WorldWideScience

Sample records for subject courses taught

  1. Improving Discussion in Astronomy Courses Taught Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troischt, Parker

    2017-06-01

    Astronomy courses that are either hybrid in nature or offered in a completely online format are becoming more common at colleges and universities. In particular, faculty members at small colleges are being encouraged to develop courses that can be taught online in order to give students increased flexibility in scheduling classes and reach a separate population of learners. For instructors accustomed to teaching students in person using plenty of interaction, making the switch to teaching even one online course a year can be challenging. However, some topics are developing so rapidly (exoplanets) that it is difficult to imagine having students rely on a standard textbook at all, and the use of online resources become essential. Here, we describe methods used to promote discussion, evaluate its content and effectively incorporate the use of recently released articles in order to keep students engaged. We present efforts to produce a lively classroom atmosphere centered on recent advances and several debated topics. Lastly, we report on successes, challenges and plans for improving online courses in the future.

  2. Human Sexuality: A Student Taught Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Edward S.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Four senior female students presented seminars in human sexuality to freshmen coeds. The seminar topics were (1) petting and intercourse, (2) masturbation, (3) venereal disease and problematic sexual behavior, and (4) abortion and sterilization. Improvement in knowledge was determined by pre- and post-course questionnaires. Student evaluations…

  3. A leadership elective course developed and taught by graduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Brandon J; Garza, Oscar W; Witry, Matthew J; Chang, Elizabeth H; Letendre, Donald E; Trewet, Coralynn B

    2013-12-16

    To develop and implement a flexible-credit elective course to empower student pharmacists to develop lifelong leadership skills and provide teaching practice opportunities for graduate students. An elective course focusing on leadership development for second- and third-year doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students was designed and taught by 4 graduate students under the mentorship of 2 faculty members. Student pharmacists could enroll in a 1-, 2-, or 3-credit-hour version of the course. Attainment of course objectives was measured using student pharmacist reflection papers and continuing professional development portfolios. Additionally, self-assessments of graduate students and faculty members delivering the course were conducted. In their responses on course evaluations, student pharmacists indicated they found the course a valuable learning experience. Graduate students found course development to be challenging but useful in developing faculty skills. This flexible-credit elective course taught by graduate students was an innovative way to offer formal leadership instruction using limited college resources.

  4. A Leadership Elective Course Developed and Taught by Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Oscar W.; Witry, Matthew J.; Chang, Elizabeth H.; Letendre, Donald E.; Trewet, CoraLynn B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To develop and implement a flexible-credit elective course to empower student pharmacists to develop lifelong leadership skills and provide teaching practice opportunities for graduate students. Design. An elective course focusing on leadership development for second- and third-year doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students was designed and taught by 4 graduate students under the mentorship of 2 faculty members. Student pharmacists could enroll in a 1-, 2-, or 3-credit-hour version of the course. Assessment. Attainment of course objectives was measured using student pharmacist reflection papers and continuing professional development portfolios. Additionally, self-assessments of graduate students and faculty members delivering the course were conducted. In their responses on course evaluations, student pharmacists indicated they found the course a valuable learning experience. Graduate students found course development to be challenging but useful in developing faculty skills. Conclusion. This flexible-credit elective course taught by graduate students was an innovative way to offer formal leadership instruction using limited college resources. PMID:24371347

  5. Student perceptions of an animal-welfare and ethics course taught early in the veterinary curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abood, Sarah K; Siegford, Janice M

    2012-01-01

    Animal welfare and veterinary ethics are two subjects that have been acknowledged as necessary for inclusion in the veterinary curriculum. In fact, the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Council on Education has mandated that veterinary ethics be taught to all students in US veterinary colleges. Animal welfare was recently included in the US veterinarian's oath, and AVMA established a committee to create a model curriculum on the subject. At US veterinary colleges, the number of animal-welfare courses has more than doubled from five in 2004 to more than 10 in 2011. How and what is taught with regard to these two subjects may be as important as whether they are taught at all, and a variety of approaches and varying amounts and types of content are currently being offered on them. At Michigan State University's College of Veterinary Medicine, students were introduced to animal welfare and veterinary ethics during their first semester in a mandatory two-credit course. To assess their perception of the course, students completed an online evaluation at the end of the semester. Most students found the course to be challenging and effective and felt that they improved their ability to identify and discuss ethical dilemmas.

  6. Two Undergraduate Process Modeling Courses Taught Using Inductive Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroush, Masoud; Weinberger, Charles B.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript presents a successful application of inductive learning in process modeling. It describes two process modeling courses that use inductive learning methods such as inquiry learning and problem-based learning, among others. The courses include a novel collection of multi-disciplinary complementary process modeling examples. They were…

  7. Multiple strategy peer-taught evidence-based medicine course in a poor resource setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabouni, Ammar; Bdaiwi, Yamama; Janoudi, Saad L; Namous, Lubaba O; Turk, Tarek; Alkhatib, Mahmoud; Abbas, Fatima; Yafi, Ruba Zuhri

    2017-05-04

    Teaching Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) is becoming a priority in the healthcare process. For undergraduates, it has been proved that integrating multiple strategies in teaching EBM yields better results than a single, short-duration strategy. However, there is a lack of evidence on applying EBM educational interventions in developing countries. In this study, we aim to evaluate the effectiveness of a multiple strategy peer-taught online course in improving EBM awareness and skills among medical students in two developing countries, Syria and Egypt. We conducted a prospective study with pre- and post- course assessment of 84 medical students in three universities, using the Berlin questionnaire and a set of self-reported questions which studied the students' EBM knowledge, attitude and competencies. The educational intervention was a peer-taught online course consisting of six sessions (90 min each) presented over six weeks, and integrated with assignments, group discussions, and two workshops. The mean score of pre- and post-course Berlin tests was 3.5 (95% CI: 2.94-4.06) and 5.5 (95% CI: 4.74-6.26) respectively, increasing by 2 marks (95% CI: 1.112-2.888; p-value <0.001), which indicates a statistically significant increase in students' EBM knowledge and skill, similar to a previous expert-taught face to face contact course. Self-reported confidences also increased significantly. However, our course did not have a major effect on students' attitudes toward EBM (1.9-10.8%; p-value: 0.12-0.99). In developing countries, multiple strategy peer-taught online courses may be an effective alternative to face to face expert-taught courses, especially in the short term.

  8. Academic performance in a pharmacotherapeutics course sequence taught synchronously on two campuses using distance education technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Michael; Morin, Anna K

    2011-10-10

    To compare the academic performance of campus-based students in a pharmacotherapeutics course with that of students at a distant campus taught via synchronous teleconferencing. Examination scores and final course grades for campus-based and distant students completing the case-based pharmacotherapeutics course sequence over a 5-year period were collected and analyzed. The mean examination scores and final course grades were not significantly different between students on the 2 campuses. The use of synchronous distance education technology to teach students does not affect students' academic performance when used in an active-learning, case-based pharmacotherapeutics course.

  9. Molecular Modeling as a Self-Taught Component of a Conventional Undergraduate Chemical Reaction Engineering Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, Erhard W.; Zygmunt, William E.

    2016-01-01

    We inserted a self-taught molecular modeling project into an otherwise conventional undergraduate chemical-reaction-engineering course. Our objectives were that students should (a) learn with minimal instructor intervention, (b) gain an appreciation for the relationship between molecular structure and, first, macroscopic state functions in…

  10. Retention of Information Taught in Introductory Psychology Courses across Different Accelerated Course Formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deichert, Nathan T.; Maxwell, Shannon J.; Klotz, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The current study is a quasi-experimental examination of the effects of traditional and accelerated course formats on learning retention. The study analyzed data on an end-of-course exam collected from 132 students enrolled in introductory psychology courses across 3 course formats: a traditional 16-week format, a 5-week accelerated format, and an…

  11. Restructuring of the jurisprudence course taught at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleberzon, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The process by which the jurisprudence course was restructured at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College is chronicled. Method: A Delphi process used to restructure the course is described, and the results of a student satisfaction survey are presented. Results: When asked “I think this material was clinically relevant,” over 81% of the 76 students who respondents strongly agreed or agreed with this statement; 100% of students agreed or strongly agreed that scope of practice; marketing, advertising and internal office promotion; record keeping; fee schedules; malpractice issues and; professional malpractice issues and negligence was clinically relevant. When asked “I think this material was taught well,” a minimum of 89% of students agreed or strongly agreed with this statement. Discussion: This is the first article published that described the process by which a jurisprudence course was developed and assessed by student survey. Summary: Based on a survey of student perceptions, restructuring of the jurisprudence course was successful in providing students with clinically relevant information in an appropriate manner. This course may serve as an important first step in development a ‘model curriculum’ for chiropractic practice and the law courses in terms of content, format and assessment strategies. PMID:20195427

  12. A Study to Determine the Teaching Effectiveness of Faculty in Courses Taught on a Multiple Section Basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Joseph E.

    The present study attempted to discover if significant differences in grade distributions occurred in certain accounting courses taught on a multiple section basis at Johnson & Wales College during the academic years 1972-1973 and 1973-1974. All multiple section courses for the above mentioned years were identified and grade distributions…

  13. Combining Chemical Information Literacy, Communication Skills, Career Preparation, Ethics, and Peer Review in a Team-Taught Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mary Lou Baker; Seybold, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    The widely acknowledged need to include chemical information competencies and communication skills in the undergraduate chemistry curriculum can be accommodated in a variety of ways. We describe a team-taught, semester-length course at Wright State University which combines chemical information literacy, written and oral communication skills,…

  14. MODERN PROBLEMS IN TAUGHT COURSE «ECOLOGY OF POWER ENGINEERING» IN TRAINING PO- WER ENGINEERS, WAYS OF THEIR SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. G. Pospelova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a viewpoint to improvement and modernization of a taught course “Ecology of Power Engineering” in respect of its content, teaching forms and methods with the purpose to meet modern challenges of power engineering and sustainable development. Concrete recommendations for delivering lectures and practical classes are given in the paper with due account of requirements of practical designing and operation of power objects.

  15. Evaluating a blended-learning course taught to different groups of learners in a dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahinis, Kimon; Stokes, Christopher W; Walsh, Trevor F; Cannavina, Giuseppe

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to present and evaluate a blended-learning course developed for undergraduate (B.D.S.), postgraduate, and diploma (hygiene and therapy) students at the University of Sheffield School of Clinical Dentistry. Blended learning is the integration of classroom face-to-face learning with online learning. The overall methodology used for this study was action research. The data were collected using three processes: questionnaires to collect contextual data from the students taking the course; a student-led, nominal group technique to collect group data from the participants; and a non-participant observer technique to record the context in which certain group and individual behaviors occurred. The online component of the course was accepted as a valuable resource by 65 percent of those responding. While online information-sharing occurred (31 percent of the students posted in forums), there was no evidence of online collaboration, with only 8 percent replying to forum postings. Accessibility of the online environment was one of the main concerns of the students at the nominal group sessions. Differences regarding overall engagement with the course between the student groups (years) were observed during the sessions. The majority of the students were satisfied with the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) course. No statistically significant differences between males and females were found, but there were differences between different student cohorts (year groups).

  16. Pilot Course or Flying University? A University Course on Hungarian Language and History Taught in Wellington, New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Bálint Koller; Alexander Maxwell

    2016-01-01

    The authors, a historian and a language-learning expert, recently devised an introduction to Hungarian history, language and culture for students in Wellington, New Zealand. We describe the origin and circumstances of New Zealand’s Hungarian community, why we thought to develop a Hungarian language course, and how the course relates to the interests of New Zealand students. After explaining our approach to historical and linguistic components of the course, we consider the future of Hungarian...

  17. A Survey of the Viewers of College Courses Taught Over Television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert M.

    A survey was conducted, in the fall of 1966, of students' reaction to three college credit courses, Astronomy, Latin America I, and Latin America II, broadcast in major cities in the State of New York. The 608 viewers who were sent questionnaires did not represent all viewers, but rather those interested enough to write in for materials.…

  18. Finding Hidden Chemistry in Ancient Egyptian Artifacts: Pigment Degradation Taught in a Chemical Engineering Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gime´nez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to show the application of the study of ancient technology and science on teaching (and learning) chemistry in Chemical Engineering Undergraduate studies. Degradation patterns of pigments used in Ancient Egypt were incorporated in the syllabus of the course entitled "Technological and Scientific…

  19. Pilot Course or Flying University? A University Course on Hungarian Language and History Taught in Wellington, New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bálint Koller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors, a historian and a language-learning expert, recently devised an introduction to Hungarian history, language and culture for students in Wellington, New Zealand. We describe the origin and circumstances of New Zealand’s Hungarian community, why we thought to develop a Hungarian language course, and how the course relates to the interests of New Zealand students. After explaining our approach to historical and linguistic components of the course, we consider the future of Hungarian studies in New Zealand.

  20. A blended learning course taught to different groups of learners in a dental school: follow-up evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahinis, Kimon; Stokes, Christopher W; Walsh, Trevor F; Tsitrou, Effrosyni; Cannavina, Giuseppe

    2008-09-01

    This article reports the results of a follow-up study conducted to investigate students' perceptions about a blended learning health informatics course that combined online and traditional classroom instruction. The course is taught to five different groups of students at the School of Clinical Dentistry of the University of Sheffield each academic year: first-, third-, and fourth-year dental students, dental hygiene and therapy students, and postgraduate dental students. The goal of the study was to determine the impact of the modifications made to the course after the first year of implementation. To accomplish this goal, students' perceptions of this blended learning course were compared after the first and second implementations. The methodology used for this study was action research. The data were collected using three processes: questionnaires were used to collect contextual data from the students taking the course; a student-led, nominal group technique was used to collect group data from the participants; and a non-participant observer technique was used to record the context in which certain group and individual behaviors occurred. Depending on group assignment, between 41.5 and 91.5 percent of students believed that the blended-learning course had added to their skills. The online learning environment was perceived as a useful resource by 75 percent of students in four of the five student groups, but only 45 percent of the fourth-year dental students indicated it was a useful resource. The perceived lack of sufficient online support material was one of the main concerns of the students at the nominal group evaluation sessions. The non-participant observer technique identified different engagement levels among the student groups. Discernible differences were identified, with improvement in some areas and a decline in others compared to a previous evaluation. The change in the delivery method influenced the students' comprehension of the material

  1. Train, teach; taught? How the content of specific science subject matter knowledge sessions impacts on trainee teachers’ classroom practice and children’s learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Kind

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The impact science sessions for trainee science teachers have on 11-14 year olds’ learning of science was assessed using questionnaires and a “Video-Interview (trainee –Interview (pupils” (V-I-I technique devised for this study. V-I-I involved: video-recording trainee-taught lessons; and two interviews – with a pupil group to probe learning occurring in the lesson and with the trainee.Eighty UK-based trainees taking a one-year postgraduate teacher education course completed the questionnaire probing perceptions about university- and school-based training sessions designed to develop science subject matter knowledge (SMK and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK. Six trainees participated in V-I-I.Most trainees saw all sessions as SMK-based, regardless of teacher educators’ intended purposes. Lesson videos revealed ”describing” activities, task completion and good behaviour as main focii. Explanation of key science ideas and use of materials and /ideas from training sessions were largely absent. Trainee interviews revealed contrasts: most perceived a lesson as “successful” when children completed tasks quietly. Other trainees realised their understanding impacted on pupils’ learning science concepts. Pupil interviews showed positive attitudes towards science and learning difficult ideas, but little specific learning of topics taught.

  2. Subjects taught in VR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, Frans; van den Broek, Egon; Stam, Liesbeth M.; Abrahamse, E.L.; Luursema, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    This deliverable serves to reinstate a broad view on Virtual Reality (VR), capturing all its constituting disciplines. The core target of this report is to establish a foundation for an educational program where all disciplines subordinate to VR technology will converge. Over the past decade(s) the

  3. Business English in Thailand: The Needs of the Thai Business Community, and Courses Taught at the Thai University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savangvarorose, Bang-Orn

    Results of a 1982-1983 survey of the Thai business community concerning its needs for English language skills and of a survey of the course offerings at Thai colleges and universities are reported and discussed. The industry survey targeted 60 of the 600 largest Thai companies in manufacturing, trading, finance, hotels and health care. The…

  4. Research on Consciousness of Choosing Subjects and Future Course in Curriculum of High School Students: Comparing Students between Science Course and Normal Course

    OpenAIRE

    山﨑, 保寿

    2015-01-01

    Based on importance of the science and mathematics education, following six conclusions became clear by the research about the course awareness of the studentscomparingbetween science course and normalcoursein high schools.(1) About the reason that decided the entrance subject, there is significantly difference between the students who entered the science course and normal course. The students in science course are recommended to select the science course by the parents or teachers ofjunior h...

  5. Should engineering ethics be taught?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaté, Charles J

    2011-09-01

    Should engineering ethics be taught? Despite the obvious truism that we all want our students to be moral engineers who practice virtuous professional behavior, I argue, in this article that the question itself obscures several ambiguities that prompt preliminary resolution. Upon clarification of these ambiguities, and an attempt to delineate key issues that make the question a philosophically interesting one, I conclude that engineering ethics not only should not, but cannot, be taught if we understand "teaching engineering ethics" to mean training engineers to be moral individuals (as some advocates seem to have proposed). However, I also conclude that there is a justification to teaching engineering ethics, insofar as we are able to clearly identify the most desirable and efficacious pedagogical approach to the subject area, which I propose to be a case study-based format that utilizes the principle of human cognitive pattern recognition.

  6. Herder and Modernity: From Lesser-Taught Languages to Lesser-Taught Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Votruba

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The typical North American curriculum of a lesser-taught Slavic language implicitly relies on the legacy of Johann Gottfried von Herder’s interpretation that language in and of itself contains national (ethnic culture. At the same time, enrolments are dwindling even in courses in the most commonly taught Slavic languages. Millennials’ understandable focus on the practicality of the courses they take make it unlikely for the lesser-taught languages to survive the slump. On the other hand, foreign culture courses are appearing to hold their ground more successfully. Slavic departments may reconsider Herder’s dictum as they try to maintain or establish programs in lesser-taught languages and cultures.

  7. Experiential Learning of Electronics Subject Matter in Middle School Robotics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihtaršic, David; Avsec, Stanislav; Kocijancic, Slavko

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the experiential learning of electronics subject matter is effective in the middle school open learning of robotics. Electronics is often ignored in robotics courses. Since robotics courses are typically comprised of computer-related subjects, and mechanical and electrical engineering, these…

  8. The Integrated Final-Year Course at the Department of Pharmacy, University of Aston, Birmingham, England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibberley, D. G.

    1976-01-01

    An integrated final year course was introduced in the department in the 1973-74 academic year. The background to this course, a brief summary of the subjects taught, and commentary on the results of this change are offered. (LBH)

  9. Subject Knowledge Enhancement Courses for Creating New Chemistry and Physics Teachers: The Students' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynan, Richard; Jones, Robert Bryn; Mallaburn, Andrea; Clays, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Subject knowledge enhancement (SKE) courses are one option open in England to graduates with a science background whose first degree content is judged to be insufficient to train to become chemistry or physics teachers. Previous articles in "School Science Review" have discussed the structure of one type of extended SKE course offered at…

  10. Insights from a Subject Knowledge Enhancement Course for Preparing New Chemistry and Physics Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Michael; Mallaburn, Andrea; Tynan, Richard; Clays, Ken; Jones, Robert Bryn

    2013-01-01

    A recent Government response to shortages of new physics and chemistry teachers is the extended subject knowledge enhancement (SKE) course. Graduates without a physics or chemistry bachelor degree are prepared by an SKE course to enter a Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) programme to become science teachers with a physics or chemistry…

  11. Ethics: Can It Be Taught

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-05

    conduct Professional practices Business practices ETHICS : CAN IT BE TAUGHT? 49 Figure 11. Changes in Metacognitive Reasoning Strategy Due to...jealousy manifesting in such behaviors as moodiness, frustration, and loneliness) negatively correlates to ethical decision-making in business ...active rule-based compliance program but not a value-based ETHICS : CAN IT BE TAUGHT? 54 ethics program . . . the importance of leadership

  12. Subject Knowledge Enhancement (SKE) Courses for Creating New Chemistry and Physics Teachers: Do They Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynan, Richard; Mallaburn, Andrea; Jones, Robert Bryn; Clays, Ken

    2014-01-01

    During extended subject knowledge enhancement (SKE) courses, graduates without chemistry or physics bachelor degrees prepared to enter a Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) programme to become chemistry or physics teachers. Data were gathered from the exit survey returned by Liverpool John Moores University SKE students about to start…

  13. What Computational Approaches Should be Taught for Physics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Rubin

    2005-03-01

    The standard Computational Physics courses are designed for upper-level physics majors who already have some computational skills. We believe that it is important for first-year physics students to learn modern computing techniques that will be useful throughout their college careers, even before they have learned the math and science required for Computational Physics. To teach such Introductory Scientific Computing courses requires that some choices be made as to what subjects and computer languages wil be taught. Our survey of colleagues active in Computational Physics and Physics Education show no predominant choice, with strong positions taken for the compiled languages Java, C, C++ and Fortran90, as well as for problem-solving environments like Maple and Mathematica. Over the last seven years we have developed an Introductory course and have written up those courses as text books for others to use. We will describe our model of using both a problem-solving environment and a compiled language. The developed materials are available in both Maple and Mathaematica, and Java and Fortran90ootnotetextPrinceton University Press, to be published; www.physics.orst.edu/˜rubin/IntroBook/.

  14. Evaluation of Parallel Authentic Research-Based Courses in Human Biology on Student Experiences at Stanford University and the University of Gothenburg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindh, Jacob; Annerstedt, Claes; Besier, Thor; Matheson, Gordon O.; Rydmark, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Under a previous grant (2005-08), researchers and teachers at Stanford University (SU) and the University of Gothenburg (GU) co-designed a ten-week interdisciplinary, research-based laboratory course in human biology to be taught online to undergraduate students. Essentials in the subject were taught during the first four weeks of this course.…

  15. Evaluation of Vipassana Meditation Course Effects on Subjective Stress, Well-being, Self-kindness and Mindfulness in a Community Sample: Post-course and 6-month Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekeres, Roberta A; Wertheim, Eleanor H

    2015-12-01

    Residential Vipassana meditation courses, which teach mindfulness skills, are widely available globally but under-evaluated. This study examined effects of a standardized, community-based Vipassana course, on subjective stress, well-being, self-kindness and trait mindfulness in a community sample. Participants completed self-report measures of these variables at pre-course and post-course (n = 122), and outcomes were compared to a control group of early enrollers (EEs) (n = 50) who completed measures at parallel time points before course commencement. Six-month follow-up was undertaken in the intervention group (n = 90). Findings, including intention-to-complete analyses, suggested positive effects of the Vipassana course in reducing subjective stress and increasing well-being, self-kindness and overall mindfulness (present-moment awareness and non-reaction). Although some reductions in post-course gains were found at follow-up, particularly in stress, follow-up scores still showed improvements compared to pre-course scores. Mindfulness change scores between pre-course and 6-month follow-up were moderately to highly correlated with outcome variable change scores, consistent with the idea that effects of the Vipassana course on stress and well-being operate, at least partially, through increasing mindfulness. The present research underscores the importance of undertaking further investigations into Vipassana courses' effects and applications. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Empathy - can it be taught?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, D; Downie, R

    2016-06-01

    There is now a societal and cultural expectation that doctors and nurses should feel, and display, empathy for their patients. Many commentators argue that medical and nursing students should be taught empathy. Empathy, however, is difficult to define: it is not the same as kindness, as it implies a degree of psychological insight into what the patient is thinking or feeling. Empathy is seen by some as a form of emotional intelligence that can be systematically developed through teaching and positive role models. Here we debate the meaning of empathy, and whether it is truly a quality, or attribute, that can be taught.

  17. Natural Course of Metabolically Healthy Overweight/Obese Subjects and the Impact of Weight Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruizhi Zheng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have described the characteristics of metabolically healthy individuals with excess fat in the Chinese population. This study aimed to prospectively investigate the natural course of metabolically healthy overweight/obese (MH-OW/OB adults, and to assess the impact of weight change on developing metabolic abnormalities. During 2009–2010, 525 subjects without any metabolic abnormalities or other obesity-related diseases were evaluated and reevaluated after 5 years. The subjects were categorized into two groups of overweight/obese and normal weight based on the criteria of BMI by 24.0 at baseline. At follow-up, the MH-OW/OB subjects had a significantly increased risk of developing metabolically abnormalities compared with metabolically healthy normal-weight (MH-NW individuals (risk ratio: 1.35, 95% confidence interval: 1.17–1.49, p value < 0.001. In the groups of weight gain and weight maintenance, the MH-OW/OB subjects was associated with a larger increase in fasting glucose, triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and decrease in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol comparing with MH-NW subjects. In the weight loss group, no significant difference of changes of metabolic parameters was observed between MH-OW/OB and MH-NW adults. This study verifies that MH-OW/OB are different from MH-NW subjects. Weight management is needed for all individuals since weight change has a significant effect on metabolic health without considering the impact of weight change according to weight status.

  18. Performance Gaps between Online and Face-to-Face Courses: Differences across Types of Students and Academic Subject Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Di; Jaggars, Shanna S.

    2014-01-01

    Using a dataset containing nearly 500,000 courses taken by over 40,000 community and technical college students in Washington State, this study examines the performance gap between online and face-to-face courses and how the size of that gap differs across student subgroups and academic subject areas. While all types of students in the study…

  19. Rethinking how Undergraduate ``Hard Rock'' Petrology is Taught

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, M. R.

    2010-12-01

    A course in "hard rock" petrology forms a core component of undergraduate training in the geosciences. In most cases, the subjects of igneous and metamorphic petrology are combined in a single course and the course is traditionally structured so that the two subjects are covered in series. This approach enables students to focus on each subject separately, with knowledge of igneous rocks helping students to understand metamorphic rock protoliths. Student assessment shows, however, that this approach tends to compartmentalize learning and the two main subjects might just as well be taught in separate courses. In practical applications such as fieldwork, students must be able to access their understanding of igneous and metamorphic rocks virtually simultaneously. To better integrate student learning, I developed a spiral learning approach to teaching petrology (e.g., Bruner, 1990; Dyar et al., 2004) so that commonalities could be revisited several times over the course of a semester and, in so doing, students' grasp of the fundamental insights provided by igneous and metamorphic rocks could be scaffolded into greater understanding. The course initially focuses on the dynamics of the environments in which igneous and metamorphic rocks form: heat flow, fluid flow, and plate tectonics. Several subsequent weeks explore topics relevant to identifying and understanding igneous and metamorphic rocks in the field: crystal nucleation and growth, the roles of pressure and heat, and field classification. Laboratory exercises parallel this structure, also emphasizing observations that are valuable in the field: the relationship between minerals and rocks, textural observations, and general rock classification. The final portion of the course explores “hard rocks” in more detail with a greater emphasis on the interplay between chemistry and mineralogy. A variety of learner-centered activities in the course help students bridge the gap between novice and expert and include

  20. Time course of subjective pain ratings, and wound and leg tenderness after hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møiniche, S; Dahl, J B; Erichsen, C J

    1997-01-01

    .0002). CONCLUSION: These results indicate that wound pressure algometry correlates to postoperative pain at rest and during movement and may be an alternative way of assessing wound pain and tenderness. Increased tenderness to mechanical stimulation remote from the surgical wound could not be demonstrated.......BACKGROUND: Little information is available on time course of wound tenderness and relationship to subjective pain ratings following surgery. Furthermore, it is not clarified whether surgical procedures may induce hyperalgesia to mechanical stimulation outside the area of the surgical incision. We...... have therefore assessed postoperative pain and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) adjacent to and remote from the surgical incision in 16 patients undergoing hysterectomy. METHODS: Pressure pain threshold was assessed with pressure algometry preoperatively, 4 and 6 and 1, 4 and 8 d after surgery...

  1. Gender and Diversity Topics Taught in Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Ebony Joy; Piercy, Fred P.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores how the topics of gender and diversity are being taught and defined in accredited marriage and family therapy programs through syllabi content analysis and interviews with selected faculty. We examined findings by program (master's and doctoral) and type of training (those that taught specific gender and culture courses and…

  2. Baby Boomers' subjective life course and its physical health effects: how distinctive is the "forever young" cohort?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Anne E; Toothman, Erica L

    2014-01-01

    We consider members of the "forever young" cohort's negotiation of aging by examining how shifts in their views of the life course and their location in it influence their physical health. Using OLS regression (Midlife in the United States, 1995-1996 and 2004-2006; n = 1,257), we compare Early and Late Baby Boomers' subjective life course, measured as age identity and timing of middle age, and its physical health effects with those of an earlier cohort, the Lucky Few. Contrary to expectations, the earlier cohort not only held more elongated conceptions of the life course at Wave 1 but also lengthened them more between waves than did Baby Boomers. Results also failed to support the notion of youthful conceptions having stronger health consequences for Baby Boomers. Examining more cohorts over longer timespans would illuminate how developmental aging processes intersect with sociohistorical contexts to shape the subjective life course and its health consequences.

  3. Predictors of Student Success in Online Courses: Quantitative versus Qualitative Subject Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidry, Krisandra

    2013-01-01

    This study seeks to examine whether the predictors of success for students in an online quantitative course are different than those for an online qualitative course. Data were collected from students taking online courses offered by an AACSB accredited College of Business at a medium sized state university (total student population 7,000) in…

  4. Science Fiction Taught as Futurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Dennis

    1973-01-01

    A minicourse offered during a college intersession explored the essence of futuristic thinking through science fiction literature. Reading assignments, guests speakers, films, and simulations used in the course are described. (KM)

  5. Reflective Pedagogy: The Integration of Methodology and Subject-Matter Content in a Graduate-Level Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakeman, Rick C.; Henderson, Markesha M.; Howard, Lionel C.

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a critical reflection on how we, instructors of a graduate-level course in higher education administration, sought to integrate theoretical and subject-matter content and research methodology. Our reflection, guided by autoethnography and teacher reflection, challenged both our assumptions about curriculum design and our…

  6. Learning with LinkedIn: Students' Perceptions of Incorporating Subject-Related Blogging in an International Marketing Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galan, Nataliya; Khodabandehloo, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to report the results of implementation of blogging within a LinkedIn discussion group in an international marketing course for a multicultural group of students focusing on the students' perceptions of the subject-related blogging. Design/Methodology/ Approach: This study adopts a qualitative approach; data have been…

  7. A team-taught interdisciplinary approach to engineering ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, Glenn C; Pionke, Christopher D

    2006-04-01

    This paper outlines the development and implementation of a new course in Engineering Ethics at the University of Tennessee. This is a three-semester-hour course and is jointly taught by an engineering professor and a philosophy professor. While traditional pedagogical techniques such as case studies, position papers, and classroom discussions are used, additional activities such as developing a code of ethics and student-developed scenarios are employed to encourage critical thinking. Among the topics addressed in the course are engineering as a profession and its role in society; ethical successes and failures; risk, safety, and the environment; professional responsibilities; credit and intellectual property; and international concerns. The most significant aspect of the course is that it brings both engineering and non-engineering points of view to the topics at hand. This is accomplished in two ways. First, as mentioned previously, it is team-taught by engineering faculty with an interest in ethical and societal issues, and by philosophy faculty with expertise in the field of professional ethics and an interest in science and technology. Second, the course is offered to both engineers and non-engineers. This mix of students requires that all students must be able to explain their technical and ethical decisions in a non-technical manner. Work teams are structured to maximize interdisciplinary interaction and to foster insights by each student into the professional commitments and attitudes of others.

  8. Subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Vega Encabo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I claim that subjectivity is a way of being that is constituted through a set of practices in which the self is subject to the dangers of fictionalizing and plotting her life and self-image. I examine some ways of becoming subject through narratives and through theatrical performance before others. Through these practices, a real and active subjectivity is revealed, capable of self-knowledge and self-transformation. 

  9. Promoting Adaptive Coping Skills and Subjective Well-Being through Credit-Based Leisure Education Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Cindy L.; Evans, Kate E.; Anderson, Denise M.

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study addresses the need for campus-based programming that allows students to practice adaptive coping skills and increase well-being. Eight focus groups and seven individual interviews were conducted with students participating in credit-based leisure education courses to understand self-reported health-related motivations and…

  10. Museology as a University Subject in Slovakia: History, Program and Course Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tišliar, Pavol

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the development of museum studies and museology as a field of scientific inquiry and a university course in Slovakia. First I examine the role of memory institutions in the formation of this field in response to the need for the specialized education of their staff and describe the fundamentals and the development of program…

  11. EPR: what has it taught us

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stapp, H.P.

    1985-05-01

    This symposium commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the paper of Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen is a fitting place to review what that work and its sequels have taught us. Prima facie, the EPR paper appears to have been exceedingly counter-productive for the following reasons: (1) The work was quickly rebutted by Bohr, and this rebuttal was apparently accepted by most workers in the field. (2) Scientists who adopted the position advocated by Bohr have produced, in the intervening fifty years, a marvelous body of useful theory, whereas those following the course suggested by EPR have produced nothing of any certified practical value. (3) It has been shown by Bell that the conclusion reached by EPR is incompatible with their assumptions. Chemists and physicists have recently begun to examine the behavior of quantum mechanical systems that are very small, yet large enough to influence their environment in ways that appreciably modify their own behavior, vis-a-vis the behavior they would have if isolated. Because these systems are neither small enough to be treated as isolated (or as residing in a classically described environment) between preparation and detection, nor large enough to be treated classically, they do not conform to the format demanded by the Copenhagen interpretation. Indeed, the behavior of these systems depends on ontological considerations that were irrelevant in the situations covered by the Copenhagen interpretation, and that were systematically ignored in that interpretation. Scientists now face the task of enlarging the scope of quantum theory to cover these new situations, and comparing the empirical consequences of various ontological assumptions. 17 refs.

  12. RELATION OF IDENTITY AND SUBJECTIVE PICTURE OF THE COURSE OF LIFE OF THE PERSONALITY AT TEENAGERS AND YOUNG MEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Yuryevich Kuzmin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the problem of relation between identity and subjective picture of a personality’s life line in subjects -adolescents and young people. In the course of theoretical analysis of the problem in native (Kulesh, Burovihina, Vechkanova and foreign sources the authors come to the conclusion that the type of the relation between identity and subjective picture of life line in the subjects of different age remains debatable. The empiric research was conducted on the sample of 150 subjects with the help of LifeLine by Cronic, SJeI-test bt Soldatova and Semantic differential methods. As a result the authors found out that there exists specific relation between identity and life line picture different in adolescents and young people. The higher the subjects-young people esteem themselves on the scales of Semantic differential method, the less attention they pay to their past. In general, it is typical for the subjects undergoing the crisis stages of identity forming and having low self-esteem to direct much attention to their past. And on the contrary, the subjects with mature, formed identity typically pay attention to their future.

  13. Managing Large-Enrollment Courses in Hybrid Instruction Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    This essay addresses the hitches and glitches in the hybrid instruction system of teaching and learning for large-enrollment courses. This new instructional methodology asks facilitators to redesign their entire traditional teaching and learning practices. The nature of subject to be taught via the hybrid mode further affects the success rate of…

  14. What Veterans Bring to Civilian Workplaces: A Prototype Toolkit for Helping Private-Sector Employers Understand the Nontechnical Skills Taught in the Military

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    skills (related terms: demonstrating concern for others, demonstrating insight into behavior, oral communication , intercultural skills): Works well...Taught Skills and competencies beyond those described above emphasized in this course include: • Written communications : Several short, graded written...Other Skills and Competencies Taught The MSLC also teaches some other valued nontechnical skills: • Written communications : Students are taught and

  15. Moderate- to long-term periodontal outcomes of subjects failing to complete a course of periodontal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, V; Hackmack, P P; Corbet, E F; Leung, W K

    2017-06-01

    The current retrospective cross-sectional study investigated 5-18-year treatment outcomes in subjects who did not complete a recommended course of periodontal therapy. Sixty-five subjects who voluntarily discontinued therapy were recalled. The subjects' demographic data and dental history since discontinuation of periodontal treatment were collected via questionnaires. The subjects' periodontal condition, radiographic data and individual tooth-based prognosis at pre-discontinuation and recall were compared. A total of 229 teeth had been lost over time, mainly due to periodontal reasons. Upper and lower molars were most frequently lost. Rate of tooth loss (0.38/patient per year) was comparable to untreated patients. Deterioration in periodontal health in terms of increased percentage of sites with bleeding on probing (BOP) and sites with probing pocket depths (PPD) of 6 mm or more at re-examination was observed. Positive correlations were found between tooth loss and: (i) years since therapy discontinued; (ii) percentage of sites with PPD of 6 mm or more at pre-discontinuation; and (iii) at re-examination. Percentage of sites with PPD of 6 mm or more at recall was positively correlated with periodontal tooth loss and negatively correlated with percentage of sites without BOP. Patients not completing a course of periodontal therapy are at risk of further tooth loss and deterioration in periodontal conditions over time. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  16. The Dialectical Nature of Writing and Its Implications for Learning Subject Matter Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Males, Terry

    1997-01-01

    Looks at writing as a dialectical affair--"dialectic" refers both to the dialogical nature of writing and the opportunity it opens up for the writer in coming to a new understanding of the subject matter. Uses H. Gadamer's philosophical hermeneutics as a starting point for developing writing as a dialectical process. (PA)

  17. Teaching Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS): A nationwide retrospective analysis of 8202 lessons taught in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luedi, Markus M; Wölfl, Christoph C; Wieferich, Katharina; Dogjani, Agron; Kauf, Peter; Doll, Dietrich

    To examine whether faculty who teach the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) course would improve with experience and, correspondingly, ratings from course evaluations would increase. Retrospective analysis of student evaluations of 262 ATLS courses held between 2008 and 2012. All ATLS courses held between 2008 and 2012 nationwide in Germany. All ATLS student course evaluations covering 8202 lessons, 81 instructors, 36 course directors, and 5 coordinators. ATLS courses in Germany attained high levels of student satisfaction. Satisfaction levels increased steadily over the 5-year period studied. The entire staff influenced this finding. Teaching quality improved the most within the first 100 lessons taught. Skill stations received better evaluations than lectures, and local courses were less satisfactory than national course formats. The 2 demonstrations that open the course were the top rated events. Skill stations, including a human phantom, were highly rated; the cricothyrotomy station was top rated. The German ATLS course evaluations indicated steady improvement over the 5-year study. The level of experience of course coordinators, directors, and instructors influenced this finding. Teaching quality improved most within the first 100 lessons taught, and then reached a steady state. Skill stations received better evaluations than lectures, and local courses were less satisfactory than national course formats. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of subjective symptoms associated with exposure to low levels of formaldehyde between students enrolled and not enrolled in a gross anatomy course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Mihoko; Matsumoto, Yuuki; Kushino, Nanae; Morimatsu, Yoshitaka; Hoshiko, Michiko; Saga, Tsuyoshi; Yamaki, Koh-ichi; Ishitake, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate students' subjective symptoms associated with exposure to low levels of formaldehyde (FA) during a gross anatomy course and to survey how the risk of subjective symptoms was affected by exposure to FA. We conducted three questionnaire surveys of 125 students enrolled in an anatomy course (FA exposure group) and 124 students not enrolled in the course (FA nonexposure group) before, during, and 6 months after the course. The questionnaire included questions inquiring about subjective symptoms, sex, age, and allergies. We analyzed differences in the prevalence of subjective symptoms in distinct survey periods. Furthermore, we analyzed the relationship between the subjective symptoms and exposure to FA after adjusting for allergy, sex, and age using multiple logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of some of the ocular, nasal, and nonspecific symptoms in the FA exposure group was low before the course, increased during the course and decreased 6 months after the course. A significant positive relationship was observed between exposure to FA and some symptoms after adjusting for allergy, sex, and age. We identified some concrete symptoms associated with exposure to FA. We suggest that the exposure to low levels of FA influences students' subjective symptoms.

  19. Time-course analysis of stretch reflexes in hemiparetic subjects using an on-line spasticity measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, M S; Chen, J J; Lee, H M; Lin, T S; Lin, C C; Huang, Y Z

    2000-02-01

    Spasticity after a stroke is usually assessed in a score form by subjectively determining the resistance of a joint to an externally imposed passive movement. This work presents a spasticity measurement system for on-line quantifying the stretch reflex of paretic limbs. Four different constant stretch velocities in a ramp-and-hold mode are used to elicit the stretch reflex of the elbow joint in spastic subjects. The subjects are tested at supine position with the upper limb stretched towards the ground, in contrast with the horizontally stretched movement used in other studies. By subtracting the baseline torque, reflex torque measured at a selected low stretch velocity of 5 deg/sec, the influence of gravity torque and inertial in vertical stretching mode can be minimized. The averaged speed-dependent reflex torque (ASRT), defined as the measured torque deviated from the baseline torque, is used for quantifying the spastic hypertonia. Four subjects having incurred cerebrovascular accident (CVA) are recruited for time-course study in which the measurements are taken at 72 hours, one week, one month, three months, and six months after onset of stroke. During the development of spasticity, the changes of ASRT and velocity sensitivity of ASRT of the involved and the intact elbow joints are discussed.

  20. What My Refugee Students Taught Me

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sidney

    2016-01-01

    In the early 1990s, a coup in Haiti sent a new wave of political refugees to southern Florida. First-year teacher Sidney Brown taught ESOL classes to Haitian teens who came to Dillard High School in Ft. Lauderdale. As she got to know her students, she was surprised by the class distinctions that divided the French-speaking students, whose…

  1. Time-course of vascular adaptations during 8 weeks of exercise training in subjects with type 2 diabetes and middle-aged controls.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, T.H.A.; Green, D.J.; Nyakayiru, J.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Thijssen, D.H.J.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Exercise training in healthy volunteers rapidly improves vascular function, preceding structural remodelling. No study examined the time-course of such adaptations in subjects with a priori endothelial dysfunction. METHODS: We examined brachial artery endothelial and smooth muscle function

  2. Development of Meta-Subject Competencies of the 7-9 Grades Basic School Students through the Implementation of Interdisciplinary Mathematical Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorev, Pavel M.; Masalimova, Alfiya R.

    2017-01-01

    The article is aimed at describing one of the possible interdisciplinary courses for students of the 7-9 classes of the basic school connecting mathematics with natural sciences and the study of such courses role in the formation and development of meta-subject competencies of students. The leading method for this is the modeling of…

  3. The 10-year course of adult aggression toward others in patients with borderline personality disorder and axis II comparison subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanarini, Mary C; Temes, Christina M; Ivey, Alexandra M; Cohn, Danielle M; Conkey, Lindsey C; Frankenburg, Frances R; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M

    2017-06-01

    This study had two aims. The first was to assess and compare various types of aggressive behavior toward others reported by borderline patients and axis II comparison subjects over time. The second was to determine the best baseline and time-varying predictors of aggressive behavior in these borderline patients. At baseline, a series of interviews and self-report measures were administered to 290 borderline patients and 72 axis II comparison subjects. Measures assessing aggression toward others, axis I and II disorders as well as adult adversity were re-administered every two years over the course of ten years. It was found that borderline patients reported significantly higher rates of verbal, emotional, and physical aggression toward others than comparison subjects but the rates of these forms of aggression toward others declined significantly for those in both study groups. Multivariate analyses indicated that the strongest predictors of adult aggression towards others were severity of adult adversity and a substance use disorder. Taken together, these results suggest that borderline patients commonly report aggression toward others but that this aggression declines significantly over time. These results also suggest that this aggression toward others is most strongly associated with adult experiences of adversity and concurrent substance abuse. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The 10-year Course of Physically Self-destructive Acts Reported by Borderline Patients and Axis II Comparison Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanarini, Mary C.; Frankenburg, Frances R.; Reich, D. Bradford; Fitzmaurice, Garrett; Weinberg, Igor; Gunderson, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this paper was to determine the frequency and methods of two forms of physically self-destructive acts (i.e., self-mutilation and suicide attempts) reported by borderline patients and axis II comparison subjects over ten years of prospective follow-up. Methods 290 borderline patients and 72 axis II comparison subjects were interviewed about their physically self-destructive acts during their index admission and at five contiguous two-year follow-up periods. Results It was found that a high percentage of borderline patients reported multiple acts and methods of each of these two forms of physically self-destructive behavior prior to their index admission. It was also found that the percentage of borderline patients reporting multiple acts and methods declined significantly over time. However, these acts remained significantly more common among borderline patients than axis II comparison subjects. Conclusions The course of self-mutilation and suicide attempts among borderline patients is initially more serious and ultimately more benign than previously recognized. PMID:18241308

  5. The Teaching of Psychology on Health Professional Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Dominic; Mansell, Hayley

    2008-01-01

    Psychology is taught on a range of vocational courses including such training for professions as nurses, medics, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, and other health care professionals. However, what is uncertain is what psychology is taught, who it is taught by and how it is taught. This project aims to address these unresolved questions…

  6. Teaching science to science teachers: Lessons taught and lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, E. M.; Hashimoto-Martell, E. A.; Balicki, S.; Oglavie, D. R.

    2009-12-01

    The Boston Science Partnership has created a comprehensive set of graduate courses that immerse teachers in the science topics most relevant to their teaching practices. In these courses, teachers become students of science, developing their conceptual understandings through scientific inquiry. All courses are co-taught by a university faculty and teacher leaders from the Boston Public Schools. Each course provides contextual linkages between the science content and the standards-based curriculum of the Boston Public School district. One of the most relevant science topics to teachers and students of all disciplines is climate change. This served as the overarching theme for our course delivered during summer 2008 and 2009. This course focused on weather and the pivotal role that water and solar radiation play in the exchange of energy at the Earth's surface. Basic concepts such as the behavior of gases, energy flow, density changes, phase changes, heat capacities, and thermal convection were applied to examine short-term weather and water dynamics and longer-term impacts on global warming and climate change. The course was designed to embrace the 7E learning cycle and instructional model, as proposed by Eisenkraft in his landmark 2003 Science Teacher article. This inquiry-based instructional model builds upon prior conceptions and engages the learner in activities in which they begin to construct meaning of a concept prior to being given an explanation. Each day focused on an essential topic related to weather and climate change, and experiential learning was our main objective. There were many successes and challenges with our course. Twenty-five participants were enrolled, and all had different background knowledge and skill sets. Additionally, their level of teaching varied greatly, from K-12, so the level of depth with which to learn the content in order to bring it back to their classrooms varied a great deal as well. Therefore differentiating instruction for

  7. CALL and Less Commonly Taught Languages--Still a Way to Go

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Many Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) innovations mainly apply to the Most Commonly Taught Languages (MCTLs), especially English. Recent manifestations of CALL for MCTLs such as corpora, Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL) and Massively Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are found less frequently in the world of Less Commonly Taught…

  8. Teaching physics as a service subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, T. L.; Hayes, M.

    1986-07-01

    At South Glamorgan Institute of Higher Education physics is taught over a wide range of courses. In addition to the more conventional courses found in science, technology and education faculties there is a physics input into areas such as beauty therapy, applied biology, catering, chiropody, dental technology, environmental health, food technology, hairdressing, human-movement studies, industrial design, applied life sciences, marine technology, medical laboratory science, physiological measurement, nursing and speech therapy. Due to the fundamental differences in emphasis required when teaching physics as a 'minor' subject on these types of courses, and since the authors have no courses which lead to a 'major' physics qualification, it is necessary to develop a rational strategy for teaching physics as a 'service' subject. If this is not achieved then staff satisfaction and student interest are likely to suffer. They describe their strategy.

  9. Curso Introductorio sobre el Sistema DIALOG (Introductory Course on the DIALOG System).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Ketty

    As an introduction to the use of the DIALOG online retrieval service, this guide presents material that was developed during a fellowship at Carlos III University, School of Library Science and Documentation, Madrid (Spain) and that is based on a course on the same subject taught in English at Texas Women's University. Although the use of DIALOG…

  10. Comparison of Students Taught Basketball Skills Using Mastery and Nonmastery Learning Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakemore, Connie L.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Researchers compared psychomotor skill performance in isolation and in competitive game situations with seventh grade boys taught basketball using Bloom's mastery learning model or nonmastery procedures. Mastery subjects surpassed control and nonmastery groups on all skills performed in isolation. No significant differences existed in skill…

  11. What Should be Taught in Intermediate Macroeconomics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Pedro; O'Sullivan, Roisin; Simpson, Nicole B.

    2013-01-01

    A lack of consensus remains on what should form the theoretical core of the undergraduate intermediate macroeconomic course. In determining how to deal with the Keynesian/classical divide, instructors must decide whether to follow the modern approach of building macroeconomic relationships from micro foundations, or to use the traditional approach…

  12. The Subject and the Setting: Re-Imagining Opportunities for Primary Teachers' Subject Knowledge Development on School-Based Teacher Education Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Rupert

    2017-01-01

    The landscape of teacher education is undergoing significant change in many countries and this is often associated with a move towards greater school involvement in the preparation of teachers. One aspect of teaching expertise that is particularly challenging for primary student-teachers is the development of subject knowledge across a wide range…

  13. Retention of Vaginal Breech Delivery Skills Taught in Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Heather; Crane, Joan; Johnston, Kathy; Craig, Catherine

    2018-02-01

    The optimal frequency of conducting simulation training for high-acuity, low-frequency events in obstetrics and gynaecology residency programs is unknown. This study evaluated retention over time of vaginal breech delivery skills taught in simulation, by comparing junior and senior residents. In addition, the residents' subjective comfort level to perform this skill clinically was assessed. This prospective cohort study included 22 obstetrics and gynaecology residents in a Canadian residency training program. Digital recordings were completed for pre-training, immediate post-training, and delayed (10-26 weeks later) post-training intervals of a vaginal breech delivery simulation, with skill assessment by a blinded observer using a binary checklist. Residents also completed questionnaires to assess their subjective comfort level at each interval. Junior and senior residents had significant improvements in vaginal breech delivery skills from the pre-training assessment to both the immediate post-training assessment (junior, P simulation 10-26 weeks later, although a decline in skills occurred over this time period. Comfort level was positively affected and retained. These results will aid in determining the frequency of simulation teaching for high-acuity, low-frequency events in a residency simulation curriculum. Copyright © 2018 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Distance courses on the subject «Management of information projects» based on technology Moodle

    OpenAIRE

    ZIANGIROVA LINEZA FAATOVNA

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to development of a remote course on discipline "Management of information projects" in the direction of preparation "Applied informatics" on the basis of distance learning MOODLE (Modular Object-Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment) system. There are considered the methodology of information systems introduction, decisions introduction organization unified model in the methodologies of Microsoft Solutions Framework (MSF), the project integration and contents managemen...

  15. How is veterinary parasitology taught in China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Yi; Wang, Ming; Suo, Xun; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2006-12-01

    Many parasites of domestic animals in China are of major socioeconomic and medical importance. Hence, veterinary parasitology is one of the core subjects for undergraduate and postgraduate students of veterinary science. Here, we review the teaching of veterinary parasitology in Chinese universities, including a description of the veterinary science curricula and measures to improve the quality of veterinary parasitology teaching in China.

  16. The impact of the language of instruction: How economics students in the Netherlands evaluate an English-taught Undergraduate Programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grift, Y.K.; Meijer, A.A.; van der Salm, F.H.

    2012-01-01

    In this article student ratings of undergraduate level Economics courses are analysed on the basis of the aggregated results of end-of-term questionnaires. Two groups of students were involved, one of which was taught in Dutch and the other in English. In the analysis the influence was investigated

  17. Intraosseous access can be taught to medical students using the four-step approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzali, Monika; Kvisselgaard, Ask Daffy; Lyngeraa, Tobias Stenbjerg

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The intraosseous (IO) access is an alternative route for vascular access when peripheral intravascular catheterization cannot be obtained. In Denmark the IO access is reported as infrequently trained and used. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate if medical students can obtain...... competencies in IO access when taught by a modified Walker and Peyton's four-step approach. METHODS: Nineteen students attended a human cadaver course in emergency procedures. A lecture was followed by a workshop. Fifteen students were presented with a case where IO access was indicated and their performance...... score of 14.2 versus the non-expert raters with mean 14.6 and 14.3. The overall IRR calculated with Randolph's free-marginal multi rater kappa was 0.71. CONCLUSION: The essentials of the IO access procedure can be taught to medical students using a modified version of the Walker and Peyton's four...

  18. Information and Announcements Refresher Course on Advanced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    teaching experience, course taught, positions held, telephone numbers, etc.) along with a brief write-up to why they would like to participate in this course, through the Head of the. Institution/University, to. Dr. R Ramaraj, Course Director, Refresher Course on "Advanced Topics in Chemistry". Centre for Photoelectrochemistry ...

  19. First year medical students' learning style preferences and their correlation with performance in different subjects within the medical course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Torrano, Daniel; Ali, Syed; Chan, Chee-Kai

    2017-08-08

    Students commencing their medical training arrive with different educational backgrounds and a diverse range of learning experiences. Consequently, students would have developed preferred approaches to acquiring and processing information or learning style preferences. Understanding first-year students' learning style preferences is important to success in learning. However, little is understood about how learning styles impact learning and performance across different subjects within the medical curriculum. Greater understanding of the relationship between students' learning style preferences and academic performance in specific medical subjects would be valuable. This cross-sectional study examined the learning style preferences of first-year medical students and how they differ across gender. This research also analyzed the effect of learning styles on academic performance across different subjects within a medical education program in a Central Asian university. A total of 52 students (57.7% females) from two batches of first-year medical school completed the Index of Learning Styles Questionnaire, which measures four dimensions of learning styles: sensing-intuitive; visual-verbal; active-reflective; sequential-global. First-year medical students reported preferences for visual (80.8%) and sequential (60.5%) learning styles, suggesting that these students preferred to learn through demonstrations and diagrams and in a linear and sequential way. Our results indicate that male medical students have higher preference for visual learning style over verbal, while females seemed to have a higher preference for sequential learning style over global. Significant associations were found between sensing-intuitive learning styles and performance in Genetics [β = -0.46, B = -0.44, p styles and performance in Genetics [β = 0.36, B = 0.43, p learning techniques. Instructors can also benefit by modifying and adapting more appropriate teaching approaches in these

  20. Parent-taught driver education in Texas : a comparative evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    An evaluation of the Parent-Taught Driver Education (PTDE) program in Texas was conducted using three different research techniques: (1) focus groups with driver education instructors, teen drivers, and their parents; (2) statewide mail survey of you...

  1. A Radionavigation Systems Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Guerrero, Antonio José; Valenzuela-Valdés, Juan Francisco

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new course, Radionavigation Systems, whose laboratory and theoretical components complement each other to enhance student learning. Radionavigation skills and knowledge are taught by means of various instructional methods, and the laboratory successfully merges hands-on learning using specific instrumentation and software…

  2. Peace Corps Yoruba Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awobuluyi, A. Oladele

    The materials in this course are designed to be taught by an instructor who speaks Yoruba as her/his first language and, in addition, has a good knowledge of English. The mimicry, manipulation, and memorization phase consists of three parallel columns: Column A lists the lexical items to be introduced, Column B gives the pronunciation of some…

  3. [Psychosocial behaviour and subjective experience specific to the course of study of medical students in their first and fifth years of study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voltmer, E; Kieschke, U; Spahn, C

    2008-02-01

    This study concerns the evaluation of study-related psychosocial risk factors and resources in medical students at the beginning and before the end of their course of studies. Written questionnaires were filled out by medical students in Lübeck and Freiburg in their first and fifth years of study and analysed with three standard instruments (AVEM, SAM, F-Sozu). The response rate was 84.5% (n=435) in the first and 83.0% (n=351) in the fifth year of study. At the outset of their course of study, most of the students evinced behaviour and subjective experience patterns which were not deleterious to their health. Nevertheless, even at this point in time, 22.9% of the students showed a risk constellation with an excessive commitment to work and readiness to overstrain themselves. With 17.9% resignatory exhaustion with a highly restrictive subjective quality of life was found. In the fifth year of study, this proportion had increased to 23.3%, while the quality of health behaviour and subjective experience patterns deteriorated. Self-awareness and social support were augmented by comparison with norm samples. A portion of the medical students showed a risk constellation in behaviour and subjective experience at the very beginning of their studies. At the end, this tendency has significantly strengthened. The integration of teaching contents dealing with health promotion and successful coping with stress for the medical students themselves would therefore seem essential for the conservation of the health and working capacity of the students, as well as in order to prevent subsequent profession-specific mental stress and burn-out.

  4. Psychomotor Skill Acquisition in the Technical Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PaDelford, Harry

    Psychomotor skills need to be taught in technical education courses. Some students can be taught more easily than others, depending on their physical attributes. These attributes are speed, steadiness, perception, dexterity, agility/flexibility, endurance, equilibrium/balance, strength, and coordination. Before students attempt to learn vocational…

  5. Does the Subject Content of the Pharmacy Degree Course Influence the Community Pharmacist’s Views on Competencies for Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Jeffrey; De Paepe, Kristien; Sánchez Pozo, Antonio; Rekkas, Dimitrios; Volmer, Daisy; Hirvonen, Jouni; Bozic, Borut; Skowron, Agnieska; Mircioiu, Constantin; Marcincal, Annie; Koster, Andries; Wilson, Keith; van Schravendijk, Chris; Wilkinson, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    Do community pharmacists coming from different educational backgrounds rank the importance of competences for practice differently—or is the way in which they see their profession more influenced by practice than university education? A survey was carried out on 68 competences for pharmacy practice in seven countries with different pharmacy education systems in terms of the relative importance of the subject areas chemical and medicinal sciences. Community pharmacists were asked to rank the competences in terms of relative importance for practice; competences were divided into personal and patient-care competences. The ranking was very similar in the seven countries suggesting that evaluation of competences for practice is based more on professional experience than on prior university education. There were some differences for instance in research-related competences and these may be influenced, by education. PMID:28975909

  6. Does the Subject Content of the Pharmacy Degree Course Influence the Community Pharmacist’s Views on Competencies for Practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Atkinson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Do community pharmacists coming from different educational backgrounds rank the importance of competences for practice differently—or is the way in which they see their profession more influenced by practice than university education? A survey was carried out on 68 competences for pharmacy practice in seven countries with different pharmacy education systems in terms of the relative importance of the subject areas chemical and medicinal sciences. Community pharmacists were asked to rank the competences in terms of relative importance for practice; competences were divided into personal and patient-care competences. The ranking was very similar in the seven countries suggesting that evaluation of competences for practice is based more on professional experience than on prior university education. There were some differences for instance in research-related competences and these may be influenced, by education.

  7. Overestimation of the subjective experience of time in social anxiety: Effects of facial expression, gaze direction and time course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta eIshikawa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available It is known that threatening stimuli increase emotional arousal, resulting in overestimating the subjective experience of passing time. Moreover, facial expressions and gaze direction interact to create socially threatening situations in people with social anxiety. The present study investigated the effect of social anxiety on the perceived duration of observing emotional faces with a direct or an averted gaze. Participants were divided into high, medium and low social anxiety groups based on social anxiety inventory scores. Participants then performed a temporal bisection task. Participants with high social anxiety provided larger overestimates for neutral faces with an averted gaze than those with low social anxiety in the second half of the task, whereas these differences were not found for angry face with direct and averted gaze. These results suggest that people with social anxiety perceive the duration of threatening situations as being longer than true durations based on objectively measured time.

  8. Introducing Islamic Civilization: Course Syllabus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Reuben W., Ed.

    The syllabus reflects a course in Islamic civilization taught at the University of Chicago and includes the recommendations of participants at a conference on the problems of presenting such a course. The "civilization approach" offers a panoramic view of various related fields, affords a perspective on the problems of analyzing changes over time,…

  9. Independence, Interaction, Interdependence and Interrelation: Learner Autonomy in a Web-based Less Commonly Taught Language Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina V. Kostina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the United States, teaching less commonly taught languages has been a very challenging task due to low student enrollment and the high costs of hiring permanent teaching faculty. Therefore, webbased distance learning (DL is beginning to attract serious attention from the less commonly taught languages profession (Fleming, Hiple and Du, 2002. However, DL classes are often associated with student isolation, where learners are deprived of non-verbal clues, vocal expression, and eye contact that are crucial for foreign language learning (White, 2005. Thus, working in a more isolated context requires higher learner autonomy (White, 2005. This article provides a review of literature on autonomy that exists in the foreign language field, and describes four aspects of autonomy that need to be considered by language teachers while developing their web-based courses. It also offers some practical suggestions for the less commonly taught language instructors that foster autonomy and decrease isolation online.

  10. Values taught, values learned, attitude and performance in mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbaco, K. S. A.

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify, describe and find the relationship among values taught, values learned, attitude and performance in mathematics. The researcher used descriptive-correlational method of research to gather information and to describe the nature of situation. The following instruments were used in this study: Math Attitude Inventory, Inventory of Values Taught and Learned which were content validated by experts in the field of Mathematics, Values and Education. Generally, most of the values were taught by the teachers. All of the values were learned by the students. The following got the highest mean ratings for values taught: moral strength, sharing, charity, valuing life, love of God, truth and honesty, reason, alternativism and articulation. The following got highest mean ratings for values learned: patience/tolerance, sharing, charity, valuing life, faith, love of God, truth and honesty, analogical thinking, confidence and individual liberty. Majority of the respondents have moderately positive attitude towards mathematics. Positive statements in the Mathematics Attitude Inventory are "Generally true" while negative statements are "Neutral." In conclusion, values were taught by mathematics teacher, thus, learned by the students. Therefore, mathematics is very much related to life. Values can be learned and strengthened through mathematics; there is a significant relationship between values taught by the teachers and values learned by the students and attitude towards mathematics and performance in mathematics; values taught does not affect attitude towards mathematics and performance in mathematics. A student may have a positive attitude towards mathematics or have an exemplary performance in mathematics even if the mathematics teacher did not teach values; values learned does not affect attitude towards mathematics and performance in mathematics. A student may have a positive attitude towards mathematics or have an exemplary performance

  11. Medical undergraduate primary care teaching across the UK: what is being taught?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Veronica; Ridd, Matthew; Blythe, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    All UK medical schools use primary care settings to deliver their undergraduate courses. However there is no national undergraduate curriculum for primary care and it is thought that the learning objectives of primary care teaching vary considerably between medical schools. The overall aim was to establish what is being taught within and by primary care across UK medical schools. We did this by collating learning objectives from the primary care department at each school. In order to categorise and compare the list of learning objectives from each school we mapped the learning objectives to the postgraduate curriculum of the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP). Cross sectional survey sent to heads of teaching of primary care at all 32 UK medical schools. GP teacher handbooks for primary care modules at each medical school were requested. Information was extracted based on key headings from the RCGP postgraduate curriculum. Topics taught by primary care at all medical schools include: consulting and communication skills, leading and working in teams, and developing yourself and others. Novel topics, taught at a few medical schools include: learning disability, genetics and multi-morbidity. The majority of medical schools address aspects of over half of the RCGP postgraduate curriculum headings in their learning objectives for primary care. This project provides valuable information about primary care teaching at an undergraduate level across the UK. Although it confirms widespread variation in learning objectives, it also highlights considerable common ground and opportunities for sharing teaching resources between schools.

  12. ACTIVITY APPROACH AND FORMATION OF PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCIES IN SUBJECT TEACHERS IN THE COURSE OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S E Mansurova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Activity approach, differently refracted at different levels of education, has put many new challenges for teachers. The competence approach acts as the methodological basis of the state educational standard of higher professional education, additional professional education; the system-activity approach acts as the methodological basis of the standards of General education. With regard to teachers of General education, the main task is to overcome the contradiction between the real level of their qualifications and new high requirements for them. These requirements are outlined in the leading normative documents of the educational standards, Professional standard “Teacher”. For the system of teacher professional development the authors of this article propose an integrated approach that combines competence-based and system-activity approaches. The integrated approach differs substantially for teachers who teach subjects of Humanities and science profiles. The paper presents the examples of tasks for various categories of teachers, the specifics of the project and research activities, as well as the characteristics of the process of problematization in the classroom and in extracurricular activities of the teachers. The universal educational actions are differenciated from the position of the variable component. At the same time the authors understand the necessity of taking into account the invariant component in the teaching of humanitarian and natural science disciplines. This thesis is a reflection of the general trend towards integration and interdisciplinarity.

  13. Sport Management Taught On-Line: A Discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William F. Stier Jr

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An introduction to the world of on-line courses (distance education/learning is presented. In addition, the world of on-line learning, as it pertains to sport management, is examined within the framework of (a pedagogy, (b finances,(c assessment, and (d choosing to transition from the traditional classroom to on-line learning. Pertinent points relative to each of the four categories are presented from the literature. In an effort to stimulate thought and discussion to the subject of on-line learning for sport management programs/courses the authors provide their reactions to the literature points by presenting their comments/reactions from a sport management perspective. Sport management professors and administrators are encouraged to critically examine the feasibility of such on-line courses (distance education/learning within their own curricula while maintaining an appropriate framework revolving around sound theoretical instructional strategies, methods as well as appropriate use of instructional tools, including but not limited to, computersand the WWW.

  14. Teaching the Holocaust as an Interdisciplinary Course in Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Terrance L.; Nelson, Carnot E.

    2001-01-01

    Describes a course about the Holocaust that is taught through the psychology department. Explains that the team-taught course, "The Holocaust, Social Prejudice, and Morality," is also relevant to public health. States that the topics include but are not limited to stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination, and the language of domination…

  15. Effect of a four-week course of interleukin-10 on cytokine production in a placebo-controlled study of HIV-1-infected subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, Gregory B; Sailer, Carrie A; Porat, Reuven; Peskind, Robert L; Fuchs, Amy C; Angel, Jonathan B; Skolnik, Paul R; Jacobson, Mark A; Giordano, Michael F; Lebeaut, Alexandre; Grint, Paul C; Dinarello, Charles A; Shapiro, Leland

    2007-06-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10 suppresses synthesis of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)alpha, IL-1beta, and interferon (IFN)gamma. Since pro-inflammatory cytokines have been implicated in the production of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), cytokine synthesis in whole blood cultures were determined during a 4-week course of subcutaneous IL-10 injections in 33 HIV-1-infected patients. Patients were randomized into four groups: placebo (nine), IL-10 at 1 microg/kg/day (nine), IL-10 at 4 microg/kg/day (six) and IL-10 at 8 microg/kg three times per week (nine). Whole blood was obtained at the beginning and conclusion of the study and was stimulated for 24 hours with the combination of IL-18 plus lipopolysaccharide. TNFalpha production in stimulated whole blood was reduced three and six hours after the first injection of IL-10 compared to subjects injected with the placebo. After four weeks of treatment, production of IFNgamma was suppressed in a greater number of patients in the IL-10 treatment groups compared to subjects in the placebo group. Similarly, IL-1beta production was lower in the IL-10 treatment groups compared to subjects receiving placebo. In contrast, after four weeks of IL-10, circulating levels of the anti-inflammatory TNF soluble receptor p55 increased dose-dependently compared to placebo subjects. Patient heterogeneity and small sample size presented difficulties in establishing statistical significance. Although the cytokine changes in our study did not demonstrate statistically significant changes, the data nevertheless reveal that four weeks of IL-10 therapy in HIV-1 infected subjects produced the anticipated suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  16. Collaborative teaching of an integrated methods course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Zhou

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available With an increasing diversity in American schools, teachers need to be able to collaborate in teaching. University courses are widely considered as a stage to demonstrate or model the ways of collaboration. To respond to this call, three authors team taught an integrated methods course at an urban public university in the city of New York. Following a qualitative research design, this study explored both instructors‟ and pre-service teachers‟ experiences with this course. Study findings indicate that collaborative teaching of an integrated methods course is feasible and beneficial to both instructors and pre-service teachers. For instructors, this collaborative teaching was a reciprocal learning process where they were engaged in thinking about teaching in a broader and innovative way. For pre-service teachers, this collaborative course not only helped them understand how three different subjects could be related to each other, but also provided opportunities for them to actually see how collaboration could take place in teaching. Their understanding of collaborative teaching was enhanced after the course.

  17. Collaborative teaching of an integrated methods course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George ZHOU

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available With an increasing diversity in American schools, teachers need to be able to collaborate in teaching. University courses are widely considered as a stage to demonstrate or model the ways of collaboration. To respond to this call, three authors team taught an integrated methods course at an urban public university in the city of New York. Following a qualitative research design, this study explored both instructors‟ and pre-service teachers‟ experienceswith this course. Study findings indicate that collaborative teaching of an integrated methods course is feasible and beneficial to both instructors and pre-service teachers. For instructors,this collaborative teaching was a reciprocal learning process where they were engaged in thinking about teaching in a broader and innovative way. For pre-service teachers, this collaborative course not only helped them understand how three different subjects could berelated to each other, but also provided opportunities for them to actually see how collaboration could take place in teaching. Their understanding of collaborative teaching was enhanced after the course.

  18. [The placement courses and the subjective quality of life of 6- to 11-year-old children living in child welfare institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacro, F; Rambaud, A; Humbert, C; Sellenet, C

    2015-10-01

    Besides diseases, the concept of quality of life is increasingly used to account for the consequences of other vulnerability situations that may be encountered by individuals, including young children. However, very few studies have examined children's perception of their quality of life in the context of child welfare and protection, and they yielded mixed results. The objectives of this study were (1) to compare the subjective quality of life of children placed in institution with that of children living in their families, by controlling for child sex, age, socioeconomic and familial status, and (2) to examine its relations with their placement course in the child welfare system. The sample of this study was composed of 56 children aged 6 to 11, 28 of which were placed in a child welfare institution. Information about the placement course of institutionalized children was given by their social workers and the quality of life of all participants was assessed with the AUQUEI questionnaire. This self-report, which is based on children's conception of their quality of life, allows assessment of four distinct dimensions in addition to the overall score: leisure, performances, relations and family life, and separation. According to the results, the quality of life of children placed in institutions did not differ from that of children living in their families. However, its perception was closely related to the placement course of institutionalized children in the child welfare system. Whereas maltreated children obtained lower overall and performance scores than their neglected peers, children placed in foster families before institution had a poorer perception of their quality of life in the domains of family life and separations. These results are interpreted in light of attachment research and theory. Indeed, the relations between children's quality of life and their placement course could be explained by their high level of attachment disorganization. Finally, the

  19. Old versus New Medications: How Much Should Be Taught?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, James W.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To address the issue of how much psychiatric residents should be taught about older medications. Methods: Selective use of the literature, including historical overview, was employed to compare and contrast old and newer generation medications. Results: While many old drugs are truly antiquated, medications such as typical…

  20. Was Mendelian genetics taught during the Lysenkoist period in Poland?

    OpenAIRE

    Köhler, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    The content of Polish textbooks of botany, zoology and rudiments of evolutionism of Lysenkoist times was analysed, along with a methodological manual for biology and a set of guidelines. On this basis, and taking into account the memories of eyewitnesses, it can be stated that Mendelian genetics was not taught in schools in Poland during the Lysenkoist period.

  1. Should Gun Safety Be Taught in Schools? Perspectives of Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeng, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    Background: Gun-related injuries and deaths among children occur at disproportionately high rates in the United States. Children who live in homes with guns are the most likely victims. This study describes teachers' views on whether gun safety should be taught to children in the preschool and elementary years. Methods: A total of 150 survey…

  2. Scholarly Appraisals of Literary Works Taught in High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, Stephen, Ed.; Sams, Henry W., Ed.

    Critical essays on eight literary works--four from the conventional literature curriculum and four less widely taught--are collected in this publication. Each o f the four standard selections--"Great Expectations,""Julius Caesar,""The Scarlet Letter," and "Macbeth"--is treated in two essays and a bibliography; and each of the less widely taught…

  3. Active Problem Solving and Applied Research Methods in a Graduate Course on Numerical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maase, Eric L.; High, Karen A.

    2008-01-01

    "Chemical Engineering Modeling" is a first-semester graduate course traditionally taught in a lecture format at Oklahoma State University. The course as taught by the author for the past seven years focuses on numerical and mathematical methods as necessary skills for incoming graduate students. Recent changes to the course have included Visual…

  4. Time Course and Association of Functional and Biochemical Markers in Severe Semitendinosus Damage Following Intensive Eccentric Leg Curls: Differences between and within Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Carmona

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the extent and evolution of hamstring muscle damage caused by an intensive bout of eccentric leg curls (ELCs by (1 assessing the time course and association of different indirect markers of muscle damage such as changes in the force-generating capacity (FGC, functional magnetic resonance (fMRI, and serum muscle enzyme levels and (2 analyzing differences in the degree of hamstring muscle damage between and within subjects (limb-to-limb comparison.Methods: Thirteen male participants performed six sets of 10 repetitions of an ELC with each leg. Before and at regular intervals over 7 days after the exercise, FGC was measured with maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVC. Serum enzyme levels, fMRI transverse relaxation time (T2 and perceived muscle soreness were also assessed and compared against the FGC.Results: Two groups of subjects were identified according to the extent of hamstring muscle damage based on decreased FGC and increased serum enzyme levels: high responders (n = 10, severe muscle damage and moderate responders (n = 3, moderate muscle damage. In the high responders, fMRI T2 analysis revealed that the semitendinosus (ST muscle suffered severe damage in the three regions measured (proximal, middle, and distal. The biceps femoris short head (BFsh muscle was also damaged and there were significant differences in the FGC within subjects in the high responders.Conclusion: FGC and serum enzyme levels measured in 10 of the subjects from the sample were consistent with severe muscle damage. However, the results showed a wide range of peak MVC reductions, reflecting different degrees of damage between subjects (high and moderate responders. fMRI analysis confirmed that the ST was the hamstring muscle most damaged by ELCs, with uniform T2 changes across all the measured sections of this muscle. During intensive ELCs, the ST muscle could suffer an anomalous recruitment pattern due to fatigue and damage, placing an

  5. Ship Design and Construction. An Integrated University Course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated course in design and construction of merchant ships taught at the Department of Naval Architecture andOffshore Engineering, the Technical University of Denmark. During the course, the students make a preliminary design of a ship of selected type and also design...... its engine room. The teaching combines lectures with laboratory work at the drawing tables and computer terminals. During the summer holiday, sea time on board ships of the relevant types are offered. Experienced naval architects from shipyards and ship consultancies give lectures and instructions...... on special subjects in addition to the teaching provided by the university professors. The course is offered to and especially designed for students relatively early in their Master's programme....

  6. Intellectual disability health content within nursing curriculum: An audit of what our future nurses are taught.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trollor, Julian N; Eagleson, Claire; Turner, Beth; Salomon, Carmela; Cashin, Andrew; Iacono, Teresa; Goddard, Linda; Lennox, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    Individuals with intellectual disability experience chronic and complex health issues, but face considerable barriers to healthcare. One such barrier is inadequate education of healthcare professionals. To establish the quantity and nature of intellectual disability content offered within Australian nursing degree curricula. A two-phase national audit of nursing curriculum content was conducted using an interview and online survey. Australian nursing schools offering pre-registration courses. Pre-registration course coordinators from 31 universities completed the Phase 1 interview on course structure. Unit coordinators and teaching staff from 15 universities in which intellectual disability content was identified completed the Phase 2 online survey. Quantity of compulsory and elective intellectual disability content offered (units and teaching time) and the nature of the content (broad categories, specific topics, and inclusive teaching) were audited using an online survey. Over half (52%) of the schools offered no intellectual disability content. For units of study that contained some auditable intellectual disability content, the area was taught on average for 3.6h per unit of study. Units were evenly distributed across the three years of study. Just three participating schools offered 50% of all units audited. Clinical assessment skills, and ethics and legal issues were most frequently taught, while human rights issues and preventative health were poorly represented. Only one nursing school involved a person with intellectual disability in content development or delivery. Despite significant unmet health needs of people with intellectual disability, there is considerable variability in the teaching of key intellectual disability content, with many gaps evident. Equipping nursing students with skills in this area is vital to building workforce capacity. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. How can learning vocabulary strategies be taught in class?

    OpenAIRE

    Cuevas, María Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    In spite of its great importance and relevance for language teaching, vocabulary is usually neglected in state schools. Many teachers mostly concentrate on the four macro skills and on grammar, treating vocabulary as part of them. Vocabulary should be taught separately, or at least given special attention, since it is essential for conveying meaning. Just knowing the rules of language or being competent in the four skills is not enough to express thoughts, opinions, ideas or emotions. This do...

  8. Crossing Borders: An Interdisciplinary Course in the "Enlightenment"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol White

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this essay, we present a twofold version of the first team-taught course on the eighteenth century designed by faculty at Clayton State University who plan to develop and teach this course again in the near future. We hope that our explanation of the original course and our projected future version of the course will be useful to scholars who teach in the eighteenth century, as well as to specialists in other historical periods who wish to plan revisions of courses to make them more reflective of current scholarship in gender studies. Authors taught in this course include Benjamin Franklin, Voltaire, Denis Diderot, Helen Maria Williams, and others.

  9. A study on the students feedback on the foundation course in first year MBBS curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srimathi T

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Study: To study the students feedback on the short orientation course in first year MBBS curriculum, which was introduced in the institution as per the recommendations of Medical Council of India for the Foundation course. Methodology: 250 First year MBBS students were divided into 7 small groups of 35 to 36 each. They attended a short orientation course over a period of 8 days on a rotation basis. The skills taught include Stress and Time Management, language, communication, use of information technology, National health policies, Biohazard safety, Introduction to the preclinical subjects, Medical literature search, First Aid and Basic life support, Medical ethics and professionalism. The results were analyzed on the 8th day by student’s feedback and debate sessions. Results: Positive feedback of 88.5 to 98.5% was recorded regarding the objectives of the course, contents, presentation, future value of the course in the student’s career by a Questionnaire issued to the students. Remedial measures undertaken for negative Feedback. The course enabled self directed learning of the subjects. Conclusion: The Foundation Course at the beginning of the First phase of the course enables the First year students to acquire the basic knowledge and skills required for all the subsequent phases in MBBS course and later on their medical practice and career.

  10. Large-scale Assessment Yields Evidence of Minimal Use of Reasoning Skills in Traditionally Taught Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Beth

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale assessment data from Texas Tech University yielded evidence that most students taught traditionally in large lecture classes with online homework and predominantly multiple choice question exams, when asked to answer free-response (FR) questions, did not support their answers with logical arguments grounded in physics concepts. In addition to a lack of conceptual understanding, incorrect and partially correct answers lacked evidence of the ability to apply even lower level reasoning skills in order to solve a problem. Correct answers, however, did show evidence of at least lower level thinking skills as coded using a rubric based on Bloom's taxonomy. With the introduction of evidence-based instruction into the labs and recitations of the large courses and in a small, completely laboratory-based, hands-on course, the percentage of correct answers with correct explanations increased. The FR format, unlike other assessment formats, allowed assessment of both conceptual understanding and the application of thinking skills, clearly pointing out weaknesses not revealed by other assessment instruments, and providing data on skills beyond conceptual understanding for course and program assessment. Supported by National Institutes of Health (NIH) Challenge grant #1RC1GM090897-01.

  11. How neuroscience is taught to North American dental students: results of the Basic Science Survey Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Douglas J; Clarkson, Mackenzie J; Hutchins, Bob; Lambert, H Wayne

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how North American dental students are taught neuroscience during their preclinical dental education. This survey represents one part of a larger research project, the Basic Science Survey Series for Dentistry, which covers all of the biomedical science coursework required of preclinical students in North American dental schools. Members of the Section on Anatomical Sciences of the American Dental Education Association assembled, distributed, and analyzed the neuroscience survey, which had a 98.5 percent response from course directors of the sixty-seven North American dental schools. The eighteen-item instrument collected demographic data on the course directors, information on the content in each course, and information on how neuroscience content is presented. Findings indicate that 1) most neuroscience instruction is conducted by non-dental school faculty members; 2) large content variability exists between programs; and 3) an increase in didactic instruction, integrated curricula, and use of computer-aided instruction is occurring. It is anticipated that the information derived from the survey will help guide neuroscience curricula in dental schools and aid in identifying appropriate content.

  12. Promoting Self-Directed Learning in Developing or Poorly Defined Subject Areas: A Problem-Based Course in Molecular Biology, Genetics, and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Katherine M.

    A new problem-based course in molecular biology, genetics, and cancer for first-year veterinary students was developed at the College of Veterinary Medicine at Cornell University (New York). The course was developed out of a desire to foster student-centered and lifelong learning and to integrate basic and clinical science knowledge despite a lack…

  13. Structuring the AP Art History Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herscher, Walter R.

    2013-01-01

    While AP (Advanced Placement) Art History may be taught within the art department in many schools, social studies teachers are equally capable of teaching the course well. They have the historical background to discuss the reasons for changes in art styles. A teacher's preparation is similar to teaching a course stressing political history,…

  14. A Course Offering in Jewish Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorff, Elliott N.; Rosett, Arthur L.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a course taught at the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Law. Content was divided into four segments: an introduction to the literature and a brief history of its development, court procedures, marriage and family law, and commercial law. Origins of the course and problems, especially that of comparing two legal systems…

  15. Teaching a Course about the Space Telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Thornton

    1983-01-01

    "Astronomy with the Space Telescope" is a course designed to show scientists/engineers how this instrument can make important advances in astrophysics, planetology, and geophysics. A description of the course (taught to 11 students working for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration) and sample student paper on black holes are…

  16. Refresher Course on Physics of Earthquakes -98 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Gaur, Centre for Mathematical Modelling and Computer Simulation and Indian Institute of. AstrophYSiCS, Bangalore; Ramesh Chander, Panchkula, ... with telephone and e-mail addresses!, qualifications, courses taught, and a statement expressing self-assessment of the ability to follow the proposed course and the.

  17. Blogging in the Communication Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Carrie Anne

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an assignment that was developed for an undergraduate course on communication technologies taught at a public university in the Upper Midwest. The course focuses on the impact of new media technologies on traditional media industries and contemporary culture, and is taken by students majoring in journalism, public relations,…

  18. Does Reflective Journal Writing Improve Course Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisero, Cheryl A.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated whether a reflective journal writing assignment would improve students' course performance. A total of 166 students from undergraduate sections of a course taught by the same instructor over three semesters completed the assignment as part of their requirements. Students (N = 317) from five previous semesters of the same…

  19. Student Preference Rates for Predominately Online, Compressed, or Traditionally Taught University Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Kevin S.; Dickson, Kole W.; Lessiter, Julie A.; Vassar, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Universities and colleges in the United States are actively searching for new ways to increase student enrollment as one means to offset recent government budget cuts in educational funding. One proposal at a particular institution involves transitioning a commuter university from a traditional semester length calendar to one that offers…

  20. Comparing Graduate Courses Taught by the Same Instructor Using Competing Approaches: Traditional vs. Technology-Infused

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisicki, Todd

    2012-01-01

    The use of educational technologies as a tool to improve academic achievement continues to increase as more technologies becomes available to students. However, teachers are entering the classroom not fully prepared to integrate technology into their daily classroom teaching because they have not been adequately prepared to do so. Teacher…

  1. Can Genetics and Genomics Nursing Competencies Be Successfully Taught in a Prenursing Microbiology Course?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, Michele

    2011-01-01

    In recognition of the entry into the era of personalized medicine, a new set of genetics and genomics competencies for nurses was introduced in 2006. Since then, there have been a number of reports about the critical importance of these competencies for nursing practices and about the challenges of addressing these competencies in the preservice…

  2. A Research-Based Development Economics Course for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prakarsh; Guo, Hongye; Morales, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The authors present details of a research-based course in development economics taught at a private liberal arts college. There were three key elements in this class: teaching of applied econometrics, group presentations reviewing published and working papers in development economics, and using concepts taught in class to write an original…

  3. Redesigning a Large Enrollment Course: The Impact on Academic Performance, Course Completion and Student Perceptions in Introductory Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Danae L.; Whisenhunt, Brooke L.; Shoptaugh, Carol F.; Rost, Ann D.; Fondren-Happel, Rachel N.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing college enrollments, and decreased funding have led institutions and instructors to focus on developing courses that can be taught effectively in a large class format. This article presents the effectiveness of a redesigned, blended format of Introductory Psychology taught in large sections. The goals of the project included improving…

  4. Teaching acoustics courses online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burroughs, Courtney B.

    2003-04-01

    Three graduate-level courses in noise control engineering have been taught by the Graduate Program in Acoustics through the Penn State World Campus for more than four years. In each course, students receive (1) a study guide which gives an overview of the course, the software, and assignments, and (2) a CD which contains the content of the course with animations embedded in the text. Because all communications are online, students have been able to take these courses asynchronously on their own schedule with minimum disruptions in their home and work schedules. Students work on group projects, known as collaborative learning activities, and conduct simulated measurements using virtual instruments. Individual learning activities include study questions, written problems, computer coding, and interactive demonstrations. The first course has been offered four times and several students have completed all three courses. Overviews of the elements of these online courses that have been successful and the elements that have presented problems, along with a discussion of adjustments that we have been able to make and those that we would like to make to improve the courses, will be presented.

  5. Comparing Student Outcomes in Blended and Face-to-Face Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscoe, Douglas D.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a study of student outcomes in a pair of matched courses, one taught face-to-face and one taught in a blended format, in which students completed most of the work online but met several times face-to-face. Learning objectives, course content, and pedagogical approaches were identical but the mode of instruction was…

  6. Final Exam Scores in Introductory Economics Courses: Effect of Course Delivery Method and Proctoring

    OpenAIRE

    Wachenheim, Cheryl J.

    2007-01-01

    There is a small but growing body of research exploring student learning in online courses. The current study compares student performance on the final exam in introductory economics courses taught online and in the classroom and considers the effect of proctoring the final exam. Students who took a course in the classroom did better on a proctored final exam than those taking the course online.

  7. Self-Taught convolutional neural networks for short text clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiaming; Xu, Bo; Wang, Peng; Zheng, Suncong; Tian, Guanhua; Zhao, Jun; Xu, Bo

    2017-04-01

    Short text clustering is a challenging problem due to its sparseness of text representation. Here we propose a flexible Self-Taught Convolutional neural network framework for Short Text Clustering (dubbed STC(2)), which can flexibly and successfully incorporate more useful semantic features and learn non-biased deep text representation in an unsupervised manner. In our framework, the original raw text features are firstly embedded into compact binary codes by using one existing unsupervised dimensionality reduction method. Then, word embeddings are explored and fed into convolutional neural networks to learn deep feature representations, meanwhile the output units are used to fit the pre-trained binary codes in the training process. Finally, we get the optimal clusters by employing K-means to cluster the learned representations. Extensive experimental results demonstrate that the proposed framework is effective, flexible and outperform several popular clustering methods when tested on three public short text datasets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Survey of Digital Materials for Teaching Less Commonly Taught Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Blankenship

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the first phase of a survey of digital materials for teaching Less Commonly Taught Languages. The research, conducted by the UCLA Language Materials Project from August, 2010, through February, 2012, located more than 500 reliable digital resources from academic and governmental providers. The report details the survey’s selection criteria and primary sources, and describes trends in technology, distribution of materials, and types of content. Then narrowing its focus to the eleven languages supported by the federal Startalk and Flagship programs, the report summarizes the population of digital materials available for those languages and identifies needs. It ends with recommendations of categories of materials that need to be developed, along with comments on feasibility.

  9. Development and evaluation of a blended learning course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jan M. Nauta; Jo Platenkamp; Marike Hettinga

    2016-01-01

    In a pilot project, a blended-learning course “Research and Development” was developed. This course is taught according to the flipped classroom principle. To develop the course, the ADDIE-model (Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation) was used. During the evaluation phase, we

  10. Internet Learning In Control Engineering: A Fuzzy Control Course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Jan

    2003-01-01

    This educational study is based on a course taught over the Internet for seven years. The objective of the study is to evaluate the didactic method, e-mail tutoring. An average of about 45 students complete the course every year. The course evaluation is based on 42 - 51 student responses to a qu...

  11. Quality Assurance in Large Scale Online Course Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsombach-Ebner, Cinda

    2013-01-01

    The course design and development process (often referred to here as the "production process") at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU-Worldwide) aims to produce turnkey style courses to be taught by a highly-qualified pool of over 800 instructors. Given the high number of online courses and tremendous number of live sections…

  12. A Software Configuration Management Course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asklund, U.; Bendix, Lars Gotfred

    2003-01-01

    Software Configuration Management has been a big success in research and creation of tools. There are also many vendors in the market of selling courses to companies. However, in the education sector Software Configuration Management has still not quite made it - at least not into the university...... curriculum. It is either not taught at all or is just a minor part of a general course in software engineering. In this paper, we report on our experience with giving a full course entirely dedicated to Software Configuration Management topics and start a discussion of what ideally should be the goal...

  13. A survey of computer science capstone course literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, Robert F., Jr.

    2011-09-01

    In this article, we surveyed literature related to undergraduate computer science capstone courses. The survey was organized around course and project issues. Course issues included: course models, learning theories, course goals, course topics, student evaluation, and course evaluation. Project issues included: software process models, software process phases, project type, documentation, tools, groups, and instructor administration. We reflected on these issues and thecomputer science capstone course we have taught for seven years. The survey summarized, organized, and synthesized the literature to provide a referenced resource for computer science instructors and researchers interested in computer science capstone courses.

  14. Redefining the Subject, Redefining the Social, Reconsidering Education: George Herbert Mead's Course on Philosophy of Education at the University of Chicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesta, Gert J. J.

    1999-01-01

    George Mead's posthumously published works express a genuine philosophy of education. This paper contributes to the reconstruction of Mead's educational philosophy, examining a typescript of student notes from his course on philosophy of education at the University of Chicago. The essay discusses the typescript against the backdrop of Mead's…

  15. Development of Arithmetical Thinking: Evaluation of Subject Matter Knowledge of Pre-Service Teachers in Order to Design the Appropriate Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guberman, Raisa

    2016-01-01

    One of the key courses in the mathematics teacher education program in Israel is arithmetic, which engages in contents which these pre-service mathematics teachers (PMTs) will later teach at school. Teaching arithmetic involves knowledge about the essence of the concept of "number" and the development thereof, calculation methods and…

  16. Can the use of humor in psychotherapy be taught?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Lisa; Gabbard, Glen O

    2014-02-01

    Despite an abundance of literature detailing the potential benefits of the use of humor in therapy, humor is rarely taught to psychiatric residents as a method of therapeutic intervention. This communication attempts to explain how current understanding of attachment theory and neuroscience may assist psychiatric faculty and supervisors in their teaching of humorous therapeutic interventions. This article reviews and synthesizes the extant literature on the use of humor, as well as recent work in neuroscience, attachment theory, and mentalization. Humor can be conceptualized as an instance of implicit relational knowing and may thus contribute significantly to the therapeutic action of psychotherapy as a subcategory of "moments of meeting" between therapist and patient. However, training residents to use humor in psychotherapy requires more individualized attention in supervision and classroom seminars. Factors such as individual proclivities for humorous repartee, mentalizing capacity, and an authentic interest in adding humor to the session may be necessary to incorporate spontaneous humor into one's technique. New findings from the areas of attachment theory, neuroscience, and right-hemisphere learning are providing potential opportunities for sophisticated teaching of the use of humor in psychotherapy.

  17. Cultural Values Represented in First Certificate Masterclass Taught in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Alimorad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the crucial role textbooks play in any educational system, an urgent need is felt to examine, evaluate, and choose the most suitable ones available. This study is an attempt to critically examine and uncover the hidden curriculum in First Certificate Masterclass (FCM that is taught at Navid institute in Iran. To this aim, FCM was deeply examined to identify any instances of Western cultural norms and preferences and their potential influences on Iranian EFL (English as a Foreign Language learners’ thoughts and ideologies. Peterson’s distinction between Big “C” culture and little “c” culture constituted the theoretical framework of the study. To collect the necessary data, all passages, texts, exercises, and even listening excerpts were closely studied and evaluated by the researcher. Results indicated that among the elements of little “c” culture introduced by Peterson, preferences or tastes, food, hobbies, popular music, and popular issues could mainly be observed in the book. Furthermore, the majority of the representations introduced and depicted in the book were incompatible with Iranian Muslim people’s ideologies and beliefs. Implications of these findings for Iranian material developers and textbook writers as well as English teachers are also discussed.

  18. Should Creationism be Taught in the Public Schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennock, Robert T.

    This article discusses philosophicalarguments relevant to the question of teachingcreationism, especially with regard to developments inthe debate since the early 1990s.Section 1 reviews the newfactions within the creationist movement, and theoverlapping views from young earth to intelligentdesign creationism, as well as non-Christianvarieties. It also considers what are the relevantdifferences for the policy question for private,public schools, and for home schoolers, as well aspossible differences in what it means to teachcreationism. Sections 2 & 3 discuss the main legal argumentsthat have ruled in the public school case, as well asarguments from academic freedom, fairness, censorship,parental rights and majority rule. Section 4 evaluates theepistemological issues regarding competing claims oftruth, and the contention that excluding whatChristians know (Alvin Plantinga) amounts toviewpoint discrimination (Phillip Johnson). Section 5argues that religious protection arguments actuallyfavor excluding creationism more than including it. Section 6 considers the goals of education, especiallyDewey's views on science education, and what theseimply regarding the teaching of a theistic science. In Section 7, I review a new argument of Alvin Plantingabased upon a purported Rawlsian basic right of aparent not to have her children taught anything thatviolates her comprehensive beliefs, and show whyRawlsian agents would reject it.

  19. Changing the way science is taught through gamified laboratories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Mads; Makransky, G.; Wandall, J.

    2015-01-01

    A large proportion of high school and college students indicate that they have little interest in science, and many graduate with marginal science competencies. However, laboratory exercises, usually the most engaging part of science courses, tend to be expensive, time consuming and occasionally...... the crime-scene case in an introductory, college-level, life science course was conducted revealed that a gamified laboratory simulation can significantly increase both learning outcomes and motivation levels when compared with, and particularly when combined with, traditional teaching....

  20. The Course of Adult Experiences of Abuse in Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder and Axis II Comparison Subjects: A 10-Year Follow-Up Study

    OpenAIRE

    McGowan, Amelia; King, Hannah; Frankenburg, Frances F.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett; Zanarini, Mary C.

    2012-01-01

    The first objective of this study was to assess the rates of adult experiences of verbal, emotional, physical, and sexual abuse reported by borderline patients and axis II comparison subjects over ten years of prospective follow-up. The second objective was to determine time-to-cessation, recurrence, and new onset of each type of abuse. The Abuse History Interview was administered to 290 borderline patients and 72 axis II comparison subjects at baseline. The AHI Follow-up Version was administ...

  1. Graduate Employability and Communication Competence: Are Undergraduates Taught Relevant Skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clokie, Trish L.; Fourie, Elna

    2016-01-01

    This research establishes the role of communication education in employability by determining how employers of graduates view communication, identifying communication skills that employers view as relevant, and establishing whether these skills are included in communication courses. To achieve these aims, local businesses were surveyed, and the…

  2. A course in theoretical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Shepherd, P J

    2013-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive account of five extended modules covering the key branches of twentieth-century theoretical physics, taught by the author over a period of three decades to students on bachelor and master university degree courses in both physics and theoretical physics. The modules cover nonrelativistic quantum mechanics, thermal and statistical physics, many-body theory, classical field theory (including special relativity and electromagnetism), and, finally, relativistic quantum mechanics and gauge theories of quark and lepton interactions, all presented in a single, self-contained volume. In a number of universities, much of the material covered (for example, on Einstein’s general theory of relativity, on the BCS theory of superconductivity, and on the Standard Model, including the theory underlying the prediction of the Higgs boson) is taught in postgraduate courses to beginning PhD students. A distinctive feature of the book is that full, step-by-step mathematical proofs of all essentia...

  3. Work-Family Life Courses and Subjective Wellbeing in the MRC National Survey of Health and Development (the 1946 British birth cohort study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Rebecca; Stafford, Mai; Sacker, Amanda; McMunn, Anne

    Studies investigating the impact of combining paid work and family life on wellbeing have generally used information at one or a limited number of points in the life course, and have mainly focused on women. This study uses multi-channel sequence analysis to characterise work-family life courses across adulthood (ages 16-60) for more than 1500 men and women in the MRC National Study of Health and Development. Wellbeing at age 60-64 was captured by the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS), Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well Being Scale (WEMWBS) and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). A typology of 11 work-family groups was derived, across which there was greater variation for women. Adjusted for socioeconomic position, parental separation, adolescent internalising and externalising disorders, and health, men who had strong ties to paid work but no family had lower life satisfaction than those who combined work with parenthood and marriage (regression coefficient -2.89 (95 %CI: -5.04, -0.74); standard deviation for SWLS = 6.01). Women with weaker ties to paid work had lower life satisfaction, as did women who did not have children, compared to those who combined strong ties to paid work with marriage and parenthood. There were no significant associations between work-family life courses and WEMWBS or GHQ. This study shows that the way in which people combine work and family life may impact life satisfaction in early old age and highlights the need for policies that support combining work and family life.

  4. Condensing embryology teaching for medical students: can it be taught in 2 hours?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazzazi, Fawz; Bartlett, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Embryology forms a valuable part of the medical school curriculum. However, medical students traditionally struggle with revising embryology and appreciating its relevance. Condensing the teaching content, implementing peer-teaching methods, and increasing clinical focus in curricula have been suggested as methods to improve student engagement. Medical students at two universities were taught a condensed version of the embryological curriculum in 2 hours by final-year medical students. Students' confidence with the topics covered in the embryological curricula was assessed using anonymized precourse and postcourse questionnaires. Students were asked to further evaluate the quality, delivery, and content of the teaching in the postcourse questionnaire and were given the opportunity to provide written comments. All questions consisted of a statement stem and a five-point Likert scale. Students scored significantly higher levels of confidence with embryology after implementation of the course. They found the talk to be effectively delivered, clear, and relevant to their examinations. We have demonstrated that it is possible to design and produce an embryology teaching program that covers an undergraduate embryology curriculum in a chronological systems-based manner in 2 hours with successful results.

  5. Designing and Implementing an Information Literacy Course in the Humanities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Daugman

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available As instructors in the Z. Smith Reynolds Library information literacy program at Wake Forest University, we are expanding beyond our introductory course model to teach discipline-specific information literacy courses. Z. Smith Reynolds Library initiated an information literacy program in 2002 and currently offers a 1-credit elective, taught in 15 sections per semester. Advanced discipline-specific courses were added in Spring 2008, and include courses in the social sciences, business and economics, and the sciences. As the subject specialists for art, dance, literature, music, religion and theatre, we were charged with creating a credit-bearing arts and humanities information literacy course, LIB250: Humanities Research Sources and Strategies. In addition to our arts and humanities course content and methodologies, we incorporated web2.0 technologies throughout course design and delivery in order to streamline planning and to facilitate student engagement. In our course preparation, we utilized Google Docs for collaborative brainstorming, planning, organization and self-evaluation. Our students used Google Docs for submitting their course assignments, which included a faculty or practitioner interview and the final project for the course. The project was an annotated bibliography that extended beyond books and journal articles to include additional elements such as scholarly associations, core journals, primary sources, and major special collections related to their topics. A blog was used for the course syllabus, incorporating assignment information and supplementary resources for class topics; student blogging included reflection and feedback on each lecture as well as application of class content to their research topics. A visit to the Library's Rare Books Reading Room exposed the students to the Library's unique holdings and introduced them to rare and archival resources at other libraries. Our article presents this process from start to

  6. Integrating SD into Engineering Courses at the Delft University of Technology: The Individual Interaction Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peet, D. -J.; Mulder, K. F.; Bijma, A.

    2004-01-01

    When sustainable development (SD) is only taught in specific courses, it is questionable if engineering students are able to integrate it into their engineering practices and technical designs. For this reason, sustainability should also be integrated into regular engineering courses, e.g. design courses, materials courses or processing…

  7. Students Learn Language via a Civilization Course--A Comparison of Second Language Classroom Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafayette, Robert C.; Buscaglia, Michael

    1985-01-01

    A comparison of language skill development by college students enrolled in a content course taught in French and in a French language course found that content-course students excelled in oral skills and language attitudes and that language-course students excelled in writing skills, challenging conventional assumptions about language-learning…

  8. Reference to the Safety Engineering Undergraduate Courses to Improve the Subjects and Contents of the Certified Safety Engineer Qualification and Examination System of China

    OpenAIRE

    Haibin Qiu; Shanghong Shi; Tingdi Zhao; Yiwei Qiao; Jiangshi Zhang

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to recommend that the subjects and contents of certified safety engineers use safety engineering undergraduate curriculum system for reference. Human resources play an important role in accident prevention and loss control. Education on safety engineering develops quickly in China. Moreover, the State Administration of Work Safety and the National Human Resources and Social Security Ministry have implemented a certified safety engineer qualification and examination sy...

  9. Loneliness and Fear of Intimacy among Adolescents Who Were Taught Not To Trust Strangers during Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, Francis; Terrell, Ivanna S.; Von Drashek, Susan R.

    2000-01-01

    Explores feelings of loneliness and fear of intimacy among college students (N=80) as a function of whether or not they were taught to trust strangers during childhood. Results show that those who were taught not to trust strangers had a greater fear of intimacy. Female participants experienced more loneliness than their male counterparts. (MKA)

  10. Why Theology Can and Should Be Taught at Secular Universities: Lonergan on Intellectual Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddy, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on Bernard Lonergan's "Method in Theology" (1972) I argue that theology can be taught because personal knowledge, of which it is an instance, is at the heart of academic inquiry; and it should be taught because critical engagement with basic ways of taking one's life as a whole (religion in a broad sense) furnishes a critique of the…

  11. Society of Neurological Surgeons boot camp courses: knowledge retention and relevance of hands-on learning after 6 months of postgraduate year 1 training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selden, Nathan R; Anderson, Valerie C; McCartney, Shirley; Origitano, Thomas C; Burchiel, Kim J; Barbaro, Nicholas M

    2013-09-01

    In July 2010, the Society of Neurological Surgeons (SNS) introduced regional courses to promote patient safety and teach fundamental skills and knowledge to all postgraduate Year 1 (PGY1) trainees entering Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited US neurosurgery residency programs. Data from these courses demonstrated significant didactic learning and high faculty and resident satisfaction with hands-on training. Here, the authors evaluated the durability of learning from and the relevance of participation in SNS PGY1 courses as measured midway through PGY1 training. Resident participants were resurveyed 6 months after boot camp course attendance to assess knowledge retention and course effectiveness. Exposure to relevant hands-on experiences during PGY1 training and the subjective value of pre-residency simulated training in the courses were assessed. Ninety-four percent of all residents entering US PGY1 neurosurgical training participated in the 2010 SNS boot camp courses. One hundred sixty-four (88%) of these resident participants responded to the survey. Six months after course completion, 99% of respondents believed the boot camp courses benefited beginning neurosurgery residents and imparted skills and knowledge that would improve patient care. The PGY1 residents' knowledge of information taught in the courses was retained 6 months after initial testing (p < 0.0001). The learning and other benefits of participation in a national curriculum for residents entering PGY1 neurosurgical training were maintained 6 months after the courses, halfway through the initial training year.

  12. Effectiveness of Multimedia-Supported Education in Practical Sports Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leser, Roland; Baca, Arnold; Uhlig, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Multimedia-assisted teaching and learning have become standard forms of education. In sports, multimedia material has been used to teach practical aspects of courses, such as motor skills. The main goal of this study is to examine if multimedia technology impacts learning in the field of sport motor skill acquisition. This question was investigated during a practical sports education course involving 35 students who participated in a university soccer class. The whole course was split into two groups: Group A was taught traditionally with no assistance of multimedia and Group B was prepared with multimedia-assisted instructional units. To quantify selected skills of soccer technique and tactic, the test subjects performed a specific passing test and a tactical assessment. Furthermore, a ques-tionnaire was used to assess the subjective impressions of the test subjects. All testing instruments were applied before and after a six-week-long teaching period. A comparison of the gathered data between the two groups resulted in no significant differences, neither concerning the results of the technique test nor concerning the tactic test. However, the results of the ques-tionnaire showed a positive agreement among the participants in the usability and assistance of multimedia for the sports practical course. Considering the reviewed conditions, it can be concluded that the use of multimedia content doesn’t affect the learning effects. Key points Multimedia-assisted learning showed no positive learning effects on technical skills in soccer. Multimedia-assisted learning showed no positive learning effects on tactical skills in soccer. Students participating in practical sports courses have very good attitudes towards the use of multi-media learning material. This may be considered for motivational effects. PMID:24149313

  13. Effectiveness of multimedia-supported education in practical sports courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leser, Roland; Baca, Arnold; Uhlig, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Multimedia-assisted teaching and learning have become standard forms of education. In sports, multimedia material has been used to teach practical aspects of courses, such as motor skills. The main goal of this study is to examine if multimedia technology impacts learning in the field of sport motor skill acquisition. This question was investigated during a practical sports education course involving 35 students who participated in a university soccer class. The whole course was split into two groups: Group A was taught traditionally with no assistance of multimedia and Group B was prepared with multimedia-assisted instructional units. To quantify selected skills of soccer technique and tactic, the test subjects performed a specific passing test and a tactical assessment. Furthermore, a ques-tionnaire was used to assess the subjective impressions of the test subjects. All testing instruments were applied before and after a six-week-long teaching period. A comparison of the gathered data between the two groups resulted in no significant differences, neither concerning the results of the technique test nor concerning the tactic test. However, the results of the ques-tionnaire showed a positive agreement among the participants in the usability and assistance of multimedia for the sports practical course. Considering the reviewed conditions, it can be concluded that the use of multimedia content doesn't affect the learning effects. Key pointsMultimedia-assisted learning showed no positive learning effects on technical skills in soccer.Multimedia-assisted learning showed no positive learning effects on tactical skills in soccer.Students participating in practical sports courses have very good attitudes towards the use of multi-media learning material. This may be considered for motivational effects.

  14. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Quantum Mechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2013-09-15

    Sep 15, 2013 ... In order to participate, please send a short letter explaining your motivation to participate along with a brief curriculum vitae (including name, date of birth, gender, educational qualifications with marks obtained, teaching experience, typical courses taught, positions held, postal and e-mail addresses, phone ...

  15. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Statistical Mechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    to participate, along with a brief curriculum vitae (including name, date of birth, gender, educational qualifications, teaching experience, typical courses taught, positions held, postal and email address, and contact numbers). Applications should be sent (preferably by email) to RCSP2013@physics.mu.ac.in or by post to: ...

  16. Project for the Institution of an Advanced Course in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorani, M.; Nobili, G.

    2006-06-01

    A project for an advanced course in physics at the master level, is presented in great detail. The goal of this project is to create a specific and rigorous training for those who want to carry out experimental and theoretical research on "anomalies" in physical science, especially from the point of view of atmospheric physics, plasma physics, photonic physics, biophysics, astronomy and astrophysics. A specific training in powering mental skills is planned as well. The planned teaching program is presented as a two-year course where the following subjects are intended to be taught: cognitive techniques (I and II), radiation physics (I and II), biophysics (I and II), bioastronomy (I and II), history of physics (I and II), didactics of physics, physics of atmospheric plasmas, physics of non-stationary photonic events, physics of non-linear processes, complements of quantum mechanics, quantum informatics, research methodology in physics and astronomy, computer science methods in physics and astronomy, optoelectronics, radioelectronics. Detailed teaching programs, didactics methods, and performance evaluation, are presented for each subject. The technical content of this project is preceded by an ample introduction that shows all the reasons of this kind of physics course, particularly aimed at innovation in physical science.

  17. AP statistics crash course

    CERN Document Server

    D'Alessio, Michael

    2012-01-01

    AP Statistics Crash Course - Gets You a Higher Advanced Placement Score in Less Time Crash Course is perfect for the time-crunched student, the last-minute studier, or anyone who wants a refresher on the subject. AP Statistics Crash Course gives you: Targeted, Focused Review - Study Only What You Need to Know Crash Course is based on an in-depth analysis of the AP Statistics course description outline and actual Advanced Placement test questions. It covers only the information tested on the exam, so you can make the most of your valuable study time. Our easy-to-read format covers: exploring da

  18. Workplace Skills Taught in a Simulated Analytical Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonchik Marine, Susan

    2001-11-01

    Integration of workplace skills into the academic setting is paramount for any chemical technology program. In addition to the expected chemistry content, courses must build proficiency in oral and written communication skills, computer skills, laboratory safety, and logical troubleshooting. Miami University's Chemical Technology II course is set up as a contract analytical laboratory. Students apply the advanced sampling techniques, quality assurance, standard methods, and statistical analyses they have studied. For further integration of workplace skills, weekly "department meetings" are held where the student, as members of the department, report on their work in process, present completed projects, and share what they have learned and what problems they have encountered. Information is shared between the experienced members of the department and those encountering problems or starting a new project. The instructor as department manager makes announcements, reviews company and department status, and assigns work for the coming week. The department members report results to clients in formal reports or in short memos. Factors affecting the success of the "department meeting" approach include the formality of the meeting room, use of an official agenda, the frequency, time, and duration of the meeting, and accountability of the students.

  19. A Team Taught Interdisciplinary Approach To Physics and Calculus Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David B.

    The Special Intensive Program for Scientists and Engineers (SIPSE) at Diablo Valley College in California replaces the traditional engineering calculus and physics sequences with a single sequence that combines the two subjects into an integrated whole. The project report provides an overview of SIPSE, a section that traces the project from…

  20. The 10-year course of social security disability income reported by patients with borderline personality disorder and axis II comparison subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanarini, Mary C; Jacoby, Ryan J; Frankenburg, Frances R; Reich, D Bradford; Fitzmaurice, Garrett

    2009-08-01

    This study had two purposes. The first purpose was to assess the prevalence as well as the stability of reliance on social security disability income (SSDI) among patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). The second purpose was to detail the prevalence of aspects of adult competence reported by borderline patients who ever received disability payments and those who never received such payments. The disability status and other aspects of psychosocial functioning of 290 borderline inpatients and 72 axis II comparison subjects were assessed using a semi-structured interview at baseline and at each of the five subsequent two-year follow-up periods. Borderline patients were three times more likely to be receiving SSDI benefits than axis II comparison subjects over time, although the prevalence rate for both groups remained relatively stable. Forty percent of borderline patients on such payments at baseline were able to get off disability but 43% of these patients subsequently went back on SSDI. Additionally, 39% of borderline patients who were not on disability at baseline started to receive federal benefits for the first time. However, borderline patients on SSDI were not without psychosocial strengths. By the time of the 10-year follow-up, 55% had worked or gone to school at least 50% of the last two years, about 70% had a supportive relationship with at least one friend, and over 50% a good relationship with a romantic partner. The results of this study suggest that receiving SSDI benefits is both more common and more fluid over time for patients with BPD than previously known.

  1. Establishing Common Course Objectives for Undergraduate Exercise Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, Shawn R.

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate exercise physiology is a ubiquitous course in undergraduate kinesiology/exercise science programs with a broad scope and depth of topics. It is valuable to explore what is taught within this course. The purpose of the present study was to facilitate an understanding of what instructors teach in undergraduate exercise physiology, how…

  2. Design of a Dynamic Undergraduate Green Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    The green chemistry course taught at Westminster College (PA) incorporates nontraditional teaching techniques and texts to educate future chemists about the importance of using green chemistry principles. The course is designed to introduce green chemistry concepts and demonstrate their inherent necessity by discussing historical missteps by the…

  3. Science Academies' Refresher Course on Evolutionary Ecology of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    official and residential address, telephone and mobile numbers, academic qualifications starting from B.Sc., teaching/research experience (current research activities), courses taught, positions held and a statement indicating the reason for their interest in participation and their expectations from the Course. (Please do not ...

  4. Heart Adventures Challenge Course: A Lifestyle Education Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Beth; Buck, Marilyn M.

    1995-01-01

    The Heart Adventures Challenge Course teaches students about the circulatory system's design and functions, taking them through a model of the circulatory system in the gym. The article provides detailed instructions for presenting the unit. It describes how the course was developed and taught in a middle school. (SM)

  5. Mathematics in Literature and Cinema: An Interdisciplinary Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabrán, H. Rafael; Kozek, Mark

    2016-01-01

    We describe our team-taught, interdisciplinary course "Numb3rs in Lett3rs & Fi1ms: Mathematics in Literature and Cinema," which explores mathematics in the context of modern literature and cinema. Our goal with this course is to advance collaborations between mathematics and the written/theatre-based creative arts.

  6. A Combinatorics Course with One Goal: Authentic Mathematical Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    This article shares an example of a course in Combinatorics, taught at Adelphi University in Fall 2012, designed with a primary goal of engaging students in pursuing mathematics as mathematicians do. The course went beyond usual applications of inquiry-based learning in that students were also charged with the responsibility of posing the…

  7. An Honors Interdisciplinary Community-Based Research Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, David; Terlecki, Melissa; Watterson, Nancy; Ratmansky, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    This article describes how two faculty members at Cabrini College--one from biology and the other from psychology--incorporated interdisciplinary community-based research in an honors course on environmental watershed issues. The course, Environmental Psychology, was team-taught in partnership with a local watershed organization, the Valley Creek…

  8. Teaching a Comprehensive Orofacial Pain Course in the Dental Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonty, Arthur A.

    1990-01-01

    Two surveys about the teaching of orofacial pain in the dental curriculum are reported, and the comprehensive course taught at the University of Kentucky is described. The first survey was of 89 Kentucky course alumni. The second was of 57 dental schools concerning the status of their orofacial pain curricula. (MSE)

  9. Blending in: Collaborating with an Instructor in an Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Blended and embedded librarianship describe efforts by librarians to integrate information literacy more closely into courses, especially online. In this case study, online tutorials replace a librarian-taught research skills session for a course that has moved from face to face to online. Issues discussed include ways to integrate research skills…

  10. An Introduction to Computing: Content for a High School Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jean B.

    A general outline of the topics that might be covered in a computers and computing course for high school students is provided. Topics are listed in the order in which they should be taught, and the relative amount of time to be spent on each topic is suggested. Seven units are included in the course outline: (1) general introduction, (2) using…

  11. Evaluation of a blended learning course for teaching oral radiology to undergraduate dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavadella, A; Tsiklakis, K; Vougiouklakis, G; Lionarakis, A

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and implement a blended course (a combined face-to-face and online instruction) on undergraduate oral radiology and evaluate it by comparing its educational effectiveness (derived from students' performance and answers to questionnaires) to a conventional course's. Students' attitudes concerning the blended methodology were also registered. An original course was developed and implemented, and its electronic version was uploaded to an e-learning educational platform. The course was attended by two groups of final-year students, who were taught by either the conventional face-to-face methodology or the blended learning methodology. Students answered a series of questionnaires, before and after following the course, regarding their perceptions, attitudes and evaluation of the course. Additionally, they completed knowledge assessment tests and their grades (before and after the course) were compared. Educational effectiveness of the course was determined by analysing the results of the questionnaires and the tests. Students in the blended group performed significantly better than their colleagues of the conventional group in the post-course knowledge test, and female students of the blended group performed better than male students. Students evaluated high the course content, organisation, educational material, and the blended group students additionally appreciated the course design and clarity of instructions. Students' attitudes towards elements of blended learning (effectiveness, motivation and active engagement) were very positive. Most of the blended group students, who attended the face-to-face meeting (approx. 91%), evaluated it as helpful for summarising the subject and clarifying difficult issues. Blended learning is effective and well evaluated by dental students and can be implemented in undergraduate curriculum for teaching oral radiology. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Games in an Introductory Soil Science Course: A Novel Approach for Increasing Student Involvement with Course Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzman, Elizabeth W.

    2004-01-01

    An optional 1-credit recitation course was developed to supplement a traditionally taught 4-credit lecture-plus-laboratory course in soil science at Oregon State University. Popular, competitive games that would be familiar to students were revised to be "soils-based" and were employed in the recitation class. These games were seen as a…

  13. Local Community Studies In Social Studies Course: An Action Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuğba Selanik Ay

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Social Studies can be defined as “bonding process based on verification with social reality and dynamic information obtained as a result of this process”. In this context, it is essential to unify the Social Studies course with the real life and to benefit from the society in teaching-learning process in order to enable the learned information to be applied in the real life. In the Social Studies course, students should encounter with the real life itself. Thus, students can produce multidimensional alternative solutions for the cases they encounter and they can explain the best solution with justifications. Considering these arguments, it can be claimed that involving the subjects and studies related to the society and near environment in the Social Studies courses increases the effectiveness of Social Studies teaching. Local community studies, which are associated with the Social Studies program by means of a detailed and good plan, can draw students’ attention and thus permanent learning can occur. In this sense, teachers should benefit from the local community studies in the Social Studies course which reflects the real life.The aim of this study is to determine how local community studies will be applied in Social Studies course in the primary education schools. In line with this aim, the following research questions were addressed:1. How can the activities ofa. benefitting from institutions and organizations in local communitiesb. benefitting from people in local communitiesc. using Internet and library sourcesd. benefitting from special days and current eventswhich are carried out in the Social Studies course taught with local community studies, be arranged?2. Do the local community studies help the students determine the problems in their environments and find out the solutions for these problems?3. What are the students’ opinions about the Social Studies course taught with local community studies ?4. Does the Social Studies

  14. El proceso evaluativo en la asignatura Oftalmología durante cuatro cursos académicos The evaluative process in the Ophthalmology subject during 4 academic courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenaida F Torres Paz

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realiza un análisis del proceso evaluativo de los alumnos de 5to. año de Medicina de la Facultad de Ciencias Médicas de Pinar del Río, en su rotación por la asignatura oftalmología desde septiembre de 1996 hasta julio de 2000; se analizan la cantidad de evaluaciones frecuentes realizadas, así como las calificaciones obtenidas en examen práctico, teórico y nota final de la rotación, separando los alumnos en 2 grupos, internos y externos; se encontraron que fueron realizadas 8 evaluaciones como promedio a cada alumno, la calificación de 5 puntos predominó de forma significativa en examen práctico, teórico y nota final; no se encontraron diferencias significativas entre los internos y externosAn analysis of the evolutive process of the fifth year medical students from the Faculty of Medical Sciences of Pinar del Rio that were studying Ophthalmology from 1996 to 2000.was made. The number of frequent evaluations as well as the marks obtained in the practical and theoretical exams and the final mark of this subject were analyzed. Students were divided into 2 groups: internal and external. Every student had 8 evaluations as an average. The mark predominating in the practical, theoretical and final test was 5 points. No significant differences were found between the external and internal students

  15. Development of Graduate Course Education by Industry Collaboration in Center for Engineering Education Development, CEED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Toru; Yoshikawa, Kozo; Nakamura, Masato; Kaneko, Katsuhiko

    New education programs for engineering graduate courses, and the achievements are described. Following the previous reports on overseas and domestic internship2) , 3) , this article states other common programs ; seminars on state of technologies in industries, practical English and internationalization programs, and a program to accept overseas internship students. E-learning system to assist off-campus students is also described. All these programs are developed and conducted by specialist professors invited from industries and national institutions, in collaboration with faculty professors. Students learn how the engineering science apply to the practical problems, acquire wider view and deeper understanding on industries, and gain abilities to act in global society including communication skill, those are not taught in classrooms and laboratories. Educational effects of these industry collaborated programs is significant to activate the graduate course education, although the comprehensive evaluation is the future subject.

  16. The Flipped Classroom Improves Student Achievement and Course Satisfaction in a Statistics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    There are but a handful of experimental or quasi-experimental studies comparing student outcomes from flipped or inverted classrooms to more traditional lecture formats. In the current study, I present cumulative exam performance and student evaluation data from two sections of a statistics course I recently taught: one a traditional lecture (N =…

  17. Utrecht Radiative Transfer Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Utrecht courses taught by the late Kees Zwaan. The third exercise set was developed by Phil Judge, Mandy Hagenaar, and Thijs Krijger. Reverse acknowledgement. If you are a user of this free material you might refer to this summary and so boost my citation standing. Corrections are also welcome.

  18. Networking Course Syllabus in Accredited Library and Information Science Programs: A Comparative Analysis Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouserie, Hossam Eldin Mohamed Refaat

    2009-01-01

    The study investigated networking courses offered in accredited Library and Information Science schools in the United States in 2009. The study analyzed and compared network syllabi according to Course Syllabus Evaluation Rubric to obtain in-depth understanding of basic features and characteristics of networking courses taught. The study embraced…

  19. Self-Regulation, Goal Orientation, and Academic Achievement of Secondary Students in Online University Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuga, Julia M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the self-regulation, goal orientation, and academic achievement of 40 secondary students who completed online university courses in the sciences. Students were enrolled in one of three online university science courses. Each course was taught by a two-person team, made up of one university science professor and one…

  20. The Design and Implementation of a Career Orientation Course for Undergraduate Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Over the past several years I have taught a career orientation course at St. John Fisher College. This course was designed to increase student awareness of potential careers following their undergraduate studies in our Biology program. Additionally, the course has also been used as a model for similar experiences in our Psychology, Chemistry,…

  1. Metacognition and transfer within a course or instructional design rules and metacognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Henk

    2006-01-01

    A metacognitive strategy for doing research, included transfer, was taught in a course of nine afternoons. The success of this course raised some questions. How do the students learn? How does metacognition play a role? The course was designed in accordance with several instructional principles. The

  2. An Examination of the Outcomes of a Distance-Delivered Science Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina; McConnell, Sherry

    A comparative study was conducted to examine the effects of distance delivery on student performance in a science course. Academic outcomes and interactions were compared among students (n=44) enrolled in two sections of an upper level histology course taught over the course of a single semester by the same instructor. Eleven students took the…

  3. Student Perception of Metacognitive Activities in Entry-Level Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandall, Leah; Mamo, Martha; Speth, Carol; Lee, Don; Kettler, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    A research study investigated student perception of the use of metacognitive activities in the classroom. The courses were large enrollment (n greater than 100) introductory Plant and Soil Sciences courses taught in the fall semester. The courses implemented activities such as concept sketches or conceptual modeling to help students develop their…

  4. Are Australian medical students being taught to teach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Amy C; Liu, Michael; Dannaway, Jasan; Schoo, Adrian

    2017-10-01

    The current global trend of growth in medical training is increasing the demand for the teaching and supervision of medical students and junior doctors. If well trained and supported, junior doctors and medical students represent an important teaching resource. Unfortunately, there is limited evidence available on whether Australian medical students are equipped with teaching skills. This study aimed to gain insight into the type and amount of teaching-skills training and peer-to-peer teaching present in Australian medical schools. A survey of Australian medical schools was conducted between May and December 2014. An online 22-item questionnaire was sent to all 19 Australian medical schools. The response rate to the questionnaire was 100 per cent. Eleven Australian medical schools reported offering a teaching-skills programme, of which five were described as compulsory formal programmes. Eight schools did not offer such a programme, citing time restraints and other subjects taking higher priority. Formal peer-to-peer teaching opportunities were described by 17 schools, with 13 offering this electively. Two schools reported that they did not offer such opportunities because of time restraints, the belief that the quality of expert teaching is superior and because of a lack of staffing. The demand for the teaching and supervision of medical students and junior doctors is increasing CONCLUSIONS: Despite the increasing number of medical students and subsequently junior doctors in Australia, a minority of Australian medical schools report including a formal, compulsory teaching-skills programme. These results may imply a lost opportunity to use the positive effects of teaching-skills programmes, and are in line with studies from other countries. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  5. Sex Stereotypes of Secondary School Teaching Subjects: Male and Female Status Gains and Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Richard L.

    1974-01-01

    A survey reveals that teachers considered different subjects appropriately taught by men or by women and that higher prestige was attributed to whatever sex conformed to the subjects' sex stereotypes. (Author/KM)

  6. EFFECTS OF USE OF CARTOONS IN SOCIAL STUDIES COURSE ON STUDENTS’ ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT AND THEIR OPINIONS ABOUT THE COURSE

    OpenAIRE

    Hamza AKENGİN; Zafer İBRAHİMOĞLU

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of the use of cartoons in the social studies course on the academic achievement of students, and their opinions about the course. The Social Studies 7th Grade “Science in Time” unit was taught with cartoon-based activitieswithin the scope of the study. Qualitative and quantitative methods were used simultaneously; student achievements were assessed using three worksheets; their opinions about the course were determined using a 13-item questionnaire; and it ...

  7. Proposing a syllabus for the operation room B.S. courses in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Zahra; Irani, Mehri Doosti; Aarabi, Akram; Motlagh, Farzaneh Gholami; Farahmand, Hassan; Naji, Homayoun; Mashhadizadeh, Ahmad; Rafiian, Mohsen

    2010-12-01

    Education is based upon the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that are required for an occupation, and the changes occurring in the occupations and duties as well as in the ideals and values necessitate constant needs analysis. Furthermore, owing to the transformations in sciences, especially medical sciences, the current syllabus for the operation room courses at associate level will not meet the requirements for operation room personnel in future. Therefore, the syllabus for operation room B.S. was developed and proposed in a research project entitled "Study of the international syllabus for the operation room courses and proposing an appropriate syllabus for the courses in Iran." Since the operation room courses at B.S. level are supposed to be introduced in Iranian universities, we intended to learn about the opinions of other people related to this subject in Iran. In this research, a questionnaire was used that contained the syllabus proposed for the operation room B.S. courses, which was the result of a research project entitled "Study of the international syllabus for the operation room courses and proposing an appropriate syllabus for the courses in Iran." To develop this syllabus, 12 heads of the operation room departments in universities across Iran in which the subject matter was being taught at associate level were consulted. The study showed that 14 out of the 53 courses proposed in the syllabus had a desirability level of 100%, 22 courses were desirable at levels of 91-100%, 19 were 75-90% desirable, and no courses had a desirability level less than 75%. After carrying out some modifications to the syllabus, the problems were resolved and the opinions were again asked. When a consensus of greater than 70% was reached, the syllabus for the operation room courses at B.S. level was finalized and proposed. The regulations from the Development, Planning, and Evaluation Office of the Ministry of Health were also followed. Although all the courses showed a

  8. A Kenyan Cloud School. Massive Open Online & Ongoing Courses for Blended and Lifelong Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Jobe

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This research describes the predicted outcomes of a Kenyan Cloud School (KCS, which is a MOOC that contains all courses taught at the secondary school level in Kenya. This MOOC will consist of online, ongoing subjects in both English and Kiswahili. The KCS subjects offer self-testing and peer assessment to maximize scalability, and digital badges to show progress and completion to recognize and validate non-formal learning. The KCS uses the Moodle LMS with responsive web design to increase ubiquitous access from any device. Access is free and open, and the KCS intends to be a contextualized open educational resource for formal secondary institutions to support blended learning and a free source of non-formal education for lifelong learning. The expected outcomes are that this effort will reduce secondary school dropout rates, improve test scores, become a quality resource for blended learning, as well as validate and recognize lifelong learning in Kenya.

  9. A distance education course in statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ried, L Douglas

    2010-11-10

    To evaluate the learning outcomes of an online, distance education course in statistics for doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students. Lectures for the course were produced by the course faculty, converted into digital format (mp4), placed within the college's course management system, and video streamed to students. The course required students to interact with the course content using workbooks and simulations and with the instructor via VoIP examination reviews. A quasi-experimental study involving 4 groups of students was conducted. Second-year (P2) students were assigned randomly to 1 of 3 groups and asked to complete a precourse survey that contained: demographic information only (group 1); demographic items plus 10 items assessing statistics knowledge (group 2); or demographic items plus 20 items assessing statistics knowledge (group 3). At the end of the course, all students were given the same 20 items on the final examination (postcourse survey instrument). A control group consisting of randomly selected first-year (P1) students completed the 20-item precourse survey instrument. P1 and P2 students' scores on the 20-item precourse survey were not significantly different. Students who had taken a statistics course before entering the PharmD program scored higher on the precourse survey. P2 students in all 3 study groups had similar scores on the final examination (postcourse survey) (p = 0.43). Students can be taught the basic principles of statistics and how to use statistics to read the pharmacy and medical literature entirely online. This study has significant implications for how classes traditionally taught in the classroom might be taught at a distance using innovative instructional technologies.

  10. Research and Teaching: Does the Classroom Matter? How the Physical Space Affects Learning in Introductory Undergraduate Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kaisa E.; Young, Chadwick H.; Beyer, Adam

    2017-01-01

    We compare student learning and perception data from astronomy, physics, and geology courses taught in a traditional classroom with individual desks to the same classes taught in a large auditorium. In a large student sample (1,593 students), there is no clear difference between rooms in measures of failure rates or average final grades. However,…

  11. Designing “Theory of Machines and Mechanisms” course on Project Based Learning approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shinde, Vikas

    2013-01-01

    Theory of Machines and Mechanisms course is one of the essential courses of Mechanical Engineering undergraduate curriculum practiced at Indian Institute. Previously, this course was taught by traditional instruction based pedagogy. In order to achieve profession specific skills demanded by the i......Theory of Machines and Mechanisms course is one of the essential courses of Mechanical Engineering undergraduate curriculum practiced at Indian Institute. Previously, this course was taught by traditional instruction based pedagogy. In order to achieve profession specific skills demanded...... by the industry and the learning outcomes specified by the National Board of Accreditation (NBA), India; this course is restructured on Project Based Learning approach. A mini project is designed to suit course objectives. An objective of this paper is to discuss the rationale of this course design...

  12. The role of writing in learning less-commonly-taught languages in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Yigitoglu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates language learners' perceptions of foreign language writing and how writing influences their language learning to write in non-Latin alphabets. While most research studies have focused on writing in commonly-taught languages, recently, L2 writing researchers have begun to call for the importance of researching the language learning and writing experiences of speakers who learn less-commonly taught languages. To address this issue, this study investigates the role of writing in learning less-commonly-taught languages. The study was conducted at a large university in Istanbul, Turkey. Turkish students learning Arabic, Russian, and Chinese as foreign languages were surveyed and interviewed in different times of the semester. The results indicated that while lower level language learners stated the act of writing serves as the only way to memorize the characters, words, and sometimes sentences, higher level language learners talked about the role of communicative aspects of writing in their language learning processes.

  13. Impact of Anatomy Boot Camp on Students in a Medical Gross Anatomy Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herling, Patrick J; Mohseni, B Tanya; Hill, Derek C; Chelf, Stacy; Rickert, Jeffrey A; Leo, Jonathan T; Langley, Natalie R

    2017-06-01

    Lincoln Memorial University-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine (LMU-DCOM) offers an optional three-week summer Anatomy Boot Camp course (ABC) to facilitate students' transition into medical school and promote retention of anatomy subject matter. The pre-matriculation program is a supplemental instruction course that utilizes a small group learning format. Boot camp instruction is led by teaching assistants and two anatomy professors. Enrollees gain early exposure to Medical Gross Anatomy (MGA) course subject matter, which is taught in the fall semester, and learn study skills necessary to excel in medical school. No grade is assigned for the course, therefore participants can study without the fear of potentially affecting grades. This study evaluates the effectiveness of the LMU-DCOM ABC course using data from four consecutive summers. Independent two-sample t-tests were used to compare ABC to non-ABC students for the following variables: incoming grade point average (GPA) and Medical College Admission Test® (MCAT®) scores, MGA written and laboratory practical examination grades, and final MGA course grade. Additionally, a 26-question survey was administered to 2012-2014 boot camp participants. There were no significant differences in incoming GPA and MCAT scores. However, boot campers scored significantly higher on the first two lecture and laboratory examinations (P < 0.05) for each year of the study. Thereafter scores varied less, suggesting a faster head start for boot camp participants. Mean MGA final grade was on average 3% higher for the boot camp cohort. The survey feedback supports that the ABC course assists with the academic and social transition into medical school. Anat Sci Educ 10: 215-223. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  14. Dialogues in Performance: A Team-Taught Course on the Afterlife in the Classical and Italian Traditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosetti-Murrayjohn, Angela; Schneider, Federico

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a reflection on a team-teaching experience in which performative dialogues between co-instructors and among students provided a pedagogical framework within which comparative analysis of textual traditions within the classical tradition could be optimized. Performative dialogues thus provided a model for and enactment of…

  15. An Integrative Approach to STEM Concepts in an Introductory Neuroscience Course: Gains in Interdisciplinary Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Alo C.; Mondoux, Michelle A.; Whitt, Jessica L.; Isaacs, André K.; Narita, Tomohiko

    2017-01-01

    Neuroscience is an integrative discipline for which students must achieve broad-based proficiency in many of the sciences. We are motivated by the premise that student pursuit of proficiency in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) can be supported by awareness of the application of knowledge and tools from the various disciplines for solving complex problems. We refer to this awareness as “interdisciplinary awareness.” Faculty from biology, chemistry, mathematics/computer science, physics, and psychology departments contributed to a novel integrative introductory neuroscience course with no pre-requisites. STEM concepts were taught in “flipped” class modules throughout the semester: Students viewed brief videos and completed accompanying homework assignments independently. In subsequent class meetings, students applied the STEM concepts to understand nervous system structure and function through engaged learning activities. The integrative introduction to neuroscience course was compared to two other courses to test the hypothesis that it would lead to greater gains in interdisciplinary awareness than courses that overlap in content but were not designed for this specific goal. Data on interdisciplinary awareness were collected using previously published tools at the beginning and end of each course, enabling within-subject analyses. Students in the integrative course significantly increased their identification of scientific terms as relevant to neuroscience in a term-discipline relevance survey and increased their use of terms related to levels of analysis (e.g., molecular, cellular, systems) in response to an open-ended prompt. These gains were seen over time within the integrative introduction to neuroscience course as well as relative to the other two courses. PMID:29371849

  16. Implementing economics subjects within the context of economic kinanthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír Hobza

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For more than fifteen years, courses on "Sports Economics" and "Sportkönomie" or "Economics of Sport" - which deal with the interdisciplinary contexts of economics, economics and sport sciences - have been part of a cluster of economic subjects at sport-oriented universities and colleges in EU countries. As of yet, with only a few exceptions, this subject has not appeared in the study programs of Czech universities. This subject is taught at Czech universities in various specific forms only on selected faculties - VŠE Praha, UK in Praha, MU in Brno and UP in Olomouc. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this paper is to describe a new subject, its design, targeting and content. The secondary objective is to highlight the factual reasons for its creation as an immediate response to the many unresolved questions and problems arising from the interdisciplinary relationship between kinanthropology (in the strict sense of the word "movement", and economics considering theoretical and practical aspects of evaluating the cost-effectiveness of sports activities, grant programs, the effectiveness of the grant process, the effectiveness of sports projects etc. METHODS: The proposal for the course "Economics of Sport" methodically builds on the division of kinanthropology into subspecialties, specifically the subfield of "economic kinanthropology" (Hodaň, 2006. The syllabus of the course is based on an analysis of domestic and foreign literature, analysis of the Czech environment, analyzing primary and secondary data from the sports environment of the country - region - municipality (towns, villages - sports movements (sport associations and clubs, including analysis of sports bodies and the business environment of sports. RESULTS: The course syllabus prepared is focused on the following priority areas: micro-economic aspects of sport, macro-economic aspects of sport, public economics in sports, the interdisciplinary model of the productive aspect of

  17. Degree of vertical integration between the undergraduate program and clinical internship with respect to cervical and cranial diagnostic and therapeutic procedures taught at the canadian memorial chiropractic college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppington, Charmody; Gleberzon, Brian; Fortunato, Lisa; Doucet, Nicolea; Vandervalk, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for the cervical and cranial spine taught to students during the undergraduate program at Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College are required to be used during their internship by their supervising clinicians and, if so, to what extent these procedures are used. Course manuals and course syllabi from the Applied Chiropractic and Clinical Diagnosis faculty of the undergraduate chiropractic program for the academic year 2009-2010 were consulted and a list of all diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for the cranial and cervical spine was compiled. This survey asked clinicians to indicate if they themselves used or if they required the students they were supervising to use each procedure listed and, if so, to what extent each procedure was used. Demographic information of each clinician was also obtained. In general, most diagnostic procedures of the head and neck were seldom used, with the exception of postural observation and palpation. By contrast, most cervical orthopaedic tests were often used, with the exception of tests for vertigo. Most therapeutic procedures were used frequently with the exception of prone cervical and "muscle" adjustments. There was a low degree of vertical integration for cranial procedures as compared to a much higher degree of vertical integration for cervical procedures between the undergraduate and clinical internship programs taught. Vertical integration is an important element of curricular planning and these results may be helpful to aid educators to more appropriately allocate classroom instruction.

  18. How spirituality is understood and taught in New Zealand medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambie, D; Egan, R; Walker, S; MacLeod, R

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this research was to explore how spirituality is currently understood and taught in New Zealand Medical Schools. A mixed methods study was carried out involving interviews (n = 14) and a survey (n = 73). The first stage of the study involved recorded semi-structured interviews of people involved in curriculum development from the Dunedin School of Medicine (n = 14); which then informed a cross-sectional self-reported electronic survey (n = 73). The results indicate that spirituality is regarded by many involved in medical education in New Zealand as an important part of healthcare that may be taught in medical schools, but also that there is little consensus among this group as to what the topic is about. These findings provide a basis for further discussion about including spirituality in medical curricula, and in particular indicate a need to develop a shared understanding of what 'spirituality' means and how it can be taught appropriately. As a highly secular country, these New Zealand findings are significant for medical education in other secular Western countries. Addressing spirituality with patients has been shown to positively impact a range of health outcomes, but how spirituality is taught in medical schools is still developing across the globe.

  19. Application of Research-Informed Teaching in the Taught-Postgraduate Education of Maritime Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ling; Pan, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Despite numerous studies of the research-teaching nexus, applying research-informed teaching (RiT) to taught-postgraduate education has been largely overlooked. This knowledge gap is particularly significant in the maritime law discipline given the fast-growing business of international shipping and logistics. This paper aims to examine the impact…

  20. Student-Taught Review Sessions: Fostering Communication Skills and Reinforcing Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Melanie R.

    2001-01-01

    Uses student-taught review sessions to reinforce basic concepts and to practice giving an oral presentation to an attentive audience. Indicates that the program was successful in helping students develop oral presentation skills while they were experiencing peer teaching. (ASK)

  1. Preparing Undergraduates for Paraprofessional Positions: What, Where, when, and how Are Ethical Issues Taught?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haemmerlie, Frances M.; Matthews, Janet R.

    1988-01-01

    Raises questions about undergraduate preparation in ethical issues and discusses appropriate paraprofessional roles. Suggests what should be taught, how it might be included in the curriculum, and ways that ethics might be addressed. Stresses the importance of teaching about ethical issues because psychology graduates obtain employment in human…

  2. An Analytical Framework for Internationalization through English-Taught Degree Programs: A Dutch Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotake, Masako

    2017-01-01

    The growing importance of internationalization and the global dominance of English in higher education mean pressures on expanding English-taught degree programs (ETDPs) in non-English-speaking countries. Strategic considerations are necessary to successfully integrate ETDPs into existing programs and to optimize the effects of…

  3. English Communication Skills: How Are They Taught at Schools and Universities in Oman?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mahrooqi, Rahma

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate, from a student perspective, how English communication skills are taught in Oman's schools and higher education institutions. Previous research has documented the lack of communicative ability in English among school and higher education graduates in Oman (Al-Issa, 2007; Moody, 2009). However, the reasons…

  4. Collaborative Classroom Management in a Co-Taught Primary School Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rytivaara, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how teachers manage their classroom in co-taught lessons. The data were collected by observing and interviewing a pair of primary school teachers. The most important influence of collaboration on classroom management seemed to be the emotional support of another adult, and the opportunity to use different…

  5. Color in the Classroom: How American Schools Taught Race, 1900-1954

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, Zoe

    2011-01-01

    Between the turn of the twentieth century and the "Brown v. Board of Education" decision in 1954, the way that American schools taught about "race" changed dramatically. This transformation was engineered by the nation's most prominent anthropologists, including Franz Boas, Ruth Benedict, and Margaret Mead, during World War II.…

  6. Evaluation of WorldView Textbooks; Textbooks Taught at a Military University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Masoud; Jodai, Hojat

    2012-01-01

    This paper intends to evaluate the WorldView series textbooks of English learning, which are being taught at an Iranian military university foreign language center. No textbook evaluation had been conducted by the university administration prior to the introduction of the textbooks to the language program. Theorists in the field of ELT textbook…

  7. What's Used and What's Useful? Exploring Digital Technology Use(s) among Taught Postgraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Michael; Finger, Glenn; Selwyn, Neil

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the digital technologies that taught postgraduate students engage with during their studies, what these technologies are used for and how useful they are perceived to be. The article draws upon data gathered from a survey of 253 masters and postgraduate diploma/certificate students across two universities in Australia.…

  8. A Comparative Analysis regarding Pictures Included in Secondary School Geography Textbooks Taught in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasar, Okan; Seremet, Mehmet

    2007-01-01

    This study brings in a comparative approach regarding pictures involved in secondary school (14-17 ages) textbooks taught in Turkey. In this respect, following the classification of pictures (line drawings and photographs) included in secondary school education geography textbooks, evaluation of the photographs in books in question in terms of…

  9. Role Modelling in Manager Development: Learning that Which Cannot Be Taught

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warhurst, Russell

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This is an empirical article which aims to examine the extent and nature of management role modelling and the learning achieved from role modelling. The article argues that the spread of taught management development and formal mentoring programmes has resulted in the neglect of practice-knowledge and facets of managerial character…

  10. Experiences of Visually Impaired Students in Community College Math Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, S. Tomeka

    Blind and visually impaired students who attend community colleges face challenges in learning mathematics (Forrest, 2010). Scoy, McLaughlin, Walls, and Zuppuhaur (2006) claim these students are at a disadvantage in studying mathematics due to the visual and interactive nature of the subject, and by the way mathematics is taught. In this qualitative study six blind and visually impaired students attended three community colleges in one Mid-Atlantic state. They shared their experiences inside the mathematics classroom. Five of the students were enrolled in developmental level math, and one student was enrolled in college level math. The conceptual framework used to explore how blind and visually impaired students persist and succeed in math courses was Piaget's theory on constructivism. The data from this qualitative study was obtained through personal interviews. Based on the findings of this study, blind and visually impaired students need the following accommodations in order to succeed in community college math courses: Accommodating instructors who help to keep blind and visually impaired students motivated and facilitate their academic progress towards math completion, tutorial support, assistive technology, and a positive and inclusive learning environment.

  11. On the Cutting Edge Workshop on Effective and Innovative Course Design: A Model for Designing Rigorous Introductory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewksbury, B. J.; MacDonald, R. H.

    2004-12-01

    As part of a professional development program for faculty in the geosciences, the NSF-funded program On the Cutting Edge (http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/) has developed and offered workshops for geoscience faculty that guide participants through a stimulating process designed to help faculty members articulate goals and design effective and innovative courses that both meet those goals and assess outcomes. Of approximately 150 faculty members who have participated in the workshops, more than 120 have designed introductory courses in topics ranging from physical geology to Earth systems to historical geology to oceanography. The method of course design taught through these workshops leads to the development of rigorous, student-centered introductory courses. Our method of course design begins, not with a list of content items, but with setting goals by answering the question, "What do I want my students to be able to do on their own when they are done with my class?", rather than the question, "What do I want my students to know in this subject?" Focusing on what faculty members want students to be able to do, rather than on what topics should be covered by the faculty member, promotes designing courses in which students are actively engaged in doing geoscience. This course design method emphasizes setting goals for students involving higher order thinking skills (e.g., analysis, synthesis, design, formulation, prediction, interpretation, evaluation), rather than lower order thinking skills (e.g., identification, description, recognition, classification). For example, the goal of having students be able to evaluate the geologic hazards in an unfamiliar region involves higher order thinking skills and engages the student in deeper analysis than simply asking students to recall and describe examples of geologic hazards covered in class. This goal also has imbedded in it many lower order thinking skills tasks (e.g., identification, description). Rigor comes in

  12. Simulator Building as a Problem-Based Learning Approach for Teaching Students in a Computer Architecture Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Li-minn; Seng, Kah Phooi

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a Problem-Based Learning (PBL) approach to support and promote deeper student learning in a computer architecture course. A PBL approach using a simulator building activity was used to teach part of the course. The remainder of the course was taught using a traditional lecture-tutorial approach. Qualitative data was collected…

  13. Problem-Centered Design and Personal Teaching Style: An Exploratory Study of Youguang Tu's Course on Philosophy of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hongde

    2016-01-01

    Youguang Tu is a contemporary Chinese philosopher of education. His course on philosophy of education had a significant impact on his students. This exploratory study examines how Tu designed and taught this course. Ultimately, there are two reasons why Tu's course had such a significant influence on his students. The first is that Tu used…

  14. Transforming the Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horodyskyj, L.; Ben-Naim, D.; Semken, S. C.; Anbar, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    Traditional large lecture classes are fundamentally passive and teacher-centered. Most existing online courses are as well, including massive open online courses (MOOCs). Research tells us that this mode of instruction is not ideal for student learning. However, the unique attributes of the online environment have thus far been mostly underutilized. We hypothesize that new tools and the innovative curricula they enable can foster greater student engagement and enhance learning at large scale. To test this hypothesis, over the past three years, Arizona State University developed and offered "Habitable Worlds", an online-only astrobiology lab course. The course curriculum is based on the Drake Equation, which integrates across disciplines. The course pedagogy is organized around a term-long, individualized, game-inspired project in which each student must find and characterize rare habitable planets in a randomized field of hundreds of stars using concepts learned in the course. The curriculum allows us to meaningfully integrate concepts from Earth, physical, life, and social sciences in order to address questions related to the possibility of extraterrestrial life. The pedagogy motivates students to master concepts, which are taught through interactive and adaptive inquiry-driven tutorials, featuring focused feedback and alternative pathways that adjust to student abilities, built using an intelligent tutoring system (Smart Sparrow's Adaptive eLearning Platform - AeLP). Through the combination of the project and tutorials, students construct knowledge from experience, modeling the authentic practice of science. Because the tutorials are self-grading, the teaching staff is free to dedicate time to more intense learner-teacher interactions (such as tutoring weaker students or guiding advanced students towards broader applications of the concepts), using platforms like Piazza and Adobe Connect. The AeLP and Piazza provide robust data and analysis tools that allow us to

  15. Incorporating code-based software in an introductory statistics course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doehler, Kirsten; Taylor, Laura

    2015-08-01

    This article is based on the experiences of two statistics professors who have taught students to write and effectively utilize code-based software in a college-level introductory statistics course. Advantages of using software and code-based software in this context are discussed. Suggestions are made on how to ease students into using code with minimal anxiety.

  16. A Course Connecting Astronomy to Art, History, and Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Don

    2015-01-01

    For the past 20 years the author has taught an Honors College course combining astronomy and the humanities. The purpose of this note is to give examples of methods that can be adapted to classroom use for topics including night sky paintings by Vincent van Gogh, Edvard Munch, and Claude Monet, historical events influenced by astronomical factors,…

  17. Agile Preparation within a Traditional Project Management Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Jeffrey P.; McDaniel, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Agile software approaches have seen a steady rise over a decade and a half, but agile's place in the information systems (IS) undergraduate curriculum is far from settled. While agile concepts may arguably be taught in multiple places in the IS curriculum, this paper argues for its inclusion in a project management course. This paper builds on…

  18. Life Insurance: A Suggested Adult Business Education Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Continuing Education Curriculum Development.

    This course is aimed at the buyer or potential buyer of life insurance for the purpose of helping him to a better understanding of life insurance and of aiding him in making decisions about his own life insurance coverage. It is structured to be taught one evening a week for six to eight weeks. Each session would last about two hours. The course…

  19. Creating a Course in Global Business Ethics: A Modest Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhooge, Lucien J.

    2011-01-01

    The College of Management at the Georgia Institute of Technology has placed more emphasis on the topic of business ethics in the past few years. Business ethics has always been a required component of the legal environment of business course whether taught at the undergraduate or graduate levels. More recently, the college has introduced an…

  20. Incorporating Code-Based Software in an Introductory Statistics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doehler, Kirsten; Taylor, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This article is based on the experiences of two statistics professors who have taught students to write and effectively utilize code-based software in a college-level introductory statistics course. Advantages of using software and code-based software in this context are discussed. Suggestions are made on how to ease students into using code with…

  1. FRENCH LANGUAGE: A BASIC G.S COURSE FOR NNAMDI ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JONATHAN

    2016-07-01

    Jul 1, 2016 ... French language is an international language and the official language of the four countries that surround ... in French, the language is only taught as a service course to five departments irrespective of the NUC ... man from these countries has a good knowledge of two international languages (English and.

  2. The Advertising Marketplace and the Media Planning Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Carla V.; Slater, Jan; Robbs, Brett

    2000-01-01

    Surveys media professionals as to how major marketplace changes are affecting the way media planning courses should be taught. Offers recommendations to teach students to: think conceptually, critically, and creatively; use numbers to determine and support their media decisions; contend with audience fragmentation and advertising clutter;…

  3. Enhancing Motivation in Online Courses with Mobile Communication Tool Support: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantorn Chaiprasurt

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mobile technologies have helped establish new channels of communication among learners and instructors, potentially providing greater access to course information, and promoting easier access to course activities and learner motivation in online learning environments. The paper compares motivation between groups of learners being taught through an online course based on an e-learning system with and without the support of mobile communication tools, respectively. These tools, which are implemented on a mobile phone, extend the use of the existing Moodle learning management system (LMS under the guidance of a mobile communication tools framework. This framework is considered to be effective in promoting learner motivation and encouraging interaction between learners and instructors as well as among learner peers in online learning environments. A quasi-experimental research design was used to empirically investigate the influence of these tools on learner motivation using subjective assessment (for attention, relevance, confidence, satisfaction, and social ability and objective assessment (for disengagement, engagement, and academic performance. The results indicate that the use of the tools was effective in improving learner motivation, especially in terms of the attention and engagement variables. Overall, there were statistically significant differences in subjective motivation, with a higher level achieved by experimental-group learners (supported by the tools than control-group learners (unsupported by the tools.

  4. Impact of distance education on academic performance in a pharmaceutical care course.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Nogueira Gossenheimer

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare the performance of pharmacy students from a Pharmaceutical Care course, taught in both distance education (DE and campus-based formats using active methodologies. For two semesters, students (n = 82 taking the course studied half the subject in the distance education format and half in person. Questionnaires were applied at the beginning of the semester aimed to outline the demographic profile of the students. Their grade in the course was evaluated to determine their performance. The Module 1 (Information on Medication average on the campus-based was 7.1225 and on DE was 7.5519, (p = 0.117. The Module 2 (Pharmaceutical Services average on the campus-based was 7.1595 and on distance education was 7.7025, (p = 0.027*. There was a difference in learning outcomes in the Pharmaceutical Care Course between face-to-face and distant education. Therefore, the student performance was better in the distance education module, indicating distance education can be satisfactorily used in Pharmacy Programs.

  5. Impact of distance education on academic performance in a pharmaceutical care course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossenheimer, Agnes Nogueira; Bem, Tamires; Carneiro, Mára Lucia Fernandes; de Castro, Mauro Silveira

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the performance of pharmacy students from a Pharmaceutical Care course, taught in both distance education (DE) and campus-based formats using active methodologies. For two semesters, students (n = 82) taking the course studied half the subject in the distance education format and half in person. Questionnaires were applied at the beginning of the semester aimed to outline the demographic profile of the students. Their grade in the course was evaluated to determine their performance. The Module 1 (Information on Medication) average on the campus-based was 7.1225 and on DE was 7.5519, (p = 0.117). The Module 2 (Pharmaceutical Services) average on the campus-based was 7.1595 and on distance education was 7.7025, (p = 0.027*). There was a difference in learning outcomes in the Pharmaceutical Care Course between face-to-face and distant education. Therefore, the student performance was better in the distance education module, indicating distance education can be satisfactorily used in Pharmacy Programs.

  6. Evaluar para integrar los contenidos en un curso: el caso de la asignatura modelos y simulación (EVALUATE TO INTEGRATE CONTENTS IN A COURSE: SUBJECT MODELS AND SIMULATION CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Escalante Saiach Jaquelina Edit

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Resumen“Modelos y Simulación” es una asignatura optativa de la Carrera de Licenciatura en Sistemas de Información, de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales y Agrimensura (Universidad Nacional del Nordeste en Corrientes, Argentina. En este trabajo se describen las estrategias de evaluación aplicadas en la asignatura en el año 2007, con el propósito de propiciar situaciones en las cuales los estudiantes no se limiten a la mera adquisición y acumulación del conocimiento, sino que adquieran destrezas para saber dónde, cómo y cuándo lo deben aplicar en la resolución de problemas basados en casos reales. Este trabajo se compone de cuatro secciones. En esta primera sección se caracteriza la asignatura objeto de estudio y la modalidad de dictado. En la segunda sección se describen las instancias de evaluación abordadas en el año 2007, orientadas a integrar vertical y horizontalmente los contenidos. En la tercera sección se sintetizan los resultados obtenidos. En la cuarta sección se comentan algunas conclusiones y futuros trabajos.Abstract “Models and Simulation” is an optional subject from the degree course of Information Systems from the Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences and Surveying (Northeastern National University – U.N.NE. in Corrientes, Argentina. In this work, evaluation strategies used in the subject in 2007 are described. They aim to create situations in which students are not limited to the simple acquisition and accumulation of knowledge but develop skills to know where, how and when to apply them to solve problems based in real cases. This work is composed by four sections. In the first one, the study target and dictation format is revised. In the second section, the 2007 evaluation topics are described and they are focused to integrate contents vertical and horizontally. In the third one, the obtained results are summarized. In the last section, some conclusions and future works are commented.

  7. A hidden history: A survey of the teaching of eugenics in health, social care and pedagogical education and training courses in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, H L; Steels, S L

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge and understanding of how eugenics has historically affected the lives of people with intellectual disabilities is vital if professionals are to mount an effective defence against its contemporary influences. An online survey of European providers of health, social care and pedagogical education and training courses was undertaken to find out how the history of eugenics is taught to those wishing to work in services for people with intellectual disabilities. Two hundred and six educational providers were contacted with a response rate of 35.9% (n = 74). Findings showed that the majority of educational providers recognize the importance of including the history of eugenics in their courses, although fewer feel confident that it is sufficiently well covered to prepare future professionals for their role as protector. Course content differs on both the emphasis given to the different components of this history, time dedicated to its delivery and the extent to which it is used to inform legal and ethical debate. Specific recommendations for developing the way in which this subject area is taught are outlined. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. EAD IN ACCOUNTING: AN ANALYSIS OF ITS EFFECTIVENESS IN THE USE OF ACCOUNTANCY COURSE AT THE FEDERAL UNIVERSITY OF RIO GRANDE DO SUL, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Kovara Vieira

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to demonstrate with which approach and in which disciplines Distance Education (DE can improve learning, from the perception of the students of Accounting Course of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The study starts from the issue relating to the perceptions of students of accountancy course regarding to which disciplines may have enhanced their learning with this type of education. Therefore, a quantitative and explanatory focus is used as a methodology of research, applied through methodological procedures of case study, by use of questionnaire. All results showed that the bulk of the students integrate the young age group and have great abilities in the use of technological devices. They also suggest that the disciplines that are not directly related to the accounting area should be taught in the distance format, that there is need of teacher’s encouragement so that students to participate in forums and distance learning activities as well as the unwillingness of students to performing of a course taught entirely in a distance way. Due to the results obtained with the application of this research, it is suggested that UFRGS should establish an assessment of the subjects that could be offered in a distance way, and teachers could also be trained, aiming to improve the learning process.

  9. Book discussion course: timely topics for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Donna F; Woodson, Deidra; Jones, Dee

    2014-01-01

    Several library faculty members at the Louisiana State University Health Shreveport Health Sciences Library offered a book discussion course as an elective for first-year medical students. This article provides details on how the librarians developed, taught, and evaluated this elective. The librarians took a team-teaching approach, required the students to read two books, and outlined the criteria for participation. At the end of the course, the students completed an evaluation, commenting on positive and negative aspects of the course. The elective proved to be successful, and the librarians look forward to offering the course again in the spring of 2014.

  10. French Courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. The next session will take place from 28 January to 5 April 2013. Oral Expression This course is aimed for students with a good knowledge of French who want to enhance their speaking skills. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. The next session will take place from 28 January to 5 April 2013. Writing professional documents in French These courses are designed for non-French speakers with a very good standard of spoken French. The next session will take place from 28 January to 5 April 2013. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister.

  11. Digital Learning in Higher Education: A Training Course for Teaching Online--Universidade Aberta, Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, José António; José António, Susana; Goulão, Maria de Fátima; Barros, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    This paper uses qualitative evidence to describe, explore and discuss the progress of the online teaching training course taught at the Universidade Aberta to Portuguese and foreign professors of higher education institutions. As this is an entirely online course, its pedagogical design results from the combination of the basics of open distance…

  12. Developing and Implementing an Interdisciplinary Origins Course at a State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Keith; Totten, Iris

    2009-01-01

    A truly interdisciplinary course was successfully developed and taught that presented an overview of the historical sciences with an emphasis on the nature of scientific inquiry and its relationship to other ways of knowing. The course included contributions from faculty in physics, biology, geology, philosophy, and English. (Contains 2 figures.)

  13. Overcoming Disciplinary and Institutional Barriers: An Interdisciplinary Course in Economic and Sociological Perspectives on Health Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Bruce H.; Stone, Jack H.

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe an interdisciplinary course team-taught by an economist and a sociologist. Historically mindful of the less than amicable relationship between these disciplines, these colleagues developed a course that attempted to illuminate the different perspectives of economics and sociology in relation to selected health themes. Such a…

  14. Effects of Jigsaw II Technique on Academic Achievement and Attitudes to Written Expression Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to explore the effects of a cooperative technique Jigsaw II (experimental group, n=42) and instructional teacher-centered teaching method (control group, n=38) on Turkish language teacher education department students' attitudes to written expression course (a course in which writing skills were taught), their academic achievement,…

  15. Cinderella and Sleeping Beauty: Developing a Course on Disney and Fairytale Movies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonds-Raacke, Jennifer M.

    2008-01-01

    I developed and taught a course titled The Psychology of Disney and Fairytale Movies. This course examined the psychological effects of mass communication on behavior and thought, specifically the stereotyping of women and men and the concept of true love as portrayed in Disney and Fairytale movies. This paper describes the (a) development of the…

  16. Ideas to Consider for New Chemical Engineering Educators: Part 1 (Courses Offered Earlier in the Curriculum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Jason M.; Silverstein, David L.; Visco, Donald P., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Chemical engineering faculty members are often asked to teach a core course that they have not taught before. The immediate thought is to come up with some new ideas to revolutionize that core course in ways that will engage students and maximize learning. This paper summarizes the authors' selection of the most effective, innovative approaches…

  17. A Joint Venture Model for Teaching Required Courses in "Ethics and Engineering" to Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandvoort, H.; Van Hasselt, G. J.; Bonnet, J. A. B. A. F.

    2008-01-01

    We present our experience, spanning more than 10 years of teaching a course on "ethics and engineering" for a group of MSc programmes in applied sciences at Delft University of Technology. The course is taught by a team of teachers from the faculty of Applied Sciences and from the department of Philosophy of the Faculty of Technology,…

  18. Language, Culture and Dissonance: A Study Course for Globally Minded Teachers with Possibilities for Catalytic Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon-Muniz, Anaida; SooHoo, Suzanne; Brignoni, Evangelina

    2010-01-01

    The study explores the impact of a course taught abroad, with the objective of preparing globally minded intercultural educators proficient in second language and culture pedagogy for English learners. The findings suggest that the course content is more powerful when teacher candidates experience cultural and linguistic immersion simultaneously.…

  19. Bridging the Gap: Embedding Communication Courses in the Science Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandciu, Eric; Stewart, Jaclyn J.; Stoodley, Robin; Birol, Gülnur; Han, Andrea; Fox, Joanne A.

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe a model for embedding science communication into the science curriculum without displacing science content. They describe the rationale, development, design, and implementation of two courses taught by science faculty addressing these criteria. They also outline the evaluation plan for these courses, which emphasize broad…

  20. Scientific Computing for Chemists: An Undergraduate Course in Simulations, Data Processing, and Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Charles J.

    2017-01-01

    The Scientific Computing for Chemists course taught at Wabash College teaches chemistry students to use the Python programming language, Jupyter notebooks, and a number of common Python scientific libraries to process, analyze, and visualize data. Assuming no prior programming experience, the course introduces students to basic programming and…

  1. Green Chemistry and Sustainability: An Undergraduate Course for Science and Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Erin M.

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate lecture course in Green Chemistry and Sustainability has been developed and taught to a "multidisciplinary" group of science and nonscience majors. The course introduced students to the topics of green chemistry and sustainability and also immersed them in usage of the scientific literature. Through literature…

  2. Educational Impact of Digital Visualization Tools on Digital Character Production Computer Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Langeveld, Mark Christensen

    2009-01-01

    Digital character production courses have traditionally been taught in art departments. The digital character production course at the University of Utah is centered, drawing uniformly from art and engineering disciplines. Its design has evolved to include a synergy of computer science, functional art and human anatomy. It gives students an…

  3. Science of Food and Cooking: A Non-Science Majors Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Deon T.; Bachman, Jennifer K.

    2009-01-01

    Recent emphasis on the science of food and cooking has been observed in our popular literature and media. As a result of this, a new non-science majors course, The Science of Food and Cooking, is being taught at our institution. We cover basic scientific concepts, which would normally be discussed in a typical introductory chemistry course, in the…

  4. Evaluation of an ESP Course of Qur'anic Sciences and Tradition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Hadi; Davari, Ameneh; Yunus, Melor Md

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation is defined as matching process that matches the needs to available solutions. The present study is an attempt to evaluate English for specific purposes (ESP) course book on "the ESP Course of Qur'anic Sciences and Tradition" taught at some universities in Iran. To achieve this goal, a researcher-made questionnaire and an…

  5. Design of a Food Chemistry-Themed Course for Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    The physical science curriculum design at Georgia Gwinnett College requires a theme-based course (lecture and group work, and laboratory) for nonscience majors. Increased student engagement is anticipated when science topics are taught in the context of a topic of which students can select during course registration. This paper presents the course…

  6. French language: A basic G.S course for Nnamdi Azikiwe University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The finding indicated that some universities have adopted French as one of the GS courses. It suggested that French language be taught in UNIZIK as a GS course. The work was based on NUC benchmark minimum academic standards for undergraduate progammes in Nigerian universities (BMMAS) of 2007. Key words: ...

  7. Becoming Animated When Teaching Physics, Crafts and Drama Together: A Multidisciplinary Course for Student-Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallunki, Veera; Karppinen, Seija; Komulainen, Kauko

    2017-01-01

    This article examines a physics course for pre-service primary teachers in which physics, crafts and drama were taught together by connecting the standpoints of crafts and drama. The study was carried out by three university educators from these disciplines during an advanced optional course for student-teachers at the University of Helsinki in…

  8. The Development and Assessment of an Online Microscopic Anatomy Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbeau, Michele L.; Johnson, Marjorie; Gibson, Candace; Rogers, Kem A.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing enrollment in post-secondary institutions across North America, along with an increase in popularity of and demand for distance education is pressuring institutions to offer a greater number and variety of courses online. A fully online laboratory course in microscopic anatomy (histology) which can be taught simultaneously with a…

  9. An Investigation of Marketing Educators' Approach to Teaching International Marketing in the Introductory Marketing Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Robert J.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A survey of 122 college teachers of marketing courses investigated the extent and methods of their inclusion of international marketing into the course curriculum. Findings suggest that, among those teaching international marketing, how they acquired their international knowledge had a significant effect on how they taught international marketing.…

  10. Teaching Information Systems Courses in China: Challenges, Opportunities, and Lessons for US Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryling, Meg; Rivituso, Jack

    2016-01-01

    In Fall of 2014, as a result of a Chinese faculty visit to an upstate New York college to observe American pedagogical techniques in teaching information systems, two US faculty members were invited to teach two separate courses at a vocational college in southeast China. The courses to be taught in China were selected by the Chinese faculty and…

  11. Exercise, Nutrition and You: An Off-Campus Course for Grades 2?12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Ann C.; Mauzy-Melitz, Debra K.

    2005-01-01

    Since interest in science classes has declined recently and obesity, especially in youth, continues to increase, an exercise physiology-based course was taught in public parks to promote active-learning science and healthy living. The course emphasized and integrated exercise, nutrition, and health during a 3-h session. Following an introduction,…

  12. The Impact of Collaboration, Empowerment, and Choice: An Empirical Examination of the Collaborative Course Development Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, K. Damon; Heinze, Timothy C.; Meuter, Matthew L.; Chapman, Kenneth J.

    2017-01-01

    This research empirically tests collaborative course development (CCD)-a pedagogy presented in the 2016 "Marketing Education Review Special Issue on Teaching Innovations". A team of researchers taught experimental courses using CCD methods (employing various techniques including syllabus building, "flex-tures," free-choice…

  13. Combining Content and Elements of Communication into an Upper-Level Biochemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Carli P.; Pellock, Samuel J.; Cunningham, Rebecca L.; Cox, James R.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes how a science communication module was incorporated into an advanced biochemistry course. Elements of communication were taught synergistically with biochemistry content in this course in an effort to expose students to a variety of effective oral communication strategies. Students were trained to use these established…

  14. How We Teach Introductory Bible Courses: A Comparative and Historical Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Collin; LeMon, Joel M.

    2016-01-01

    This study identifies the dominant modes of biblical interpretation being taught in introductory Bible courses through a qualitative analysis of course syllabi from three institutional contexts: evangelical Christian colleges, private colleges, and public universities. Despite a proliferation of methods and scholarly approaches to the Bible, this…

  15. A Course on Experimental Design for Different University Specialties: Experiences and Changes over a Decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Luaces, Victor; Velazquez, Blanca; Dee, Valerie

    2009-01-01

    We analyse the origin and development of an Experimental Design course which has been taught in several faculties of the Universidad de la Republica and other institutions in Uruguay, over a 10-year period. At the end of the course, students were assessed by carrying out individual work projects on real-life problems, which was innovative for…

  16. Contextualizing the Intermediate Financial Accounting Courses in the Global Financial Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Robert; Webinger, Mariah

    2011-01-01

    This paper represents an attempt to incorporate concepts and issues stemming from the global financial crisis (GFC) into the typical Intermediate Accounting, two-course sequence as taught in North American colleges and universities. The teaching approach which the authors advocate embeds the GFC throughout these courses. The main expected outcome…

  17. Enhancing Motivation in Online Courses with Mobile Communication Tool Support: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiprasurt, Chantorn; Esichaikul, Vatcharaporn

    2013-01-01

    Mobile technologies have helped establish new channels of communication among learners and instructors, potentially providing greater access to course information, and promoting easier access to course activities and learner motivation in online learning environments. The paper compares motivation between groups of learners being taught through an…

  18. Investigating Art Objects through Collaborative Student Research Projects in an Undergraduate Chemistry and Art Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Gary; Haaf, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Inspired in part by Chemistry Collaborations, Workshops, and Community of Scholars workshops, the Chemistry and Art course offered at Ithaca College is team-taught by a chemist and an art historian, underscoring the complementary nature of the two disciplines. The course, populated primarily by nonscience majors, highlights the importance of using…

  19. Teaching chemical product design to engineering students: course contents and challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Anne Ladegaard; Kiil, Søren

    Chemical product design is not taught in the same way as traditional engineering courses like unit operations or transport phenomena. This paper gives an overview of the challenges that we, as teachers, have faced when teaching chemical product design to engineering students. Specific course...... contents and relevant teaching methods are discussed....

  20. Launch of technical training courses for programmers

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    This autumn, two new technical training courses have been launched for scientists and engineers at CERN who undertake programming tasks, particularly in C and C++. Both courses are taught by Andrzej Nowak, an expert in next-generation and cutting-edge computing technology research.   The training courses are organised in cooperation with CERN openlab and are sponsored by the CERN IT department – there is only a nominal registration fee of 50 CHF. This is an opportunity not to be missed! Computer architecture and hardware-software interaction (2 days, 26-27 October) The architecture course offers a comprehensive overview of current topics in computer architecture and their consequences for the programmer, from the basic Von Neumann schema to its modern-day expansions. Understanding hardware-software interaction allows the programmer to make better use of all features of available computer hardware and compilers. Specific architectural ...

  1. English courses

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    New courses University of Cambridge ESOL examination course We will be starting two new courses in October leading to the Cambridge First Certificate in English (level B2 of the European Framework) and the Cambridge Advanced English (level C1) examinations. These courses will consist of two semesters of 15 weeks with two two-hourly classes per week. There will be an average of eight students per class. Normally the examination will be taken in June 2011 but strong participants could take it earlier. People wishing to take these courses should enrol: http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9:1927376177842004::NO::X_COURSE_ID,X_STATUS:4133%2CD and they will then be required to take a placement test to check that their level of English is of an appropriate level. Please note that we need a minimum of seven students enrolled to open a session. For further information please contact Tessa Osborne 72957. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: From 4th October 2010 to 5th Feb...

  2. A Multidimensional Software Engineering Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzilay, O.; Hazzan, O.; Yehudai, A.

    2009-01-01

    Software engineering (SE) is a multidimensional field that involves activities in various areas and disciplines, such as computer science, project management, and system engineering. Though modern SE curricula include designated courses that address these various subjects, an advanced summary course that synthesizes them is still missing. Such a…

  3. Teaching with technology: learning outcomes for a combined dental and dental hygiene online hybrid oral histology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Singh, Amul H; Overman, Pamela R

    2013-06-01

    Among the challenges leaders in dental and allied dental education have faced in recent years is a shortage of well-qualified faculty members, especially in some specialty areas of dentistry. One proposed solution has been the use of technology. At the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Dentistry, the departure of a faculty member who taught the highly specialized content in oral histology and embryology provided the opportunity to implement distance delivery of that course. The course is taught once a year to a combined group of dental and dental hygiene students. Previous to spring semester of 2009, the course was taught using traditional face-to-face, in-class lectures and multiple-choice examinations. During the spring semesters of 2009, 2010, and 2011, the course was taught using synchronous and asynchronous distance delivery technology. Outcomes for these courses (including course grades and performance on the National Board Dental Examination Part I) were compared to those from the 2006, 2007, and 2008 courses. Students participating in the online hybrid course were also given an author-designed survey, and the perceptions of the faculty member who made the transition from teaching the course in a traditional face-to-face format to teaching in an online hybrid format were solicited. Overall, student and faculty perceptions and student outcomes and course reviews have been positive. The results of this study can provide guidance to those seeking to use technology as one method of curricular delivery.

  4. Laboratory techniques in plant molecular biology taught with UniformMu insertion alleles of maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    An undergraduate course - Laboratory Techniques in Plant Molecular Biology - was organized around our research application of UniformMu insertion alleles to investigate mitochondrial functions in plant reproduction. The course objectives were to develop students’ laboratory, record keeping, bioinfor...

  5. Assessment of primary school students’ level of understanding the concepts of 2nd grade life sciences course based on different variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altıntaş Gülşen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The course of Life Sciences is one of the pivot courses taught in the first three years of primary school. Ensuring children get to know their environment and gain correct information related to their problems by making them investigate their natural and socio-cultural environment as well as providing them with necessary information, skills and behaviors for environmental adaptation are among the main purposes of Life Sciences course. The concepts to be instilled in students in line with these purposes are important. Since concepts are mostly intellectual and non-physical, they can only exist tangibly through examples. This study aims to assess Primary School Students’ Level of Understanding the Concepts of 2nd Grade Life Sciences Course Based on Different Variables. 17 concepts included in the 2nd Grade Life Sciences course within the subject of School Excitement were addressed within the study, and students were requested to define and exemplify these concepts. A total of 102 students from five different primary schools of upper-middle and lower socioeconomic classes located in Manisa and Istanbul were included in the study in line with the intentional maximum diversity sample selection. The answers given by students for each concept were categorized and analyzed in terms of liking or disliking home, school, technology and the course of Life Sciences.

  6. A comparative evaluation of teaching methods in an introductory neuroscience course for physical therapy students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Gilbert M.

    Background and purpose. Use of computer based instruction (CBI) in physical therapy (P.T.) education is growing. P.T. educators have reported few studies regarding the effectiveness of CBI compared to lecture based instruction, and none have specifically addressed the area of neuroscience. The purpose of this study was to determine whether CBI would be a better alternative than lecture for teaching introductory neuroscience information to first year P.T. students. Subjects. This study was conducted over two years, with 28 participants in 2003 and 34 in 2004. Methods. A randomized, cross-over design was employed for this investigation. The course in which the study took place was divided into two sections with an exam after each. Both sections included 5 one hour lectures (or 5 equivalent CBI modules) and a two hour laboratory experience. Exams consisted of 30 multiple choice questions. Students in one group participated in CBI during the first half of the course and lecture during the second half. The order of participation was reversed for students in the other group. A review exam (60 multiple choice questions) was also taken by participants six months post-participation in the course. Exam scores, study time, course development costs, and student opinions regarding teaching methods were collected after each section of the course and analyzed using quantitative and qualitative methods. Results. There were no statistically significant differences in "within course" or review exam scores between participant groups based on instructional method, however, CBI taught students spent less time studying. Student opinions did not distinguish a major preference for either instruction method. Many students preferred that CBI be used as a complimentary rather than mutually exclusive instructional method. Lecture based instruction was clearly more cost effective than CBI. Conclusion. In this study, lecture based instruction was clearly the better choice of teaching method in

  7. Blended Learning Course Format on Moodle: A Model for Beginner Level Foreign Language Courses in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Azaryad Shechter

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a pedagogically sound, user-friendly course model for teaching beginner level foreign languages on the Moodle platform, based upon a Turkish course developed and currently being taught by the author. The paper shows that an integrated course layout which combines monthly chronological units with thematic ones facilitates teaching and learning. Guidelines for designing an aesthetically appealing, uniquely tailored course website are given, which make a variety of pertinent and interesting educational materials easy to locate. An engaging and enriching course site of this kind raises the students’ motivation and enhances learning. Foreign language teachers are encouraged to adopt this model in its entirety or with idiosyncratic adjustments to revamp their courses and achieve improved pedagogical outcomes. Likewise, instructors who do not have Moodle can adapt the concept of the integrated course layout to implement it with other learning management systems (LMSs.

  8. The Cosmology Distinction Course in NSW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollow, Robert P.; McAdam, W. B.; O'Byrne, J.; White, Graeme L.; Holmes, R.; Webb, J. K.; Allen, L. R.; Zealey, W. J.; Hafner, R.

    1994-04-01

    The Cosmology Distinction Course is a new one-year course to be introduced for Year 12 candidates in the 1994 Higher School Certificate (HSC) examinations in NSW. It is one of three challenging courses of study that will enrich the HSC for talented students who accelerate and complete part of the HSC one year early. The courses will be taught through distance learning and will include residential seminars. They will be implemented on behalf of the Board of Studies by Charles Sturt University and the University of New England. The Cosmology Course is organized into nine modules of course work covering historical and social aspects of cosmology, observational techniques, key observatons and the various models developed--Newtonian, de Sitter, Friedmann, Lemaitre, steady-state, quasi-steady-state and big bang. Assessment will be through assignments, exams and a major project. As the first Distinction Course in a scientific area, the Cosmology Course represents an exciting and important educational initiative that needs the cooperation of NSW astronomers and, in return, promises to benefit the astronomical and general scientific community in Australia.

  9. Language courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 5 May to 11 July 2014. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://hr-training.web.cern.ch/hr-training/ or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (kerstin.fuhrmeister@cern.ch). Oral Expression This course is aimed for students with a good knowledge of French who want to enhance their speaking skills. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session will take place from 5 May to 11 July 2014. Writing professional documents in French These courses are designed for non-French speakers with a very good standard of spoken French. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session...

  10. French courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 29 April to 5 July 2013. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (kerstin.fuhrmeister@cern.ch). Oral Expression This course is aimed for students with a good knowledge of French who want to enhance their speaking skills. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session will take place from 29 April to 5 July 2013. Writing professional documents in French These courses are designed for non-French speakers with a very good standard of spoken French. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session will take place from 29 April to 5 July...

  11. French courses

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2012-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 2nd May to 6th July 2012. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister.   Oral Expression This course is aimed for students with a good knowledge of French who want to enhance their speaking skills. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session will take place from 2nd May to 6th July 2012.   Writing professional documents in French These courses are designed for non-French speakers with a very good standard of spoken French. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session will take place from 2nd May to ...

  12. English course

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next sessions will take place: From 3rd October 2011 to beginning of February 2012 (break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister, tel. 70896. Oral Expression The next sessions will take place from 3rd October 2011 to beginning of February 2012 (break at Christmas). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be on average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister, tel. 70896. Writing Professional Documents in English - Administrative Wr...

  13. Language Courses

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 1st March to end of June 2010 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages or contact Nathalie Dumeaux, tel. 78144. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 1st March to end of June 2010 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be on average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) More details Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 1st March to end of June 2010 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is designed for people with a good le...

  14. NEW COURSES

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Hands-on Training Support for the Windows 2000 Migration Please note that the set of hands-on courses listed below has been added to the Technical Training Programme to support the labwide migration to Windows 2000. If there is enough demand it is planned to organise sessions throughout the summer period. Anyone interested is asked to register for the course(s) of their choice by accessing the web course description from : http://training.web.cern.ch/Training/Welcome.html As soon as a minimum number of applications have been received dates will be fixed and published in the weekly bulletin and on the web. Please note that in order to get maximum benefit from these courses it is important to have Windows 2000 installed on your computer either before or immediately after you attend the session. People who do not have access to a Windows 2000 PC are strongly recommended to plan their training to coincide with the migration of their PC. A migration plan has been prepared in agreement with the NICE 2000 divisiona...

  15. Integrating international relations and environmental science course concepts through an interactive world politics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, K. H.; Kesgin, B.

    2012-12-01

    scientific research and uncertainty on this topic. One of the global issues that students must face in the simulation is the melting of "Ice Mountain," which threatens to flood coastal cities before the end of the game; only through cooperative action can the "Globe of Frost" be built to potentially stop the melting. In addition, the game fundamentally integrates tradeoffs between resources, pollution, immigration, education, health, defense, and other sustainability-related subjects throughout. Pre- and post-course surveys will include both environmental science/sustainability and political science concepts that may not be explicitly taught in both courses, but that students should have a greater awareness of through their interaction in the Statecraft simulation. Student attitudes toward integration of the course material will also be assessed.

  16. A case study of students' experiences in an on-line college physics course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozen, Kadriye

    Online courses are a new paradigm in education. Many universities have adopted these courses to provide instruction to a diverse population. There were numerous issues that were addressed when delivering online courses. However, there were not many case studies conducted to take into account the students' reactions and perceptions of online learning. A qualitative case study was designed to bring out the details from the viewpoint of the students by using multiple sources of data. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected in the fall of 1999. Data sources included surveys, email messages between the students and the instructor, interviews and field notes from observations and informal meetings. Qualitative data were analyzed using grounded theory principles. Content analysis was applied to find out the type of email interaction between the students and the instructor. One Sample t-test was applied to find out the difference between successful students and less successful students. Fifteen students who enrolled in an introductory College Physics course at the large midwestern university participated in this study. This study focused on the students' experiences with an online course as taught via the Internet. To attain deeper understanding of student learning experiences with the course, the study looked at the elements of how students respond to the instructional system delivering the materials online, the learning environments created online by the instructor, the learning materials provided online or offline, the nature of interactions, sources of motivation, advantages and issues associated with online learning and technology-mediated learning. The findings indicated that the online learning puts a high premium on the students becoming independent learners. Therefore, the students needed to have a specific study guideline that provides direction on how to approach the subject and physics problems including some highlights pertaining to the subject

  17. Continuing professional education in Eritrea taught by local obstetrics and gynaecology residents: Effects on work environment and patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzolf, Susan; Zekarias, Berhane; Tedla, Kifleyesus; Woldeyesus, Dawit Estifanos; Sereke, Dawit; Yohannes, Abraham; Asrat, Kibreab; Weaver, Marcia R

    2015-01-01

    Education and training can improve the quality of health care. We evaluated a course taught by Obstetrics/Gynaecology residents on the work environment and maternal/neonatal outcomes at Orotta Maternity Hospital. Participants were given a Standardised Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) to measure work environment before and after training. Maternal/neonatal outcomes were extracted from hospital logbooks. Neonatal quality indicators were: adverse score index, weighted score index and severity score index. SAQ response rate was 77.6% (45/58) pre-training and 95.6% (43/45) post-training. Mean total SAQ score increased from 3.07 to 3.32 out of 5 points (p < 0.05). Changes in relative risk (RR) were not statistically significant for maternal [maternal death ratio of RR (RRR) =1.08, 95% CI: 0.20-5.84 and blood transfusion RRR = 0.90, 95% CI: 0.74 -1.09] or neonatal outcomes (intrapartum death RRR = 1.24, 95% CI: 0.57-2.75, neonatal death RRR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.26-3.24, neonatal transfer RRR = 1.02, 95% CI: 0.81-1.27, and Apgar < 7 at 5 minutes RRR = 1.20, 95% CI: 0.83-1.73). Neonatal quality indicators did not change significantly. Utilising residents to teach staff-developed training within a hospital setting was feasible and may improve the work environment. Impact on maternal/neonatal outcomes is not evident but continued follow-up is important.

  18. Foundation doctors in Anaesthesia: should they be taught to administer an anaesthetic?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williamson Sean

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anaesthetic pre-registration house officer posts have been available since 1997. With the change to postgraduate medical training introduced in 2005, these posts have become vital building blocks for Foundation Programmes. Discussion We debate the skills that new Foundation Programme doctors in such posts should be taught, particularly whether administration of an anaesthetic holds an important place. The opinion of college tutors prior to the institution of the foundation programme is included. These were obtained from a postal questionnaire. Summary We maintain that teaching how to administer an anaesthetic remains an important learning objective and something that should be actively pursued.

  19. Entrepreneurship Course

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    +++++++ Turn your idea into a company +++++++ Starting date: Thursday 23 October 2003 Timing: Every Thursday from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Venue: University of Geneva, Sciences II Duration: 1 semester Registration: http://www.startupcafe.ch/learn More Information: info@createswitzerland.ch Deadline to submit the application: 10 October 2003. Check the CREATE website for alternative dates and venues. The course is restricted to 30 pre-selected participants. The course covers important aspects of launching a business from initial idea to growth and international expansion and addresses two kind of skills requested to start a high tech company which are divided into personal skills (entrepreneur skills) and those to start a company (Start-up tools). The 14 week course is free of charge. For any question, please, contact Ilias.Goulas@cern.ch from the Technology Transfer Group (http://cern.ch/ttdb).

  20. The home care teaching and learning process in undergraduate health care degree courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Ana Paula; Lacerda, Maria Ribeiro; Maftum, Mariluci Alves; Bernardino, Elizabeth; Mello, Ana Lúcia Schaefer Ferreira de

    2017-07-01

    Home care, one of the services provided by the health system, requires health practitioners who are capable of understanding its specificities. This study aimed to build a substantive theory that describes experiences of home care teaching and learning during undergraduate degree courses in nursing, pharmacy, medicine, nutrition, dentistry and occupational therapy. A qualitative analysis was performed using the grounded theory approach based on the results of 63 semistructured interviews conducted with final year students, professors who taught subjects related to home care, and recent graduates working with home care, all participants in the above courses. The data was analyzed in three stages - open coding, axial coding and selective coding - resulting in the phenomenon Experiences of home care teaching and learning during the undergraduate health care degree courses. Its causes were described in the category Articulating knowledge of home care, strategies in the category Experiencing the unique nature of home care, intervening conditions in the category Understanding the multidimensional characteristics of home care, consequences in the category Changing thinking about home care training, and context in the category Understanding home care in the health system. Home care contributes towards the decentralization of hospital care.

  1. Massive open online courses in health sciences from Latin American institutions: A need for improvement? [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Culquichicón

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Massive open online courses (MOOCs have undergone exponential growth over the past few years, offering free and worldwide access to high-quality education. We identified the characteristics of MOOCs in the health sciences offered by Latin American institutions (LAIs. Methods: We screened the eight leading MOOCs platforms to gather their list of offerings. The MOOCs were classified by region and subject. Then, we obtained the following information: Scopus H-index for each institution and course instructor, QS World University Ranking® 2015/16 of LAI, and official language of the course. Results: Our search identified 4170 MOOCs worldwide. From them, 205 MOOCs were offered by LAIs, and six MOOCs were health sciences related. Most of these courses (n = 115 were offered through Coursera. One health science MOOC was taught by three instructors, of which only one was registered in Scopus (H-index = 0. The remaining five health science MOOCs had solely one instructor (H-index = 4 [0–17]. The Latin American country with the highest participation was Brazil (n = 11. Conclusion: The contribution of LAI to MOOCs in the health sciences is low.

  2. Course Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Tenna Doktor Olsen

    2015-01-01

    Welcome to your first DESIGN course: ‘Mapping Meals and their Spaces’. I hope you are ready to learn about the emerging discipline of Food Design and the so‐called “Design Thinking” perspective, as well as how to implement the interdisciplinary knowledge characterizing your new education Integrat...

  3. Course Layout

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    present roll Presentation roll Interactive Media Element This is an interactive diagram of a MATLAB course layout covering 16 topics in 4 different main areas: Basics of MATLAB, Numerical Methods in MATLAB, Symbolic Manipulations in MATLAB, Mathematical Modeling in MATLAB and Simulink AE2440 Introduction to Digital Computation

  4. Language courses

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses: The next session will take place from 7 October to 13 December 2013. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. Oral Expression: This course is aimed for students with a good knowledge of French who want to enhance their speaking skills. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. The next session will take place from 7 October to 13 December 2013. Writing professional documents in French: These courses are designed for non-French speakers with a very good standard of spoken French. The next session will take place from 7 October to 13 December 2013. Cours d'anglais général et professionnel: La prochaine session se déroulera du 7 octobre 2013 au 31 janvier 2014 (interruption à Noël). Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Oral Expression: F...

  5. Language courses

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Tessa Osborne, tel.16 23 40. Oral Expression The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc., depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students). Writing Professional Documents in English The next...

  6. Language Courses

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will be held from 26 February or 5 March to end of June 2007 (1/2 week's break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Françoise Benz, tel. 73127. Oral Expression The next session will be held from 26 February or 5 March to end of June 2007 (1/2 week's break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-play, etc., depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students). Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will be held from 26 February or 5 March to e...

  7. Where is leadership training being taught in U.S. dental schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichman, Russell S; Parkinson, Joseph W

    2012-06-01

    Since leadership is vital in all professions and organizations, the purpose of this study was to determine where in dental schools leadership for predoctoral students is taught and to what degree it is emphasized in order to establish a baseline from which to generate recommendations for best practices. Academic deans of U.S. dental schools were surveyed to determine where in the curriculum leadership is taught and emphasized. The response rate was 39 percent returned completed surveys. These responses were representative of all geographic regions of the country, with equitable distribution between private and public institutions. The results showed that leadership training is delivered in many different parts of the curriculum and at various levels. Generally, the respondents indicated that leadership education is delivered in the setting of practice management, community out-reach, or public health. In some cases, specific training programs are dedicated to leadership development. Thus, several models for leadership development were identified, showing design flexibility in addressing regional and national needs. In the future, it would be of value to assess the effectiveness of the various models and whether single or multiple pathways for leadership training are most beneficial.

  8. Where is Leadership Training Being Taught in U.S. Dental Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichman, Russell S.; Parkinson, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    Leadership is vital in all professions and organizations. Our purpose was to determine where in dental schools leadership is taught, and to what degree it is emphasized so that we could establish a base line from which to generate recommendations for best practices. Therefore we surveyed all US Deans of Academic Affairs in Dental Schools to determine where in the curriculum leadership is taught and emphasized. Our results showed that leadership training is delivered in many different parts of the curriculum, and at various levels. Generally, respondents indicated that leadership education is delivered either in the setting of practice management, community outreach or in public health settings. In some cases, specific training programs are dedicated specifically to leadership development. Thus several models for leadership development were identified showing design and flexibility to address regional and national needs. In the future it would be of value to assess the effectiveness of the different models and whether single or multiple pathways for leadership training are most beneficial. PMID:22659699

  9. Asynchronous video streaming vs. synchronous videoconferencing for teaching a pharmacogenetic pharmacotherapy course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moridani, Majid

    2007-02-15

    To compare students' performance and course evaluations for a pharmacogenetic pharmacotherapy course taught by synchronous videoconferencing method via the Internet and for the same course taught via asynchronous video streaming via the Internet. In spring 2005, a pharmacogenetic therapy course was taught to 73 students located on Amarillo, Lubbock, and Dallas campuses using synchronous videoconferencing, and in spring 2006, to 78 students located on the same 3 campuses using asynchronous video streaming. A course evaluation was administered to each group at the end of the courses. Students in the asynchronous setting had final course grades of 89% +/- 7% compared to the mean final course grade of 87% +/- 7% in the synchronous group (p = 0.05). Regardless of which technology was used, average course grades did not differ significantly among the 3 campus sites. Significantly more of the students in the asynchronous setting agreed (57%) with the statement that they could read the lecture notes and absorb the content on their own without attending the class than students in the synchronous class (23%; chi-square test; p videos over delivery of content using the synchronous or asynchronous method alone.

  10. Expanding subjectivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda; Soldz, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A major theme in recent psychoanalytic thinking concerns the use of therapist subjectivity, especially “countertransference,” in understanding patients. This thinking converges with and expands developments in qualitative research regarding the use of researcher subjectivity as a tool to understa...

  11. Short course groundwater modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boekelman, R.H.; Rientjes, T.H.M.

    1991-09-01

    Hydrology is the science dealing with the occurrence, behavior and the chemical and physical properties of water on the surface and in the subsurface of the earth. Obviously, hydrological models can be of a very different nature and of course it is impossible to cover the whole field in a workshop. The aim of the present course is to gain more insight in the behavior and interaction of surface and groundwater, quantitatively and qualitatively and also to become more familiar with the use of personal computers and software. Groundwater modelling has become an important tool in water management. This is due to the fact, that pollution of groundwater by acid rain, industrial activities etc. often necessitating extra purification and in some cases even closing of a well field. Groundwater models focused on these phenomena may help to find the best solution. The course comprises two subjects. The first subject described in chapter I deals with the theory of groundwater hydrology. The second subject deals with the theory of groundwater modelling.

  12. Pre-Service Teachers' Mind Maps and Opinions on STEM Education Implemented in an Environmental Literacy Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sümen, Özlem Özçakir; Çalisici, Hamza

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to implement a science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education approach in an environmental education course. The research involved the design and implementation of STEM activities by researchers, as part of the environmental education course taught in the second year of a Primary School Teaching undergraduate…

  13. Revisions of Physical Geology Laboratory Courses to Increase the Level of Inquiry: Implications for Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissom, April N.; Czajka, C. Douglas; McConnell, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The introductory physical geology laboratory courses taught at North Carolina State University aims to promote scientific thinking and learning through the use of scientific inquiry-based activities. A rubric describing five possible levels of inquiry was applied to characterize the laboratory activities in the course. Two rock and mineral…

  14. MEMSlab: A Practical MEMS Course for the Fabrication, Packaging, and Testing of a Single-Axis Accelerometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundbacher, R.; Hoetzel, J. E.; Hierold, C.

    2009-01-01

    A microelectro-mechanical systems (MEMS) laboratory course (MEMSlab) in the Mechanical and Process Engineering Department at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich), is presented. The course has been taught for four years and has been attended primarily by Master's students from mechanical and electrical engineering; since fall…

  15. Recreation Hard Skills Courses for Credit: A Collaborative Effort between the Academic Department and the Outings Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin, David M.; Stuessy, Thomas L.; Poff, Raymond A.

    At Indiana University, the Department of Recreation and Park Administration and Indiana University Outdoor Adventures (IUOA) work together to offer university students for-credit courses in recreation skills. Since 1997, graduate students trained and directed by IUOA have taught 1-credit courses in specific outdoor skills, based on nationally…

  16. What's Not in the Syllabus: Faculty Transformation, Role Modeling and Role Conflict in Immersion Service-Learning Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Beth; Esposito, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Immersion service-learning courses provide increased opportunities for faculty and students to experience the transformational effects of service-learning. This paper focuses on the experiences of faculty and the responses of students who took part in several immersion service-learning courses taught between 2005 and 2007 during the Winter term at…

  17. Integration of Instructional Design Principles to Online Courses and Faculty Training in Three Puerto Rican Institutions of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Wanda W.

    2011-01-01

    Research on how the principles of instructional design are taught in faculty training courses for online teaching and how faculty members incorporate these principles into their online courses is limited. This gap in the research literature is especially pronounced when considering the relatively new online learning context of Puerto Rico's higher…

  18. Should general surgery residents be taught laparoscopic pyloromyotomies? An ethical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Mauricio A; Hartin, Charles W; McCullough, Laurence B

    2014-01-01

    The authors examine the ethical implications of teaching general surgery residents laparoscopic pyloromyotomy. Using the authors' previously presented ethical framework, and examining survey data of pediatric surgeons in the United States and Canada, a rigorous ethical argument is constructed to examine the question: should general surgery residents be taught laparoscopic pyloromyotomies? A survey was constructed that contained 24 multiple-choice questions. The survey included questions pertaining to surgeon demographics, if pyloromyotomy was taught to general surgery and pediatric surgery residents, and management of complications encountered during pyloromyotomy. A total of 889 members of the American Pediatric Surgical Association and Canadian Association of Paediatric Surgeons were asked to participate. The response rate was 45% (401/889). The data were analyzed within the ethical model to address the question of whether general surgery residents should be taught laparoscopic pyloromyotomies. From an ethical perspective, appealing to the ethical model of a physician as a fiduciary, the answer is no. We previously proposed an ethical model based on 2 fundamental ethical principles: the ethical concept of the physician as a fiduciary and the contractarian model of ethics. The fiduciary physician practices medicine competently with the patient’s best interests in mind. The role of a fiduciary professional imposes ethical standards on all physicians, at the core of which is the virtue of integrity, which requires the physician to practice medicine to standards of intellectual and moral excellence. The American College of Surgeons recognizes the need for current and future surgeons to understand professionalism, which is one of the 6 core competencies specified by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Contracts are models of negotiation and ethically permissible compromise. Negotiated assent or consent is the core concept of contractarian

  19. A design build activity for a “design build” course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Christensen, Jørgen Erik; Simonsen, Claus

    2011-01-01

    describes this course activity. The “Design Build” course revolves around the activity that the students should build a model house of their own during the course. The only demands stipulated are that the house should be made as a scale 1:20 model of a realistic house and that is should be thermally......This paper deals with the CDIO course “Design Build”, which is taught in the first semester of the Bachelor of Engineering education at the Technical University of Denmark’s Department of Civil Engineering. A specific design build assignment has been developed for the course, and the paper...

  20. How to Fit Teaching of Information Literacy in with Students’ Needs: an on-line Credit Course Model from the University of Tartu Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilve Seiler

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available E-learning is widely acknowledged as a possible methodology to teach information literacy. Nevertheless, studies reveal that information literacy courses as separate credit-bearing courses taught entirely in the form of e-learning, and using methods of active learning, are rare. This study analyzes the performance of a model for an e-learning course in information literacy in which learners with various backgrounds can participate, and where assignments can be completed according to personal information needs. Although the course does not provide face-to-face contact, learner-centred personal guidance is applied, as every student has an instructor — a subject librarian familiar with information sources in her field. The course is based on a constructivist learning approach: active learning techniques are used and critical thinking is developed through reflection and analysis of fellow students’ assignments. The preliminary qualitative content analysis of feedback and reflections from graduates indicates that students value knowledge and skills obtained from the course. Moreover, information literacy as a course is considered necessary and guided e-learning is quite suitable for gaining information literacy. We conclude that, in order to be beneficial and valuable for students, information literacy does not necessarily have to be integrated into the teaching process of another subject. However, it should be connected with these studies, enabling students to obtain skills for information searching and learning necessary for successful graduation. At the same time, e-learning as a tool helps to promote information literacy in the academic environment in all segments of the university, integrating it with curricula.

  1. A Comparison of the Development and Delivery of Two Short-Term Study-Abroad Thermal Sciences Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobitz, Frank

    2014-11-01

    Short-term study-abroad engineering courses provide an opportunity to increase the international awareness and global competency of engineering students. Two different approaches have been taken in the past years in the development and delivery of two three-week long thermal sciences courses. A senior-level elective Topics in Fluid Mechanics course was taught twice in Marseille (France) in January 2010 and 2013. A sophomore-level Introduction to Thermal Sciences course was offered in London (United Kingdom) in July 2014. Both courses were developed due to a strong student desire for engineering study-abroad courses and an effort by the home institution to internationalize its curriculum. The common goals of the two courses are an effective teaching of their respective technical content combined with a meaningful international experience. The two courses differed in their respective settings: Topics in Fluid Mechanics was taught at Aix-Marseille University and included strong interactions with local faculty and students. Introduction to Thermal Sciences, however, was taught in a cluster of seven courses offered by the home institution in London. The courses were assessed using surveys, student reflection papers, course evaluations, and instructor observations.

  2. Young children can be taught basic natural selection using a picture-storybook intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, Deborah; Emmons, Natalie A; Seston Schillaci, Rebecca; Ganea, Patricia A

    2014-04-01

    Adaptation by natural selection is a core mechanism of evolution. It is also one of the most widely misunderstood scientific processes. Misconceptions are rooted in cognitive biases found in preschoolers, yet concerns about complexity mean that adaptation by natural selection is generally not comprehensively taught until adolescence. This is long after untutored theoretical misunderstandings are likely to have become entrenched. In a novel approach, we explored 5- to 8-year-olds' capacities to learn a basic but theoretically coherent mechanistic explanation of adaptation through a custom storybook intervention. Experiment 1 showed that children understood the population-based logic of natural selection and also generalized it. Furthermore, learning endured 3 months later. Experiment 2 replicated these results and showed that children understood and applied an even more nuanced mechanistic causal explanation. The findings demonstrate that, contrary to conventional educational wisdom, basic natural selection is teachable in early childhood. Theory-driven interventions using picture storybooks with rich explanatory structure are beneficial.

  3. Teachers' experiences of English-language-taught degree programs within health care sector of Finnish polytechnics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkajarvi, Marianne; Eriksson, Elina; Kekki, Pertti

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to research teachers' experiences of the English-Language-Taught Degree Programs in the health care sector of Finnish polytechnics. More specifically, the focus was on teachers' experiences of teaching methods and clinical practice. The data were collected from eighteen teachers in six polytechnics through focus group interviews. Content analysis was used to analyse the data. The results suggested that despite the positive interaction between students and teachers, choosing appropriate teaching methods provided a challenge for teachers, due to cultural diversity of students as well as to the use of a foreign language in tuition. Due to students' language-related difficulties, clinical practice was found to be the biggest challenge in the educational process. Staffs' attitudes were perceived to be significant for students' clinical experience. Further research using stronger designs is needed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Hand and Eye Dominance in Sport: Are Cricket Batters Taught to Bat Back-to-Front?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, David L; Runswick, Oliver R; Allen, Peter M

    2016-09-01

    When first learning to bimanually use a tool to hit a target (e.g., when chopping wood or hitting a golf ball), most people assume a stance that is dictated by their dominant hand. By convention, this means that a 'right-handed' or 'left-handed' stance that places the dominant hand closer to the striking end of the tool is adopted in many sports. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the conventional stance used for bimanual hitting provides the best chance of developing expertise in that task. Our study included 43 professional (international/first-class) and 93 inexperienced (back-to-front' and have a significant disadvantage in the game. Moreover, the results may generalize more widely, bringing into question the way in which other bimanual sporting actions are taught and performed.

  5. Practices in Less Commonly Taught Languages: Factors that Shape Teachers’ Beliefs and Guide Their Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Saydee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this qualitative study, the researcher investigated teachers’ perceptions about effective teaching and learning methodologies and discovered the factors that shape teachers’ beliefs and lead them to prefer certain methodologies. Data was collected through interviews of Arabic, Chinese, Dari, Pashto, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, and Persian teachers (N=25 and their adult students, ten per teacher (N=241 at institutions of higher education in Southern California. In general, the teachers had similar views about effective teaching strategies and similar factors influenced their views- all the teachers emphasized the languages they teach differ from commonly taught languages; and, therefore, teaching and learning strategies should also be different. Knowing the factors that shape teachers’ beliefs significantly contributes to the field of teacher education. In particular, educators will become more cognizant of content to include in their teacher training program curriculum to better influence teachers and alter their instructional methodologies.

  6. The 1966 Flooding of Venice: What Time Taught Us for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trincardi, Fabio; Barbanti, Andrea; Bastianini, Mauro; Benetazzo, Alvise; Chiggiato, Jacopo; Papa, Alvise; Pomaro, Angela; Sclavo, Mauro; Tosi, Luigi; Umgiesser, Georg

    2017-04-01

    Upon this fiftieth anniversary of the storm that flooded the historical Italian centers of Venice and Florence, we review the event from the perspective of today's scientific knowledge. In particular, we discuss the components of relative sea level rise in Venice that contribute to flooding, the monitoring networks and forecast capabilities that are currently in place, and the engineering actions adopted since the 1966 flood to safeguard the Venice lagoon and the city. Focusing on the meteo-oceanographic aspects, we also show how sheer luck at the time avoided a much worse disaster in Venice. Reference Trincardi, F., A. Barbanti, M. Bastianini, A. Benetazzo, L. Cavaleri, J. Chiggiato, A. Papa, A. Pomaro, M. Sclavo, L. Tosi, and G. Umgiesser. 2016. The 1966 flooding of Venice: What time taught us for the future. Oceanography 29(4), https://doi.org/10.5670/ oceanog.2016.87.

  7. Depth image super-resolution via semi self-taught learning framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Furong; Cao, Zhiguo; Xiao, Yang; Zhang, Xiaodi; Xian, Ke; Li, Ruibo

    2017-06-01

    Depth images have recently attracted much attention in computer vision and high-quality 3D content for 3DTV and 3D movies. In this paper, we present a new semi self-taught learning application framework for enhancing resolution of depth maps without making use of ancillary color images data at the target resolution, or multiple aligned depth maps. Our framework consists of cascade random forests reaching from coarse to fine results. We learn the surface information and structure transformations both from a small high-quality depth exemplars and the input depth map itself across different scales. Considering that edge plays an important role in depth map quality, we optimize an effective regularized objective that calculates on output image space and input edge space in random forests. Experiments show the effectiveness and superiority of our method against other techniques with or without applying aligned RGB information

  8. Effect of working characteristics and taught ergonomics on the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders amongst dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Saad A; Chew, Kwai Yee

    2013-04-02

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are one of the main occupational health hazards affecting dental practitioners. This study was conducted to assess the prevalence of Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorder (WMSD) amongst dental students. Possible correlations with the working environment and ergonomics taught in Malaysian dental schools were also sought. Five dental schools in Malaysia participated in this cross-sectional study. A validated self-administered questionnaire was used to establish the point prevalence of WMSD in the dental students based on various body regions. The questionnaire also collected data regarding the working environment, clinical practice and the taught ergonomics of the students during their training years. Out of five hundred and sixty eight dental students who participated in the study, 410 were in their clinical years whilst 158 were students in their non- clinical years. Ninety three percent of the clinical year students reported symptoms of WMSD in one or more body regions. Female students reported a significantly higher numbers of symptoms compared to male students. The neck (82%) and lower back (64%) were reported to have the highest prevalence of WMSD. Discomfort in the neck region was found to be associated with self-reported frequency of bending of the neck. A majority of students (92%) reported minimum participation in workshops related to ergonomics in dentistry and 77% were unfamiliar with treatment and remedies available in the case of WMSD. There was more WMSD seen in dental students who had started their clinical years. Neck and lower back are more injury prone areas and are at increased risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders. Theory and practice of ergonomics should be incorporated into the dental undergraduate curriculum.

  9. Bilateral Internal Mammary Artery Use Can Be Safely Taught Without Increasing Morbidity or Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasrija, Chetan; Ghoreishi, Mehrdad; Shah, Aakash; Rouse, Michael; Gammie, James S; Kon, Zachary N; Taylor, Bradley S

    2018-01-01

    Evidence shows a likely survival benefit with the use of bilateral internal mammary arteries (BIMA) compared with a single internal mammary artery (SIMA). Nonetheless, BIMA use is often not used or taught because of a perceived increase in operative time and complexity. This study aimed to evaluate operative time, morbidity, and mortality in both resident and nonresident cases using BIMA compared with SIMA. Consecutive patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (October 2012 to April 2015) at a single institution were reviewed. Cases were stratified on the basis of the use of SIMA versus BIMA and resident teaching versus nonresident teaching cases. Primary outcomes included operative time, postoperative morbidity, and mortality. A total of 416 patients were identified; 335 of 416 (81%) patients received a SIMA, and 81 of 416 (19%) patients received BIMA. A total of 184 of 416 (44%) were resident cases: 143 of the 335 (43%) SIMA cases and 41 of the 81 (51%) BIMA cases. Use of BIMA in resident cases was associated with a longer operative and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time than resident SIMA cases, but this increased time did not affect morbidity or mortality. Use of SIMA versus BIMA in nonresident cases had no significant difference on total operative time, CPB time, postoperative morbidity, or mortality. Overall, operative and 1-year mortality rates were similar in the SIMA and BIMA groups (SIMA: 1.2%, 1.8%, respectively; BIMA: 0%, 0%, respectively; p = NS). In the hands of an experienced surgeon, BIMA use can be effectively performed without an increase in operative or CPB time. In resident teaching cases, BIMA use may increase operative time, but it can be safely taught without affecting morbidity or mortality. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of working characteristics and taught ergonomics on the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders amongst dental students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are one of the main occupational health hazards affecting dental practitioners. This study was conducted to assess the prevalence of Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorder (WMSD) amongst dental students. Possible correlations with the working environment and ergonomics taught in Malaysian dental schools were also sought. Methods Five dental schools in Malaysia participated in this cross-sectional study. A validated self-administered questionnaire was used to establish the point prevalence of WMSD in the dental students based on various body regions. The questionnaire also collected data regarding the working environment, clinical practice and the taught ergonomics of the students during their training years. Results Out of five hundred and sixty eight dental students who participated in the study, 410 were in their clinical years whilst 158 were students in their non- clinical years. Ninety three percent of the clinical year students reported symptoms of WMSD in one or more body regions. Female students reported a significantly higher numbers of symptoms compared to male students. The neck (82%) and lower back (64%) were reported to have the highest prevalence of WMSD. Discomfort in the neck region was found to be associated with self-reported frequency of bending of the neck. A majority of students (92%) reported minimum participation in workshops related to ergonomics in dentistry and 77% were unfamiliar with treatment and remedies available in the case of WMSD. Conclusions There was more WMSD seen in dental students who had started their clinical years. Neck and lower back are more injury prone areas and are at increased risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders. Theory and practice of ergonomics should be incorporated into the dental undergraduate curriculum. PMID:23547959

  11. An elective course in aromatherapy science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Emily R; Bystrek, Mary V; Klein, JoAnn S

    2014-05-15

    To evaluate the impact of an innovative team-taught elective course on second-year (P2) students' knowledge and skills relating to the relationship between aromatherapy and pharmacy. An Aromatherapy Science elective course was offered to P2 students in an accelerated doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) degree program and was designed to provide an elective course experience while focusing on active-learning skills such as group work, student-led presentations, and in-class activities. Lectures were designed to reinforce core curricular threads from the basic sciences within the pharmaceutical sciences department while highlighting key aromatherapy principles. Course evaluations, grades, and student self-assessments were used to evaluate student fulfillment and knowledge gained. Students agreed this hands-on course integrated pharmaceutical science experiences, enriched their pharmacy education, and provided knowledge to enhance their confidence in describing essential oil uses, drug interactions, and key aromatherapy clinical implications. Students agreed this course prepared them to identify essential oil therapeutic uses and potential essential oil-drug interactions, and interpret literature. The introduction of aromatherapy principles to pharmacy students will prepare a new generation of healthcare professionals on the role of alternative medicines.

  12. Language courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Cours d’anglais général et professionnel La prochaine session se déroulera du 22 septembre au 12 décembre. Ces cours s’adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu’à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages web : http://cern.ch/Training. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 29 September to 5 December. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be an average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Writing Professional Documents in English – Administrative Writing Professional Documents in English – Technical The next session will take place from 29 September to 5 December. These courses are...

  13. English courses

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Cours d'anglais général et professionnel La prochaine session se déroulera du 4 mars jusqu’au 21 juin 2013. Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Pour le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages web. Oral Expression The next sessions will take place from 4 March to 21 June 2013. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be on average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. More information here. Writing Professional Documents in English - Administrative Writing Professional Documents in English - Technical The next sessions will take place from 4 March to 21 June 2013. These courses are designed for people with a goo...

  14. English Course

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2012-01-01

    Cours d'anglais général et professionnel : La prochaine session se déroulera : du 27 février au 22 juin 2012. Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages Web: http://cern.ch/Training Vous pouvez aussi contacter Kerstin Fuhrmeister, tél. 70896. Oral Expression The next sessions will take place from 27 February to 22 June, 2012.  This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be on average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web page: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister, tel. ...

  15. SUBJECT INDEX

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subject Index. Variation of surface electric field during geomagnetic disturbed period at Maitri, Antarctica. 1721. Geomorphology. A simple depression-filling method for raster and irregular elevation datasets. 1653. Decision Support System integrated with Geographic. Information System to target restoration actions in water-.

  16. Class notes for a PL/I course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dritz, K. W.

    1975-11-01

    Presented here are notes for a course in PL/I. They might serve as a guide to those who are developing a course, or as class notes for that course. They might be useful as a textbook independent of any course; as such a textbook, however, they are not self-contained because of the built-in assumption that they will supplement lectures and be accompanied by manuals. Very nearly the full language is taught here, with the emphasis on concepts rather than practical details. Discussion of I/O is avoided until roughly the midpoint of the course. The hoped-for consequence for students is an enhanced perception and understanding of the many concepts and their logical relationships. The dawning of the age of transportability for PL/I programs gives the user a reason, for the first time, to avoid convenient but illegal language.

  17. EMC Corporation Provides Colleges with a Course in Storage Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Sickle, Ed

    2008-05-01

    EMC Corporation, the world leader in data storage, created the EMC Academic Alliance Program to educate students on storage and close the education gap that exists. EMC developed a Storage Technology course to teach students about the design of storage technologies and the "big picture" of an information infrastructure. The course is "open" and focused on storage technologies, not products. College and universities use the course to teach students about a very important topic in IT: Storage. EMC collaborates with colleges and universities by providing the course, knowledge transfer sessions to faculty and program support. There is no cost to join and no cost to obtain the courses. EMC requires partners to sign an agreement for course use. Several colleges are using the course as an upper level elective and the course is taught by faculty. The alliance program has reduced faculty time to develop a storage course and time to learn the topic. Faculty is responsible for credentialing students and they supplement the course with additional materials. Students are being recruited for jobs by EMC and others, including internships. The Alliance program provides academic institutions with a way to differentiate. This paper will explain the program and the Storage Technology course.

  18. Benefits and Limitations of Online Instruction in Natural Science Undergraduate Liberal Arts Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, Joseph; Roberts, Godfrey; Liddicoat, Kendra; Porzecanski, Ana Luz; Mendez, Martin; McMullen, David

    2013-04-01

    Online courses in the Natural Sciences are taught three ways at New York University to undergraduate students majoring in the liberal arts and professional programs - synchronous courses in which students communicate online with the instructor and classmates in real time, asynchronous courses when faculty present course material for students to access and learn at their leisure, and hybrid or blended courses when part is taught asynchronously and part is taught face-to-face in a classroom with all students present. We have done online courses each way - Global Ecology (synchronous); Stars, Planets, and Life (synchronous and asynchronous); Darwin to DNA: An Overview of Evolution (asynchronous); Biodiversity Conservation (asynchronous); and Biology of Hunger and Population (blended). We will present the advantages and challenges we experienced teaching courses online in this fashion. Besides the advantages listed in the description for this session, another can be programmed learning that allows a set of sequential steps or a more complex branching of steps that allows students to repeat lessons multiple times to master the material. And from an academic standpoint, course content and assessment can be standardized, making it possible for each student to learn the same material. Challenges include resistance to online learning by a host of stakeholders who might be educators, students, parents, and the community. Equally challenging might be the readiness of instructors and students to teach and learn online. Student integrity issues such as plagiarism and cheating are a concern in a course taught online (Thormann and Zimmerman, 2012), so we will discuss our strategies to mitigate them.

  19. Effectiveness of a mining simulation cooperative learning activity on the cognitive and affective achievement of students in a lower division physical geology course: A confluent approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolhurst, Jeffrey Wayne

    Most students enrolled in lower division physical geology courses are non-majors and tend to finish the course with little appreciation of what it is geologists really do. They may also be expected to analyze, synthesize, and apply knowledge from previous laboratory experiences with little or no instruction and/or practice in utilizing the critical thinking skills necessary to do so. This study sought to answer two research questions: (1) do physical geology students enrolled in a course designed around a mining simulation activity perform better cognitively than students who are taught the same curriculum in the traditional fashion; and (2) do students enrolled in the course gain a greater appreciation of physical geology and the work that geologists do. Eighty students enrolled in the course at Columbia College, Sonora, California over a two year period. During the first year, thirty-one students were taught the traditional physical geology curriculum. During the second year, forty-nine students were taught the traditional curriculum up until week nine, then they were taught a cooperative learning mining simulation activity for three weeks. A static group, split plot, repeated measures design was used. Pre- and post-tests were administered to students in both the control and treatment groups. The cognitive assessment instrument was validated by content area experts in the University of South Carolina Geological Sciences Department. Students were given raw lithologic, gravimetric, topographic, and environmental data with which to construct maps and perform an overlay analysis. They were tested on the cognitive reasoning and spatial analysis they used to make decisions about where to test drill for valuable metallic ores. The affective instrument used a six point Likert scale to assess students' perceived enjoyment, interest, and importance of the material. Gains scores analysis of cognitive achievement data showed a mean of 2.43 for the control group and 4.47 for

  20. Integrated Curriculum and Subject-based Curriculum: Achievement and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casady, Victoria

    The research conducted for this mixed-method study, qualitative and quantitative, analyzed the results of an academic year-long study to determine whether the use of an integrated fourth grade curriculum would benefit student achievement in the areas of English language arts, social studies, and science more than a subject-based traditional curriculum. The research was conducted based on the international, national, and state test scores, which show a slowing or lack of growth. Through pre- and post-assessments, student questionnaires, and administrative interviews, the researcher analyzed the phenomenological experiences of the students to determine if the integrated curriculum was a beneficial restructuring of the curriculum. The research questions for this study focused on the achievement and attitudes of the students in the study and whether the curriculum they were taught impacted their achievement and attitudes over the course of one school year. The curricula for the study were organized to cover the current standards, where the integrated curriculum focused on connections between subject areas to help students make connections to what they are learning and the world beyond the classroom. The findings of this study indicated that utilizing the integrated curriculum could increase achievement as well as students' attitudes toward specific content areas. The ANOVA analysis for English language arts was not determined to be significant; although, greater growth in the students from the integrated curriculum setting was recorded. The ANOVA for social studies (0.05) and the paired t-tests (0.001) for science both determined significant positive differences. The qualitative analysis led to the discovery that the experiences of the students from the integrated curriculum setting were more positive. The evaluation of the data from this study led the researcher to determine that the integrated curriculum was a worthwhile endeavor to increase achievement and attitudes

  1. Active Learning Not Associated with Student Learning in a Random Sample of College Biology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, T. M.; Leonard, M. J.; Colgrove, C. A.; Kalinowski, S. T.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that adding active learning to traditional college science lectures substantially improves student learning. However, this research predominantly studied courses taught by science education researchers, who are likely to have exceptional teaching expertise. The present study investigated introductory biology courses randomly selected from a list of prominent colleges and universities to include instructors representing a broader population. We examined the relationship between active learning and student learning in the subject area of natural selection. We found no association between student learning gains and the use of active-learning instruction. Although active learning has the potential to substantially improve student learning, this research suggests that active learning, as used by typical college biology instructors, is not associated with greater learning gains. We contend that most instructors lack the rich and nuanced understanding of teaching and learning that science education researchers have developed. Therefore, active learning as designed and implemented by typical college biology instructors may superficially resemble active learning used by education researchers, but lacks the constructivist elements necessary for improving learning. PMID:22135373

  2. A course in Peace Journalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake Lynch

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This article sets out a reasoned and annotated plan for a short course in Peace Journalism, suitable for teaching to students of Journalism, Communications, Media and Peace and Conflict Studies. It is based on courses the author has taught, over many years, and the aim of the article is to help teachers to devise their own courses. The best way to help students to begin thinking about issues in the representation of conflicts, the article argues, is to give them a flavour of it, by showing them different ways in which the same story can be told. The article gives story-boards and scripts for two television news treatments of the same event, a bombing in the Philippines. The first is an example of War Journalism, it is argued; the second, Peace Journalism. The article suggests ways to develop a course from this illustrative starting point, to ask why the distinctions between these two approaches should be considered important - both in their own terms, and in terms of their potential influence on the course of events in conflict. Different approaches to conceptualising and measuring this possible influence are discussed, with suggestions for further exploration. The article recounts some of the author's experiences in introducing and discussing what is, inevitably sometimes, difficult and sensitive material, with groups including participants from conflict-affected countries - Palestine, Israel and the Philippines. Not all students will be aspiring journalists. The article offers brief notes on practical Peace Journalism, as well as showing how learning outcomes can be formulated to allow the same issues to be tackled in the form of a civil society campaign, or as a peace-building intervention in conflict. The article also explains how students can be equipped to question elements of journalistic practice which they may take for granted, and which pass unexamined in many current journalism courses. That, in turn, entails examining the emergence

  3. Feasibility of PBL implementation in clinical courses of nursing and midwifery from the viewpoints of faculty members of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahidi R.Gh

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: PBL, as a teaching method, has a basic role in promoting education level and combining the theoretical and practical knowledge. But there still exist serious obstacles to implementing this educational method Purpose: To recognize the impediments an obstacle preventing PBL method implementation. Methods: The Subjects studied in this research are all the tutors who taught basic and clinical courses in the faculty of nursing and midwifery in the first and second terms of the year 2001-2002. Choosing subjects was done by using census method and the number of subjects was 33 basic course teachers and 20 clinical course teachers. A questionnaire developed based on the studies’ goals was the tool used for collecting data. Data was analysed by means of SPSS/Win 10 Soft ware using descriptive statistics Results: The 95% of basic course teachers and 93.9% clinical course teachers think of the conditions and facilities needed for implementing PBL as of medium level. Tutors believe that most of the impediments are related to student's lack of group work skills, and the skills needed for making correct communication, and the need for students practical participation in PBL for making them ready and receptive. They also relate most of the strong points to PBL's being efficient in training community – oriented students. The tutors state that performing PBL does not decrease their motivation at all, due to the change in their role from lecturer to facilitator. Conclusion: The Although findings of this research indicate that the conditions needed for implementing PBL exist at present, still there are many obstacles to its performance such as student's lack of group work skills and their disability in making correct interaction, costliness of beginning and marinating PBL, large number of students and lack of tutors Keywords: PBL IMPLEMENTATION, MEDICAL EDUCATION

  4. International summer course in geobiology gives emerging field a boost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berelson, William

    Educators are always concerned with the quality of graduate courses and the fate of their graduate students. When my father wrote Graduate Education in the United States [Berelson, 1960], graduate students learned from lectures, lab, and technical assignments; they learned from one-on-one tutoring, from their fellow students, and they learned by taking on challenging research topics and producing and presenting justifiable results. That educational style hasn't changed. But in the 1950s and 1960s, there was no interdisciplinary graduate course taught on Catalina Island in which students and instructors mingled during kayak trips, mountain hikes, and during breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

  5. A Unique Civil Engineering Capstone Design Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Padmanabhan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The North Dakota State University, USA, capstone course was developed as a unique model in response to the effort of the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology, USA, to streamline and improve design instruction in the curriculum and has steadily evolved to keep pace with the ever-changing technology and the expectations of the profession and the society we serve. A capstone design course by definition should be a design experience for students in the final year before graduation integrating all major design concepts they have learned up until then in the program. Carefully chosen real world projects with design content in all sub-disciplines of civil engineering are assigned in this team-taught course. Faculty and practicing professionals make presentations on design process; project management; leadership in an engineering environment; and public policy; global perspectives in engineering; and professional career and licensure. Practicing professionals also critique the final student presentations. Students work in teams with number of faculty serving as technical consultants, and a faculty mentor for each team to provide non-technical guidance and direction. The course requires students to demonstrate mastery of the curriculum and to work with others in a team environment. Course assessment includes evaluation of the final design, presentations, written technical reports, project design schedule, a project design journal, and reaction papers.

  6. The Journalism Writing Course: Evaluation of Hybrid versus Online Grammar Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jensen; Jones, Khristen

    2015-01-01

    This study examined introductory journalism writing courses and compared hybrid (part online/part classroom) versus online grammar instruction. The hybrid structure allowed for grammar topics to be taught online, with a pretest following, and then reviewing missed/difficult pretest concepts in class prior to a posttest. The quasi-experimental…

  7. A Survey of Bioethics Courses in U.S. Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Jon R.

    1977-01-01

    Data from questionnaires sent to every college and university in the United States ascertained that 26 percent of the 223 responding major institutions offered a bioethics course, most frequently presented by the biology department to medical students and taught most frequently by professors of ethics and philosophy background. Questionnaire and…

  8. Trials and Tribulations of SLA Framework in Designing Arabic Courses for Speakers of Other Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabsi, Zouhir; Patel, Fay; Hamad, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    There is a consensus among language teachers and researchers that language course design is always a work in progress. This is influenced by variables such as the type of language being taught and whether the teaching of this language has been researched. Arabic is one the languages that have created a perennial debate among its teachers about the…

  9. College Students' Opinions of Engaging Approaches in a Physical Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Espada, Wilson

    2009-01-01

    Physical science courses have historically been taught from a variety of perspectives or emphases. In many cases, the instructor decides on the perspective and textbook for nonscience majors, so students rarely have a voice in the decision. This top-down approach and a potential gap between what instructors and students expect from a general…

  10. How MOOC Instructors View the Pedagogy and Purposes of Massive Open Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Suzannah; Myrick, Jessica Gall

    2015-01-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) have proliferated in recent years despite disagreement about the role of MOOCs in higher education and whether student outcomes are satisfactory. Taking a mixed-methods approach, the current study surveys professors who have taught MOOCs (n = 162) in order to better understand how MOOCs are perceived by…

  11. Student Enrollment in a Supplement Course for Anatomy and Physiology Results in Improved Retention and Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Mari

    2011-01-01

    Anatomy and Physiology I (A&P 1) has one of the highest failure and withdrawal rates on campus. To increase academic success, a course to supplement A&P 1 (Supplement) was developed and taught by anatomy and physiology faculty. Primary goals for the Supplement included (1) early identification of students at risk for failing or withdrawal;…

  12. Making the Familiar Strange: Thinking Visually in a Study Abroad Course in Professional Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Deborah C.

    2016-01-01

    Business and professional communicators increasingly rely on visual thinking and design strategies to create effective messages. The workplace need for such thinking, however, is not readily accommodated in current pedagogy. A long-running study abroad short course for American students taught in London provides a model for meeting this need.…

  13. The Comparison of a Thematic versus Regional Approach to Teaching a World Geography Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korson, Cadey; Kusek, Weronika

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of a regional or thematic approach to the study and presentation of world geography have long been debated. The goal to not reimagine these debates or to promote one approach over another; the aim is to explore how world geography courses are currently being taught in American universities. By polling and sharing information about…

  14. Online Learning: Outcomes and Satisfaction among Underprepared Students in an Upper-Level Psychology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Colleen; Roberts, Ramona Palmerio; Hummel, Jessamy

    2014-01-01

    Online learning is on the rise, but research on outcomes and student satisfaction has produced conflicting results, and systematic, targeted research on underprepared college students is generally lacking. This study compared three sections (traditional, online, and 50% hybrid) of the same upper-level psychology course, taught with identical…

  15. A Curriculum Model: Engineering Design Graphics Course Updates Based on Industrial and Academic Institution Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meznarich, R. A.; Shava, R. C.; Lightner, S. L.

    2009-01-01

    Engineering design graphics courses taught in colleges or universities should provide and equip students preparing for employment with the basic occupational graphics skill competences required by engineering and technology disciplines. Academic institutions should introduce and include topics that cover the newer and more efficient graphics…

  16. Positive Effects of Converting a Food and Bioprocessing Analysis Course to an Inquiry-Guided Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Gabriel K.; Cvitkusic, Sanja; Draut, Amanda S.; Hathorn, Chelani S.; Stephens, Amanda M.; Constanza, Karen E.; Leonardelli, Michael J.; Watkins, Ruth H.; Dean, Lisa O.; Hentz, Nathaniel G.

    2012-01-01

    Food science laboratory courses are traditionally taught as a series of preplanned laboratories with known endpoints. In contrast, inquiry-guided (IG) laboratories allow students to ask questions, think through problems, design experiments, then adapt and learn in response to unexpected results. This study examined the effects of converting the…

  17. Engaging Students in Higher Education through Mobile Learning: Lessons Learnt in a Chinese Entrepreneurship Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menkhoff, Thomas; Bengtsson, Magnus Lars

    2012-01-01

    This evaluative-exploratory case study reports pedagogical experiences with using mobiles phones, wikis, and other mobile learning approaches such as podcasts and walking tours as educational tools in the context of an undergraduate course on Chinese Entrepreneurship and Asian Business Networks taught at a university in Singapore. Conceptualized…

  18. A Portable Bioinformatics Course for Upper-Division Undergraduate Curriculum in Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floraino, Wely B.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the challenges that bioinformatics education is facing and describes a bioinformatics course that is successfully taught at the California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, to the fourth year undergraduate students in biological sciences, chemistry, and computer science. Information on lecture and computer practice…

  19. Students' Perceptions of Institutional Practices: The Case of Limits of Functions in College Level Calculus Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Nadia

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a study of instructors' and students' perceptions of the knowledge to be learned about limits of functions in a college level Calculus course, taught in a North American college institution. I modeled these perceptions using a theoretical framework that combines elements of the Anthropological Theory of the Didactic, developed…

  20. Assessing the Impact of a Race-Based Course on Counseling Students: A Quantitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paone, Tina R.; Malott, Krista M.; Barr, Jason J.

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to determine changes in 121 White counseling students following their participation in an experiential, race-based course taught in a group format. Pre- and postoutcomes were reported based on instruments that measured White racial identity development, White privilege, color blindness, and the costs of racism. Findings indicated…

  1. Metalloprotease Peptide Inhibitors: A Semester-Long Organic Synthetic Research Project for the Introductory Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontrello, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    A semester-long research project to synthesize unique compounds designed after published metalloprotease peptide inhibitors is presented. The research project encompasses a set of nine organic chemistry reactions traditionally taught in the second semester lab course, and the procedures are derived from scientific literature. The two principle…

  2. Promoting Athletic Training through a General Education Course in Psychosocial Aspects of Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner-Shires, Alison Marie; Heinerichs, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Context: A general education course taught by athletic training education faculty has the potential to expose the entire student body to the athletic training profession in a unique way while also meeting requirements of the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Objective: To introduce a detailed case study of a general…

  3. Effectiveness of Peer Assessment in a Professionalism Course Using an Online Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Kenneth David

    2015-01-01

    An online Moodle Workshop was evaluated for peer assessment effectiveness. A quasiexperiment was designed using a Seminar in Professionalism course taught in face-to-face mode to undergraduate students across two campuses. The first goal was to determine if Moodle Workshop awarded a fair peer grader grade. The second objective was to estimate if…

  4. From Gene to Protein: A 3-Week Intensive Course in Molecular Biology for Physical Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Jay L.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a 3-week intensive molecular biology methods course based upon fluorescent proteins, which is successfully taught at the McGill University to advanced undergraduates and graduates in physics, chemical engineering, biomedical engineering, and medicine. No previous knowledge of biological terminology or methods is expected, so…

  5. Student Performance in and Perceptions of a High Structure Undergraduate Human Anatomy Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Justin F.

    2016-01-01

    Human anatomy has usually been taught in a didactic fashion in colleges and universities. However, recent calls from United States governmental agencies have called for the transformation of undergraduate life sciences education to include active learning in the classroom. In addition, high structure courses have been shown to increase student…

  6. Active Learning "Not" Associated with Student Learning in a Random Sample of College Biology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, T. M.; Leonard, M. J.; Colgrove, C. A.; Kalinowski, S. T.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that adding active learning to traditional college science lectures substantially improves student learning. However, this research predominantly studied courses taught by science education researchers, who are likely to have exceptional teaching expertise. The present study investigated introductory biology courses…

  7. A Troubling Success Story: Revisiting a Classic Deviance Assignment in a Criminology Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordt, Rebecca L.

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on an adapted version of the classic deviance exercise used in a criminology course taught from 1992 to 2000. Describes how the exercise typically worked, but also discusses a time when the exercise went wrong. Addresses what lessons were learned from that experience. (CMK)

  8. Analysis of Introducing Active Learning Methodologies in a Basic Computer Architecture Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbelaitz, Olatz; José I. Martín; Muguerza, Javier

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of introducing active methodologies in the Computer Architecture course taught in the second year of the Computer Engineering Bachelor's degree program at the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Spain. The paper reports the experience from three academic years, 2011-2012, 2012-2013, and 2013-2014, in which…

  9. The Effectiveness of Mutual Aid Learning Communities in Online MSW Practice Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douville, M. Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Online social work education has grown rapidly in recent years, and practice courses now are frequently taught online. The present study contributes to the growing body of knowledge regarding best practices in online social work education by examining the effects of small-group learning communities on student learning and on student satisfaction…

  10. Seventh Grade Students' Perceptions of Using Concept Cartoons in Science and Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ören, Fatma Sasmaz; Meriç, Gülçin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the efficiency of use of concept cartoons in elementary school 7th grade students Science and Technology course according to students' perceptions. In terms of this aim, the unit of "Force and Motion" has been taught by concept cartoons and at the end of this period, semi-structured interviews were…

  11. An Intervention To Remediate Developmental Students' Procrastination in a Computer-Based PSI Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothen, Thomas; Bazzarre, M. Elizabeth

    1998-01-01

    Examines the effectiveness of a personalized learning assistance intervention to overcome developmental students' procrastination in a computer-based introductory psychology course taught with the Personalized System of Instruction (PSI). An evaluation of the intervention suggests that it was effective in getting the procrastinating students to…

  12. Teaching Critical Thinking and Civic Thinking in a First-Year College Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Donald E.; Houlihan, Adam J.; Corbo, Christopher P.; Mosher, Roy H.

    2017-01-01

    Two professors co-taught critical and civic thinking in the same first-semester course for four years. For the first year, they used computerized argument mapping and critical-thinking-for-civic-thinking (CT)[superscript 2] exercises based on open-ended scenarios framed within a civic context. The instructors assessed student skill levels using…

  13. Using a Service Audit Project for Improving Student Learning in a Service-Marketing Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Padron, Tracy; Ferguson, Jeffery M.

    2015-01-01

    Service-marketing education provides students customer service skills sought by employers who recognize the relationship between service and profit. Students in service marketing benefit from active-learning activities with actual organizations to apply customer service frameworks taught in the course. The purpose of this paper is to describe an…

  14. Transforming a Business Statistics Course with Just-in-Time Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangs, Joann

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes changing the way a business statistics course is taught through the use of just-in-time teaching methods. Implementing this method allowed for more time in the class to be spent focused on problem solving, resulting in students being able to handle more difficult problems. Students' perceptions of the just-in-time assignments…

  15. Positive Effects of Converting a Food and Bioprocessing Analysis Course to an Inquiry-Guided Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food science laboratory courses are traditionally taught as a series of preplanned laboratories with known endpoints. In contrast, inquiry-guided (IG) laboratories allow students to ask questions, think through problems, design experiments, then adapt and learn in response to unexpected results. T...

  16. Should the history of epidemiology be taught in epidemiology training programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskaris, Zoey; Morabia, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is no evidence concerning the presence of historical content in the epidemiology curricula of the United States and abroad. Similarly, it is not known how epidemiologists view this topic in the context of master's or doctoral level course work. We attempted to fill these knowledge gaps with data from 2 online surveys-Survey I administered to persons in charge of all epidemiology training programs in North America and Survey II to epidemiologists practicing around the world. A substantial minority (39%) of graduate programs in epidemiology in the United States teach a course on the history of the field. In both surveys, the most common reasons selected for teaching such a course were "To build a sense of identity as an epidemiologist" and "As a tool for achieving a deeper understanding into specific methods and concepts." The majority of respondents, from 63 countries, agreed that the history of epidemiology should be included in curricula for graduate students in epidemiology.

  17. Should Torsion Balance Technique Continue to be Taught to Pharmacy Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilger, Rhonda; Chereson, Rasma

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To determine the types of balances used in compounding pharmacies: torsion or digital. Methods. A survey was mailed to the pharmacist-in-charge at 698 pharmacies, representing 47% of the pharmacies in Missouri as of July 2013. The pharmacies were randomly selected and stratified by region into eight regions to ensure a representative sample. Information was gathered regarding the type and use of balances and pharmacists’ perspectives on the need to teach torsion balance technique to pharmacy students. Results. The response rate for the survey was 53.3%. Out of the total responses received, those pharmacies having a torsion balance, digital balance or both were 46.8%, 27.4% and 11.8%, respectively. About 68.3% of respondents compound prescriptions. The study showed that 52% of compounding pharmacies use torsion balances in their practice. Of those with a balance in their pharmacy, 65.6% favored continuation of torsion balance instruction. Conclusions. Digital balances have become increasingly popular and have replaced torsion balances in some pharmacies, especially those that compound a significant number of prescriptions. The results of this study indicate that torsion balances remain integral to compounding practice. Therefore, students should continue being taught torsion balance technique at the college. PMID:28720913

  18. Religious Education towards Justice: What Kind of Justice Is to Be Taught in a Christian Context?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Bobbert

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Education is a human right. It prepares human beings for life, helps to develop individual abilities and opens up social opportunities—e.g., earning one’s own living. Religion interprets our human existence in connection to a transcendental dimension. Religion can also influence moral values and behavior. The Christian religion established a basis for social life, and thus deals with religious and moral justice. As the Christian faith is understood as the identity of the qualities of love of God, of your neighbor and even of your enemy, it has to look for justice in the world. Modern Christian ethics does unfold interpersonal and global justice for all people and tries to give good reasons for moral claims. Religious education in a Christian context has to answer the question of what kind of justice is to be taught and by what means justice, as a goal of education, can be reached within such a setting. This article will unfold, from an ethical point of view, what kind of knowledge and competence teachers must have and what kind of goals can be followed with regard to their pupils or students. The results of this reflection imply certain pedagogical methods and means and exclude others—although it is not possible to go more deeply into a pedagogical discussion.

  19. What are school children in Europe being taught about hygiene and antibiotic use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecky, Donna M; McNulty, Cliodna A M; Adriaenssens, Niels; Koprivová Herotová, Tereza; Holt, Jette; Touboul, Pia; Merakou, Kyriakoula; Koncan, Raffaella; Olczak-Pienkowska, Anna; Avô, António Brito; Campos, José; Farrell, David; Kostkova, Patty; Weinberg, Julius

    2011-06-01

    e-Bug is a pan-European antibiotic and hygiene teaching resource that aims to reinforce awareness in school children of microbes, prudent antibiotic use, hygiene and the transmission of infection. Prior to the production of the resource, it was essential to examine the educational structure across each partner country and assess what school children were being taught on these topics. A questionnaire was devised for distribution to each European partner (Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, England, France, Greece, Italy, Poland, Portugal and Spain), exploring their educational structure and examining educational resources or campaigns currently available. From the data collected it was evident that the majority of European schools have structured hand hygiene practices in place from a young age. The curricula in all countries cover the topic of human health and hygiene, but limited information is provided on antibiotics and their prudent use. School educational resources that link to the national curriculum and implement National Advice to the Public campaigns in the classroom are limited. The Microbes en question mobile health education campaign in France is an example of a successful children's education campaign and an innovative programme. Evaluation of the impact of school education on attitude and change of behaviour is also limited throughout many European countries. Not enough is currently being done across Europe to educate school children on the importance of appropriate antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance. The data from this research were used to develop e-Bug, a European Union-funded antibiotic and hygiene teaching resource.

  20. Should Torsion Balance Technique Continue to be Taught to Pharmacy Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilger, Rhonda; Chereson, Rasma; Salama, Noha Nabil

    2017-06-01

    Objective. To determine the types of balances used in compounding pharmacies: torsion or digital. Methods. A survey was mailed to the pharmacist-in-charge at 698 pharmacies, representing 47% of the pharmacies in Missouri as of July 2013. The pharmacies were randomly selected and stratified by region into eight regions to ensure a representative sample. Information was gathered regarding the type and use of balances and pharmacists' perspectives on the need to teach torsion balance technique to pharmacy students. Results. The response rate for the survey was 53.3%. Out of the total responses received, those pharmacies having a torsion balance, digital balance or both were 46.8%, 27.4% and 11.8%, respectively. About 68.3% of respondents compound prescriptions. The study showed that 52% of compounding pharmacies use torsion balances in their practice. Of those with a balance in their pharmacy, 65.6% favored continuation of torsion balance instruction. Conclusions. Digital balances have become increasingly popular and have replaced torsion balances in some pharmacies, especially those that compound a significant number of prescriptions. The results of this study indicate that torsion balances remain integral to compounding practice. Therefore, students should continue being taught torsion balance technique at the college.

  1. Searching for the right form: A self-taught village player recalling performance live

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Jelena

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Repertoire of the excellent self-taught traditional dvojnice-player, Miladin Arsenijević, from the vicinity of Topola (central Serbia consists of lyrical songs of a newer rural repertoire. During a 'cognitive interview', in his attempt to recall and reconstruct old-time traveler's (putničko playing through performance, a 'real music situation', he has gradually condensed the developed form of the homophonic shepherd's song into the fragmentary form of heterophonic traveler's playing. In this paper the accent is on the player's search and creative process in his attempt to derive the right musical form of a piece, using his long-term memory, since he has not heard or played the piece for quite a long time. It is also a successful attempt to bring musical data from passive to active musical memory, and a transit from one collective semantic musical code to another. The motoric component plays an important role as well. The analysis of musical change shows that musical memory is a distributive system, and data is organized in groups. Musical parameters change: rhythm and tone are changed first, while other parameters seem to depend mostly on the shape of the melodic model; they gradually change while this element finds its right form.

  2. Examining why ethics is taught to veterinary students: a qualitative study of veterinary educators' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães-Sant'Ana, Manuel; Lassen, Jesper; Millar, Kate M; Sandøe, Peter; Olsson, I Anna S

    2014-01-01

    Although it is widely agreed that veterinary students need to be introduced to ethics, there is limited empirical research investigating the reasons why veterinary ethics is being taught. This study presents the first extensive investigation into the reasons for teaching veterinary ethics and reports data collected in semi-structured interviews with educators involved in teaching undergraduate veterinary ethics at three European schools: the University of Copenhagen, the University of Nottingham, and the Technical University of Lisbon (curricular year 2010-2011). The content of the interview transcripts were analyzed using Toulmin's argumentative model. Ten objectives in teaching veterinary ethics were identified, which can be grouped into four overarching themes: ethical awareness, ethical knowledge, ethical skills, and individual and professional qualities. These objectives include recognizing values and ethical viewpoints, identifying norms and regulations, developing skills of communication and decision making, and contributing to a professional identity. Whereas many of the objectives complement each other, there is tension between the view that ethics teaching should promote knowledge of professional rules and the view that ethics teaching should emphasize critical reasoning skills. The wide range of objectives and the possible tensions between them highlight the challenges faced by educators as they attempt to prioritize among these goals of ethics teaching within a crowded veterinary curriculum.

  3. Can emotion recognition be taught to children with autism spectrum conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron-Cohen, Simon; Golan, Ofer; Ashwin, Emma

    2009-12-12

    Children with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) have major difficulties in recognizing and responding to emotional and mental states in others' facial expressions. Such difficulties in empathy underlie their social-communication difficulties that form a core of the diagnosis. In this paper we ask whether aspects of empathy can be taught to young children with ASC. We review a study that evaluated The Transporters, an animated series designed to enhance emotion comprehension in children with ASC. Children with ASC (4-7 years old) watched The Transporters every day for four weeks. Participants were tested before and after intervention on emotional vocabulary and emotion recognition at three levels of generalization. The intervention group improved significantly more than a clinical control group on all task levels, performing comparably to typical controls at time 2. The discussion centres on how vehicles as mechanical systems may be one key reason why The Transporters caused the improved understanding and recognition of emotions in children with ASC. The implications for the design of autism-friendly interventions are also explored.

  4. Cultural Factors in High School Student Motivation to Study Less Commonly Taught Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masako Nunn

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Learning less commonly taught languages (LCTLs such as Japanese can be challenging for American students. Due to the difficulty of learning LCTLs, more effort is required of the learners to become proficient as compared to European languages. Motivation contributes to the learners’ academic success. In the socio-cultural perspective, the learners’ cultural background mediates their cognitive process. This study examines the motivational differences and similarities among two culturally diverse groups of high school learners of Japanese: Asians excluding Japanese-Americans and non-Asians. One hundred forty two students completed a survey. Factor analysis yielded six factors: integrative motivation, instrumental motivation, intrinsic motivation (doing activities for enjoyment, self-efficacy (a belief in one’s ability to succeed, goal specificity, and goal strategy. The motivational differences were confirmed in intrinsic motivation and self-efficacy. Implications of these findings for LCTL teachers suggest practical steps that can be taken on motivational factors that influence students from different cultural backgrounds.

  5. The Impact of an Intervention Taught by Trained Teachers on Childhood Overweight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Oliveira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of a six-months’ nutrition program, delivered and taught by classroom teachers with in-service nutrition training, on the prevention of overweight and obesity among children in grades 1 to 4. In this randomized trial, four hundred and sixty four children from seven elementary schools were allocated to a nutrition educational program delivered by their own teachers. Intervened teachers had 12 sessions of three hours each with the researchers throughout six months, according to the topics nutrition and healthy eating, the importance of drinking water and healthy cooking activities. After each session, teachers were encouraged to develop activities in class focused on the learned topics. Sociodemographic, anthropometric, dietary, and physical activity assessments were performed at baseline and at the end of the intervention. In the intervention group the increase in Body Mass Index (BMI z-score was significantly lower than in the control group (p = 0.009; fewer proportion of children became overweight in the intervened group compared with the control (5.6% vs. 18.4%; p = 0.037. Our study provides further support to decrease the overweight epidemic, involving classroom teachers in a training program and making them dedicated interventionists.

  6. Understanding the experience of being taught by peers: the value of social and cognitive congruence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockspeiser, Tai M; O'Sullivan, Patricia; Teherani, Arianne; Muller, Jessica

    2008-08-01

    Medical schools use supplemental peer-teaching programs even though there is little research on students' actual experiences with this form of instruction. To understand the student experience of being taught by peers instead of by faculty. We conducted focus groups with first- and second-year medical students participating in a supplemental peer-teaching program at one institution. From the learner focus group themes, we developed a questionnaire and surveyed all first-year students. Focus groups revealed four learner themes: learning from near-peers, exposure to second-year students, need for review and synthesis, teaching modalities and for the peer-teachers, the theme of benefits for the teacher. Factor analysis of the survey responses resulted in three factors: second-year students as teachers, the benefit of peer-teachers instead of faculty, and the peer-teaching process. Scores on these factors correlated with attendance in the peer-teaching program (P learning from near-peers because of their recent experience with the materials and their ability to understand the students' struggles in medical school. Students with the highest participation in the program valued the unique aspects of this kind of teaching most. Areas for improvement for this program were identified.

  7. [How timely are the methods taught in psychotherapy training and practice?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutel, Manfred E; Michal, Matthias; Wiltink, Jörg; Subic-Wrana, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Even though many psychotherapists consider themselves to be eclectic or integrative, training and reimbursement in the modern healthcare system are clearly oriented toward the model of distinct psychotherapy approaches. Prompted by the proposition to favor general, disorder-oriented psychotherapy, we investigate how timely distinctive methods are that are taught in training and practice. We reviewed the pertinent literature regarding general and specific factors, the effectiveness of integrative and eclectic treatments, orientation toward specific disorders, manualization and psychotherapeutic training. There is a lack of systematic studies on the efficacy of combining therapy methods from different approaches. The first empirical findings reveal that a superiority of combined versus single treatmentmethods has yet to be demonstrated. The development of transnosological manuals shows the limits of disorder-specific treatment.General factors such as therapeutic alliance or education about the model of disease and treatment rationale require specific definitions. Taking reference to a specific treatment approach provides important consistency of theory, training therapy and supervision, though this does not preclude an openness toward other therapy concepts. Current manualized examples show that methods and techniques can indeed be integrated from other approaches. Integrating different methods can also be seen as a developmental task for practitioners and researchers which may be mastered increasingly better with more experience.

  8. AP English language & composition crash course

    CERN Document Server

    Hogue, Dawn

    2012-01-01

    AP English Language & Composition Crash Course - Gets You a Higher Advanced Placement Score in Less Time Crash Course is perfect for the time-crunched student, the last-minute studier, or anyone who wants a refresher on the subject. AP English Language & Composition Crash Course gives you: Targeted, Focused Review - Study Only What You Need to Know Crash Course is based on an in-depth analysis of the AP English Language & Composition course description outline and actual Advanced Placement test questions. It covers only the information tested on the exam, so you can make the most of your valua

  9. AP calculus AB & BC crash course

    CERN Document Server

    Rosebush, J

    2012-01-01

    AP Calculus AB & BC Crash Course - Gets You a Higher Advanced Placement Score in Less Time Crash Course is perfect for the time-crunched student, the last-minute studier, or anyone who wants a refresher on the subject. AP Calculus AB & BC Crash Course gives you: Targeted, Focused Review - Study Only What You Need to Know Crash Course is based on an in-depth analysis of the AP Calculus AB & BC course description outline and actual AP test questions. It covers only the information tested on the exams, so you can make the most of your valuable study time. Written by experienced math teachers, our

  10. Effect of Online Learning in Psychology course on Undergraduate students' Engagement in Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Ambalika Dogra; Sunil Dutt

    2016-01-01

    The paper has analyzed the effect of online learning and traditional mode of learning on students’ engagement in learning. A sample of 50 students studying psychology in their B.A course was selected randomly from one college in Chandigarh. An online learning course in selected topics of psychology was developed. The experimental group of the study was exposed through online learning mode for 15 days. Likewise, control group was taught the same content by traditional learning for 15 days as w...

  11. The effectiveness of using new instructors to teach an LGBT ally development course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Peter; Haehnel, Alison Aguilar; Muñoz, Darlene Nava; Sodolka, Jason

    2013-01-01

    We examined student responses to three new instructors who taught a lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) ally development course as described in a study by Ji, Finnessy, and Dubois (2009). Our analysis of the responses indicated that students did improve as LGBT allies in ways similar to those reported in the 2009 study. The findings suggest that the course could be disseminated provided that instructors actively encouraged students to engage in experiences that develop their LGBT ally identities.

  12. a University Course on the Physical Principles of Ultrasound Nondestructive Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genis, Vladimir

    2009-03-01

    The ultrasound nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of materials course was offered to Applied Engineering Technology (AET) students at Drexel University for last two years. The main objective of this three-credit (thirty-hour) course is to introduce students to physical principles of ultrasound measurements and to demonstrate the basic principles of ultrasound nondestructive evaluation of materials by combining hands-on laboratory experience with lectures. The work in the laboratory enhances the fundamentals taught in the classroom sessions.

  13. Can Clinical Skills Be Taught Online? Comparing Skill Development between Online and F2F Students Using a Blinded Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Dina J.; King, Erin; Ashmore, Margaret; Stanley, Craig

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the development of clinical assessment and intervention skills between students enrolled in a face-to-face (F2F) or an asynchronous online clinical social work class. All students from three semesters of F2F (n = 74) and online (n = 78) sections of an MSW clinical class taught by the same instructor were included. Two…

  14. Physiology Should Be Taught as Science Is Practiced: An Inquiry-Based Activity to Investigate the "Alkaline Tide"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lujan, Heidi L.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) strongly recommends that "science be taught as science is practiced." This means that the teaching approach must be consistent with the nature of scientific inquiry. In this article, the authors describe how they added scientific inquiry to a large lecture-based physiology…

  15. Acquisition, Preference and Follow-Up Comparison across Three AAC Modalities Taught to Two Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLay, Laurie; Schäfer, Martina C. M.; van der Meer, Larah; Couper, Llyween; McKenzie, Emma; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Marschik, Peter B.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Sutherland, Dean

    2017-01-01

    Identifying an augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) method for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) might be informed by comparing their performance with, and preference for, a range of communication modalities. Towards this end, the present study involved two children with ASD who were taught to request the continuation of toy…

  16. A retrospective study of social relations in a Danish primary school class taught in 'udeskole'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmeyer, Rikke Dalgaard; Mygind, Erik

    2016-01-01

    exhaustively. Therefore, we explored the conditions in ‘udeskole’ influencing pupils’ social relations based on an extreme case called the ‘Nature Class’. In the ‘Nature Class’ the pupils (third to fifth grades) were taught outside the classroom one day a week. Five pupils and two teachers were interviewed...

  17. Challenges in Academic Reading and Overcoming Strategies in Taught Master Programmes: A Case Study of International Graduate Students in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manjet Kaur Mehar

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on research into academic reading practices of international graduate students in taught Master programmes in a Malaysian university. The purpose of the study was to examine the challenges faced in the academic reading practices as well as the strategies employed to overcome the challenges in the academic reading practices.…

  18. Skype Videoconferencing for Less Commonly Taught Languages: Examining the Effects on Students' Foreign Language Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terantino, Joe

    2014-01-01

    This study compared students' foreign language anxiety levels while completing oral assessments administered face-to-face (F2F) and via Skype videoconferencing for university courses delivered under the self-instructional language program (SILP) model (Dunkel, Brill, & Kohl, 2002). Data were gathered by administering a modified Foreign…

  19. Can Cultural Competence Be Taught? Evaluating the Impact of the SOAP Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin-Burque, Angie; Zugazaga, Carole B.; Davis-Maye, Denise

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the Self and Other Awareness Project (SOAP) cultural competence development model and presents the results of a study that evaluated its impact on the racial attitudes of 110 undergraduate students enrolled in an undergraduate interdisciplinary Minority Groups course at a mid-sized public university in the Southeastern…

  20. Can Literary, Nay, Poetic, Translation Be Taught? A Conference Interpreter Thinks [So].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viaggio, Sergio

    One professional translator's experiences in teaching a course on the problems of English/Spanish literary translation, using a number of Spanish and Russian poems and short stories and their different kinds of translations for texts are discussed. The process of analyzing the literature for translation difficulties is outlined, as well as…

  1. Lessons in Generative Design, Publishing, and Circulation: What EM-Journal's First Year Has Taught Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinski, Jana; Lonsdale, Chelsea; Morrison, Becky; Mueller, Derek; Nannini, Adam

    2013-01-01

    "EM-Journal" is a flexibly refereed online journal featuring writing produced by students of Eastern Michigan University. The journal showcases a variety of documents (articles, essays, reports, etc.) written and designed by students enrolled in EMU's First-Year Writing (FYW) program, in selected Writing Intensive (WI) courses affiliated…

  2. Internal and External Factors Shaping Educational Beliefs of High School Teachers of "Sacred" Subjects to Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iluz, Shira; Rich, Yisrael

    2009-01-01

    This research investigated pedagogical beliefs of teachers of "sacred" school subjects, curricular topics that the school community deems culturally valued, unassailable and inviolate. Two hundred and fifty-five teachers of girls only who taught sacred or secular subjects in Jewish modern religious high schools responded to questionnaires focusing…

  3. A Comparative Analysis of General Culture Courses within the Scope of Knowledge Categories in Undergraduate Teacher Education Programs "Turkey and the USA"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayirsever, Fahriye; Kalayci, Nurdan

    2017-01-01

    In this study, general culture and general education courses within the scope of knowledge categories in undergraduate teacher education programs in Turkey and the USA are comparatively analyzed. The study is a comparative education study and uses a descriptive model. In the study, the general culture - general education courses taught in the…

  4. An Empirical Evaluation of Jolly Phonics Series Being Taught in Iran's Baby College Institutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Derakhshan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available With growth of EFL in Iran, based on context requirements, textbook evaluation has received substantial attention. Teachers' experiences and perceptions play vital roles in the process of book evaluation. The study is based on the Jolly Phonics series (Lloyd & Wernham, 1995 used by number of institutes and colleges in teaching in Iran. The main objective of the study was to find out whether this teaching material follows the essential objectives for teaching English as a foreign language to children or not. Considering the point that teachers have an indispensable role in analyzing and making an applicable and practical decision on evaluating and choosing the best possible material to be taught, the study focused on the teachers’ perceptions. The series were evaluated against Nokelainen's (2006 checklist. To this end, 72 female experienced teachers of Baby College institutes in Tehran and Gorgan branches, Iran, were randomly selected and given the Pedagogically Meaningful Learning Questionnaire (PMLQ of 40 questions to fill in. The findings showed that teachers mostly believe Jolly Phonics series and the teaching method can stand as a capable and trustable material for young EFL learners. However, in order to make it more profitable it may involve using decisions in adapting textual materials to the needs and interests of pupils as the learners' requirements are changing regarding the adventures of their environment. It is suggested that being a teacher’s guide to educate the teachers how to adapt and teach the materials on the base of learners' needs would be much better than just knowing or learning how to teach it. The textbook will continue to play an important role in helping teachers in teaching process, but it should not be a dictator (Williams, 1983, and the investigated material is respectful to this idea as it can well cover the flexibility, motivation, applicability, learner control and learner activity objectives since most of

  5. A self-taught artificial agent for multi-physics computational model personalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Dominik; Mansi, Tommaso; Itu, Lucian; Georgescu, Bogdan; Kayvanpour, Elham; Sedaghat-Hamedani, Farbod; Amr, Ali; Haas, Jan; Katus, Hugo; Meder, Benjamin; Steidl, Stefan; Hornegger, Joachim; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2016-12-01

    Personalization is the process of fitting a model to patient data, a critical step towards application of multi-physics computational models in clinical practice. Designing robust personalization algorithms is often a tedious, time-consuming, model- and data-specific process. We propose to use artificial intelligence concepts to learn this task, inspired by how human experts manually perform it. The problem is reformulated in terms of reinforcement learning. In an off-line phase, Vito, our self-taught artificial agent, learns a representative decision process model through exploration of the computational model: it learns how the model behaves under change of parameters. The agent then automatically learns an optimal strategy for on-line personalization. The algorithm is model-independent; applying it to a new model requires only adjusting few hyper-parameters of the agent and defining the observations to match. The full knowledge of the model itself is not required. Vito was tested in a synthetic scenario, showing that it could learn how to optimize cost functions generically. Then Vito was applied to the inverse problem of cardiac electrophysiology and the personalization of a whole-body circulation model. The obtained results suggested that Vito could achieve equivalent, if not better goodness of fit than standard methods, while being more robust (up to 11% higher success rates) and with faster (up to seven times) convergence rate. Our artificial intelligence approach could thus make personalization algorithms generalizable and self-adaptable to any patient and any model. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. WHAT ARE CANADIAN DENTAL PROFESSIONAL STUDENTS TAUGHT ABOUT INFANT, TODDLER AND PRENATAL ORAL HEALTH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroth, Robert J; Quiñonez, Rocio B; Yaffe, Aaron B; Bertone, Mary F; Hardwick, Felicity K; Harrison, Rosamund L

    2015-01-01

    Establishing dental homes for children at an early age is an important step toward instilling good oral health practices and changing trajectories of oral health. The purpose of this study was to determine how accredited dental and dental hygiene programs in Canada prepare students in the areas of infant, toddler and prenatal oral health. An electronic questionnaire was sent to associate deans (academic), program directors or curriculum directors of accredited dental (n = 10) and dental hygiene (n = 39) programs. Participants were asked about infant, toddler and prenatal oral health curricula taught at their institution. Descriptive statistics and bivariate analyses were used to assess the results. A p value = 0.05 was considered significant. Representatives of 10 dental (100%) and 25 dental hygiene (64.1%) programs responded. All dental and 56% of dental hygiene programs recommend a first visit by 12 months. Infant and toddler oral health was noted as a component of most schools' curriculum. Barriers to teaching about or providing clinical experiences in infant and toddler oral health include lack of time, patients, program resources and finances. Most dental (70%) and dental hygiene (82.6%) programs include prenatal oral health as a component of their curriculum, yet only 40% of responding dental and 70% of dental hygiene programs reported having designated time in their curriculum for it. Barriers preventing programs from teaching or providing clinical experiences regarding prenatal oral health include lack of time and patients. Many, but not all dental professional programs are teaching their students about the recommended age for a first dental visit. Better adherence to national guidelines will require programs to address current barriers impeding learning about this important topic and to provide creative opportunities for students regarding prenatal and infant and toddler oral health.

  7. Thematic course design for an undergraduate photonics engineering course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoop, Barry L.

    2009-06-01

    The traditional approach to undergraduate engineering course design is to first present underlying theoretical concepts in the course curriculum and then subsequently apply these theoretical concepts to system-level applications. A traditional photonics engineering course, for example, first reviews electromagnetic field theory, addressing essential concepts from geometrical and wave optics followed by an investigation of the interaction of photons with materials. Building upon these fundamental principles, the students then study the operating principles and design considerations of photoemitters, photodetectors, optical waveguides, and optical modulators. Individual devices are then combined in the design, construction and testing of a system - an example being a fiber optic communication link. This approach is often frustrating for the students because it is the applications that motivated them to study the subject and in many cases they have lost focus and interest well-before the applications are covered. This challenge can be overcome by deliberate course design where relevant thematic applications are introduced early in the course and routinely revisited as a referent. This approach has been shown to effectively motivate student-centric, inquiry-based learning. This thematic course design framework was applied to an undergraduate photonics engineering course,1,2 at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point where an emphasis was placed on inquiry-based investigation of a wavelength division multiplexing communication system introduced during the first lesson of the course and subsequently revisited throughout the remainder of the course. The underlying theory necessary to understand foundational concepts, device behavior and subsystem operation was presented in a just-in-time fashion.

  8. Computer Utilization for Nurse Researchers: A Course for Thesis Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwirian, Patricia M.; Yates, Karan Johnson

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a course that is taught for Master's Degree candidates in a college of nursing. The goal of the course is to introduce the students (who generally have had little/no computer experience) with the mainframe/microcomputer systems, software and people they will need when they are ready to analyze the data from their thesis research. The course begins with an introduction of basic computer terminology and concepts, and computer applications in nursing are surveyed. The remainder of the course provides instruction and experience in four research activities that can be supported by computers: (a) the literature review; (b) data input, storage and retrieval; (c) statistical analysis of data; (d) word processing.

  9. The Effect of Concept Mapping on the Learning Levels of Students in Taking the Course of "Nursing Care of Patients With Glandular Diseases Subject" in Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghakhani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Studies show that traditional teaching methods, such as lecturing, do not lead to in-depth learning. Concept maps have been used for a long time by researchers and teachers to facilitate learning. Objectives The present study aimed to investigate the effect of concept mapping on the learning levels of students in nursing care of patients with glandular diseases subject in Urmia University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods In a quasi-experimental study with a pre-test/post-test design, 28 nursing students were selected and divided into two groups: the experimental and the control groups. After administration of pre-test, the students in the experimental group participated in classes on designing concept maps. Next, lessons on glands and nursing were presented to the students in the experimental and control groups through concept maps and lectures, respectively. At the end of the semester, the learning levels of the students in both groups were evaluated by the post-test. Results The means of the scores of the students as determined by results of the pre-test revealed insignificant statistical difference between the two groups. However, the learning level of the students in the experimental group was significantly higher (P < 0.05. As a metacognitive intervention, concept mapping can contribute to in-depth learning of nursing students. Conclusions According to the findings, it is recommended that concept mapping should be used for teaching and evaluation. Further studies are needed to compare the effect of concept mapping with those of other metacognition approaches on different types of learners.

  10. A Critical Care Hybrid Online Elective Course for Third-Year Pharmacy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Anne M.; Coyle, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess the impact of a four-week hybrid online elective course in critical care on student learning attitudes and outcomes compared to that achieved when the same course was taught using a traditional lecture-based approach. Design. A hybrid online elective course was created that featured video-recorded lectures and in-class skills laboratories. Course evaluations were used to assess student perceptions of learning methods, and examination scores were used to assess learning outcomes. Assessment. One hundred five students enrolled in the critical care elective course from 2011-2014. Fifty-four students completed the traditional lecture course, and 51 completed the hybrid online elective course. The examination scores of students who completed the hybrid course were significantly higher than those of students who completed the traditional lecture course. The majority of students enrolled in the hybrid online elective course stated they preferred that format over a traditional course format and would recommend the elective course to a peer. Conclusion. Students preferred the format used for an online hybrid elective course in critical care over a traditional course format, and performed better on examinations than did students who had completed the course when it was offered in a traditional lecture format. PMID:28090103

  11. A Critical Care Hybrid Online Elective Course for Third-Year Pharmacy Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanat, Matthew A; Tucker, Anne M; Coyle, Elizabeth A

    2016-11-25

    Objective. To assess the impact of a four-week hybrid online elective course in critical care on student learning attitudes and outcomes compared to that achieved when the same course was taught using a traditional lecture-based approach. Design. A hybrid online elective course was created that featured video-recorded lectures and in-class skills laboratories. Course evaluations were used to assess student perceptions of learning methods, and examination scores were used to assess learning outcomes. Assessment. One hundred five students enrolled in the critical care elective course from 2011-2014. Fifty-four students completed the traditional lecture course, and 51 completed the hybrid online elective course. The examination scores of students who completed the hybrid course were significantly higher than those of students who completed the traditional lecture course. The majority of students enrolled in the hybrid online elective course stated they preferred that format over a traditional course format and would recommend the elective course to a peer. Conclusion. Students preferred the format used for an online hybrid elective course in critical care over a traditional course format, and performed better on examinations than did students who had completed the course when it was offered in a traditional lecture format.

  12. Teaching for Conceptual Change in a Density Unit Taught to 7th Graders: Comparing Two Teaching Methodologies--Scientific Inquiry and a Traditional Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holveck, Susan E.

    2012-01-01

    This mixed methods study was designed to compare the effect of using an inquiry teaching methodology and a more traditional teaching methodology on the learning gains of students who were taught a five-week conceptual change unit on density. Seventh graders (N = 479) were assigned to five teachers who taught the same unit on density using either a…

  13. Differences between Good and Poor Child Writers on fMRI Contrasts for Writing Newly Taught and Highly Practiced Letter Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Todd L.; Berninger, Virginia W.; Stock, Pat; Altemeier, Leah; Trivedi, Pamala; Maravilla, Kenneth R.

    2011-01-01

    During fMRI imaging, 12 good and 8 poor writers aged 11 wrote a newly taught pseudoletter and a highly practiced letter. Both letters were formed from the same components, but the pseudoletter had a novel configuration not corresponding to a written English letter form. On the first fMRI contrast between the newly taught pseudoletter and highly…

  14. What Veterans Bring to Civilian Workplaces: A Prototype Toolkit for Helping Veterans Communicate to Private-Sector Employers About the Nontechnical Skills Taught in the Military

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    cooperation. Interpersonal skills (related terms: demonstrating concern for others, demonstrating insight into behavior, oral communication , intercultural ...Taught Skills and competencies beyond those described above emphasized in Basic Combat Training include: • Oral communications : Soldier students from...that the follow- ing skills and competencies are also taught: • Oral communication is practiced regularly, since students participate extensively in

  15. Short Course in the Microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Falana

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, it has become evident that the microbiome is an important environmental factor that affects many physiological processes, such as cell proliferation and differentiation, behaviour, immune function and metabolism. More importantly, it may contribute to a wide variety of diseases, including cancer, inflammatory diseases, metabolic diseases and responses to pathogens. We expect that international, integrative and interdisciplinary translational research teams, along with the emergence of FDA-approved platforms, will set the framework for microbiome-based therapeutics and diagnostics. We recognize that the microbiome ecosystem offers new promise for personalized/precision medicine and targeted treatment for a variety of diseases. The short course was held as a four-session webinar series in April 2015, taught by pioneers and experts in the microbiome ecosystem, covering a broad range of topics from the healthy microbiome to the effects of an altered microbiome from neonates to adults and the long term effects as it is related to disease, from asthma to cancer. We have learned to appreciate how beneficial our microbes are in breaking down our food, fighting off infections and nurturing our immune system, and this information provides us with ideas as to how we can manipulate our microbiome to prevent certain diseases. However, given the variety of applications, there are scientific challenges, though there are very promising areas in reference to the clinical benefits of understanding more about our microbiome, whether in our gut or on our skin: the outlook is bright. A summary of the short course is presented as a meeting dispatch.

  16. The subjective experience of collaboration in interprofessional tutor teams: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The Center for Interprofessional Training in Medicine at the Faculty of Medicine Carl Gustav Carus at the Technische Universität Dresden, Germany, has offered courses covering interprofessional material since the winter semester 2014/15. The unusual feature of these courses is that they are co-taught by peer tutors from medicine and nursing. This study investigates the subjective experiences of these tutors during the collaborative preparation and teaching of these tutorials with the aim of identifying the effects of equal participation in the perceptions and assessments of the other professional group.Method: Semi-structured, guideline-based interviews were held with six randomly selected tutors. The interviews were analyzed using structuring content analysis.Results: The results show that collaborative work led to reflection, mostly by the university student tutors, on the attitudes held. However, the co-tutors from each professional group were perceived to different degrees as being representative of those in their profession. Asked to master a shared assignment in a non-clinical context, the members of the different professional groups met on equal footing, even if the medical students had already gathered more teaching experience and thus mostly assumed a mentoring role over the course of working on and realizing the teaching units. The nursing tutors were primarily focused on their role as tutor. Both professional groups emphasized that prior to the collaboration they had an insufficient or no idea about the theoretical knowledge or practical skills of the other professional group. Overall, the project was rated as beneficial, and interprofessional education was endorsed.Conclusion: In the discussion, recommendations based on the insights are made for joint tutor training of both professional groups. According to these recommendations, harmonizing the teaching abilities of all tutors is essential to ensure equality during cooperation

  17. How parasitology is taught in medical faculties in Europe? Parasitology, lost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, Fabrizio

    2009-11-01

    The results of a survey in different medical faculties in Europe, after the distribution of a dedicated questionnaire, are presented and compared with those obtained 10 years ago in a similar manner. In particular, the situation in France, Germany, Italy and Poland shows the decrease of Parasitology Departments in many Faculties, as well as the reduction of the number of hours dedicated to this discipline in independent courses. Additional information is provided from several other countries. European situation is compared with that of North, South America, China and Southeast Asia. Some suggestions are given to improve the scenario.

  18. Infusing Geoethics One Geoscience Course at a Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, V. S.

    2016-12-01

    Positive change is sometimes difficult to accomplish within a university. While it might be easy to get faculty members and administrators to agree that facilitating the development of students as ethical geoscientists is a desirable goal in the abstract, formally proposing concrete plans to achieve that goal might generate negative responses and even roadblocks. For example, it might be a challenge to pass a course in geoethics through a college curriculum committee, because ethics is a topic usually taught by the philosophy faculty. Although there are recognized subfields in engineering, medical, business, and legal ethics that are commonly taught by faculty members in those respective departments, geoethics is not yet recognized in this way. A more productive approach might be to begin with change that can be accomplished simply, within existing courses. Faculty members are usually granted broad discretionary authority to decide how material is to be presented in geoscience courses, including required core courses. My suggestion is to structure a course that presents all of the material normally expected under that course title, but in such a way that the ethical dimensions are intentionally and consistently highlighted. As with any change in the way we present course material, there is a startup cost to be borne by the teacher. One cost is the time needed to deepen our understanding of applied professional and scientific ethics; however, this is more of a personal and professional benefit than a cost in the long run. Infusing a course with an awareness of ethical issues also takes prior thought and planning to be successful. But, of course, that is no different from any other improvement in science education. Impressions from a semester's effort to include geoethics in a required core course in structural geology to about 25 students will be shared. The main course topic is not particularly relevant, because there are a number of ethical questions that students

  19. Increased course structure improves performance in introductory biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Scott; Haak, David; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2011-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that highly structured course designs, which implement reading quizzes and/or extensive in-class active-learning activities and weekly practice exams, can lower failure rates in an introductory biology course for majors, compared with low-structure course designs that are based on lecturing and a few high-risk assessments. We controlled for 1) instructor effects by analyzing data from quarters when the same instructor taught the course, 2) exam equivalence with new assessments called the Weighted Bloom's Index and Predicted Exam Score, and 3) student equivalence using a regression-based Predicted Grade. We also tested the hypothesis that points from reading quizzes, clicker questions, and other "practice" assessments in highly structured courses inflate grades and confound comparisons with low-structure course designs. We found no evidence that points from active-learning exercises inflate grades or reduce the impact of exams on final grades. When we controlled for variation in student ability, failure rates were lower in a moderately structured course design and were dramatically lower in a highly structured course design. This result supports the hypothesis that active-learning exercises can make students more skilled learners and help bridge the gap between poorly prepared students and their better-prepared peers.

  20. Features of the Masters Programme in Nonlinear Dynamical Systems and Control Processes Taught in English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Golubev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The last three decades have witnessed the great breakthrough in nonlinear control theory. Nonlinear models and nonlinear techniques play now the central role in control engineering, since they allow to describe nonlocal behavior of a dynamical system and obtain results that are valid in large regions of the state space.However, to our knowledge, at the same time there is a serious lack of the postgraduate educational programmes properly covering the great variety of nonlinear design tools. One can find a lot of masters programmes in automatic control dealing with numerous applications and linear control theory. But, unfortunately, most of them don't provide the comprehensive knowledge of nonlinear control techniques. Typically only basics of nonlinear dynamic inversion control are studied.This note deals with the Masters educational programme offered in English by the Department of Mathematical Modeling at Bauman Moscow State Technical University. The programme is specifically focused on nonlinear control techniques. We suggest the modular structure of the educational programme in question. The students are provided both with the theoretical courses in modern nonlinear control theory and applied courses in control of unmanned aerial vehicles and mobile robots.Application examples in aerospace control are considered. Examples of mathematical models for unmanned aerial vehicles that can be used for educational purposes are given.One of the potential application areas for the results discussed in this paper is preparing Masters educational programmes in the field of automatic control of technical plants like unmanned aerial vehicles and mobile robots.

  1. Local species richness of Central European hoverflies (Diptera : Syrphidae): a lesson taught by local faunal lists

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Keil, P.; Konvička, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 5 (2005), s. 471-426 ISSN 1366-9516 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB6007306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : central Europe * diversity determinants * geography Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.345, year: 2005

  2. The aesthetics of forestry: What has empirical preference research taught us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribe, Robert G.

    1989-01-01

    Multiple-use forest management has come to include an attention to scenic values, and methods are being developed to incorporate aesthetic considerations into decision making. A considerable body of scientific research has been conducted exploring public preferences for forest landscapes and intersubjective and contextual influences upon their perception. This research is surveyed. Findings regarding the perception of forest conditions, such as tree density and size, ground cover, species makeup and nonmanagement are considered. The scenic effects of forest treatments such as thinning, burning, and chemical application are outlined. Findings for harvest and regeneration practices such as clear-cutting, shelterwoods, selection cuts, and slash treatments are reported. Advances that consider the effects of time upon forest beauty and experiences are explored, along with a problem in multiple-use evaluation of scenic changes. Research on these topics and on observer intersubjective problems and general theory development is supported as a course of advancement in the field.

  3. Technology, Science, Physics and Culture: Scientific View of the World as a Non-technical Subject in Engineering Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelen, Josef

    1997-01-01

    Argues that technology stems from science, and science represents important and specific values in the whole of culture. Such topics can contribute to educating the whole and balanced engineer. Describes a course taught at the Czech Technical University in Prague on the scientist's understanding of the world. (Author/PVD)

  4. Badminton: Course Proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, David G.

    A proposal is presented for a Community College of Philadelphia Life Sciences and Allied Health Services course in Badminton. Following a standard cover form, a statement of purpose explains that the course is designed to introduce students to the techniques, knowledge, and strategies of badminton. Next, course goals and a course outline are…

  5. Opinion of Croatian Teacher Education Students Regarding the Quality of the Visual Arts Teaching Didactics Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijana Županić Benić

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess student satisfaction with the Visual Arts Teaching Methodology course taught at the Croatian faculties of teacher education and identify important areas for improvement. The students’ open-ended, qualitative responses were reviewed and each response was assigned to one or more of the following categories: teacher performance, student teaching practice, assessment and grading, course organization, availability of learning materials and resources, and student teaching competences. The results indicate that the students are most satisfied with teacher performance, but they are also the least satisfied with course organization and recommend the most improvements in this area.

  6. Comparing Social Isolation Effects on Students Attrition in Online Versus Face-to-Face Courses in Computer Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad Ali

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares the effect of social isolation on students enrolled in online courses versus students enrolled in on campus courses (called in this paper Face-to-Face or F2F. Grade data was collected from one online section and two F2F sections of a computer literacy course that was recently taught by one of the authors of this study. The same instructor taught all sections thereby providing a controlled comparison between the two forms of teaching (F2F and online. This paper first introduces the plan and the limitation of this study. It provides a literature review and notes the trend of social isolation found in online courses. This paper then presents a summary of the collected data; and offers a conclusion based on the collected data.

  7. Interrogating the Lesson Plan in a Pre-Service Methods Course: Evidence from a University in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simwa, Kefa L.; Modiba, Maropeng

    2015-01-01

    The paper reports on research that examined how the content of a History methods course, taught in a university in Kenya, influenced student teachers' lesson planning and pedagogical skills. A lecture on a lesson plan, micro-teaching lesson plan documents and presentations were examined to determine student teachers' preparedness for teaching the…

  8. Intercultural Communication Skills among Prospective Turkish Teachers of German in the Context of the Comparative Country Knowledge Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basbagi, R. Ragip

    2012-01-01

    This study develops and provides a sample implementation of a seminar for the "Comparative Country Knowledge" course taught in the German Language Teaching departments of Turkish universities. The study was conducted with the participation of forty-seven 1st year students attending a German Language Teaching department. As part of the…

  9. A TELL English Course to Meet the Needs of a Multilevel BA in ELT Group: What Was Wrong?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes Fierro, María del Carmen; Delgado Alvarado, Natanael

    2015-01-01

    A Technology Enhanced Language Learning (TELL) course was designed to meet the needs of a multilevel first-semester group of students of the BA in English Language Teaching (ELT) taught at the School of Languages of the Juarez University of the State of Durango (ELE-UJED), Mexico. Amongst the relevant needs, students were to reach a CEFR B1.1…

  10. Impact of Hands-On Research Experience on Students' Learning in an Introductory Management Information System Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun; Sankar, Chetan S.

    2013-01-01

    Although students in Introductory Information Systems courses are taught new technology concepts, the complexity and constantly changing nature of these technologies makes it challenging to deliver the concepts effectively. Aiming to improve students' learning experiences, this research utilized the five phases of design science methodology to…

  11. Interdisciplinary Team-Teaching Experience for a Computer and Nuclear Energy Course for Electrical and Computer Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Charles; Jackson, Deborah; Keiller, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A new, interdisciplinary, team-taught course has been designed to educate students in Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) so that they can respond to global and urgent issues concerning computer control systems in nuclear power plants. This paper discusses our experience and assessment of the interdisciplinary computer and nuclear energy…

  12. Do Student-Centred Learning Activities Improve Learning Outcomes on a BTEC Applied Science Course in FE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dear, Denise V.

    2017-01-01

    This article provides quantitative evidence on the effect on learning outcomes of contrasting teaching styles applied to a class of Level 3 final-year students on a BTEC Applied Science course within a further education college in the UK. Two topics within a unit were taught using either a student-centred or teacher-centric (instructional)…

  13. "Recombinant Protein of the Day": Using Daily Student Presentations to Add Real-World Aspects to a Biotechnology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Justin F.

    2013-01-01

    To provide a realistic view of the biotechnology industry for students, a novel course focusing on recombinant proteins and their importance in medicine, pharmaceuticals, industry, scientific research, and agriculture was developed. ''Designer Proteins and Society,'' an upper-division elective, was taught in the Fall 2012 semester to 16 junior,…

  14. Reflections by potential health care providers on a research methodology course taught under a primary health care centre: An experience of inter-professional education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farah A. Mansuri, FCPS; Lubna A. Baig, PhD; Waseem A. Siddiqui, MCPS; Tasneem A. Burhany, MRCGP; Sarwat S. Sultana, MCPS; Nighat Huda, MS

    2017-01-01

    ... من قبل المشاركين في مجال التواصل واستكشاف آراء المشاركين حول تقييم برنامج التدريب. طرق البحث: تم اختيار ما مجموعه ٩٦ مشاركا من بينهم أعضاء هيئة تدريس، وطلبة طب، وطلبة خدمة...

  15. Reflections by potential health care providers on a research methodology course taught under a primary health care centre: An experience of inter-professional education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farah A. Mansuri, FCPS; Lubna A. Baig, PhD; Waseem A. Siddiqui, MCPS; Tasneem A. Burhany, MRCGP; Sarwat S. Sultana, MCPS; Nighat Huda, MS

    2017-01-01

    أهداف البحث: تتطلب بحوث الصحة العامة نهجا تعاونيا أثناء العمل مع المجتمعات لمكافحة التحديات المتوقعة في الميدان. لذلك، أُضيف برنامج تدريبي في منهجية البحث...

  16. Reflections by potential health care providers on a research methodology course taught under a primary health care centre: An experience of inter-professional education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah A. Mansuri, FCPS

    2017-06-01

    الاستنتاجات: وُجد أن التعلم فعَّال باستخدام العلاقة المتداخلة بين التخصصات بالنسبة لأعضاء هيئة التدريس مقارنة بتعلّم العمل الجماعي بصورة أفضل من قبل الطلبة. إضافة إلى ذلك، كان من الواضح أن إيصال المعلومات للأُسر من قِبَل الطلبة كان أفضل مما كان عليه من قِبَل أعضاء هيئة التدريس.

  17. Reflections by potential health care providers on a research methodology course taught under a primary health care centre: An experience of inter-professional education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farah A. Mansuri, FCPS; Lubna A. Baig, PhD; Waseem A. Siddiqui, MCPS; Tasneem A. Burhany, MRCGP; Sarwat S. Sultana, MCPS; Nighat Huda, MS

    2017-01-01

    ... اجتماعية، وفنيون صحيون خلال الفترة من مارس إلى سبتمبر ٢٠١٠. كان البحث متعدد المناهج حيث تم تحليل كفاءات الاتصال في الدورة وانطباعات المشاركين حول تقييم الدورة وعولجت...

  18. Subjection and subjectification / technique and techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Clarizio

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Course on The Hermeneutic of the Subject problematizes a theme that goes through the whole Foucault’s thought, that of technique. The article, through a dialogue among Foucault, Heidegger and Simondon, aims to trace the development of this theme, also asking the way the technique works when related to processes of subjection and subjectification.

  19. Introductory course on differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Gorain, Ganesh C

    2014-01-01

    Introductory Course on DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS provides an excellent exposition of the fundamentals of ordinary and partial differential equations and is ideally suited for a first course of undergraduate students of mathematics, physics and engineering. The aim of this book is to present the elementary theories of differential equations in the forms suitable for use of those students whose main interest in the subject are based on simple mathematical ideas. KEY FEATURES: Discusses the subject in a systematic manner without sacrificing mathematical rigour. A variety of exercises drill the students in problem solving in view of the mathematical theories explained in the book. Worked out examples illustrated according to the theories developed in the book with possible alternatives. Exhaustive collection of problems and the simplicity of presentation differentiate this book from several others. Material contained will help teachers as well as aspiring students of different competitive examinations.

  20. [The ATLS Courses in Italy. Twelve years experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, D; Spada, P; Di Mugno, M; Runfola, M; Bianchi, M G; Mao, P; Bruna, L; Olivero, G

    2007-03-01

    ATLS Courses were introduced in the USA in 1980 and have been taught in Italy since 1994. Through theoretical lessons and practical sessions, their scope is to provide proper training for doctors with every kind of speciality who work in Emergency Departments, in order to prepare them to rapidly and effectively intervene on a patient who has suffered a serious trauma. Universities, in fact, do not prepare doctors adequately on this topic, while the application of the ATLS method in the first hours after trauma can effectively improve the prognosis of the patient. This study collects the data of the Italian experience in ATLS training, which has been carried out under the aegis of the Italian Chapter of the American College of Surgeons. The ATLS Courses have become widespread throughout our Country, which today is the fourth in the world for number of courses held every year.

  1. Cross Coursing in Mathematics: Physical Modelling in Differential Equations Crossing to Discrete Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Brian

    2012-01-01

    We give an example of cross coursing in which a subject or approach in one course in undergraduate mathematics is used in a completely different course. This situation crosses falling body modelling in an upper level differential equations course into a modest discrete dynamical systems unit of a first-year mathematics course. (Contains 1 figure.)

  2. Polarization of physics on global courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alinea, Allan L.; Naylor, Wade

    2015-03-01

    Since October 2010, the Chemistry-Biology Combined Major Program, an international course taught in English at Osaka University, has been teaching small classes (no more than 20 in size). We present data from the Force Concept Inventory (FCI) given to first-year classical mechanics students (N = 47 students over three years) pre and post score, for a class that predominantly uses interactive engagement, such as MasteringPhysics. Our findings show a G-factor improved score of about ˜0.18, which is marginally about the average of a traditional-based course. Furthermore, we analyze in detail a set of six questions from the FCI, involving the identification of forces acting on a body. We find that student answers tend to cluster about ‘polarizing choices’—a pair of choices containing the correct choice and a wrong choice, with the latter corresponding to a superset of forces in the former. Our results are suggestive that students have a good idea of the right set of forces acting on a given system, but the inclusion of extra force(s) brings about confusion; something that may be explained by misleading ontological categorization of forces. In an appendix A we also comment on possible correlations between the pre/post score and the level of English ability on entry to the course.

  3. A new experience: the course of ethics in engineering in the Department of Civil Engineering, University of Granada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Martín, Luisa María; Hernández-Montes, Enrique; Segura-Naya, Armando

    2010-06-01

    A course in professional ethics for civil engineers was taught for the first time in Spain during the academic year 2007/08. In this paper a survey on the satisfaction and expectation of the course is presented. Surprisingly the students sought moral and ethical principles for their own ordinary lives as well as for their profession. Students were concerned about the law, but in their actions they were more concerned with their conscience, aware that it can be separate from the law.

  4. Development of a Nanomaterials One-Week Intersession Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Keith A.; Bullen, Heather A.

    2008-01-01

    A novel one-week intersession lecture-lab hybrid course on nanomaterials is presented. The course provided a combination of background theory and hands-on laboratory experiments to educate students about nanomaterials and nanotechnology. The design of the course, subject matter, and laboratory experiments are discussed. Topics and level were…

  5. Western medical ethics taught to junior medical students can cross cultural and linguistic boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ypinazar, Valmae A; Margolis, Stephen A

    2004-07-30

    Little is known about teaching medical ethics across cultural and linguistic boundaries. This study examined two successive cohorts of first year medical students in a six year undergraduate MBBS program. The objective was to investigate whether Arabic speaking students studying medicine in an Arabic country would be able to correctly identify some of the principles of Western medical ethical reasoning. This cohort study was conducted on first year students in a six-year undergraduate program studying medicine in English, their second language at a medical school in the Arabian Gulf. The ethics teaching was based on the four-principle approach (autonomy, beneficence, non-malfeasance and justice) and delivered by a non-Muslim native English speaker with no knowledge of the Arabic language. Although the course was respectful of Arabic culture and tradition, the content excluded an analysis of Islamic medical ethics and focused on Western ethical reasoning. Following two 45-minute interactive seminars, students in groups of 3 or 4 visited a primary health care centre for one morning, sitting in with an attending physician seeing his or her patients in Arabic. Each student submitted a personal report for summative assessment detailing the ethical issues they had observed. All 62 students enrolled in these courses participated. Each student acting independently was able to correctly identify a median number of 4 different medical ethical issues (range 2-9) and correctly identify and label accurately a median of 2 different medical ethical issues (range 2-7) There were no significant correlations between their English language skills or general academic ability and the number or accuracy of ethical issues identified. This study has demonstrated that these students could identify medical ethical issues based on Western constructs, despite learning in English, their second language, being in the third week of their medical school experience and with minimal instruction

  6. Western medical ethics taught to junior medical students can cross cultural and linguistic boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margolis Stephen A

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about teaching medical ethics across cultural and linguistic boundaries. This study examined two successive cohorts of first year medical students in a six year undergraduate MBBS program. Methods The objective was to investigate whether Arabic speaking students studying medicine in an Arabic country would be able to correctly identify some of the principles of Western medical ethical reasoning. This cohort study was conducted on first year students in a six-year undergraduate program studying medicine in English, their second language at a medical school in the Arabian Gulf. The ethics teaching was based on the four-principle approach (autonomy, beneficence, non-malfeasance and justice and delivered by a non-Muslim native English speaker with no knowledge of the Arabic language. Although the course was respectful of Arabic culture and tradition, the content excluded an analysis of Islamic medical ethics and focused on Western ethical reasoning. Following two 45-minute interactive seminars, students in groups of 3 or 4 visited a primary health care centre for one morning, sitting in with an attending physician seeing his or her patients in Arabic. Each student submitted a personal report for summative assessment detailing the ethical issues they had observed. Results All 62 students enrolled in these courses participated. Each student acting independently was able to correctly identify a median number of 4 different medical ethical issues (range 2–9 and correctly identify and label accurately a median of 2 different medical ethical issues (range 2–7 There were no significant correlations between their English language skills or general academic ability and the number or accuracy of ethical issues identified. Conclusions This study has demonstrated that these students could identify medical ethical issues based on Western constructs, despite learning in English, their second language, being in the third

  7. Does Stereotype Threat Affect Post-Course Scores on the Astronomy Diagnostic Test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, G. L.; Hufnagel, B.; Landato, J. M.; Hodari, A. K.

    2003-12-01

    During the 1990s, Claude Steele and others demonstrated that women mathematics students under-performed while men over-performed on selected GRE questions when told that the exam could differentiate by gender. Stereotype threat is triggered for these women when they fear someone else may negatively stereotype them, and therefore, their performance is affected. In a limited study involving 229 students, we investigated the effect of stereotype threat on performance on the Astronomy Diagnostic Test (ADT). The ADT was administered as a pre-test in four introductory astronomy classes intended for non-science majors. The same professors taught pairs of classes at the University of Maryland, a large research institution, and W. R. Harper College, a small liberal arts school. The classes were treated the same until the final day before the post-course ADT was given. One "threatened" class at each campus was told that gender mattered so they should be sure to include it on the ADT. The "control" classes were told that gender does not matter. The results show no stereotype threat effect on the women in these introductory classes. The university men did slightly over-perform at low statistical significance. As Steele suggested, students must identify with a subject in order to strongly invoke a stereotype threat. This research was supported in part by the National Science Foundation through grants REC-0089239 to GLD, DGE-97014489 to BH, and DGE-9714452 for AKH.

  8. Research on historical environments in elementary schools’ social sciences textbooks taught in Northern Cyprus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazım Kaşot

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive study has yet to be carried out depending on the historical environment particular to the Elementary Schools in Northern Cyprus. The aim of this study is hence to determine whether the coverage of historical environment subjects in elementary school social sciences textbooks is absorbed or not by the 4th and 5th Grades in the context of both content and visuals. The method of study analysed has been organised in accordance with the qualitative research. The population was not indicated pursuant to qualitative research and so purposive sampling was implemented. The textbooks used were mainly selected from the afore-mentioned grades and classes. All the data collected were based on the textbooks used during the assessment process. The data was gathered in accordance with the document analysis technique and everything was analysed in detail. The categories used were generated after the authors performed analysis by utilising textbooks. To ensure the validity of the categories, literature scanning was undertaken and expert opinion was taken. The category definitions were written for public access. Moreover, units, titles and sub-titles were chosen as registration units and studied accordingly. Thus, the texts in the textbooks were guaranteed to cover the sufficient coverage and dimension for teaching the subject. The frequency of categories used under the text in historical environment was given and the number of words for the scope was also indicated. The size of visuals used in textbooks was given in accordance with the categories. As a result of the study, while 5th Grade textbooks cover historical environment subjects, there was no indication for the 4th Grade textbooks.

  9. How Is Science Being Taught? Measuring Evidence-Based Teaching Practices across Undergraduate Science Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinkwater, Michael J.; Matthews, Kelly E.; Seiler, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    While there is a wealth of research evidencing the benefits of active-learning approaches, the extent to which these teaching practices are adopted in the sciences is not well known. The aim of this study is to establish an evidential baseline of teaching practices across a bachelor of science degree program at a large research-intensive Australian university. Our purpose is to contribute to knowledge on the adoption levels of evidence-based teaching practices by faculty within a science degree program and inform our science curriculum review in practical terms. We used the Teaching Practices Inventory (TPI) to measure the use of evidence-based teaching approaches in 129 courses (units of study) across 13 departments. We compared the results with those from a Canadian institution to identify areas in need of improvement at our institution. We applied a regression analysis to the data and found that the adoption of evidence-based teaching practices differs by discipline and is higher in first-year classes at our institution. The study demonstrates that the TPI can be used in different institutional contexts and provides data that can inform practice and policy. PMID:28232589

  10. Are Future Doctors Taught to Respond to Intimate Partner Violence? A Study of Australian Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valpied, Jodie; Aprico, Karina; Clewett, Janita; Hegarty, Kelsey

    2015-07-16

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among women of childbearing age. This study aimed to describe delivery of IPV education in Australian pre-vocational medical degrees, and barriers and facilitators influencing this delivery. Eighteen Australian medical schools offering pre-vocational medical degrees were identified. Two were excluded as they had not finalized new curricula. One declined to participate. At least one staff member from each of the remaining 15 schools completed a telephone survey. Main outcome measures included whether IPV education was delivered within the degree, at what stage, and whether it was compulsory; mode and number of hours of delivery; and barriers and facilitators to delivery. Twelve of the medical schools delivered IPV education (median time spent per course = 2 hr). IPV content was typically included as part of Obstetrics and Gynecology or General Practice curriculum. Barriers included time constraints and lack of faculty commitment, resources, and funding. The two schools that successfully implemented a comprehensive IPV curriculum used an integrated, advocacy-based approach, with careful forward planning. Most Australian pre-vocational medical students receive little or no IPV education. The need remains for a more consistent, comprehensive approach to IPV education in medical degrees. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Concepts first: A course with improved educational outcomes and parity for underrepresented minority groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, D. J.

    2017-08-01

    Two active learning physics courses were taught and compared. The "concepts first" course was organized to teach only concepts in the first part of the class, the ultimate goal being to increase students' problem-solving abilities much later in the class. The other course was taught in the same quarter by the same instructor using the same curricular materials, but covered material in the standard (chapter-by-chapter) order. After accounting for incoming student characteristics, students from the concepts-first course scored significantly better in two outcome measures: their grade on the final exam and the grade received in their subsequent physics course. Moreover, in the concepts-first class course, students from groups underrepresented in physics had final exam scores and class grades that were indistinguishable from other students. Finally, students who took at least one concepts-first course in introductory physics were found to have significantly higher rates of graduation with a STEM major than students from this cohort who did not.

  12. Hunger can be taught: Hunger Recognition regulates eating and improves energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampolini, Mario; Lovell-Smith, H David; Kenealy, Timothy; Bianchi, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    A set of spontaneous hunger sensations, Initial Hunger (IH), has been associated with low blood glucose concentration (BG). These sensations may arise pre-meal or can be elicited by delaying a meal. With self-measurement of BG, subjects can be trained to formally identify and remember these sensations (Hunger Recognition). Subjects can then be trained to ensure that IH is present pre-meal for most meals and that their pre-meal BG is therefore low consistently (IH Meal Pattern). IH includes the epigastric Empty Hollow Sensation (the most frequent and recognizable) as well as less specific sensations such as fatigue or light-headedness which is termed inanition. This report reviews the method for identifying IH and the effect of the IH Meal Pattern on energy balance. In adults, the IH Meal Pattern has been shown to significantly decrease energy intake by one-third, decrease preprandial BG, reduce glycosylated hemoglobin, and reduce insulin resistance and weight in those who are insulin resistant or overweight. Young children as well as adults can be trained in Hunger Recognition, giving them an elegant method for achieving energy balance without the stress of restraint-type dieting. The implications of improving insulin sensitivity through improved energy balance are as wide as improving immune activity.

  13. Hunger can be taught: Hunger Recognition regulates eating and improves energy balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampolini, Mario; Lovell-Smith, H David; Kenealy, Timothy; Bianchi, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    A set of spontaneous hunger sensations, Initial Hunger (IH), has been associated with low blood glucose concentration (BG). These sensations may arise pre-meal or can be elicited by delaying a meal. With self-measurement of BG, subjects can be trained to formally identify and remember these sensations (Hunger Recognition). Subjects can then be trained to ensure that IH is present pre-meal for most meals and that their pre-meal BG is therefore low consistently (IH Meal Pattern). IH includes the epigastric Empty Hollow Sensation (the most frequent and recognizable) as well as less specific sensations such as fatigue or light-headedness which is termed inanition. This report reviews the method for identifying IH and the effect of the IH Meal Pattern on energy balance. In adults, the IH Meal Pattern has been shown to significantly decrease energy intake by one-third, decrease preprandial BG, reduce glycosylated hemoglobin, and reduce insulin resistance and weight in those who are insulin resistant or overweight. Young children as well as adults can be trained in Hunger Recognition, giving them an elegant method for achieving energy balance without the stress of restraint-type dieting. The implications of improving insulin sensitivity through improved energy balance are as wide as improving immune activity. PMID:23825928

  14. Methods for creativity stimulation of students in Math courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.P. PURCARU

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present paper is to highlight, using a comparative study, different methods for the stimulation of the creativity of students taking part in classes of Algebra, Geometry, Differential Equations, Special Mathematics. It is analyzed and exemplified the development of the students’ creativity with: scientific contents taught at mentioned disciplines; the teaching and learning methods used at courses and seminars having the goal of teaching this content; the employed methods and evaluation tools; other approached strategies of differentiate instruction. The creativity of the teacher is also taken into consideration.

  15. Who Teaches Primary Physical Education? Change and Transformation through the Eyes of Subject Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Luke; Green, Ken

    2017-01-01

    Primary physical education (PE) lessons tend to be taught by one, or a combination of, three different groups: generalist classroom teachers, specialist primary PE teachers and so-called adults other than teachers, who are almost exclusively sports coaches. Drawing upon data gathered from one-to-one interviews with 36 subject leaders (SLs), this…

  16. A Case Study on Teaching of Energy as a Subject for 9th Graders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezen, Sevim; Bayrak, Celal; Aykutlu, Isil

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to describe how energy subject is taught in 9th grades. The study is designed as a descriptive case study with the participation of 3 physics teachers and 85 students. Data were obtained through observation, interviews, and documents, and they were analyzed through descriptive analysis method. In the observations made at the…

  17. The Teacher as One of the Factors Influencing Students' Perception of Biology as a School Subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiatko, Milan; Torkar, Gregor; Rovnanova, Lenka

    2017-01-01

    The main aim of our research was to determine whether the teacher is one of the factors influencing students' perception of biology as a school subject. The study also aimed to identify the influence of certain other factors in this regard, specifically: students' gender and place of residence, the number of biology teachers who have taught the…

  18. Management Education and Transformational Learning: The Integration of Mindfulness in an MBA Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuechler, William; Stedham, Yvonne

    2018-01-01

    Most management classes are taught by modified traditional techniques in which the acquisition of facts and rote skills is primary. However, traditional pedagogies fall short when the desired result is not inculcating knowledge about a subject, but rather constructively altering worldviews and behaviors. Leadership, ethics, strategic management,…

  19. Undergraduate Course on Global Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, G. A.; Weidner, D. J.

    2008-12-01

    GEO 311: Geoscience and Global Concerns is an undergraduate course taught at Stony Brook University during each fall semester. The class meets twice per week, with one session consisting of a lecture and the other, an interactive activity in a computer laboratory that engages the students in exploring real world problems. A specific concern or issue serves as a focus during each session. The students are asked to develop answers to a series of questions that engage them in identifying causes of the problem, connections with the Earth system, relationships to other problems, and possible solutions on both a global and local scale. The questions are designed to facilitate an integrated view of the Earth system. Examples of topics that the students explore during the laboratory sessions are: 1) fossil fuel reserves and consumption rates and the effect of their use on climate, 2) alternative sources of energy and associated technologies, such as solar photovoltaics, nuclear energy, tidal power, geothermal energy, and wind power, 3) effects of tsunamis and earthquakes on human populations and infrastructure, 4) climate change, and 5) hurricanes and storms. The selection and scheduling of topics often takes advantage of the occurrence of media attention or events that can serve as case studies. Tools used during the computer sessions include Google Earth, ArcGIS, spreadsheets, and web sites that offer data and maps. The students use Google Earth or ArcGIS to map events such as earthquakes, storms, tsunamis, and changes in the extent of polar ice. Spreadsheets are employed to discern trends in fossil fuel supply and consumption, and to experiment with models that make predictions for the future. We present examples of several of these activities and discuss how they facilitate an understanding of interrelationships within the Earth system.

  20. Hunger can be taught: Hunger Recognition regulates eating and improves energy balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciampolini M

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Mario Ciampolini,1 David Lovell-Smith,2 Timothy Kenealy,3 Riccardo Bianchi4 1Unit of Preventive Gastroenterology, Department of Pediatrics, Università di Firenze, Florence, Italy; 2Department of General Practice, University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand; 3Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; 4Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, USA Abstract: A set of spontaneous hunger sensations, Initial Hunger (IH, has been associated with low blood glucose concentration (BG. These sensations may arise pre-meal or can be elicited by delaying a meal. With self-measurement of BG, subjects can be trained to formally identify and remember these sensations (Hunger Recognition. Subjects can then be trained to ensure that IH is present pre-meal for most meals and that their pre-meal BG is therefore low consistently (IH Meal Pattern. IH includes the epigastric Empty Hollow Sensation (the most frequent and recognizable as well as less specific sensations such as fatigue or light-headedness which is termed inanition. This report reviews the method for identifying IH and the effect of the IH Meal Pattern on energy balance. In adults, the IH Meal Pattern has been shown to significantly decrease energy intake by one-third, decrease preprandial BG, reduce glycosylated hemoglobin, and reduce insulin resistance and weight in those who are insulin resistant or overweight. Young children as well as adults can be trained in Hunger Recognition, giving them an elegant method for achieving energy balance without the stress of restraint-type dieting. The implications of improving insulin sensitivity through improved energy balance are as wide as improving immune activity. Keywords: energy intake, hunger, energy balance, food intake regulation, prevention, insulin resistance, obesity, diabetes, inflammation, risks

  1. Are medical students being taught anatomy in a way that best prepares them to be a physician?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meral Savran, Mona; Tranum-Jensen, Jørgen; Frost Clementsen, Paul

    2015-01-01

    was assessed by administering the tests to clinical consultants, anatomy teachers, and pre-course medical students. Post-course medical students took both tests to explore the focus of the course, i.e., whether it facilitated clinical reasoning. RESULTS: The pre-course students scored significantly lower than...... the teachers and post-course students on both tests and lower than the consultants on the consultants' test (P students (P ... tests). The post-course students scored significantly lower on the consultants' test (P = 0.001) and significantly higher on the teachers' test (P = 0.02) than the consultants. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates poor performances by medical students on a test containing clinically relevant anatomy...

  2. The subjectivity of scientists and the Bayesian approach

    CERN Document Server

    Press, James S

    2001-01-01

    Comparing and contrasting the reality of subjectivity in the work of history's great scientists and the modern Bayesian approach to statistical analysisScientists and researchers are taught to analyze their data from an objective point of view, allowing the data to speak for themselves rather than assigning them meaning based on expectations or opinions. But scientists have never behaved fully objectively. Throughout history, some of our greatest scientific minds have relied on intuition, hunches, and personal beliefs to make sense of empirical data-and these subjective influences have often a

  3. Planning Modular Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Alan

    1972-01-01

    A modular'' course is composed of bits of self-consistent knowledge,'' which can be put together in a predefined pattern to attain the desired objective; author gives a theory of modular course construction. (Author/SP)

  4. Intellectual disability health content within medical curriculum: an audit of what our future doctors are taught.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trollor, Julian N; Ruffell, Beth; Tracy, Jane; Torr, Jennifer J; Durvasula, Seeta; Iacono, Teresa; Eagleson, Claire; Lennox, Nicolas

    2016-04-11

    There is a high burden of unmet health needs for people with intellectual disability. Despite experiencing significantly higher rates of morbidity and mortality compared with the general population, this group faces greater barriers to accessing healthcare. While increasing workplace capacity is one way to reduce this inequitable access, previous research indicates a scarcity of undergraduate teaching in intellectual disability. The aim of the study was to determine the extent and nature of intellectual disability content currently offered within medical degree curricula. All Australian universities (n = 20) providing accredited medical training were invited to participate in a two-phase audit via an email invitation to the Dean of each medical school. The Dean's delegate from 14 medical schools completed Phase 1, which involved a questionnaire or telephone interview about the overall medical course structure. Unit coordinators and/or teaching staff from 12 medical schools completed Phase 2, which involved an online survey about intellectual disability content within the curriculum. In Australia, medical school curricula contain a median of 2.55 h of compulsory intellectual disability content. The majority of universities only offer a small amount of compulsory content. Of compulsory units, intellectual disability teaching is minimal in sexual health and emergency medicine (only one unit offered in one school for each). Topics of key relevance in intellectual disability health such as human rights issues, interdisciplinary team work and preventative health are poorly represented in intellectual disability teaching. Elective content varies markedly across universities (1 to 122 h), but emergency medicine, women's health, men's health and many other specialist medicine areas are not represented. Inclusive practice is inconsistent in degree and nature, but a majority of universities (nine) involve people with intellectual disability in the development or delivery

  5. Concept and benefits of the Inverted Classroom method for a competency-based biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühl, Susanne J; Toberer, Matthias; Keis, Oliver; Tolks, Daniel; Fischer, Martin R; Kühl, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background: Medical students often have a problem recognising the relevance of basic science subjects for their later professional work in the pre-clinical stage of their studies. This can lead to a lower motivation to learn biochemical content and dissatisfaction in the courses amongst the students. Alternative teaching methods such as the Inverted Classroom (IC) method can address this deficiency. The goal of this study was: to analyse the motivation and satisfaction of the students in a biochemistry seminar through the use of the e-learning-based IC method, to investigate the acceptance against the IC teaching method in biochemistry, and to compare the learning success achieved using the IC approach with that of a traditional course. We also investigated how a biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies can be successfully organised according to the IC method. Furthermore, we examined the benefits of the IC method over conventional teaching formats. Method: The IC method was implemented in accordance with the guidelines of the GMA committee "New Media" [30] in a biochemistry seminar for two student IC intervention groups with 42 students. A part of the factual knowledge from the on-site phase in the form of teaching videos together with self-learning control tasks were provided online before the seminar for both IC intervention groups. Exporting content to the self-learning phase creates new free time in the on-site phase, during which the content can be critically considered and processed and additional competency-based learning objectives can be taught. Identical biochemistry teaching content was taught in parallel control groups (14 student groups with n=299 students), but no material was handed out beforehand for a self-learning phase. These students only received the materials after the on-site phase. Motivation and satisfaction as well as the acceptance for the teaching methods were recorded by questionnaires, the

  6. Concept and benefits of the Inverted Classroom method for a competency-based biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühl, Susanne J.; Toberer, Matthias; Keis, Oliver; Tolks, Daniel; Fischer, Martin R.; Kühl, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background: Medical students often have a problem recognising the relevance of basic science subjects for their later professional work in the pre-clinical stage of their studies. This can lead to a lower motivation to learn biochemical content and dissatisfaction in the courses amongst the students. Alternative teaching methods such as the Inverted Classroom (IC) method can address this deficiency. The goal of this study was: to analyse the motivation and satisfaction of the students in a biochemistry seminar through the use of the e-learning-based IC method, to investigate the acceptance against the IC teaching method in biochemistry, and to compare the learning success achieved using the IC approach with that of a traditional course. We also investigated how a biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies can be successfully organised according to the IC method. Furthermore, we examined the benefits of the IC method over conventional teaching formats. Method: The IC method was implemented in accordance with the guidelines of the GMA committee “New Media” [30] in a biochemistry seminar for two student IC intervention groups with 42 students. A part of the factual knowledge from the on-site phase in the form of teaching videos together with self-learning control tasks were provided online before the seminar for both IC intervention groups. Exporting content to the self-learning phase creates new free time in the on-site phase, during which the content can be critically considered and processed and additional competency-based learning objectives can be taught. Identical biochemistry teaching content was taught in parallel control groups (14 student groups with n=299 students), but no material was handed out beforehand for a self-learning phase. These students only received the materials after the on-site phase. Motivation and satisfaction as well as the acceptance for the teaching methods were recorded by questionnaires

  7. French courses for BEGINNERS

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    We are now offering a French course for beginners. If you are interested in following this course, please enrol through the following link: https://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9:4314988246421131::::X_STATUS,XS_COURSE_NAME,XS_PROGRAMME,XS_SUBCATEGORY,X_COURSE_ID,XS_LANGUAGE,XS_SESSION:D%2C%2C1%2C%2C4251%2CB%2C or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister: tel. 70896.  

  8. Greek Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This course in Modern Greek, consisting of 100 lesson units in 13 volumes, is one of the Defense Language Institute's Basic Course Series. The course is designed to train native English language speakers to Level 3 proficiency in comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing Modern Greek. (Level 5 is native-speaker proficiency.) Lesson units…

  9. Models of Online Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Robin

    2001-01-01

    Proposes a framework within which to consider online courses. Highlights include historical background; pedagogical evolution, including discussions, collaborative activities, online assessment, and interactive course materials; examples of online course models from the United Kingdom's Open University; and the development of new learning…

  10. ANALYSIS OF AN INTERDISCIPLINARY OPTIONAL COURSE: GEOINFORMTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRISTIAN STĂNILĂ

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the first part, we presented the concept of curriculum and analysed aspects related to the introduction of school-based curriculum in secondary education in Romania. The objective of this study was to analyse the curriculum of a Geoinformatics optional course, the “annual plan”, the “learning unit plan”, the learning activities included in the Geoinformatics optional course, the students’ achievement in this course and their views on the subject matter. In order to identify the students’ opinions about the course, we used the questionnaire as the survey method. We concluded that this optional course met the students’ expectations and interests, being correlated to the prospects of evolution of the knowledge-based society.

  11. The Implementation of an Integrative Model of Adventure-Based Counseling and Adlerian Play Therapy Value-Based Taught by Parents to Children to Increase Adjustment Ability of Preschool Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Eka Izzaty

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted for two reasons. First, pre-school age is the foundation for the subsequent development. Second, the previous research findings show that there are behavioral problems which affect the development of subsequent development. This study aims to increase children’s social ability by employing An Integrative Model of Adventure-Based Counseling and Adlerian Play Therapy, a counseling model emphasizing the importance of play providing opportunity for children to express their feelings in natural situation and insight toward personality and environment by modifying teaching cultural values by parents to children. This study employed an action study. The prior data collection techniques were conducting literary study, surveying on cultural values taught, and selecting a counseling model. The subjects were four preschool children (4-6 years old with behavioral problems. The study was conducted in 2 cycles with several steps: planning, action, evaluation, and reflection. The finding of this research shows that an Integrative Model of Adventure-Based Counseling and Adlerian Play Therapy can increase children social ability and decrease non adaptive behavior. The reflection of employing counseling model modified with cultural values taught by parents to children is when using this model, counselors truly examine the duration of the implementation, the children’s condition, the counselors’ condition, the type of play, and the purpose of each steps which must be detailed.

  12. Gender Differences in Achievement in an Inquiry-Based Learning Precalculus Course

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas E. Cooper; Brad Bailey; Briggs, Karen S.

    2015-01-01

    The authors conducted a two-semester quasi-experimental study in which each author taught a traditional lecture-based section of precalculus and a section using an inquiry-based approach called a Modified Moore Method in which the students worked through and presented the course material. A common final exam was used to compare student achievement. The results were compared for the overall population and by each instructor. Gender proved to be an important variable with the females performing...

  13. Boosting critical thinking in a Project Management course: An active learning experience

    OpenAIRE

    Berbegal-Mirabent, Jasmina; Gil-Domènech, Dolors; Gieure, Clara

    2016-01-01

    [EN] The present study reports the experience of a project-based activity in which students are asked to plan an event. It is part of a Project Management course taught at Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, in a Masters’ Degree in Business Administration and Production Systems. The activity has been designed in such a way that it is expected to help students develop the acquired technical skills while it requires the use of different quantitative methods and tools to in...

  14. Global Climate Change Pilot Course Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuenemann, K. C.; Wagner, R.

    2011-12-01

    In fall 2011 a pilot course on "Global Climate Change" is being offered, which has been proposed to educate urban, diverse, undergraduate students about climate change at the introductory level. The course has been approved to fulfill two general college requirements, a natural sciences requirement that focuses on the scientific method, as well as a global diversity requirement. This course presents the science behind global climate change from an Earth systems and atmospheric science perspective. These concepts then provide the basis to explore the effect of global warming on regions throughout the world. Climate change has been taught as a sub-topic in other courses in the past solely using scientific concepts, with little success in altering the climate change misconceptions of the students. This pilot course will see if new, innovative projects described below can make more of an impact on the students' views of climate change. Results of the successes or failures of these projects will be reported, as well as results of a pre- and post-course questionnaire on climate change given to students taking the course. Students in the class will pair off and choose a global region or country that they will research, write papers on, and then represent in four class discussions spaced throughout the semester. The first report will include details on the current climate of their region and how the climate shapes that region's society and culture. The second report will discuss how that region is contributing to climate change and/or sequestering greenhouse gases. Thirdly, students will discuss observed and predicted changes in that region's climate and what impact it has had, and could have, on their society. Lastly, students will report on what role their region has played in mitigating climate change, any policies their region may have implemented, and how their region can or cannot adapt to future climate changes. They will also try to get a feel for the region

  15. Music and the mind: a new interdisciplinary course on the science of musical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prichard, J Roxanne; Cornett-Murtada, Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the instructors describe a new team-taught transdisciplinary seminar, "Music and Mind: The Science of Musical Experience." The instructors, with backgrounds in music and neuroscience, valued the interdisciplinary approach as a way to capture student interest and to reflect the inherent interconnectivity of neuroscience. The course covered foundational background information about the science of hearing and musical perception and about the phenomenology of musical creation and experience. This two-credit honors course, which attracted students from eleven majors, integrated experiential learning (active listening, journaling, conducting mini-experiments) with rigorous reflection and discussion of academic research. The course culminated in student-led discussions and presentations of final projects around hot topics in the science of music, such as the 'Mozart Effect,' music and religious experience, etc. Although this course was a two-credit seminar, it could easily be expanded to a four-credit lecture or laboratory course. Student evaluations reveal that the course was successful in meeting the learning objectives, that students were intrinsically motivated to learn more about the discipline, and that the team-taught, experiential learning approach was a success.

  16. Integrating psychoeducation in a basic computer skills course for people suffering from social anxiety: participants' experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Löhr HD

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Hildegard D Löhr1,2, Jan H Rosenvinge1,3, Rolf Wynn2,41Division of General Psychiatry, University Hospital of North Norway, 2Telemedicine Research Group, Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, 3Department of Psychology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, 4Division of Addiction and Specialized Psychiatry, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, NorwayAbstract: We describe a psychoeducational program integrated in a basic computer skills course for participants suffering from social anxiety. The two main aims of the course were: that the participants learn basic computer skills, and that the participants learn to cope better with social anxiety. Computer skills were taught by a qualified teacher. Psychoeducation and cognitive therapy skills, including topics such as anxiety coping, self-accept, and self-regulation, were taught by a clinical psychologist. Thirteen of 16 participants completed the course, which lasted 11 weeks. A qualitative analysis was performed, drawing on observations during the course and on interviews with the participants. The participants were positive about the integration of psychoeducation sessions in the computer course, and described positive outcomes for both elements, including improved computer skills, improved self-esteem, and reduced social anxiety. Most participants were motivated to undertake further occupational rehabilitation after the course.Keywords: cognitive therapy, information technology, occupational rehabilitation, psychoeducation, self-help, social anxiety

  17. Living Outside Their Heads: Assessing the Efficacy of a Multicultural Course on the Attitudes of Graduate Students in Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Renee J; Dagostino-Kalniz, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Given the importance of multicultural education, its impact on students and the ensuing impact on society, it would appear that studies assessing the efficacy of how social justice issues are taught appear to be essential. However, most studies assessing the efficacy of multicultural teacher education coursework appears to be inconclusive. This paper poses the following questions: to what extent is it possible for students who are teachers and administrators in American schools to engage in a multicultural graduate course taught using a social reconstructionist approach to see outside the boundaries of their own perspectives; and to what extent might a multicultural education course have a lasting impact on their personal and professional lives. Additionally, the study asks whether the effects of a multicultural course may be long lasting and significant.

  18. Principles of protein structure: an established Internet-based course in structural biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Sansom

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The Internet is becoming an important medium for the delivery of educational materials. However, relatively few institutions are delivering whole courses using this medium. More often, the technologies are used to complement traditional courses, which may be given face-to-face or at a distance (Farrell, 1999. The Department of Crystallography at Birkbeck College, London, has been in the vanguard of the development of 'virtual education', providing some of the first accredited postgraduate courses in the UK to be offered entirely using the new technologies. For the past four years, we have been running an Advanced Certificate course entitled 'Principles of Protein Structure using the Internet'1 (Sansom, Walshaw and Moss, 1997 (PPS. See http://www.cryst.bbk.aauk/pps for more details. This was one of the first tutor-assisted, accredited, university-level courses to be taught entirely over the Internet, and is certainly the first in biochemistry in the UK.

  19. Comparing brief stress management courses in a community sample: mindfulness skills and progressive muscle relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agee, John D; Danoff-Burg, Sharon; Grant, Christoffer A

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to compare a five-week mindfulness meditation (MM) course to a five-week course that taught progressive muscle relaxation (PMR). Forty-three adults from the community were randomly assigned to either MM (n = 19) or PMR (n = 24) courses after responding to flyers and other advertisements for a free stress management course. Mindfulness meditation participants practiced meditation significantly more often than PMR participants practiced relaxation during the intervention period (F[1, 43] = 7.42; P relaxation or mindfulness. Although there were no differences between groups on any of the primary outcome measures, across both treatment conditions there were statistically significant reductions from pretreatment to posttreatment in general psychological distress. Thus, although MM did not emerge as clearly superior to PMR, results of this study suggest that a brief mindfulness skills course may be effective for stress management.

  20. Human error and patient safety: interdisciplinary course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Augustine R; Fabri, Peter J; Wolfson, Jay

    2012-01-01

    The medical community has only recently begun to address how human error affects patient safety. In order to confront human error in medicine, there is a need to teach students who are entering the health professions how potential errors may manifest and train them to prevent or mitigate these problems. The objective is to describe a semester-long, interdisciplinary, human error and patient safety course taught at the University of South Florida. Six interdisciplinary groups, composed of students from five of the university's colleges, were formed. The curriculum consisted of expert lecturers, readings, case studies, and analysis of patient safety problems. Students were evaluated based on their group's work on the final project and peer evaluations. Nursing students scored the highest in each category evaluated. Physicians and medical students had the lowest evaluations in team participation and active engagement. All students rated the course highly and indicated that it enhanced their ability to work in interprofessional settings. The students showed improved knowledge and substantive skill level relative to patient safety and human error concepts. Working in interdisciplinary teams gave the students a better understanding of the role each discipline can have in improving health care systems and health care delivery.

  1. Evaluating the effectiveness of an academic literacy course: Do students benefit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parkinson, Jean

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The proliferation of academic literacy courses in South African universities in the last 25 years prompts the question of how effective such courses are. Addressing the difficulties of studying in a second language combined with insufficient stress on reading and writing at school, such courses are designed to assist students with university reading and writing tasks. This article describes how reading and writing acquisition are scaffolded in one such course designed specifically for students who enter a science degree programme through alternative access routes. It then assesses how successful the course is at improving students’ academic reading and writing. Equivalent tests before and after the course indicate that students do improve their academic reading and writing, with the weakest students making the biggest improvement. By the end of the course the academic literacy of this weakest group is, however, still not equivalent to that of regular entrants to the Faculty. Student evaluation at the end of the course indicates that students believe they have learnt much from the course and, to a lesser extent, that they have enjoyed the course. Previous students report making extensive use of the literacies taught by the course in the later years of their degrees.

  2. Distance education: The Introduction to College Chemistry course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Lisa A.

    The purpose of this study was to compare a group of students in a traditional introductory college chemistry course to their distance learning counterparts. Both of the groups were required to have videotaped lessons and workbooks, but the traditional group met for two and one half hours each week with the instructor, whereas the distance students were not obligated to attend classroom meetings. The same instructor taught both of the groups and both were given equal access opportunities to the instructor beyond class meetings. The literature review included in this study indicated that distance learning has changed from a less popular alternative method for study to the forefront in modern academic institutions. The two target populations for this study were students enrolled in the Edison Community College Introduction to College Chemistry videotaped course and students taking the same course in a traditional setting. The study was conducted over a two consecutive semester interval, from August 2002 through May 2003. These two groups were compared on a number of items including gender, student attitudes about their own learning style, ethnicity, and final course grade. Information regarding attrition and reasons for choosing to take the course was collected. The results of this study found a significant difference in the number of students who withdrew from each course, with the distance students having the greater attrition rate. Gender and ethnicity were not significant in terms of student success when comparing the two groups. The self-reported behavior types showed no significant correlation to success for either the traditional or the distance students. However, many of the distance students felt that meeting occasionally for a face-to-face laboratory course would have been beneficial. Suggested applications of this study include strategies for a more successful distance learning experience for students. Also, laboratory courses such as chemistry have some

  3. The study of electrochemical cell taught by problem-based learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srichaitung, Paisan

    2018-01-01

    , students constructed their skills, scientific process, and seek self knowledge which made them seek the choices to solve problems variously. This Research using problem-based learning can be applied to teaching activity in other subjects.

  4. A study of the effects of gender and different instructional media (computer-assisted instruction tutorials vs. textbook) on student attitudes and achievement in a team-taught integrated science class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eardley, Julie Anne

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of different instructional media (computer assisted instruction (CAI) tutorial vs. traditional textbook) on student attitudes toward science and computers and achievement scores in a team-taught integrated science course, ENS 1001, "The Whole Earth Course," which was offered at Florida Institute of Technology during the Fall 2000 term. The effect of gender on student attitudes toward science and computers and achievement scores was also investigated. This study employed a randomized pretest-posttest control group experimental research design with a sample of 30 students (12 males and 18 females). Students had registered for weekly lab sessions that accompanied the course and had been randomly assigned to the treatment or control group. The treatment group used a CAI tutorial for completing homework assignments and the control group used the required textbook for completing homework assignments. The Attitude toward Science and Computers Questionnaire and Achievement Test were the two instruments administered during this study to measure students' attitudes and achievement score changes. A multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA), using hierarchical multiple regression/correlation (MRC), was employed to determine: (1) treatment versus control group attitude and achievement differences; and (2) male versus female attitude and achievement differences. The differences between the treatment group's and control group's homework averages were determined by t test analyses. The overall MANCOVA model was found to be significant at p < .05. Examining research factor set independent variables separately resulted in gender being the only variable that significantly contributed in explaining the variability in a dependent variable, attitudes toward science and computers. T test analyses of the homework averages showed no significant differences. Contradictory to the findings of this study, anecdotal information from

  5. The CanMEDS role of Collaborator: How is it taught and assessed according to faculty and residents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Elizabeth; Chan, Ming-Ka; Kuper, Ayelet; Albert, Mathieu; Jenkins, Deirdre; Harrison, Megan; Harris, Ilene

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the perspectives of paediatric residents and faculty regarding how the Collaborator role is taught and assessed. METHODS: Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, focus groups at four Canadian universities were conducted. Data were analyzed iteratively for emergent themes. RESULTS: Residents reported learning about collaboration through faculty role modelling but did not perceive that it was part of the formal curriculum. Faculty reported that they were not trained in how to effectively model this role. Both groups reported a need for training in conflict management, particularly as it applies to intraprofessional (physician-to-physician) relationships. Finally, the participants asserted that current methods to assess residents on their performance as collaborators are suboptimal. CONCLUSIONS: The Collaborator role should be a formal part of the residency curriculum. Residents need to be better educated with regard to managing conflict and handling intraprofessional relationships. Finally, innovative methods of assessing residents on this non-medical expert role need to be created. PMID:24294063

  6. An Innovative Course in Technical Communication and More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranor, Maria B.; Price, Richard H.

    2004-05-01

    Several studies have shown that otherwise well-prepared physics undergraduates do not develop writing and speaking skills sufficient to the demands of graduate school or the technical workplace. To rectify this, we have developed and taught, for five semesters, a very successful course for junior and senior physics majors. Students improve their writing and speaking skills through technical projects and through a reading list which includes modules on scientific practice and ethics, pseudo science, management, and workplace collaboration. We present here an overview of this course, and discuss the pros and cons of introducing a useful, yet unusual and highly labor-intensive (for teachers and for students) class into the traditional physics curriculum.

  7. The Graduate Record Examination as an indicator of learning of the curriculum taught to physics majors in US institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halley, J. W.; Adjoudani, Azin; Heller, Patricia; Terwilliger, James S.

    1991-05-01

    A study is described to evaluate the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) as an indicator of learning by undergraduate physics majors. Measures were obtained of the overlap of the Graduate Record Examination in physics with the curriculum as it is taught to physics majors in US colleges and universities. The output of the project, for a given subfield f and set j of institutions, was two numbers Rj, f1 and Rj, f2. These two numbers estimated the extent to which (1) for Rj, f1, the curriculum prepares students at institutions j to take that part of the GRE which covers subfield f and (2) for Rj, f2, the GRE covers the materials in subfield f taught in the curriculum of institutions j. The subfields f were mechanics, electricity and magnetism, statistical mechanics and thermodynamics, modern physics, and ``other'' (including experimental, mathematical, and solid-state physics). The institutions j were grouped into four categories: ``top graduate'' (those with the 20 best-ranked graduate programs); ``top undergraduate'' (those participating in the Oberlin Conference on College Science); ``random graduate'' (other institutions with graduate programs); and ``random undergraduate'' (other institutions without graduate programs). Generally the results show that the GRE does not cover the entire curriculum (low values of R2) for any institutional type. With regard to the coverage of the GRE by the curriculum (R1 values), there are significant differences between institutions of different types. Institutions with graduate programs have curricula that cover the modern physics and statistical mechanics aspects of the GRE significantly better than institutions without graduate programs.

  8. Aliens are us. An innovative course in astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Carlos F.; Barufaldi, James P.

    2009-01-01

    We live in a scientific world; paradoxically, the scientific literacy of the population is minimal at best. Science is an ongoing process, a human endeavour; paradoxically, students tend to believe that science is a finished enterprise. Many non-science major students are not motivated in science classes; paradoxically, there is a public fascination with the possibility of life in the Universe, which is nowadays a scientific endeavour. An astrobiology course was developed at the Center for Science and Mathematics Education at The University of Texas at Austin to address these paradoxes and includes the following objectives: (a) to improve scientific literacy; (b) to demonstrate that science is a work in progress; (c) to enhance the inherent interdisciplinary aspect of science; (d) to demonstrate that science is embedded in society and relates with several social sciences; (e) to improve the content knowledge about the nature of science; (f) to illustrate how engaging learning science can be; and (g) to draw from the intrinsic motivation already incorporated in the general population. The course has been offered, taught and revised for the past three years. The informal course student feedback has been very positive and encouraging. The purpose of this paper is to provide a general overview of the course. In addition, the course's background, content, themes and mode of delivery are outlined, discussed and analysed in this paper. This paper subscribes to an educational philosophy that focuses on the multidisciplinary nature of science and includes critical thinking-based teaching strategies using the dynamic discipline of astrobiology.

  9. Innovations in Physics Pedagogy: A Paperless Physics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, Charles; Plano-Clark, V. L.; Moore, C. J.; Kirkman, T.; Fuller, R. G.; Dunbar, Steven R.; Spiegel, Amy N.

    1997-04-01

    The ability to analyze data and solve problems in the real world is increasingly important. The effective use of information and technology requires education in science and mathematics as well as development of the skills necessary to use available technical resources. We address the application of computers, computer software, and information technology to physics teaching and describe an experimental paperless course in general physics that is designed for engineering and physical science majors. The course, taught in an interactive classroom, uses the ''Physics InfoMall'' CD-ROM instead of a textbook to integrate multimedia and mathematics with physics. Modern technology is used to enhance the student-teacher interaction and to examine physical phenomena in the real world. The students are using computers to conduct experiments using electronic transducers for data acquisition, analyze data, and do homework problems using standard software packages. The challenges encoutered in developin this course including curriculum development, technical issues, assessing student performance, and evaluating course effectiveness will be discussed. Lessons learned in developing this paperless physics course will be described.

  10. Going the Distance Part 2: Five Ways of Teaching an Extension Course: Elive, Blackboard, Teleconference, Correspondence, and Face-to-Face

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Heidi B.; Hanna, Virgene; Spiers, Kent; Kienenberger, Donavan

    2014-01-01

    Remote and widely dispersed clientele in Alaska create a need for effective distance-delivery programs. Extension agents often travel via small airplane, snow machine, or boat to teach face-to-face classes in off-road communities. Effective and more cost-efficient delivery methods are needed. We taught a course for beginning farmers residing…

  11. Improving First Computer Programming Experiences: The Case of Adapting a Web-Supported and Well-Structured Problem-Solving Method to a Traditional Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Murat Pasa

    2014-01-01

    The introductory computer programming (CP) course has been taught for three decades in the faculty. Besides pursuing CP technology, one major goal has been enhancing learners' problem-solving (PS) skills. However, the current situation has implied that this might not be the case. Therefore, a research was conducted to investigate the effects of a…

  12. The Analysis of the 5th Grade Students' Attitudes and Self-Efficacy for Physical Education Course in Terms of Demographic Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogan, Hayri

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study is to analyze the 5th grade students' attitudes and self-efficacy for the physical education course that they have come across for the first time which is taught by physical education and sports teachers. Law No. 6287 was issued by the Turkish Grand National Assembly National Education Culture Youth and Sports Commission on…

  13. An Exploratory Study on the Application of Multiple Intelligences to MBA Andragogy with Particular Reference to ERP-Controlling Configuration Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Sophia S.; Bharathi, S. Vijayakumar

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to elicit the application of Multiple Intelligences (MI) theory to a course taught in the MBA Andragogy. Administered to a sample of 47 students of the first year MBA Information Technology Business Management (ITBM) program at a private university in India the study brought out certain interesting implications.…

  14. Designing and Teaching an Online Teacher Training Course: Integrating Critical Thinking Skills into the Exploration of Culture in an EFL Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, Leslie; Durham, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines how the educational principles that are at the core of the MA TESOL program at SIT Graduate Institute were embodied in a stand-alone ten-week fully-online teacher training course taught to English as a Foreign Language (EFL) instructors in India and Bhutan. Through the authors' reflections as the primary instructor and the…

  15. Concept and benefits of the Inverted Classroom method for a competency-based biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kühl, Susanne J.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical students often have a problem recognising the relevance of basic science subjects for their later professional work in the pre-clinical stage of their studies. This can lead to a lower motivation to learn biochemical content and dissatisfaction in the courses amongst the students. Alternative teaching methods such as the Inverted Classroom (IC method can address this deficiency. The goal of this study was: We also investigated how a biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies can be successfully organised according to the IC method. Furthermore, we examined the benefits of the IC method over conventional teaching formats. Method: The IC method was implemented in accordance with the guidelines of the GMA committee “New Media” in a biochemistry seminar for two student IC intervention groups with 42 students. A part of the factual knowledge from the on-site phase in the form of teaching videos together with self-learning control tasks were provided online before the seminar for both IC intervention groups. Exporting content to the self-learning phase creates new free time in the on-site phase, during which the content can be critically considered and processed and additional competency-based learning objectives can be taught. Identical biochemistry teaching content was taught in parallel control groups (14 student groups with n=299 students, but no material was handed out beforehand for a self-learning phase. These students only received the materials after the on-site phase. Motivation and satisfaction as well as the acceptance for the teaching methods were recorded by questionnaires, the acquisition of knowledge by MC exams.Results: On a Likert scale from 1 (strongly disagree to 6 (strongly agree, the students in the IC intervention groups could be seen to be much more motivated (5.53 than students in the control group (4.01. Students in the IC intervention groups also recognised the

  16. CP Violation course

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva HR-RFA

    2006-01-01

    The lecture introduces the concepts and phenomena of matter-antimatter symmetry violation, so-called "CP" violation. The lecture is organized in four courses, the first being devoted to a historical overview and an introduction into fundamental discrete symmetries. The second course introduces the most compelling CP-violating phenomena, and presents the first experimental discovery of CP violation in the neutral kaon system. The third course discusses how CP violation is beautifully incorporated into the Standard Model of particle interactions, and how modern B-meson "factories" provide precise tests of this picture. Finally, the fourth and last course introduces CP violation and the genesis of our matter world.

  17. Noise hazard course

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A 1/2 day course to promote awareness of the risks incurred by noise at the work place and recommendations to settle them. Next course Wednesday 24th September 2003. Costs are covered by TIS, Jacques Coillard from Bureau Véritas will present the course. Registration is obligatory. For more information and to enrol on this course go to the safety section of Human Resources Training and Development web pages, or contact : Ana-Paula Bernardes/TIS-GS (71385) or e-mail Ana-Paula.Bernardes@cern.ch

  18. Noise hazard course

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A 1/2 day course to promote awareness of the risks incurred by noise at the work place and recommendations to settle them. Next course Wednesday 24th September 2003. Costs are covered by TIS, Jacques Coillard from Bureau Véritas will present the course. Registration is obligatory. For more information and to enrol on this course go to the safety section of Human Resources Training and Development web pages, or contact: Ana-Paula Bernardes/TIS-GS (71385) or e-mail Ana-Paula.Bernardes@cern.ch

  19. Integrating Anxiety Reduction into an Existing Self-Management of Auditory Hallucinations Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccheri, Robin K; Trygstad, Louise Nigh; Buffum, Martha D; Ju, Dau-Shen; Dowling, Glenna A

    2017-05-01

    High levels of anxiety were found to interfere with voice hearers' ability to benefit from a 10-Session Behavioral Management of Auditory Hallucinations Course. The 10-session course was revised, adding anxiety reduction strategies to the first four classes and reinforcing those strategies in the remaining eight classes. A multi-site study (N = 27) used repeated measures to determine whether the new 12-session course would significantly reduce anxiety. Ten course leaders were trained and taught the course six times at three different outpatient mental health sites. Three measures of anxiety were used. The 12-session course was found to significantly reduce anxiety after the first four classes with further reduction at the end of the course. Eighty-eight percent of course participants reported the course was moderately to extremely helpful. They also reported that being in a group with others with similar symptoms was valuable. Course leaders reported learning about the prevalence and importance of treating voice hearers' anxiety. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(5), 29-39.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Teaching Critical Thinking through a course on Science and Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, H. L.; Jordan, J. J.

    2004-12-01

    The relationship between science and religion is, according to the public debate, rather stormy. It doesn't have to be this way. Since 1998, an astronomer (Shipman) and a philosopher (Jordan) have team-taught a course with a more constructive approach. This course has a recognized role in the University's General Education program and in the philosophy major. As overall course goals, we hope that our students will be able to: - exhibit critical thinking skills in being able to tell the difference between good arguments and bad arguments in this area - recognize that the relationship between science and religion is not necessarily an antagonistic one. We accomplish these goals by focusing the course on four major issues, namely: - Does Big Bang Cosmology leave room for a Creator? - Can a rational person believe in miracle reports? - In the light of modern science, what does it mean to be human? - Can a theist, someone who believes in God, rationally accept the scientific theory of biological evolution? We have evidence in the course to evaluate student progress towards our goals. Student responses to a pre- and post-testing methodology, where they responded to the same assignment at the beginning and at the end of the course, were classified as seeing the relationship between science and religion as confrontational, distinct, convergent, or transitional between distinct and convergent. Preliminary analysis of the student responses shows a significant shift away from a confrontational position and towards a more convergent position. The development of this course was supported by the John Templeton Foundation's Science and Religion course program. H.L.S.'s scholarly work integrating science research and science education research is supported by the National Science Foundation's Distinguished Teaching Scholars Program. DUE-0306557),

  1. Experiences from developing a new course in mechatronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren; Ravn, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Experiences from a new course in mechatronics at Technical University of Denmark are conveyed in this paper. The course is supposed to teach students enrolled in the bachelor degree in electrical engineering some fundamental knowledge about mechanics and to teach students enrolled in the bachelor...... degree in mechanical engineering fundamentals about electronics. Furthermore the course uses project work as a method to keep the students actively participating and in part have them teach each other the subjects. The general course plan is presented and the reasoning behind the course structure...

  2. Class modality, student characteristics, and performance in a community college introductory STEM course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogle, Thomas Ty

    Research on introductory STEM course performance has indicated that student characteristics (age, ethnicity and gender) and Grade Point Average (G.P.A.) can be predictive of student performance, and by implication, a correlation among these factors can help determine course design interventions to help certain types of students perform well in introductory STEM courses. The basis of this study was a community college Visual Basic programming course taught in both online and hybrid format. Beginning students in this course represented a diverse population residing in a large, mid-western, city and surrounding communities. Many of these students were defined as "at-Risk" or "non-traditional, which generally means any combination of socio-economic, cultural, family and employment factors that indicate a student is non-traditional. Research has shown these students struggle academically in technologically dense STEM courses, and may require student services and support to achieve their individual performance goals. The overall number in the study range was 392 distance students and 287 blended course students. The main question of this research was to determine to what extent student characteristics in a community college context, and previous success, as measured in overall G.P.A., were related to course performance in an introductory Visual Basic programming (STEM) course; and, whether or not a combination of these factors and course modality was predictive of success. The study employed a quantitative, quasi-experimental design to assess whether students' course performance was linked to course modality, student characteristics and overall G.P.A. The results indicated that the only predictor of student performance was overall G.P.A. Despite the research analyzed in Chapter 2, there was no statistically significant relationship to modality, age, ethnicity, or gender to performance in the course. Cognitive load is significant in a computer programming course and it

  3. A suggested syllabus model for a course in developing reading skills with special reference to the ELT Department at Gazi University

    OpenAIRE

    Tikence, Mevlüt

    1991-01-01

    Ankara : The Institute of Economics and Social Sciences of Bilkent Univ., 1991. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 1991. Includes bibliographical references leaves 63-64. The focus of this study is the development of a model syllabus for an English for Specific Purposes (ESP) reading course taught to first year students of the Gazi University ELT Department. First, the general background of ESP, problems of the reading course at Gazi and the limitations of the st...

  4. Descriptive Analysis of Single Subject Research Designs: 1983-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Diana; Gast, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Single subject research methodology is commonly used and cited in special education courses and journals. This article reviews the types of single subject research designs published in eight refereed journals between 1983 and 2007 used to answer applied research questions. Single subject designs were categorized as withdrawal/reversal, time…

  5. Facets of Subjective Health From Early Adulthood to Old Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franz, Carol E; Finkel, Deborah; Panizzon, Matthew S

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Subjective health is a complex indicator predicting longevity independent of objective health. Few studies examine genetic and environmental mechanisms underlying different facets of subjective health across the life course. METHOD: Three subjective health measures were examined in 12...... appears to be dependent on frame of reference and reflect different aspects of health. Results suggest different genetic and environmental mechanisms underlie each facet....

  6. Subjective adult identity and casual sexual behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Heidi Ann

    2015-12-01

    A majority of Americans have a casual sexual experience before transitioning to adulthood. Little research has yet to examine how identity influences causal sexual behavior. The current study fills this gap in the literature by examining if subjective adult identity predicts casual sexual behavior net of life course transitions in a national sample of Americans. To answer this research question, the Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health is utilized. Structural equation modeling results show the older and more adult-like individuals feel the less likely they are to report a recent casual sexual partner. Once life course factors are included in the model, subjective identity is no longer associated with casual sex. Practitioners who work with adult populations need to consider how life course transitions influence casual sexual behavior.

  7. Sensibility and Subjectivity: Levinas’ Traumatic Subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmika Pandya

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The importance of Levinas’ notions of sensibility and subjectivity are evident in the revision of phenomenological method by current phenomenologists such as Jean-Luc Marion and Michel Henry. The criticisms of key tenants of classical phenomenology, intentionality and reduction, are of a particular note. However, there are problems with Levinas’ characterization of subjectivity as essentially sensible. In “Totality and Infinity” and “Otherwise than Being”, Levinas criticizes and recasts a traditional notion of subjectivity, particularly the notion of the subject as the first and foremost rational subject. The subject in Levinas’ works is characterized more by its sensibility and affectedness than by its capacity to reason or affect its world. Levinas ties rationality to economy and suggests an alternative notion of reason that leads to his analysis of the ethical relation as the face-to-face encounter. The ‘origin’ of the social relation is located not in our capacity to know but rather in a sensibility that is diametrically opposed to the reason understood as economy. I argue that the opposition in Levinas’ thought between reason and sensibility is problematic and essentially leads to a self-conflicted subject. In fact, it would seem that violence characterizes the subject’s self-relation and, thus, is also inscribed at the base of the social relation. Rather than overcoming a problematic tendency to dualistic thought in philosophy Levinas merely reverses traditional hierarchies of reason/emotion, subject/object and self/other. 

  8. Statistics for mathematicians a rigorous first course

    CERN Document Server

    Panaretos, Victor M

    2016-01-01

    This textbook provides a coherent introduction to the main concepts and methods of one-parameter statistical inference. Intended for students of Mathematics taking their first course in Statistics, the focus is on Statistics for Mathematicians rather than on Mathematical Statistics. The goal is not to focus on the mathematical/theoretical aspects of the subject, but rather to provide an introduction to the subject tailored to the mindset and tastes of Mathematics students, who are sometimes turned off by the informal nature of Statistics courses. This book can be used as the basis for an elementary semester-long first course on Statistics with a firm sense of direction that does not sacrifice rigor. The deeper goal of the text is to attract the attention of promising Mathematics students.

  9. Instructional design for online course development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperman, Larry

    2007-01-01

    There is a big difference between preparing to teach in the classroom and preparing to teach online. The classroom environment is typically marked by a level of spontaneity in instruction; beyond the preparation-the course syllabus and the PowerPoint slides, for example-the delivery of the course is largely altered by both the dynamics of the class and the impromptu decisions of the professor. Mediating this dynamic is the nature of the subject matter itself-teaching a course in computer programming varies dramatically from a course in sociology. The goal of this article is to explain the uses and misuses of instructional design, its foundational frameworks, and its implications for online education.

  10. Implementation and outcomes of inquiry-based learning in mathematics content courses for pre-service teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Sandra L.; Hassi, Marja-Liisa; Hough, Sarah

    2016-02-01

    This mixed-methods study describes classroom characteristics and student outcomes from university mathematics courses that are based in mathematics departments, targeted to future pre-tertiary teachers, and taught with inquiry-based learning (IBL) approaches. The study focused on three two-term sequences taught at two research universities, separately targeting elementary and secondary pre-service teachers. Classroom observation established that the courses were taught with student-centred methods that were comparable to those used in IBL courses for students in mathematics-intensive fields at the same institutions. To measure pre-service teachers' gains in mathematical knowledge for teaching, we administered the Learning Mathematics for Teaching (LMT) instrument developed by Hill, Ball and Schilling for in-service teacher professional development. Results from the LMT show that pre-service teachers made significant score gains from beginning to end of their course, while data from interviews and from surveys of learning gains show that pre-service teachers viewed their gains as relevant to their future teaching work. Measured changes on pre-/post-surveys of attitudes and beliefs were generally supportive of learning mathematics but modest in magnitude. The study is distinctive in applying the LMT to document pre-service teachers' growth in mathematical knowledge for teaching. The study also suggests IBL is an approach well suited to mathematics departments seeking to strengthen their pre-service teacher preparation offerings in ways consistent with research-based recommendations.

  11. An introductory course of particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, Palash B

    2014-01-01

    For graduate students unfamiliar with particle physics, this text teaches the basic techniques and fundamental theories related to the subject. It gives them the competence to work out various properties of fundamental particles, such as scattering cross-section and lifetime. The book also gives a lucid summary of the main ideas involved. Figure slides are available upon qualifying course adoption.

  12. INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY COURSE, INSTRUCTORS' GUIDE. VOLUME 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Engineering Extension Service.

    INFORMATION RELATIVE TO THE LESSON PLANS IN "INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY COURSE, INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE, VOLUME I" (VT 003 565) IS PRESENTED ON 52 INFORMATION SHEETS INCLUDING THE SUBJECTS SHIELDING EQUATIONS AND LOGARITHMS, METAL PROPERTIES, FIELD TRIP INSTRUCTIONS FOR STUDENTS, WELDING SYMBOLS AND SIZES, SAMPLE REPORT FORMS, AND TYPICAL SHIPPING…

  13. Staff Specialist Survival Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The syllabus for this 4.5-day course addresses the challenges for today’s staff specialists and provides not only hands-on review of actual artifacts...but also case studies to enhance learners’ actual experiences. Background The course was designed to magnify the staff specialist’s skills in

  14. Hydrologic Services Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Rockville, MD. National Weather Service.

    A course to develop an understanding of the scope of water resource activities, of the need for forecasting, of the National Weather Service's role in hydrology, and of the proper procedures to follow in fulfilling this role is presented. The course is one of self-help, guided by correspondence. Nine lessons are included: (1) Hydrology in the…

  15. Course documentation report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Lillian; Bygholm, Ann; Walther, Tina Dyngby Lyng

    A documentation report on the three pedagogical courses developed during the MVU project period. The report describes the three processes taking departure in the structure and material avaiable at the virtual learning environment. Also the report describes the way the two of the courses developed...

  16. Russian Language Course

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The Russian Cultural Circle is organising a new course of "Russian for Beginners", and is continuing a course for Advanced Students (3rd year). Interested persons are invited to contact: Mrs M. Mikhailova e-mail : mailto:mmmacha@hotmail.com Tel. 022 788 27 53

  17. YORUBA, BASIC COURSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    STEVICK, EARL W.; AND OTHERS

    A BASIC COURSE IN YORUBA, A LANGUAGE OF WEST AFRICA, IS PROVIDED IN THIS TEXT. THE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO BE USED WITH TAPE RECORDINGS AND IS DIVIDED INTO THREE PARTS--(1) THREE SERIES OF TONE DRILLS WHICH CONCENTRATE ON THE TONE PATTERNS OF SHORT VOWELS IN SHORT UTTERANCES, THE TONE PATTERNS OF LONG OR DOUBLE VOWELS IN SHORT UTTERANCES, AND THE…

  18. Astrophysics: An Integrative Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutsche, Graham D.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a one semester course in introductory stellar astrophysics at the advanced undergraduate level. The course aims to integrate all previously learned physics by applying it to the study of stars. After a brief introductory section on basic astronomical measurements, the main topics covered are stellar atmospheres, stellar structure, and…

  19. The TESOL Methods Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Christine Uber

    1991-01-01

    Presents results of an empirical study of the curriculum of the Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) methods course in the United States. Information is provided about the content of the TESOL methods course, its goals, requirements, instructional materials, and common problems, and the identification of possible avenues for…

  20. French courses for BEGINNERS

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    We are now offering a French course for beginners. If you are interested in following this course, please enrol through the following link, or contac: Kerstin Fuhrmeister, tel. 70896 or Martine Zuffi, tel. 73483. Language Training French Training Kerstin Fuhrmeister Tel. 70896 kerstin.fuhrmeister@cern.ch