2010 were analyzed. The collected data were: aircraft type, ejection seat generation, pilots" age and experience, causes of ejection, aeronautical parameters, the condition of aircraft control and types of injuries. For ease of comparison the US Air Force Safety Regulations were used to define major injuries: hospitalization for 5 days or more, loss of consciousness for over 5 min, bone fracture, joint dislocation, injury to any internal organ, any third-degree burn, or second-degree burn over 5% of the body surface area. There were 52 ejections (51 pilots and 1 mechanic) on 44 airplanes. The ejected persons were from 22 to 46 years, average 32 years. Major injuries were present in 25.49% cases. Of all the ejected pilots 9.61% had fractures of the thoracic spine, 11.53% fractures of the legs, 3.48% fractures of the arms. Of all major injuries, fractures of the thoracic spine were 38.46%. None of the pilots had experienced ejection previously. Our results suggest that taking preventive measures is obligatory. Namely, magnetic resonance imaging (MRL) scan must be included in the standard pilot selection procedure and procedure after ejection, physical conditioning of pilots has to be improved, training on ejection trainer has to be accomplished, too.

  1. Exploration of fluid dynamic indicators/causative factors in the formation of tower structures in staphylococci bacteria bio-films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Erica; Derek, Moormeier; Bayles, Kenneth; Wei, Timothy

    2015-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteria form biofilms with distinct structures that facilitate their ability to tolerate treatment and to spread within the body. As such, staph infections represent one of the greatest threats to post-surgery patients. It has been found that flow conditions play a significant role in the developmental and dispersal activity of a biofilm. The coupling between the growing biofilm and surrounding flow, however, is not well understood. Indeed, little is know why bacteria form tower structures under certain conditions but not in a predictable way. μ-PTV measurements were made in a microchannel to try to identify fluid dynamic indicators for the formation of towers in biofilm growth. Preliminary experiments indicated changes in the near wall flow up to five hours before a tower formed. The reason for that is the target of this investigation. Staphylococcus aureus bacteria were cultured in the Bioflux Fluxion channel and subjected to a steady shear rate of 0.5 dynes. In addition to μ-PTV measurement, nuclease production and cell number density counts were observed prior to and during tower development. These were compared against measurements made under the same nominal flow conditions where a tower did not form.

  2. Determining the Azimuthal Properties of Coronal Mass Ejections from Multi-Spacecraft Remote-Sensing Observations with STEREO SECCHI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    the Lagrangian L4 and L5 points. Subject headings: scattering — MHD — Sun: corona — Sun: coronal mass ejections (CMEs) 1. introduction With the launch...to improve our understanding of CME physical param- eters . For example, Thernisien et al. (2009) used multi- spacecraft observations to determine the

  3. A study of the Civic Tower in Ravenna as an example of medieval towers' preservation problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Stefania; Maino, Giuseppe; Marrocchino, Elena; Vaccaro, Carmela; Volpe, Lisa

    2013-03-01

    Structuralstabilityis a major item when considering very high masonry buildings made of stones, bricks, etc., that can start sudden structural failures and collapses, often without any obvious signs of warning. A famous example is the collapse of the belfry of the Basilica of San Marco in Venice --the implementation of it began in the ninth century-- which took place in July 1902 a few days after the appearanceof a fissure. This paper discusses the scientific investigation performed on the Torre Civica (Civic Tower) in Ravenna (North-East Italy), in order to characterize its constituent materials, namely bricks and mortar. All this information and relevant data merge in a multimedia database which will help to design appropriate conservation and restoration works, mainly concerning the reconstruction of the apical part of the tower, that was foreshortened ten years ago for safety reasons, starting from the original materials catalogued and preserved up to the present day.

  4. Evaluation of cooling tower environmental effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas, G.W.; Sopocy, D.M.

    1974-11-01

    Cooling towers interact with the environment through the discharge of blowdown to a lake or stream and through the emission of moisture and warmed air to the atmosphere. The environmental effects of these interactions can be evaluated by measuring various physical and chemical properties of the cooling system and of the ambient meteorology and hydrology. Blowdown parameters used in this evaluation are temperature, pH, flow rate, total dissolved solids, biocide, and inhibitor concentrations. In addition to meteorological parameters, the atmospheric parameters which require evaluation include fogging, drift, salt deposition, and moist plume characteristics. The instrumentation needs for monitoring these parameters are discussed with respect to current status. Concepts and instrumentation requiring additional development are also cited. Instrumentation required for the measurement of meteorology, humidity, wind speed and direction, atmospheric temperature and stability, height of the mixed layer, fogging, visibility, and drift are included. Fog dispersal techniques are mentioned. (Air Pollut. Abstr.)

  5. PORFIDO on the NEMO Phase 2 tower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciaffoni, Orlando; Cordelli, Marco; Habel, Roberto; Martini, Agnese; Trasatti, Luciano [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (RM) (Italy)

    2014-11-18

    We have designed and built an underwater measurement system, PORFIDO (Physical Oceanography by RFID Outreach) to gather oceanographic data from the Optical Modules of a neutrino telescope with a minimum of disturbance to the main installation. PORFIDO is composed of a sensor glued to the outside of an Optical Module, in contact with seawater, and of a reader placed inside the sphere, facing the sensor. Data are transmitted to the reader through the glass by RFID and to shore in real time for periods of years. The sensor gathers power from the radio frequency, thus eliminating the need for batteries or connectors through the glass. We have deployed four PORFIDO probes measuring temperatures with the NEMO-KM3Net-Italy Phase 2 tower in april 2013. The four probes are operative and are transmitting temperature data from 3500 m depth.

  6. Analysis of wind-resistant and stability for cable tower in cable-stayed bridge with four towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yangjun; Li, Can

    2017-06-01

    Wind speed time history simulation methods have been introduced first, especially the harmonic synthesis method introduced in detail. Second, taking Chishi bridge for example, choosing the particular sections, and combined with the design wind speed, three-component coefficient simulate analysis between -4°and 4°has been carry out with the Fluent software. The results show that drag coefficient reaches maximum when the attack Angle is 1°. According to measured wind speed samples,time history curves of wind speed at bridge deck and tower roof have been obtained,and wind-resistant time history analysis for No.5 tower has been carry out. Their results show that the dynamic coefficients are different with different calculation standard, especially transverse bending moment, pulsating crosswind load does not show a dynamic amplification effect.Under pulsating wind loads at bridge deck or tower roof, the maximum displacement at the top of the tower and the maximum stress at the bottom of the tower are within the allowable range. The transverse stiffness of tower is greater than that of the longitudinal stiffness, therefore wind-resistant analysis should give priority to the longitudinal direction. Dynamic coefficients are different with different standard, the maximum dynamic coefficient should be used for the pseudo-static analysis.Finally, the static stability of tower is analyzed with different load combinations, and the galloping stabilities of cable tower is proved.

  7. Ecological study on residences in the vicinity of AM radio broadcasting towers and cancer death: preliminary observations in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sue Kyung; Ha, Mina; Im, Hyung-Jun

    2004-08-01

    Public health concern about the health effects of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) has increased with the increase in public exposure. This study was to evaluate some health effect of RF exposure by the AM radio broadcasting towers in Korea. We calculated cancer mortality rates using Korean death certificates over the period of 1994-1995 and population census data in ten RF-exposed areas, defined as regions that included AM radio broadcasting towers of over 100 kW, and in control areas, defined as regions without a radio broadcasting tower inside and at least 2 km away from the towers. All cancers-mortality was significantly higher in the exposed areas [direct standardized mortality rate ratio (MRR) = 1.29, 95%CI = 1.12-1.49]. When grouped by each exposed area and by electrical power, MRRs for two sites of 100 kW, one site of 250 kW and one site of 500 kW, for all subjects, and for one site of 100 kW and two sites of 250 kW, for male subjects, showed statistically significant increases without increasing trends according to the groups of electric power. Leukemia mortality was higher in exposed areas (MRR = 1.70, 95% CI = 0.84-3.45), especially among young adults aged under 30 years (0-14 years age group, MRR = 2.29, 95% CI = 1.05-5.98; 15-29 age group, MRR = 2.44, 95% CI = 1.07-5.24). We observed higher mortality rates for all cancers and leukemia in some age groups in the area near the AM radio broadcasting towers. Although these findings do not prove a causal link between cancer and RF exposure from AM radio broadcasting towers, it does suggest that further analytical studies on this topic are needed in Korea.

  8. Hunting for Stellar Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Heidi; Vida, Krisztián; Leitzinger, Martin; Odert, Petra; Kovács, Orsolya Eszter

    2017-10-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are explosive events that occur basically daily on the Sun. It is thought that these events play a crucial role in the angular momentum and mass loss of late-type stars, and also shape the environment in which planets form and live. Stellar CMEs can be detected in optical spectra in the Balmer lines, especially in Hα, as blue-shifted extra emission/absorption. To increase the detection probability one can monitor young open clusters, in which the stars are due to their youth still rapid rotators, and thus magnetically active and likely to exhibit a large number of CMEs. Using ESO facilities and the Nordic Optical Telescope we have obtained time series of multi-object spectroscopic observations of late-type stars in six open clusters with ages ranging from 15 Myrs to 300 Myrs. Additionally, we have studied archival data of numerous active stars. These observations will allow us to obtain information on the occurrence rate of CMEs in late-type stars with different ages and spectral types. Here we report on the preliminary outcome of our studies.

  9. Heart failure with reduced ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Michelle W; Greenberg, Barry; Jaarsma, Tiny; Januzzi, James L; Lam, Carolyn S P; Maggioni, Aldo P; Trochu, Jean-Noël; Butler, Javed

    2017-08-24

    Heart failure is a global public health problem that affects more than 26 million people worldwide. The global burden of heart failure is growing and is expected to increase substantially with the ageing of the population. Heart failure with reduced ejection fraction accounts for approximately 50% of all cases of heart failure in the United States and is associated with substantial morbidity and reduced quality of life. Several diseases, such as myocardial infarction, certain infectious diseases and endocrine disorders, can initiate a primary pathophysiological process that can lead to reduced ventricular function and to heart failure. Initially, ventricular impairment is compensated for by the activation of the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, but chronic activation of these pathways leads to worsening cardiac function. The symptoms of heart failure can be associated with other conditions and include dyspnoea, fatigue, limitations in exercise tolerance and fluid accumulation, which can make diagnosis difficult. Management strategies include the use of pharmacological therapies and implantable devices to regulate cardiac function. Despite these available treatments, heart failure remains incurable, and patients have a poor prognosis and high mortality rate. Consequently, the development of new therapies is imperative and requires further research.

  10. Do slow shocks precede some coronal mass ejections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hundhausen, A.J.; Holzer, T.E.; Low, B.C.

    1987-10-01

    The observed speeds of coronal mass ejections are often below the estimated Alfven speed but above the sound speed for the background solar corona. This suggets that slow magnetohydrodynamic shocks may form as mass ejections sweep through the corona. We argue on the basis of the Rankine-Hugoniot relations and the propagation of small-amplitude slow mode waves that the shape of a slow shock front would be flattened (with respect to a sun-centered sphere) or perhaps even concave outward (from the sun) and thus present a very different appearance from the fast coronal shock waves that have been commonly modeled as wrapping around a mass ejection. The region behind a slow shock front standing just off the top of a coronal mass ejection would extend well out beyond the visible flanks of the ejection. The deflections of coronal structures that are commonly observed well outside of these flanks (and which are inconsistent with a fast shock wrapped around the mass ejection) are consistent with the presence of the slow shock, whether they lie in the enlarged postshock region or in a region still further beyond. Although the flattering of the tops of some mass ejections suggests our proposed slow shock configuration, a true test of its existence awaits formulation of quantitative models and detailed comparison with observations. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  11. Rigidity-induced scale invariance in polymer ejection from capsid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linna, R. P.; Suhonen, P. M.; Piili, J.

    2017-11-01

    While the dynamics of a fully flexible polymer ejecting a capsid through a nanopore has been extensively studied, the ejection dynamics of semiflexible polymers has not been properly characterized. Here we report results from simulations of ejection dynamics of semiflexible polymers ejecting from spherical capsids. Ejections start from strongly confined polymer conformations of constant initial monomer density. We find that, unlike for fully flexible polymers, for semiflexible polymers the force measured at the pore does not show a direct relation to the instantaneous ejection velocity. The cumulative waiting time t (s ) , that is, the time at which a monomer s exits the capsid the last time, shows a clear change when increasing the polymer rigidity κ . The major part of an ejecting polymer is driven out of the capsid by internal pressure. At the final stage the polymer escapes the capsid by diffusion. For the driven part there is a crossover from essentially exponential growth of t with s of the fully flexible polymers to a scale-invariant form. In addition, a clear dependence of t on polymer length N0 was found. These findings combined give the dependence t (s ) ∝N00.55s1.33 for the strongly rigid polymers. This crossover in dynamics where κ acts as a control parameter is reminiscent of a phase transition. This analogy is further enhanced by our finding a perfect data collapse of t for polymers of different N0 and any constant κ .

  12. Ejection of small droplet from microplate using focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroki; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2017-08-01

    We discussed an ultrasonic system for single-droplet ejection from a microplate, which is one of the basic and important procedures in the noncontact handling of droplets in air. In this system, a 1.5 MHz concave transducer located below the microplate is used for chasing the liquid surface through a pulse echo method, and also for the ejection of a 1 µL single droplet by the burst of focused ultrasound. We investigated the relationship between the droplet ejection characteristics, the distance from the transducer to the surface of liquid, the material property, and the excitation condition of the focused ultrasonic transducer. It was verified that the optimal position of the transducer was off the focal point of sound pressure by ±1 mm, because the sound intensity had to be controlled to eject a single droplet. Subsequently, we confirmed experimentally that the ejected droplet volume linearly depended on the surface tension of the liquid, and that the droplet volume and ejection velocity were determined by the Webber number, Reynolds number, and Ohnesolge number. In addition, by optimizing the duration of the burst ultrasound, the droplet volume and ejection velocity were controlled.

  13. Magazine Influence on Cartridge Case Ejection Patterns with Glock Pistols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkhoff, Wim; Alberink, Ivo; Mattijssen, Erwin J A T

    2018-01-01

    In this study, the cartridge case ejection patterns of six different Glock model pistols (one specimen per model) were compared under three conditions: firing with a loaded magazine, an empty magazine, and without magazine. The distances, covered by the ejected cartridge cases given these three conditions, were compared for each of the six models. A significant difference was found between the groups of data for each of the tested specimens. This indicates that it is important that, to reconstruct a shooting scene incident based on the ejection patterns of a pistol, test shots are fired with the same pistol type and under the correct magazine condition. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  14. Improved Measurement of Ejection Velocities From Craters Formed in Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintala, Mark J.; Byers, Terry; Cardenas, Francisco; Montes, Roland; Potter, Elliot E.

    2014-01-01

    A typical impact crater is formed by two major processes: compression of the target (essentially equivalent to a footprint in soil) and ejection of material. The Ejection-Velocity Measurement System (EVMS) in the Experimental Impact Laboratory has been used to study ejection velocities from impact craters formed in sand since the late 1990s. The original system used an early-generation Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera; custom-written software; and a complex, multicomponent optical system to direct laser light for illumination. Unfortunately, the electronic equipment was overtaken by age, and the software became obsolete in light of improved computer hardware.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Tower Rotor Interaction for Downwind Wind Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isam Janajreh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Downwind wind turbines have lower upwind rotor misalignment, and thus lower turning moment and self-steered advantage over the upwind configuration. In this paper, numerical simulation to the downwind turbine is conducted to investigate the interaction between the tower and the blade during the intrinsic passage of the rotor in the wake of the tower. The moving rotor has been accounted for via ALE formulation of the incompressible, unsteady, turbulent Navier-Stokes equations. The localized CP, CL, and CD are computed and compared to undisturbed flow evaluated by Panel method. The time history of the CP, aerodynamic forces (CL and CD, as well as moments were evaluated for three cross-sectional tower; asymmetrical airfoil (NACA0012 having four times the rotor's chord length, and two circular cross-sections having four and two chords lengths of the rotor's chord. 5%, 17%, and 57% reductions of the aerodynamic lift forces during the blade passage in the wake of the symmetrical airfoil tower, small circular cross-section tower and large circular cross-section tower were observed, respectively. The pronounced reduction, however, is confined to a short time/distance of three rotor chords. A net forward impulsive force is also observed on the tower due to the high speed rotor motion.

  16. Power Tower Technology Roadmap and cost reduction plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Thomas R.; Gary, Jesse A. (U.S. Department of Energy); Kolb, Gregory J.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2011-04-01

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies continue to mature and are being deployed worldwide. Power towers will likely play an essential role in the future development of CSP due to their potential to provide dispatchable solar electricity at a low cost. This Power Tower Technology Roadmap has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to describe the current technology, the improvement opportunities that exist for the technology, and the specific activities needed to reach the DOE programmatic target of providing competitively-priced electricity in the intermediate and baseload power markets by 2020. As a first step in developing this roadmap, a Power Tower Roadmap Workshop that included the tower industry, national laboratories, and DOE was held in March 2010. A number of technology improvement opportunities (TIOs) were identified at this workshop and separated into four categories associated with power tower subsystems: solar collector field, solar receiver, thermal energy storage, and power block/balance of plant. In this roadmap, the TIOs associated with power tower technologies are identified along with their respective impacts on the cost of delivered electricity. In addition, development timelines and estimated budgets to achieve cost reduction goals are presented. The roadmap does not present a single path for achieving these goals, but rather provides a process for evaluating a set of options from which DOE and industry can select to accelerate power tower R&D, cost reductions, and commercial deployment.

  17. Ejection injury to the spine in small aviators: sled tests of manikins vs. post mortem specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzar, Robert S; Bolton, James R; Crandall, Jeff R; Paskoff, Glenn R; Shender, Barry S

    2009-07-01

    This study presents the results of seven aerospace manikin and three post mortem human surrogate (PMHS) horizontal deceleration sled tests. The objective of this study was to establish a body of baseline data that examines the ability of small (fifth percentile) manikins to predict whole-body kinematics associated with aircraft ejection, and whether currently available head and neck injury criteria are applicable in these situations. Subjects were exposed to a short-duration local z-axis sled pulse while horizontally seated and restrained in an ejection seat. Test subjects included instrumented fifth percentile female and male manikins, and two small (163.8 cm, 48.3 kg; 143.5 cm, 48.6 kg) female and one small (166.2 cm, 54.3 kg) male PMHS. The anterior (local x-axis) translations of the PMHS heads were less than those observed in the manikin tests, but the local z-axis translations of the PMHS heads were greater than those of the manikins. Z-axis translations of the manikins' T1 were generally similar to those of the PMHS T1, but the anterior x-axis translations of T1 were greater in the PMHS. The neck injury criterion (Nij) tended to under-predict observed injury (primarily ruptures of the posterior ligaments at C4-5, T2-3), and the Beam Criterion (BC) tended to over-predict observed injury for small occupants. The USN/USAF neck injury criteria (NIC) performed best in predicting the observed injuries. Present manikin designs do not predict the kinematics of PMHS in ejection tests. Further refinement of existing injury criteria is required to accurately predict location and severity of ejection-induced injuries.

  18. Experimental Ejection Forces of Thermoplastic Parts From Rapid Tooled Injection Mold Inserts (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kinsella, Mary E; Lilly, Blaine

    2007-01-01

    .... Ejection forces for cylindrical parts molded with high density polyethylene and high impact polystyrene were measured directly and compared with values calculated from an ejection force differently...

  19. Nanodust dynamics during a coronal mass ejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Czechowski

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of nanometer-sized grains (nanodust is strongly affected by electromagnetic forces. High-velocity nanodust was proposed as an explanation for the voltage bursts observed by STEREO. A study of nanodust dynamics based on a simple time-stationary model has shown that in the vicinity of the Sun the nanodust is trapped or, outside the trapped region, accelerated to high velocities. We investigate the nanodust dynamics for a time-dependent solar wind and magnetic field configuration in order to find out what happens to nanodust during a coronal mass ejection (CME. The plasma flow and the magnetic field during a CME are obtained by numerical simulations using a 3-D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD code. The equations of motion for the nanodust particles are solved numerically, assuming that the particles are produced from larger bodies moving in near-circular Keplerian orbits within the circumsolar dust cloud. The charge-to-mass ratios for the nanodust particles are taken to be constant in time. The simulation is restricted to the region within 0.14 AU from the Sun. We find that about 35 % of nanodust particles escape from the computational domain during the CME, reaching very high speeds (up to 1000 km s−1. After the end of the CME the escape continues, but the particle velocities do not exceed 300 km s−1. About 30 % of all particles are trapped in bound non-Keplerian orbits with time-dependent perihelium and aphelium distances. Trapped particles are affected by plasma ion drag, which causes contraction of their orbits.

  20. Nanodust dynamics during a coronal mass ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czechowski, Andrzej; Kleimann, Jens

    2017-09-01

    The dynamics of nanometer-sized grains (nanodust) is strongly affected by electromagnetic forces. High-velocity nanodust was proposed as an explanation for the voltage bursts observed by STEREO. A study of nanodust dynamics based on a simple time-stationary model has shown that in the vicinity of the Sun the nanodust is trapped or, outside the trapped region, accelerated to high velocities. We investigate the nanodust dynamics for a time-dependent solar wind and magnetic field configuration in order to find out what happens to nanodust during a coronal mass ejection (CME). The plasma flow and the magnetic field during a CME are obtained by numerical simulations using a 3-D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code. The equations of motion for the nanodust particles are solved numerically, assuming that the particles are produced from larger bodies moving in near-circular Keplerian orbits within the circumsolar dust cloud. The charge-to-mass ratios for the nanodust particles are taken to be constant in time. The simulation is restricted to the region within 0.14 AU from the Sun. We find that about 35 % of nanodust particles escape from the computational domain during the CME, reaching very high speeds (up to 1000 km s-1). After the end of the CME the escape continues, but the particle velocities do not exceed 300 km s-1. About 30 % of all particles are trapped in bound non-Keplerian orbits with time-dependent perihelium and aphelium distances. Trapped particles are affected by plasma ion drag, which causes contraction of their orbits.

  1. Forecasting Coronal Mass Ejections from Vector Magnetograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Gary, G. A.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In a 17 vector magnetogram study of 12 bipolar active regions (Falconer, Moore, & Gary, 2002, ApJ in press), we correlated four quantitative global magnetic measures with the Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) productivity of the active region. The global measures included a measure of active region size, the total magnetic flux phi and three measures of an active region global nonpotentiality 1) the net current (I (sub N)), 2) the length of the strong-shear, strong-field main neutral line (L(sub SS)) and 3) and the normalized twist (alpha = muIN/PHI). The CME productivity was determined from YOHKOH/SXT observations, Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), and when possible Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment (SOHO/LASCO) observations within 12 days of the day of the magnetogram. We found that the three measures of global nonpotentiality (I(sub N), L(sub SS), alpha) were all well correlated (greater than 99% confidence level) with an active region's CME productivity. The sample size was to small to confirm if there was a statistical significant correlation of the globally nonscientist measures with future CME activity (i.e. from the date of the magnetogram forward). We are doubling our sample, and will report on the statistical significance of global nonpotentiality as a predictor of future CME productivity. The new active regions are all from the first year of the upgraded MSFC vector magnetograms. This work, is funded by NSF through the Space Weather Program, by NASA through the Living with the Star, Targeted Research and Technology, and by NASA Solar Physics Supporting Research and Technology Program. The upgrade to the MSFC vector magnetograph was supported by the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) mission.

  2. Analysis of tower locations for the secure border initiative network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendley, Keith W.

    2008-04-01

    The Secure Border Initiative Network (SBInet) is a series of sensor platforms along the U.S. border areas for the purpose of better monitoring cross-border excursions. From a technical standpoint, the challenge of SBInet is to provide the necessary area coverage needed while controlling costs. This paper presents one set of methods for analyzing different tower locations and technologies. Since the purpose of the paper is to consider analytical techniques, the terrain and tower locations used do not relate to the P28 area nor any other specific approaches or tower locations currently being studied for the SBInet program.

  3. Virtual and remote control tower research, design, development and validation

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The interdisciplinary research and development work carried out in the last ten years which is presented in this book aimed at replacing the conventional airport control tower by a new “remote tower operation” work environment (RTO) which should enhance work efficiency and safety and reduce costs. This revolutionary human–system interface allows for remote aerodrome traffic control without a physical tower building and enables the establishment of remote airport traffic control centers (RTC) of which each may serve several airports from a central location.

  4. Videodensitometric ejection fraction from intravenous digital subtraction right ventriculograms: correlation with first pass radionuclide ejection fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Detrano, R.; MacIntyre, W.; Salcedo, E.E.; O' Donnell, J.; Underwood, D.A.; Simpfendorfer, C.; Go, R.T.; Butters, K.; Withrow, S.

    1985-06-01

    Thirty-one consecutive patients undergoing intravenous blurred mask digital subtraction right ventriculography were submitted to first pass radionuclide angiography. Second order mask resubtraction of end-diastolic and end-systolic right ventricular digital image frames was executed using preinjection end-diastolic and end-systolic frames to rid the digital subtraction images of mis-registration artifact. End-diastolic and end-systolic perimeters were drawn manually by two independent observers with a light pen. Ejection fractions calculated from the integrated videodensitometric counts within these perimeters correlated well with those derived from the first pass radionuclide right ventriculogram (r = 0.84) and the interobserver correlation was acceptable (r = 0.91). Interobserver differences occurred more frequently in patients with atrial fibrillation and in those whose tricuspid valve planes were difficult to discern on the digital subtraction right ventriculograms. These results suggest that videodensitometric analysis of digital subtraction right ventriculograms is an accurate method of determining right ventricular ejection fraction and may find wide clinical applicability.

  5. Reproducibility of gallbladder ejection fraction measured by fatty meal cholescintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Muqbel, Kusai M.; Hani, M. N. Hani; Elheis, M. A.; Al-Omari, M. H. [School of Medicine, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid (Jordan)

    2010-12-15

    There are conflicting data in the literature regarding the reproducibility of the gallbladder ejection fraction (GBEF) measured by fatty meal cholescintigraphy (CS). We aimed to test the reproducibility of GBEF measured by fatty meal CS. Thirty-five subjects (25 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with chronic abdominal pain) underwent fatty meal CS twice in order to measure GBEF1 and GBEF2. The healthy volunteers underwent a repeat scan within 1-13 months from the first scan. The patients underwent a repeat scan within 1-4 years from the first scan and were not found to have chronic acalculous cholecystitis (CAC). Our standard fatty meal was composed of a 60-g Snickers chocolate bar and 200 ml full-fat yogurt. The mean {+-} SD values for GBEF1 and GBEF2 were 52{+-}17% and 52{+-}16%, respectively. There was a direct linear correlation between the values of GBEF1 and GBEF2 for the subjects, with a correlation coefficient of 0.509 (p=0.002). Subgroup data analysis of the volunteer group showed that there was significant linear correlation between volunteer values of GBEF1 and GBEF2, with a correlation coefficient of 0.473 (p=0.017). Subgroup data analysis of the non-CAC patient group showed no significant correlation between patient values of GBEF1 and GBEF2, likely due to limited sample size. This study showed that fatty meal CS is a reliable test in gallbladder motility evaluation and that GBEF measured by fatty meal CS is reproducible

  6. Pilot Fullerton dons ejection escape suit (EES) on middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Pilot Fullerton dons ejection escape suit (EES) (high altitude pressure garment) life preserver unit (LPU) on forward port side of middeck above potable water tank. Fullerton also adjusts lapbelt fitting and helmet holddown strap.

  7. Particle ejection during mergers of dark matter halos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carucci, Isabella P.; Sparre, Martin; Hansen, Steen H. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, Copenhagen, 2100 Denmark (Denmark); Joyce, Michael, E-mail: carucci@dark-cosmology.dk, E-mail: sparre@dark-cosmology.dk, E-mail: hansen@dark-cosmology.dk, E-mail: joyce@lpnhe.in2p3.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Nucléaire et Hautes Énergies, Université Pierre et Marie Curie - Paris 6, CNRS IN2P3 UMR 7585, 4 Place Jussieu, Paris Cedex 05, 75752 France (France)

    2014-06-01

    Dark matter halos are built from accretion and merging. During merging some of the dark matter particles may be ejected with velocities higher than the escape velocity. We use both N-body simulations and single-particle smooth-field simulations to demonstrate that rapid changes to the mean field potential are responsible for such ejection, and in particular that dynamical friction plays no significant role in it. Studying a range of minor mergers, we find that typically between 5–15% of the particles from the smaller of the two merging structures are ejected. We also find that the ejected particles originate essentially from the small halo, and more specifically are particles in the small halo which pass later through the region in which the merging occurs.

  8. Experimental system of ejected electron spectroscopy with ECR ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitazawa, Sin-iti [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1995-09-01

    The experiment of analyzing energy spectrum of electrons ejected from multiple electron capture process on ion-atom collision is carried out using ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion source. An old collision system using gas atoms as target and a new system using vapour atoms are developed. In this report, the developments and exploitations of the experimental systems for the ejected electron spectroscopy with ECR Ion source are presented. (author).

  9. Jet behaviors and ejection mode recognition of electrohydrodynamic direct-write

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyi Zheng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available By introducing image recognition and micro-current testing, jet behavior research was conducted, in which the real-time recognition of ejection mode was realized. To study the factors influencing ejection modes and the current variation trends under different modes, an Electrohydrodynamic Direct-Write (EDW system with functions of current detection and ejection mode recognition was firstly built. Then a program was developed to recognize the jet modes. As the voltage applied to the metal tip increased, four jet ejection modes in EDW occurred: droplet ejection mode, Taylor cone ejection mode, retractive ejection mode and forked ejection mode. In this work, the corresponding relationship between the ejection modes and the effect on fiber deposition as well as current was studied. The real-time identification of ejection mode and detection of electrospinning current was realized. The results in this paper are contributed to enhancing the ejection stability, providing a good technical basis to produce continuous uniform nanofibers controllably.

  10. The Tower Shielding Facility: Its glorious past

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1997-05-07

    The Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) is the only reactor facility in the US that was designed and built for radiation-shielding studies in which both the reactor source and shield samples could be raised into the air to allow measurements to be made without interference from ground scattering or other spurious effects. The TSF proved its usefulness as many different programs were successfully completed. It became active in work for the Defense Atomic Support Agency (DASA) Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power, Defense Nuclear Agency, Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, the Gas-Cooled and High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor programs, and the Japanese-American Shielding Program of Experimental Research, just to mention a few of the more extensive ones. The history of the TSF as presented in this report describes the various experiments that were performed using the different reactors. The experiments are categorized as to the programs which they supported and placed in corresponding chapters. The experiments are described in modest detail, along with their purpose when appropriate. Discussion of the results is minimal, but references are given to more extensive topical reports.

  11. Assessment of requirements for dry towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, D E; Sonnichsen, J C

    1976-09-01

    The regional limitations of surface water supplies in the U.S. were assessed with respect to the consumptive use requirements of wet cooling towers. The study simulated unit consumptive use factors by region, assessed regional water supplies, and examined electric load projections through 2000 A.D. to ascertain where and when water limitations may occur and, therefore, where dry cooling may be required. It was concluded that the cooling water supply situation in the United States through the year 2000 is adequate in most areas, but is uncertain over much of the Southwest. The uncertainty is related to increasing competition for the available supplies and to potential Federal and/or State policy decisions that may have a significant effect on power plant cooling. Limitations on coastal siting, seismic zone constraints, and state constraints on the purchase and transfer of water rights from other uses to cooling supply have the potential of bringing wet/dry or dry cooling into relatively common use in the 1990's. (LCL)

  12. Counter-Flow Cooling Tower Test Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvořák, Lukáš; Nožička, Jiří

    2014-03-01

    The article contains a design of a functional experimental model of a cross-flow mechanical draft cooling tower and the results and outcomes of measurements. This device is primarily used for measuring performance characteristics of cooling fills, but with a simple rebuild, it can be used for measuring other thermodynamic processes that take part in so-called wet cooling. The main advantages of the particular test cell lie in the accuracy, size, and the possibility of changing the water distribution level. This feature is very useful for measurements of fills of different heights without the influence of the spray and rain zone. The functionality of this test cell has been verified experimentally during assembly, and data from the measurement of common film cooling fills have been compared against the results taken from another experimental line. For the purpose of evaluating the data gathered, computational scripts were created in the MATLAB numerical computing environment. The first script is for exact calculation of the thermal balance of the model, and the second is for determining Merkel's number via Chebyshev's method.

  13. NAMMA SENEGAL RADIOSONDE AND TOWER FLUX DATA V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NAMMA Senegal Radiosonde and Tower Flux data includes measurements of humidity, wind speed/direction and velocity. Additionally the Flux data includes...

  14. Newton slopes for Artin-Schreier-Witt towers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Christopher; Wan, Daqing; Xiao, Liang

    2016-01-01

    We fix a monic polynomial f(x)∈Fq[x] over a finite field and consider the Artin-Schreier-Witt tower defined by f(x); this is a tower of curves ⋯→Cm→Cm−1→⋯→C0=A1, with total Galois group Zp. We study the Newton slopes of zeta functions of this tower of curves. This reduces to the study of the Newton...... slopes of L-functions associated to characters of the Galois group of this tower. We prove that, when the conductor of the character is large enough, the Newton slopes of the L-function form arithmetic progressions which are independent of the conductor of the character. As a corollary, we obtain...

  15. Concept for the layout against buckling of cooling tower shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mungan, I.

    1981-10-01

    Hypotheses and considerations governing the buckling design of cooling tower shells are presented. The theoretical and experimental investigations themselves have already been published in various research reports. A list of publications is presented.

  16. Parametric study of closed wet cooling tower thermal performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qasim, S. M.; Hayder, M. J.

    2017-08-01

    The present study involves experimental and theoretical analysis to evaluate the thermal performance of modified Closed Wet Cooling Tower (CWCT). The experimental study includes: design, manufacture and testing prototype of a modified counter flow forced draft CWCT. The modification based on addition packing to the conventional CWCT. A series of experiments was carried out at different operational parameters. In view of energy analysis, the thermal performance parameters of the tower are: cooling range, tower approach, cooling capacity, thermal efficiency, heat and mass transfer coefficients. The theoretical study included develops Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models to predicting various thermal performance parameters of the tower. Utilizing experimental data for training and testing, the models simulated by multi-layer back propagation algorithm for varying all operational parameters stated in experimental test.

  17. Transient Simulation of Wind Turbine Towers under Lightning Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A simulation algorithm is proposed in this paper for lightning transient analysis of the wind turbine (WT towers. In the proposed algorithm, the tower body is first subdivided into a discrete multiconductor system. A set of formulas are given to calculate the electrical parameters of the branches in the multiconductor system. By means of the electrical parameters, each branch unit in the multiconductor system is replaced as a coupled π-type circuit and the multiconductor system is converted into a circuit model. Then, the lightning transient responses can be obtained in different parts on the tower body by solving the circuit equations of the equivalent discretization network. The laboratory measurement is also made by a reduced-scale tower for checking the validity of the proposed algorithm.

  18. NAMMA SENEGAL RADIOSONDE AND TOWER FLUX DATA V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NAMMA Senegal Radiosonde and Tower Flux data includes measurements of humidity, wind speed/direction and velocity. Additionally, the flux data includes...

  19. Evaluation of Tower Shadowing on Anemometer Measurements at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruggeman, David Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-14

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of tower shadowing from the meteorology towers at LANL during 2014. This study is in response to the Department of Energy Meteorological Coordinating Council visit in 2015 that recommended an evaluation of any biases in the wind data introduced by the tower and boom alignment at all meteorology towers.

  20. The Search for Stellar Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villadsen, Jacqueline Rose

    2017-05-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) may dramatically impact habitability and atmospheric composition of planets around magnetically active stars, including young solar analogs and many M dwarfs. Theoretical predictions of such effects are limited by the lack of observations of stellar CMEs. This thesis addresses this gap through a search for the spectral and spatial radio signatures of CMEs on active M dwarfs. Solar CMEs produce radio bursts with a distinctive spectral signature, narrow-band plasma emission that drifts to lower frequency as a CME expands outward. To search for analogous events on nearby stars, I worked on system design, software, and commissioning for the Starburst project, a wideband single-baseline radio interferometry backend dedicated to stellar observations. In addition, I led a survey of nearby active M dwarfs with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), detecting coherent radio bursts in 13 out of 23 epochs, over a total of 58 hours. This survey's ultra-wide bandwidth (0.23-6.0 GHz) dynamic spectroscopy, unprecedented for stellar observations, revealed diverse behavior in the time-frequency plane. Flare star UV Ceti produced complex, luminous events reminiscent of brown dwarf aurorae; AD Leo sustained long-duration, intense, narrow-band "storms"; and YZ CMi emitted a burst with substructure with rapid frequency drift, resembling solar Type III bursts, which are attributed to electrons moving at speeds of order 10% of the speed of light. To search for the spatial signature of CMEs, I led 8.5-GHz observations with the Very Long Baseline Array simultaneous to 24 hours of the VLA survey. This program detected non-thermal continuum emission from the stars in all epochs, as well as continuum flares on AD Leo and coherent bursts on UV Ceti, enabling measurement of the spatial offset between flaring and quiescent emission. These observations demonstrate the diversity of stellar transients that can be expected in time-domain radio surveys, especially

  1. Mathematics learning opportunities when playing a Tower Defense Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aura Hernàndez-Sabaté

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A qualitative research study is presented herein with the purpose of identifying mathematics learning opportunities in a commercial version of a Tower Defense game. These learning opportunities are understood as mathematicisable moments of the game and involve the establishment of relationships between the game and mathematical problem solving. Based on the analysis of the nature of these mathematicisable moments, we present several design options that are being implemented in a didactic version of a Tower Defense game.

  2. Improved heliostat field design for solar tower plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Francisco J.; Guallar, Jesús

    2017-06-01

    In solar power tower (SPT) systems, selecting the optimum location of thousands of heliostats and the most profitable tower height and receiver size remains a challenge. Campo code is prepared for the detailed design of such plants in particular, the optimum layout, provided that the plant size is known. Therefore, less exhaustive codes, as DELSOL3, are also needed to perform preliminary parametric analysis that narrows the most economic size of the plant.

  3. A new topology of tensegrity towers with uniform force distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Mauricio C.; Skelton, Robert E.

    2005-05-01

    This work investigates the design of a new class of three dimensional tensegrity tower structures with nodes lying on a cylinder. The novel aspect of the proposed topology is the fact that all bars in all stages are oriented in the same way, clockwise or counterclockwise. We investigate the existence of conditions for static equilibrium of such towers with an arbitrary number of stages and uniform force distribution.

  4. Evaluation of dynamic response for monopole and hybrid wind mill tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Hemal J.; Desai, Atul K.

    2017-07-01

    The wind mill towers are constructed using monopoles or lattice type tower. As the height of tower increases it gives more power but it becomes uneconomical, so in the present research work innovative wind mill tower such as combination of monopole and lattice tower is analyzed using FEM software. When the tall structures are constructed on soft soil it becomes dynamically sensitive so 3 types of soil such as hard, medium and soft soil is also modeled and the innovative tower is studied for different operating frequencies of wind turbine. From study it is concluded that the innovative tower will reduce resonance condition considering soil structure interaction.

  5. Short Duration Reduced Gravity Drop Tower Design and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, B.; Welch, C.

    The industrial and commercial development of space-related activities is intimately linked to the ability to conduct reduced gravity research. Reduced gravity experimentation is important to many diverse fields of research in the understanding of fundamental and applied aspects of physical phenomena. Both terrestrial and extra-terrestrial experimental facilities are currently available to allow researchers access to reduced gravity environments. This paper discusses two drop tower designs, a 2.0 second facility built in Australia and a proposed 2.2 second facility in the United Kingdom. Both drop towers utilise a drag shield for isolating the falling experiment from the drag forces of the air during the test. The design and development of The University of Queensland's (Australia) 2.0 second drop tower, including its specifications and operational procedures is discussed first. Sensitive aspects of the design process are examined. Future plans are then presented for a new short duration (2.2 sec) ground-based reduced gravity drop tower. The new drop tower has been designed for Kingston University (United Kingdom) to support teaching and research in the field of reduced gravity physics. The design has been informed by the previous UQ drop tower design process and utilises a catapult mechanism to increase test time and also incorporates features to allow participants for a variety of backgrounds (from high school students through to university researchers) to learn and experiment in reduced gravity. Operational performance expectations for this new facility are also discussed.

  6. Establishment of the model of motorcyclist ejection injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hai-bin; Hang, Jian-jin; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Da-wei; Yang, Guang-yu; Wang, Zheng-guo

    2010-04-01

    To establish the device and model of motorcyclist ejection injury. Based on our laboratory devices, a motorcyclist ejection injury simulation system was developed. A total of 18 pigs were approved by the local animal experimentation and ethics committee to serve as the motorcyclist substitutes. In this ejection motion, the animal rode freely at the motor driver seat and was straightly accelerated by means of our custom motorcyclist ejection injury simulation system. When it was speeded up to the preset velocity (v equal to 30, 40 or 50 km/h) at the preset position, the animal was ejected forward. Pathological and dynamic analyses were conducted, accompanied with the high-speed photograph, acceleration/velocity signal test, gross observation and light microscope examination as well as the abbreviated injury score-injury severity score (AIS-ISS) scale. The high-speed photograph indicated that during the ejection procedure the motorcycle was first arrested and decelerated suddenly, and then the motorcycle driver was ejected forward, accompanied with the rotation motion in the air. Finally, the head, shoulder and thorax of the ejected animal impacted directly on the hard ground. Varying degrees of injury focusing on the liver, heart, lung and spleen were found. There existed a significant positive correlation between ISS and the ejection velocity of the motorcycle drivers (ISS equal to 16.7+/-2.9 for 30 km/h, 25.0+/-0.0 for 40 km/h and 37.3+/-1.0 for 50 km/h). The detailed injury characteristics were as follows: for the mildly injured animals, there were interlobar gaps or leaf gaps and lobar surface blood coagulation blocks in the liver, and mild lung hemorrhage; for the severely injured animals, there were liver comminuted laceration, moderate lung hemorrhage and heart injury. Animals suffering from the most severe injuries died half an hour later. The new injury model stated in this paper has a high stability and good repeatability, and is likely to be helpful to

  7. Proposal for improving ejection seats with respect to sitting comfort and ejection posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, A

    1975-05-01

    It is generally accepted that in the case of ejection, the flexion posture is often the reason for vertebral body fracture, but to maintain the right egress posture (this means an erect or even hyperextended position) throughtout the entire duration of flight would increase pilot complaints about validly criticized misalignment of the seat profile. X-ray controlled seat studies led to the conclusion that an acceptable egress position does not allow relaxed sitting posture during normal cockpit activities over long periods. Therefore, an attempt at solution is being made by a seat device whose comfort is guaranteed by a back-rest construction variable at will. For emergency case, the posture will be optimized automatically and synchronically with the action of the power retraction unit. A schematic design outlines the construction.

  8. Association between Androgenic Hormone Levels and Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Sotoudeh Anvari

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Androgens have been shown to have diverse effects on the cardiovascular system. The aim of this study was to compare androgenic hormone levels in patients with different left ventricular ejection fractions (EF.Methods: The study population consisted of 515 consecutive men who were referred for angiographic studies and whose results of echocardiography and coronary angiography were available. The patients were classified into four groups: EF < 35%, EF = 35-45%, EF = 45-54%, and EF ≥ 55% to evaluate the trends of baseline characteristics and serum androgens,including free testosterone (fT, total testosterone (tT, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS. To better elucidate thedifference in the patients with severe heart failure, the patients were divided into two groups according to their EF level, andcomparisons were repeated between those with EF < 35% and the ones with EF ≥ 35%.Results: There were statistically significant trends in some characteristics in the patients with different levels of EF. The subjects with higher EF levels were less likely to have diabetes (p value < 0.001, coronary artery lesion (p value < 0.001,or high levels of C-reactive protein (CRP (p value < 0.001. As regards the patients with severe heart failure, our regressionanalysis revealed that the fT level was significantly lower in those with EF < 35% than in the ones with EF ≥ 35% (5.82 ± 2.73 pg/mL vs. 6.88 ± 3.34 pg/mL, p value < 0.05.Conclusion: A significant association was found between the level of fT and EF < 35%. There is a need for further controlled prospective studies to delineate any possible causal relationship accurately.

  9. Quantification of parametric uncertainties induced by irregular soil loading in orchard tower sprayer nonlinear dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Americo; Palacios Felix, Jorge Luis; Balthazar, José Manoel

    2017-11-01

    This paper deals with the nonlinear stochastic dynamics of an orchard tower sprayer subjected to random excitations due to soil irregularities. A consistent stochastic model of uncertainties is constructed to describe random loadings and to predict variabilities in mechanical system response. The dynamics is addressed in time and frequency domains. Monte Carlo method is employed to compute the propagation of uncertainties through the stochastic model. Numerical simulations reveals a very rich dynamics, which is able to produce chaos. This numerical study also indicates that lateral vibrations follow a direct energy cascade law. A probabilistic analysis reveals the possibility of large lateral vibrations during the equipment operation.

  10. A rapid method for standardization of the gated radionuclide left ventricular ejection fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purnell, G.L.; Baker, B.J.; Murphy, M.M.; Boyd, C.M.; Dalrymple, G.V. (Univ. of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Radionuclide ventriculography has become the standard method for serially evaluating left ventricular ejection fraction (EF). The gold standard for evaluating EF is the contrast ventriculogram, which uses mathematical models to arrive at the volumes used to calculate EF. These models are subject to possible error. This paper reports the standardization of volume measurements of a digital angiographic camera system using a series of cardiac phantoms and the correlation of measurement of the EF of a series of patients whose EF was determined by digital angiography and radionuclide ventriculography.

  11. Probabilistic Capacity Assessment of Lattice Transmission Towers under Strong Wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eZhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Serving as one key component of the most important lifeline infrastructure system, transmission towers are vulnerable to multiple nature hazards including strong wind and could pose severe threats to the power system security with possible blackouts under extreme weather conditions, such as hurricanes, derechoes, or winter storms. For the security and resiliency of the power system, it is important to ensure the structural safety with enough capacity for all possible failure modes, such as structural stability. The study is to develop a probabilistic capacity assessment approach for transmission towers under strong wind loads. Due to the complicated structural details of lattice transmission towers, wind tunnel experiments are carried out to understand the complex interactions of wind and the lattice sections of transmission tower and drag coefficients and the dynamic amplification factor for different panels of the transmission tower are obtained. The wind profile is generated and the wind time histories are simulated as a summation of time-varying mean and fluctuating components. The capacity curve for the transmission towers is obtained from the incremental dynamic analysis (IDA method. To consider the stochastic nature of wind field, probabilistic capacity curves are generated by implementing IDA analysis for different wind yaw angles and different randomly generated wind speed time histories. After building the limit state functions based on the maximum allowable drift to height ratio, the probabilities of failure are obtained based on the meteorological data at a given site. As the transmission tower serves as the key nodes for the power network, the probabilistic capacity curves can be incorporated into the performance based design of the power transmission network.

  12. Failure and Ejection Behavior of Concrete Materials under Internal Blast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifu Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the failure and ejection behavior of concrete materials under internal blast, the default Riedel-Hiermaier-Thoma (RHT concrete model in AUTODYN and a meshfree processor called SPH are employed in this numerical simulation. It is shown that the failure mechanisms are significantly different in these damaged zones. Crushed zone is caused by shear failure while fractured zone is induced by tensile failure, and spalled zone is formed by a combination of shear and tensile failure. In addition, the ejection velocity distribution of the fragmented concrete mass on free surface is examined. The results indicate that the ejection velocity declines monotonously with the increase of the distance to symmetry axis of computational model. On the wall of the prefabricated borehole, two types of fragmented concrete mass are analyzed, and bottom initiation is recommended to eject the fragmented concrete mass effectively. Moreover, an algorithm of average ejection speed is developed to effectively estimate the drill capacity of high velocity, energetic (HE projectiles. At last, the validity of numerical simulation is verified by physical experiments.

  13. Cardiorenal Syndrome Caused by Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Lazzeri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Since cardiorenal dysfunction is usually secondary to multiple factors acting in concert (and not only reduced cardiac output in the present paper we are going to focus on the interrelationship between heart failure with normal ejection fraction and the development of cardiorenal syndrome. The coexistence of renal impairment in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (CRS type 2 and 4 is common especially in older females with hypertension and/or diabetes. It can be hypothesized that the incidence of this disease association is growing, while clinical trials enrolling these patients are still lacking. The main mechanisms thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of this condition are represented by the increase of intra-abdominal and central venous pressure and the activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Differently from CRS in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, the involvement of the kidney may be under-diagnosed in patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction and the optimal therapeutic strategy in this condition, though challenging, is far to be completely elucidated. Further studies are needed to assess the best therapeutic regimen in patients with renal dysfunction (and worsening and heart failure and preserved ejection fraction.

  14. Cardiorenal Syndrome Caused by Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Valente, Serafina; Tarquini, Roberto; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2011-01-01

    Since cardiorenal dysfunction is usually secondary to multiple factors acting in concert (and not only reduced cardiac output) in the present paper we are going to focus on the interrelationship between heart failure with normal ejection fraction and the development of cardiorenal syndrome. The coexistence of renal impairment in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (CRS type 2 and 4) is common especially in older females with hypertension and/or diabetes. It can be hypothesized that the incidence of this disease association is growing, while clinical trials enrolling these patients are still lacking. The main mechanisms thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of this condition are represented by the increase of intra-abdominal and central venous pressure and the activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Differently from CRS in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, the involvement of the kidney may be under-diagnosed in patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction and the optimal therapeutic strategy in this condition, though challenging, is far to be completely elucidated. Further studies are needed to assess the best therapeutic regimen in patients with renal dysfunction (and worsening) and heart failure and preserved ejection fraction. PMID:21331316

  15. Inhibition of DNA ejection from bacteriophage by Mg+2 counterions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sell; Tran, C. V.; Nguyen, T. T.

    2011-03-01

    The problem of inhibiting viral DNA ejection from bacteriophages by multivalent counterions, specifically Mg+2 counterions, is studied. Experimentally, it is known that MgSO4 salt has a strong and nonmonotonic effect on the amount of DNA ejected. There exists an optimal concentration at which the minimum amount of DNA is ejected from the virus. At lower or higher concentrations, more DNA is ejected from the capsid. We propose that this phenomenon is the result of DNA overcharging by Mg+2 multivalent counterions. As Mg+2 concentration increases from zero, the net charge of DNA changes from negative to positive. The optimal inhibition corresponds to the Mg+2 concentration where DNA is neutral. At lower/higher concentrations, DNA genome is charged. It prefers to be in solution to lower its electrostatic self-energy, which consequently leads to an increase in DNA ejection. By fitting our theory to available experimental data, the strength of DNA-DNA short range attraction energies, mediated by Mg+2, is found to be -0.004 kBT per nucleotide base. This and other fitted parameters agree well with known values from other experiments and computer simulations. The parameters are also in agreement qualitatively with values for tri- and tetravalent counterions.

  16. The hemodynamic effects of spinal block with low dose of bupivacaine and sufentanil in patients with low myocardial ejection fraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Sanatkar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effect of spinal block with low dose of bupivacaine and sufentanil on patients with low cardiac output who underwent lower limb surgery. Fifteen patients who had ejection fraction less than 40% (group 1 were compared with 65 cases with ejection fraction more than 40% (group 2 in our study. Our subjects underwent spinal block with 7.5 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% and 5 µg sufentanil. We recorded early events such as hypotension, bradycardia, vasopressor need and ST segment change in our cases. The average mean arterial pressure decreased 13% (110 mmHg to 95.7 mmHg in group 1 and 20% (160 mmHg to 128 mmHg in group 2 (P<0.001. Hypotension due to spinal anesthesia was observed in none of our subjects in both groups and none of our cases need to vasopressor support. All patients remained alert, and no ST segment changes were observed in two groups. In our study none of subjects complained of pain intraoperatively. The subjects were without complaints during the spinal anesthetic in both groups. Spinal block with low dose local anesthetic and sufentanil was a safe and effective method for lower limb surgery in patients with low ejection fraction.

  17. On the geological origin of Devils Tower (WY, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavada, P.; Dedecek, P.; Holloway, S. D.; Chang, J. C.; Crain, K.; Keller, G. R.

    2011-12-01

    The Devils Tower is an exceptional igneous rock formation and a dominating landmark of the northern plains in Wyoming (USA). It rises 250 m above the surrounding sedimentary formations. Previous hypotheses suggested that the Devils Tower was originally part of a magmatic intrusion; volcanic conduit, magmatic stock or a laccolith. Our review of the geological evidence suggests that the Devils Tower is a remnant of an eroded lava lake that filled a broad phreatomagmatic volcano crater. Our hypothesis is based on a detailed study of a similar phonolite landmark in Czech Republic, called Boren, and analogue modeling, finite element numerical modeling of cooling for various shapes of volcanic bodies, and results of field and gravity surveys of the area. The Devils Tower together with a group of five phonolite bodies called Missouri Buttes, located 6 km NW from the Devils Tower, represent the easternmost products of the Tertiary tectonomagmatic events related to the lithospheric-scale uplift of the Black hills monocline. The phreatomagmatic deposits in the surroundings of the Missouri Buttes and the Devils Tower suggest that these phonolite bodies were originally emplaced into phreatomagmatic maar-diatreme volcanoes. To reveal the original shape of the Devils Tower, we employed the analogue modeling using plaster of Paris as analogue for phonolite magma to study internal fabrics and shapes of extrusive/intrusive magmatic bodies emplaced into the maar-diatreme volcanoes. Then, the resulting shapes of analogue magmatic bodies were used for the Finite Element thermal numerical models of their cooling using the thermophysical parameters of the phonolite magma and the rock units surrounding the Devils Tower and Missouri Buttes. Because the columnar joints grow perpendicular to the isotherms in cooling igneous and volcanic bodies, we analyzed the match between the thermal structure of the FE models and the columnar jointing pattern on the Devils Tower. The best fit of the

  18. Reliability Assessment of Steel-Aluminium Lattice Tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudzik, Agnieszka

    2017-10-01

    In the subject of the present study a probabilistic approach to the analysis of steelaluminium lattice tower was used. Structural design parameters are defined as the deterministic values and random variables. Random variables are not correlated. The criterion for structural failure is expressed the limits of functions referring to the serviceability limit state. The description of the limit state of structure implicit forms of the random variables function was used. The study presents a combination of the reliability analysis program with the MES3D external FEM program. The NUMPRESS software, created at the IFTR PAS, was used in the reliability analysis. The Hasofer-Lind reliability index, determined using an iterative procedure of Rackwitz-Fiessler, was used as a reliability measure. The values of reliability index for different cases of the vector of random variables, that is, different descriptions of mathematical model of the structure, were determined. The effect of assumed probability distribution of individual random variables on the value of the reliability index was determined. In the description of random variables, the different types of probability distribution were used and the values of the reliability index for the normal distribution and the distribution chosen according to the kind of a variable were compared. The primary research method is the FORM method. In order to verify the correctness of the calculation Monte Carlo and Importance Sampling methods are used. The relative error of the reliability index was calculated taking the simulation Monte Carlo method as a reference. The effectiveness of the primary research method was performed by comparing the number of calls of the limit state, which is connected with the calculation time. The sensitivity of reliability index to the random variables was defined.

  19. Capstan friction model for DNA ejection from bacteriophages

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosal, Sandip

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophages infect cells by attaching to the outer membrane and injecting their DNA into the cell.The phage DNA is then transcribed by the cell's transcription machinery.A number of physical mechanisms by which DNA can be translocated from the phage capsid into the cell have been identified. A fast ejection driven by the elastic and electrostatic potential energy of the compacted DNA within the viral capsid appears to be used by most phages, at least to initiate infection.In recent in vitro experiments, the speed of DNA translocation from a lambda phage capsid has been measured as a function of ejected length over the entire duration of the event.Here a mechanical model is proposed that is able to explain the observed dependence of exit velocity on ejected length, and that is also consistent with the accepted picture of the geometric arrangement of DNA within the viral capsid.

  20. Ejection of a rear facing, golf cart passenger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schau, Kyle; Masory, Oren

    2013-10-01

    The following report details the findings of a series of experiments and simulations performed on a commercially available, shuttle style golf cart during several maneuvers involving rapid accelerations of the vehicle. It is determined that the current set of passive restraints on these types of golf carts are not adequate in preventing ejection of a rear facing passenger during rapid accelerations in the forward and lateral directions. Experimental data and simulations show that a hip restraint must be a minimum of 13 in. above the seat in order to secure a rear facing passenger during sharp turns, compared to the current restraint height of 5 in. Furthermore, it is determined that a restraint directly in front of the rear facing passenger is necessary to prevent ejection. In addressing these issues, golf cart manufacturers could greatly reduce the likelihood of injury due to ejection of a rear facing, golf cart passenger. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Numerical Simulation of Flow around Ejection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dalin; Wei, Tao

    Aerodynamic characteristics of an Ejection Seat System at different angles of attack are studied by the numerical method and the flow mechanisms for such flows are carefully analyzed. The governing equations are Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations which are solved by the unstructured finite volume method. Upwind Osher scheme is used for spatial discretization and five-stage Runge-Kutta scheme is applied for temporal discretization. The DES model based on S-A one equation turbulence model is adopted. Parallel computation is based on the domain decomposition method and multi-block is achieved by using METIS system. The experimental data is used to validate this method. This research is helpful to understand the aerodynamic characteristics and flow mechanisms of Ejection Seat System at different angles of attack and Mach numbers, and can provide reasonable reference for Ejection Seat System design.

  2. Current characteristics of various ejection modes in electrohydrodynamic printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The real-time observation of electrohydrodynamic printing (EHDP process is of importance in practical applications. The electric current is a reflection of charge transfer and might provide a potential method to detect the liquid behavior. In this paper, current during EHDP process is measured and studied to investigate the relationship with liquid behaviors. Experimental results show that the liquid ejection can be accurately reflected by the current signal. Current of various ejection modes in EHDP are then examined, and various characteristic numbers are summarized to identify the present liquid ejection mode. This work proposes a simple and efficient method by combining current detection and visual observation to achieve better real-time monitoring and controlling of EHDP process.

  3. 3-D rod ejection analysis using a conservative methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Min Ho; Park, Jin Woo; Park, Guen Tae; Um, Kil Sup; Ryu, Seok Hee; Lee, Jae Il; Choi, Tong Soo [KEPCO, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The point kinetics model which simplifies the core phenomena and physical specifications is used for the conventional rod ejection accident analysis. The point kinetics model is convenient to assume conservative core parameters but this simplification loses large amount of safety margin. The CHASER system couples the three-dimensional core neutron kinetics code ASTRA, the sub-channel analysis code THALES and the fuel performance analysis code FROST. The validation study for the CHASER system is addressed using the NEACRP three-dimensional PWR core transient benchmark problem. A series of conservative rod ejection analyses for the APR1400 type plant is performed for both hot full power (HFP) and hot zero power (HZP) conditions to determine the most limiting cases. The conservative rod ejection analysis methodology is designed to properly consider important phenomena and physical parameters.

  4. Sensor Placement For Structural Monitoring of Transmission Line Towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benny eRaphael

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Transmission line towers are usually analyzed using linear elastic idealized truss models. Due to the assumptions used in the analysis, there are discrepancies between the actual results obtained from full scale prototype testing and the analytical results. Therefore, design engineers are interested in assessing the actual stress levels in transmission line towers. Since it is costly to place sensors on every member of a tower structure, the best locations for sensors need to be carefully selected. This study evaluates a methodology for sensor placement in transmission line towers. The objective is to find optimal locations for sensors such that the real behavior of the structure can be explained from measurements. The methodology is based on the concepts of entropy and model falsification. Sensor locations are selected based on maximum entropy such that there is maximum separation between model instances that represent different possible combinations of parameter values which have uncertainties. The performance of the proposed algorithm is compared to that of an intuitive method in which sensor locations are selected where the forces are maximum. A typical 220 kV transmission tower is taken as case study in this paper. It is shown that the intuitive method results in much higher number of non-separable models compared to the optimal sensor placement algorithm. Thus the intuitive method results in poor identification of the system.

  5. Randomized Clinical Trials of Gene Transfer for Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penny, William F; Hammond, H Kirk

    2017-05-01

    Despite improvements in drug and device therapy for heart failure, hospitalization rates and mortality have changed little in the past decade. Randomized clinical trials using gene transfer to improve function of the failing heart are the focus of this review. Four randomized clinical trials of gene transfer in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) have been published. Each enrolled patients with stable symptomatic HFrEF and used either intracoronary delivery of a virus vector or endocardial injection of a plasmid. The initial CUPID trial randomized 14 subjects to placebo and 25 subjects to escalating doses of adeno-associated virus type 1 encoding sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (AAV1.SERCA2a). AAV1.SERCA2a was well tolerated, and the high-dose group met a 6 month composite endpoint. In the subsequent CUPID-2 study, 243 subjects received either placebo or the high dose of AAV1.SERCA2a. AAV1.SERCA2a administration, while safe, failed to meet the primary or any secondary endpoints. STOP-HF used plasmid endocardial injection of stromal cell-derived factor-1 to promote stem-cell recruitment. In a 93-subject trial of patients with ischemic etiology heart failure, the primary endpoint (symptoms and 6 min walk distance) failed, but subgroup analyses showed improvements in subjects with the lowest ejection fractions. A fourth trial randomized 14 subjects to placebo and 42 subjects to escalating doses of adenovirus-5 encoding adenylyl cyclase 6 (Ad5.hAC6). There were no safety concerns, and patients in the two highest dose groups (combined) showed improvements in left ventricular function (left ventricular ejection fraction and -dP/dt). The safety data from four randomized clinical trials of gene transfer in patients with symptomatic HFrEF suggest that this approach can be conducted with acceptable risk, despite invasive delivery techniques in a high-risk population. Additional trials are necessary before the approach can be endorsed for clinical

  6. Ejection of cool plasma into the hot corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias, P.; Peter, H.; Bingert, S.

    2011-08-01

    Context. The corona is highly dynamic and shows transient events on various scales in space and time. Most of these features are related to changes in the magnetic field structure or impulsive heating caused by the conversion of magnetic to thermal energy. Aims: We investigate the processes that lead to the formation, ejection and fall of a confined plasma ejection that was observed in a numerical experiment of the solar corona. By quantifying physical parameters such as mass, velocity, and orientation of the plasma ejection relative to the magnetic field, we provide a description of the nature of this particular plasma ejection. Methods: The time-dependent three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) equations are solved in a box extending from the chromosphere, which serves as a reservoir for mass and energy, to the lower corona. The plasma is heated by currents that are induced through field line braiding as a consequence of photospheric motions included in the model. Spectra of optically thin emission lines in the extreme ultraviolet range are synthesized, and magnetic field lines are traced over time. We determine the trajectory of the plasma ejection and identify anomalies in the profiles of the plasma parameters. Results: Following strong heating just above the chromosphere, the pressure rapidly increases, leading to a hydrodynamic explosion above the upper chromosphere in the low transition region. The explosion drives the plasma, which needs to follow the magnetic field lines. The ejection is then moving more or less ballistically along the loop-like field lines and eventually drops down onto the surface of the Sun. The speed of the ejection is in the range of the sound speed, well below the Alfvén velocity. Conclusions: The plasma ejection observed in a numerical experiment of the solar corona is basically a hydrodynamic phenomenon, whereas the rise of the heating rate is of magnetic nature. The granular motions in the photosphere lead (by chance) to a

  7. Computer modelling of ballistic particle ejection from NaCl

    CERN Document Server

    Ramasawmy, D; Smith, R

    2003-01-01

    The impact of positively charged sodium ions incident normally on the (1 0 0) surface of NaCl is studied by molecular dynamics simulations in the energy regime where nuclear collisions dominate (1 keV). It is found that there is a large amount of channelling and a relatively low sputtering yield of 0.36. In contrast to metals the angular distribution of the ejected particles contains less structural information about the underlying lattice, with less well-defined angular distribution patterns and a larger number of dimers emitted. The energy distribution of ejected particles peaks at below 1 eV. Mechanisms are investigated which explain these phenomena.

  8. One-year dynamic monitoring of a masonry tower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guidobaldi Marco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some results of the continuous dynamic monitoring program carried out on the tallest historic tower in Mantua, Italy. This project follows an extensive diagnostic investigation aimed at assessing the structural condition of the tower after the Italian earthquakes of May 2012. A simple dynamic monitoring system was permanently installed in the upper part of the building and automatic modal identification was performed. The results allow to evaluate the effects of changing temperature on automatically identified natural frequencies, to verify the practical feasibility of damage detection methods based on natural frequencies shifts and provide clear evidence of the possible key role of continuous dynamic monitoring in the preventive conservation of historic towers.

  9. A modular restoration tower for electric power line transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolazzi, L.C.; Pereira, J.C.; Leonel, C.E.L.; Rocha, G.B.; Bianchezzi, V.; Mendes, F. [Universidade Federal Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica], Emails: lauro@grante.ufsc.br, jcarlos@grante.ufsc.br; Luz, R.L. [ELETROSUL Centrais Eletricas S.A., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)], Email: rluz@eletrosul.gov.br

    2009-07-01

    The main target of this R and D project is to develop an restoration tower for electric energy lines transmission. Whereas these towers should present the main features like transport facility, easiest assembling associated with a low cost of manufacture, it was applied the single-column tower concepts supported by stays, modularized, framed and articulated at the base. The concepts used for this development was a design methodology. From the different definition situations of load, numerical models have been developed focusing the design to the best of structural element arrangements of its modules. Then, tests were performed in laboratory to determine the module structural performance for different work load situations. These tests served to identify inconsistencies in the numerical models and proposed adjustments in its design to improve its performance on the strength and stability. (author)

  10. Membrane distillation of industrial cooling tower blowdown water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.E. Koeman-Stein

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The potential of membrane distillation for desalination of cooling tower blowdown water (CTBD is investigated. Technical feasibility is tested on laboratory and pilot scale using real cooling tower blowdown water from Dow Benelux in Terneuzen (Netherlands. Two types of membranes, polytetrafluorethylene and polyethylene showed good performance regarding distillate quality and fouling behavior. Concentrating CTBD by a factor 4.5 while maintaining a flux of around 2 l/m2*h was possible with a water recovery of 78% available for reuse. Higher concentration factors lead to severe decrease in flux which was caused by scaling. Membrane distillation could use the thermal energy that would otherwise be discharged of in a cooling tower and function as a heat exchanger. This reduces the need for cooling capacity and could lead to a total reduction of 37% water intake for make-up water, as well as reduced energy and chemicals demands and greenhouse gas emissions.

  11. Integration of Small Solar tower Systems into Distributed Power Islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, M.; Marcos, M. J.; Tellez, F. M.; Blanco, M.; Fernandez, V.; Baonza, F.; Berger, S. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    One of the short-term priorities for renewable energies in Europe is their integration for local power supply into communities and energy islands (blocks of buildings, new neighborhoods in residential areas, shopping centers, hospitals, recreational areas, eco-paks, small rural areas or isolated ones such as islands or mountain communities). Following this strategy, the integration of small tower fields into so-called MIUS (Modular Integrated Utility Systems) is proposed. This application strongly influences field concepts leadings to modular multi-tower systems able to more closely track demand, meet reliability requirements with fewer megawatts of installed power and spread construction costs over time after output has begum. In addition, integration into single-cycle high-efficiency gas turbines plus waste-heat applications clearly increments the solar share. The chief questions are whether solar towers can be redesigned for such distributed markets and the keys to their feasibility. This paper includes the design and performance analysis of a 1.36-MW plant and integration in the MIUS system, as well as the expected cost of electricity and a sensitivity analysis of the small tower plant's performance with design parameters like heliostat configuration and tower height. A practical application is analyzed for a shopping center with 85% power demand during day-time by using a hybrid solar tower and a gas turbine producing electricity and waste heat for hot water and heating and cooling of spaces. The operation mode proposed is covering night demand with power from the grid and solar-gas power island mode during 14 hours daytime with a maximum power production of 1.36 MW. (Author) 26 refs.

  12. Survival outcomes in low-level ejections from high performance aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, David G

    2013-10-01

    The modern ejection seat has evolved to a high standard of sophistication, significantly expanding the safe ejection envelope. Low-level ejections are at the margins of this envelope and the outcome depends on numerous factors, including aircraft attitude, airspeed, and vertical rate of descent. The purpose of this study was to analyze all published ejection injury studies, with particular emphasis on altitude at the time of ejection, to determine if low-level ejections have an overall higher fatality rate. The aeromedical literature was reviewed for all studies relating to ejection outcomes in which the ejection altitude was recorded. Used in this analysis were 10 studies covering the period 1952-1997. Low-level ejections were defined as ejection below 500 ft (152 m) above ground level. There were 562 low-level ejections identified. Out of this number, there were 274 fatalities, giving a low-level ejection survival rate of 51.2%. There were 2607 ejections that occurred above 500 ft (152 m), with a survival rate of 91.4%. There was a significant difference between ejection survival rates below and above 500 ft (152 m). Low-level ejections have a significantly increased risk of a fatal outcome (Odds Ratio 10.07). Ejecting from an aircraft below 500 ft (152 m) has a lower survival rate compared with the survival rate for all ejections. This is due to many factors, including the nature of the emergency, aircraft operating parameters at the time, and the inherent dangers of low-level operations. Low-level emergencies are time-critical events in which an early decision to eject can improve the chances of a successful outcome.

  13. Comparison of Second Wind Triton Data with Meteorological Tower Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, G.; Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.

    2010-02-01

    With the increased interest in remote sensing of wind information in recent years, it is important to determine the reliability and accuracy of new wind measurement technologies if they are to replace or supplement conventional tower-based measurements. In this study, we present the results of an analysis characterizing the measurement performance of a state-of-the-art SOund Detection And Ranging (sodar) device when compared to a high-quality tower measurement program. Second Wind Inc. (Somerville, MA, USA) provided NREL with more than six months of data from a measurement program conducted near an operating wind farm in western Texas.

  14. Reliability Analysis of a Mono-Tower Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Enevoldsen, I.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    In this paper a reliability analysis of a Mono-tower platform is presented. The failure modes, considered, are yelding in the tube cross-sections, and fatigue failure in the butt welds. The fatigue failure mode is investigated with a fatigue model, where the fatigue strength is expressed through SN...... for the fatigue limit state is a significant failure mode for the Mono.tower platform. Further, it is shown for the fatigue failure mode the the largest contributions to the overall uncertainty are due to the damping ratio, the inertia coefficient, the stress concentration factor, the model uncertainties...

  15. Towards Cooling Tower Efficiency-An Energy Audit Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Su Weng Alwin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research studied the power generation trends from national grid and gas for a period of 4 years. Energy audit of critical systems like this is needful for optimal energy utilization. An energy audit was carried outon 6 industrial cooloing towers and their annual operating cost calculated. Variable speed drive suggested was installed and corresponding annual energy savings of 114,900 kWh/year cost saving of RM30,000 was achieved at a case study plant located in Malaysia. Cooling towers with smart systems was recommended for higher energy savings.

  16. Cooling tower practice in Germany: state of the art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerna, W.; Kraetzig, W.B.; Mungan, I.

    1982-03-01

    Development in design and construction of natural draught cooling towers that has taken place in Germany is discussed. Research has been concentrated on theory and analysis of shells, on acting forces, especially on wind effects, on buckling behavior and constructional problems. An approximate earthquake analysis allows a quick estimation of seismic response. The earthquake analysis is carried out by the response-spectrum-method. All design methods develop construction methods minimizing the imperfections and their control and correction during the erection process. It is shown how by arranging stiffening rings the buckling resistance and the lowest natural frequency of this new generation of cooling towers can be improved. 13 refs.

  17. Energy and exergy analysis of counter flow wet cooling towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan Mani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cooling tower is an open system direct contact heat exchanger, where it cools water by both convection and evaporation. In this paper, a mathematical model based on heat and mass transfer principle is developed to find the outlet condition of water and air. The model is solved using iterative method. Energy and exergy analysis infers that inlet air wet bulb temperature is found to be the most important parameter than inlet water temperature and also variation in dead state properties does not affect the performance of wet cooling tower. .

  18. Electronic circuit detects left ventricular ejection events in cardiovascular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebben, V. D.; Webb, J. A., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Electronic circuit processes arterial blood pressure waveform to produce discrete signals that coincide with beginning and end of left ventricular ejection. Output signals provide timing signals for computers that monitor cardiovascular systems. Circuit operates reliably for heart rates between 50 and 200 beats per minute.

  19. Characterization of Boulders Ejected from Small Impact Craters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bart, G.D.; Melosh, H.J.; Strom, R.G.

    2004-01-01

    When an asteroid or comet impacts the surface of a solid body, some of the surface material is often ejected from the crater in the form of blocks. We are characterizing the size and location of such blocks around craters on the Moon and Mars. The lunar craters were observed in Lunar Orbiter III

  20. Epidemiology of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Vasan, Ramachandran S

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) is a common condition, and the prevalence is projected to increase further. Studies differ in the reported incidence and mortality associated with this condition, although there is agreement that between a third and one-half of all patients w...

  1. Solar Cycle Variation of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-08-25

    Aug 25, 2010 ... Spörer's sunspot law at low latitudes (thus, no 'butterfly diagram'); how- ever, at high latitudes, there may be a poleward motion and an equator- ward motion from the rise to the maximum to the declining phases. Key words. Sun: activity, coronal mass ejections (CMEs). 1. Introduction. Interplanetary coronal ...

  2. Experimental investigation on ejecting low-temperature cooling superconducting magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bin; Zhang, Qiang, E-mail: 6266798@qq.com; Tong, Ming-wei; Hu, Peng; Wu, Shuang-ying; Cai, Qin; Qin, Zeng-hu

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • The cooling temperature of the superconducting materials can be adjusted by the ejecting refrigeration. • The result shows that the temperature of liquid nitrogen can be reduced to 70 K by controlling the inlet water pressure of the ejector. • The refrigeration performance of ejector is affected by the different structure and system pressure. -- Abstract: With the development of the high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials and refrigeration technologies, using ejecting refrigeration to cool the superconducting materials becomes the direction of HTS applications. In this paper, an experimental study has been carried out on the basis of the theory of analyzing the ejecting low-temperature cooling superconducting magnet. The relationship between area ratios and refrigeration performance at different system pressures was derived. In addition, the working fluid flow and suction chamber pressure of the ejector with different area ratios at various inlet pressures have been examined to obtain the performance of ejectors under different working conditions. The result shows that the temperature of liquid nitrogen can be reduced to 70 K by controlling the inlet water pressure when the pressurized water at 20 °C is used to eject the saturated liquid nitrogen, which can provide the stable operational conditions for the HTS magnets cooling.

  3. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: A clinical crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Prithwish

    2016-02-01

    A previously less known form of heart failure (Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction, HFPEF) is on the rise. This article discusses the threat this poses and what could be done including a call for dedicated HFPEF clinics run jointly by cardiologists and geriatricians. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Galectin-3 in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Rudolf A.; Edelmann, Frank; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Mamas, Mamas A.; Maisel, Alan; Pieske, Burkert

    2013-01-01

    In the last decades it has been appreciated that many patients with heart failure (HF) suffer from HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). The diagnosis and treatment of HFpEF is difficult, as we lack specific markers of the disease and no specific treatments have been identified. Galectin-3

  5. Invasive hemodynamic characterization of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Jønsson; Borlaug, Barry A

    2014-01-01

    Recent hemodynamic studies have advanced our understanding of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Despite improved pathophysiologic insight, clinical trials have failed to identify an effective treatment for HFpEF. Invasive hemodynamic assessment can diagnose or exclude HFp...

  6. Cellular Phone Towers, Cell towers developed for Appraiser's Department in 2003. Location was based upon parcel centroids, and corrected to orthophotography. Probably includes towers other than cell towers (uncertain). Not published., Published in 2003, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Sedgwick County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Cellular Phone Towers dataset current as of 2003. Cell towers developed for Appraiser's Department in 2003. Location was based upon parcel centroids, and corrected...

  7. On synthesis and optimization of cooling water systems with multiple cooling towers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gololo, KV

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available minimization, which incorporates the performances of the cooling towers involved. The study focuses mainly on cooling systems consisting of multiple cooling towers that supply a common set of heat exchangers. The heat exchanger network is synthesized using...

  8. LBA-ECO CD-04 Biomass Survey, km 83 Tower Site, Tapajos National Forest, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains the results of a biometric tree survey of a 19.25 ha area adjacent to the eddy flux tower at the km 83 logged forest tower site in...

  9. LBA-ECO CD-04 Biomass Survey, km 83 Tower Site, Tapajos National Forest, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains the results of a biometric tree survey of a 19.25 ha area adjacent to the eddy flux tower at the km 83 logged forest tower site in Tapajos...

  10. Meteorological tower design for severe weather and remote locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly Elder; Ilkoo Angutikjuak; Jessica Baker; Matt Belford; Tom Bennett; Karl Birkeland; Daniel Bowker; Doug Chabot; April Cheuvront; Mark Dixon; Dylan Elder; Lee Elder; Shari Gearheard; Greg Giedt; Kim Grant; Sam Green; Ethan Greene; Nick Houfek; Caleb Huntington; Henry Huntington; Thomas Huntington; Daniel Janigian; Crane Johnson; Glen Liston; Rob Maris; Andrea Marsh; Hans-Peter Marshall; Aidan Meiners; Alex Meiners; Theo Meiners; Limakee Palluq; Josh Pope; Esa Qillaq; Joelli Sanguya; Sam Sehnert; Ron Simenhois; Banning Starr; Roger Tyler

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a robust meteorological tower for deployment in locations with extreme conditions and for applications that require relatively maintenance-free structures. The basic design consists of a triangular base with two horizontal rails on each side, and uprights at the triangle vertices for various instrument configurations. The fabrication materials include...

  11. The Rock Island Clock Tower, From Ordnance to Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-01

    name can be given to the ex- terior architecture.൛ A local art historian at Augustana College has suggested that the original plans are an example of...11.) The Clock Tower shows no influence of two other architectural styles which were rapidly becoming popular in 1863: the Victor ian and gothic

  12. Continuous measurements of methane from a tower network over Siberia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasakawa, M.; Machida, T.; Saeki, T.; Koyama, Y.; Maksyutov, S. (Center for Global Environmental Research, National Inst. for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)); Shimoyama, K. (Inst. of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido Univ., Hokkaido (Japan)); Tsuda, N. (Global Environmental Forum, Tokyo (Japan)); Suto, H. (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan)); Arshinov, M.; Davydov, D.; Fofonov, A.; Krasnov, O. (Inst. of Atmospheric Optics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation))

    2010-11-15

    We have been conducting continuous measurements of Methane (CH{sub 4}) concentration from an expanding network of towers (JR-STATION: Japan-Russia Siberian Tall Tower Inland Observation Network) located in taiga, steppe and wetland biomes of Siberia since 2004. High daytime means (>2000 ppb) observed simultaneously at several towers during winter, together with in situ weather data and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data, indicate that high pressure systems caused CH{sub 4} accumulation at subcontinental scale due to the widespread formation of an inversion layer. Daytime means sometimes exceeded 2000 ppb, particularly in the summer of 2007 when temperature and precipitation rates were anomalously high over West Siberia, which implies that CH{sub 4} emission from wetlands were exceptionally high in 2007. Many hot spots detected by MODIS in the summer of 2007 illustrate that the contribution of biomass burning also cannot be neglected. Daytime mean CH{sub 4} concentrations from the Siberian tower sites were generally higher than CH{sub 4} values reported at NOAA coastal sites in the same latitudinal zone, and the difference in concentrations between two sets of sites was reproduced with a coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian transport model. Simulations of emissions from different CH{sub 4} sources suggested that the major contributor to variation switched from wetlands during summer to fossil fuel during winter.

  13. Galois towers over non-prime finite fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassa, Alp; Beelen, Peter; Garcia, Arnaldo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we construct Galois towers with good asymptotic properties over any non-prime finite field Fℓ; i.e., we construct sequences of function fields N=(N1⊂N2⊂⋯) over Fℓ of increasing genus, such that all the extensions Ni/N1 are Galois extensions and the number of rational places of these...

  14. Towers of Function Fields over Non-prime Finite Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassa, Alp; Beelen, Peter; Garcia, Arnaldo

    2015-01-01

    Over all non-prime finite fields, we construct some recursive towers of function fields with many rational places. Thus we obtain a substantial improvement on all known lower bounds for Ihara’s quantity A(ℓ), for ℓ = pn with p prime and n > 3 odd. We relate the explicit equations to Drinfeld modu...

  15. Simulation of control drives in a tower crane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech SOLARZ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of a control system for a tower crane is investigated. Underlying the controller design is the theory of optimal linear control. Computer models of a crane and the control systems for the crane drives are developed. Simulation data reveals that the motion of the load can be effectively controlled so that it should follow a predetermined trajectory.

  16. Solar Power Tower Design Basis Document, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZAVOICO,ALEXIS B.

    2001-07-01

    This report contains the design basis for a generic molten-salt solar power tower. A solar power tower uses a field of tracking mirrors (heliostats) that redirect sunlight on to a centrally located receiver mounted on top a tower, which absorbs the concentrated sunlight. Molten nitrate salt, pumped from a tank at ground level, absorbs the sunlight, heating it up to 565 C. The heated salt flows back to ground level into another tank where it is stored, then pumped through a steam generator to produce steam and make electricity. This report establishes a set of criteria upon which the next generation of solar power towers will be designed. The report contains detailed criteria for each of the major systems: Collector System, Receiver System, Thermal Storage System, Steam Generator System, Master Control System, and Electric Heat Tracing System. The Electric Power Generation System and Balance of Plant discussions are limited to interface requirements. This design basis builds on the extensive experience gained from the Solar Two project and includes potential design innovations that will improve reliability and lower technical risk. This design basis document is a living document and contains several areas that require trade-studies and design analysis to fully complete the design basis. Project- and site-specific conditions and requirements will also resolve open To Be Determined issues.

  17. Solar updraft tower - structural optimisation under dynamic wind action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Eck, S.; Coenders, J.L.; Doomen, R.

    2015-01-01

    A solar updraft tower is a type of power plant which uses solar irradiation to generate electricity. It consists of three elements: a solar air collector, wind turbines and a chimney. The proposed concepts for this chimney schematise it as a 1-km-tall reinforced concrete shell, which are vulnerable

  18. Indiana State University Graduates to Advanced Plastic Cooling Towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Ed

    2012-01-01

    Perhaps more than many other industries, today's universities and colleges are beset by dramatically rising costs on every front. One of the areas where overhead can be contained or reduced is in the operation of the chilled water systems that support air conditioning throughout college campuses, specifically the cooling towers. Like many…

  19. A new tower with good p-rank meeting Zink’s bound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anbar Meidl, Nurdagül; Beelen, Peter; Nguyen, Nhut

    2017-01-01

    In this article we investigate the asymptotic p-rank of a new tower of function fields defined over cubic finite fields. Its limit meets Zink's bound, but the new feature of this tower is that its asymptotic p-rank for small cubic finite fields is much smaller than that of other cubic towers for ...... for which the asymptotic p-rank is known. This is of independent interest, but also makes this new tower more interesting for theoretical applications in cryptography....

  20. Upward streamers produced by a lightning strike to radio transmission towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krider, E. Philip; Wetmore, Ralph H.

    1987-01-01

    A lightning strike to the center of three 78-m radio transmission towers produced upward discharges with lengths of 40 and 79 m from each of the neighboring towers. This strike also caused a number of insulators on guy wires that supported the tower to flash over, and the locations of these points and the two-dimensional geometry of the discharge channels are projected onto a vertical plane that is centered on the tower.

  1. THE METRIC DOCUMENTATION OF CHAM TOWERS IN VIETNAM BY SPHERICAL PHOTOGRAMMETRY

    OpenAIRE

    G. Fangi; E. S. Malinverni; Tassetti, A. N.

    2013-01-01

    The Università Politecnica delle Marche is charged of the study, survey and documentation of the Chan towers in Vietnam. The towers are spread near the coastline from latitude 16° 30', to latitude of 10° 56'. The Champa civilization flourished from 8th century till 17th century produced the Cham towers, places of religious worship. The ancient Cham people created a developed culture expressed in the architecture in the towers, which were Buddhist temples. Roughly there are six differ...

  2. Some techniques for reducing the tower shadow of the DOE/NASA mod-0 wind turbine tower. [wind tunnel tests to measure effects of tower structure on wind velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, R. R.; Savino, J. M.; Wagner, L. H.; Diedrich, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    Wind speed profile measurements to measure the effect of a wind turbine tower on the wind velocity are presented. Measurements were made in the wake of scale models of the tower and in the wake of certain full scale components to determine the magnitude of the speed reduction (tower shadow). Shadow abatement techniques tested on the towers included the removal of diagonals, replacement of diagonals and horizontals with round cross section members, installation of elliptical shapes on horizontal members, installation of airfoils on vertical members, and application of surface roughness to vertical members.

  3. The step response of left ventricular pressure to ejection flow: A system oriented approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, H.B.K.; Wijkstra, Hessel

    1992-01-01

    Left ventricular pressure is dependent on both ventricular volume and ventricular ejection flow. These dependencies are usually expressed byventricular elastance, andresistance, respectively. Resistance is a one-valued effect only, when ejection flow either is constant or increases. Decreasing

  4. A new tower with good p-rank meeting Zink’s bound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anbar Meidl, Nurdagül; Beelen, Peter; Nguyen, Nhut

    2017-01-01

    In this article we investigate the asymptotic p-rank of a new tower of function fields defined over cubic finite fields. Its limit meets Zink's bound, but the new feature of this tower is that its asymptotic p-rank for small cubic finite fields is much smaller than that of other cubic towers for ...

  5. Dimensions of Air Traffic Control Tower Information Needs: From Information Requests to Display Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durso, Francis T.; Johnson, Brian R.; Crutchfield, Jerry M.

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to determine the information needs of tower air traffic controllers, instructors from the Federal Aviation Administration's Academy in Oklahoma City were asked to control traffic in a high-fidelity tower cab simulator. Information requests were made apparent by eliminating access to standard tower information sources. Instead,…

  6. 78 FR 10210 - Utility Scale Wind Towers From China and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... COMMISSION Utility Scale Wind Towers From China and Vietnam Determinations On the basis of the record \\1... with material injury by reason of imports of utility scale wind towers from China and Vietnam, provided... of imports of utility scale wind towers from China and Vietnam. Commissioner Dean A. Pinkert...

  7. 77 FR 9700 - Utility Scale Wind Towers From China and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... COMMISSION Utility Scale Wind Towers From China and Vietnam Determinations On the basis of the record \\1... with material injury by reason of imports from Vietnam of utility scale wind towers, provided for in... wind towers from China and Vietnam. Accordingly, effective December 29, 2011, the Commission instituted...

  8. 14 CFR 170.13 - Airport Traffic Control Tower (ATCT) establishment criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airport Traffic Control Tower (ATCT... AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL SERVICES AND NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES Airport Traffic Control Towers § 170.13 Airport Traffic Control Tower (ATCT) establishment criteria. (a) The following criteria along with general...

  9. Using seismic hazard assessment to study dynamic behavior of Gonbad-e Kāvus tower (the tallest brick tower in the world)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Gholamreza; Keshtkar, Rooholla; Mavizchi, Masoud; Vetr, Mohammad Ghasem

    2014-12-01

    Gonbad-e Kāvus Brick tower, which was completed in the tenth century, is the remnant of an ancient glorious building that is located in downtown of Gonbad-e Kāvus, Golestan, Iran. It is of note that, this massive brick structure is known as the tallest brick tower in the world. Unfortunately, the tower is located on a very active seismic region, hence there is an urgent need for a careful study of seismic behavior of the tower due to its historical importance. Hence, probabilistic seismic hazard assessment has been performed for Gonbad region to prepare the acceleration spectrum charts. Three-dimensional finite element models of the tower are used in the nonlinear finite element program ANSYS. Dynamic modal and dynamic analyses by means of two spectral accelerations were conducted to study the dynamic response. In conclusion, earthquake with 2,475 years period duration can cause damage to the overall the tower.

  10. The influence of occupant anthropometry and seat position on ejection risk in a rollover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Theresa; Fras, Andrew; Telehowski, Paul

    2010-08-01

    During rollover crashes, ejection increases an occupant's risk of severe to fatal injury as compared to risks for those retained in the vehicle. The current study examined whether occupant anthropometry might influence ejection risk. Factors such as restraint use/disuse, seating position, vehicle type, and roll direction were also considered in the analysis. The current study examined occupant ejections in 10 years of National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) single-event rollovers of passenger vehicles and light trucks. Statistical analysis of unweighted and weighted ejection data was carried out. No statistically significant differences in ejection rates were found based on occupant height, age, or body mass index. Drivers were ejected significantly more frequently than other occupants: 62 percent of unrestrained drivers were ejected vs. 51 percent unrestrained right front occupants. Second row unrestrained occupants were ejected at rates similar to right front-seated occupants. There were no significant differences in ejection rates for near- vs. far-side occupants. These data suggest that assessment of ejection prevention systems using either a 50th or 5th percentile adult anthropomorphic test dummy (ATD) might provide a reasonable measure of system function for a broad range of occupants. They also support the development of ejection mitigation technologies that extend beyond the first row to protect occupants in rear seat positions. Future studies should consider potential interaction effects (i.e., occupant size and vehicle dimensions) and the influence of occupant size on ejection risk in non-single-event rollovers.

  11. Deactivation in the rabbit left ventricle induced by constant ejection flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijkstra, Hessel; Boom, H.B.K.

    1989-01-01

    A study of pressure generated by the left ventricle after ejection with constant flow for different values of the ejection flow, flow duration, time of flow arrest, and ventricular volume is discussed. It was found that pressure after ejection, normalized with respect to isovolumic pressure, is

  12. Noncardiac Comorbidities in Heart Failure With Reduced Versus Preserved Ejection Fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mentz, Robert J.; Kelly, Jacob P.; von Lueder, Thomas G.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Lam, Carolyn S. P.; Cowie, Martin R.; Kjeldsen, Keld; Jankowska, Ewa A.; Atar, Dan; Butler, Javed; Fiuzat, Mona; Zannad, Faiez; Pitt, Bertram; O'Connor, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure patients are classified by ejection fraction (EF) into distinct groups: heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) or heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). Although patients with heart failure commonly have multiple comorbidities that complicate management

  13. Quality of life is impaired similarly in heart failure patients with preserved and reduced ejection fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Tialda; Lesman-Leegte, Ivonne; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Sanderman, Robbert; Jaarsma, Tiny

    Aims To compare quality of life (QoL) in heart failure (HF) patients with preserved ejection fraction (HF-PEF) and HF patients with reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF) in a well-defined HF population. Methods and results Patients with HF-PEF [left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) >= 40%] were

  14. Thermal-Structural Analysis of PICA Tiles for Solar Tower Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Parul; Empey, Daniel M.; Squire, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal protection materials used in spacecraft heatshields are subjected to severe thermal and mechanical loading environments during re-entry into earth atmosphere. In order to investigate the reliability of PICA tiles in the presence of high thermal gradients as well as mechanical loads, the authors designed and conducted solar-tower tests. This paper presents the design and analysis work for this tests series. Coupled non-linear thermal-mechanical finite element analyses was conducted to estimate in-depth temperature distribution and stress contours for various cases. The first set of analyses performed on isolated PICA tile showed that stresses generated during the tests were below the PICA allowable limit and should not lead to any catastrophic failure during the test. The tests results were consistent with analytical predictions. The temperature distribution and magnitude of the measured strains were also consistent with predicted values. The second test series is designed to test the arrayed PICA tiles with various gap-filler materials. A nonlinear contact method is used to model the complex geometry with various tiles. The analyses for these coupons predict the stress contours in PICA and inside gap fillers. Suitable mechanical loads for this architecture will be predicted, which can be applied during the test to exceed the allowable limits and demonstrate failure modes. Thermocouple and strain-gauge data obtained from the solar tower tests will be used for subsequent analyses and validation of FEM models.

  15. Radio tower of V. G. Shukhov in the energy supply system of the Russian capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryadko, Igor

    2017-10-01

    Today, when solving the problems of energy supply of buildings, it is important to turn to past experience, to evaluate the effectiveness of solutions that pertain to the period of the formation of an industrial Russian city of the XX century. In this regard, it is important to preserve those objects of industrial architecture that were intended, among other things, for solving problems of energy supply. Even now the architectural legacy of V.G. Shukhov, an outstanding Russian engineer and inventor, triggers discussions and debates. In particular, an impassionate debate arose over the best procedures for the preservation of his architectural works. In the meantime, while debatorslock their horns, the architectural works, designed by this phenomenal engineer and architect, keep decaying. The mission of this article is to assess the impact of the structures, designed by V.G. Shukhov, produced on the conceptual design of an industrial city, and to understand what particular losses the decay of his projects may involve. Another mission, pursued by the author, is to demonstrate the scale of V.G.Shukhov’s work performed in the capacity of an engineer and an inventor. The subject of this research is limited to the study of the restoration effort applied to the Shukhov radio and television tower, also known as the Shabolovka tower.

  16. Analysis of Transportation Alternatives for Ejection Seat Training

    OpenAIRE

    Gambel, Ray; Lundy, David; Murphy, William; Southmost Consulting

    2011-01-01

    EMBA Project Report EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Student Military Aviators who complete primary flight training at Training Wing FOUR and select jets for their advanced training track will require Naval Aviation Survival Training Program (NASTP) Class 1 training until the T-6B replaces the T-34C as the primary flight training aircraft. This Class 1 training instructs students in ejection seat equipment and procedures for emergency egress of their new aircraft. Of the eight available Aviation Survi...

  17. Survivability rate among pilots in case of ejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru GHEORGHIU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The current paper presents a statistical analysis of a recent research made by the author [1], showing the factors causing the accidents that happened in Romanian Air Force from 1952 to 2014. Also the decision of ejection is analyzed. The study contains 225 events: 110 catastrophes and 115 accidents. 280 fighter pilots and 235 aircraft were involved in this analysis. The below information is a personal one and does not reflect an official position of the Ministry of National Defence.

  18. Multinucleon Ejection Model for Two Body Current Neutrino Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobczyk, Jan T.; /Fermilab

    2012-06-01

    A model is proposed to describe nucleons ejected from a nucleus as a result of two-body-current neutrino interactions. The model can be easily implemented in Monte Carlo neutrino event generators. Various possibilities to measure the two-body-current contribution are discussed. The model can help identify genuine charge current quasielastic events and allow for a better determination of the systematic error on neutrino energy reconstruction in neutrino oscillation experiments.

  19. Management of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanayakkara, Shane; Kaye, David M

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the clinical management of patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF). For this critical review, electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed) were searched for relevant basic research studies and randomized clinical trials recently published or presented at major meetings. Details of in-progress or planned studies were obtained from the ClinicalTrials.gov website. The range of publication dates was the year 2000 to 2015. Search terms included HFPEF, heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, HFPSF, heart failure with preserved systolic function, diastolic heart failure, diastolic dysfunction, HFNEF, heart failure with normal ejection fraction, treatment, management, therapy. Patients with HFPEF account for up to half of all patients with a clinical diagnosis of HF. Key contributing factors include hypertension, obesity, and atrial fibrillation, and other chronic diseases, including diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and anemia, frequently coexist. To date, large-scale clinical trials, particularly those focused on antagonism of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, have provided limited evidence of clinical benefit. The aggressive management of contributing factors, including hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and myocardial ischemia, is key in the management of HFPEF. New insights into the mechanisms and thus the identification of potential therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pharmacotherapy of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basaraba, Jade E; Barry, Arden R

    2015-04-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) constitutes ~50% of all heart failure diagnoses and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. The treatment of HFpEF can be challenging due to a lack of evidence supporting the benefit of various drug therapies. In practice, treatment can be divided into acute and chronic management. Acute therapy for decompensated heart failure is similar for both HFpEF and heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. The mainstay of treatment is diuretics to reduce volume overload and improve dyspnea. Patients with an acute exacerbation of HFpEF and rapid atrial fibrillation (AF) should be rate controlled with negative chronotropic agents. For chronic therapy, patients with HFpEF should not be treated like patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. Chronic management of HFpEF can be simplified by using three strategies based on applicability: treat precipitating conditions (e.g., hypertension, AF), control symptoms by maintaining euvolemia with diuretics, and avoid therapies that have been shown not to be beneficial unless another compelling indication exists. Nondrug interventions for HFpEF include salt and fluid restriction, regular physical activity, and referral to a heart function clinic, if appropriate. © 2015 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  1. Four Operational Strategies For The Tower of Pisa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolozzi, F.

    The operational strategies proposed for safeguarding the Leaning Tower all agree on the urgent need to lay a sub-foundation for guaranteeing the stability of the foundation soil, considerably decreasing the current pressure to a value compatible with its resistance characteristics. Their second common property is the creation of a static beneficial effect on the material forming the monument. This effect may be achieved by reducing the pressure in the material forming the Tower, by making the present inclination decrease considerably, or by means of a reinforcement ring on the most stressed parts of the Tower - if the present inclination is to remain unchanged - or with the combined action of both the inclination decrease and the reinforcement ring. Clearly, the choice of each operation must be made within the framework of the present and particular resistance conditions of the material. On the other hand, the four techniques differ structurally and operationally. The former aspects refer to laying structural elements, all equally effective, but different in conception and function - such as pillars, beams, hinges and tubular devices ­ to be laid in order to integrate the common sub-foundation and to be utilised with respect to each operational technique. The operational differences mainly depend on the different executive needs with respect to the structural elements to be laid. The operational aspect of the fourth technique is very simple, but particularly delicate, as are all techniques concerning the Tower. In relation to this, the operation must clearly be managed by a highly qualified and professional group of technicians and workers using the most appropriate and modern technological apparatus. I believe that the considerable delicacy of the operational stage does not obstruct the application of the proposed techniques, both because of the precarious safety conditions of the building (requiring a radical solution), and because the operations put into

  2. Photospheric magnetic field of an eroded-by-solar-wind coronal mass ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, J.; Cid, C.; Saiz, E.; Guerrero, A.

    2017-10-01

    We have investigated the case of a coronal mass ejection that was eroded by the fast wind of a coronal hole in the interplanetary medium. When a solar ejection takes place close to a coronal hole, the flux rope magnetic topology of the coronal mass ejection (CME) may become misshapen at 1 AU as a result of the interaction. Detailed analysis of this event reveals erosion of the interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) magnetic field. In this communication, we study the photospheric magnetic roots of the coronal hole and the coronal mass ejection area with HMI/SDO magnetograms to define their magnetic characteristics.

  3. Demo-application of shape memory alloy devices: the rehabilitation of the S. Giorgio Church bell tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indirli, Maurizio; Castellano, Maria G.; Clemente, Paolo; Martelli, Alessandro

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes the rehabilitation of the S. Giorgio Church Bell-Tower (Trignano, Municipality of S. Martino in Rio, Reggio Emilia, Italy), completed in September 1999. This masonry building, seriously damaged by the earthquake of October 15th 1996 which struck the Reggio Emilia and Modena Districts, Italy), was investigated by the authors immediately after the seismic event, as other ancient Cultural Heritage Structures (CUHESs) in the same area. In the past, seismic events have visited substantial destruction that translates into a significant loss of architectural heritage. The most common solution traditionally used to enhance the CUHESs seismic behaviour is the introduction of localized reinforcements, usually Traditional Steel Ties (TSTs), increasing stability and ductility. Anyway, in many cases said reinforcement techniques, often too invasive, proved to be inadequate to prevent collapse. For these reasons, the Bell-Tower intervention applies Innovative Antiseismic Techniques (IATs) by the use of superelastic Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) Devices (SMADs), a technology developed after a large amount of theoretical studies, numerical analyses and test campaigns. The SMADs, which can be considered a powerful tool with respect to the traditional methods, provide acceleration reduction, force limitation and energy dissipation. Furthermore, they are characterized by low invasivity and complete reversibility. When another earthquake occurred on June 18th 2000, with the same epicenter and a comparable Richter Magnitudo, the Bell-Tower, subjected to a new investigation, showed no damage of any type. Thus, the new seismic event has been the best verification of the retrofit intervention.

  4. Use of tower reactors for continuous ethanol production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Viegas

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to develop a continuous fermentation system operating with a tower reactor using some flocculent yeast strains isolated from an industrial process. The strain was an used in the trial of the proposed system, composed of two serial glass tower reactor. The effects of the following variables were studied on the yield and productivity of the system: total reducing sugar (TRS, concentration in feeding, recycle flow in the second reactor, residence time and diameter/height ratio of the reactors. It was observed that the TRS concentration in feeding and residence time is the variables that interfere most with the productivity of the system. Yield was not affected by any of the variables within the range of values studied. All trials were performed according to a factorial experimental design (making up a total of 19 trials and the results were evaluated by response surface.

  5. Calculation of Lightning Transient Responses on Wind Turbine Towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient method is proposed in this paper for calculating lightning transient responses on wind turbine towers. In the proposed method, the actual tower body is simplified as a multiconductor grid in the shape of cylinder. A set of formulas are given for evaluating the circuit parameters of the branches in the multiconductor grid. On the basis of the circuit parameters, the multiconductor grid is further converted into an equivalent circuit. The circuit equation is built in frequency-domain to take into account the effect of the frequency-dependent characteristic of the resistances and inductances on lightning transients. The lightning transient responses can be obtained by using the discrete Fourier transform with exponential sampling to take the inverse transform of the frequency-domain solution of the circuit equation. A numerical example has been given for examining the applicability of the proposed method.

  6. A mathematical model for optimal tower crane layout planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Hosseini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Tower cranes, on today’s typical building construction sites, are the centerpiece of production, hoisting and transporting of a variety of loads. Due to a simple crane limited capacity; there is an urgent need to use high capacity cranes such as tower cranes. However, we have to select an appropriate type of cranes to be utilized to reduce the associated coste as much as possible. In this research, we propose a method to select the suitable type of crane and locate the best place for crane erection based on a minimum radius for requested crane and minimum cost. To fulfill the target, a computer program is designed to numerate these problems, demonstrating an example explaining how to apply the program and the results are discussed.

  7. Mathematics learning opportunities when playing a Tower Defense Game

    OpenAIRE

    Aura Hernàndez-Sabaté; Meritxell Joanpere; Núria Gorgorió; Lluís Albarracín

    2015-01-01

    A qualitative research study is presented herein with the purpose of identifying mathematics learning opportunities in a commercial version of a Tower Defense game. These learning opportunities are understood as mathematicisable moments of the game and involve the establishment of relationships between the game and mathematical problem solving. Based on the analysis of the nature of these mathematicisable moments, we present several design options that are being implemented in a didactic vers...

  8. Optimum Tower Crane Selection and Supporting Design Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo Won Sohn

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available To optimize tower crane selection and supporting design, lifting requirements (as well as stability should be examined, followed by a review of economic feasibility. However, construction engineers establish plans based on data provided by equipment suppliers since there are no tools with which to thoroughly examine a support design's suitability for various crane types, and such plans lack the necessary supporting data. In such cases it is impossible to optimize a tower crane selection to satisfy lifting requirements in terms of cost, and to perform lateral support and foundation design. Thus, this study is intended to develop an optimum tower crane selection and supporting design management method based on stability. All cases that are capable of generating an optimization of approximately 3,000 ˜ 15,000 times are calculated to identify the candidate cranes with minimized cost, which are examined. The optimization method developed in the study is expected to support engineers in determining the optimum lifting equipment management.

  9. Report of ejections in the Spanish Air Force, 1979-1995: an epidemiological and comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Vázquez, J M; Durán Tejeda, M R; García Alcón, J L

    1999-07-01

    Ejection seats have saved many lives with more than 80% of pilots having survived an ejection. Nevertheless, ejection injuries are seen in all modern air forces. An epidemiological study has been carried out on the 48 ejections made by the Spanish Air Force (SpAF) from 1979-1995. From data facilitated by the Flight Safety Section of the SpAF Staff, by the Flight Safety Section of Squadrons, and from personal reports of pilots who survived ejections a form was created. Relationships between data concerning aeronautical parameters, pilot data and injuries have been found, and a comparative study was made between these results and data shown by air forces of other countries. Of 48 pilots who ejected, 7 died, 25 had severe injuries, 11 had minor injuries and 5 had no injuries. The reason for the ejections included 35 cases of technical failure, and 13 cases of human error. Of 43 surviving pilots, 23 were injured only at the egress phase, 1 1 only at landing, and 9 cases at both moments. None of the five pilots who ejected outside the ejection envelope were able to adopt the correct position. However, of 43 pilots who ejected within the envelope, 19 were seated in good position. Of 13 pilots who maintained control of the airplane, 9 were able to adopt a correct position. Of 35 pilots who effected the ejection without control of the aircraft, 25 were not able to achieve a correct seated position. The pilot position in the ejection seat, plane control, ejection inside the envelope, the pilot's training in how to assume the necessary body position at both egress and landing phases are determining factors for successful ejections.

  10. Survivability and injuries from use of rocket-assisted ejection seats: analysis of 232 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Matthew E

    2006-09-01

    Ejection injury has been documented with respect to non-rocket-assisted seats, but there is little information on injuries associated with rocket-assisted seats. This study analyses the survivability of military accidents and the injuries associated with rocket-assisted ejection. A total of 232 Royal Air Force accident reports were accessed and aircrews' injuries were related to the aircraft parameters of ejection, aircrew anthropometry, and the ejection seat and parachute dynamics. Ejection sequences were simulated using a computerized modeling tool to provide information relating to the dynamic response index, acceleration of the ejection seats, and performance of the parachutes. Ejection survival was 89.2% overall, 95.7% for within envelope ejections and 23.8% for out of envelope ejections. There were 29.4% of aircrew who sustained spinal fractures. Another 14.2% of aircrew sustained a head injury and the incidence of head injury in Tornado ejectees was higher than the other aircraft types. Compared with 5.8% of ejectees from aircraft with an arm restraint system, 11.2% of aircrew sustained upper limb flail injuries from ejecting from aircraft without an arm restraint system. Arm flail injuries occurred at a higher aircraft speed at ejection compared with ejections where no arm flail injuries were sustained. There was also 18% of aircrew who sustained lower limb parachute landing injuries. Information from this study has lead to a redesign of the Tornado ejection seat headbox, an improvement in the Tornado ejection catapult dynamics, an upgrade of escape system parachutes, and provided evidence that future aircraft should be fitted with an arm restraint system.

  11. Tall towers for large wind turbines. Report from Vindforsk project V-342

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engstroem, Staffan; Lyrner, Tomas; Hassanzadeh, Manouchehr; Stalin, Thomas; Johansson, John

    2010-07-15

    The general rule of thumb has been to furnish a wind turbine with a tower as tall as the turbine diameter, with deviations downwards for high wind speed sites. In this report the statement is questioned, with special emphasis for wind turbines sited in forests. The aim of this project was to propose and calculate candidate types of tall towers for on-shore wind turbines in the 3 - 5 MW range, with special reference to siting in forests with a representative wind shear. During the project this scope has been more precisely defined to study 3 and 5 MW wind turbines with hub heights of 80 - 175 meters featuring the following tower solutions: 1. Steel shell tower designed in a conventional way with flanges and both longitudinal and transverse welds. 2. Steel shell tower with bolted friction joints only. 3. Concrete tower with pretensioned steel tendons. 4. Hybrid tower with a lower concrete part and an upper part built as a conventional steel shell. 5. Lattice tower. 6. Wooden tower. During the execution of the project the design of a total of 42 towers was outlined and calculated. Today the welded steel shell tower dominates the wind turbine market. Larger turbines and higher hub heights result in larger optimal tower base diameters. For the road transportation there are limitations due to bridges and other obstacles. In Sweden the limit for transports with special permits in general maximizes the diameter to 4,5 metres. To some extent it is still technically possible to build towers with a less than optimal diameter, but due to the high mass and the large wall thickness they tend to be uneconomical in comparison with other alternatives above a hub height of roughly 100 metres. In this report welded steel shell towers were outlined for 3 MW turbines up to a hub height of 150 metres whereas the limit for the 5 MW towers was 100 metres. When diameter restrictions tend to make welded towers uneconomical, the next logical choice is steel shell towers with bolted friction

  12. Communication towers, lights, and birds: successful methods of reducing the frequency of avian collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Joelle; Kerlinger, Paul; Manville, Albert M

    2009-03-01

    Estimates suggest that each year millions of birds, predominantly Neotropical migrating songbirds, collide with communication towers. To determine the relative collision risks that different nighttime Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) communication tower obstruction lighting systems pose to night-migrating birds, we compared fatalities at towers with different systems: white strobe lights only; red strobe-like lights only; red, flashing, incandescent lights only; and red, strobe-like lights combined with non-flashing, steady-burning, red lights. Avian fatality data used to compare these tower light systems were collected simultaneously in Michigan on 20 consecutive days during early morning hours during peak songbird migration at 24 towers in May and September 2005 (total = 40 days). Twenty-one towers were 116-146 m above ground level (AGL), and three were > or = 305 m AGL. During the two 20-day sample periods, we found a mean of 3.7 birds under 116-146 m AGL towers equipped with only red or white flashing obstruction lights, whereas towers with non-flashing/steady-burning lights in addition to the flashing lights were responsible for 13.0 fatalities per season. Kruskal-Wallis test, ANOVA, Student's t test, and multiple comparisons procedures determined that towers lit at night with only flashing lights were involved in significantly fewer avian fatalities than towers lit with systems that included the FAA "status quo" lighting system (i.e., a combination of red, flashing lights and red, non-flashing lights). There were no significant differences in fatality rates among towers lit with red strobes, white strobes, and red, incandescent, flashing lights. Results from related studies at the same towers in May and September 2004 and September 2003 provide ancillary support for these findings. Our results suggest that avian fatalities can be reduced, perhaps by 50-71%, at guyed communication towers by removing non-flashing/steady-burning red lights. Our lighting

  13. EPISODIC EJECTION FROM ACTIVE ASTEROID 311P/PANSTARRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jewitt, David [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California at Los Angeles, 595 Charles Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 (United States); Agarwal, Jessica [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Gottingen (Germany); Weaver, Harold [The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Mutchler, Max [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Larson, Stephen, E-mail: jewitt@ucla.edu [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 East University Boulevard, Tucson AZ 85721-0092 (United States)

    2015-01-10

    We examine the development of the active asteroid 311P/PANSTARRS (formerly, 2013 P5) in the period from 2013 September to 2014 February using high resolution images from the Hubble Space Telescope. This multi-tailed object is characterized by a single, reddish nucleus of absolute magnitude H ≥ 18.98 ± 0.10, corresponding to an equal-area sphere of radius ≤200 ± 20 m (for assumed geometric albedo 0.29 ± 0.09). We set an upper limit to the radii of possible companion nuclei at ∼10 m. The nucleus ejected debris in nine discrete episodes, spread irregularly over a nine month interval, each time forming a distinct tail. Particles in the tails range from about 10 μm to at least 80 mm in radius, and were ejected at speeds <1 m s{sup –1}. The ratio of the total ejected dust mass to the nucleus mass is ∼3×10{sup –5}, corresponding to a global surface layer ∼2 mm thick, or to a deeper layer covering a smaller fraction of the surface. The observations are incompatible with an origin of the activity by impact or by the sublimation of entrapped ice. This object appears to be shedding its regolith by rotational (presumably YORP-driven) instability. Long-term fading of the photometry (months) is attributed to gradual dissipation of near-nucleus dust. Photometric variations on short timescales (<0.7 hr) are probably caused by fast rotation of the nucleus. However, because of limited time coverage and dilution of the nucleus signal by near-nucleus dust, we have not been able to determine the rotation period.

  14. VLA Measurements of Faraday Rotation through Coronal Mass Ejections

    OpenAIRE

    Kooi, Jason E.; Fischer, Patrick D.; Buffo, Jacob J.; Spangler, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large-scale eruptions of plasma from the Sun that play an important role in space weather. Faraday rotation (FR) is the rotation of the plane of polarization that results when a linearly polarized signal passes through a magnetized plasma such as a CME. FR observations of a source near the Sun can provide information on the plasma structure of a CME shortly after launch. We report on simultaneous white-light and radio observations made of three CMEs in August...

  15. Arterial Stiffening With Exercise in Patients With Heart Failure and Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Yogesh N V; Andersen, Mads J; Obokata, Masaru; Koepp, Katlyn E; Kane, Garvan C; Melenovsky, Vojtech; Olson, Thomas P; Borlaug, Barry A

    2017-07-11

    Aortic stiffening and reduced nitric oxide (NO) availability may contribute to the pathophysiology of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). This study compared indices of arterial stiffness at rest and during exercise in subjects with HFpEF and hypertensive control subjects to examine their relationships to cardiac hemodynamics and determine whether exertional arterial stiffening can be mitigated by inorganic nitrite. A total of 22 hypertensive control subjects and 98 HFpEF subjects underwent hemodynamic exercise testing with simultaneous expired gas analysis to measure oxygen consumption. Invasively measured radial artery pressure waveforms were converted to central aortic waveforms by transfer function to assess integrated measures of pulsatile aortic load, including arterial compliance, resistance, elastance, and wave reflection. Arterial load and wave reflections in HFpEF were similar to those in control subjects at rest. During submaximal exercise, HFpEF subjects displayed reduced total arterial compliance and higher effective arterial elastance despite similar mean arterial pressures in control subjects. This was directly correlated with higher ventricular filling pressures and depressed cardiac output reserve (both p exercise, increased wave reflections, impaired compliance, and increased resistance and elastance were observed in subjects with HFpEF. A subset of HFpEF subjects (n = 52) received sodium nitrite or placebo therapy in a 1:1 double-blind, randomized fashion. Compared to placebo, nitrite decreased aortic wave reflections at rest and improved arterial compliance and elastance and central hemodynamics during exercise. Abnormal pulsatile aortic loading during exercise occurs in HFpEF independent of hypertension and is correlated with classical hemodynamic derangements that develop with stress. Inorganic nitrite mitigates arterial stiffening with exercise and improves hemodynamics, indicating that arterial stiffening with

  16. Development of heavy steel plate for Mayflower Resolution, special purpose vessel for erection of offshore wind towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuetz, W.; Schroeter, F.

    2005-05-15

    Special problems necessitate special solutions. Installation vessels for the erection of offshore wind towers are subject to extremely demanding design and structural specifications. Such projects are made possible only by the use of high strength, fine grained structural steels possessing good toughness properties even at extremely low temperatures; in addition, such steels must also offer good workability. Such steel plate material exhibits mechanical properties greatly superior to those possessed by conventional shipbuilding plate. This article focuses on the material for such an installation vessel and the underlying steel development work performed at AG der Dillinger Huettenwerke. (author)

  17. Expanding subjectivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda; Soldz, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A major theme in recent psychoanalytic thinking concerns the use of therapist subjectivity, especially “countertransference,” in understanding patients. This thinking converges with and expands developments in qualitative research regarding the use of researcher subjectivity as a tool to understa...

  18. Visibility analysis of fire lookout towers in the Boyabat State Forest Enterprise in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucuk, Omer; Topaloglu, Ozer; Altunel, Arif Oguz; Cetin, Mehmet

    2017-07-01

    For a successful fire suppression, it is essential to detect and intervene forest fires as early as possible. Fire lookout towers are crucial assets in detecting forest fires, in addition to other technological advancements. In this study, we performed a visibility analysis on a network of fire lookout towers currently operating in a relatively fire-prone region in Turkey's Western Black Sea region. Some of these towers had not been functioning properly; it was proposed that these be taken out of the grid and replaced with new ones. The percentage of visible areas under the current network of fire lookout towers was 73%; it could rise to 81% with the addition of newly proposed towers. This study was the first research to conduct a visibility analysis of current and newly proposed fire lookout towers in the Western Black Sea region and focus on its forest fire problem.

  19. Treatment of hypertension in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asrar ul Haq, Muhammad; Hare, David L; Wong, Chiew; Hayat, Umair; Barlis, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Prevalence of Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection (HFPEF) has been rising steadily in the recent past. Studies have shown that at least half of patients presenting with symptoms and signs of heart failure (HF) have preserved left ventricular ejection fraction, i.e. HFPEF, and that this portion of the HF population consists predominantly of women, older age group, and people with hypertension and other cardiovascular risk factors. The morbidity and mortality associated with HFPEF are much higher than the normal population. Chronic hypertension is the most common cause in addition to age, with suggestion of up to 60% of patients with HFPEF being hypertensive. Addressing the specific aetiology and aggressive risk factor modification remain the mainstay in the treatment of HFPEF. Current guidelines recommend the management should involve treatment of hypertension, control of heart rate, venous pressure reduction, and prevention of myocardial ischemia. This review aims to discuss the role of hypertension in the pathophysiology, risk stratification and prognosis of HFPEF, as well as the current available data on various antihypertensive options in this population.

  20. Right heart dysfunction in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melenovsky, Vojtech; Hwang, Seok-Jae; Lin, Grace; Redfield, Margaret M.; Borlaug, Barry A.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Right heart function is not well characterized in patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). The goal of this study was to examine the haemodynamic, clinical, and prognostic correlates of right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) in HFpEF. Methods and results Heart failure and preserved ejection fraction patients (n = 96) and controls (n = 46) underwent right heart catheterization, echocardiographic assessment, and follow-up. Right and left heart filling pressures, pulmonary artery (PA) pressures, and right-sided chamber dimensions were higher in HFpEF compared with controls, while left ventricular size and EF were similar. Right ventricular dysfunction (defined by RV fractional area change, FAC Right ventricular function was impaired in HFpEF compared with controls using both load-dependent (FAC: 40 ± 10 vs. 53 ± 7%, P Right heart dysfunction is common in HFpEF and is caused by both RV contractile impairment and afterload mismatch from pulmonary hypertension. Right ventricular dysfunction in HFpEF develops with increasing PA pressures, atrial fibrillation, male sex, and left ventricular dysfunction, and may represent a novel therapeutic target. PMID:24875795

  1. Spontaneous Aerosol Ejection: Origin of Inorganic Particles in Biomass Pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Andrew R; Gantt, Rachel; Joseph, Kristeen E; Maduskar, Saurabh; Paulsen, Alex D; Krumm, Christoph; Zhu, Cheng; Dauenhauer, Paul J

    2016-06-08

    At high thermal flux and temperatures of approximately 500 °C, lignocellulosic biomass transforms to a reactive liquid intermediate before evaporating to condensable bio-oil for downstream upgrading to renewable fuels and chemicals. However, the existence of a fraction of nonvolatile compounds in condensed bio-oil diminishes the product quality and, in the case of inorganic materials, catalyzes undesirable aging reactions within bio-oil. In this study, ablative pyrolysis of crystalline cellulose was evaluated, with and without doped calcium, for the generation of inorganic-transporting aerosols by reactive boiling ejection from liquid intermediate cellulose. Aerosols were characterized by laser diffraction light scattering, inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy, and high-speed photography. Pyrolysis product fractionation revealed that approximately 3 % of the initial feed (both organic and inorganic) was transported to the gas phase as aerosols. Large bubble-to-aerosol size ratios and visualization of significant late-time ejections in the pyrolyzing cellulose suggest the formation of film bubbles in addition to the previously discovered jet formation mechanism. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at Atqasuk (METTWR2H) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritsche, MT

    2006-01-01

    The Atqasuk meteorology station (AMET) uses mainly conventional in situ sensors to measure wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, dew point, and humidity mounted on a 10-m tower. It also obtains barometric pressure, visibility and precipitation data from sensors at or near the base of the tower. In addition, a chilled mirror hygrometer (CMH) is located at 1 m for comparison purposes. Temperature and relative humidity (RH) probes are mounted at 2 m and 5 m on the tower.

  3. Modification of General Research Corporation (GRC) Dynatup 8200 Drop Tower Rebounding Brake System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    ARL-TN-0770 ● AUG 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Modification of General Research Corporation ( GRC ) Dynatup 8200 Drop Tower...Research Laboratory Modification of General Research Corporation ( GRC ) Dynatup 8200 Drop Tower Rebounding Brake System by David Gray and...Research Corporation ( GRC ) Dynatup 8200 Drop Tower Rebounding Brake System 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  4. GA optimization model for solving tower crane location problem in construction site

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Adel Abdelmegid; Khaled Mohamed Shawki; Hesham Abdel-Khalek

    2015-01-01

    Tower crane is increasingly becoming one of the key components of temporary site layout facilities in most construction projects. Determining the location of tower crane is an essential task of layout planning, which is also the central focus of this study. The optimization of tower crane location depends on many interrelated factors, including site constraints, shape and size of the buildings, type and quantity of required materials, crane configurations, crane type, and construction site la...

  5. How to Make a Microgravity Drop Tower for Your Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLombard, Richard; Hall, Nancy R.

    2014-01-01

    Microgravity is quite often seen as exotic and special as astronauts float around in the International Space Station, eating MM's in mid-air, and performing science experiments, all done seemingly without gravity being present. Surprisingly enough, up on the ISS there is about 90 of the same gravity that holds you to the floor in your classroom or museum exhibit hall. Participate in this session and you will understand that and more. You can use simple devices to demonstrate microgravity conditions in your classroom or museum exhibit hall. This will be the same microgravity condition that astronauts experience on the ISS, just for a much shorter period of time. Contrary to popular opinion of some people, microgravity is NOT caused by zero gravity up there. Microgravity on the ISS is due to free fall within the Earth's gravitational field. That means you can drop an item in free fall in your classroom and museum exhibit hall and that item will experience microgravity. In this session, a short theory segment will explain and reinforce these concepts so that you may explain to others. The session will concentrate on showing the session participants how to make an effective, but inexpensive, drop tower for use in the classroom. Such a drop tower may be used to reinforce classroom instruction in physics and forces motion as well as serve as a platform for student investigations, classroom competitions, and student science or technology fair entries. Session participants will build their own simple microgravity experiment and operate them in a drop tower, compare results, and modify their experiment based on results. This material is also useful for public demonstrations at school open houses, travelling museum exhibits, fixed museum exhibits, and independent student projects or experiments. These free fall concepts also connect terrestrial demonstrations with planetary moon motion, comet trajectory, and more.

  6. Atmospheric extinction in simulation tools for solar tower plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrieder, Natalie; Wilbert, Stefan; Schroedter-Homscheidt, Marion; Schnell, Franziska; Guevara, Diana Mancera; Buck, Reiner; Giuliano, Stefano; Pitz-Paal, Robert

    2017-06-01

    Atmospheric extinction causes significant radiation losses between the heliostat field and the receiver in a solar tower plants. These losses vary with site and time. State of the art is that in ray-tracing and plant optimization tools, atmospheric extinction is included by choosing between few constant standard atmospheric conditions. Even though some tools allow the consideration of site and time dependent extinction data, such data sets are nearly never available. This paper summarizes and compares the most common model equations implemented in several ray-tracing tools. There are already several methods developed and published to measure extinction on-site. An overview of the existing methods is also given here. Ray-tracing simulations of one exemplary tower plant at the Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA) are presented to estimate the plant yield deviations between simulations using standard model equations instead of extinction time series. For PSA, the effect of atmospheric extinction accounts for losses between 1.6 and 7 %. This range is caused by considering overload dumping or not. Applying standard clear or hazy model equations instead of extinction time series lead to an underestimation of the annual plant yield at PSA. The discussion of the effect of extinction in tower plants has to include overload dumping. Situations in which overload dumping occurs are mostly connected to high radiation levels and low atmospheric extinction. Therefore it can be recommended that project developers should consider site and time dependent extinction data especially on hazy sites. A reduced uncertainty of the plant yield prediction can significantly reduce costs due to smaller risk margins for financing and EPCs. The generation of extinction data for several locations in form of representative yearly time series or geographical maps should be further elaborated.

  7. Drop Tower Experiments concerning Fluid Management under Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaulke, Diana; Dreyer, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Transport and positioning of liquid under microgravity is done utilizing capillary forces. Therefore, capillary transport processes have to be understood for a wide variety of space applications, ranging from propellant management in tanks of space transportation systems to eating and drinking devices for astronauts. There are two types of liquid transportation in microgravity using capillary forces. First, the driven liquid flow in open channels where the capillary forces at free surfaces ensure a gas and vapor free flow. Here it is important to know the limiting flow rate through such an open channel before the free surface collapses and gas is sucked into the channel. A number of different experiments at the drop tower Bremen, on sounding rockets and at the ISS have been conducted to analyse this phenomenon within different geometries. As result a geometry dependent theory for calculating the maximum flow rate has been found. On the other hand liquid positioning and transportation requires the capillary pressure of curved surfaces to achieve a liquid flow to a desired area. Especially for space applications the weight of structure has to be taken into account for development. For example liquid positioning in tanks can be achieved via a complicated set of structure filling the whole tank resulting in heavy devices not reasonable in space applications. Astrium developed in cooperation with ZARM a propellant management device much smaller than the tank volume and ensuring a gas and vapour free supply of propellant to the propulsion system. In the drop tower Bremen a model of this device was tested concerning different microgravity scenarios. To further decrease weight and ensure functionality within different scenarios structure elements are designed as perforated geometries. Capillary transport between perforated plates has been analyzed concerning the influence of geometrical pattern of perforations. The conducted experiments at the drop tower Bremen show the

  8. Cooling Tower (Evaporative Cooling System) Measurement and Verification Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurnik, Charles W. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Boyd, Brian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stoughton, Kate M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lewis, Taylor [Colorado Energy Office, Denver, CO (United States)

    2017-12-05

    This measurement and verification (M and V) protocol provides procedures for energy service companies (ESCOs) and water efficiency service companies (WESCOs) to determine water savings resulting from water conservation measures (WCMs) in energy performance contracts associated with cooling tower efficiency projects. The water savings are determined by comparing the baseline water use to the water use after the WCM has been implemented. This protocol outlines the basic structure of the M and V plan, and details the procedures to use to determine water savings.

  9. European sail tower SPS [Solar Power Satellite] concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seboldt, W.; Leipold, M.; Hanowski, N. [Institute of Space Sensor Technology and Planetary Exploration, Cologne (Germany). German Aerospace Center; Klimke, M. [HOPE Worldwide Deutschland, Berlin (Germany)

    2001-06-01

    Based on a DLR-study in 1998/99 on behalf of ESA/ESTEC called ''System Concepts, Architectures and Technologies for Space Exploration and Utilization (SE and U)'' a new design for an Earth-orbiting Solar Power Satellite (SPS) has been developed. The design is called ''European Sail Tower SPS'' and consists mainly of deplorable sail-like structures derived from the ongoing DLR/ESA solar sail technology development activity. Such an SPS satellite features an extremely light-weight and large tower-like orbital system and could supply Europe with significant amounts of electrical power generated by photovoltaic cells and subsequently transmitted to earth via microwaves. In order to build up the sail tower, 60 units - each consisting of a pair of square-shaped sails - are moved from LEO to GEO with electric propulsion and successively assembled in GEO robotically on a central strut. Each single sail has dimensions of 150 m x 150 m and is automatically deployed, using four diagonal lightweight carbon fiber (CFRP) booms which are initially rolled up on a central hub. The electric thrusters for the transport to GEO could also be used for orbit and attitude control of the assembled tower which has a total length of about 15 km and would be mainly gravity gradient stabilized. Employing thin film solar cell technology, each sail is used as a solar array and produces an electric power in orbit of about 3.7 MW{sub e}. A microwave antenna with a diameter of 1 km transmits the power to a 10 km rectenna on the ground. The total mass of this 450 MW SPS is about 2100 tons. First estimates indicate that the costs for one kWh delivered in this way could compete with present day energy costs, if launch costs would decrease by two orders of magnitude. Furthermore, mass production and large numbers of installed SPS systems must be assumed in order to lower significantly the production costs and to reduce the influence of the expensive technology

  10. Drop Tower Facility at Queensland University of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plagens, Owen; Castillo, Martin; Steinberg, Theodore; Ong, Teng-Cheong

    The Queensland University of Technology (QUT) Drop Tower Facility is a {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}2.1 second, 21.3 m fall, dual capsule drop tower system. The dual capsule comprises of an uncoupled exterior hollow drag shield that experiences drag by the ambient atmosphere with the experimental capsule falling within the drag shield. The dual capsule system is lifted to the top of the drop tower via a mechanical crane and the dropping process is initiated by the cutting of a wire coupling the experimental package and suspending the drag shield. The internal experimental capsule reaches the bottom of the drag shield floor just prior to the deceleration stage at the air bag and during this time experience gravity levels of {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}10textsuperscript{-6} g. The deceleration system utilizes an inflatable airbag where experimental packages can be designed to experience a maximum deceleration of {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}10textsuperscript{18} g for {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}0.1 seconds. The drag shield can house experimental packages with a maximum diameter of 0.8 m and height of 0.9 m. The drag shield can also be used in foam mode, where the walls are lined with foam and small experiments can be dropped completely untethered. This mode is generally used for the study of microsatellite manipulation. Payloads can be powered by on-board power systems with power delivered to the experiment until free fall occurs. Experimental data that can be collected includes but is not limited to video, temperature, pressure, voltage/current from the power supply, and triggering mechanisms outputs which are simultaneously collected via data logging systems and high speed video recording systems. Academic and commercial projects are currently under investigation at the QUT Drop Tower Facility and collaboration is openly welcome at this facility. Current research includes the study of heterogeneously burning metals in oxygen which is aimed at fire safety applications and

  11. TDRS-H is lifted up launch tower at CCAFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    An overhead crane is positioned on the nose fairing covering the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS-H) in order to lift it up the tower at Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. It will be mated with the Atlas IIA/Centaur rocket, which is already stacked, for launch on June 29. The satellite will augment the TDRS system's existing S- and Ku-band frequencies by adding Ka- band capability. TDRS will serve as the sole means of continuous, high-data-rate communication with the Space Shuttle, with the International Space Station upon its completion, and with dozens of unmanned scientific satellites in low earth orbit.

  12. Dynamic modeling of Badaling molten salt tower CSP pilot plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zijiang; Lu, Jiahui; Zhang, Qiangqiang; Li, Zhi; Li, Xin; Wang, Zhifeng

    2017-06-01

    Under the collaboration framework between EDF China R&D Centre and CAS-IEE, a preliminary numerical model of 1MWth molten salt tower solar power demonstration plant in Badaling, Beijing is presented in this paper. All key components in the plant are presented throughout detailed modules in the model according to its design specifications. Control strategies are also implemented to maintain the design system performance at transient scenario. By this model some key design figures of plant has been validated and it will be used to guide experiment set-up and plant commissioning.

  13. Reliability Analysis of a Mono-Tower Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Enevoldsen, I.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, a reliability analysis of a Mono-tower platform is presented. Te failure modes considered are yielding in the tube cross sections and fatigue failure in the butts welds. The fatigue failrue mode is investigated with a fatigue model, where the fatigue strength is expressed through SN...... relations. In determining the cumulative fatigue damage, Palmgren-Miner's rule is applied. Element reliability as well as systems reliability, is estimated using first-order reliability methods(FORM). The sensitivity of the systems reliability to various parameters is investigated. It is shown...

  14. Update on the Purdue University 2-second Drop Tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collicott, Steven

    A small drop tower of approximately one second drop duration was built in the School of Aero-nautics and Astronautics at Purdue University beginning in 1998 and operated until summer 2007. This inexpensive tower in an old airplane hanger, was built largely by Yongkang Chen, now a Research Professor at Portland State University in Oregon, USA. In about 7 years of operations, the tower generated sufficient science results for Chen's PhD thesis[1] (summarized in three AIAA Journal papers[2-4]), Fitzpatrick's MS thesis[5], two industry projects for since-canceled advanced rodent habitats for ISS, and one project for NASA Marshall. In addition to the science use, Purdue undergraduate students designed, built, and performed simpler fluids experiments for their own career advancement, including a novel investigation of the impact of imperfect repeatability of initial conditions on a zero-g fluids experiment. The tower was also used for outreach to school children. It is most satisfying that Chen's PhD research in this small tower, and subsequent discussions and interactions, helped Weislogel to propose the two Vane Gap tests in his highly successful Capillary Fluids Experiment (CFE) in the International Space Station in 2006 and 2007[6]. Chen as been involved in the remodeling of these two Vane Gap cylinders for subsequent re-launch to ISS for a second round of experiments expected in 2010 and 2011. In August 2007 the School of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Purdue University moved into the new Neil Armstrong Hall of Engineering and construction on a new 2-second drop tower began. A vertical shaft of nearly 23 meters was designed into the building. An approximately 80 m2 general-use fluids lab is at the top level, and a small access room of approximately 9 m2 is at the bottom. However, construction of the new $57M building created only the space for the science facility, not the science facility itself. The science facility is under construction and this paper presents

  15. Active tower damping and pitch balancing - design, simulation and field test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckwitz, Daniel; Shan, Martin

    2014-12-01

    The tower is one of the major components in wind turbines with a contribution to the cost of energy of 8 to 12% [1]. In this overview the load situation of the tower will be described in terms of sources of loads, load components and fatigue contribution. Then two load reduction control schemes are described along with simulation and field test results. Pitch Balancing is described as a method to reduce aerodynamic asymmetry and the resulting fatigue loads. Active Tower Damping is reducing the tower oscillations by applying appropiate pitch angle changes. A field test was conducted on an Areva M5000 wind turbine.

  16. Approximate method for calculating free vibrations of a large-wind-turbine tower structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S. C.; Linscott, B. S.

    1977-01-01

    A set of ordinary differential equations were derived for a simplified structural dynamic lumped-mass model of a typical large-wind-turbine tower structure. Dunkerley's equation was used to arrive at a solution for the fundamental natural frequencies of the tower in bending and torsion. The ERDA-NASA 100-kW wind turbine tower structure was modeled, and the fundamental frequencies were determined by the simplified method described. The approximate fundamental natural frequencies for the tower agree within 18 percent with test data and predictions analyzed.

  17. Radiation Testing of PICA at the Solar Power Tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratory's Solar Power Tower was used to irradiate specimens of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA), in order to evaluate whether this thermal protection system material responded differently to potential shock layer radiative heating than to convective heating. Tests were run at 50, 100 and 150 Watts per square centimeter levels of concentrated solar radiation. Experimental results are presented both from spectral measurements on 1- 10 mm thick specimens of PICA, as well as from in-depth temperature measurements on instrumented thicker test specimens. Both spectral measurements and measured in-depth temperature profiles showed that, although it is a porous, low-density material, PICA does not exhibit problematic transparency to the tested high levels of NIR radiation, for all pragmatic cm-to-inch scale thicknesses. PICA acted as a surface absorber to efficiently absorb the incident visible and near infrared incident radiation in the top 2 millimeter layer in the Solar Power Tower tests up to 150 Watts per square centimeter.

  18. QUANTUS: Implementing atom optical experiments in the Bremen drop tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müntinga, Hauke; van Zoest, T.; Ahlers, H.; Seidel, S. T.; Herr, W.; Rudolph, J.; Gaaloul, N.; Singh, Y.; Schulze, T. A.; Rode, C.; Schkolnik, V.; Ertmer, W.; Rasel, E.; Müntinga, H.; Künemann, T.; Resch, A.; Herrmann, S.; Lümmerzahl, C.; Dittus, H.; Vogel, A.; Wenzlawski, A.; Sengstock, K.; Meyer, N.; Bongs, K.; Krutzik, M.; Lewoczko-Adamczyk, W.; Schiemangk, M.; Peters, A.; Eckart, M.; Kajari, E.; Arnold, S.; Nandi, G.; Walser, R.; Schleich, W. P.; Steinmetz, T.; Hünsch, T. W.; Reichel, J.

    We report on the current status of the QUANTUS free fall BEC experiment at the ZARM drop tower in Bremen. After the first realization of a BEC in microgravity in 2007, we were able to observe conden-sates after an unprecedented time of free evolution. The extremely shallow traps possible in microgravity and resulting ultralow temperatures of a few nK allow for further studies ranging from coherence properties of condensates to inertial sensors based on matter waves. In our talk we will focus on technological challanges of the project and its roll in bringing matter wave optics into space. A drop tower experiment is considered a stepping stone towards the ISS or other platforms as it makes high demands on mechanical stability, power consumption and payload. After showing the feasibility of such a project we are now working on a second generation apparatus which leads the way to high precision measurements of gravitational forces and eventually a quantum test of Einstein's weak equivalence principle. These goals are worked on in close cooperation with QUEST and the projects PRIMUS and LASUS. The QUANTUS project is a collaboration of U Hamburg, U Ulm, HU Berlin, MPQ Munich, ZARM at U Bremen and LU Hannover. It is supported by the German Space Agency DLR with funds provided by the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi) under grant numbers 50WM0835 -50WM0839.

  19. Modified corrosion protection coatings for Concrete tower of Transmission line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kai; Jing, Xiangyang; Wang, Hongli; Yue, Zengwu; Wu, Yaping; Mi, Xuchun; Li, Xingeng; Chen, Suhong; Fan, Zhibin

    2017-12-01

    By adding nano SiO2 particles, an enhanced K-PRTV anti-pollution flashover coating had been prepared. Optical profile meter (GT-K), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) characterization were carried out on the coating surface analysis. With the use of modified epoxy resin as the base material, the supplemented by phosphate as a corrosion stabilizer, to achieve a corrosion of steel and galvanized steel with rust coating. Paint with excellent adhesion, more than 10MPa (1), resistant to neutral salt spray 1000h does not appear rust point. At the same time coating a large amount of ultra-fine zinc powder can be added for the tower galvanized layer zinc repair function, while the paint in the zinc powder for the tower to provide sacrificial anode protection, to achieve self-repair function of the coating. Compared to the market with a significant reduction in the cost of rust paint, enhance the anti-corrosion properties.

  20. Tower wake/blade interaction noise of a wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiwaki, Hideo; Takeda, Katsumi

    1987-10-01

    A scale model of a 1.5m dia. two-bladed windturbine was used in an anechoic chamber that provided a free-stream velocity of 8m/s. The blades used were a 1.5/8 scale model of a test machine for a local energy utilization project promoted by the Science and Technology Agency. The height of the tower from the ground level was 1.8m. The acoustic measurements were made in a circle of 1.6m downstream from the machine at the height of the windmill centerline. The noise level of the on-axis spectra was about 15dB larger than that of the off-axis. This is a result of the dipole nature of the acoustic impulse. The Wortmann airfoil (FX 77-W series) was employed for the blade profiles and the Reynolds number was 10(5), based on the tip chord length. The experiment revealed that the sound intensity at each harmonic was not proportional to the axial and radial extents of the wake. The elliptic slender configuration was the quietest, while the square configuration was the loudest. From a practical point of view, it is suggested that the circular section is most suitable for the tower leg.

  1. Impact of tower modeling on wind turbine wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleusberg, Elektra; Schlatter, Philipp; Henningson, Dan

    2017-11-01

    Recent research suggests the importance of modeling the support structure (tower and nacelle) when investigating the wake development behind wind turbines. These investigations are however mostly limited to low ambient turbulence levels which seldomly occur in field conditions. We present numerical simulations of wind turbine wakes using the actuator line method under different inflow conditions including varying turbulence levels and sheared inflow. The wind turbine, which employs the NREL S826 airfoil, is modeled after experiments conducted at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. The rotor is investigated when perpendicular to the inflow and at a yaw angle of 30 degrees. The support structure is modeled using lift and drag body forces based on tabulated data. The simulations are performed with the spectral-element code Nek5000. After discussing the setup of the numerical domain and the turbulent inflow boundary condition, the influence of the tower model is characterized under turbulent, sheared and uniform inflow and the impact on downstream turbines is evaluated.

  2. Magnetic Evolution of Mini-Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarbakhsh, L.; Alipour, N.; Safari, H.

    2016-03-01

    The present study investigates the relationship between mini-coronal mass ejections (mini-CMEs) and the evolution of their magnetic fluxes. An automatic detection algorithm was used to detect mini-dimmings in 171 Å images taken with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Using the difference images for the dimmings, 131 events that satisfied mini-CME signatures were selected. Changes in their magnetic structure using photospheric line-of-sight magnetograms taken with the Heliospheric and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on SDO were investigated. It was found that 27 % of the events had slight changes and 73 % showed considerable changes in magnetic flux. About 18 % of the magnetic structures evolved by cancellation and 38 % by complex flux changes.

  3. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections observed by MESSENGER and Venus Express

    CERN Document Server

    Good, S W

    2015-01-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) observed by the MESSENGER (MES) and Venus Express (VEX) spacecraft have been catalogued and analysed. The ICMEs were identified by a relatively smooth rotation of the magnetic field direction consistent with a flux rope structure, coinciding with a relatively enhanced magnetic field strength. A total of 35 ICMEs were found in the surveyed MES data (primarily from March 2007 to April 2012), and 84 ICMEs in the surveyed VEX data (from May 2006 to December 2013). The ICME flux rope configurations have been determined. Ropes with northward leading edges were about four times more common than ropes with southward leading edges, in agreement with a previously established solar cycle dependence. Ropes with low inclinations to the solar equatorial plane were about four times more common than ropes with high inclinations, possibly an observational effect. Left and right-handed ropes were observed in almost equal numbers. In addition, data from MES, VEX, STEREO-A, STEREO-B ...

  4. Geoeffectiveness of Coronal Mass Ejections in the SOHO Era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dumbovic, M.; Devos, A.; Vrsnak, B.

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of the study is to determine the probability distributions of the geomagnetic Dst index as a function of the coronal mass ejection (CME) and solar flare parameters for the purpose of establishing a probabilistic forecast tool for the geomagnetic storm intensity. Several CME...... and flare parameters as well as the effect of successive-CME occurrence in changing the probability for a certain range of Dst index values, were examined. The results confirm some of already known relationships between remotely-observed properties of solar eruptive events and geomagnetic storms, namely...... the importance of initial CME speed, apparent width, source position, and the associated solar flare class. In this paper we quantify these relationships in a form to be used for space weather forecasting in future. The results of the statistical study are employed to construct an empirical statistical model...

  5. An ice-cream cone model for coronal mass ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, X. H.; Wang, C. B.; Dou, X. K.

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we use an ice-cream cone model to analyze the geometrical and kinematical properties of the coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Assuming that in the early phase CMEs propagate with near-constant speed and angular width, some useful properties of CMEs, namely the radial speed (v), the angular width (α), and the location at the heliosphere, can be obtained considering the geometrical shapes of a CME as an ice-cream cone. This model is improved by (1) using an ice-cream cone to show the near real configuration of a CME, (2) determining the radial speed via fitting the projected speeds calculated from the height-time relation in different azimuthal angles, (3) not only applying to halo CMEs but also applying to nonhalo CMEs.

  6. Pharmacologic management of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dana; Cheng, Judy W M

    2010-12-01

    To provide an overview of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF), as well as its pathophysiology, diagnosis, and clinical evidence regarding its pharmacologic management. Peer-reviewed articles were identified from MEDLINE, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, and Current Contents (all 1966-August 2010) using the search terms heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, diastolic dysfunction, diastolic heart failure, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), digoxin, β-blockers, calcium-channel blockers, and vasodilators. Citations from available articles were also reviewed for additional references. Fourteen published manuscripts relating to pharmacologic management of HFPEF were identified. The prevalence of HFPEF has continued to increase. Compared to heart failure with left ventricular systolic dysfunction, HFPEF has been largely understudied. Unlike in the management of heart failure with left ventricular systolic dysfunction, ACE inhibitors, ARBs, β-blockers, and aldosterone antagonists did not demonstrate mortality benefit in HFPEF, with the exception of one small study evaluating the use of propranolol. However, this study enrolled a small number of patients with recent history of myocardial infarction, which limited the generalizability of the results. Most of the current evidence centers on morbidity benefits and symptom reduction. One study showed that treatment with candesartan reduced hospital admissions in this population of patients. Management of HFPEF still focuses on optimally managing underlying diseases (eg, hypertension). Much remains to be learned about the appropriate pharmacologic management of patients with HFPEF. Hypertension is in most cases the predominant contributor to its development and progression. For this reason, antihypertensive treatment, including ACE inhibitors, ARBs, β-blockers, and calcium-channel blockers, has been evaluated and is recommended to control

  7. Episodic mass ejections from common-envelope objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Matthew; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Ivanova, Natasha; Justham, Stephen

    2017-09-01

    After the initial fast spiral-in phase experienced by a common-envelope binary, the system may enter a slow, self-regulated phase, possibly lasting hundreds of years, in which all the energy released by orbital decay can be efficiently transported to the surface, where it is radiated away. If the remaining envelope is to be removed during this phase, this removal must occur through some as-yet-undetermined mechanism. We carried out 1D hydrodynamic simulations of a low-mass red giant undergoing a synthetic common-envelope event in such a slow spiral-in phase, using the stellar evolutionary code mesa. We simulated the heating of the envelope due to frictional dissipation from a binary companion's orbit in multiple configurations and investigated the response of the giant's envelope. We find that our model envelopes become dynamically unstable and develop large-amplitude pulsations, with periods in the range 3-20 yr and very short growth time-scales of similar order. The shocks and associated rebounds that emerge as these pulsations grow are in some cases strong enough to dynamically eject shells of matter of up to 0.1 M⊙, ˜10 per cent of the mass of the envelope, from the stellar surface at above escape velocity. These ejections are seen to repeat within a few decades, leading to a time-averaged mass-loss rate of the order of 10-3 M⊙ yr-1, which is sufficiently high to represent a candidate mechanism for removing the entire envelope over the duration of the slow spiral-in phase.

  8. Metabolomic fingerprint of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beshay N Zordoky

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF is increasingly recognized as an important clinical entity. Preclinical studies have shown differences in the pathophysiology between HFpEF and HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF. Therefore, we hypothesized that a systematic metabolomic analysis would reveal a novel metabolomic fingerprint of HFpEF that will help understand its pathophysiology and assist in establishing new biomarkers for its diagnosis.Ambulatory patients with clinical diagnosis of HFpEF (n = 24, HFrEF (n = 20, and age-matched non-HF controls (n = 38 were selected for metabolomic analysis as part of the Alberta HEART (Heart Failure Etiology and Analysis Research Team project. 181 serum metabolites were quantified by LC-MS/MS and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Compared to non-HF control, HFpEF patients demonstrated higher serum concentrations of acylcarnitines, carnitine, creatinine, betaine, and amino acids; and lower levels of phosphatidylcholines, lysophosphatidylcholines, and sphingomyelins. Medium and long-chain acylcarnitines and ketone bodies were higher in HFpEF than HFrEF patients. Using logistic regression, two panels of metabolites were identified that can separate HFpEF patients from both non-HF controls and HFrEF patients with area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves of 0.942 and 0.981, respectively.The metabolomics approach employed in this study identified a unique metabolomic fingerprint of HFpEF that is distinct from that of HFrEF. This metabolomic fingerprint has been utilized to identify two novel panels of metabolites that can separate HFpEF patients from both non-HF controls and HFrEF patients.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02052804.

  9. The orbit's evolution of particles ejected from the surface of Phobos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineeva, Svetlana; Lupovka, Valery

    2016-04-01

    1. Introduction It is known that all giant planets have ring systems. Generally there are faint rings, such as "gossamer rings" of Jupiter. One of the basic theories of faint's origin of rings is their formation from the dust ejected in collisions of meteorite material with the natural satellites. Thus, a question of possible existence of Mars's dust rings arises. Mars has two natural satellites, which are subjected to bombardment. Evidences of this are impact craters of different sizes that cover the surface of both satellites. 2. Methods To test the theory, a calculation of the movement of simulated particles, which could be ejected from the surface of Phobos by meteorite impact, was made. The initial coordinates of 650 particles on Phobos surface were simulated using regular grid 10° × 10°. Uniform distribution of the velocity was set to the absolute value in the range of 0.5 km/s to 3 km/sec; direction of the velocity vector was assigned randomly. In this study effect of the gravitational attraction of the Sun, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Phobos and Deimos was taken into account as an attraction of the central mass. Using software package for orbital dynamic MERCURY6 [1] - an integration of the equations of motion of particles was performed using Everhart method with a Radau spacing of the 15th order [2]. 3. Results Motion of 650 particles was considered at the time interval of 10 000 years. As a result of calculation: 202 of the particles (31.1%) returned to Phobos; 132 of the particles (20.3%) fell to Mars; 173 particles (26.6%) had a hyperbolic orbit; 143 particles rotated on their orbits around Mars, and they represent 22.0% of the total number of simulated particles. The orbits of the particles are elongated: eccentricity is within the range from 0.1 to 0.95; pericentric distance varies from 3 500 km to 48 100 km; respectively apocenteric distance is from 9000 to 421 400 km. In the space, orbits are inclined to the ecliptic from 1 to 73 degrees, so

  10. Coronary microvascular rarefaction and myocardial fibrosis in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Selma F; Hussain, Saad; Mirzoyev, Sultan A; Edwards, William D; Maleszewski, Joseph J; Redfield, Margaret M

    2015-02-10

    Characterization of myocardial structural changes in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) has been hindered by the limited availability of human cardiac tissue. Cardiac hypertrophy, coronary artery disease (CAD), coronary microvascular rarefaction, and myocardial fibrosis may contribute to HFpEF pathophysiology. We identified HFpEF patients (n=124) and age-appropriate control subjects (noncardiac death, no heart failure diagnosis; n=104) who underwent autopsy. Heart weight and CAD severity were obtained from the autopsy reports. With the use of whole-field digital microscopy and automated analysis algorithms in full-thickness left ventricular sections, microvascular density (MVD), myocardial fibrosis, and their relationship were quantified. Subjects with HFpEF had heavier hearts (median, 538 g; 169% of age-, sex-, and body size-expected heart weight versus 335 g; 112% in controls), more severe CAD (65% with ≥1 vessel with >50% diameter stenosis in HFpEF versus 13% in controls), more left ventricular fibrosis (median % area fibrosis, 9.6 versus 7.1) and lower MVD (median 961 versus 1316 vessels/mm(2)) than control (Pcoronary microvascular rarefaction, and myocardial fibrosis than controls. Each of these findings may contribute to the left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and cardiac reserve function impairment characteristic of HFpEF. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Public Safety Transmitter Towers, Emergency communication towers developed for Risk Management in Oct., 2004. Completeness is unknown. Not published., Published in 2004, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Sedgwick County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Public Safety Transmitter Towers dataset current as of 2004. Emergency communication towers developed for Risk Management in Oct., 2004. Completeness is unknown. Not...

  12. Cellular Phone Towers, Cell tower locations as derived from various sources including the Department of Licenses and Inspections and the Department of Planning and Zoning., Published in 2010, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Howard County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Cellular Phone Towers dataset current as of 2010. Cell tower locations as derived from various sources including the Department of Licenses and Inspections and the...

  13. SUBJECT INDEX

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subject Index. Variation of surface electric field during geomagnetic disturbed period at Maitri, Antarctica. 1721. Geomorphology. A simple depression-filling method for raster and irregular elevation datasets. 1653. Decision Support System integrated with Geographic. Information System to target restoration actions in water-.

  14. The caracol tower at chichen itza: an ancient astronomical observatory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveni, A F; Gibbs, S L; Hartung, H

    1975-06-06

    platforms of the Caracol seem to have been laid out deliberately to point to horizon events involving the sun and the planet Venus. Of the lines taken through the windows, the Venus setting points seem most plausible to us in view of both the accuracy with which they fit the architecture and the historical evidence bearing upon the importance of Venus to the Mesoamerican people. A specific connection between the Venus calendar in the Dresden Codex and the sighting of the extreme positions of the planet along the horizon, however, is yet to be established. It is especially significant that alignments in both the base and the top of the tower relate to Venus. The solar equinox alignment in window I remains problematical, although the arrangement probably functioned as an approximate means of determining the first day of spring and the first day of autumn. Lines pointing to individual bright stars undoubtedly should be given lower value. If one is willing to carry the matching game to its ultimate completion, a stellar object can always be found which, although very obscure, will fit an alignment. In our consideration of the problem we have attempted to single out bright stars which appeared or disappeared on significant calendar dates. Other round structures resembling the Caracol exist in Mesoamerica (20), although there are comparatively few built by the Maya. Nearly all can be attributed to the cult of Quetzalcoatl (34). To our knowledge none have been carefully measured and analyzed for astronomical orientations. The ruined tower Q-152 at Mayapan bore distinct similarities to the Caracol, both in shape and structure. It probably contained only a single doorway which faced west. Both structures possessed circular corridors. A circular tower is still standing at Paalmul on the coast of Quintana Roo north of Tulum. Pollock (20, p. 115) states that it has a single room in the turret. A window similar to No. I in the Caracol faces northwest, the same direction as the base of

  15. Method and system for simulating heat and mass transfer in cooling towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathan, Desikan; Hassani, A. Vahab

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a system and method for simulating the performance of a cooling tower. More precisely, the simulator of the present invention predicts values related to the heat and mass transfer from a liquid (e.g., water) to a gas (e.g., air) when provided with input data related to a cooling tower design. In particular, the simulator accepts input data regarding: (a) cooling tower site environmental characteristics; (b) cooling tower operational characteristics; and (c) geometric characteristics of the packing used to increase the surface area within the cooling tower upon which the heat and mass transfer interactions occur. In providing such performance predictions, the simulator performs computations related to the physics of heat and mass transfer within the packing. Thus, instead of relying solely on trial and error wherein various packing geometries are tested during construction of the cooling tower, the packing geometries for a proposed cooling tower can be simulated for use in selecting a desired packing geometry for the cooling tower.

  16. Upper estimates of complexity of algorithms for multi-peg Tower of Hanoi problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Novikov

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available There are proved upper explicit estimates of complexity of lgorithms: for multi-peg Tower of Hanoi problem with the limited number of disks, for Reve's puzzle and for $5$-peg Tower of Hanoi problem with the free number of disks.

  17. 47 CFR 10.340 - Digital television transmission towers retransmission capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Digital television transmission towers... COMMERCIAL MOBILE ALERT SYSTEM System Architecture § 10.340 Digital television transmission towers... required to install on, or as part of, any broadcast television digital signal transmitter, equipment to...

  18. Is the Construct of l -Topological Spaces a Co-Tower Extension of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In an earlier paper, the second author associated with any fibre-small topological construct A and any completely distributive lattice L, an extension of A, called the (L)-co-tower extension of A. He demonstrated that many familiar constructs in fuzzy topology can be expressed as co-tower extensions of more basic constructs

  19. Fire analog: a comparison between fire plumes and energy center cooling tower plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orgill, M.M.

    1977-10-01

    Thermal plumes or convection columns associated with large fires are compared to thermal plumes from cooling towers and proposed energy centers to evaluate the fire analog concept. Energy release rates of mass fires are generally larger than for single or small groups of cooling towers but are comparable to proposed large energy centers. However, significant physical differences exist between cooling tower plumes and fire plumes. Cooling tower plumes are generally dominated by ambient wind, stability and turbulence conditions. Fire plumes, depending on burning rates and other factors, can transform into convective columns which may cause the fire behavior to become more violent. This transformation can cause strong inflow winds and updrafts, turbulence and concentrated vortices. Intense convective columns may interact with ambient winds to create significant downwind effects such as wakes and Karman vortex streets. These characteristics have not been observed with cooling tower plumes to date. The differences in physical characteristics between cooling tower and fire plumes makes the fire analog concept very questionable even though the approximate energy requirements appear to be satisfied in case of large energy centers. Additional research is suggested in studying the upper-level plume characteristics of small experimental fires so this information can be correlated with similar data from cooling towers. Numerical simulation of fires and proposed multiple cooling tower systems could also provide comparative data.

  20. 77 FR 75978 - Utility Scale Wind Towers From the People's Republic of China: Final Affirmative Countervailing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... sections thereof. Certain wind towers are designed to support the nacelle and rotor blades in a wind... imported as part of a wind turbine (i.e., accompanying nacelles and/or rotor blades). Scope Comments In... International Trade Administration Utility Scale Wind Towers From the People's Republic of China: Final...

  1. 78 FR 11146 - Utility Scale Wind Towers From the People's Republic of China: Antidumping Duty Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... certain wind towers, whether or not tapered, and sections thereof. Certain wind towers are designed to support the nacelle and rotor blades in a wind turbine with a minimum rated electrical power generation... under HTSUS 8502.31.0000 when imported as part of a wind turbine (i.e., accompanying nacelles and/or...

  2. 77 FR 33422 - Utility Scale Wind Towers From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Affirmative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... towers, whether or not tapered, and sections thereof. Certain wind towers are designed to support the nacelle and rotor blades in a wind turbine with a minimum rated electrical power generation capacity in... HTSUS 8502.31.0000 when imported as part of a wind turbine (i.e., accompanying nacelles and/or rotor...

  3. Wind Turbine Rotor-Tower Interaction Using an Incompressible Overset Grid Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahle, Frederik; Sørensen, Niels N.; Johansen, Jeppe

    2009-01-01

    , combined with the interaction with the shed vortices, which causes a strongly time-varying response. Finally, the results show that the rotor has a strong effect on the tower shedding frequency, causing under certain flow conditions vortex lock-in to take place on the upper part of the tower. Copyright...... © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  4. From the Eiffel Tower to the Javanese Dancer: Envisioning Cultural Globalization at the 1889 Paris Exhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Arguably the two main attractions for visitors to the 1889 "Exposition Universelle" (Universal Exposition), the Eiffel Tower and the live dancers from the Dutch colony of Java make for a provocative juxtaposition. Constructed expressly for the 1889 Exhibition, Gustave Eiffel's 106-story iron lattice tower became not only the world's…

  5. Using the Tower of Hanoi Puzzle to Infuse Your Mathematics Classroom with Computer Science Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzocchi, Alison S.

    2016-01-01

    This article suggests that logic puzzles, such as the well-known Tower of Hanoi puzzle, can be used to introduce computer science concepts to mathematics students of all ages. Mathematics teachers introduce their students to computer science concepts that are enacted spontaneously and subconsciously throughout the solution to the Tower of Hanoi…

  6. Numerical Simulations of a Flux Rope Ejection P. Pagano1,∗, D. H. ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most violent phenom- ena observed on the Sun. One of the most successful models to explain. CMEs is the flux rope ejection model, where a magnetic flux rope is expelled from the solar corona after a long phase along which the flux rope stays in equilibrium while magnetic ...

  7. Ejection in hostile environments: medico-psychological aspects for the fighter pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daudin, Marianne; Renard, Magali-Diane; Louzon, Virginie; Chollet, Sabine; Colas, Marie-Dominique

    2013-08-01

    In the French Air Force, commitment of fighter squadrons in Afghanistan revives the fear among pilots of being ejected in a hostile environment, along with the prospect of being captured. Although ejection in a hostile environment is an exceptional event, it is what flight crews fear most strongly over enemy territory. Since the widespread use of ejection seats in fighter aircraft in the 1950s, ejection has become a means of protecting the crews' lives. Ejection is a breaking point when the pilot suddenly passes from an intense activity to a passive position in which he (or she) is often helpless and sometimes exposed to the hostility of the environment where he lands. It is always important to analyze the circumstances surrounding an ejection. Some clinical observations allow us to understand the psycho-traumatic potential of this brutal experience. In a hostile environment, ejection quite rapidly becomes a question of survival. The pilot is technically and physically prepared during training. He (or she) regularly trains for the use of the ejection seat and the equipment to protect himself, to report, and ensure his survival until his recovery. Because it is always a singular event, on a case-by-case basis, no psychological reaction to such a situation can be modeled with a view to predicting psycho-traumatic disorders. Since 2007, there has been a medico-psychological supporting device, organized by the French Air Force, to be used after this type of event.

  8. Exercise hemodynamics in patients with and without diastolic dysfunction and preserved ejection fraction after myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads J; Ersbøll, Mads; Bro-Jeppesen, John

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (DD) is common after myocardial infarction (MI) despite preservation of left ventricular ejection fraction, yet it remains unclear how or whether DD affects cardiac hemodynamics with stress.......Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (DD) is common after myocardial infarction (MI) despite preservation of left ventricular ejection fraction, yet it remains unclear how or whether DD affects cardiac hemodynamics with stress....

  9. Biomarker Profiles of Acute Heart Failure Patients With a Mid-Range Ejection Fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tromp, Jasper; Khan, Mohsin A. F.; Mentz, Robert J.; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Metra, Marco; Dittrich, Howard C.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Teerlink, John R.; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth; Cleland, John G. F.; Givertz, Michael M.; Bloomfield, Daniel M.; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Hillege, Hans L.; Voors, Adriaan A.; van der Meer, Peter

    OBJECTIVES In this study, the authors used biomarker profiles to characterize differences between patients with acute heart failure with a midrange ejection fraction (HFmrEF) and compare them with patients with a reduced (heart failure with a reduced ejection fraction [HFrEF]) and preserved (heart

  10. Ejection Regimes in Picosecond Laser-Induced Forward Transfer of Metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohl, Ralph; Visser, C.W.; Römer, Gerardus Richardus, Bernardus, Engelina; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao; Huis in 't Veld, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a 3D direct-write method suitable for precision printing of various materials, including pure metals. To understand the ejection mechanism and thereby improve deposition, here we present visualizations of ejection events at high-spatial (submicrometer) and

  11. The step response of left ventricular pressure to ejection flow: a system oriented approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, H. B.; Wijkstra, H.

    1992-01-01

    Left ventricular pressure is dependent on both ventricular volume and ventricular ejection flow. These dependencies are usually expressed by ventricular elastance, and resistance, respectively. Resistance is a one-valued effect only, when ejection flow either is constant or increases. Decreasing

  12. EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENTS OF TOWER CONSTRUCTION TILT USING ELECTRONIC TACHEOMETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Mikhailov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern tendencies for assessment of high-rise building deformation state presuppose creation of automated and regular monitoring while using highly-accurate space positioning systems (GPS-systems, a robotic electronic tacheometer, highlyaccurate inclinators (Leica Nivel210/Nivel220-model with measuring accuracy of tilt angle up to 0.09 s, Geomos software complex (Leica Geosystems. Automated system for deformation monitoring requires significant time and material expenditures, special training of specialists so simpler methods and criteria for assessment of building deformation state are also considered as rather actual for this purpose.There are more than ten conventional methods for determining building tilt. All these methods are based on angular measurements from the fixed base while using highly-accurate theodolites. The methods are rather labor-consuming and they do not provide operational efficiency and accuracy in measurements. Introduction of electronic tacheometers with large radius of refractorless measurements of distances has made it possible to calculate coordinates on the building surface with high accuracy and at various sections (heights that results in possibility to obtain 3D model of the building surface. Leica TCRA1201 tacheometer has been set at the good visibility point of a tower construction, device orientation and plane coordinates of the temporary point have been determined with the purpose to assess a tilt value of an exhaust stack having 150 meter height. Then 3D coordinates of six points on the building surface have been measured for every stack section. After that these points have been projected on the horizontal plane. LISCAD PLUS software complex has been used for processing and interpretation of geodetic data.The proposed method permits to obtain data for determination value and direction of a tower construction tilt, immediately carry out in-situ measurements and obtain final results in the automatic mode of

  13. System and method for aligning heliostats of a solar power tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convery, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar power tower heliostat alignment system and method that includes a solar power tower with a focal area, a plurality of heliostats that each reflect sunlight towards the focal area of the solar power tower, an off-focal area location substantially close to the focal area of the solar power tower, a communication link between the off-focal area location and a misaligned heliostat, and a processor that interprets the communication between the off-focal area location and the misaligned heliostat to identify the misaligned heliostat from the plurality of heliostats and that determines a correction for the identified misaligned heliostat to realign the misaligned heliostat to reflect sunlight towards the focal area of the solar power tower.

  14. Structural analysis of floating offshore wind turbine tower based on flexible multibody dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kwang Phil; Jo, A Ra [Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering, Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Ju Hwan [Mokpo Nat' l Univ., Muan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    In this study, we perform the structural analysis of a floating offshore wind turbine tower by considering the dynamic response of the floating platform. A multibody system consisting of three blades, a hub, a nacelle, the platform, and the tower is used to model the floating wind turbine. The blades and the tower are modeled as flexible bodies using three dimensional beam elements. The aerodynamic force on the blades is calculated by the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory with hub rotation. The hydrostatic, hydrodynamic, and mooring forces are considered for the platform. The structural dynamic responses of the tower are simulated by numerically solving the equations of motion. From the simulation results, the time history of the internal forces at the nodes, such as the bending moment and stress, are obtained. In conclusion, the internal forces are compared with those obtained from static analysis to assess the effects of wave loads on the structural stability of the tower.

  15. Research on dynamic characteristics of wind turbine tower with different analysis methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji YAO

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A wind turbine located in Yunnan is taken as an example in this paper. By using the analytical method and the finite element method, the modal analysis of wind turbine tower is carried out, then the structural dynamic behavior is obtained. Based on the comparison of the results from different calculation methods, the rigidity and the resonance of tower induced by wind wheel rotation are studied. The research shows that, the finite element model is simplified, while the results of this method are rich; the transient resonance inevitably appears for two times in the starting process for the flexible wind tower which has the structure of symmetry basically; while in the normal operation stage, the wind wheel would not induce the resonance for flexible tower. The research provides a theoretical basis for the design of wind turbine tower.

  16. An experimental study of windturbine noise from blade-tower wake interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, E. N.; Harris, W. L.

    1983-04-01

    A program of experiments has been conducted to study the impulsive noise of a horizontal axis windturbine. These tests were performed on a 1/53 scale model of the DOE-NASA MOD-1 windturbine. Experiments were performed in the M.I.T. 5 x 7-1/2 ft Anechoic Windtunnel Facility. The impulsive noise of a horizontal axis windturbine is observed to result from repeated blade passage through the mean velocity deficit induced in the lee of the windturbine support tower. The two factors which most influence this noise are rotation speed and tower drag coefficient. The intensity of noise from blade tower wake interaction is predicted to increase with the fourth power of the RPM and the second power of the tower drag coefficient. These predictions are confirmed in experiments. Further experiments are also presented in order to observe directionality of the acoustic field as well as the acoustic influence of tower shape and blade number.

  17. Femtosecond pulse-width dependent trapping and directional ejection dynamics of dielectric nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Chiang, Weiyi

    2013-09-19

    We demonstrate that laser pulse duration, which determines its impulsive peak power, is an effective parameter to control the number of optically trapped dielectric nanoparticles, their ejections along the directions perpendicular to polarization vector, and their migration distances from the trapping site. This ability to controllably confine and eject the nanoparticle is explained by pulse width-dependent optical forces exerted on nanoparticles in the trapping site and ratio between the repulsive and attractive forces. We also show that the directional ejections occur only when the number of nanoparticles confined in the trapping site exceeds a definite threshold. We interpret our data by considering the formation of transient assembly of the optically confined nanoparticles, partial ejection of the assembly, and subsequent filling of the trapping site. The understanding of optical trapping and directional ejections by ultrashort laser pulses paves the way to optically controlled manipulation and sorting of nanoparticles. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  18. Experimental and Computational Analysis of Water-Droplet Formation and Ejection Process Using Hollow Microneedle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Norihisa; Oka, Ryotaro; Sakai, Takahiro; Shibata, Takayuki; Kawashima, Takahiro; Nagai, Moeto; Mineta, Takashi; Makino, Eiji

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we present the possibility of liquid delivery using fabricated hollow silicon dioxide microneedles of approximately 2 µm in diameter. As a fundamental study, the water-droplet formation and ejection process was examined via dynamic observations during water ejection tests and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. The experimental results indicated that fluid flow in a microneedle follows the Hagen-Poiseuille law, i.e., the flow rate is approximately directly proportional to the fourth power of the inner diameter. Moreover, the ejection pressure and maximum droplet curvature obtained using the proposed microfluid ejection model were in good agreement with the experimental results. The resulting ejection pressure is equal to the theoretical pressure difference of a spherical droplet, which is determined using the Young-Laplace equation. The maximum curvature of a droplet formed at the tip of a microneedle can be estimated on the basis of the contact angle theory expressed by the Young equation.

  19. M2-F1 ejection seat test at South Edwards

    Science.gov (United States)

    1963-01-01

    The M2-F1 was fitted with an ejection seat before the airtow flights began. The project selected the seat used in the T-37 as modified by the Weber Company to use a rocket rather than a ballistic charge for ejection. To test the ejection seat, the Flight Research Center's Dick Klein constructed a plywood mockup of the M2-F1's top deck and canopy. On the first firings, the test was unsuccessful, but on the final test the dummy in the seat landed safely. The M2-F1 ejection seat was later used in the two Lunar Landing Research Vehicles and the three Lunar Landing Training Vehicles. Three of them crashed, but in each case the pilot ejected from the vehicle successfully. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with

  20. Evaluating the effectiveness of wildlife detection and observation technologies at a solar power tower facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Robert H.; Valdez, Ernest W.; Preston, Todd M.; Wellik, Mike J.; Cryan, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Solar power towers produce electrical energy from sunlight at an industrial scale. Little is known about the effects of this technology on flying animals and few methods exist for automatically detecting or observing wildlife at solar towers and other tall anthropogenic structures. Smoking objects are sometimes observed co-occurring with reflected, concentrated light (“solar flux”) in the airspace around solar towers, but the identity and origins of such objects can be difficult to determine. In this observational pilot study at the world’s largest solar tower facility, we assessed the efficacy of using radar, surveillance video, and insect trapping to detect and observe animals flying near the towers. During site visits in May and September 2014, we monitored the airspace surrounding towers and observed insects, birds, and bats under a variety of environmental and operational conditions. We detected and broadly differentiated animals or objects moving through the airspace generally using radar and near solar towers using several video imaging methods. Video revealed what appeared to be mostly small insects burning in the solar flux. Also, we occasionally detected birds flying in the solar flux but could not accurately identify birds to species or the types of insects and small objects composing the vast majority of smoking targets. Insect trapping on the ground was somewhat effective at sampling smaller insects around the tower, and presence and abundance of insects in the traps generally trended with radar and video observations. Traps did not tend to sample the larger insects we sometimes observed flying in the solar flux or found dead on the ground beneath the towers. Some of the methods we tested (e.g., video surveillance) could be further assessed and potentially used to automatically detect and observe flying animals in the vicinity of solar towers to advance understanding about their effects on wildlife.

  1. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Wildlife Detection and Observation Technologies at a Solar Power Tower Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Robert H; Valdez, Ernest W; Preston, Todd M; Wellik, Michael J; Cryan, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    Solar power towers produce electrical energy from sunlight at an industrial scale. Little is known about the effects of this technology on flying animals and few methods exist for automatically detecting or observing wildlife at solar towers and other tall anthropogenic structures. Smoking objects are sometimes observed co-occurring with reflected, concentrated light ("solar flux") in the airspace around solar towers, but the identity and origins of such objects can be difficult to determine. In this observational pilot study at the world's largest solar tower facility, we assessed the efficacy of using radar, surveillance video, and insect trapping to detect and observe animals flying near the towers. During site visits in May and September 2014, we monitored the airspace surrounding towers and observed insects, birds, and bats under a variety of environmental and operational conditions. We detected and broadly differentiated animals or objects moving through the airspace generally using radar and near solar towers using several video imaging methods. Video revealed what appeared to be mostly small insects burning in the solar flux. Also, we occasionally detected birds flying in the solar flux but could not accurately identify birds to species or the types of insects and small objects composing the vast majority of smoking targets. Insect trapping on the ground was somewhat effective at sampling smaller insects around the tower, and presence and abundance of insects in the traps generally trended with radar and video observations. Traps did not tend to sample the larger insects we sometimes observed flying in the solar flux or found dead on the ground beneath the towers. Some of the methods we tested (e.g., video surveillance) could be further assessed and potentially used to automatically detect and observe flying animals in the vicinity of solar towers to advance understanding about their effects on wildlife.

  2. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Wildlife Detection and Observation Technologies at a Solar Power Tower Facility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H Diehl

    Full Text Available Solar power towers produce electrical energy from sunlight at an industrial scale. Little is known about the effects of this technology on flying animals and few methods exist for automatically detecting or observing wildlife at solar towers and other tall anthropogenic structures. Smoking objects are sometimes observed co-occurring with reflected, concentrated light ("solar flux" in the airspace around solar towers, but the identity and origins of such objects can be difficult to determine. In this observational pilot study at the world's largest solar tower facility, we assessed the efficacy of using radar, surveillance video, and insect trapping to detect and observe animals flying near the towers. During site visits in May and September 2014, we monitored the airspace surrounding towers and observed insects, birds, and bats under a variety of environmental and operational conditions. We detected and broadly differentiated animals or objects moving through the airspace generally using radar and near solar towers using several video imaging methods. Video revealed what appeared to be mostly small insects burning in the solar flux. Also, we occasionally detected birds flying in the solar flux but could not accurately identify birds to species or the types of insects and small objects composing the vast majority of smoking targets. Insect trapping on the ground was somewhat effective at sampling smaller insects around the tower, and presence and abundance of insects in the traps generally trended with radar and video observations. Traps did not tend to sample the larger insects we sometimes observed flying in the solar flux or found dead on the ground beneath the towers. Some of the methods we tested (e.g., video surveillance could be further assessed and potentially used to automatically detect and observe flying animals in the vicinity of solar towers to advance understanding about their effects on wildlife.

  3. Factors Associated with Delayed Ejection in Mishaps Between 1993 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, John E

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to identify factors associated with Air Force aviators delaying ejection during in-flight emergencies. The investigator reviewed all reports within the Air Force Safety Automated System describing mishaps that resulted in the destruction of Air Force ejection-seat equipped aircraft between 1993 and 2013. Crewmembers were classified as either timely or delayed ejectors based on altitude at onset of emergency, altitude at ejection, and a determination regarding whether or not the aircraft was controlled during the mishap sequence. Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression were used to explore the association between delayed ejection and multiple potential risk factors. In total, 366 crewmembers were involved in in-flight emergencies in ejection-seat-equipped aircraft that resulted in the loss of the aircraft; 201 (54.9%) of these crewmembers delayed ejection until their aircraft had descended below recommended minimum ejection altitudes. Multivariate analysis indicated that independent risk factors for delayed ejection included increased crewmember flight hours and a mechanical or human-factors related cause of the emergency versus bird strike or midair collision. This investigation provided quantitative assessments of factors associated with aviators delaying ejection during in-flight emergencies. Increased odds of delay among crewmembers with greater than 1500 total flight hours suggests that complacency and overconfidence may adversely influence the ejection decision to at least as great a degree as inexperience. Increased odds of delay during mechanical and human factors mishaps confirms previously reported hypotheses and reaffirms the importance of targeting these areas to reduce aviator injuries and fatalities.

  4. Measurement of solar extinction in tower plants with digital cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestrín, J.; Monterreal, R.; Carra, M. E.; Fernandez-Reche, J.; Barbero, J.; Marzo, A.

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric extinction of solar radiation between the heliostat field and the receiver is accepted as a non-negligible source of energy loss in the increasingly large central receiver plants. However, the reality is that there is currently no reliable measurement method for this quantity and at present these plants are designed, built and operated without knowing this local parameter. Nowadays digital cameras are used in many scientific applications for their ability to convert available light into digital images. Its broad spectral range, high resolution and high signal to noise ratio, make them an interesting device in solar technology. In this work a method for atmospheric extinction measurement based on digital images is presented. The possibility of defining a measurement setup in circumstances similar to those of a tower plant increases the credibility of the method. This procedure is currently being implemented at Plataforma Solar de Almería.

  5. The Frari bell tower in Venice: study and restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Cavaggioni

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The preliminary study, project and restoration process of the bell tower of the Frari church in Venice is an exemplary case of intervention on a historic building. This intervention started within depth research into the documentary data along with a detailed study of the material fabric which has made it possible to compare the verisimilitude and gaps in the historic sources, the evolution of the building, its built reality and the effects of the repair works carried out in the past at the same time as the damages in the fabric were monitored. Thanks to the knowledge thus gleaned, the restoration works proceeded with great caution in order to respect the material history of the building and short and long-term structural compatibility.

  6. Fatigue Reliability Analysis of a Mono-Tower Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Brincker, Rune

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, a fatigue reliability analysis of a Mono-tower platform is presented. The failure mode, fatigue failure in the butt welds, is investigated with two different models. The one with the fatigue strength expressed through SN relations, the other with the fatigue strength expressed...... through linear-elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). In determining the cumulative fatigue damage, Palmgren-Miner's rule is applied. Element reliability, as well as systems reliability, is estimated using first-order reliability methods (FORM). The sensitivity of the systems reliability to various parameters...... is investigated. The systems reliability index, estimated by using the fatigue elements with the fatigue strength expressed through SN relations, is found to be smaller than the systems reliability index estimated by using LEFM. It is shown that the systems reliability index is very sensitive to variations...

  7. GREEN TOWERS AND ICONIC DESIGN: Cases from Three Continents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kheir M Al-Kodmany

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, massive urbanization, increasingly denser cities and environmental consciousness are pushing architects to build “green” skyscraper. This paper examines the emergence of a notable type of skyscrapers which depart from purely image-driven structures, and emphasizes functionality and energy efficiency. It argues that breathtaking green design and practical clean technology are merged to give birth to green architectural aesthetics. Upon reviewing over 30 towers from various parts of the world, the paper identifies salient green design strategies that provide new iconicity including: structural efficiencies, renewable energy, façade technology, greeneries, and bioclimatic design. Findings suggest that a dynamic synergy among innovative green design strategies, new architectural languages and exciting aesthetics has constituted a trend that is more likely to prevail in the 21st Century.

  8. Fatigue Analysis of a Mono-Tower Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Brincker, Rune

    In this paper, a fatigue reliability analysis of a Mono-tower platform is presented. The failure mode, fatigue failure in the butt welds, is investigated with two different models. The one with the fatigue strength expressed through SN relations, the other with the fatigue strength expressed...... through linear-elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). In determining the cumulative fatigue damage, Palmgren-Miner's rule is applied. Element reliability as well as systems reliability is estimated using first-order reliability methods (FORM). The sensitivity of the systems reliability to various parameters...... is investigated. The systems reliability index, estimated by using the fatigue elements with the fatigue strength expressed through SN relations, is found to be smaller than the systems reliability index estimated by using LEFM. It is shown that the systems reliability index is very sensitive to variations...

  9. Operational cooling tower model (CTTOOL V1.0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleman, S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); LocalDomainServers, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Garrett, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical draft cooling towers (MDCT’s) are widely used to remove waste heat from industrial processes, including suspected proliferators of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The temperature of the air being exhausted from the MDCT is proportional to the amount of thermal energy being removed from the process cooling water, although ambient weather conditions and cooling water flow rate must be known or estimated to calculate the rate of thermal energy dissipation (Q). It is theoretically possible to derive MDCT air exhaust temperatures from thermal images taken from a remote sensor. A numerical model of a MDCT is required to translate the air exhaust temperature to a Q. This report describes the MDCT model developed by the Problem Centered Integrated Analysis (PCIA) program that was designed to perform those computational tasks. The PCIA program is a collaborative effort between the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), the Northrop-Grumman Corporation (NG) and the Aerospace Corporation (AERO).

  10. Integrated system tests of the LSST raft tower modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, P.; Antilogus, P.; Doherty, P.; Haupt, J.; Herrmann, S.; Huffer, M.; Juramy-Giles, C.; Kuczewski, J.; Russo, S.; Stubbs, C.; Van Berg, R.

    2016-07-01

    The science focal plane of the LSST camera is made up of 21 fully autonomous 144 Mpixel imager units designated raft tower modules (RTM). These imagers incorporate nine 4K x 4K fully-depleted CCDs and 144 channels of readout electronics, including a dedicated CMOS video processing ASIC and components that provide CCD biasing and clocking, video digitization, thermal stabilization, and a high degree of monitoring and telemetry. The RTM achieves its performance goals for readout speed, read noise, linearity, and crosstalk with a power budget of less than 400mW/channel. Series production is underway on the first units and the production will run until 2018. We present the RTM final design, tests of the integrated signal chain, and performance results for the fully-integrated module with pre-production CCDs.

  11. Flue gas injection control of silica in cooling towers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, Patrick Vane; Anderson, Howard L., Jr.; Altman, Susan Jeanne

    2011-06-01

    Injection of CO{sub 2}-laden flue gas can decrease the potential for silica and calcite scale formation in cooling tower blowdown by lowering solution pH to decrease equilibrium calcite solubility and kinetic rates of silica polymerization. Flue gas injection might best inhibit scale formation in power plant cooling towers that use impaired makeup waters - for example, groundwaters that contain relatively high levels of calcium, alkalinity, and silica. Groundwaters brought to the surface for cooling will degas CO{sub 2} and increase their pH by 1-2 units, possibly precipitating calcite in the process. Recarbonation with flue gas can lower the pHs of these fluids back to roughly their initial pH. Flue gas carbonation probably cannot lower pHs to much below pH 6 because the pHs of impaired waters, once outgassed at the surface, are likely to be relatively alkaline. Silica polymerization to form scale occurs most rapidly at pH {approx} 8.3 at 25 C; polymerization is slower at higher and lower pH. pH 7 fluids containing {approx}220 ppm SiO{sub 2} require > 180 hours equilibration to begin forming scale whereas at pH 8.3 scale formation is complete within 36 hours. Flue gas injection that lowers pHs to {approx} 7 should allow substantially higher concentration factors. Periodic cycling to lower recoveries - hence lower silica concentrations - might be required though. Higher concentration factors enabled by flue gas injection should decrease concentrate volumes and disposal costs by roughly half.

  12. Coronal Mass Ejections and Their Effect on the Venusian Nightglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, C. L.; Chanover, N.; Slanger, T. G.

    2012-12-01

    Earth, Venus, and Mars all formed close to the Sun under similar conditions and with similar materials. While having common origins of formation, they have very different atmospheres. These difference are due to various evolutionary paths taken by each planet, resulting in two CO2 dominated atmospheres and a one N2/O2 dominated atmosphere. In order to understand the processes that led to the evolution of these atmospheres we need to understand the present chemistry. Knowing the chemical reactions occurring in the mesosphere and ionosphere of these two types of atmospheres leads to a greater understanding of physical processes, such as winds and transport mechanisms. These chemical reactions can be determined by observing nightglow. Nightglow is caused by recombination of atoms into molecules, or electrons with ions, producing excited molecules and atoms, respectively. Venus has several strong nightglow features, one of which is the O(1S-1D) transition at 5577.3 Å (oxygen green line). This feature is known to be highly temporally variable. When it was first seen in 1999, it had an intensity greater than the terrestrial nightglow, but it was too weak to be detected after 2004. The reason for this variability, and the chemistry producing the emission, have both been poorly understood. Literature review of past observations show that a week prior to every detection, at least one high energy solar flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) occurred directed at Venus. Solar flares produce large amounts of extreme ultra violet light and charged particles. CMEs are large plasma ejections usually connected with solar flares. We propose that the oxygen green line emission is due to CME impacts from the Sun. The charged particles of the plasma can interact with the atmosphere of Venus to produce nightglow/aurora, where dissociative recombination of O2+ is the mostly likely source of O(1S). To test our hypothesis, we observed Venus as a Target of Opportunity with the ARCES high

  13. Cellular Phone Towers, File name = CELLTOWERS Contains point file of cell towers and an inclomplete poly cadastral layer of properties with cell towers. http://www.harfordcountymd.gov/gis/Index.cfm, Published in 2011, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Harford County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Cellular Phone Towers dataset current as of 2011. File name = CELLTOWERS Contains point file of cell towers and an inclomplete poly cadastral layer of properties...

  14. Cellular Phone Towers, FCC registered communications towers. Points were generated from FCC data latlong. Originally created as a basis of comparison for Appraiser's cell tower points, bu comparison was inconclusive. Represented all registered FCC sites as of 6/26/2003. No, Published in 2003, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Sedgwick County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Cellular Phone Towers dataset current as of 2003. FCC registered communications towers. Points were generated from FCC data latlong. Originally created as a basis of...

  15. 77 FR 75992 - Utility Scale Wind Towers From the People's Republic of China: Final Determination of Sales at...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... certain wind towers, whether or not tapered, and sections thereof. Certain wind towers are designed to support the nacelle and ] rotor blades in a wind turbine with a minimum rated electrical power generation... International Trade Administration Utility Scale Wind Towers From the People's Republic of China: Final...

  16. Hypertension in Patients with Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Massimo; Santolamazza, Caterina; Tocci, Giuliano

    2016-12-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a well-known health problem associated with considerable morbidity and mortality and it is an important risk factor for the development of heart failure (HF). These findings support the need for optimizing the antihypertensive strategies to prevent the progression to HF. Interestingly, the progression from HTN to HF, among other things, may be a consequence of inappropriate over-activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), sympathetic nervous system (SNS), and the natriuretic peptide system (NPS). In the present review, we will discuss the pathophysiological aspects of the progression from HTN to HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and we will focus on the evolution of different pharmacological therapies which are reported to be effective in reducing BP and improving HF outcomes, paying particular attention to the recent trials that have demonstrated the efficacy of the combined therapy of RAAS blockade and Neprilysin (NEP) inhibitor in lowering BP and mediating several beneficial actions within cardiovascular tissues, such as avoiding the worsening of HF.

  17. Coronal Mass Ejections: Models and Their Observational Basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. F. Chen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Coronal mass ejections (CMEs are the largest-scale eruptive phenomenon in the solar system, expanding from active region-sized nonpotential magnetic structure to a much larger size. The bulk of plasma with a mass of ∼10^11 – 10^13 kg is hauled up all the way out to the interplanetary space with a typical velocity of several hundred or even more than 1000 km s^-1, with a chance to impact our Earth, resulting in hazardous space weather conditions. They involve many other much smaller-sized solar eruptive phenomena, such as X-ray sigmoids, filament/prominence eruptions, solar flares, plasma heating and radiation, particle acceleration, EIT waves, EUV dimmings, Moreton waves, solar radio bursts, and so on. It is believed that, by shedding the accumulating magnetic energy and helicity, they complete the last link in the chain of the cycling of the solar magnetic field. In this review, I try to explicate our understanding on each stage of the fantastic phenomenon, including their pre-eruption structure, their triggering mechanisms and the precursors indicating the initiation process, their acceleration and propagation. Particular attention is paid to clarify some hot debates, e.g., whether magnetic reconnection is necessary for the eruption, whether there are two types of CMEs, how the CME frontal loop is formed, and whether halo CMEs are special.

  18. Coronal mass ejections and their sheath regions in interplanetary space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Kilpua

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs are large-scale heliospheric transients that originate from the Sun. When an ICME is sufficiently faster than the preceding solar wind, a shock wave develops ahead of the ICME. The turbulent region between the shock and the ICME is called the sheath region. ICMEs and their sheaths and shocks are all interesting structures from the fundamental plasma physics viewpoint. They are also key drivers of space weather disturbances in the heliosphere and planetary environments. ICME-driven shock waves can accelerate charged particles to high energies. Sheaths and ICMEs drive practically all intense geospace storms at the Earth, and they can also affect dramatically the planetary radiation environments and atmospheres. This review focuses on the current understanding of observational signatures and properties of ICMEs and the associated sheath regions based on five decades of studies. In addition, we discuss modelling of ICMEs and many fundamental outstanding questions on their origin, evolution and effects, largely due to the limitations of single spacecraft observations of these macro-scale structures. We also present current understanding of space weather consequences of these large-scale solar wind structures, including effects at the other Solar System planets and exoplanets. We specially emphasize the different origin, properties and consequences of the sheaths and ICMEs.

  19. Sheath-accumulating Propagation of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Takuya; Shibata, Kazunari, E-mail: takahasi@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607–8471 (Japan)

    2017-03-10

    Fast interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are the drivers of strong space weather storms such as solar energetic particle events and geomagnetic storms. The connection between the space-weather-impacting solar wind disturbances associated with fast ICMEs at Earth and the characteristics of causative energetic CMEs observed near the Sun is a key question in the study of space weather storms, as well as in the development of practical space weather prediction. Such shock-driving fast ICMEs usually expand at supersonic speeds during the propagation, resulting in the continuous accumulation of shocked sheath plasma ahead. In this paper, we propose a “sheath-accumulating propagation” (SAP) model that describes the coevolution of the interplanetary sheath and decelerating ICME ejecta by taking into account the process of upstream solar wind plasma accumulation within the sheath region. Based on the SAP model, we discuss (1) ICME deceleration characteristics; (2) the fundamental condition for fast ICMEs at Earth; (3) the thickness of interplanetary sheaths; (4) arrival time prediction; and (5) the super-intense geomagnetic storms associated with huge solar flares. We quantitatively show that not only the speed but also the mass of the CME are crucial for discussing the above five points. The similarities and differences between the SAP model, the drag-based model, and the“snow-plow” model proposed by Tappin are also discussed.

  20. Sheath-accumulating Propagation of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Takuya; Shibata, Kazunari

    2017-03-01

    Fast interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are the drivers of strong space weather storms such as solar energetic particle events and geomagnetic storms. The connection between the space-weather-impacting solar wind disturbances associated with fast ICMEs at Earth and the characteristics of causative energetic CMEs observed near the Sun is a key question in the study of space weather storms, as well as in the development of practical space weather prediction. Such shock-driving fast ICMEs usually expand at supersonic speeds during the propagation, resulting in the continuous accumulation of shocked sheath plasma ahead. In this paper, we propose a “sheath-accumulating propagation” (SAP) model that describes the coevolution of the interplanetary sheath and decelerating ICME ejecta by taking into account the process of upstream solar wind plasma accumulation within the sheath region. Based on the SAP model, we discuss (1) ICME deceleration characteristics; (2) the fundamental condition for fast ICMEs at Earth; (3) the thickness of interplanetary sheaths; (4) arrival time prediction; and (5) the super-intense geomagnetic storms associated with huge solar flares. We quantitatively show that not only the speed but also the mass of the CME are crucial for discussing the above five points. The similarities and differences between the SAP model, the drag-based model, and the“snow-plow” model proposed by Tappin are also discussed.

  1. Regarding the detectability and measurement of coronal mass ejections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review I discuss the problems associated with the detection and measurement of coronal mass ejections (CMEs. CMEs are important phenomena both scientifically, as they play a crucial role in the evolution of the solar corona, and technologically, as their impact with the Earth leads to severe space weather activity in the form of magnetic storms. I focus on the observation of CMEs using visible white light imagers (coronagraphs and heliospheric imagers, as they may be regarded as the binding agents between different datasets and different models that are used to reconstruct them. Our ability to accurately measure CMEs observed by these imagers is hampered by many factors, from instrumental to geometrical to physical. Following a brief review of the history of CME observation and measurement, I explore the impediments to our ability to measure them and describe possible means for which we may be able to mitigate those impediments. I conclude with a discussion of the claim that we have reached the limit of the information that we can extract from the current generation of white light imagers, and discuss possible ways forward regarding future instrument capabilities.

  2. Treatment of heart failure with decreased left ventricular ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronow, Wilbert S

    2006-01-01

    Class I recommendations for treating patients with current or prior symptoms of heart failure with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) include using diuretics and salt restriction in individuals with fluid retention. Use angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, beta blockers, and angiotensin II receptor blockers if intolerant to ACE inhibitors because of cough or angioneurotic edema. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, most antiarrhythmic drugs, and calcium channel blockers should be avoided or withdrawn. Exercise training is recommended. Implant cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is recommended in individuals with a history of cardiac arrest, ventricular fibrillation, or hemodynamically unstable ventricular tachycardia. ICD is indicated in patients with ischemic heart disease for at least 40 d post-myocardial infarction or nonischemic cardiomyopathy, an LVEF of 30% or less, New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II or III symptoms on optimal medical therapy, and an expectation of survival of at least 1 yr. Cardiac resynchronization therapy should be used in individuals with an LVEF of 35% or below, NYHA class III or IV symptoms despite optimal therapy, and a QRS duration greater than 120 ms. An aldosterone antagonist can be added in selected patients with moderately severe to severe symptoms of heart failure who can be carefully monitored for renal function and potassium concentration (serum creatinine should be

  3. Coronas Mass Ejections, Shocks, and Type II Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2010-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most energetic phenomena in the interplanetary medium. Type II radio bursts are the earliest indicators of particle acceleration by CME-driven shocks. There is one-to-one correspondence between large solar energetic particle (SEP) events and long wavelength type II bursts because the same CME-driven shock is supposed to accelerate electrons and ions. However, there are some significant deviations: some CMEs lacking type II bursts (radio-quiet or RQ CMEs) are associated with small SEP events while some radioloud (RL) CMEs are not associated with SEP events, suggesting subtle differences in the acceleration of electrons and protons. Not all CME-driven shocks are radio loud: more than one third of the interplanetary shocks during solar cycle 23 were radio quiet. Some RQ shocks were associated with energetic storm particle (ESP) events, which are detected when the shocks arrive at the observing spacecraft. This paper attempts to explain these contradictory results in terms of the properties of CMEs, shocks, and the ambient medium.

  4. Coronal mass ejections and their sheath regions in interplanetary space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpua, Emilia; Koskinen, Hannu E. J.; Pulkkinen, Tuija I.

    2017-11-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are large-scale heliospheric transients that originate from the Sun. When an ICME is sufficiently faster than the preceding solar wind, a shock wave develops ahead of the ICME. The turbulent region between the shock and the ICME is called the sheath region. ICMEs and their sheaths and shocks are all interesting structures from the fundamental plasma physics viewpoint. They are also key drivers of space weather disturbances in the heliosphere and planetary environments. ICME-driven shock waves can accelerate charged particles to high energies. Sheaths and ICMEs drive practically all intense geospace storms at the Earth, and they can also affect dramatically the planetary radiation environments and atmospheres. This review focuses on the current understanding of observational signatures and properties of ICMEs and the associated sheath regions based on five decades of studies. In addition, we discuss modelling of ICMEs and many fundamental outstanding questions on their origin, evolution and effects, largely due to the limitations of single spacecraft observations of these macro-scale structures. We also present current understanding of space weather consequences of these large-scale solar wind structures, including effects at the other Solar System planets and exoplanets. We specially emphasize the different origin, properties and consequences of the sheaths and ICMEs.

  5. Automatic Determination of the Conic Coronal Mass Ejection Model Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulkkinen, A.; Oates, T.; Taktakishvili, A.

    2009-01-01

    Characterization of the three-dimensional structure of solar transients using incomplete plane of sky data is a difficult problem whose solutions have potential for societal benefit in terms of space weather applications. In this paper transients are characterized in three dimensions by means of conic coronal mass ejection (CME) approximation. A novel method for the automatic determination of cone model parameters from observed halo CMEs is introduced. The method uses both standard image processing techniques to extract the CME mass from white-light coronagraph images and a novel inversion routine providing the final cone parameters. A bootstrap technique is used to provide model parameter distributions. When combined with heliospheric modeling, the cone model parameter distributions will provide direct means for ensemble predictions of transient propagation in the heliosphere. An initial validation of the automatic method is carried by comparison to manually determined cone model parameters. It is shown using 14 halo CME events that there is reasonable agreement, especially between the heliocentric locations of the cones derived with the two methods. It is argued that both the heliocentric locations and the opening half-angles of the automatically determined cones may be more realistic than those obtained from the manual analysis

  6. Spironolactone in patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sánchez, C; Mendoza-Ruiz de Zuazu, H F; Formiga, F; Manzano, L; Ceresuela, L M; Carrera-Izquierdo, M; González Franco, Á; Epelde-Gonzalo, F; Cerqueiro-González, J M; Montero-Pérez-Barquero, M

    2015-01-01

    Aldosterone inhibitors have been shown to be beneficial for patients with systolic heart failure. However, the evidence from patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) is limited. We evaluated the role of spironolactone in the prognosis of a cohort of patients with HFPEF. We analyzed the outcomes of patients hospitalized for HFPEF in 52 departments of internal medicine of the Spanish RICA registry according to those who did and did not take spironolactone. We recorded the posthospital mortality rate and readmissions at 1 year and performed a multivariate survival analysis. We included 1212 patients with HFPEF, with a mean age of 79 years (standard deviation, 7.9), (64.1% women), the majority of whom had hypertensive heart disease (50.7%). The patients treated with spironolactone, compared with those who were not treated with this diuretic, had a more advanced functional class, a higher number of readmissions (44.3 vs. 29.1%; p<0.001) and a higher rate in the combined variable of readmissions/mortality (39.0 vs. 29.0%; p=0.001). In the multivariate analysis, the administration of spironolactone was associated with an increase in readmissions (RR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.16-1.78; p=0.001). For patients with HFPEF, the administration of spironolactone was associated with an increase in all-cause readmission, perhaps due to the higher rate of hyperpotassemia. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  7. Comparison of sap flux, moisture flux tower and MODIS enhanced vegetation index methods for estimating riparian evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagler, Pamela L.; Glenn, Edward P.; Morino, Kiyomi; Neale, Christopher M.U; Cosh, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    Riparian evapotranspiration (ET) was measured on a salt cedar (Tamarix spp.) dominated river terrace on the Lower Colorado River from 2007 to 2009 using tissue-heat-balance sap flux sensors at six sites representing very dense, medium dense, and sparse stands of plants. Salt cedar ET varied markedly across sites, and sap flux sensors showed that plants were subject to various degrees of stress, detected as mid-day depression of transpiration and stomatal conductance. Sap flux results were scaled from the leaf level of measurement to the stand level by measuring plant-specific leaf area index and fractional ground cover at each site. Results were compared to Bowen ratio moisture tower data available for three of the sites. Sap flux sensors and flux tower results ranked the sites the same and had similar estimates of ET. A regression equation, relating measured ET of salt cedar and other riparian plants and crops on the Lower Colorado River to the Enhanced Vegetation Index from the MODIS sensor on the Terra satellite and reference crop ET measured at meteorological stations, was able to predict actual ET with an accuracy or uncertainty of about 20%, despite between-site differences for salt cedar. Peak summer salt cedar ET averaged about 6 mm d-1 across sites and methods of measurement.

  8. Analysis of the evaporative towers cooling system of a coal-fired power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laković Mirjana S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a theoretical analysis of the cooling system of a 110 MW coal-fired power plant located in central Serbia, where eight evaporative towers cool down the plant. An updated research on the evaporative tower cooling system has been carried out to show the theoretical analysis of the tower heat and mass balance, taking into account the sensible and latent heat exchanged during the processes which occur inside these towers. Power plants which are using wet cooling towers for cooling condenser cooling water have higher design temperature of cooling water, thus the designed condensing pressure is higher compared to plants with a once-through cooling system. Daily and seasonal changes further deteriorate energy efficiency of these plants, so it can be concluded that these plants have up to 5% less efficiency compared to systems with once-through cooling. The whole analysis permitted to evaluate the optimal conditions, as far as the operation of the towers is concerned, and to suggest an improvement of the plant. Since plant energy efficiency improvement has become a quite common issue today, the evaluation of the cooling system operation was conducted under the hypothesis of an increase in the plant overall energy efficiency due to low cost improvement in cooling tower system.

  9. Quantifying the local influence at a tall tower site in nocturnal conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, David; Buckley, Robert; Zhang, Gengsheng; Kurzeja, Robert; Leclerc, Monique; Duarte, Henrique; Parker, Matthew; Watson, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    The influence of the local terrestrial environment on nocturnal atmospheric CO2 measurements at a 329-m television transmitter tower (and a component of a CO2 monitoring network) was estimated with a tracer release experiment and a subsequent simulation of the releases. This was done to characterize the vertical transport of emissions from the surface to the uppermost tower level and how it is affected by atmospheric stability. The tracer release experiment was conducted over two nights in May of 2009 near the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. Tracer was released on two contrasting nights—slightly stable and moderately stable—from several upwind surface locations. Measurements at the 329-m level on both nights indicate that tracer was able to mix vertically within a relatively short (˜24 km) distance, implying that nocturnal stable conditions do not necessarily prevent vertical dispersion in the boundary layer and that CO2 measurements at the tower are at least partly influenced by nearby emissions. A simulation of the tracer release is used to calculate the tower footprint on the two nights to estimate the degree to which the local domain affects the tower readings. The effect of the nocturnal boundary layer on the area sampled by the tower can be seen clearly, as the footprints were affected by changes in stability. The contribution of local sources to the measurements at the tower was minimal, however, suggesting that nocturnal concentrations at upper levels are contributed mostly by regional sources.

  10. Hexcrete Tower for Harvesting Wind Energy at Taller Hub Heights - Budget Period 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sritharan, Sri [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Interest in designing taller towers for wind energy production in the United States (U.S.) has been steadily growing. In May 2015, it was revealed that taller towers will make wind energy production a reality in all 50 states, including some states that have nearly zero renewables in their energy portfolio. Facilitating wind energy production feasibility in all 50 states will no doubt contribute to increasing the electricity produced by wind from 4.5% in 2013 to a targeted scenario of 35% by 2050 in the Wind Vision report. This project focuses on the Hexcrete tower concept developed for tall towers using High Strength Concrete (HSC) and/or Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC). Among other benefits, the Hexcrete concept overcomes transportation and logistical challenges, thus facilitating construction of towers with hub heights of 100-m (328-ft) and higher. The goal of this project is to facilitate widespread deployment of Hexcrete towers for harvesting wind energy at 120 to 140-m (394 to 459-ft) hub heights and reduce the Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) of wind energy production in the U.S. The technical scope of the project includes detailed design and optimization of at least three wind turbine towers using the Hexcrete concept together with experimental validation and LCOE analyses and development of a commercialization plan.

  11. Design of SMART waste heat removal dry cooling tower using solar energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong Jae; Jeong, Yong Hoon [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The 85% of cooling system are once-through cooling system and closed cycle wet cooling system. However, many countries are trying to reduce the power plant water requirement due to the water shortage and water pollution. Dry cooling system is investigated for water saving advantage. There are two dry cooling system which are direct and indirect cooling system. In direct type, turbine exhaust is directly cooled by air-cooled condenser. In indirect system, turbine steam is cooled by recirculating intermediate cooling water loop, then the loop is cooled by air-cooled heat exchanger in cooling tower. In this paper, the purpose is to remove SMART waste heat, 200MW by using newly designed tower. The possibility of enhancing cooling performance by solar energy is analyzed. The simple cooling tower and solar energy cooling tower are presented and two design should meet the purpose of removing SMART waste heat, 200MW. In first design, when tower diameter is 70m, the height of tower should be 360m high. In second design, the chimney height decrease from 360m to 180m as collector radius increase from 100m to 500m due to collector temperature enhancement by solar energy, To analyze solar cooling tower further, consideration of solar energy performance at night should be analyzed.

  12. The effect analysis of strain rate on power transmission tower-line system under seismic excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Li; Wang, Wenming; Qian, Hui

    2014-01-01

    The effect analysis of strain rate on power transmission tower-line system under seismic excitation is studied in this paper. A three-dimensional finite element model of a transmission tower-line system is created based on a real project. Using theoretical analysis and numerical simulation, incremental dynamic analysis of the power transmission tower-line system is conducted to investigate the effect of strain rate on the nonlinear responses of the transmission tower and line. The results show that the effect of strain rate on the transmission tower generally decreases the maximum top displacements, but it would increase the maximum base shear forces, and thus it is necessary to consider the effect of strain rate on the seismic analysis of the transmission tower. The effect of strain rate could be ignored for the seismic analysis of the conductors and ground lines, but the responses of the ground lines considering strain rate effect are larger than those of the conductors. The results could provide a reference for the seismic design of the transmission tower-line system.

  13. The Metric Documentation of Cham Towers in Vietnam by Spherical Photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangi, G.; Malinverni, E. S.; Tassetti, A. N.

    2013-07-01

    The Università Politecnica delle Marche is charged of the study, survey and documentation of the Chan towers in Vietnam. The towers are spread near the coastline from latitude 16° 30', to latitude of 10° 56'. The Champa civilization flourished from 8th century till 17th century produced the Cham towers, places of religious worship. The ancient Cham people created a developed culture expressed in the architecture in the towers, which were Buddhist temples. Roughly there are six different architectonic styles and two different layouts in plan. One lay-out is that one main tower is surrounded by smaller service buildings, like walls, doors, gates; the other layout is a set of three aligned towers. We carried out the documentation with three different techniques, laser scanning, dense point clouds generation with SfM (Structure from Motion) algorithm, and mainly by Panoramic Spherical Photogrammetry (PSP). Laser scanning is indeed the best instrument but sometimes its availability is very limited for different practical and logistic reasons. The point cloud generation produced good results, but it has some problems and limitations of management too. On the other hand PSP is very quick technique in the taking phase, but the restitution is rather slow. PSP is suitable for a good metric documentation, making the Cham tower project the main project of documentation executed with spherical photogrammetry.

  14. Spine injuries related to high-performance aircraft ejections: a 9-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manen, Olivier; Clément, Julian; Bisconte, Sébastien; Perrier, Eric

    2014-01-01

    During an aircraft ejection, the pilot is exposed to accelerations to the point of human tolerance, which may cause spinal injuries. Many nations have reported a spinal trauma rate of about 20-30%, with plain radiography as the first-line exam. Insofar as ejection seats and diagnostic imaging have improved, the objectives of this study are to describe the spine injuries among recently ejected French aircrew, to analyze the spinal imaging used, and, if necessary, to propose a better standardized radiological procedure. A retrospective cohort study included all aircrews of the French forces who ejected from 2000 to 2008, with an authorized access to the technical reports of the investigations. There were 36 ejections collected, 75% with an MK-10 seat and an arrival on dry land. All pilots were alive, but 42% of them sustained 24 spinal fractures, most of the time with a simple compression of the thoracic segment, but also 4 ligamentous or discal lesions. Computed tomography or RMI was used in 64% of cases and four fractures were missed or underestimated on X-ray. One complex fracture required surgical treatment. A return to flying duties was frequently possible within a period of 6 mo. New generation ejection seats remain highly traumatic for the spine. It is recommended that all ejected aircrews be assessed with computed tomography to improve the sensitivity of the screening for fractures. The risk of asymptomatic lesions makes necessary the systematic use of a stretcher for initial evacuation when possible.

  15. Left atrial ejection force predicts the outcome after catheter ablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishima, Hideyuki; Mine, Takanao; Takahashi, Satoshi; Ashida, Kenki; Ishihara, Masaharu; Masuyama, Tohru

    2018-02-01

    Left atrium (LA) systolic dysfunction is observed in the early stages of atrial fibrillation (AF) prior to LA anatomical change. We investigated whether LA systolic dysfunction predicts recurrent AF after catheter ablation (CA) in patients with paroxysmal AF. We studied 106 patients who underwent CA for paroxysmal AF. LA systolic function was assessed with the LA emptying volume = Maximum LA volume (LAV max ) - Minimum LA volume (LAV min ), LA emptying fraction = [(LAV max - LAV min )/LAV max ] × 100, and LA ejection force calculated with Manning's method [LA ejection force = (0.5 × ρ × mitral valve area × A 2 )], where ρ is the blood density and A is the late-diastolic mitral inflow velocity. Recurrent AF was detected in 35/106 (33%) during 14.6 ± 9.1 months. Univariate analysis revealed reduced LA ejection force, decreased LA emptying fraction, larger LA diameter, and elevated brain natriuretic peptide as significant variables. On multivariate analysis, reduced LA ejection force and larger LA diameter were independently associated with recurrent AF. Moreover, patients with reduced LA ejection force and larger LA diameter had a higher risk of recurrent AF than preserved LA ejection force (log-rank P = 0.0004). Reduced LA ejection force and larger LA diameter were associated with poor outcome after CA for paroxysmal AF, and could be a new index to predict recurrent AF. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. An Intracardiac Soft Robotic Device for Augmentation of Blood Ejection from the Failing Right Ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Markus A; Wamala, Isaac; Rytkin, Eric; Doyle, Elizabeth; Payne, Christopher J; Thalhofer, Thomas; Berra, Ignacio; Solovyeva, Anna; Saeed, Mossab; Hendren, Sara; Roche, Ellen T; Del Nido, Pedro J; Walsh, Conor J; Vasilyev, Nikolay V

    2017-09-01

    We introduce an implantable intracardiac soft robotic right ventricular ejection device (RVED) for dynamic approximation of the right ventricular (RV) free wall and the interventricular septum (IVS) in synchrony with the cardiac cycle to augment blood ejection in right heart failure (RHF). The RVED is designed for safe and effective intracardiac operation and consists of an anchoring system deployed across the IVS, an RV free wall anchor, and a pneumatic artificial muscle linear actuator that spans the RV chamber between the two anchors. Using a ventricular simulator and a custom controller, we characterized ventricular volume ejection, linear approximation against different loads and the effect of varying device actuation periods on volume ejection. The RVED was then tested in vivo in adult pigs (n = 5). First, we successfully deployed the device into the beating heart under 3D echocardiography guidance (n = 4). Next, we performed a feasibility study to evaluate the device's ability to augment RV ejection in an experimental model of RHF (n = 1). RVED actuation augmented RV ejection during RHF; while further chronic animal studies will provide details about the efficacy of this support device. These results demonstrate successful design and implementation of the RVED and its deployment into the beating heart. This soft robotic ejection device has potential to serve as a rapidly deployable system for mechanical circulatory assistance in RHF.

  17. Identification of ultrasound contrast agent dilution systems for ejection fraction measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischi, Massimo; Jansen, Annemieke H M; Kalker, Antonius A C M; Korsten, Hendrikus H M

    2005-03-01

    Left ventricular ejection fraction is an important cardiac-efficiency measure. Standard estimations are based on geometric analysis and modeling; they require time and experienced cardiologists. Alternative methods make use of indicator dilutions, but they are invasive due to the need for catheterization. This study presents a new minimally invasive indicator dilution technique for ejection fraction quantification. It is based on a peripheral injection of an ultrasound contrast agent bolus. Left atrium and left ventricle acoustic intensities are recorded versus time by transthoracic echocardiography. The measured curves are corrected for attenuation distortion and processed by an adaptive Wiener deconvolution algorithm for the estimation of the left ventricle impulse response, which is interpolated by a monocompartment exponential model for the ejection fraction assessment. This technique measures forward ejection fraction, which excludes regurgitant volumes. The feasibility of the method was tested on a group of 20 patients with left ventricular ejection fractions going from 10% to 70%. The results are promising and show a 0.93 correlation coefficient with echographic bi-plane ejection fraction measurements. A more extensive validation as well as an investigation on the method applicability for valve insufficiency and right ventricular ejection fraction quantification will be an object of future study.

  18. Evidence for direct geographic influences on linguistic sounds: the case of ejectives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caleb Everett

    Full Text Available We present evidence that the geographic context in which a language is spoken may directly impact its phonological form. We examined the geographic coordinates and elevations of 567 language locations represented in a worldwide phonetic database. Languages with phonemic ejective consonants were found to occur closer to inhabitable regions of high elevation, when contrasted to languages without this class of sounds. In addition, the mean and median elevations of the locations of languages with ejectives were found to be comparatively high. The patterns uncovered surface on all major world landmasses, and are not the result of the influence of particular language families. They reflect a significant and positive worldwide correlation between elevation and the likelihood that a language employs ejective phonemes. In addition to documenting this correlation in detail, we offer two plausible motivations for its existence. We suggest that ejective sounds might be facilitated at higher elevations due to the associated decrease in ambient air pressure, which reduces the physiological effort required for the compression of air in the pharyngeal cavity--a unique articulatory component of ejective sounds. In addition, we hypothesize that ejective sounds may help to mitigate rates of water vapor loss through exhaled air. These explications demonstrate how a reduction of ambient air density could promote the usage of ejective phonemes in a given language. Our results reveal the direct influence of a geographic factor on the basic sound inventories of human languages.

  19. Pre-chemotherapy values for left and right ventricular volumes and ejection fraction by gated tomographic radionuclide angiography using a cadmium-zinc-telluride detector gamma camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haarmark, Christian; Haase, Christine; Jensen, Maria Maj

    2016-01-01

    age and both left and right ventricular volumes in women (r = -0.4, P right end systolic ventricular volume in men (r = -0.3, P = .001). CONCLUSION: A set of reference values for cardiac evaluation prior to chemotherapy in cancer patients without other known cardiopulmonary......BACKGROUND: Estimation of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) using equilibrium radionuclide angiography is an established method for assessment of left ventricular function. The purpose of this study was to establish normative data on left and right ventricular volumes and ejection fraction......, using cadmium-zinc-telluride SPECT camera. METHODS AND RESULTS: From routine assessments of left ventricular function in 1172 patients, we included 463 subjects (194 men and 269 women) without diabetes, previous potentially cardiotoxic chemotherapy, known cardiovascular or pulmonary disease. The lower...

  20. CORONAL MASS EJECTION RECONSTRUCTION FROM THREE VIEWPOINTS VIA SIMULATION MORPHING. I. THEORY AND EXAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazin, Richard A., E-mail: rfrazin@umich.edu [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    The problem of reconstructing the three-dimensional (3D) density distribution of a coronal mass ejection (CME) from three simultaneous coronagraph observations is timely in that the COR1 and COR2 coronagraphs on the dual-spacecraft STEREO mission complement the LASCO coronagraphs on the SOHO satellite and the Mk4 on Mauna Loa. While the separation angle between the STEREO spacecraft and the Earth depends on the time since the launch in 2006, the reconstruction problem is always severely underinformed. So far, all 3D reconstruction efforts have made use of relatively simple parameterized models in order to determine the 3D structure of the CME. Such approaches do not utilize the power of 3D MHD simulation to inform the reconstruction. This paper considers the situation in which a specific CME event observed in coronagraphs from three viewpoints is later simulated by solving MHD equations. The reconstruction is then subjected to an invertible morphological operator chosen so that morphed MHD simulation is most consistent with the three-viewpoint coronagraph data. The morphological operations are explained mathematically and synthetic examples are given. The practical application to reconstructing CMEs from STEREO and SOHO data is discussed.

  1. Subendocardial viability ratio and ejection duration as parameters of early cardiovascular risk in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marčun-Varda, Nataša; Nikolic, Sara; Močnik, Mirjam

    The purpose of this study was to investigate subendocardial viability ratio (SEVR) and ejection duration (ED) in children and adolescents with common cardiovascular risk factors such as arterial hypertension, obesity, and hypercholesterolemia. Four groups of pediatric patients were analyzed: 31 children and adolescents had hypertension, 36 were overweight, 49 were overweight and had hypertension, and 70 had hypercholesterolemia. The patients were compared to a control group of 50 healthy individuals. Subjects were sampled by opportunity sampling at the Department of Pediatrics Maribor, Slovenia. In each patient, blood pressure, anthropometrical parameters, and pulse wave analysis (PWA) measurements using applanation tonometry technique were performed and calculated. The results show a statistically-significant difference in ED (p = 0.013) but not in SEVR (p = 0.074) in the hypercholesterolemia group in comparison to the control group. In other research groups, no statistically-significant differences were found. In all study groups, SEVR correlated significantly with age (positive, moderate) and heart rate (negative, strong) as well as with central mean pressure (CMP). Our study does not show a significant role of SEVR and ED in early cardiovascular risk determination in children. However, some results do indicate a potential role of both, at least in hypercholesterolemia, and should be further investigated.
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  2. The Influence of Coronal Mass Ejections on the Mass-loss Rates of Hot-Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherenkov, A.; Bisikalo, D.; Fossati, L.; Möstl, C.

    2017-09-01

    Hot-Jupiters are subject to extreme radiation and plasma flows coming from their host stars. Past ultraviolet Hubble Space Telescope observations, supported by hydrodynamic models, confirmed that these factors lead to the formation of an extended envelope, part of which lies beyond the Roche lobe. We use gas-dynamic simulations to study the impact of time variations in the parameters of the stellar wind, namely that of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), on the envelope of the typical hot-Jupiter HD 209458b. We consider three CMEs characterized by different velocities and densities, taking their parameters from typical CMEs observed for the Sun. The perturbations in the ram-pressure of the stellar wind during the passage of each CME tear off most of the envelope that is located beyond the Roche lobe. This leads to a substantial increase of the mass-loss rates during the interaction with the CME. We find that the mass lost by the planet during the whole crossing of a CME is of ≈1015 g, regardless of the CME taken into consideration. We also find that over the course of 1 Gyr, the mass lost by the planet because of CME impacts is comparable to that lost because of high-energy stellar irradiation.

  3. Static and Motion-Based Visual Features Used by Airport Tower Controllers: Some Implications for the Design of Remote or Virtual Towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Stephen R.; Liston, Dorion B.

    2011-01-01

    Visual motion and other visual cues are used by tower controllers to provide important support for their control tasks at and near airports. These cues are particularly important for anticipated separation. Some of them, which we call visual features, have been identified from structured interviews and discussions with 24 active air traffic controllers or supervisors. The visual information that these features provide has been analyzed with respect to possible ways it could be presented at a remote tower that does not allow a direct view of the airport. Two types of remote towers are possible. One could be based on a plan-view, map-like computer-generated display of the airport and its immediate surroundings. An alternative would present a composite perspective view of the airport and its surroundings, possibly provided by an array of radially mounted cameras positioned at the airport in lieu of a tower. An initial more detailed analyses of one of the specific landing cues identified by the controllers, landing deceleration, is provided as a basis for evaluating how controllers might detect and use it. Understanding other such cues will help identify the information that may be degraded or lost in a remote or virtual tower not located at the airport. Some initial suggestions how some of the lost visual information may be presented in displays are mentioned. Many of the cues considered involve visual motion, though some important static cues are also discussed.

  4. Evaluation of Aircraft Ejection Seat Safety When Using Advanced Helmet Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-09

    No. DODIG‑2015‑090 M A R C H 9 , 2 0 1 5 Evaluation of Aircraft Ejection Seat Safety When Using Advanced Helmet Sensors Report Documentation Page...DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Evaluation of Aircraft Ejection Seat Safety When Using Advanced Helmet Sensors...Defense F r a u d , W a s t e & A b u s e DODIG-2015-090 (Project No. D2014-DT0TAD-0002.000) │ i Results in Brief Evaluation of Aircraft Ejection Seat

  5. New Classification for Heart Failure with Mildly Reduced Ejection Fraction; Greater clarity or more confusion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Nadar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The latest European Society of Cardiology (ESC guidelines for the diagnosis and management of heart failure include a new patient group for those with heart failure with mildly reduced ejection fraction (HFmrEF. By defining this group of patients as a separate entity, the ESC hope to encourage more research focusing on patients with HFmrEF. Previously, patients with this condition were caught between two classifications—heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. Hopefully, the inclusion of new terminology will not increase confusion, but rather aid our understanding of heart failure, a complex clinical syndrome.

  6. Recurrent mass ejections observed in H-alpha and CIV. [solar spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieder, B.; Simon, G.; Martres, M.-J.; Mein, P.; Mein, N.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1984-01-01

    Time sequences of recurrent mass ejections have been observed during a coordinated SMY program (Sept. 1, 1980 - Sept. 23, 1980 - Oct. 2, 1980). Comparison of the temporal evolution of H-alpha and CIV brightnesses shows a weak phase lag between H-alpha and CIV maxima, in the case of homologous flares, with CIV brightness maxima preceding H-alpha maxima. The analysis of the variation of the ejection velocities is expected to lead to the determination of an energy balance. Such recurrent ejections could be due to periodic energy storage and periodic reorganization of magnetic field as envisaged to occur for flares, but at lower energy levels.

  7. Seismic response of a full-scale wind turbine tower using experimental and numerical modal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Kamel Sayed Ahmad; Saudi, Ghada N.; Eltaly, Boshra Aboul-Anen; El-khier, Mostafa Mahmoud Abo

    2016-12-01

    Wind turbine technology has developed tremendously over the past years. In Egypt, the Zafarana wind farm is currently generating at a capacity of 517 MW, making it one of the largest onshore wind farms in the world. It is located in an active seismic zone along the west side of the Gulf of Suez. Accordingly, seismic risk assessment is demanded for studying the structural integrity of wind towers under expected seismic hazard events. In the context of ongoing joint Egypt-US research project "Seismic Risk Assessment of Wind Turbine Towers in Zafarana wind Farm Egypt" (Project ID: 4588), this paper describes the dynamic performance investigation of an existing Nordex N43 wind turbine tower. Both experimental and numerical work are illustrated explaining the methodology adopted to investigate the dynamic behavior of the tower under seismic load. Field dynamic testing of the full-scale tower was performed using ambient vibration techniques (AVT). Both frequency domain and time domain methods were utilized to identify the actual dynamic properties of the tower as built in the site. Mainly, the natural frequencies, their corresponding mode shapes and damping ratios of the tower were successfully identified using AVT. A vibration-based finite element model (FEM) was constructed using ANSYS V.12 software. The numerical and experimental results of modal analysis were both compared for matching purpose. Using different simulation considerations, the initial FEM was updated to finally match the experimental results with good agreement. Using the final updated FEM, the response of the tower under the AQABA earthquake excitation was investigated. Time history analysis was conducted to define the seismic response of the tower in terms of the structural stresses and displacements. This work is considered as one of the pioneer structural studies of the wind turbine towers in Egypt. Identification of the actual dynamic properties of the existing tower was successfully performed

  8. Damping of Offshore Wind Turbine Tower Vibrations by a Stroke Amplifying Brace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Mark Laier; Høgsberg, Jan Becker

    2014-01-01

    The potential of installing dampers inside the tower of an offshore wind turbine is investigated through simulations. Dampers are installed at the bottom to act on the curvature of the tower, and it is shown that dampers installed in suitable braces have the potential to increase the critical...... damping ratio of the two lowest tower modes by 1 percent. By using a toggle-brace system, damper stroke is increased, while the damper force is reduced. Finally, by installing the dampers in a symmetric configuration, tuning for maximum damping is approximately independent of the orientation of the rotor......, thereby making this installation of dampers feasible....

  9. Study on Remote Monitoring System of Crossing and Spanning Tangent Tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Da-bing; Zhang, Nai-long; Zhang, Meng-ge; Wang, Ze-hua; Zhang, Yan

    2017-05-01

    In order to grasp the vibration state of overhead transmission line and ensure the operational security of transmission line, the remote monitoring system of crossing and spanning tangent tower was studied. By use of this system, the displacement, velocity and acceleration of the tower, and the local weather data are collected automatically, displayed on computer of remote monitoring centre through wireless network, real-time collection and transmission of vibration signals are realized. The applying results show that the system is excellent in reliability and accuracy and so on. The system can be used to remote monitoring of transmission tower of UHV power transmission lines and in large spanning areas.

  10. Improvement of risk estimate on wind turbine tower buckled by hurricane

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jingwei

    2013-01-01

    Wind is one of the important reasonable resources. However, wind turbine towers are sure to be threatened by hurricanes. In this paper, method to estimate the number of wind turbine towers that would be buckled by hurricanes is discussed. Monte Carlo simulations show that our method is much better than the previous one. Since in our method, the probability density function of the buckling probability of a single turbine tower in a single hurricane is obtained accurately but not from one approximated expression. The result in this paper may be useful to the design and maintenance of wind farms.

  11. Effect of Step-Change Radiation Flux on Dynamic Characteristics in Tower Solar Cavity Receiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengwei Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The heat flux on the inner surface of the tower solar thermal power plant system will show the characteristics of noncontinuous step change, especially in nonnormal and transient weather conditions, which may result in a continuous dynamic variation of the characteristic parameters. Therefore, the research of dynamic characteristics plays a very important role in the operation and the control safely in solar cavity receiver system. In this paper, based on the noncontinuous step change of radiation flux, a non-linear dynamic model is constructed to obtain the effects of the non-continuous step change radiation flux and step change feed water flow on the receiver performance by sequential modular approach. The subject investigated in our study is a 1 MW solar power station constructed in Yanqing county, Beijing, China. This study has obtained the dynamic responses of the characteristic parameters in the cavity receiver such as drum pressure, drum water level, main steam flow, and main steam enthalpy under step change radiation flux. And the influence of step-change feed water flow to the dynamic characteristics has also been analyzed. The results could provide general guidance for security operation and control in solar cavity receiver system.

  12. Steam generator design for solar towers using solar salt as heat transfer fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Gómez, Pedro Ángel; Petrakopoulou, Fontina; Briongos, Javier Villa; Santana, Domingo

    2017-06-01

    Since the operation of a concentrating solar power plant depends on the intermittent character of solar energy, the steam generator is subject to daily start-ups, stops and load variations. Faster start-up and load changes increase the plant flexibility and the daily energy production. However, it involves high thermal stresses on thick-walled components. Continuous operational conditions may eventually lead to a material failure. For these reasons, it is important to evaluate the transient behavior of the proposed designs in order to assure the reliability. The aim of this work is to analyze different steam generator designs for solar power tower plants using molten salt as heat transfer fluid. A conceptual steam generator design is proposed and associated heat transfer areas and steam drum size are calculated. Then, dynamic models for the main parts of the steam generator are developed to represent its transient performance. A temperature change rate that ensures safe hot start-up conditions is studied for the molten salt. The thermal stress evolution on the steam drum is calculated as key component of the steam generator.

  13. Disturbed Zone and Piston Shock Ahead of Coronal Mass Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eselevich, V.; Eselevich, M.

    2012-12-01

    The 2010 June 13 coronal mass ejection (CME) propagating toward the position angle P.A. ≈ 245° (measured counterclockwise from the Sun's north pole) was studied from the SDO/AIA and SOHO/LASCO C2, C3 data. We show that ahead of the CME frontal structure, as a result of its interaction with the undisturbed solar wind, a disturbed region (with an increased and disturbed plasma density), whose size increases as the CME travels away from the Sun, emerges gradually. Discontinuity formation at the disturbed zone front is observed in the narrow P.A. ≈ 245°-250° range. Its characteristics satisfy the properties of a piston collision shock. In the other directions relative to the CME motion axis (P.A. > 250° and P.A. piston shock formation ahead of a CME, which are as follows: (1) Shock formation ahead of a CME in a vicinity along its propagation axis may occur at various distances R = Ru from the Sun's center. Its formation is determined by fulfilling a local inequality u(R) > VA (R), where u(R) is a CME velocity relative to the surrounding solar wind and VA (R) is a local Alfvén velocity that is approximately equal to the velocity of fast magnetic sound in the solar corona. (2) At R ~ 10-15 R ⊙, one observes the formation of a new discontinuity δsstarf F Lt λ p wide at the head of the collision front. Within limits of error, δsstarf F does not depend on R and is determined to be δsstarf F ≈ 0.1-0.2 R ⊙ by the LASCO C3 spatial resolution and δsstarf F ≈ 0.03 R ⊙ for COR2. This discontinuity is identified with a collisionless shock.

  14. The Management of Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Andrew Js; Shewan, Louise G

    2015-04-01

    Heart failure is defined as a clinical syndrome and is known to present with a number of different pathophysiological patterns. There is a remarkable degree of variation in measures of left ventricular systolic emptying and this has been used to categorise heart failure into two separate types: low ejection fraction (EF) heart failure or HF-REF and high EF heart failure or HF-PEF. Here we review the pathophysiology, epidemiology and management of HF-PEF and argue that sharp separation of heart failure into two forms is misguided and illogical, and the present scarcity of clinical trial evidence for effective treatment for HF-PEF is a problem of our own making; we should never have excluded patients from major trials on the basis of EF in the first place. Whilst as many heart failure patients have preserved EFs as reduced we have dramatically under-represented HF-PEF patients in trials. Only four trials have been performed in HF-PEF specifically, and another two trials that recruited both HF-PEF and HF-REF can be considered. When we consider the similarity in outcomes and neurohormonal activation between HF-REF and HF-REF, the vast corpus of trial data that we have to attest to the efficacy of various treatment (angiotensin-converting-enzyme [ACE] inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers [ARBs], beta-blockers and aldosterone antagonists) in HF-REF, and the much more limited number of trials of similar agents showing near statistically significant benefits in HF-PEF the time has come rethink our management of HF-PEF, and in particular our selection of patients for trials.

  15. Resonance Overlap Is Responsible for Ejecting Planets in Binary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudryk, Lawrence R.; Wu, Yanqin

    2006-03-01

    A planet orbiting around a star in a binary system experiences both secular and resonant perturbations from the companion star. It may be dislodged from its host star if it is simultaneously affected by two or more resonances. We find that overlap between subresonances lying within mean-motion resonances (mostly of the j:1 type) can account for the boundary of orbital stability within binary systems first observed in numerical studies (e.g., Holman & Wiegert). Strong secular forcing from the companion displaces the centroids of different subresonances, producing large regions of resonance overlap. Planets lying within these overlapping regions experience chaotic diffusion, which in most cases leads to their eventual ejection. The overlap region extends to shorter period orbits as either the companion's mass or its eccentricity increase, with boundaries largely agreeing with those obtained by Holman & Wiegert. Furthermore, we find the following two results: First, at a given binary mass ratio, the instability boundary as a function of eccentricity appears jagged, with jutting peninsulas and deep inlets corresponding to islands of instability and stability, respectively; as a result, the largest stable orbit could be reduced from the Holman & Wiegert values by as much as 20%. Second, very high-order resonances (e.g., 50:3) do not significantly modify the instability boundary; these weak resonances, while producing slow chaotic diffusion that may be missed by finite-duration numerical integrations, do not contribute markedly to planet instability. We present some numerical evidence for the first result. More extensive experiments are called for to confirm these conclusions. For the special case of circular binaries, we are intrigued to find that the Hill criterion (based on the critical Jacobi integral) yields an instability boundary that is very similar to that obtained by resonance overlap arguments, making the former both a necessary and a sufficient condition for

  16. Treatment of patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deswal, Anita; Bozkurt, Biykem

    2008-12-01

    Of the more than 5 million Americans who have heart failure (HF), 30% to 50% have HF with preserved ejection fraction (HF-PEF). HF-PEF commonly occurs in elderly patients, especially women, with comorbidities of hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy, diabetes, myocardial ischemia, and obesity. HF-PEF is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Although two large multicenter randomized, placebo-controlled trials evaluating an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) and an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) in patients with HF-PEF did not demonstrate any statistically significant benefit in their primary end points, they did suggest that these agents may have a modest role in reducing HF hospitalizations. Although calcium channel blockers and beta-blockers may be of benefit in patients with HF-PEF, large clinical trial data are not available to support their routine use in all patients with HF-PEF. Subgroup analysis does not support the use of digoxin in patients with HF-PEF in sinus rhythm. Current therapeutic recommendations for HF-PEF are aimed at 1) management of HF symptoms with sodium and fluid restriction along with diuretics for volume overload and 2) treatment of concomitant comorbidities, especially hypertension, rate and possibly rhythm control of atrial fibrillation, and evaluation and treatment of myocardial ischemia and anemia. ACEIs, ARBs, calcium channel blockers, and beta-blockers are recommended for HF-PEF patients who have other established indications for their use. Results are awaited from ongoing clinical trials with another ARB, irbesartan, and an aldosterone blocker, spironolactone.

  17. Ejection of Supernova-Enriched Gas From Dwarf Disk Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fragile, P C; Murray, S D; Lin, D C

    2004-06-15

    We examine the efficiency with which supernova-enriched gas may be ejected from dwarf disk galaxies, using a methodology previously employed to study the self-enrichment efficiency of dwarf spheroidal systems. Unlike previous studies that focused on highly concentrated starbursts, in the current work we consider discrete supernova events spread throughout various fractions of the disk. We model disk systems having gas masses of 10{sup 8} and 10{sup 9} M{sub {circle_dot}} with supernova rates of 30, 300, and 3000 Myr{sup -1}. The supernova events are confined to the midplane of the disk, but distributed over radii of 0, 30, and 80% of the disk radius, consistent with expectations for Type II supernovae. In agreement with earlier studies, we find that the enriched material from supernovae is largely lost when the supernovae are concentrated near the nucleus, as expected for a starburst event. In contrast, we find the loss of enriched material to be much less efficient (as low as 21%) when the supernovae occur over even a relatively small fraction of the disk. The difference is due to the ability of the system to relax following supernova events that occur over more extended regions. Larger physical separations also reduce the likelihood of supernovae going off within low-density ''chimneys'' swept out by previous supernovae. We also find that, for the most distributed systems, significant metal loss is more likely to be accompanied by significant mass loss. A comparison with theoretical predications indicates that, when undergoing self-regulated star formation, galaxies in the mass range considered shall efficiently retain the products of Type II supernovae.

  18. Neck injury criteria formulation and injury risk curves for the ejection environment: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Jeffrey C; Miller, Michael E; Pellettiere, Joseph A; Erich, Roger A

    2013-12-01

    Helmet mounted displays provide increased pilot capability, but can also increase the risk of injury during ejection. The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration's (NHTSA's) neck injury criteria (Nij) metric is evaluated for understanding the impact of helmet mass on the risk of injury and modified risk curves are developed which are compatible with the needs of the aviation community. Existent human subject data collected under various accelerative and head loading conditions were applied to understand the sensitivity of the Nij construct to changes in acceleration and helmet mass, as well as its stability with respect to gender, body mass, neck circumference, and sitting height. A portion of this data was combined with data from an earlier postmortem human subject study to create pilot study modified risk curves. These curves were compared and contrasted with the NHTSA risk curves. A statistically significant difference in the peak mean Nij was observed when seat acceleration increased by 2 G, but not when helmet mass was varied from 1.6 kg to 2 kg at a constant seat acceleration of 8 G. Although NHTSA risk curves predict a 13% risk of AIS 2+ injury for the 8-G, 2-kg helmet condition mean Nij of 0.138, no AIS 2+ injuries were observed. Modified risk curves were produced which predict a 0.91% risk of AIS 2+ injury under these conditions. The Nij was shown to be sensitive to changes in acceleration and generally robust to anthropometric differences between individuals. Modified risk curves are proposed which improve risk prediction at lower Nij values.

  19. ESA Parabolic Flight, Drop Tower and Centrifuge Opportunities for University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callens, Natacha; Ventura-Traveset, Javier; Zornoza Garcia-Andrade, Eduardo; Gomez-Calero, Carlos; van Loon, Jack J. W. A.; Pletser, Vladimir; Kufner, Ewald; Krause, Jutta; Lindner, Robert; Gai, Frederic; Eigenbrod, Christian

    The European Space Agency (ESA) Education Office was established in 1998 with the purpose of motivating young people to study science, engineering and technology subjects and to ensure a qualified workforce for ESA and the European space sector in the future. To this end the ESA Education Office is supporting several hands-on activities including small student satellites and student experiments on sounding rockets, high altitude balloons as well as microgravity and hypergravity platforms. This paper is intended to introduce three new ESA Education Office hands-on activities called "Fly Your Thesis!", "Drop Your Thesis!" and "Spin Your Thesis!". These activities give re-spectively access to aircraft parabolic flight, drop tower and centrifuge campaigns to European students. These educational programmes offer university students the unique opportunity to design, build, and eventually perform, in microgravity or hypergravity, a scientific or techno-logical experiment which is linked to their syllabus. During the "Fly Your Thesis!" campaigns, the students accompany their experiments onboard the A300 Zero-G aircraft, operated by the company Novespace, based in Bordeaux, France, for a series of three flights of 30 parabolas each, with each parabola providing about 20s of microgravity [1]. "Drop Your Thesis!" campaigns are held in the ZARM Drop Tower, in Bremen, Germany. The installation delivers 4.74s of microgravity in dropping mode and 9.3s in the catapulting mode [2]. Research topics such as fluid physics, fundamental physics, combustion, biology, material sciences, heat transfer, astrophysics, chemistry or biochemistry can greatly benefit from using microgravity platforms. "Spin Your Thesis!" campaigns take place in the Large Diameter Centrifuge (LDC) facility, at ESTEC, Noordwijk, in the Netherlands. This facility offers an acceleration from 1 to 20 times Earth's gravity [3]. The use of hypergravity allows completing the scientific picture of how gravity has an

  20. Improved Rock Core Sample Break-off, Retention and Ejection System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort advances the design of an innovative core sampling and acquisition system with improved core break-off, retention and ejection features. The...

  1. Noninvasive ventilation in functional capacity of cardiac patients with normal fraction ventricular ejection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Joelson dos Santos Silva; Ananília Regina Silva Cavalcante; Nathalie Cortez Bezerra de Medeiros; Carolina Taveira Gonçalves; Johnnatas Mikael Lopes; Daniela Gardano Bucharles Mont’Alverne; Gustavo Christofoletti; Karla Luciana Magnani

    2016-01-01

    ...: To evaluate the noninvasive ventilation (NIV) effects in functional capacity of patients with stable heart failure with a normal ejection fraction, evaluated using six-minute treadmill walk (tread6MWT). Method...

  2. Jülich solar power tower - system behavior during downtime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Torsten; Göhring, Felix; Stadler, Hannes; Doerbeck, Till

    2017-06-01

    At the Jülich Solar Power Tower, two new shut-off dampers have been installed in the hot air piping system in order to reduce thermal losses during downtime of the plant. The thermodynamic behavior of the thermal energy storage and the steam boiler has been investigated with respect to heat losses after shut-down of the plant. Also, the change of temperature and the pressure drop at both shut-off dampers during downtime has been analyzed. Results show that for the storage, a reduction of thermal losses can be achieved by closing the damper overnight. Regarding the steam boiler, no improvements on heat losses were observed. If only two of the four storage chambers have been charged during operation, heat transfer between the chambers is observed after shut-down. It is concluded that natural convection is not the main source of thermal overnight losses, however, it can be lowered thanks to the dampers. Heat conduction and convectional heat transfer at the surfaces also contribute to the decrease of thermal energy, which can be lowered by thicker insulation layers in the future.

  3. Hanoi tower-like multilayered ultrathin palladium nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xi; Liu, Xinhong; Pan, Yung-Tin; Walsh, Kathleen A; Yang, Hong

    2014-12-10

    This paper describes the synthesis, formation mechanism, and mechanical property of multilayered ultrathin Pd nanosheets. An anisotropic, Hanoi Tower-like assembly of Pd nanosheets was identified by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). These nanosheets may contain ultrathin Pd layers, down to single unit cell thickness. Selected area electron diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscopy data show the interconnected atomically thick layers stacking vertically with rotational mismatches, resulting in unique diffractions and Moiré patterns. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation with van der Waals correction (DFT+vdW) shows the adsorption of Pd4(CO)4(OAc)4 on Pd(110) surface (Ead = -5.68 eV) is much stronger than that on Pd(100) (Ead = -4.72 eV) or on Pd(111) (Ead = -3.80 eV). The adsorption strength of this Pd complex is significantly stronger than that of CO on the same Pd surfaces. The DFT+vdW calculation results suggest a new mechanism for the observed anisotropic growth of nanosheets with unusually high aspect ratio, in which the competitive adsorptions between Pd4(CO)4(OAc)4 complex and CO on various surfaces result in a favored growth along the ⟨110⟩ directions and inhibition along ⟨111⟩ directions. The mechanical property of these multilayered Pd nanosheets was studied using AFM and nanoindentation techniques, which indicate multilayered nanosheets show more plastic deformation than the bulk in response to an applied force.

  4. Dynamic Resource Allocation with the arcControlTower

    CERN Document Server

    Filipcic, Andrej; The ATLAS collaboration; Nilsen, Jon Kerr

    2015-01-01

    Distributed computing resources available for high-energy physics research are becoming less dedicated to one type of workflow and researchers’ workloads are increasingly exploiting modern computing technologies such as parallelism. The current pilot job management model used by many experiments relies on static dedicated resources and cannot easily adapt to these changes. The model used for ATLAS in Nordic countries and some other places enables a flexible job management system based on dynamic resources allocation. Rather than a fixed set of resources managed centrally, the model allows resources to be requested on the fly. The ARC Computing Element (ARC-CE) and ARC Control Tower (aCT) are the key components of the model. The aCT requests jobs from the ATLAS job management system (PanDA) and submits a fully-formed job description to ARC-CEs. ARC-CE can then dynamically request the required resources from the underlying batch system. In this paper we describe the architecture of the model and the experienc...

  5. CHEP2015: Dynamic Resource Allocation with arcControlTower

    CERN Document Server

    Filipcic, Andrej; The ATLAS collaboration; Nilsen, Jon Kerr

    2015-01-01

    Distributed computing resources available for high-energy physics research are becoming less dedicated to one type of workflow and researchers’ workloads are increasingly exploiting modern computing technologies such as parallelism. The current pilot job management model used by many experiments relies on static dedicated resources and cannot easily adapt to these changes. The model used for ATLAS in Nordic countries and some other places enables a flexible job management system based on dynamic resources allocation. Rather than a fixed set of resources managed centrally, the model allows resources to be requested on the fly. The ARC Computing Element (ARC-CE) and ARC Control Tower (aCT) are the key components of the model. The aCT requests jobs from the ATLAS job mangement system (Panda) and submits a fully-formed job description to ARC-CEs. ARC-CE can then dynamically request the required resources from the underlying batch system. In this paper we describe the architecture of the model and the experience...

  6. LBA-ECO CD-04 Meteorological and Flux Data, km 83 Tower Site, Tapajos National Forest

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Tower flux measurements of carbon dioxide,water vapor, heat, and meteorological variables were obtained at the Tapajos National Forest, km 83 site,...

  7. LBA-ECO CD-04 Meteorological and Flux Data, km 83 Tower Site, Tapajos National Forest

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Tower flux measurements of carbon dioxide,water vapor, heat, and meteorological variables were obtained at the Tapajos National Forest, km 83 site, Santarem, Para,...

  8. LBA-ECO CD-04 LAI Estimated from Photos, km 83 Tower Site, Tapajos National Forest

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains summary data for monthly leaf area index (LAI) and plant area index (PAI) at the km 83 Tower Site, in the Tapajos National Forest,...

  9. LBA-ECO CD-04 LAI Estimated from Photos, km 83 Tower Site, Tapajos National Forest

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains summary data for monthly leaf area index (LAI) and plant area index (PAI) at the km 83 Tower Site, in the Tapajos National Forest, Para,...

  10. Seismic Analysis of Intake Towers Considering Multiple-Support Excitation and Soil-Structure Interaction Effects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vidot, Aidcer

    2004-01-01

    .... The other effect examined is the soil-structure interaction. First, a direct approach based on a finite element model of the tower, bridge, and dam with the earthquake motion applied at the bedrock is used...

  11. LBA-ECO CD-04 Soil Respiration, km 83 Tower Site, Tapajos National Forest, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set reports on the flux of carbon dioxide from logged forest soils near the eddy flux tower at the km 83 site, Para, Brazil. The automated soil...

  12. KM3NeT tower data acquisition and data transport electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolau C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the KM3Net European project, the production stage of a large volume underwater neutrino telescope has started. The forthcoming installation includes 8 towers and 24 strings, that will be installed 100 km off-shore Capo Passero (Italy at 3500 m depth. The KM3NeT tower, whose layout is strongly based on the NEMO Phase-2 prototype tower deployed in March 2013, has been re-engineered and partially re-designed in order to optimize production costs, power consumption, and usability. This contribution gives a description of the main electronics, including front-end, data transport and clock distribution system, of the KM3NeT tower detection unit.

  13. LBA-ECO CD-10 Temperature Profiles at km 67 Tower Site, Tapajos National Forest

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains a single text file which reports temperature measurements at the Para Western (Santarem) - km 67, Primary Forest Tower Site. This...

  14. LBA-ECO CD-10 Temperature Profiles at km 67 Tower Site, Tapajos National Forest

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains a single text file which reports temperature measurements at the Para Western (Santarem) - km 67, Primary Forest Tower Site. This site is in...

  15. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Wildlife Detection and Observation Technologies at a Solar Power Tower Facility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Diehl, Robert H; Valdez, Ernest W; Preston, Todd M; Wellik, Michael J; Cryan, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    .... Smoking objects are sometimes observed co-occurring with reflected, concentrated light ("solar flux") in the airspace around solar towers, but the identity and origins of such objects can be difficult to determine...

  16. Trends, Opportunities, and Challenges for Tall Wind Turbine and Tower Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lantz, Eric; Roberts, Owen; Dykes, Katherine

    2017-06-28

    This presentation summarizes recent analysis focused on characterizing the opportunity for Tall Wind technologies generally and for tall tower technologies specifically. It seeks to illuminate and explain the concept of Tall Wind, its impact on the wind industry to date, and the potential value of Tall Wind in the future. It also explores the conditions and locations under which the impacts of Tall Wind offer the most significant potential to increase wind technology performance. In addition, it seeks to examine the status of tall tower technology as a key sub-component of Tall Wind, focusing on the potential for continued innovation in tubular steel wind turbine towers and the status and potential for a select set of alternative tall tower technologies.

  17. Stochastic Analysis of the Influence of Tower Shadow on Fatigue Life of Wind Turbine Blade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ronnie; Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue damage accumulation in upwind turbine blades is primarily influenced by turbulence in the inflow. However, the stress reversals during blade passages through the stagnating and deflected mean wind field in front of the tower also contributes significantly. In the paper the lower order...... statistical moments of the fatigue life of a blade are estimated and compared for a turbine with a tripod tower and a standard mono-tower, respectively. The stagnation zones for each of the legs of the tripod are narrower than for the mono-tower, and hence the stress reversals will be comparable smaller....... The blade stresses are calculated from a dynamic mechanical model based on a two dynamic degree of freedom with quasi-static correction for higher modes. The self-induced aero-elastic loading and the turbulence loading are modeled by means of a quasi-static model linearized around the operational point...

  18. Field Plot Points for Devils Tower National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Vegetation field plots at Devils Tower NM were visited, described, and documented in a digital database. The database consists of 2 parts - (1) Physical Descriptive...

  19. NACP VPRM NEE Parameters Optimized to North American Flux Tower Sites, 2000-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides Vegetation Photosynthesis Respiration Model (VPRM) net ecosystem exchange (NEE) parameter values optimized to 65 flux tower sites across North...

  20. Solar assisted ventilation tower, Frederiksberg[Denmark]; Ventilationsanlaeggenes betydning for ejendommens varmeforbrug. Delrapport 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-04-01

    The project has demonstrated a building integrated ventilation system with the ducts system installed outside the facade. The air ducts are installed in a solar tower parallel to the staircases in the courtyard. The towers utilise the solar energy for preheating the ventilation air. An air handling unit with counterflow heat exchanger is installed in the roof space. The system is designed for old building block, which are going to be renovated with mechanical ventilation. The system saves room space for the installations of the ventilation ducts. The monitoring of the system performance shows energy saving of 40% caused by new windows, individual heat meters and ventilation with heat recovery and solar tower. The system efficiency of the solar tower is high compared with other traditional solar wall constructions. The ventilation system is designed with a very low electricity consumption of the fans. The monitored electricity consumption is 22 W per dwellings. (au)

  1. LBA-ECO CD-04 CO2 Profiles, km 83 Tower Site, Tapajos National Forest

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Atmospheric carbon dioxide profiles were measured at 12 levels up to 64 m at the km 83 logged tower site in Tapajos National Forest, Santarem, Para,...

  2. Applications to determine the shortest tower BTS distance using Dijkstra algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardana, Herwin; Maharani, Septya; Hatta, Heliza Rahmania

    2017-02-01

    Telecommunications Tower or so-called BTS (Base Transceiver System) Toweris one of the main components in the network infrastructure that has experienced an increase in the number of construction. Telecommunications tower function as a place to put the antenna signal transmitter (access network) to provide communication services to customers around the tower. In addition, other use of telecommunications tower also to place the transmission signal antenna (transport network using microwave technology) for connecting customers with a central area. Therefore, in needed of a decision support system that can provide recommendations planting route of fiber optic cable with the shortest distance in purpose the use of fiber optic cable becoming more efficient. The results of the research were the shortest rule information, showing the distance to be travelled and the map view to enabling users to look at these.

  3. The possible use of ancient tower tombs as watchtowers in Syro-Mesopotamia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M. Silver; M. Törmä; K. Silver; J. Okkonen; M. Nuñez

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally polygonal tower tombs dating from the Greco-Roman era, especially found in the area of Syro-Mesopotamia, have only been treated as funerary structures without discussion of their other possible purposes...

  4. LBA-ECO CD-04 Dendrometry, km 83 Tower Site, Tapajos National Forest, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: A dendrometry study was conducted at the logged forest tower site, km 83 site, Tapajos National Forest, Para, Brazil over a period of 4 years following the...

  5. LBA-ECO CD-04 Leaf Area Index, km 83 Tower Site, Tapajos National Forest, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Leaf area index was estimated in an 18 ha plot at the logged forest tower site, km 83, Tapajos National Forest, Para, Brazil. The plot was adjacent to the eddy flux...

  6. NACP MCI: CO2 Flux Tower Measurements, Upper Midwest Region, USA, 2007-2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides high precision and high accuracy atmospheric CO2 data from seven instrumented communication towers located in the U.S. Upper...

  7. NACP MCI: Tower Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations, Upper Midwest Region, USA, 2007-2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides high precision and high accuracy atmospheric CO2 data from seven instrumented communication towers located in the U.S. Upper Midwest. The...

  8. BOREAS Follow-On FLX-04 Tower Flux and Meteorological Data from NSA Burn Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Tower flux and meteorological data were collected above 4 black spruce forest sites in the NSA that experienced stand-replacing wildfires in 1989,1981,1964 and 1930....

  9. BOREAS Follow-On FLX-04 Tower Flux and Meteorological Data from NSA Burn Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Tower flux and meteorological data were collected above 4 black spruce forest sites in the NSA that experienced stand-replacing wildfires in 1989,1981,1964...

  10. How tall can gelatin towers be? An introduction to elasticity and buckling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taberlet, Nicolas; Ferrand, Jérémy; Camus, Élise; Lachaud, Léa; Plihon, Nicolas

    2017-12-01

    The stability of elastic towers is studied through simple hands-on experiments. Using gelatin-based stackable bricks, one can investigate the maximum height a simple structure can reach before collapsing. We show through experiments and by using the classical linear elastic theory that the main limitation to the height of such towers is the buckling of the elastic structures under their own weight. Moreover, the design and architecture of the towers can be optimized to greatly improve their resistance to self-buckling. To this aim, the maximum height of hollow and tapered towers is investigated. The experimental and theoretical developments presented in this paper can help students grasp the fundamental concepts in elasticity and mechanical stability.

  11. SAFARI 2000 Meteorological Tower Measurements, Kruger National Park, 2000-2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: An eddy covariance system mounted on a tower near the Skukuza Camp in Kruger National Park, South Africa, has been operating continuously since early 2000....

  12. SAFARI 2000 Meteorological Tower Measurements, Kruger National Park, 2000-2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An eddy covariance system mounted on a tower near the Skukuza Camp in Kruger National Park, South Africa, has been operating continuously since early 2000....

  13. Modeling and Optimization of a CoolingTower-Assisted Heat Pump System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xiaoqing Wei; Nianping Li; Jinqing Peng; Jianlin Cheng; Jinhua Hu; Meng Wang

    2017-01-01

    To minimize the total energy consumption of a cooling tower-assisted heat pump (CTAHP) system in cooling mode, a model-based control strategy with hybrid optimization algorithm for the system is presented in this paper...

  14. A simple calculator of ballistic trajectories for blocks ejected during volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, Larry G.

    2001-01-01

    During the past century, numerous observers have described the violent ejection of large blocks and bombs from volcanoes during volcanic explosions. Minakami (1942) mapped the locations of blocks ejected from Asama Volcano during explosions in 1937. He developed a mathematical expression relating initial velocity and trajectory angle of ejected blocks to the ejection distance, taking into account air drag and assuming a constant drag coefficient. In the late 1950’s, Gorshkov (1959) estimated ejection velocities at Bezymianny volcano during its sector-collapse eruption. Wilson (1972) developed the first mathematical algorithm for ballistic trajectories in the volcanological literature (earlier ones had been available for military applications) that considered variations in drag coefficient with Reynolds number. Fagents and Wilson (1993) advanced the method of Wilson (1972) by considering the effect of reduced drag near the vent. From the 1970’s through the 1990’s other papers, too numerous to mention, have estimated volcanic ejection velocities from ballistic blocks. Since the early 1990’s there has been a decrease in the number of published papers that quantify ejection velocities from ballistic trajectories. This decrease has resulted in part from the appreciation that ejection velocities cannot be uniquely determined by ejection distance due to uncertainties in initial trajectory angle and drag force. On the other hand, the decrease in usage has coincided with an increase in the ease with which ballistic calculations can be made, due to the vast improvement in computer power and in the user-friendliness of computers. During the 1970’s, only volcanologists with mathematical acumen or those who could collaborate with applied mathematicians were able to make such estimates. With 21st century computer power, ballistic computation should be available to anyone as a back-of-the-envelope indicator of explosive power; the only factor preventing such usage is

  15. Relationships between egg-recognition and egg-ejection in a grasp-ejector species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Manuel; Ruiz-Raya, Francisco; Roncalli, Gianluca; Ibáñez-Álamo, Juan Diego

    2017-01-01

    Brood parasitism frequently leads to a total loss of host fitness, which selects for the evolution of defensive traits in host species. Experimental studies have demonstrated that recognition and rejection of the parasite egg is the most common and efficient defence used by host species. Egg-recognition experiments have advanced our knowledge of the evolutionary and coevolutionary implications of egg recognition and rejection. However, our understanding of the proximate mechanisms underlying both processes remains poor. Egg rejection is a complex behavioural process consisting of three stages: egg recognition, the decision whether or not to reject the putative parasitic egg and the act of ejection itself. We have used the blackbird (Turdus merula) as a model species to explore the relationship between egg recognition and the act of egg ejection. We have manipulated the two main characteristics of parasitic eggs affecting egg ejection in this grasp-ejector species: the degree of colour mimicry (mimetic and non-mimetic, which mainly affects the egg-recognition stage of the egg-rejection process) and egg size (small, medium and large, which affects the decision to eject), while maintaining a control group of non-parasitized nests. The behaviour of the female when confronted with an experimental egg was filmed using a video camera. Our results show that egg touching is an indication of egg recognition and demonstrate that blackbirds recognized (i.e., touched) non-mimetic experimental eggs significantly more than mimetic eggs. However, twenty per cent of the experimental eggs were touched but not subsequently ejected, which confirms that egg recognition does not necessarily mean egg ejection and that accepting parasitic eggs, at least sometimes, is the consequence of acceptance decisions. Regarding proximate mechanisms, our results show that the delay in egg ejection is not only due to recognition problems as usually suggested, given that experimental eggs are not

  16. Relationships between egg-recognition and egg-ejection in a grasp-ejector species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Soler

    Full Text Available Brood parasitism frequently leads to a total loss of host fitness, which selects for the evolution of defensive traits in host species. Experimental studies have demonstrated that recognition and rejection of the parasite egg is the most common and efficient defence used by host species. Egg-recognition experiments have advanced our knowledge of the evolutionary and coevolutionary implications of egg recognition and rejection. However, our understanding of the proximate mechanisms underlying both processes remains poor. Egg rejection is a complex behavioural process consisting of three stages: egg recognition, the decision whether or not to reject the putative parasitic egg and the act of ejection itself. We have used the blackbird (Turdus merula as a model species to explore the relationship between egg recognition and the act of egg ejection. We have manipulated the two main characteristics of parasitic eggs affecting egg ejection in this grasp-ejector species: the degree of colour mimicry (mimetic and non-mimetic, which mainly affects the egg-recognition stage of the egg-rejection process and egg size (small, medium and large, which affects the decision to eject, while maintaining a control group of non-parasitized nests. The behaviour of the female when confronted with an experimental egg was filmed using a video camera. Our results show that egg touching is an indication of egg recognition and demonstrate that blackbirds recognized (i.e., touched non-mimetic experimental eggs significantly more than mimetic eggs. However, twenty per cent of the experimental eggs were touched but not subsequently ejected, which confirms that egg recognition does not necessarily mean egg ejection and that accepting parasitic eggs, at least sometimes, is the consequence of acceptance decisions. Regarding proximate mechanisms, our results show that the delay in egg ejection is not only due to recognition problems as usually suggested, given that experimental

  17. Flux footprints for a tall tower in a land–water mosaic area: A case study of the area around the Risø tower

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogachev, Andrey; Dellwik, Ebba

    2017-01-01

    in the area surrounding the 122-m tower at Risø (Denmark), which is a mosaic of water, agricultural areas and forests. These heterogeneities are clearly reflected in the tower-based observations of the turbulence statistics from a profile of six sonic anemometers and are also reproduced by the flow model...... coincide with areas, where the mean vertical velocity is positive. The positive mean vertical velocity is, in turn, related to topography and forest edge effects on the flow. Relative to the surface roughness estimated from a sonic anemometer, a higher value of the surface roughness was needed...

  18. The survival of patients with heart failure with preserved or reduced left ventricular ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesgaard, Søren

    2012-01-01

    A substantial proportion of patients with heart failure have preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HF-PEF). Previous studies have reported mixed results whether survival is similar to those patients with heart failure and reduced EF (HF-REF).......A substantial proportion of patients with heart failure have preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HF-PEF). Previous studies have reported mixed results whether survival is similar to those patients with heart failure and reduced EF (HF-REF)....

  19. Failed Filament Eruption Inside a Coronal Mass Ejection in Active Region 11121 (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-13

    2003, ApJ, 592, 597 Moore, R. L., & LaBonte, B. J. 1980, in Solar and Interplanetary Dynamics, eds. M. Dryer , & E. Tandberg-Hanssen (Dordrecht...Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195, USA 3 Air Force Research Laboratory, Solar and Solar Disturbances, Sunspot...prominences – Sun: coronal mass ejections (CMEs) 1. Introduction Solar eruptions are explosive ejections of large amounts of plasma from the lower

  20. 24 M meteorological tower data report period: January--December, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, D.; Bowen, J.; Egami, R. [and others

    1997-08-01

    This report was prepared by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). It summarizes meteorological data collected at the 24 meter tower at the Nevada Test Site Hazardous Material Spill Center (HAZMAT) located at Frenchman Flat near Mercury, Nevada, approximately 75 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The tower was originally installed in July, 1993 to characterize baseline conditions for an EPA sponsored experimental research program at the HAZMAT.

  1. Tall Tower Wind Energy Monitoring and Numerical Model Validation in Northern Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koracin, D. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Kaplan, M. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Smith, C. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); McCurdy, G. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Wolf, A. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); McCord, T. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); King, K. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Belu, R. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Horvath, K. [Croatian Meteorological and Hydrological Service, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2015-10-01

    The main objectives of this project were to conduct a tall-tower and sodar field campaign in complex terrain, investigate wind properties relevant to wind energy assessment, and evaluate high-resolution models with fixed and adaptive grid structures. Two 60-m towers at Virginia Peak ridges near Washoe Valley, Nevada, were instrumented with cup and vane anemometers as well as sonic anemometers, and an acoustic sounder (hereafter sodar) was installed near one of the towers. The towers were located 2,700 m apart with a vertical distance of 140 m elevation between their bases. Each tower had a downhill exposure of rolling complex terrain, with the nearby valley floor 3,200 m to the west and 800 m below the summit. Cup anemometers were installed at both towers at 20, 40, and 60 m, wind vanes at 20 and 60 m, and sonic anemometers at 20 and 60 m. The sodar measurements were nominally provided every 10 m in vertical distance from 40 to 200 m with the quality of the data generally decreasing with height. Surface air temperature, atmospheric pressure, and radiation measurements were conducted at 1.5 m AGL at both of the towers. Although the plan was to conduct a 1-year period of data collection, we extended the period (October 5, 2012 through February 24, 2014) to cover for possible data loss from instrument or communication problems. We also present a preliminary analysis of the towers and sodar data, including a detailed inventory of available and missing data as well as outliers. The analysis additionally includes calculation of the Weibull parameters, turbulence intensity, and initial computation of wind power density at various heights.

  2. Approaches to improving breast screening uptake: evidence and experience from Tower Hamlets

    OpenAIRE

    Eilbert, K W; Carroll, K.; Peach, J.; Khatoon, S; Basnett, I; McCulloch, N

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on an innovative whole-systems approach to improving uptake of breast screening in Tower Hamlets, a deprived borough in the East End of London with a large minority ethnic population. The approach, developed by the public health team at NHS Tower Hamlets, draws on analysis of needs and existing literature about effective interventions to promote breast screening. Social marketing research led to a campaign targeted at Bangladeshi women, together with a range of initiatives ...

  3. Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at Barrow (METTWR4H) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritsche, MT

    2008-04-01

    The Barrow meteorology station (BMET) uses mainly conventional in situ sensors mounted at four different heights (2m, 10m, 20m and 40m) on a 40 m tower to obtain profiles of wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, dew point and humidity. It also obtains barometric pressure, visibility and precipitation data from sensors at the base of the tower. Additionally, a Chilled Mirror Hygrometer and an Ultrasonic wind speed sensor are located near the 2m level for comparison purposes.

  4. Towards the spatial rectification of tower-based eddy-covariance flux observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, K.; Metzger, S.; Kljun, N.; Taylor, J. R.; Desai, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Eddy-covariance (EC) observations of ecologically relevant trace gas and energy fluxes are too sparse spatially for direct assimilation into gridded earth system models (ESMs). The spatial coverage of a tower EC measurement may represent less than 1% of a grid cell resolved by ESMs. For advancing ecological inference it is hence desirable to improve the spatial representativeness of EC measurements. The objectives of this study are (i) to map the spatio-temporally variable flux field around tower EC measurements, and (ii) to quantify spatial representativeness when surrogating the flux over an ESM grid cell with EC observations that source a spatio-temporally variable patch of surface close to the tower. The present study employs environmental response functions (ERFs) for this purpose. The underlying principle is to extract the relationship between biophysical drivers and ecological responses from measurements in the time-domain under varying environmental conditions. The resulting ERF can then be used for projecting the fluxes into target areas. Based on the probability density functions of resulting flux grids, the representativeness of tower measurements is quantified. We apply ERF to EC measurements from July and August 2011 at the AmeriFlux Park Falls tall tower, Wisconsin, U.S.A. With the ERF procedure, the spatial coverage can be increased to >70% for target areas around the tower of 400 km2. From this we determine that 85% and 24% of the tower flux observations can capture the mean turbulent flux and its variability over a 900 km2 target area, respectively, at 5% significance and 80% representativeness level. Lastly, we determine an uncertainty budget for this methodology. Our companion presentation "Assessing and correcting spatial representativeness of tower eddy-covariance flux measurements" shows the applicability of the ERF procedure to provide consistent flux time series for target regions under different climatic and ecological environments.

  5. The Diversity and Scale Matter: Ubiquitous Transportation Mode Detection using Single Cell Tower Information

    OpenAIRE

    AbdelAziz, Ali Mohamed; Youssef, Moustafa

    2015-01-01

    Detecting the transportation mode of a user is important for a wide range of applications. While a number of recent systems addressed the transportation mode detection problem using the ubiquitous mobile phones, these studies either leverage GPS, the inertial sensors, and/or multiple cell towers information. However, these different phone sensors have high energy consumption, limited to a small subset of phones (e.g. high-end phones or phones that support neighbouring cell tower information),...

  6. Composite Grounding Application of Transmission Line Tower with Flexible Graphite Grounding Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongtao; Zhang, Lei; Xiong, Jia; Cui, Zhenxing; Yang, Qi

    2017-07-01

    To solve the metal corrosion problem of transmission line tower grounding grid, a composite grounding material technique based on flexible graphite grounding is proposed. Using CDEGS software, the power frequency grounding resistances with different soils layers and different ground network size of tower are simulated. The researches show that layered soil resistance can be reduced by laying vertical grounding body and uniform soil can reduce ground resistance by increasing grounding network size.

  7. An integrated system for the energy production and accumulation from renewable sources: a rural tower prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Francesco, Silvia; Petrozzi, Alessandro; Montesarchio, Valeria

    2014-05-01

    This research work presents the implementation of an architectural prototype aiming at the complete energy self-sufficiency through an integrated system based on renewable energy. It is suitable for historical buildings in rural areas, isolated but important from natural and architectonical point of view. In addition to the energy aspects, it is important to protect the impact in terms of land-use and environment. This idea is also especially powerful because in the rural countries there are many little building centers abandoned because they are devoid of a connection to the electric energy grid and methane piping. Thus, taking inspiration from dove towers, architectural typology widespread in central Italy, a virtual model has been developed as an integrated system for renewable energy production, storage and supply. While recovering the ancient tower, it is possible to design and assembly an integrated intelligent system, able to combine energy supply and demand: a new tower that should be flexible, efficient and replicable in other contexts as manufacturing, commercial and residential ones. The prototype has been applied to a real case of study, an ancient complex located in Umbria Region. The sources for electric production installed on the tower are photovoltaics, on the head and shaft of the tower, hydropower and a biomass gasifier providing thermal too. A tank at the head of the tower allows an available hydraulic potential energy, for the turbine at any time, to cover photovoltaic lacks, caused by sudden loss of production, for environmental causes. Conversely, photovoltaic peaks, otherwise unusable, can be used to reload the water from the receiving tank at the foot of the tower, up to the tank in the head. The same underground tank acts as a thermal flywheel to optimize the geothermal heat pumps for the heat and cold production. Keywords: hydropower, photovoltaics, dove tower.

  8. Analisis Penerapan Sistem Manajemen Limbah Berdasarkan Sertifikasi Eco-hotel Di Sheraton Surabaya Hotel and Towers

    OpenAIRE

    Wibowo, Melisa; Andreani, Fransisca

    2013-01-01

    Sistem manajemen limbah menjadi hal yang perlu diperhatikan bagi pelaksana bisnis perhotelan. Sheraton Surabaya Hotel and Towers mendasarkan sistem manajemen limbah pada sertifikasi Eco-Hotel, yaitu sertifikasi yang didasarkan pada ISO 14001 tahun 2004 mengenai Standar Manajemen Lingkungan dan diaplikasikan pada bisnis dan operasional hotel. Dalam penelitian ini, penulis ingin mengetahui penerapan sistem manajemen limbah berdasarkan sertifikasi Eco-Hotel di Sheraton Surabaya Hotel and Towers....

  9. A Quantitative Analysis of Cell Tower Trace Data for Understanding Human Mobility and Mobile Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Walfield, Neal,; Griffin, John Linwood; Grothoff, Christian

    2016-01-01

    International audience; This paper provides insights into human mobility by analyzing cell tower traces. Cell tower trace data is an attractive method for studying mobility as the data can be collected in an energy-efficient and privacy-preserving way. Our new data set is useful for confirming or determining fundamental mobility parameters and for understanding mobile networks. In particular, we identify patterns in the data that would seem characteristic for particular behaviors, such as tra...

  10. Design of Tall Prestressed Reinforced Concrete Towers Based on Design Spectrum and Time History Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Scurtu, Ioan-Cosmin; Muşat, Vasile

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a case study for tall reinforced concrete tower design is presented. The aim of this study is to develop a design method for concrete reinforced towers used to support wind power turbines, taking into account the particular design requirements related to the Romania specific soil conditions and earthquake hazard. A spectral analysis was done using current design practice, and starting from these benchmark values, a more thorough time-history analysis was done with the a detaile...

  11. Study of the comparative costs of five wet/dry cooling tower concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaloudek, F.R.; Allemann, R.T.; Faletti, D.W.; Johnson, B.M.; Parry, H.L.; Smith, G.C.; Tokarz, R.D.; Walter, R.A.

    1976-09-01

    The projected cost of five alternative dry/wet power plant heat rejection concepts was studied under conditions imposed by hypothetical use in association with the San Juan Plant Unit 3, a 550-MWe facility currently under construction near the ''Four Corners'' area of New Mexico. The five alternative concepts were: integrated dry/wet tower; separate dry and wet towers; metal fin-tube induced draft tower with deluge water augmentation; plastic heat exchanger tower with deluge water augmentation, and metal fin-tube/deluge augmentation tower with an intermediate ammonia evaporation-condensation condenser and the cooling tower. The integrated dry/wet tower concept, already chosen for service at San Juan Unit 3, was included for reference purposes. All concepts were conceptually designed and estimated using the same bases and employing uniform practices. Each concept was assumed to use all water allocated for consumptive use in Unit 3. The cost estimates obtained showed the following descending order of ''comparable capital cost'': separate dry/wet; metal fin-tube/deluge; integrated dry/wet; plastic tube/deluge; and metal fin-tube/deluge/ammonia. The results indicate that two of the advanced concepts considered, i.e., the plastic tube/deluge concept and the metal fin tube/deluge/ammonia concept, can possibly reduce the overall costs of dry/wet cooling under conditions imposed by the site considered. It was recommended that these two concepts receive additional attention by the ERDA Dry Cooling Tower Program and industry to further quantify their potential benefits and demonstrate their performance and reliability.

  12. Iranian Seljuk Architecture with an Emphasis on Decorative Brickwork of the Qazvin Kharaqan Towers

    OpenAIRE

    Sanaz Khodadadi Dehkordi

    2017-01-01

    Iranian Seljuk period is one of the most magnificent, the most prominent, and at the same time, the fate of the most innovative historical periods. One of the prominent works of Seljuk architecture, which is a valuable work in art and architecture of the Islamic Iran in terms of decorative brickwork, is the Qazvin Kharaqan Towers. These twin towers have more than thirty types of brickwork with stunning arch-viewings and outstanding Kufic brick lines. In this report, I present the architectura...

  13. Validation of the Dynamic Wake Meander model with focus on tower loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, T. J.; Larsen, G. C.; Pedersen, M. M.; Enevoldsen, K.; Madsen, H. A.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a comparison between measured and simulated tower loads for the Danish offshore wind farm Nysted 2. Previously, only limited full scale experimental data containing tower load measurements have been published, and in many cases the measurements include only a limited range of wind speeds. In general, tower loads in wake conditions are very challenging to predict correctly in simulations. The Nysted project offers an improved insight to this field as six wind turbines located in the Nysted II wind farm have been instrumented to measure tower top and tower bottom moments. All recorded structural data have been organized in a database, which in addition contains relevant wind turbine SCADA data as well as relevant meteorological data - e.g. wind speed and wind direction - from an offshore mast located in the immediate vicinity of the wind farm. The database contains data from a period extending over a time span of more than 3 years. Based on the recorded data basic mechanisms driving the increased loading experienced by wind turbines operating in offshore wind farm conditions have been identified, characterized and modeled. The modeling is based on the Dynamic Wake Meandering (DWM) approach in combination with the state-of-the-art aeroelastic model HAWC2, and has previously as well as in this study shown good agreement with the measurements. The conclusions from the study have several parts. In general the tower bending and yaw loads show a good agreement between measurements and simulations. However, there are situations that are still difficult to match. One is tower loads of single-wake operation near rated ambient wind speed for single wake situations for spacing’s around 7-8D. A specific target of the study was to investigate whether the largest tower fatigue loads are associated with a certain downstream distance. This has been identified in both simulations and measurements, though a rather flat optimum is seen in the measurements.

  14. Nest sanitation does not elicit egg ejection in a brown-headed cowbird host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer, Brian D

    2017-03-01

    Most passerine birds practice nest sanitation whereby they remove debris from their nest. Nest sanitation has been posited as a pre-adaptation for egg ejection by hosts of avian brood parasites. However, relatively few North American hosts of the brood parasitic brown-headed cowbird (Molothrus ater) eject cowbird eggs to the detriment of their fitness. In this study, I added either a piece of flagging tape or a pine cone bract scale along with an artificial cowbird egg to nests of the red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) to determine whether the act of nest sanitation would elicit egg ejection. All red-winged blackbirds removed the debris within 24 h, but all individuals also accepted the cowbird eggs and this rate of ejection did not differ from that in nests that only received a cowbird egg. While nest cleaning and egg ejection are similar mechanically, they differ cognitively and egg ejection is not elicited in red-winged blackbirds during the act of removing debris from their nests.

  15. Rollover Car Crashes with Ejection: A Deadly Combination—An Analysis of 719 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rifat Latifi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rollover car crashes (ROCs are serious public safety concerns worldwide. Objective. To determine the incidence and outcomes of ROCs with or without ejection of occupants in the State of Qatar. Methods. A retrospective study of all patients involved in ROCs admitted to Level I trauma center in Qatar (2011-2012. Patients were divided into Group I (ROC with ejection and Group II (ROC without ejection. Results. A total of 719 patients were evaluated (237 in Group I and 482 in Group II. The mean age in Group I was lower than in Group II (24.3±10.3 versus 29±12.2; P=0.001. Group I had higher injury severity score and sustained significantly more head, chest, and abdominal injuries in comparison to Group II. The mortality rate was higher in Group I (25% versus 7%; P=0.001. Group I patients required higher ICU admission rate (P=0.001. Patients in Group I had a 5-fold increased risk for age-adjusted mortality (OR 5.43; 95% CI 3.11–9.49, P=0.001. Conclusion. ROCs with ejection are associated with higher rate of morbidity and mortality compared to ROCs without ejection. As an increased number of young Qatari males sustain ROCs with ejection, these findings highlight the need for research-based injury prevention initiatives in the country.

  16. Linear theory on temporal instability of megahertz faraday waves for monodisperse microdroplet ejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shirley C; Tsai, Chen S

    2013-08-01

    A linear theory on temporal instability of megahertz Faraday waves for monodisperse microdroplet ejection based on mass conservation and linearized Navier-Stokes equations is presented using the most recently observed micrometer- sized droplet ejection from a millimeter-sized spherical water ball as a specific example. The theory is verified in the experiments utilizing silicon-based multiple-Fourier horn ultrasonic nozzles at megahertz frequency to facilitate temporal instability of the Faraday waves. Specifically, the linear theory not only correctly predicted the Faraday wave frequency and onset threshold of Faraday instability, the effect of viscosity, the dynamics of droplet ejection, but also established the first theoretical formula for the size of the ejected droplets, namely, the droplet diameter equals four-tenths of the Faraday wavelength involved. The high rate of increase in Faraday wave amplitude at megahertz drive frequency subsequent to onset threshold, together with enhanced excitation displacement on the nozzle end face, facilitated by the megahertz multiple Fourier horns in resonance, led to high-rate ejection of micrometer- sized monodisperse droplets (>10(7) droplets/s) at low electrical drive power (<;1 W) with short initiation time (<;0.05 s). This is in stark contrast to the Rayleigh-Plateau instability of a liquid jet, which ejects one droplet at a time. The measured diameters of the droplets ranging from 2.2 to 4.6 μm at 2 to 1 MHz drive frequency fall within the optimum particle size range for pulmonary drug delivery.

  17. Wind-induced transmission tower foundation loads. A field study-design code comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savory, E. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ont. (Canada); Parke, G.A.R.; Disney, P.; Toy, N. [School of Engineering, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-15

    This paper presents a comparison between the wind-induced foundation loads measured on a type L6 transmission line tower during a field study in the UK and those computed using the UK Code of Practice for lattice tower and transmission line design (BS8100). In this work, the Code provisions have been generalised to give the wind-induced strain in each of the tower legs immediately above the foundation as a function of wind direction and wind speed at the top of the tower. The complete data set from the field monitoring has been decomposed to provide a similar formulation for comparison purposes. The analysis shows excellent agreement between the Code calculations and the measured results, within the overall accuracy of the field data. This indicates that, at least for the tower type examined here, the existing design Code provides a reliable transformation of the local wind speed at the top of the tower into tension and compression loads on the foundations. (author)

  18. Variation of Tower Footing Resistance on the Lightning Surge Propagation through Overhead Power Distribution Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIUT, E. L.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the analysis of the effects of electromagnetic transients generated by lightning on power distribution lines, considering the influence of tower footing resistance variation. Both types of lightning stroke, direct and induced, are considered. The model of a 20 kV three-phase overhead power distribution line is performed considering a simple line circuit with triangle canopy and 50/8 mm2 Ol-Al conductors. The model of the power distribution line is done considering a Multistory tower model. New concepts regarding lightning assessment through Electromagnetic Transients program and Finite Element Method are implemented. The simulations are performed based on a time domain analysis, considering the lightning stroke as an electromagnetic perturbation within frequency range of 10-100 kHz. A contribution to value creation is the design of the Multistory tower model, used for electromagnetic transients analysis for medium voltage power distribution lines. Excepting previous research, current study was done by considering the variation of tower footing resistance of the tower, between 4-35 ohms. The novelty of the study is the analysis of the dependency determined by the variation of tower footing resistance on the lightning surge propagation through power distribution networks and subsequent consumers.

  19. Experimental investigation of the performance characteristics of a counterflow wet cooling tower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemouari, M. [Department of Process Engineering, Faculty of Technology, University of Bejaia (Algeria); Boumaza, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, King Saud University(Saudi Arabia)

    2010-10-15

    An experimental investigation of the performance characteristics of a counter flow wet cooling tower represented by the heat rejected by the tower and its thermal effectiveness is presented in this paper. The tower is filled with a 'VGA.' (Vertical Grid Apparatus) type packing which is 0.42 m high and contains four (04) galvanized sheets having a zigzag form, between which are disposed three (03) metallic vertical grids in parallel with a cross-sectional test area of 0.15 m - 0.148 m. The investigation is concerned mainly on the effect of the air, water flow rates and the inlet water temperatures on the thermal effectiveness of the cooling tower as well as the heat rejected by this tower from water to be cooled to the air stream discharged into the atmosphere. The two operating regimes which were observed during the air/water contact inside the tower, a Pellicular Regime (PR) and a Bubble and Dispersion Regime (BDR) appear to be important, as The BDR regime enables to cool larger amount of water flow rates, while the Pellicular regime results with higher thermal effectiveness. (authors)

  20. A tower structured scintillator-lead photon calorimeter using a novel fiber optics readout system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessler, H.; Freund, P.; Gebauer, J.; Glas, J. M.; Pretzl, K. P.; Seyboth, P.; Seyerlein, J.; Thevenin, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Described is the construction and the performance of a tower-structured scintillator-lead photon calorimeter using a novel fiber optics readout system. The calorimeter is divided into 9 individual towers. Each tower has a cross section of 5 × 5 cm 2 and consists of 60 layers of 2 mm lead plus 5 mm thick scintillator. The four sides of each tower are covered by thin acrylic sheets (1.5 mm thick) doped with a wavelength shifting material. The light produced in each scintillator plate is first converted in these sheets, then converted a second time in a set of polystyrene optical fibers (diameter 2 mm) which run longitudinally through the calorimeter along the corners of each tower. A small diameter photomultiplier was attached to the fibers at the back end of the calorimeter. The obtained energy resolution with incident electrons in the range of 0.25-5.0 {GeV}/{c} is {σ}/{E} = {0.10}/{√E}. The uniformity of response across the front face of each tower was measured.

  1. Simultaneous effects of water spray and crosswind on performance of natural draft dry cooling tower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadikia Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of water spray and crosswind on the effectiveness of the natural draft dry cooling tower (NDDCT, a three-dimensional model has been developed. Efficiency of NDDCT is improved by water spray system at the cooling tower entrance for high ambient temperature condition with and without crosswind. The natural and forced heat convection flow inside and around the NDDCT is simulated numerically by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations in both air and water droplet phases. Comparison of the numerical results with one-dimensional analytical model and the experimental data illustrates a well-predicted heat transfer rate in the cooling tower. Applying water spray system on the cooling tower radiators enhances the cooling tower efficiency at both no wind and windy conditions. For all values of water spraying rate, NDDCTs operate most effectively at the crosswind velocity of 3m/s and as the wind speed continues to rise to more than 3 m/s up to 12 m/s, the tower efficiency will decrease by approximately 18%, based on no-wind condition. The heat transfer rate of radiator at wind velocity 10 m/s is 11.5% lower than that of the no wind condition. This value is 7.5% for water spray rate of 50kg/s.

  2. A highly efficient Francis turbine designed for energy recovery in cooling towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daqing Zhou

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In China, cooling water entering cooling towers still retains surplus pressure between 39,240 and 147,150 Pa. In order to utilize this wasted energy, it is suggested that the surplus water energy can be harnessed to drive a type of hydroturbine installed in the inner platform of cooling tower and make the fan rotate via its coupled shafts. However, conventional hydroturbines are not suited for this job because of their low efficiency or unmatched rotating speed with that of the fan under the operating conditions of cooling towers. In this article, according to the requirements of turbine work environment in cooling towers, a new type of hydroturbine, Francis turbine with ultra-low specific speed (ns  = 50 m.kW, was designed to replace the fan motor in a cooling tower. Primarily, the shape, position, and number of runner blades were designed and optimized through theoretical analyses and computational fluid dynamics simulations. Additionally, metal elliptical volute and single-row ring guide vanes were applied to scale down the structural dimensions. Finally, the optimal scheme of the new Francis turbine was proven to have a high efficiency of 88% and good operation stability through testing of a physical model and can achieve the goal of harvesting renewable energy in the cooling tower.

  3. The Interaction of Successive Coronal Mass Ejections: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugaz, Noé; Temmer, Manuela; Wang, Yuming; Farrugia, Charles J.

    2017-04-01

    We present a review of the different aspects associated with the interaction of successive coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the corona and inner heliosphere, focusing on the initiation of series of CMEs, their interaction in the heliosphere, the particle acceleration associated with successive CMEs, and the effect of compound events on Earth's magnetosphere. The two main mechanisms resulting in the eruption of series of CMEs are sympathetic eruptions, when one eruption triggers another, and homologous eruptions, when a series of similar eruptions originates from one active region. CME - CME interaction may also be associated with two unrelated eruptions. The interaction of successive CMEs has been observed remotely in coronagraphs (with the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment - LASCO - since the early 2000s) and heliospheric imagers (since the late 2000s), and inferred from in situ measurements, starting with early measurements in the 1970s. The interaction of two or more CMEs is associated with complex phenomena, including magnetic reconnection, momentum exchange, the propagation of a fast magnetosonic shock through a magnetic ejecta, and changes in the CME expansion. The presence of a preceding CME a few hours before a fast eruption has been found to be connected with higher fluxes of solar energetic particles (SEPs), while CME - CME interaction occurring in the corona is often associated with unusual radio bursts, indicating electron acceleration. Higher suprathermal population, enhanced turbulence and wave activity, stronger shocks, and shock - shock or shock - CME interaction have been proposed as potential physical mechanisms to explain the observed associated SEP events. When measured in situ, CME - CME interaction may be associated with relatively well organized multiple-magnetic cloud events, instances of shocks propagating through a previous magnetic ejecta or more complex ejecta, when the characteristics of the individual eruptions

  4. Rocket-borne Lithium ejection system for neutral wind measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habu, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Watanabe, S.; Larsen, M. F.

    2013-11-01

    Chemical tracer releases represent the most widely used technique for in situ neutral wind measurements in the thermosphere/ionosphere region. Different chemicals have been used for this purpose, but lithium releases in particular provide some unique capabilities due to the strong resonant emissions that are produced when lithium is illuminated by sunlight. The majority of the lithium releases from sounding rockets were carried out in the 1960's and 1970's, but there has been recent renewed interest in the use of lithium vapor releases to extend neutral wind measurements into the F region and for daytime wind profile measurements in the E region. The rocketborne Lithium Ejection System (LES) is a chemical release device that has been developed for the Japanese space research program. Since lithium vapor acts as a neutral tracer, the winds are obtained by tracking the motion of the clouds or trails optically from the ground using the bright red emission that is characteristic of the chemical. Lithium is a solid at room temperature, so that a gas release requires rapid vaporization of the metal to make the cloud at the intended altitude. The release canister is designed to produce a high-heat chemical reaction without gaseous products. Appropriate mixtures of thermite are employed as the heat source. In early experiments, lithium pellets were mixed directly into the thermite. However, since lithium is an active chemical, the use of lithium-thermite mixtures creates potential hazards when used in a rocket-borne device. Moreover, the pyrotechnic devices used to ignite the thermite also have to be considered in the payload canister design to assure that the safety standards for sounding rockets are satisfied. The design of the LES, described in this paper, was based on the safety requirements and the reliability in storing and handling of the materials. The LES design is also flexible in that the lithium tracer material can be replaced with other chemicals without

  5. VLA Measurements of Faraday Rotation through Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Fischer, Patrick D.; Buffo, Jacob J.; Spangler, Steven R.

    2017-04-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large-scale eruptions of plasma from the Sun, which play an important role in space weather. Faraday rotation is the rotation of the plane of polarization that results when a linearly polarized signal passes through a magnetized plasma such as a CME. Faraday rotation is proportional to the path integral through the plasma of the electron density and the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field. Faraday-rotation observations of a source near the Sun can provide information on the plasma structure of a CME shortly after launch. We report on simultaneous white-light and radio observations made of three CMEs in August 2012. We made sensitive Very Large Array (VLA) full-polarization observations using 1 - 2 GHz frequencies of a constellation of radio sources through the solar corona at heliocentric distances that ranged from 6 - 15 R_{⊙}. Two sources (0842+1835 and 0900+1832) were occulted by a single CME, and one source (0843+1547) was occulted by two CMEs. In addition to our radioastronomical observations, which represent one of the first active hunts for CME Faraday rotation since Bird et al. ( Solar Phys., 98, 341, 1985) and the first active hunt using the VLA, we obtained white-light coronagraph images from the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) C3 instrument to determine the Thomson-scattering brightness [BT], providing a means to independently estimate the plasma density and determine its contribution to the observed Faraday rotation. A constant-density force-free flux rope embedded in the background corona was used to model the effects of the CMEs on BT and Faraday rotation. The plasma densities (6 - 22×103 cm^{-3}) and axial magnetic-field strengths (2 - 12 mG) inferred from our models are consistent with the modeling work of Liu et al. ( Astrophys. J., 665, 1439, 2007) and Jensen and Russell ( Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L02103, 2008), as well as previous CME Faraday-rotation observations by Bird et al

  6. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist pattern of use in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction: findings from BIOSTAT-CHF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, João Pedro; Rossignol, Patrick; Machu, Jean-Loup; Sharma, Abhinav; Girerd, Nicolas; Anker, Stefan D; Cleland, John G; Dickstein, Kenneth; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Hillege, Hans L; Lang, Chim C; Ter Maaten, Jozine M; Metra, Marco; Ng, Leong; Ponikowski, Piotr; Samani, Nilesh J; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Voors, Adriaan; Zannad, Faiez

    2017-10-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) are recommended (unless contraindicated) to all patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). However, MRAs are still largely underused in routine clinical practice. This study aims to describe the determinants and pattern of use of MRAs in HFrEF. BIOSTAT-CHF is a European multicentre, prospective study which enrolled patients suboptimally treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ACEi/ARBs) and/or beta-blockers, with the aim of optimizing guideline-based use of these agents. From the original 2516 subjects, this retrospective post hoc analysis included the 1325 patients with an indication for MRA therapy (i.e. left ventricular ejection fraction ≤35%, estimated glomerular filtration rate ≥30 mL/min/1.73 m(2) , K(+) ≤5.0 mmol/L). The mean age was 66.1 ± 12.2 years. At baseline an MRA was prescribed to 741 (56%) patients. Patients who were prescribed MRAs at baseline were younger, more often male, had higher body mass index, lower sodium, higher proportion of hypertension history and ACEi/ARB prescription (all P < 0.05). Of the 1049 patients who completed the baseline plus the 9 month visit, 585 (56%) had an MRA prescribed at baseline and 662 (63%) had an MRA prescribed at 9 months. Among the 585 patients with MRA at baseline, 91 (16%) had discontinued therapy and among the 461 (44%) patients without MRA at baseline 168 (36%) had initiated therapy subsequently. MRA discontinuation was more likely in subjects with higher left ventricular ejection fraction and NYHA class III/IV (P < 0.05 for both). MRA prescription both at baseline and 9 months was not associated with the outcome of death or heart failure hospitalization (adjusted hazard ratio 1.02, 95% confidence interval 0.66-1.58; P = 0.93). In this prospective observational study across Europe, MRAs were largely under-prescribed and frequently discontinued. Owing to these dynamic

  7. Laboratory Experiment and Numerical Analysis of a New Type of Solar Tower Efficiently Generating a Thermal Updraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Ohya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A new type of solar tower was developed through laboratory experiments and numerical analyses. The solar tower mainly consists of three components. The transparent collector area is an aboveground glass roof, with increasing height toward the center. Attached to the center of the inside of the collector is a vertical tower within which a wind turbine is mounted at the lower entry to the tower. When solar radiation heats the ground through the glass roof, ascending warm air is guided to the center and into the tower. A solar tower that can generate electricity using a simple structure that enables easy and less costly maintenance has considerable advantages. However, conversion efficiency from sunshine energy to mechanical turbine energy is very low. Aiming to improve this efficiency, the research project developed a diffuser-type tower instead of a cylindrical tower, and investigated a suitable diffuser shape for practical use. After changing the tower height and diffuser open angle, with a temperature difference between the ambient air aloft and within the collector, various diffuser tower shapes were tested by laboratory experiments and numerical analyses. As a result, it was found that a diffuser tower with a semi-open angle of 4° is an optimal shape, producing the fastest updraft at each temperature difference in both the laboratory experiments and numerical analyses. The relationships between thermal updraft speed and temperature difference and/or tower height were confirmed. It was found that the thermal updraft velocity is proportional to the square root of the tower height and/or temperature difference.

  8. Heart Failure with Preserved Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, Lucas; Katz, Marcelo; Bacal, Fernando; Makdisse, Marcia Regina Pinho; Correa, Alessandra Graça; Pereira, Carolina; Franken, Marcelo; Fava, Anderson Nunes; Serrano Junior, Carlos Vicente; Pesaro, Antonio Eduardo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence and clinical outcomes of heart failure with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction after acute myocardial infarction have not been well elucidated. Objective To analyze the prevalence of heart failure with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction in acute myocardial infarction and its association with mortality. Methods Patients with acute myocardial infarction (n = 1,474) were prospectively included. Patients without heart failure (Killip score = 1), with heart failure with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (Killip score > 1 and left ventricle ejection fraction ≥ 50%), and with systolic dysfunction (Killip score > 1 and left ventricle ejection fraction < 50%) on admission were compared. The association between systolic dysfunction with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction and in-hospital mortality was tested in adjusted models. Results Among the patients included, 1,256 (85.2%) were admitted without heart failure (72% men, 67 ± 15 years), 78 (5.3%) with heart failure with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (59% men, 76 ± 14 years), and 140 (9.5%) with systolic dysfunction (69% men, 76 ± 14 years), with mortality rates of 4.3%, 17.9%, and 27.1%, respectively (p < 0.001). Logistic regression (adjusted for sex, age, troponin, diabetes, and body mass index) demonstrated that heart failure with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (OR 2.91; 95% CI 1.35–6.27; p = 0.006) and systolic dysfunction (OR 5.38; 95% CI 3.10 to 9.32; p < 0.001) were associated with in-hospital mortality. Conclusion One-third of patients with acute myocardial infarction admitted with heart failure had preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. Although this subgroup exhibited more favorable outcomes than those with systolic dysfunction, this condition presented a three-fold higher risk of death than the group without heart failure. Patients with acute myocardial infarction and heart failure with preserved left

  9. Brayton-Cycle Baseload Power Tower CSP System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Bruce [Wilson Solarpower Corporation, Boston, MA (United States)

    2013-12-31

    The primary objectives of Phase 2 of this Project were:1. Engineer, fabricate, and conduct preliminary testing on a low-pressure, air-heating solar receiver capable of powering a microturbine system to produce 300kWe while the sun is shining while simultaneously storing enough energy thermally to power the system for up to 13 hours thereafter. 2. Cycle-test a high-temperature super alloy, Haynes HR214, to determine its efficacy for the system’s high-temperature heat exchanger. 3. Engineer the thermal energy storage system. This Phase 2 followed Wilson’s Phase 1, which primarily was an engineering feasibility study to determine a practical and innovative approach to a full Brayton-cycle system configuration that could meet DOE’s targets. Below is a summary table of the DOE targets with Wilson’s Phase 1 Project results. The results showed that a Brayton system with an innovative (low pressure) solar receiver with ~13 hours of dry (i.e., not phase change materials or molten salts but rather firebrick, stone, or ceramics) has the potential to meet or exceed DOE targets. Such systems would consist of pre-engineered, standardized, factory-produced modules to minimize on-site costs while driving down costs through mass production. System sizes most carefully analyzed were in the range of 300 kWe to 2 MWe. Such systems would also use off-the-shelf towers, blowers, piping, microturbine packages, and heliostats. Per DOE’s instructions, LCOEs are based on the elevation and DNI levels of Daggett, CA, for a 100 MWe power plant following 2 GWe of factory production of the various system components.

  10. Measurement of NOx fluxes from a tall tower in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, Freya; Dunmore, Rachel; Lewis, Alastair; Vaughan, Adam; Mullinger, Neil; Nemitz, Eiko; Wild, Oliver; Zhang, Qiang; Hamilton, Jacqueline; Lee, James; Fu, Pingqing

    2017-04-01

    Nitrogen Oxides (NOx, the sum of nitrogen monoxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2)) are significant anthropogenic pollutants emitted from most combustion processes. NOx is a precursor species to the formation of O3 and secondary aerosols and, in high concentrations, NO2 can have adverse effects on human health through action as a respiratory irritant. For these reasons, there has been increased focus on improving NOx emissions inventories, typically developed using 'bottom-up' estimates of emissions from their sources, which are used to predict current and future air quality and to guide abatement strategy. Recent studies have shown a discrepancy between NOx inventories and measured NOx emissions for UK cities, highlighting the limitations of bottom-up emissions inventories and the importance of accurate measurement data to improve the estimates. Similarly, inventories in China are associated with large uncertainties and are rapidly changing with time in response to economic development and new environmental regulation. Here, we present data collected as part of the Air Pollutants in Beijing (AIRPOLL-Beijing) campaign from an urban site located at the Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IAP, CAS) (39˚ 58'28"N, 116˚ 22'16"E) in central Beijing. NOx concentrations were measured using a state-of-the-art chemiluminescence instrument, sampling from an inlet at 100 metres on a meteorological tower. Measurements at 5 Hz coupled with wind vector data measured by a sonic anemometer located at the same height as the inlet allowed NOx emission fluxes to be calculated using the eddy covariance method. Measurements were made during the period 11/11/2016 - 10/12/2016 and compared to existing emission estimates from The Multi-resolution Emission Inventory for China (MEIC) inventory. It is anticipated that this work will be used to evaluate the accuracy of emissions inventories for Beijing, to develop improved emissions estimates and thus provide

  11. Better Visual Outcome by Intraocular Lens Ejection in Geriatric Patients with Ruptured Ocular Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Tadasu; Tsunekawa, Taichi; Matsuura, Toshiyuki; Takayama, Kei; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Kachi, Shu; Ito, Yasuki; Ueno, Shinji; Nonobe, Norie; Kataoka, Keiko; Suzumura, Ayana; Iwase, Takeshi; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2017-01-01

    Ocular trauma is one of the leading causes of visual impairment worldwide. Because of the popularity of cataract surgeries, aged individuals with ocular trauma commonly have a surgical wound in their eyes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the visual outcome of cases that were coincident with intraocular lens (IOL) ejection in the eyes with ruptured open-globe ocular injuries. Consecutive patients with open-globe ocular injuries were first reviewed. Patients’ characteristics, corrected distance visual acuities (CDVAs) over 3 years after the trauma, causes of injuries, traumatic wound patterns, and coexistence of retinal detachment were examined. The relationships between poor CDVA and the other factors, including the complications of crystalline lens and IOL ejection, were examined. A total of 105 eyes/patients [43 eyes with rupture, 33 with penetrating, 28 with intraocular foreign body (IOFB), and 1 with perforating injuries] were included. Rupture injuries were common in aged patients and were mostly caused by falls, whereas penetrating and IOFB injuries were common in young male patients. CDVAs of the eyes with rupture injuries were significantly worse than those of the eyes with penetrating or IOFB injuries. CDVA from more than 50% of the ruptured eyes resulted in no light perception or light perception to 20/500. CDVA of the ruptured eyes complicated by crystalline lens ejection was significantly worse than that of those complicated by IOL ejection. The wounds of the ruptured eyes complicated by IOL ejection were mainly located at the superior corneoscleral limbus, whereas those of the eyes complicated by crystalline lens ejection were located at the posterior sclera. There were significant correlations between poor CDVA and retinal detachment and crystalline lens ejection. These results proposed a new trend in the ocular injuries that commonly occur in aged patients; history of cataract surgery might affect the final visual outcome after open

  12. The importance of integrated left atrial evaluation: From hypertension to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrami, Matteo; Palazzuoli, Alberto; Padeletti, Luigi; Cerbai, Elisabetta; Coiro, Stefano; Emdin, Michele; Marcucci, Rossella; Morrone, Doralisa; Cameli, Matteo; Savino, Ketty; Pedrinelli, Roberto; Ambrosio, Giuseppe

    2017-12-28

    Functional analysis and measurement of left atrium are an integral part of cardiac evaluation, and they represent a key element during non-invasive analysis of diastolic function in patients with hypertension (HT) and/or heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). However, diastolic dysfunction remains quite elusive regarding classification, and atrial size and function are two key factors for left ventricular (LV) filling evaluation. Chronic left atrial (LA) remodelling is the final step of chronic intra-cavitary pressure overload, and it accompanies increased neurohormonal, proarrhythmic and prothrombotic activities. In this systematic review, we aim to purpose a multi-modality approach for LA geometry and function analysis, which integrates diastolic flow with LA characteristics and remodelling through application of both traditional and new diagnostic tools. The most important studies published in the literature on LA size, function and diastolic dysfunction in patients with HFpEF, HT and/or atrial fibrillation (AF) are considered and discussed. In HFpEF and HT, pulsed and tissue Doppler assessments are useful tools to estimate LV filling pressure, atrio-ventricular coupling and LV relaxation but they need to be enriched with LA evaluation in terms of morphology and function. An integrated evaluation should be also applied to patients with a high arrhythmic risk, in whom eccentric LA remodelling and higher LA stiffness are associated with a greater AF risk. Evaluation of LA size, volume, function and structure are mandatory in the management of patients with HT, HFpEF and AF. A multi-modality approach could provide additional information, identifying subjects with more severe LA remodelling. Left atrium assessment deserves an accurate study inside the cardiac imaging approach and optimised measurement with established cut-offs need to be better recognised through multicenter studies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Influence of atrial fibrillation on the mortality of patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Jonathan; Formiga, Francesc; Cepeda, Jose; Llacer, Pau; Arévalo-Lorido, Juan; Cerqueiro, Jose; González-Franco, Alvaro; Epelde, Francesc; Manzano, Luis; Montero Pérez-Barquero, Manuel

    2017-09-01

    The impact of atrial fibrillation (AF) on the prognosis of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is still the subject of debate. We analysed the influence of AF on the prognosis on mortality and readmission in patients with HFpEF. Prospective observational study in 1,971 patients with HFpEF, who were admitted for acute heart failure. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the presence or absence of AF. We analysed mortality, readmissions and combined mortality/readmissions at one year follow-up. A total of 1,177 (59%) patients had AF, mean age 80.3 (7.8) years and 1,233 (63%) were women. Patients with HFpEF and AF were older, female, greater valvular aetiology and lower comorbidity measured by the Charlson index. At the one year follow-up, 430 (22%) patients had died and 840 (43%) had been readmitted. In the 2 groups analysed, there was no difference in all-cause mortality (22 vs. 21%; P=.739, AF vs. no-AF, respectively) or cardiovascular causes (9.6 vs. 8.2%; P=.739, AF vs. no-AF, respectively). In the multivariable analysis, factors associated with higher mortality were: age, male, valvular aetiology, uric acid, and comorbidity. In the analysis of the subgroup with HFpEF with AF, the presence of chronic AF compared to de novo AF was associated with higher mortality (HR 1,716; 95% CI 1,099-2,681; P=.018). In patients with HFpEF, the presence of AF is frequent. During the one-year follow-up, the presence of AF does not influence mortality or readmissions in patients with HFpEF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Hemodynamic responses to small muscle mass exercise in heart failure patients with reduced ejection fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Lee, Joshua F.; Berbert, Amanda; Witman, Melissa A. H.; Nativi-Nicolau, Jose; Stehlik, Josef; Richardson, Russell S.

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the mechanisms responsible for exercise intolerance in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), the present study sought to evaluate the hemodynamic responses to small muscle mass exercise in this cohort. In 25 HFrEF patients (64 ± 2 yr) and 17 healthy, age-matched control subjects (64 ± 2 yr), mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO), and limb blood flow were examined during graded static-intermittent handgrip (HG) and dynamic single-leg knee-extensor (KE) exercise. During HG exercise, MAP increased similarly between groups. CO increased significantly (+1.3 ± 0.3 l/min) in the control group, but it remained unchanged across workloads in HFrEF patients. At 15% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), forearm blood flow was similar between groups, while HFrEF patients exhibited an attenuated increase at the two highest intensities compared with controls, with the greatest difference at the highest workload (352 ± 22 vs. 492 ± 48 ml/min, HFrEF vs. control, 45% MVC). During KE exercise, MAP and CO increased similarly across work rates between groups. However, HFrEF patients exhibited a diminished leg hyperemic response across all work rates, with the most substantial decrement at the highest intensity (1,842 ± 64 vs. 2,675 ± 81 ml/min; HFrEF vs. control, 15 W). Together, these findings indicate a marked attenuation in exercising limb perfusion attributable to impairments in peripheral vasodilatory capacity during both arm and leg exercise in patients with HFrEF, which likely plays a role in limiting exercise capacity in this patient population. PMID:25260608

  15. Quantifying the local influence at a tall tower site in nocturnal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werth, David; Buckley, Robert; Zhang, Gengsheng; Kurzeja, Robert; Leclerc, Monique; Duarte, Henrique; Parker, Matthew; Watson, Thomas

    2015-10-17

    The influence of the local terrestrial environment on nocturnal atmospheric CO2 measurements at a 329-m television transmitter tower (and a component of a CO2 monitoring network) was estimated with a tracer release experiment and a subsequent simulation of the releases. This was done to characterize the vertical transport of emissions from the surface to the uppermost tower level and how it is affected by atmospheric stability. The tracer release experiment was conducted over two nights in May of 2009 near the Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. Tracer was released on two contrasting nights—slightly stable and moderately stable—from several upwind surface locations. Measurements at the 329-m level on both nights indicate that tracer was able to mix vertically within a relatively short (~24 km) distance, implying that nocturnal stable conditions do not necessarily prevent vertical dispersion in the boundary layer and that CO2 measurements at the tower are at least partly influenced by nearby emissions. A simulation of the tracer release is used to calculate the tower footprint on the two nights to estimate the degree to which the local domain affects the tower readings. The effect of the nocturnal boundary layer on the area sampled by the tower can be seen clearly, as the footprints were affected by changes in stability. The contribution of local sources to the measurements at the tower was minimal, however, suggesting that nocturnal concentrations at upper levels are contributed mostly by regional sources.

  16. Power fluctuation and power loss of wind turbines due to wind shear and tower shadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Binrong; Wei, Sha; Wei, Kexiang; Yang, Wenxian; Peng, Zhike; Chu, Fulei

    2017-09-01

    The magnitude and stability of power output are two key indices of wind turbines. This study investigates the effects of wind shear and tower shadow on power output in terms of power fluctuation and power loss to estimate the capacity and quality of the power generated by a wind turbine. First, wind speed models, particularly the wind shear model and the tower shadow model, are described in detail. The widely accepted tower shadow model is modified in view of the cone-shaped towers of modern large-scale wind turbines. Power fluctuation and power loss due to wind shear and tower shadow are analyzed by performing theoretical calculations and case analysis within the framework of a modified version of blade element momentum theory. Results indicate that power fluctuation is mainly caused by tower shadow, whereas power loss is primarily induced by wind shear. Under steady wind conditions, power loss can be divided into wind farm loss and rotor loss. Wind farm loss is constant at 3 α(3 α-1) R 2/(8 H 2). By contrast, rotor loss is strongly influenced by the wind turbine control strategies and wind speed. That is, when the wind speed is measured in a region where a variable-speed controller works, the rotor loss stabilizes around zero, but when the wind speed is measured in a region where the blade pitch controller works, the rotor loss increases as the wind speed intensifies. The results of this study can serve as a reference for accurate power estimation and strategy development to mitigate the fluctuations in aerodynamic loads and power output due to wind shear and tower shadow.

  17. Corona discharges from a windmill and its lightning protection tower in winter thunderstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ting; Wang, Daohong; Rison, William; Thomas, Ronald J.; Edens, Harald E.; Takagi, Nobuyuki; Krehbiel, Paul R.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents lightning mapping array (LMA) observations of corona discharges from a windmill and its lightning protection tower in winter thunderstorms in Japan. Corona discharges from the windmill, called windmill coronas, and those from the tower, called tower coronas, are distinctly different. Windmill coronas occur with periodic bursts, generally radiate larger power, and possibly develop to higher altitudes than tower coronas do. A strong negative electric field is necessary for the frequent production of tower coronas but is not apparently related with windmill coronas. These differences are due to the periodic rotation of the windmill and the moving blades which can escape space charges produced by corona discharges and sustain a large local electric field. The production period of windmill coronas is related with the rotation period of the windmill. Surprisingly, for one rotation of the windmill, only two out of the three blades produce detectable discharges and source powers of discharges from these two blades are different. The reason for this phenomenon is still unclear. For tower coronas, the source rate can get very high only when there is a strong negative electric field, and the source power can get very high only when the source rate is very low. The relationship between corona discharges and lightning flashes is investigated. There is no direct evidence that corona discharges can increase the chance of upward leader initiation, but nearby lightning flashes can increase the source rate of corona discharges right after the flashes. The peak of the source height distribution of corona discharges is about 100 m higher than the top of the windmill and the top of the tower. Possible reasons for this result are discussed.

  18. Dynamic Responses and Vibration Control of the Transmission Tower-Line System: A State-of-the-Art Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Guo, Wei-hua; Li, Peng-yun; Xie, Wen-ping

    2014-01-01

    This paper presented an overview on the dynamic analysis and control of the transmission tower-line system in the past forty years. The challenges and future developing trends in the dynamic analysis and mitigation of the transmission tower-line system under dynamic excitations are also put forward. It also reviews the analytical models and approaches of the transmission tower, transmission lines, and transmission tower-line systems, respectively, which contain the theoretical model, finite element (FE) model and the equivalent model; shows the advances in wind responses of the transmission tower-line system, which contains the dynamic effects under common wind loading, tornado, downburst, and typhoon; and discusses the dynamic responses under earthquake and ice loads, respectively. The vibration control of the transmission tower-line system is also reviewed, which includes the magnetorheological dampers, friction dampers, tuned mass dampers, and pounding tuned mass dampers. PMID:25105161

  19. Dynamic responses and vibration control of the transmission tower-line system: a state-of-the-art review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Guo, Wei-hua; Li, Peng-yun; Xie, Wen-ping

    2014-01-01

    This paper presented an overview on the dynamic analysis and control of the transmission tower-line system in the past forty years. The challenges and future developing trends in the dynamic analysis and mitigation of the transmission tower-line system under dynamic excitations are also put forward. It also reviews the analytical models and approaches of the transmission tower, transmission lines, and transmission tower-line systems, respectively, which contain the theoretical model, finite element (FE) model and the equivalent model; shows the advances in wind responses of the transmission tower-line system, which contains the dynamic effects under common wind loading, tornado, downburst, and typhoon; and discusses the dynamic responses under earthquake and ice loads, respectively. The vibration control of the transmission tower-line system is also reviewed, which includes the magnetorheological dampers, friction dampers, tuned mass dampers, and pounding tuned mass dampers.

  20. Studies of limb-dislodging forces acting on an ejection seat occupant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneck, D J

    1980-03-01

    A mathematical theory is being developed in order to calculate the aerodynamic loading to which a pilot is exposed during high-speed ejections. Neglecting the initial effects of flow separation, results thus far indicate that a pilot's musculoskeletal system is not likely to withstand the tendency for limb-flailing if he is ejecting at Mach numbers in excess of about 0.7. This tendency depends very strongly upon the angle at which the pilot's limbs intercept a high-speed flow; the forces that cause limb dislodgement increase dramatically with speed of ejection. Examining the time-course of limb-dislodging forces after the initial onset of windblast, the theory further predicts the generation of a double vortex street pattern on the downstream side of the limbs of an ejection seat occupant. This results in the corresponding appearance of oscillating forces tending to cause lateral motion (vibration) of the limbs. The amplitude and frequency of these oscillating forces are also very dependent on the Mach number of ejection and the angle at which the pilot's limbs intercept the flow. However, even at moderate Mach numbers, the frequency can be as high as 100 cycles per second, and the amplitude rapidly exceeds a pilot's musculo-skeletal resistive powers for Mach numbers above 0.7.