WorldWideScience

Sample records for subject area classroom

  1. Perceptions of Classroom Assessment Tasks: An Interplay of Gender, Subject Area, and Grade Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkharusi, Hussain Ali; Al-Hosni, Salim

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates students' perceptions of classroom assessment tasks as a function of gender, subject area, and grade level. Data from 2753 students on Dorman and Knightley's (2006) Perceptions of Assessment Tasks Inventory (PATI) were analyzed in a MANOVA design. Results showed that students tended to hold positive perceptions of their…

  2. The Oppressive Classroom: Student Construction of Subjectivities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudette A. Baluran

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Adopting a poststructuralist discourse analysis framework, the study explores a student‘s multiple subjectivities framed within discursive relations of power. Acknowledging language as a major contestation site for nego tiating subjectivities, it looks into the narrative of Ares, a senior university student. Utilizing the biographical approach, the study is centered on the shifting and fluid discourses in the student life of Ares, on how she was both positioned and positi oning within conflicting discourses of an ―obedient student‖ and ―resisting student‖ surrounded by oppressive practices of academics. ―Obedience‖ in the context of Ares meant refraining from questioning an academic‘s authority, undervaluing the self, and playing by expectations. However, a competing discourse involved ―resistance‖ in the form of non - attendance to classes, contemplating on students‘ rights, recognizing oppression, blaming, and prescribing. These discourses can potentially provide a glimps e into the effects of academics‘ oppressive behaviors towards students and create possibilities for the development of institutional policies to help suppress a troubling culture of oppression in the academe. Implications for the academic community are considered.

  3. Subject matter knowledge, classroom management, and instructional practices in middle school science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Okhee

    This study examined the interrelationships among three major components of classroom teaching: subject matter content knowledge, classroom management, and instructional practices. The study involved two middle school science classes of different achievement levels taught by the same female teacher. The teacher held an undergraduate degree with a major in social studies and a minor in mathematics and science from an elementary teacher education program. The findings indicated that the teacher's limited knowledge of science content and her strict classroom order resulted in heavy dependence on the textbook and students' individual activities (e.g., seatwork) and avoidance of whole-class activities (e.g., discussion) similarly in both classes. Implications for educational practices and further research are discussed.

  4. Foveal avascular zone area in normal subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Xu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To measure the foveal avascular zone(FAZarea and to investigate the characteristics of the FAZ area in normal eyes, using optical coherence tomography(OCTangiography.METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study. The FAZ area was measured in 69 participants, for a total of 138 eyes, using RTVue-100 OCT. The relations between the FAZ area and the potential factors were evaluated by univariate and multivariate linear regression analysis. Differences between the right and left eyes were calculated, and values were compared by means of a paired t test. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to assess the relationships of the FAZ area between the right and left eyes. RESULTS: The mean FAZ area was 0.30±0.11mm2 in all subjects. For the male subjects, the mean FAZ area was 0.29±0.13mm2, and for the female subjects 0.31±0.09mm2, with no significant difference(t=-1.346,P=0.180. The FAZ area did not correlate with all the potential factors. The mean FAZ area in the right eye was 0.30±0.11mm2, and in the left eye was 0.30±0.10mm2,with no significant difference(P=0.943. There was a strong correlation between the right and left eyes for the FAZ area. CONCLUSION: OCT angiography is a noninvasive method of visualizing and measuring the FAZ area in normal subjects. The FAZ area does not correlate with old age, sex and other factors. It shows significant interocular symmetry in normal subjects.

  5. INNOVATIVE TEACHING IN ACCOUNTING SUBJECTS: ANALYSIS OF THE FLIPPED CLASSROOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lubbe

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Accounting students often have a negative attitude towards the subject andstruggle to understand core concepts of accounting standards. A large percentageof accounting students do not prepare for class and homework is either not doneor neglected. Many factors contributed to students struggling to prepare for classand complete homework assignments. The flipped classroom approach has grownat a rapid pace and was perceived very successful in many subjects. Little researchhas been done on the effectiveness of this approach for accounting students.Videos was created whereby accounting theory was explained and questions withexamples were given and explained. All contact sessions were transformed into anactive learning environment. During contact sessions, students were provided withquestions. Guidance was given with regards to the interpretation of a practicalcase study. Students had to analyze questions before feedback was provided tothem. Contact sessions commenced with easy questions, and progressedto moredifficult questions.Research was conducted in order to determine whether a flipped classroommethod could improve the learning experience of accounting students at a highereducation institution. The study indicated that students watched the videos beforecontact sessions, they felt more positive about their performance in accountingand improved their time management. The majority of students that completed thesurvey preferred the flipped classroom method. It enables students to learn fromtheir own mistakes in class.

  6. Local Development of Subject Area Item Banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Annie W.; Barlow, Gene

    1984-01-01

    It is feasible for school districts to develop and use subject area tests as reliable as those previously available only from commercial publishers. Three projects in local item development in a large school district are described. The first involved only Algebra 1. The second involved life science and career education at the elementary level; and…

  7. Objective and subjective evaluation of the acoustic comfort in classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannin, Paulo Henrique Trombetta; Marcon, Carolina Reich

    2007-09-01

    The acoustic comfort of classrooms in a Brazilian public school has been evaluated through interviews with 62 teachers and 464 pupils, measurements of background noise, reverberation time, and sound insulation. Acoustic measurements have revealed the poor acoustic quality of the classrooms. Results have shown that teachers and pupils consider the noise generated and the voice of the teacher in neighboring classrooms as the main sources of annoyance inside the classroom. Acoustic simulations resulted in the suggestion of placement of perforated plywood on the ceiling, for reduction in reverberation time and increase in the acoustic comfort of the classrooms.

  8. Acquisition in different and special subject areas

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Linda S

    2013-01-01

    Learn how acquisitions librarians successfully serve specialized users! In this book, you'll find profiles, methods, and processes for acquisitions in specialized subject areas, such as local and regional poetry, oceanography, educational information in electronic formats, popular fiction, regional and ethnic materials, and more. Seasoned acquisitions librarians share their experiences in gathering the hard-to-find materials their libraries' highly specialized clients need to access. You'll also examine issues surrounding the acquisition of new reference tools that are vital in today's emergi

  9. External relations on the classroom: Experiences area Andina University Foundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Leal Hurtado

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is the result of a research project conducted in the academic context. Its aim was to analyze how the students of the Area Andina University Foundation conceive relations of friendship, relationships and management of conflicts outside the classroom. It was developed under a psychosocial approach of qualitative and exploratory, not comparative, type with application of the method of mixed focus groups with a population of 48 students, between 18 and 25 years, enrolled in the third semester of the Faculty of Health Sciences: Nursing, Respiratory Therapy Optometry programs and the School of Design, Communication and Fine Arts, with programs: Graphic Design, Fashion Design, Culinary and Gastronomy in Bogotá. It was divided in three investigation phases. The first phase is about, conceptual approach to the subject. The second phase is about, analysis and interpretation of results decanted through the voices of young people, determining the categories of friendship, family and conflict management. In the last phase, discussion, conclusions and recommendations.

  10. A Classroom Demonstration of Potential Biases in the Subjective Interpretation of Projective Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederman, Michael W.

    1999-01-01

    Suggests that instructors teaching psychological assessment can use a demonstration to illustrate potential biases when subjectively interpreting response to projective stimuli. Outlines the classroom procedure, notes styles of learning involved, and presents a summary of student evaluations. (DSK)

  11. Narcissus in the Classroom: The Pedagogical Implications of Subjective Criticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Michael G.

    1982-01-01

    Subjectivist literary criticism, which emphasizes readers' emotional responses to texts and adopts psychoanalytic classroom techniques, renders questionable such aspects of literature teaching as goals, evaluation, and teacher preparation. Literature teachers must abandon the scientific orientation of objectivism and subjectivism in favor if an…

  12. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues ... then the business is subject to a stiff penalty of d per kg of shortage by the government if the business gets caught. (with probability p) in random checking; a meaningful value of d will be ...

  13. Engaging Students with Subject Matter Experts and Science Content Through Classroom Connection Webinars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, P. V.; Rampe, E.; Stefanov, W. L.; Vanderbloemen, L.; Higgins, M.

    2015-01-01

    Connecting students and teachers in classrooms with science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) experts provides an invaluable opportunity. Subject matter experts can share exciting science and science-related events as well as help to "translate" science being conducted by professionals. The Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program, facilitated by the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Division at the NASA Johnson Space Center, has been providing virtual access to subject matter experts through classroom connection webinars for the last five years. Each year, the reach of these events has grown considerably, especially over the last nine months. These virtual connections not only help engage students with role models, but are also designed to help teachers address concepts and content standards they are required to teach. These events also enable scientists and subject matter experts to help "translate" current science in an engaging and understandable manner while actively involving classrooms in the journey of science and exploration.

  14. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    61. RESONANCE │ January 2011. CLASSROOM. Investigation of Structures Similarity of. Organic Substances. Keywords. Structures similarity, Tanimoto coefficient, Euclidean distance, fingerprints (bit-string represen- tations). Ajay Kumar. Guru Tegh Bahadur Institute of. Technology. G–8 Area, Rajouri Garden. New Delhi ...

  15. The Closed World of the Writing Classroom: Student Subjectivities as Created by, and Breaking out of, Bounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxson, Jeffrey

    This paper discusses the emergent perspective in composition studies that sees discourse forms as producing material effects and writing classrooms and programs as part of an apparatus for producing subjective forms, which individual students are then induced to inhabit. The paper suggests that the closed circuit of the classroom is overdetermined…

  16. An investigation on impacts of scheduling configurations on Mississippi biology subject area testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchette, Frances Lenora

    The purpose of this mixed modal study was to compare the results of Biology Subject Area mean scores of students on a 4 x 4 block schedule, A/B block schedule, and traditional year-long schedule for 1A to 5A size schools. This study also reviewed the data to determine if minority or gender issues might influence the test results. Interviews with administrators and teachers were conducted about the type of schedule configuration they use and the influence that the schedule has on student academic performance on the Biology Subject Area Test. Additionally, this research further explored whether schedule configurations allow sufficient time for students to construct knowledge. This study is important to schools, teachers, and administrators because it can assist them in considering the impacts that different types of class schedules have on student performance and if ethnic or gender issues are influencing testing results. This study used the causal-comparative method for the quantitative portion of the study and constant comparative method for the qualitative portion to explore the relationship of school schedules on student academic achievement on the Mississippi Biology Subject Area Test. The aggregate means of selected student scores indicate that the Mississippi Biology Subject Area Test as a measure of student performance reveals no significant difference on student achievement for the three school schedule configurations. The data were adjusted for initial differences of gender, minority, and school size on the three schedule configurations. The results suggest that schools may employ various schedule configurations and expect student performance on the Mississippi Biology Subject Area Test to be unaffected. However, many areas of concern were identified in the interviews that might impact on school learning environments. These concerns relate to effective classroom management, the active involvement of students in learning, the adequacy of teacher education

  17. The Holistic Impact of Classroom Spaces on Learning in Specific Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Peter; Davies, Fay; Zhang, Yufan; Barrett, Lucinda

    2017-05-01

    The Holistic Evidence and Design (HEAD) study of U.K. primary schools sought to isolate the impact of the physical design of classrooms on the learning progress of pupils aged from 5 to 11 years (U.S. kindergarten to fifth grade). One hundred fifty-three classrooms were assessed and links made to the learning of the 3,766 pupils in them. Through multilevel modeling, the role of physical design was isolated from the influences of the pupils' characteristics. This article presents analyses for the three main subjects assessed, namely, reading, writing, and math. Variations in the importance of the physical design parameters are revealed for the learning of each subject. In addition to some common factors, such as lighting, a heavy salience for Individualization in relation to math becomes apparent and the importance emerges of Connection for reading and of Links to Nature for writing. Possible explanations are suggested. These results provide a stimulus for additional finesse in practice and for further investigation by researchers.

  18. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CLASSROOM. 378. RESONANCE │ April 2012. Classroom. In this section of Resonance, we invite readers to pose questions likely to be raised in a classroom ... or both. “Classroom” is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal ..... In the present investigation, a question may arise as to what will be ...

  19. Implementing the flipped classroom methodology to the subject "Applied computing" of the chemical engineering degree at the University of Barcelona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Iborra

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This work is focus on implementation, development, documentation, analysis and assessment of flipped classroom methodology, by means of just in time teaching strategy, in a pilot group (1 of 6 of the subject “Applied Computing” of Chemical Engineering Undergraduate Degree of the University of Barcelona. The results show that this technique promotes self-learning, autonomy, time management as well as an increase in the effectiveness of classroom hours.

  20. School Librarians Teach Subject Area 10: Computer and Information Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Mirah J. Ingram

    2010-01-01

    School librarians currently speak about school libraries as the largest classroom in the building. If so, how can these librarians describe what they teach? This article explains the user-centered instructional role of secondary school librarians in teaching information and technology literacy skills, as well as how they can authoritatively ensure…

  1. From classroom environment to mathematics achievement: The mediating role of self-perceived ability and subject interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosto, Maria G; Asbury, Kathryn; Mazzocco, Michèle M M; Petrill, Stephen A; Kovas, Yulia

    2016-08-01

    Drawing on Bandura's triadic reciprocal causation model, perceived classroom environment and three intrapersonal factors (mathematics self-efficacy, maths interest and academic self-concept) were considered as predictors of test performance in two correlated mathematics assessments: a public examination (GCSE) and an on-line test, both taken by UK pupils at age 16 (n = 6689). Intrapersonal factors were significantly associated with both test scores, even when the alternative score was taken into account. Classroom environment did not correlate with mathematics achievement once intrapersonal factors and alternative test performance were included in the model, but was associated with subject interest and academic self-concept. Perceptions of classroom environment may exercise an indirect influence on achievement by boosting interest and self-concept. In turn, these intrapersonal factors have direct relationships with achievement and were found to mediate the relationship between perceived classroom environment and maths performance. Findings and their implications for mathematics education are discussed.

  2. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this section of Resonance, we invite readers to pose questions likely to be raised in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invitt responses, or both. "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching ...

  3. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this section of Resonance, we invite readers to pose questions likely to be raised in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, or both. "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to ...

  4. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this section of Resonance, we invite readers to pose questions likely to be raised in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with th,em, or invite responses, or both. "Classroom" is equally ti forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to ...

  5. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    group that was not yet exposed to this learning environment. Although the ... environment [15]. The Green Classroom. The 'Green classroom' is an environmental education program that wants to address knowledge, skills and attitude at the same time. ..... programme on children´s perception of biodiversity, The Journal.

  6. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Classroom. In this section of Resonance, we in'Vite readers to pose questions likely to be raised in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or in'Vite .... boron-10 which demonstrated that some very beautiful work done by a. Caltech group headed by T Lauritsen and W A Fowler was wrong.

  7. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this section of Resonance, we invite readers to pose questions likely to be raised in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, or botlt. "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to ...

  8. Drilling in areas subject to environmental protection; A perfuracao em area de protecao ambiental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendonca, Ricardo Teixeira; Guimaraes, Antimio Santos [PETROBRAS, XX (Brazil). Distrito de Perfuracao do Nordeste. Div. Tecnica; Santana, Manoel Messias de [PETROBRAS, XX (Brazil). Regiao de Producao do Nordeste. Setor de Seguranca Industrial

    1989-12-31

    This paper presents the practices developed for pollution control in areas subject to environmental protection. This well drilling operation was carried out in the Municipality of Marechal Deodoro, in the State of Alagoas, in locality named Massagueira. We stress the preventive methods for liquid and solid effluent generation and the use of Closed Fluid System or Anti-Dike System. (author) 3 figs.

  9. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal ... published this paper as a short communication in the Cambridge and Dublin Mathematical Journal, in February 1854. Ray Optics and Mathematical Preliminaries.

  10. The Quality of Recent Studies in Content-Area Writing in Secondary Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Diane M.; McTigue, Erin M.; Scott, Chyllis E.

    2015-01-01

    Situated within the historical and current state of writing and adolescent literacy research, we conducted a systematic literature review in which we screened 2,871 articles to determine the prevalent themes in current research on writing tasks in content-area classrooms. Each of the 37 final studies was evaluated and coded using seven…

  11. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ias

    tum associated with such an apparently simple purely oscillatory 1D harmonic lattice system. The classroom exercise will conclude with a sug- gestion for the possibility that the 'Concrete' case may well correspond to that of hard nanopar- ticulate crystallites embedded in a 1D elastic con- tinuum, e.g., a spider dragline silk, ...

  12. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CLASSROOM relate, for comparison, a school experience. There is an experi- ment in textbooks about measuring the percentage of oxygen in air. What the textbook prescribes is this: take a bowl with a little water, light a candle at the centre and then place an inverted glass over it. Soon the flame gets extinguished and ...

  13. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. A W Joshil,. Umapati Pattar2 and F I Surve3. lDepartment of Physics ... Introduction. Diffraction from a plane grating is a familiar topic in undergraduate optics. Students study the theory in the classroom where they derive the ...

  14. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related ... sented the statement of the experimental problem of the. InternationalPhysics Olympiad'98 (IPhO). ... The justification of this model comes from electromagnetic theory. In conducting materials, the ...

  15. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    CLASSROOM. 655. RESONANCE | July 2016. References. [1]. C Alsina, R B Nelsen, Icons of Mathematics, The Mathematical Asso- ciation of America, Washington, DC, 2011. [2]. W Dunham, Journey through Genius, Penguin Books, 1991. which contradicts (2). So t = 0, i.e., 4r2. = a2. + b2 . Hence AB. 2. + AC. 2. = a2. + b2.

  16. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    In this section of Resonance, we invite readers to pose questions likely to be raised in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, ... weekends at the Bangalore. Association for Science Educa- tion, Jawaharlal Nehru Plan- etarium, Bangalore. Keywords. Planetary motion,.

  17. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    In this section of Resonance, we invite readers to pose questions likely to be raised in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, or both. “Classroom” is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to ...

  18. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is, as evident from the normal meaning of the English word, a correspondence which associates to each mem ..... write it as a product of 3-cycles and go through the above analysis to actually arrive at a sequence of sliding moves which reaches the starting position. CLASSROOM. Look at the cycles. 0"1 = (1,2,. ,n,2n,. 2. 2. 1.

  19. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ite image of the Mercury. Transit, taken by Domin- ique Derrick, Belgium, on the 7th of May 2003. (repro- duced with permission). CLASSROOM scale in our understanding of the Universe - the Astronomical. Unit, or the mean distance between the Earth and the Sun. Historically, the transits of Venus were the first opportunity.

  20. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CLASSROOM. Figure 3. An antibubble undergoing breakup, note the expanding circular hole at the bottom. Figure 4. An antibubble trapped in a vortex flow, just prior to breakup. of the antibubble into two smaller antibubbles (see Figure 4), an observation which is worthy of theoretical investigation. In the following video ...

  1. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, or both. “Classroom” is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. Sheep Distribution Problem Through Egyptian Fractions.

  2. Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). Volume 3, Subject Area reference manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreck, R.I.

    1994-01-14

    The Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) Subject Area manuals are designed as reference guides, that is, each chapter provides the information needed to make best use of each subject area, its tables, and reporting capabilities. Each subject area is documented in a chapter in one of the subject area manuals. Because these are reference manuals, most of the information is also available in the online help system as well. See Section 5.4.2 of the HEIS User`s Guide (DOE-RL 1994a) for a detailed description of the online help.

  3. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    number multiplication. solid sphere (volume) is a sum of spherical shells (area) while in two dimensions a disk (area) is a sum of rings. (line). We develop a differentiation-based method to find the MOI of a 'shell' (thin surface layer; see (3) for its precise meaning) from that of the corresponding solid object. The conversion ...

  4. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    following equality,. Surface area of cap. Volume of cap. Surface area of whole sphere Volume of whole sphere' holds - apart from the trivial cases - only when the cap is a hemisphere. (The 'trivial cases' are when the cap has zero height and when the cap is the entire sphere.) Suggested Reading. [1] J MakeshPravin, ...

  5. More than Beliefs: Subject Areas and Teachers' Integration of Laptops in Secondary Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Sarah K.; Chan, Amy; Caputi, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship of subject areas to teachers' technology integration. Educational technology research has often identified "culture clashes" to explain differences in technology use between subject areas. These clashes are frequently attributed to core features, values and beliefs held in the…

  6. Extent of the availability of Africana resources in subject areas in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the extent of the availability of Africana resources in various subject areas in thirteen first and second generation federal university libraries in Nigeria with the view of suggesting ways to improve the development of the collection in the university libraries that are deficient in the subject areas of any of ...

  7. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ) of Erd}os) gives us: No integer congruent to 7629217 (mod 1184810) is a sum of a power of 2 and an odd prime. Z-W Sun has done substantial work in the subject of cov- ering congruences and revealed connections with zero- sum problems ...

  8. Integrating mathematics and other learning areas: Emerging tensions from a study Involving four classroom teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willy Mwakapenda

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents findings from a pilot study that investigated the extent to which teachers make connections between mathematical concepts and concepts from other disciplines. Data from concept maps and interviews were collected. The analysis revealed that the kinds of connections teachers made are closely tied to teachers’ disciplines of specialisation. The findings suggest that for some teachers, though desirable, it may not be feasible to require them to make connections with disciplines that are not within their areas of specialisation. This presents tensions for learners learning mathematics in classrooms where opportunities for making connections between mathematics and other learning areas are available but are neither taken up nor appropriately used by teachers.

  9. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Cubic equations, Cardan's method, depressed cubic, alge- braic equations. Solution of Cubic Equations: An Alternative Method. The exact solution of polynomial equations has long been an area of interest. Students are fa- miliar with the solution of linear and quadratic equations, but when they move to cubic and quar-.

  10. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. A Safe Procedure for Bromination of ... Electrophilic aromatic substitution is an important area of learning in introductory organic chemistry courses. ... G Joshi and S Adimurthy, Environment-friendly bromination of aromatic heterocycles using a ...

  11. Can Air Seat Cushions and Ball Chairs Improved Classroom Behaviors of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Single Subject Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Matin Sadr

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Classroom behaviorsare disturbed in autistic students because of their repetitive, restlessness, and disruptive behaviors. This study aimed to examine the impacts of sitting on a ball, cushion, and/or common chair on classroom behavior of four students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD. Methods: Four children with Autism participated in this single-subject study. Students’ behaviors were video recorded in three phases: Sitting on their common chairs during phase A, air-sit cushioned in phase B, and ball chairs in phase C. Sitting times and on-task/off-task behaviors were quantified by momentary time sampling (every 10 seconds and compared during different phases for important changes. Social validity was taken by the teacher at the end of the research as well. Results: The findings demonstrated increases in on-task and in-seat behaviors in four students when seated on air sit cushioned chairs. Despite rises of ontask behaviors for all students, only two of the students showed enhanced inseat behaviors when seated on therapy balls. Social validity findings indicated that the teacher preferred the use of the balls and air-cushioned chairs for her students. Conclusion: Therapy balls/cushioned chairs for students with ASD may facilitate in-seat and on-task behavior.

  12. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Leonardo da Vinci's Proof. In Figure 5, BB'CC' and BAAIBI are congruent, as are B 1C1C2A 1 and C'A'. AC. A comparison of areas makes it evident that a2 + b. 2. = c2 ([6]); see Box 3. Vedic Proof. Reference [7] claims that there are many. 'Vedic proofs' of the hypotenuse theorem, sinlpler than those given by Euclid.

  13. Evaluation of individual subjects in the analog classroom setting: II. Effects of dose of amphetamine (Adderall).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigal, S B; Swanson, J M; Greenhill, L; Waslick, B; Cantwell, D; Clevenger, W; Davies, M; Lerner, M; Regino, R; Fineberg, E; Baren, M; Browne, R

    1998-01-01

    Multiple dependent variables were graphed for 29 subjects who participated in a double-blind evaluation of 4 doses of Adderall, plus positive (methylphenidate) and placebo control conditions. Five judges ranked the conditions for each subject, and analyses of individual subjects indicated that these rankings were concordant (reliable) across judges. Consensus rankings were assigned to each subject, and an analysis of these ranks showed that the conditions differed significantly. The choice of best conditions were judged to be across 3 doses of Adderall (10, 15, and 20 mg). This confirms the clinical impression of individual differences in optimal dose of stimulant medication. The methodological, graphical, and statistical methods presented in this article provide a systematic, reliable procedure for evaluating relative response of individuals to different doses of stimulant medication.

  14. Subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Vega Encabo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I claim that subjectivity is a way of being that is constituted through a set of practices in which the self is subject to the dangers of fictionalizing and plotting her life and self-image. I examine some ways of becoming subject through narratives and through theatrical performance before others. Through these practices, a real and active subjectivity is revealed, capable of self-knowledge and self-transformation. 

  15. A logic of “linking learning”: Leadership practices across schools, subject departments and classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Melville

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the roles of school leaders, a departmental-level leader and a teacher in implementing a reform within a school, and the nature of the relations between the groups and individuals that attended this process. Drawing upon Bourdieu’s “thinking tools”, the article analyses the nature of the leadership practices surrounding the implementation of a single-sex mathematics class from the perspective of key participants in the change process: two school-level leaders, one departmental chair, and the teacher charged with teaching the class. By considering a secondary school and one of its constituent departments as a field and sub-field, respectively, we argue that even as there is evidence of contestation over the nature of the practices that influence or potentially influence the leadership practices at play within the field and sub-field as a whole, there are also significant learnings in relation to student learning on the part of those involved which serve as “links” between the leadership practices at the school and department levels, and the leadership of learning of the teacher implementing the reform. In this way, a logic of “linking learning”, guided by an ethic of concern for students’ success, was evident across school, department and classroom.

  16. Simplifying continuous monitoring of multiple-response/multiple-subject classroom interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrtic, T M; Sepler, H J

    1982-01-01

    In order to facilitate the field monitoring of three subjects interacting according to one or more of 18 response categories, a modified version of several available, but oftentimes mechanically incompatible, observational procedures was designed. Its continuous recording strategy, sectioned into one-minute observational units, enabled researchers to derive highly representative behavior samples, and when accompanied by the specially tailored coding form and recording apparatus, observers achieved over 90% agreement across all reliability sessions. This procedure provides applied researchers with a simple, highly reliable, and adaptable observation tool for continuously and simultaneously monitoring the behaviors of one or more subjects.

  17. The Enunciation of the Subject: Sharing Jean-Luc Nancy's Singular Plural in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    This article seeks to explore the implications of Jean-Luc Nancy's reading of the subject for educational philosophy by connecting his re-interpretation of Descartes to his later thinking on what he names the ontological singular plural. Nancy's re-imagining of the Cogito coalesces around the figure of the mouth ("la bouche") through…

  18. A case study of full integration of the arts into core subject area instruction in one East Texas secondary school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leysath, Maggie

    This exploratory phenomenological case study investigated the influence the full integration of the arts into core subject instruction has on classroom environment, student academic achievement, and student engagement as perceived by administrators, teachers, and students in one East Texas secondary school. Participant interviews were analyzed using Creswell's (2012) six-step method for analyzing phenomenological studies. The researcher implemented three learning activities in which ceramics learning objectives were fully integrated with chemistry learning objectives. The first activity combined clay properties and pottery wheel throwing with significant numbers. The second activity combined glaze formulation with moles. The third combined stoichiometry with the increased glaze formula for students to glaze the bowls they made. Findings suggest the full integration of art in core subject area instruction has numerous positive effects. Participants reported improved academic achievement for all students including reluctant learners. Students, teachers, and the administrator reported greater participation in the art integrated activities. Participants perceived a need for further training for teachers and administrators for greater success.

  19. DIY Media in the Classroom: New Literacies Across Content Areas (Middle Through High School). Language & Literacy Series (Practitioner's Bookshelf)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzetti, Barbara; Elliot, Kate; Welsch, Diana

    2010-01-01

    This book shows teachers how to bring students' Do-It-Yourself media practices into the classroom (Grades 6-12). In one accessible resource, the authors explain DIY media, identify their appealing features for content area instruction, and describe the literacy skills and strategies they promote. Chapters address: Adolescents' DIY Media as New…

  20. On the Urban-Rural Differences in Classroom Environment in Compulsory Education in the Eastern Coastal Developed Areas of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Furong; Xie, Limin

    2008-01-01

    Totally 789 students from 18 schools (9 primary schools and 9 junior high schools) at a medium managed level from Shanghai, Wenzhou, and Aojiang, which are located in the Eastern coastal developed areas of China were investigated with the questionnaire of Hong Kong Classroom Environment Scale in this study. The result indicates that the actual…

  1. Predicting Homework Motivation and Homework Effort in Six School Subjects: The Role of Person and Family Characteristics, Classroom Factors, and School Track

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautwein, Ulrich; Ludtke, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the determinants of homework motivation and homework effort in six school subjects at three levels: student level, classroom level, and school level. We hypothesized that several factors--including stable personality characteristics such as gender and conscientiousness, students' domain-specific homework motivation, and…

  2. The effect of productive classroom talk and metacommunication on young children's oral communicative competence and subject matter knowledge: An intervention study in early childhood education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, C.; de Mey, J.R.P.B.; van Kruistum, C.J.; van Oers, B.

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of productive classroom talk and metacommunication on the development of young children's oral communicative competence and subject matter knowledge. This study can be characterized as a quasi-experimental study with a

  3. Mastication, EMG activity and occlusal contact area in subjects with different facial types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Simone Guimarães Farias; Custodio, William; Jufer, Juliana Silva Moura; Del Bel, Cury Altair Antoninha; Garcia, Renata Cunha Matheus Rodrigues

    2010-10-01

    Dentofacial morphology may affect orofacial functions, therefore the aim of the current study was to evaluate the influence of craniofacial morphology on masticatory function, occlusal contact area (OCA), and masticatory muscles activity. Seventy-eight (78) subjects were divided into three groups according to vertical facial pattern: 1. mesofacial; 2. brachyfacial; and 3. dolichofacial. Artificial material and the sieving method were used to access masticatory efficiency (ME). OCA was determined by registration of posterior teeth. Electromyographic (EMG) activity of the masseter and anterior temporal (AT) muscles was accessed bilaterally at rest and at maximal vertical clenching (MVC). ME (%) was significantly higher in brachyfacial and lower in dolichofacial subjects. Brachyfacials presented the highest OCA (mm2) followed by meso and dolichofacial subjects. The EMG of the masseter and AT at rest and at MVC showed that dolichofacial subjects presented the lowest activity values, while brachyfacial subjects presented significantly higher measurements. Craniofacial morphology affected masticatory function, OCA, and EMG activity of the masticatory muscles.

  4. Increased BDNF promoter methylation in the Wernicke area of suicide subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Simona; Sarchiapone, Marco; Zarrilli, Federica; Videtic, Alja; Ferraro, Angelo; Carli, Vladimir; Sacchetti, Silvana; Lembo, Francesca; Angiolillo, Antonella; Jovanovic, Nikolina; Pisanti, Francesco; Tomaiuolo, Rossella; Monticelli, Antonella; Balazic, Joze; Roy, Alec; Marusic, Andrej; Cocozza, Sergio; Fusco, Alfredo; Bruni, Carmelo B; Castaldo, Giuseppe; Chiariotti, Lorenzo

    2010-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of suicidal behavior and BDNF levels are decreased in the brain and plasma of suicide subjects. So far, the mechanisms leading to downregulation of BDNF expression are poorly understood. To test the hypothesis that alterations of DNA methylation could be involved in the dysregulation of BDNF gene expression in the brain of suicide subjects. Three independent quantitative methylation techniques were performed on postmortem samples of brain tissue. BDNF messenger RNA levels were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Academic medical center. Forty-four suicide completers and 33 nonsuicide control subjects of white ethnicity. The DNA methylation degree at BDNF promoter IV and the genome-wide DNA methylation levels in the brain's Wernicke area. Postmortem brain samples from suicide subjects showed a statistically significant increase of DNA methylation at specific CpG sites in BDNF promoter/exon IV compared with nonsuicide control subjects (P Wernicke area of the postmortem brain of suicide subjects irrespective of genome-wide methylation levels, indicating that a gene-specific increase in DNA methylation could cause or contribute to the downregulation of BDNF expression in suicide subjects. The reported data reveal a novel link between epigenetic alteration in the brain and suicidal behavior.

  5. A Psychoanalyst in the Classroom: On the Human Condition in Education. Transforming Subjects: Psychoanalysis, Culture, and Studies in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britzman, Deborah P.

    2015-01-01

    "A Psychoanalyst in the Classroom" provides rich descriptions of the surprising ways individuals handle matters of love and hate when dealing with reading and writing in the classroom. With wit and sharp observations, Deborah P. Britzman advocates for a generous recognition of the vulnerabilities, creativity, and responsibilities of…

  6. Building Virtually Free Subject Area Expertise through Social Media: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooy, Brian K.

    2016-01-01

    Central to the ongoing success of the liaison model is the need for liaison librarians to stay informed and up-to-date about recent developments in the subject areas of their assigned academic departments and programs. This article describes an exploratory study conducted to determine whether information obtained from the social media accounts of…

  7. Subject Area Glossary. Arabic-English Vocabulary. Curriculum Bulletin Number 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicago Board of Education, IL. Dept. of Curriculum.

    A glossary of commonly used and subject-area English words and their Arabic equivalents with romanization was prepared for teachers and Arabic-speaking, limited-English-speaking children in the Chicago public schools. It consists of: (1) a key to Arabic pronunciation of velarized consonants, glottal consonants, and Arabic double-consonants; (2) a…

  8. Ascertaining Activities in a Subject Area Through Bibliometric Analysis; Application to "Library Literature"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracevic, Tefko; Perk, Lawrence J.

    1973-01-01

    A combination of quantitative and qualitative techniques were used to analize the journal articles indexed in one volume of Library Literature.'' This approach, merging bibliometrics and classification, yielded results in such areas as dispersion of articles among journals, frequency of article type and types of subjects covered. (16 references)…

  9. A Subject-Specificity Analysis of Radio Channels in Wireless Body Area Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Hao

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of subject-specific radio channels in wireless body area networks (WBANs using a simulation tool based on the parallel finite-difference time-domain (FDTD technique. This technique is well suited to model radio propagations around complex, inhomogeneous objects such as the human body. The impacts of different subjects varying in size on on-body, inter-body, and off-body radio channels are studied. The analysis demonstrates that the characteristics of on-body radio channels are subject-specific and are associated with human gender, height, and body mass index. On the other hand, when waves propagate away from the body, such as in the inter-body and off-body cases, the impacts of different subjects on the channel characteristics are found to be negligible.

  10. Subjective Evaluations of Motion Area and Velocity Characteristics of Dual Manipulator in Young and Elderly People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, Mitsumasa; Yoda, Asako; Shiota, Yasuhito

    In this study, we conducted a subjective evaluation experiment of a dual manipulator, which exhibits different motion characteristics. There are three motion characteristics: two of which are age-related, and the third is a robot motion characteristic and is newly added to these two motions. The motions are evaluated from motion areas and motion velocities. Subjects are elderly and young people, and the impressions of the motions are compared in two of the different age groups by the Semantic Differential (SD) method. The obtained results indicate that there are age differences in the evaluation of three manipulator motion areas. The elderly people show a higher reliability and a higher familiarity in a robot motion area than in the other two motions. The elderly people seem to be more affected by the manipulator motion than the young people. Therefore, a careful consideration is required when planning the motion of a manipulator for elderly people.

  11. Chewing side, bite force symmetry, and occlusal contact area of subjects with different facial vertical patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Guimarães Farias Gomes

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial dimensions influence oral functions; however, it is not known whether they are associated with function asymmetry. The objective of this study was to evaluate chewing side preference and lateral asymmetry of occlusal contact area and bite force of individuals with different craniofacial patterns. Seventy-eight dentate subjects were divided into 3 groups according to the VERT index as follows: (1 mesofacial, (2 brachyfacial and (3 dolichofacial. Chewing side preference was evaluated using jaw tracking equipment, occlusal contact area was measured by silicon registration of posterior teeth, and bite force was measured unilaterally on molar regions using 2.25 mm-thick sensors. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA on Ranks, Student's t-test, and Mann-Whitney tests at a 5% significance level. Mesofacial, brachyfacial, and dolichofacial subjects presented more occlusal contact area on the left side. Only dolichofacial subjects showed lateral asymmetry for bite force, presenting higher force on the left side. No statistically significant differences were found for chewing side preference among all groups. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that craniofacial dimensions play a role in asymmetry of bite force. ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT01286363.

  12. Condylar volume and condylar area in class I, class II and class III young adult subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saccucci Matteo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim Aim of this study was to compare the volume and the shape of mandibular condyles in a Caucasian young adult population, with different skeletal pattern. Material and methods 200 Caucasian patients (15–30 years old, 95 male and 105 females were classified in three groups on the base of ANB angle: skeletal class I (65 patients, skeletal class II (70 patients and skeletal class III (65 patients. Left and right TMJs of each subject were evaluated independently with CBCT (Iluma. TMJ evaluation included: condylar volume; condylar area; morphological index (MI. Condylar volumes were calculated by using the Mimics software. The condylar volume, the area and the morphological index (MI were compared among the three groups, by using non-parametric tests. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann Whitney test revealed that: no significant difference was observed in the whole sample between the right and the left condylar volume; subjects in skeletal class III showed a significantly higher condylar volume, respect to class I and class II subjects (p 3 in males and 663.5 ± 81.3 mm3 in females; p 2 in males and 389.76 ± 61.15 mm2 in females; p  Conclusion Skeletal class appeared to be associated to the mandibular condylar volume and to the mandibular condylar area in the Caucasian orthodontic population.

  13. Condylar volume and condylar area in class I, class II and class III young adult subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccucci, Matteo; D'Attilio, Michele; Rodolfino, Daria; Festa, Felice; Polimeni, Antonella; Tecco, Simona

    2012-12-14

    Aim of this study was to compare the volume and the shape of mandibular condyles in a Caucasian young adult population, with different skeletal pattern. 200 Caucasian patients (15-30 years old, 95 male and 105 females) were classified in three groups on the base of ANB angle: skeletal class I (65 patients), skeletal class II (70 patients) and skeletal class III (65 patients). Left and right TMJs of each subject were evaluated independently with CBCT (Iluma). TMJ evaluation included: condylar volume; condylar area; morphological index (MI). Condylar volumes were calculated by using the Mimics software. The condylar volume, the area and the morphological index (MI) were compared among the three groups, by using non-parametric tests. The Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann Whitney test revealed that: no significant difference was observed in the whole sample between the right and the left condylar volume; subjects in skeletal class III showed a significantly higher condylar volume, respect to class I and class II subjects (p condylar volume was observed in class II subjects, respect to class I and class III (p condylar volume (699.8 ± 63.07 mm3 in males and 663.5 ± 81.3 mm3 in females; p condylar surface (423.24 ± 63.03 mm2 in males and 389.76 ± 61.15 mm2 in females; p condylar volume and to the mandibular condylar area in the Caucasian orthodontic population.

  14. A description of a staff development program: Preparing the elementary school classroom teacher to lead environmental field trips and to use an integrated subject approach to environmental education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egana, John Joseph

    This study of the Field Trip Specialist Program (FTS) described how a professional development plan fostered change in the traditional roles of third and fourth grade teachers. Teachers that volunteered were prepared to become interpretive guides for their class on environmental field trips, integrate their basic subject areas lessons into an environmental science context, and develop their self-perception as professional educators. This qualitative study made use of quantitative data and drew on information collected over four years from surveys, interviews, classroom observations, field trip and workshop observations, focus groups, journals and assessments performed in Florida. The FTS Program attracted teachers who thought it was important for all students to understand environmental issues, and these teachers believed in integrated instruction. These beliefs were inconsistent with many aspects of school culture. FTS invited the participation of these teachers and encouraged them to take control of the program by serving as instructors and program developers. Teachers described themselves as prepared to deliver the FTS Program with a high level of motivation and relevance. They also credited the program as beneficial in preparation for the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Tests (FCAT). Teachers reported that their responsibility as field trip leaders was the primary factor motivating them to provide conscientious presentation of pre- and post-field trip lessons and thorough integration of environmental topics in basic subject area instruction. Despite the impact of the field trip leadership factor, I could not find another program in the State of Florida that required teachers to lead their own field trips. Other influential factors specific to this program were: Voluntary participation, on-site field instruction, peer instructors and program developers, high quality and task specific materials, and pre- and post-assessments for students. Factors were identified

  15. [Characterization of the leadership subject areas in the respiratory field in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Granda-Orive, J I; García-Río, F; Roig-Vázquez, F; Aleixandre-Benavent, R; Valderrama-Zurían, J C; Martínez-Albiach, J M; Callol-Sánchez, L

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the leading topics in respiratory system in Spain through a bibliometric analysis. For identify and characterize the performance of the different research topics in respiratory system in Spain, we compile the production using a journal that turn out representative of a broad group of researcher. In this sense the journal Archivos de Bronconeumología is the most important publication in Spanish language of this field. A total of 2198 articles published in Archivos Bronconeumología from 1970 to 2000 were analyzed. In each three decades, we did not found differences except in the productivity index in oncology in the eighty decade and in respiratory failure and sleep disturbance (RFSD) and oncology areas in the ninetieth decade and in the Price index (consumption indicators) in the diagnostic and therapeutic techniques area in seventy decade. When we compare the productivity index of each subject areas between decades, we found a significant production increase in the ninetieth decade in asthma, RFSD, tuberculosis, non tuberculosis infection, circulation, oncology, pleural disease and interstitial areas versus the same in seventy decade, and also, we found significant differences between ninetieth and eighty decades in the asthma, RFSD, non tuberculosis infection, circulation and pleural disease areas. Tuberculosis area maintains an insularity index higher than the other areas. We also found a progressive increase in the insularity index of RFSD, non tuberculosis infection, oncology and interstitial disease areas. In general all the indicators maintains stable although the more productivity topics were respiratory failure and sleep disturbances, and oncology. The productivity has increased in asthma, respiratory failure and sleep disturbances, tuberculosis, non - tuberculosis respiratory infections, oncology, pulmonary circulation, pleura and interstitial disease.

  16. Blood biomonitoring of metals in subjects living near abandoned mining and active industrial areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeddu, Roberto; Tolu, Paola; Asara, Yolande; Farace, Cristiano; Forte, Giovanni; Bocca, Beatrice

    2013-07-01

    A human blood biomonitoring campaign to detect the environmental exposure to metals (Cd, Cu, Cr, Mn, Pb and Zn) in 265 subjects was performed in the South-Western part of Sardinia (an Italian island) that is a particular area with a great history of coal and metal mining (Pb/Zn mainly) activities and large industrial structures (as metallurgy). Subjects living near the industrial plant area had geometric means (GM) of blood Cd (0.79 μg/l), Cu (971 μg/l), Mn (12.2 μg/l), and Pb (55.7 μg/l) significantly higher than controls (Cd, 0.47 μg/l; Cu, 900 μg/l; Mn 9.98 μg/l; Pb, 26.5 μg/l) and than people living nearby the past mining sites. Subjects living next to one dismissed mine were statistically higher in blood Cu (GM, 1,022 μg/l) and Pb (GM, 41.4 μg/l) concentrations than controls. No differences were observed in people living in the different mining sites, and this might be related to the decennial disclosure of mines and the adoption of environmental remediation programmes. Some interindividual variables influenced blood biomonitoring data, as smoke and age for Cd, gender for Cu, age, sex and alcohol for Pb, and age for Zn. Moreover, blood metal levels of the whole population were similar to reference values representative of the Sardinian population and acceptably safe according to currently available health guidelines.

  17. 75 FR 26967 - Guidance for Industry: Use of Water by Food Manufacturers in Areas Subject to a Boil-Water...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    ... Areas Subject to a Boil-Water Advisory; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Use of Water by Food Manufacturers in Areas Subject to a Boil-Water Advisory.'' This guidance is intended to advise food manufacturers that once a boil-water advisory has been...

  18. Academic Majors and Subject-Area Certifications of Health Education Teachers in the United States, 2011-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardina, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify academic preparation and subject-area certifications of K-12 public school staff teaching at least one health education class during 2011-2012 academic year. In general, teachers who are well qualified to teach a subject area are more likely to positively affect student achievement. Methods: Data…

  19. Perceptual Skills--A Concern of the Classroom Teacher?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Jerome

    1971-01-01

    Suggests specific ways in which the classroom teacher can teach to a child's perceptual and instructional weakness through his strengths. Notes that the goal is to provide instruction in the subject area, not just in perceptual skills. Bibliography. (RW)

  20. 1. Introduction The subject of Diophantine equations is an area of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 1. A Walk Which Must be Irrational for the Same Reason That 1 is Not Congruent. B Sury. Classroom Volume 17 Issue 1 January 2012 pp 76-82. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. Increased cortical area and thickness in the distal radius in subjects with SHOX-gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, A L; Hansen, S; Brixen, K; Frost, M

    2014-12-01

    Short-stature homeobox (SHOX) gene haploinsufficiency may cause skeletal dysplasia including Léri-Weill Dyschondrosteosis (LWD), a clinical entity characterised by the triad of low height, mesomelic disproportion and Madelung's deformity of the wrist. Bone microarchitecture and estimated strength in adult SHOX mutation carriers have not been examined. Twenty-two subjects with a SHOX mutation including 7 males and 15 females with a median age of 38.8 [21.1-52.2] years were recruited from five unrelated families. The control group consisted of 22 healthy subjects matched on age and sex. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Bone geometry, volumetric density, microarchitecture and finite element estimated (FEA) bone strength were measured using high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT). A full region of interest (ROI) image analysis and height-matched ROI analyses adjusting for differences in body height between the two groups were performed. Areal BMD and T-scores showed no significant differences between cases and controls. Total radius area was smaller in cases than controls (207 [176-263] vs. 273 [226-298] mm, pRadius cortical bone area (74 ± 20 vs. 58 ± 17 mm(2), p=0.01) and thickness (1.16 ± 0.30 vs. 0.84 ± 0.26 mm, pRadius trabecular bone area (119 [103-192] vs. 202 [168-247] mm(2), pradius and tibia cortical porosity or FEA failure load between groups. A segment of cortical bone defect was identified in the distal radius adjacent to ulna in five unrelated SHOX mutation carriers. Subjects with a SHOX mutation presented with a different bone geometry in radius and tibia while there were no differences in BMD or failure load compared to controls, suggesting that mutations in SHOX gene may have an impact on bone microarchitecture albeit not bone strength. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Refractive error study in young subjects: results from a rural area in Paraguay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signes-Soler, Isabel; Hernández-Verdejo, José Luis; Estrella Lumeras, Miguel Angel; Tomás Verduras, Elena; Piñero, David P.

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the distribution of refractive error in young subjects in a rural area of Paraguay in the context of an international cooperation campaign for the prevention of blindness. METHODS A sample of 1466 young subjects (ranging from 3 to 22 years old), with a mean age of 11.21±3.63 years old, were examined to assess their distance visual acuity (VA) and refractive error. The first screening examination performed by trained volunteers, included visual acuity testing, autokeratometry and non-cycloplegic autorefraction. Inclusion criteria for a second complete cycloplegic eye examination by an optometrist were VA <20/25 (0.10 logMAR or 0.8 decimal) and/or corneal astigmatism ≥1.50 D. RESULTS An uncorrected distance VA of 0 logMAR (1.0 decimal) was found in 89.2% of children. VA <20/25 and/or corneal astigmatism ≥1.50 D was found in 3.9% of children (n=57), with a prevalence of hyperopia of 5.2% (0.2% of the total) in this specific group. Furthermore, myopia (spherical equivalent ≤-0.5 D) was found in 37.7% of the refracted children (0.5% of the total). The prevalence of refractive astigmatism (cylinder ≤-1.50 D) was 15.8% (0.6% of the total). Visual impairment (VI) (0.05≤VA≤0.3) was found in 12/114 (0.4%) of the refracted eyes. Main causes for VI were refractive error (58%), retinal problems (17%, 2/12), albinism (17%, 2/12) and unknown (8%, 1/12). CONCLUSION A low prevalence of refractive error has been found in this rural area of Paraguay, with higher prevalence of myopia than of hyperopia. PMID:28393041

  3. Refractive error study in young subjects: results from a rural area in Paraguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Signes-Soler

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the distribution of refractive error in young subjects in a rural area of Paraguay in the context of an international cooperation campaign for the prevention of blindness. METHODS: A sample of 1466 young subjects (ranging from 3 to 22 years old, with a mean age of 11.21±3.63 years old, were examined to assess their distance visual acuity (VA and refractive error. The first screening examination performed by trained volunteers, included visual acuity testing, autokeratometry and non-cycloplegic autorefraction. Inclusion criteria for a second complete cycloplegic eye examination by an optometrist were VA <20/25 (0.10 logMAR or 0.8 decimal and/or corneal astigmatism ≥1.50 D. RESULTS: An uncorrected distance VA of 0 logMAR (1.0 decimal was found in 89.2% of children. VA <20/25 and/or corneal astigmatism ≥1.50 D was found in 3.9% of children (n=57, with a prevalence of hyperopia of 5.2% (0.2% of the total in this specific group. Furthermore, myopia (spherical equivalent ≤-0.5 D was found in 37.7% of the refracted children (0.5% of the total. The prevalence of refractive astigmatism (cylinder ≤-1.50 D was 15.8% (0.6% of the total. Visual impairment (VI (0.05≤VA≤0.3 was found in 12/114 (0.4% of the refracted eyes. Main causes for VI were refractive error (58%, retinal problems (17%, 2/12, albinism (17%, 2/12 and unknown (8%, 1/12. CONCLUSION: A low prevalence of refractive error has been found in this rural area of Paraguay, with higher prevalence of myopia than of hyperopia.

  4. Spatial variability of soil potassium in sugarcane areas subjected to the application of vinasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carvalho, Laércio A; Meurer, Ismael; Da Silva Junior, Carlos A; Santos, Cristiane F B; Libardi, Paulo L

    2014-12-01

    When deposited on land the vinasse can promote improvement in fertility, however, often fertilizer application occurs in areas considered homogeneous, without taking into account the variability of the soil. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of vinasse application on potassium content in two classes of soils cultivated with sugarcane, and characterize the spatial variability of soil using geostatistical techniques. In the 2010 and 2011 crop year, soil samples were collected from an experimental grid at 0-0.2 and 0.2-0.4 m depth in three soils cultivated with sugarcane, totaling 90 samplings in each grid, for the determination of pH, calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), phosphorus (P), aluminum (Al) and potential acidity (H + Al). The data have been submitted to analysis of descriptive statistics and the K attribute was subjected to geostatistical analysis. The coefficient of variation indicated medium and high variability of K for the three soils. The results showed that the spatial dependence of K increased in depth to FRce and decreased to PHlv, indicating that the attribute could have followed the pattern of distribution of clay in depth. The investigation of the spatial variability of K on the surface and subsurface soils provided the definition of management zones with different levels of fertility, which can be organized into sub-areas for a more efficient management of the resources and the environment.

  5. Spatial variability of soil potassium in sugarcane areas subjected to the application of vinasse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAÉRCIO A. DE CARVALHO

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available When deposited on land the vinasse can promote improvement in fertility, however, often fertilizer application occurs in areas considered homogeneous, without taking into account the variability of the soil. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of vinasse application on potassium content in two classes of soils cultivated with sugarcane, and characterize the spatial variability of soil using geostatistical techniques. In the 2010 and 2011 crop year, soil samples were collected from an experimental grid at 0-0.2 and 0.2-0.4 m depth in three soils cultivated with sugarcane, totaling 90 samplings in each grid, for the determination of pH, calcium (Ca, magnesium (Mg, potassium (K, phosphorus (P, aluminum (Al and potential acidity (H + Al. The data have been submitted to analysis of descriptive statistics and the K attribute was subjected to geostatistical analysis. The coefficient of variation indicated medium and high variability of K for the three soils. The results showed that the spatial dependence of K increased in depth to FRce and decreased to PHlv, indicating that the attribute could have followed the pattern of distribution of clay in depth. The investigation of the spatial variability of K on the surface and subsurface soils provided the definition of management zones with different levels of fertility, which can be organized into sub-areas for a more efficient management of the resources and the environment.

  6. DOMAIN-DRIVEN DESIGN APPLICATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS FOR CLIENTS QUEUING SUBJECT AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. Oleynik

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with domain-driven design applicability of information systems for client queuing subject areas. The following optimality criteria were put forward for the final implementation: the possibility of automation with a single system both for small institution and a whole network of institutions; advanced graphical interface with support for sensor screens; implementation of multi-users account of orders from clients; flexible application architecture with the ability of future enhancement; ability of integration with a variety of peripherals. The necessity of each criterion definition is shown. For implementability estimation, test information system was designed, automating the queuing system. Unified modeling language UML is used. Description of each class functionality is given and the association with other classes as well. Attention is paid to the design of tree (hierarchical structures and selection procedure of base classes based on the analysis of existing common attributes. For the system implementation, its own development environment SharpArchitect RAD Studio is used, offering MDA approach for implementation of systems based on standardized meta object system. A graphical view of order form developed prototype is presented, composition and structure are described, and notation developed by the author is given simplifying the prototyping process. Approaches to differentiation of access rights for different user roles are shown. Conformity of the received implementation to each selected optimality criterion is determined. Recommendations for further system development are given.

  7. Objective and subjective measures of the pharmacodynamic effects of Adderall in the treatment of children with ADHD in a controlled laboratory classroom setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, J; Wigal, S; Greenhill, L; Browne, R; Waslick, B; Lerner, M; Williams, L; Flynn, D; Agler, D; Crowley, K L; Fineberg, E; Regino, R; Baren, M; Cantwell, D

    1998-01-01

    In a randomized double-blind crossover study of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the time course effects of four doses of Adderall (5, 10, 15, and 20 mg) and an inactive (placebo) control, and an active (Ritalin) control were evaluated. A laboratory classroom setting was established in which subjective (teacher ratings of deportment and attention) and objective (scores on math tests) measurements were taken every 1.5 hours across the day. In addition to significant time and dose effects of Adderall, significant time-of-day effects were documented in the placebo condition for the subjective measure of deportment and objective measures of performance. Regression analyses were used to estimate the magnitude of these baseline effects. Correlations across time were used to evaluate the test-retest reliability of each measure in the face of these time-dependent placebo effects. After placebo/time adjustments, within-subject correlations between pairs of measures were used to evaluate the validity of the math test as a measure of response to stimulant medication.

  8. Literature-Based Teaching in the Content Areas: 40 Strategies for K-8 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Carole

    2011-01-01

    Grounded in theory and best-practices research, this practical text provides teachers with 40 strategies for using fiction and non-fiction trade books to teach in five key content areas: language arts and reading, social studies, mathematics, science, and the arts. Each strategy provides everything a teacher needs to get started: a classroom…

  9. Intra-Rater Reliability of Rehabilitative Ultrasound Imaging for Multifidus Muscles Thickness and Cross Section Area in Healthy Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseinifar, Mohammad; Akbari, Asghar; Ghiasi, Fateme

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Rehabilitative Ultrasound Imaging (RUSI) must be valuable method for research and rehabilitation. So, the reliability of its measurements must be determined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the intra-rater reliability of RUSI for measurement of multifidus (MF) muscles cross section areas (CSAs), bladder wall diameter, and thickness of MF muscles between 2 sessions in healthy subjects. Method: Fifteen healthy subjects through simple non-probability sampling participated...

  10. Economics of Scholarly Publishing: Exploring the Causes of Subscription Price Variations of Scholarly Journals in Business Subject-Specific Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lewis G.

    2011-01-01

    This empirical research investigates subscription price variations of scholarly journals in five business subject-specific areas using the semilogarithmic regression model. It has two main purposes. The first is to address the unsettled debate over whether or not and to what extent commercial publishers reap monopoly profits by overcharging…

  11. Performance Gaps between Online and Face-to-Face Courses: Differences across Types of Students and Academic Subject Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Di; Jaggars, Shanna S.

    2014-01-01

    Using a dataset containing nearly 500,000 courses taken by over 40,000 community and technical college students in Washington State, this study examines the performance gap between online and face-to-face courses and how the size of that gap differs across student subgroups and academic subject areas. While all types of students in the study…

  12. Problem Solving and Creativity and Design: What Influence Do They Have on Girls' Interest in STEM Subject Areas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Robyn; Heaverlo, Carol

    2013-01-01

    For girls there is a distinct loss in interest, lack of confidence, and decline in positive attitudes toward STEM subject areas that begins early on in their academic experience and increases with age. According to the National Academy of Engineering, students need to begin associating the possibilities in STEM fields with the need for creativity…

  13. Reproducibility and repeatability of foveal avascular zone area measurements using swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Toto, Lisa; Mattei, Peter A; Di Nicola, Marta; Zecca, Isaia A L; Carpineto, Paolo; Di Antonio, Luca

    2017-05-11

    To assess the reproducibility and repeatability of foveal avascular zone (FAZ) area measurements using swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography (SS-OCTA) in healthy subjects. Sixty-four eyes of 64 healthy volunteers were randomly subjected to FAZ area measurements using SS-OCTA by 2 examiners in 2 different sessions. The FAZ areas measured by the first and second observer were 0.269 ± 0.092 mm2 and 0.270 ± 0.090 mm2, respectively. Within subjects, the coefficients of variations were 2.44% (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.95% to 2.93%) and 2.66% (95% CI 2.00% to 3.31%) for the first and second observers, respectively. The coefficient of repeatability average measurements of FAZ area were 0.021 mm2 and 0.024 mm2. The intraclass correlation coefficient values were 0.993 (95% CI 0.989 to 0.996) and 0.991 (95% CI 0.986 to 0.995). Interobserver and intraobserver concordance correlation coefficients ranged from 0.998 (95% CI 0.997 to 0.999) to 0.999 (95% CI 0.998 to 0.999) and from 0.989 (95% CI 0.982 to 0.993) to 0.987 (95% CI 0.979 to 0.992), respectively. The FAZ area measurements by means of SS-OCTA showed high reproducibility and repeatability in healthy eyes.

  14. Condylar volume and condylar area in class I, class II and class III young adult subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Saccucci Matteo; D’Attilio Michele; Rodolfino Daria; Festa Felice; Polimeni Antonella; Tecco Simona

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aim Aim of this study was to compare the volume and the shape of mandibular condyles in a Caucasian young adult population, with different skeletal pattern. Material and methods 200 Caucasian patients (15–30 years old, 95 male and 105 females) were classified in three groups on the base of ANB angle: skeletal class I (65 patients), skeletal class II (70 patients) and skeletal class III (65 patients). Left and right TMJs of each subject were evaluated independently with CBCT (Iluma). ...

  15. MEG reveals a fast pathway from somatosensory cortex to occipital areas via posterior parietal cortex in a blind subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas A Ioannides

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cross-modal activity in visual cortex of blind subjects has been reported during performance of variety of non-visual tasks. A key unanswered question is through which pathways non-visual inputs are funneled to the visual cortex. Here we used tomographic analysis of single trial magnetoencephalography (MEG data recorded from one congenitally blind and two sighted subjects after stimulation of the left and right median nerves at three intensities: below sensory threshold, above sensory threshold and above motor threshold; the last sufficient to produce thumb twitching. We identified reproducible brain responses in the primary somatosensory (S1 and motor (M1 cortices at around 20 ms post-stimulus, which were very similar in sighted and blind subjects. Time-frequency analysis revealed strong 45 to 70 Hz activity at latencies of 20 to 50 ms in S1 and M1, and posterior parietal cortex Brodmann areas (BA 7 and 40, which compared to lower frequencies, were substantially more pronounced in the blind than the sighted subjects. Critically, at frequencies from α-band up to 100 Hz we found clear, strong and widespread responses in the visual cortex of the blind subject, which increased with the intensity of the somatosensory stimuli. Time-delayed mutual information (MI revealed that in blind subject the stimulus information is funneled from the early somatosensory to visual cortex through posterior parietal BA 7 and 40, projecting first to visual areas V5 and V3, and eventually V1. The flow of information through this pathway occured in stages characterized by convergence of activations into specific cortical regions. In sighted subjects, no linked activity was found that led from the somatosensory to the visual cortex through any of the studied brain regions. These results provide the first evidence from MEG that in blind subjects, tactile information is routed from primary somatosensory to occipital cortex via the posterior parietal cortex.

  16. MEG reveals a fast pathway from somatosensory cortex to occipital areas via posterior parietal cortex in a blind subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannides, Andreas A; Liu, Lichan; Poghosyan, Vahe; Saridis, George A; Gjedde, Albert; Ptito, Maurice; Kupers, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Cross-modal activity in visual cortex of blind subjects has been reported during performance of variety of non-visual tasks. A key unanswered question is through which pathways non-visual inputs are funneled to the visual cortex. Here we used tomographic analysis of single trial magnetoencephalography (MEG) data recorded from one congenitally blind and two sighted subjects after stimulation of the left and right median nerves at three intensities: below sensory threshold, above sensory threshold and above motor threshold; the last sufficient to produce thumb twitching. We identified reproducible brain responses in the primary somatosensory (S1) and motor (M1) cortices at around 20 ms post-stimulus, which were very similar in sighted and blind subjects. Time-frequency analysis revealed strong 45-70 Hz activity at latencies of 20-50 ms in S1 and M1, and posterior parietal cortex Brodmann areas (BA) 7 and 40, which compared to lower frequencies, were substantially more pronounced in the blind than the sighted subjects. Critically, at frequencies from α-band up to 100 Hz we found clear, strong, and widespread responses in the visual cortex of the blind subject, which increased with the intensity of the somatosensory stimuli. Time-delayed mutual information (MI) revealed that in blind subject the stimulus information is funneled from the early somatosensory to visual cortex through posterior parietal BA 7 and 40, projecting first to visual areas V5 and V3, and eventually V1. The flow of information through this pathway occurred in stages characterized by convergence of activations into specific cortical regions. In sighted subjects, no linked activity was found that led from the somatosensory to the visual cortex through any of the studied brain regions. These results provide the first evidence from MEG that in blind subjects, tactile information is routed from primary somatosensory to occipital cortex via the posterior parietal cortex.

  17. Cross-Modal Recruitment of Auditory and Orofacial Areas During Sign Language in a Deaf Subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Juan; Velasquez, Carlos; Vázquez-Bourgon, Javier; de Lucas, Enrique Marco; Gomez, Elsa

    2017-09-01

    Modern sign languages used by deaf people are fully expressive, natural human languages that are perceived visually and produced manually. The literature contains little data concerning human brain organization in conditions of deficient sensory information such as deafness. A deaf-mute patient underwent surgery of a left temporoinsular low-grade glioma. The patient underwent awake surgery with intraoperative electrical stimulation mapping, allowing direct study of the cortical and subcortical organization of sign language. We found a similar distribution of language sites to what has been reported in mapping studies of patients with oral language, including 1) speech perception areas inducing anomias and alexias close to the auditory cortex (at the posterior portion of the superior temporal gyrus and supramarginal gyrus); 2) speech production areas inducing speech arrest (anarthria) at the ventral premotor cortex, close to the lip motor area and away from the hand motor area; and 3) subcortical stimulation-induced semantic paraphasias at the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus at the temporal isthmus. The intraoperative setup for sign language mapping with intraoperative electrical stimulation in deaf-mute patients is similar to the setup described in patients with oral language. To elucidate the type of language errors, a sign language interpreter in close interaction with the neuropsychologist is necessary. Sign language is perceived visually and produced manually; however, this case revealed a cross-modal recruitment of auditory and orofacial motor areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Estimating species – area relationships by modeling abundance and frequency subject to incomplete sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaura, Yuichi; Connor, Edward F.; Royle, Andy; Itoh, Katsuo; Sato, Kiyoshi; Taki, Hisatomo; Mishima, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Models and data used to describe species–area relationships confound sampling with ecological process as they fail to acknowledge that estimates of species richness arise due to sampling. This compromises our ability to make ecological inferences from and about species–area relationships. We develop and illustrate hierarchical community models of abundance and frequency to estimate species richness. The models we propose separate sampling from ecological processes by explicitly accounting for the fact that sampled patches are seldom completely covered by sampling plots and that individuals present in the sampling plots are imperfectly detected. We propose a multispecies abundance model in which community assembly is treated as the summation of an ensemble of species-level Poisson processes and estimate patch-level species richness as a derived parameter. We use sampling process models appropriate for specific survey methods. We propose a multispecies frequency model that treats the number of plots in which a species occurs as a binomial process. We illustrate these models using data collected in surveys of early-successional bird species and plants in young forest plantation patches. Results indicate that only mature forest plant species deviated from the constant density hypothesis, but the null model suggested that the deviations were too small to alter the form of species–area relationships. Nevertheless, results from simulations clearly show that the aggregate pattern of individual species density–area relationships and occurrence probability–area relationships can alter the form of species–area relationships. The plant community model estimated that only half of the species present in the regional species pool were encountered during the survey. The modeling framework we propose explicitly accounts for sampling processes so that ecological processes can be examined free of sampling artefacts. Our modeling approach is extensible and could be applied

  19. Magneto encephalography (MEG: perspectives of speech areas functional mapping in human subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butorina A. V.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the main problems in clinical practice and academic research is how to localize speech zones in the human brain. Two speech areas (Broca and Wernicke areas that are responsible for language production and for understanding of written and spoken language have been known since the past century. Their location and even hemispheric lateralization have a substantial inter-individual variability, especially in neurosurgery patients. Wada test is one of the most frequently used invasive methodology for speech hemispheric lateralization in neurosurgery patients. However, besides relatively high-risk of Wada test for patient's health, it has its own limitation, e. g. low reliability of Wada-based evidence of verbal memory brain lateralization. Therefore, there is an urgent need for non-invasive, reliable methods of speech zones mapping.The current review summarizes the recent experimental evidence from magnitoencephalographic (MEG research suggesting that speech areas are included in the speech processing within the first 200 ms after the word onset. The electro-magnetic response to deviant word, mismatch negativity wave with latency of 100—200 ms, can be recorded from auditory cortex within the oddball-paradigm. We provide the arguments that basic features of this brain response, such as its automatic, pre-attentive nature, high signal to noise ratio, source localization at superior temporal sulcus, make it a promising vehicle for non-invasive MEG-based speech areas mapping in neurosurgery.

  20. Subject-specific computational modeling of DBS in the PPTg area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitella, Laura M.; Teplitzky, Benjamin A.; Yager, Paul; Hudson, Heather M.; Brintz, Katelynn; Duchin, Yuval; Harel, Noam; Vitek, Jerrold L.; Baker, Kenneth B.; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) has been proposed to alleviate medically intractable gait difficulties associated with Parkinson's disease. Clinical trials have shown somewhat variable outcomes, stemming in part from surgical targeting variability, modulating fiber pathways implicated in side effects, and a general lack of mechanistic understanding of DBS in this brain region. Subject-specific computational models of DBS are a promising tool to investigate the underlying therapy and side effects. In this study, a parkinsonian rhesus macaque was implanted unilaterally with an 8-contact DBS lead in the PPTg region. Fiber tracts adjacent to PPTg, including the oculomotor nerve, central tegmental tract, and superior cerebellar peduncle, were reconstructed from a combination of pre-implant 7T MRI, post-implant CT, and post-mortem histology. These structures were populated with axon models and coupled with a finite element model simulating the voltage distribution in the surrounding neural tissue during stimulation. This study introduces two empirical approaches to evaluate model parameters. First, incremental monopolar cathodic stimulation (20 Hz, 90 μs pulse width) was evaluated for each electrode, during which a right eyelid flutter was observed at the proximal four contacts (−1.0 to −1.4 mA). These current amplitudes followed closely with model predicted activation of the oculomotor nerve when assuming an anisotropic conduction medium. Second, PET imaging was collected OFF-DBS and twice during DBS (two different contacts), which supported the model predicted activation of the central tegmental tract and superior cerebellar peduncle. Together, subject-specific models provide a framework to more precisely predict pathways modulated by DBS. PMID:26236229

  1. Subject-specific computational modeling of DBS in the PPTg area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M. Zitella

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg has been proposed to alleviate medically intractable gait difficulties associated with Parkinson’s disease. Clinical trials have shown somewhat variable outcomes, stemming in part from surgical targeting variability, modulating fiber pathways implicated in side effects, and a general lack of mechanistic understanding of DBS in this brain region. Subject-specific computational models of DBS are a promising tool to investigate the underlying therapy and side effects. In this study, a parkinsonian rhesus macaque was implanted unilaterally with an 8-contact DBS lead in the PPTg region. Fiber tracts adjacent to PPTg, including the oculomotor nerve, central tegmental tract, and superior cerebellar peduncle, were reconstructed from a combination of pre-implant 7T MRI, post-implant CT, and post-mortem histology. These structures were populated with axon models and coupled with a finite element model simulating the voltage distribution in the surrounding neural tissue during stimulation. This study introduces two empirical approaches to evaluate model parameters. First, incremental monopolar cathodic stimulation (20Hz, 90µs pulse width was evaluated for each electrode, during which a right eyelid flutter was observed at the proximal four contacts (-1.0 to -1.4mA. These current amplitudes followed closely with model predicted activation of the oculomotor nerve when assuming an anisotropic conduction medium. Second, PET imaging was collected OFF-DBS and twice during DBS (two different contacts, which supported the model predicted activation of the central tegmental tract and superior cerebellar peduncle. Together, subject-specific models provide a framework to more precisely predict pathways modulated by DBS.

  2. Modelling of E. coli distribution in coastal areas subjected to combined sewer overflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchis, Mauro; Freni, Gabriele; Napoli, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Rivers, lakes and the sea were the natural receivers of raw urban waste and storm waters for a long time but the low sustainability of such practice, the increase of population and a renewed environmental sensibility increased researcher interest in the analysis and mitigation of the impact of urban waters on receiving water bodies (RWB). In Europe, the integrated modelling of drainage systems and RWB has been promoted as a promising approach for implementing the Water Framework Directive. A particular interest is given to the fate of pathogens and especially of Escherichia coli, in all the cases in which an interaction between population and the RWB is foreseen. The present paper aims to propose an integrated water quality model involving the analysis of several sewer systems (SS) discharging their polluting overflows on the coast in a sensitive marine environment. From a modelling point of view, the proposed application integrated one-dimensional drainage system models with a complex three-dimensional model analysing the propagation in space and time of E. coli in the coastal marine area. The integrated approach was tested in a real case study (the Acicastello bay in Italy) where data were available both for SS model and for RWB propagation model calibration. The analysis shows a good agreement between the model and monitored data. The integrated model was demonstrated to be a valuable tool for investigating the pollutant propagation and to highlight the most impacted areas.

  3. CO2 sequestration in two mediterranean dune areas subjected to a different level of anthropogenic disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonito, Andrea; Ricotta, Carlo; Iberite, Mauro; Gratani, Loretta; Varone, Laura

    2017-09-01

    Coastal sand dunes are among the most threatened habitats, especially in the Mediterranean Basin, where the high levels of human pressure impair the presence of plant species, putting at risk the maintenance of the ecosystem services, such as CO2 sequestration provided by these habitats. The aim of this study was to analyze how disturbance-induced changes in plant species abundance patterns account for variations in annual CO2 sequestration flow (CS) of Mediterranean sand dune areas. Two sites characterized by a high (site HAD) and a lower (site LAD) anthropogenic disturbance level were selected. At both sites, plant species number, cover, height and CS based on net photosynthesis measurements were sampled. At the plant species level, our results highlighted that Ammophila arenaria and Pancratium maritimum, had a key role in CS. Moreover, the results revealed a patchy species assemblage in both sites. In particular, HAD was characterized by a higher extension of the anthropogenic aphytoic zone (64% of the total transect length) than LAD. In spite of the observed differences in plant species composition, there were not significant differences between HAD and LAD in structural and functional traits, such as plant height and net photosynthesis. As a consequence, HAD and LAD had a similar CS (443 and 421 Mg CO2 ha-1 y-1, respectively). From a monetary point of view, our estimates based on the social costs of carbon revealed that the flow of sequestered CO2 valued on an average 3181 ± 114 ha-1 year-1 (mean value for the two sites). However, considering also the value of the CO2 negative flow related to loss of vegetated area, the annual net benefit arising from CO2 sequestration amounted to 1641 and 1772 for HAD and LAD, respectively. Overall, the results highlighted the importance to maximize the efforts to preserve dune habitats by applying an effective management policy, which could allow maintaining also a regulatory ecosystem service such as CO2 sequestration.

  4. Population aging in local areas and subjective well-being of older adults: Findings from two studies in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Tami; Sugisawa, Hidehiro; Harada, Ken; Kai, Ichiro

    2016-05-23

    Subjective well-being (SWB) of older adults could be affected by both individual and community characteristics. However, the effect of community characteristics, such as population aging in local areas, remains unclear. This study examined the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between the area-level population aging and SWB of older individuals from two distinct surveys. Those analyzed were 572 respondents aged 75 years and older for a cross-sectional survey in a metropolitan area in Tokyo, Japan (Study 1) and 1,257 and 859 respondents for a cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis, respectively, for a 2-year longitudinal survey project in urban and rural areas of Fukui Prefecture (Study 2). Area-level population aging was assessed by the number of people aged 65 years or older per 100 residents. SWB was assessed with the Life Satisfaction Index-A (LSIA). Multilevel analysis was performed to examine unconditional and conditional associations between the area-level number of older adults per 100 residents and the individual-level LSIA scores. The area-level number of older adults per 100 residents was significantly and positively associated with the LSIA scores in Study 1 (p = 0.042), even after controlling for the area- and individual-level covariates. In Study 2, we also found a significant effect of the area-level number of older adults per 100 residents on LSIA scores in the longitudinal multivariate analysis (p = 0.049). Findings from two survey projects suggested cross-validity in the positive effect of area-level population aging on older adults' SWB. Policymakers should consider older citizens' SWB in the recent urban-to-rural migration governmental policy as well as in urban renovation planning.

  5. The Difference in Translaminar Pressure Gradient and Neuroretinal Rim Area in Glaucoma and Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Siaudvytyte

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess differences in translaminar pressure gradient (TPG and neuroretinal rim area (NRA in patients with normal tension glaucoma (NTG, high tension glaucoma (HTG, and healthy controls. Methods. 27 patients with NTG, HTG, and healthy controls were included in the prospective pilot study (each group consisted of 9 patients. Intraocular pressure (IOP, intracranial pressure (ICP, and confocal laser scanning tomography were assessed. TPG was calculated as the difference of IOP minus ICP. ICP was measured using noninvasive two-depth transcranial Doppler device. The level of significance P 0.05. The difference between TPG for healthy (5.4(7.7 mmHg and glaucomatous eyes (NTG 6.3(3.1 mmHg, HTG 15.7(7.7 mmHg was statistically significant (P < 0.001. Higher TPG was correlated with decreased NRA (r = −0.83; P = 0.01 in the NTG group. Conclusion. Translaminar pressure gradient was higher in glaucoma patients. Reduction of NRA was related to higher TPG in NTG patients. Further prospective studies are warranted to investigate the involvement of TPG in glaucoma management.

  6. Fostering and Sustaining Diverse Literacy Practices in the Early Childhood Classroom: Reviewing the Literature in Three Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Emily

    2017-01-01

    In this article, I synthesize extant research that documents how teachers foster and sustain children's diverse literacy practices within the early childhood classroom. Framing this review with Bakhtin's heteroglossia, I draw on theoretical and empirical scholarship in the fields of biliteracy, translanguaging, and culturally sustaining pedagogy.…

  7. Video Modeling of Cooperative Discussion Group Behaviors with Students with Learning Disabilities in a Secondary Content-area Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Chris; Wood, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    Peer-mediated instructional strategies such as cooperative learning are commonly used in general education classrooms in secondary schools; however, students with disabilities often lack the group interaction and discussion skills necessary to fully benefit from evidence-based interventions. The present study used a multiple baseline across…

  8. English-Medium Instruction in Hong Kong: Illuminating a Grey Area in School Policies and Classroom Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Stephen; Morrison, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Research into the medium of instruction (MOI) in Hong Kong has traditionally focused on years 7-9; thus, little is known about school policies and classroom practices in the crucial senior-secondary years which fall beyond the ambit of government diktats. This lacuna is particularly conspicuous in the case of Chinese-medium schools, whose students…

  9. Sonographic measurements of low-echoic synovial area in the dorsal aspect of metatarsophalangeal joints in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraga, Masao; Ikeda, Kei; Shigeta, Koichiro; Sato, Akito; Yoshitama, Tamami; Hara, Ryota; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2015-05-01

    Assessment of synovitis in the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints with ultrasound has been shown to improve the accuracy of assessment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the presence of intraarticular low-echoic synovial area (LESA) in the MTP joints in healthy subjects complicates the sonographic assessment of these joints. Healthy subjects with no arthritic symptoms in their MTP joints were recruited. All subjects completed a questionnaire and underwent physical examination and sonographic assessment. LESAs in the dorsal aspect of all MTP joints were measured in the longitudinal view. One thousand non-arthritic MTP joints in 100 healthy subjects (female 73, mean age 41.0 years old) were evaluated. Measurable LESAs were identified in all joints assessed. Mean length of LESA in each of the 1st-5th MTP joints was 17.8, 13.9, 11.9, 10.6, and 9.2 mm, respectively, whereas mean thickness was 2.4, 2.4, 1.8, 1.2, and 0.8 mm, respectively. Multivariate linear regression models identified the difference between 1st and 5th MTP joints as the most independently influential factor on the measurement of LESA. Our data provide the normal reference values for the measurements of LESA in Japanese, which should be taken into consideration when the synovitis in MTP joints is evaluated with ultrasound.

  10. Comparison of optic area measurement using fundus photography and optical coherence tomography between optic nerve head drusen and control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Rodríguez, Patricia; Gili, Pablo; Martín-Ríos, María Dolores; Grifol-Clar, Eulalia

    2013-03-01

    To compare optic disc area measurement between optic nerve head drusen (ONHD) and control subjects using fundus photography, time-domain optical coherence tomography (TD-OCT) and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). We also made a comparison between each of the three techniques. We performed our study on 66 eyes (66 patients) with ONHD and 70 healthy control subjects (70 controls) with colour ocular fundus photography at 20º (Zeiss FF 450 IR plus), TD-OCT (Stratus OCT) with the Fast Optic Disc protocol and SD-OCT (Cirrus OCT) with the Optic Disc Cube 200 × 200 protocol for measurement of the optic disc area. The measurements were made by two observers and in each measurement a correction of the image magnification factor was performed. Measurement comparison using the Student's t-test/Mann-Whitney U test, the intraclass correlation coefficient, Pearson/Spearman rank correlation coefficient and the Bland-Altman plot was performed in the statistical analysis. Mean and standard deviation (SD) of the optic disc area in ONHD and in controls was 2.38 (0.54) mm(2) and 2.54 (0.42) mm(2), respectively with fundus photography; 2.01 (0.56) mm(2) and 1.66 (0.37) mm(2), respectively with TD-OCT, and 2.03 (0.49) mm(2) and 1.75 (0.38) mm(2), respectively with SD-OCT. In ONHD and controls, repeatability of optic disc area measurement was excellent with fundus photography and optical coherence tomography (TD-OCT and SD-OCT), but with a low degree of agreement between both techniques. Optic disc area measurement is smaller in ONHD compared to healthy subjects with fundus photography, unlike time-domain and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography in which the reverse is true. Both techniques offer good repeatability, but a low degree of correlation and agreement, which means that optic disc area measurement is not interchangeable or comparable between techniques. Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2013 The College of Optometrists.

  11. Fourier power, subjective distance and object categories all provide plausible models of BOLD responses in scene-selective visual areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Daniel Lescroart

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Perception of natural visual scenes activates several functional areas in the human brain, including the Parahippocampal Place Area (PPA, Retrosplenial Complex (RSC, and the Occipital Place Area (OPA. It is currently unclear what specific scene-related features are represented in these areas. Previous studies have suggested that PPA, RSC, and/or OPA might represent at least three qualitatively different classes of features: (1 2D features related to Fourier power; (2 3D spatial features such as the distance to objects in a scene; or (3 abstract features such as the categories of objects in a scene. To determine which of these hypotheses best describes the visual representation in scene-selective areas, we applied voxel-wise modeling (VM to BOLD fMRI responses elicited by a set of 1,386 images of natural scenes. VM provides an efficient method for testing competing hypotheses by comparing predictions of brain activity based on encoding models that instantiate each hypothesis. Here we evaluated three different encoding models that instantiate each of the three hypotheses listed above. We used linear regression to fit each encoding model to the fMRI data recorded from each voxel, and we evaluated each fit model by estimating the amount of variance it predicted in a withheld portion of the data set. We found that voxel-wise models based on Fourier power or the subjective distance to objects in each scene predicted much of the variance predicted by a model based on object categories. Furthermore, the response variance explained by these three models is largely shared, and the individual models explain little unique variance in responses. Based on an evaluation of previous studies and the data we present here, we conclude that there is currently no good basis to favor any one of the three alternative hypotheses about visual representation in scene-selective areas. We offer suggestions for further studies that may help resolve this issue.

  12. Fourier power, subjective distance, and object categories all provide plausible models of BOLD responses in scene-selective visual areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescroart, Mark D.; Stansbury, Dustin E.; Gallant, Jack L.

    2015-01-01

    Perception of natural visual scenes activates several functional areas in the human brain, including the Parahippocampal Place Area (PPA), Retrosplenial Complex (RSC), and the Occipital Place Area (OPA). It is currently unclear what specific scene-related features are represented in these areas. Previous studies have suggested that PPA, RSC, and/or OPA might represent at least three qualitatively different classes of features: (1) 2D features related to Fourier power; (2) 3D spatial features such as the distance to objects in a scene; or (3) abstract features such as the categories of objects in a scene. To determine which of these hypotheses best describes the visual representation in scene-selective areas, we applied voxel-wise modeling (VM) to BOLD fMRI responses elicited by a set of 1386 images of natural scenes. VM provides an efficient method for testing competing hypotheses by comparing predictions of brain activity based on encoding models that instantiate each hypothesis. Here we evaluated three different encoding models that instantiate each of the three hypotheses listed above. We used linear regression to fit each encoding model to the fMRI data recorded from each voxel, and we evaluated each fit model by estimating the amount of variance it predicted in a withheld portion of the data set. We found that voxel-wise models based on Fourier power or the subjective distance to objects in each scene predicted much of the variance predicted by a model based on object categories. Furthermore, the response variance explained by these three models is largely shared, and the individual models explain little unique variance in responses. Based on an evaluation of previous studies and the data we present here, we conclude that there is currently no good basis to favor any one of the three alternative hypotheses about visual representation in scene-selective areas. We offer suggestions for further studies that may help resolve this issue. PMID:26594164

  13. Classroom Management: What Does Research Tell Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postholm, May Britt

    2013-01-01

    The article reviews studies that focus on classroom management. The aim of classroom management is twofold. The first is to establish a quiet and calm environment in the classroom so that the pupils can take part in meaningful learning in a subject. The second aim is that classroom management contributes to the pupils' social and moral…

  14. Pupils' Activities in a Multimaterial Learning Environment in Craft subject A Pilot Study using an Experience Sampling Method based on a Mobile Application in Classroom Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha Jaatinen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates holistic craft processes in craft education with an instrument for data-collection and self-assessment. Teaching in a study context is based on co-teaching and a design process, highlighted by the Finnish Basic Education Core Curriculum 2014. The school architecture and web-based learning environment is combined. Division for textiles and technical work is no longer supported in this multimaterial learning environment. The aim of the study is to 1 make pupils’ holistic craft processes visible in everyday classroom practices with information collected by a mobile-application and 2 point out the curriculum topics that are covered during everyday classroom practices as defined by the teachers. The data is collected using an Experience Sampling Method with a gamified learning analytics instrument. Teachers’ classroom activities were used as the backbone for the thematic mapping of the craft curriculum. Preliminary measurements were carried out in a Finnish primary school in grades 5–6 (age 10–12, n = 125 during a four-week period in October-November 2016. The list of classroom activities was updated after the four weeks’ experiment and was tested in March-May 2017 with all the pupils of the pilot school (N = 353. The key findings were that a for pupils the self-assessment was easy as a technical process but there were several factors in the everyday classroom settings that made the process challenging and b it was relatively difficult for teachers to describe the classroom activities in terms of the new curriculum; however, after four weeks they could not only described the activities in more details but had also developed new activities that supported the ideas of the new curriculum better.Keywords: multi-material craft, learning environment, holistic craft process, experience sampling method

  15. Intra-Rater Reliability of Rehabilitative Ultrasound Imaging for Multifidus Muscles Thickness and Cross Section Area in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinifar, Mohammad; Akbari, Asghar; Ghiasi, Fateme

    2015-07-07

    Rehabilitative Ultrasound Imaging (RUSI) must be valuable method for research and rehabilitation. So, the reliability of its measurements must be determined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the intra-rater reliability of RUSI for measurement of multifidus (MF) muscles cross section areas (CSAs), bladder wall diameter, and thickness of MF muscles between 2 sessions in healthy subjects. Fifteen healthy subjects through simple non-probability sampling participated in this single-group repeated-measures reliability study. MF muscles thickness at rest and during contraction, MF muscles CSAs at rest, and bladder diameters at rest and during pelvic floor muscles (PFM) contraction were measured through RUSI. Pearson's correlation coefficient test was used to determine intra-rater reliability of variables. The results showed that intra-class correlation Coefficient (ICCs) values with 95% confidence interval (CI) and the standard error of the measurement (SEM) were good to excellent agreement for a single investigator between measurement occasions. The intra-rater reliability for the bladder wall displacement was high (ICCs for rest and PFM contraction state: 0.96 and 0.95 respectively), for the MF muscles CSAs at the L4 level was good to high (ICCs 0.75 and 0.91 for right (Rt) and left (Lt) side respectively), and for the thickness of MF muscles at two levels, at rest and during two tasks was moderate to high (ICCs: 0.64 to 0.87). The Trans-Abdominal (TA) method of RUSI is a reliable method to quantify the PFM contraction in healthy subjects. Also, the RUSI is a reliable method to measure the MF muscles CSAs, the MF muscles thickness at rest and during functional tasks in healthy subjects.

  16. Interval estimation for the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve when data are subject to error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanhong; Koval, John J; Donner, Allan; Zou, G Y

    2010-10-30

    The area (A) under the receiver operating characteristic curve is commonly used to quantify the ability of a biomarker to correctly classify individuals into two populations. However, many markers are subject to measurement error, which must be accounted for to prevent understating their effectiveness. In this paper, we develop a new confidence interval procedure for A which is adjusted for measurement error using either external or internal replicated measurements. Based on the observation that A is a function of normal means and variances, we develop the procedure by recovering variance estimates needed from confidence limits for normal means and variances. Simulation results show that the procedure performs better than the previous ones based on the delta-method in terms of coverage percentage, balance of tail errors and interval width. Two examples are presented. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. The response of teachers to new subject areas in a national science curriculum: The case of the earth science component

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Chris

    2001-11-01

    The National Curriculum for Science (NCS) introduced to schools in England and Wales in 1989 contained an earth science component that was new to many secondary science teachers. Ten years after this introduction, a survey was undertaken to test teacher perception of the effectiveness of their teaching in this subject area that was new to them, and to identify factors that might affect this effectiveness. The information gained has been used in reviewing possible curriculum changes and in developing professional development strategies that would improve the effectiveness of NCS earth science teaching. The data collected from science teachers who are currently teaching this earth science component revealed that their background knowledge of earth science from their own education was generally poor, even though most of them considered their knowledge to be moderate. The teachers indicated that the achievement of their pupils in earth science is moderate, while reports on national testing show it is poor. They reported that their main sources of earth science knowledge and understanding were science textbooks written for 11- to 16-year-old pupils (with their small earth science content of variable quality) and science colleagues (who often have poor earth science backgrounds too). Most teachers indicated that they needed more support in this area. Overall, the data indicated that while teachers consider their teaching in this area to be moderate, other evidence suggests it is poor. If this situation is not to continue it should be addressed. In the longer term the emphasis on the earth science content of the National Science Curriculum could be changed (either enhanced or reduced) within larger scale curriculum changes. Until such curriculum change takes place, effective methods of professional development should be instituted so that teachers have a much improved basis on which to build their earth science teaching. Similar measures would be necessary in other

  18. An Investigation of the Use of the "Flipped Classroom" Pedagogy in Secondary English Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chi Cheung Ruby

    2017-01-01

    Aim/Purpose: To examine the use of a flipped classroom in the English Language subject in secondary classrooms in Hong Kong. Background: The research questions addressed were: (1) What are teachers' perceptions towards the flipped classroom pedagogy?; (2) How can teachers transfer their flipped classroom experiences to teaching other…

  19. The Measurement of Relevance Amount of Documents That By Using of Google cross-language retrieval About Agriculture Subject Area are Retrieved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Jamshidi Ghahfarokhi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the relevance amount of documents has been investigated by using google cross-language retrieval tools about a agriculture subject area in cross-language retrieval form, are retrieved. For this purpose, by using Persian journals articles that have had English abstracts, Persian phrases and subject terms with their English equivalent were extracted. In three class us, thirty number of phrases and subject terms of agriculture area were extracted: First class, subject phrases that only in agriculture are used; Secondary, agriculture subject terms that in other fields are used too; Third class, agriculture subject terms that out of this field are considered as public term. Then by these phrases and terms, documents were searched, and relevance amount of search results are investigated. Results of study showed that google cross-language retrieval tools for two classes of phrases and terms, in cross-language retrieval of relevance document about agriculture subject area, aren`t succeed: one class, agriculture subject terms that in other fields are used too. other class, agriculture subject terms that out of agriculture field are considered as public term. Google cross-language retrieval tools about subject phrase and terms that only in agriculture field are used, are performance rather desirable than other two class of phrase and terms

  20. Cytogenetic analysis chromosomal status of subjects from the regions in the vicinity of uranium-contaminated areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovicic, D.; Milacie, S.; Kovacevic, R.; Petrovic, I.

    2004-07-01

    The past application of nuclear technology has brought about free emission of numerous Due to the military application of the depleted uranium (DU) in our country, the problem of its radioactivity and hemo toxicity if actualized. Likewise every heavy metal, its is highly toxic and, in addition to it, also radioactive: Interaction of the water-soluble uranium forms with soil is an important effect. In this way, it penetrates into food chain and endangers human health. The study was aimed at determining possible karyotype genotoxic effects in individuals from the regions close to the contaminated areas. Biological dosimetry was performed using modified Moorthead's micromethod. Our studies included the targeted group of 29 patients from the affected regions. The subjects were averagely aged 39.5{+-}2.8 years. Average age of the control group (k), unexposed to the effects of the known genotoxic agents comprising 22 individuals was 28.3{+-}1.2 years. The presented data evidenced that increased incidence of the chromosomal aberrations was found in 6 subjects,accounting for 20.6%. Dicentric type changes were evidence, as well ring chromosomes and eccentric fragments, which are, at the same time the most frequent aberrations. The changes are considered reparable aberrations accounting for 2-3% in metaphases of the unexposed individuals. Statistical data processing evidenced significant difference (p<0.005) between structural chromosomal aberrations in the studied and control groups, as well as in the number of chromatid aberrations (p<0.05).Based on the obtained data it may be concluded that human karyotype changes were present in the studied group, resulting from interaction of ionizing irradiation and other genotoxic agents, with possibility of potent synergistic effects. It is necessary to stress the importance of further monitoring and control of the general population health, particularly due to possible late genetic effects that may affect future generations

  1. The Measurement of Relevance Amount of Documents That By Using of Google cross-language retrieval About Agriculture Subject Area are Retrieved

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fatemeh Jamshidi Ghahfarokhi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the relevance amount of documents has been investigated by using google cross-language retrieval tools about a agriculture subject area in cross-language retrieval form, are retrieved...

  2. [Psychosocial stressors, sense of community, and subjective wellbeing in children and adolescents in urban and rural areas in Northeast Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Desirée Pereira de; Viñas, Ferran; Casas, Ferran; Montserrat, Carme; González-Carrasco, Mònica; Alcantara, Stefania Carneiro de

    2016-09-19

    The study's overall objective was to investigate the relationship between psychosocial stressors, sense of community, and subjective wellbeing in urban and rural schoolchildren in Northeast Brazil, focusing on differences according to territorial context. The sample consisted of 757 participants, 495 from urban schools and 262 from rural schools, enrolled in the 6th and 7th grades (9 to 18 years of age) in 21 municipal and state public schools, of which 13 urban and 8 rural, in 7 municipalities (counties) in Ceará State, Brazil. The study instruments were inventory of stressful events, scale of life satisfaction for students, index of sense of community, and satisfaction indices by life domains (family, material goods, relations, neighborhood/zone, health, time, school, and personal). The results indicate that socioeconomically underprivileged public schoolchildren from urban areas are more exposed to daily stress and score lower on satisfaction in specific domains of life and on sense of community. This latter is an important indicator for evaluating wellbeing in this young population.

  3. Preservice History Teachers' Perceptions of Subject Matter Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Tercan; Yazici, Fatih

    2017-01-01

    Teachers should be able to understand conceptual constructs, viewpoints, and principles related to their field and organize teaching process accordingly. This is valid also for history teachers. They are expected to comprehend the basic conceptions related to subject areas and reflect them on classroom practices. The association between subject…

  4. Effective Communication in Multicultural Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiaofan

    This research tries to determine effective intercultural classroom communication in the American higher education setting. Theories on classroom communication and intercultural communication (Uncertainty Reduction and Communication Accommodation) are used to build the framework. Subjects were four professors from three different academic…

  5. MEG reveals a fast pathway from somatosensory cortex to occipital areas via posterior parietal cortex in a blind subject

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ioannides, Andreas A; Liu, Lichan; Poghosyan, Vahe

    2013-01-01

    magnetoencephalography (MEG) data recorded from one congenitally blind and two sighted subjects after stimulation of the left and right median nerves at three intensities: below sensory threshold, above sensory threshold and above motor threshold; the last sufficient to produce thumb twitching. We identified...... reproducible brain responses in the primary somatosensory (S1) and motor (M1) cortices at around 20 ms post-stimulus, which were very similar in sighted and blind subjects. Time-frequency analysis revealed strong 45-70 Hz activity at latencies of 20-50 ms in S1 and M1, and posterior parietal cortex Brodmann...... of information through this pathway occurred in stages characterized by convergence of activations into specific cortical regions. In sighted subjects, no linked activity was found that led from the somatosensory to the visual cortex through any of the studied brain regions. These results provide the first...

  6. Reproducibility of fat area measurements in young, non-obese subjects by computerized analysis of magnetic resonance images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbers, J.M.; Haumann, G.; Asscheman, H.; Seidell, J C; Gooren, Louis J G

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess reproducibility, expressed as both inter-observer variability and intra-observer variability, of fat area measurements on images obtained by magnetic resonance (MR); to compare variability between fat area measurements, calculated from a single image per body region and from the

  7. Parallels between Objective Indicators and Subjective Perceptions of Quality of Life: A Study of Metropolitan and County Areas in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Pei-shan

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the consistency between objective indicators and subjective perceptions of quality of life in a ranking of survey data for cities and counties in Taiwan. Data used for analysis included the Statistical Yearbook of Hsiens and Municipalities and the Survey on Living Conditions of Citizens in Taiwan, both given for the year 2000.…

  8. Subjectivity in Education and Health: Research Notes on School Learning Area and Physical Education in Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Marilia; da Costa, Jonatas Maia

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of two studies researching the theory of subjectivity from a cultural-historical perspective. The studies are situated in the fields of education and health and are conducted using Qualitative Epistemology. The first study discusses the pathological movement problems of learning disabilities in Brazilian schools and…

  9. [Left ventricular hypertrophy in black African subjects with artery hypertension: Results of a cross-sectional survey conducted in semi-rural area in Senegal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaye, A; Dodo, B; Ngaïde, A A; Sy, N F; Babaka, K; Mingou, J S; Faye, M; Niang, K; Sarr, S A; Dioum, M; Bodian, M; Ndiaye, M B; Kane, A D; Ndour-Mbaye, M; Diao, M; Diack, B; Kane, M; Diagne-Sow, D; Thiaw, I; Kane, A

    2017-09-01

    To assess the prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy according to electrocardiographic and echocardiographic criteria among hypertensive patients living in semi-rural Senegalese area. According to the World Health Organization STEPSwise approach, we conducted, in November 2012, a cross-sectional and exhaustive study in the population aged at least 35 years old and living for at least six months in the semi-rural area of Guéoul. We researched electrocardiographic and echocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy in hypertensive subjects. Data were analyzed with SPSS 18.0 software version. The significance level was agreed for a value of P<0.05. We examined 1411 subjects aged on average of 48.5±12.7 years. In total, 654 subjects were hypertensive and screening of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) was effective in 515 of them. According to Sokolow-Lyon index, 86 subjects (16.7%) presented electrocardiographic LVH, more frequently in men (P=0.002). According to Cornell index and Cornell product, LVH was founded respectively in 66 (12.8%) and 52 subjects (10.1%), more frequently in female (P=0.0001; P=0.004). It was more common in grade 3 of hypertension however criteria. In echocardiography, prevalence of LVH was 2.2% (13 cases) according to the left ventricular mass, 9.3% (48 cases) according to the left ventricular mass indexed to body surface area and 8.2% (42 cases) according to the left ventricular mass indexed to height 2.7 . LVH was significantly correlated with the electrocardiographic LVH according to Sokolow-Lyon index (P<0.0001) and the grade 3 of hypertension (P=0.003). Although rare in hypertensive Senegalese living in semi-rural area, left ventricular hypertrophy is correlated with severity of grade of hypertension. Screening by electrocardiogram will allow better follow-up of these hypertensive subjects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Banzhuren and Classrooming: Democracy in the Chinese Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiacheng; Chen, Jing

    2013-01-01

    The issue of education and democracy has become more and more important in China. This paper firstly explains the theory of democracy in Chinese classrooms, and then focuses on the Chinese banzhuren who is responsible for classrooming, an important educational area equal to instruction. We illustrate how Chinese students achieve development…

  11. Classroom Management

    OpenAIRE

    Jasmina Delceva – Dizdarevik

    2008-01-01

    This paper is aiming to discover the paths that enable teachers to manage their work with students in the classroom. To be an efficient teacher means to know with what and how to motivate students to learn. Teacher as an efficient classroom manager needs to have skills to plan and prepare the education process, know how to organize the teaching and how to guide the class. An efficient teacher moreover needs o establish positive classroom climate and working discipline. Also, teacher should be...

  12. Integrating Other Areas of Learning into the Language Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdell, Mariel

    1996-01-01

    Presents modules and learning activities taken from other learning areas useful in the Australian second-language classroom. Argues that general and specific subject areas can stimulate dialogue and interest as well as cultural and social awareness, provide new language structures, enrich vocabulary and extend the use of idiomatic expressions, and…

  13. Attitudes towards Teachers' Motivation, and Classroom Strategy, in English Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlavanpoorfard, Samira; Soori, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the attitudes of Iranian EFL students towards teachers' motivation and classroom strategy in English classroom. The subjects of the study included a sample of 235 students in their classes. The findings of this study revealed that teachers' motivation and classroom strategy used by teachers have effects on the…

  14. Teaching pragmatics: (impoliteness in an EFL classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schepers, Bruna Milano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to discuss theories of politeness and impoliteness and the teaching of pragmatics in an English as a Second Language (EFL classroom. An analysis of a brief conversation taken from an American sitcom will be proposed as a tool for teaching matters of (impoliteness in class. Brown and Levinson’s theory has been among the most influential and controversial studies in this area. There are many current issues being discussed that revolve around their theory and the fact that it does not account for cultural diversity. Therefore, the insertion of this subject in the EFL classroom is extremely important in the sense that it makes students aware of the social and cultural diversity that is involved in learning English as a second language

  15. Flipped classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Tobias Kidde; Jørgensen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Artiklen beskriver Flipped Classroom som et didaktisk princip, der kan være med til at organisere og tilrettelægge en undervisning, med fokus på forskellige læringsformer. Det handler om at forstå Flipped Classroom som en opdeling i 2 faser og 3 led, som samlet set skaber en didaktisk organisering....

  16. Classrooms as

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    also supplied a means for students to develop relationships with their peers as ... promoting 'real world' skills they could transfer outside of the classroom and into their lives. ... Keywords: digital storytelling, classrooms as safe houses, personal writing, ...... British Journal of Educational Technology, DOI: 10.1111/bjet.12540.

  17. The perceptions of teachers and principals toward providing additional compensation to teachers in high-need subject areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longing, Jeffrey Lucian

    The purpose of this study was to determine possible differences in the perceptions of teachers teaching in high-need areas (i.e., math, science, special education, etc.) and teachers not teaching in high-need areas, (i.e., business education, physical education, etc.) as defined by the states of Arkansas and Louisiana, regarding higher compensation for high-need teachers. In addition, possible perception differences among principals and teachers were determined. The independent variables consisted of gender, position held, years of certified experience, and certification areas. The dependent variable was the perceptions of the participants on providing higher compensation for high-need teachers in order to attract and retain them. The data for all variables were collected using the Teacher Compensation Survey. The sample for this study was limited to teachers, grades 9 through 12, and principals of public high schools in south Arkansas and north Louisiana. Forty-four school districts in south Arkansas (Arkansas Department of Education, 2008a) and north Louisiana (Louisiana Department of Education, 2008a) met the criteria for this study. Twenty-two superintendents gave permission for their districts to participate in the research. A sample of 849 teachers and 38 principals were identified in these districts. Surveys were returned from 350 teachers, creating a 41% response rate. When the 31 principals that returned surveys were added to the total population, the response rate increased to 43% with 381 of the 887 surveyed responding. However, 42 of the teachers and two of the principals skipped some of the questions on the survey and were not included in the study. The researcher used a One-Way ANOVA and independent t-tests to determine the presence of statistical differences at the .05 level. The data showed that most math and science teachers agreed that high-need teachers should be compensated at a higher rate than teachers not teaching in high-need areas. The data

  18. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity in individuals with psoriasis: associations with body surface area and subjective disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, P B

    2013-10-01

    Psoriasis is associated with serious comorbidities such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. These comorbidities are related to low physical activity in the general population. Limited research has evaluated physical activity in psoriasis, and thus, the purpose of this investigation was to compare physical activity between individuals with and without psoriasis as well as explore the associations between measures of psoriasis severity and physical activity. Cross-sectional study using data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Self-reported psoriasis diagnosis and psoriasis severity were regressed on moderate/vigorous physical activity, as measured objectively by accelerometers. Measures of psoriasis severity included rating of psoriasis as a problem in life and body surface area involvement. A total of 4316 individuals had data on psoriasis, moderate/vigorous physical activity, and relevant covariates, with 3.6% (population weighted) of participants (N.=117) reporting a diagnosis of psoriasis. A psoriasis diagnosis was not associated with moderate/vigorous physical activity, and furthermore, body surface area involvement was not associated with moderate/vigorous physical activity among participants with psoriasis. However, every tertile increase in psoriasis as a problem in life was associated with 28% less moderate/vigorous physical activity, which remained significant after adjusting for covariates and removing outliers. While a diagnosis of psoriasis and body surface area involvement do not appear to be associated with less moderate/vigorous physical activity, individuals that rate their psoriasis to be a large problem engage in less moderate/vigorous physical activity.

  19. Intestinal Parasites Coinfection Does Not Alter Plasma Cytokines Profile Elicited in Acute Malaria in Subjects from Endemic Area of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Camilo Sánchez-Arcila

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, malaria is prevalent in the Amazon region and these regions coincide with high prevalence of intestinal parasites but few studies explore the interaction between malaria and other parasites. Therefore, the present study evaluates changes in cytokine, chemokine, C-reactive protein, and nitric oxide (NO concentrations in 264 individuals, comparing plasma from infected individuals with concurrent malaria and intestinal parasites to individuals with either malaria infection alone and uninfected. In the studied population 24% of the individuals were infected with Plasmodium and 18% coinfected with intestinal parasites. Protozoan parasites comprised the bulk of the intestinal parasites infections and subjects infected with intestinal parasites were more likely to have malaria. The use of principal component analysis and cluster analysis associated increased levels of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-10, and CRP and low levels of IL-17A predominantly with individuals with malaria alone and coinfected individuals. In contrast, low levels of almost all inflammatory mediators were associated predominantly with individuals uninfected while increased levels of IL-17A were associated predominantly with individuals with intestinal parasites only. In conclusion, our data suggest that, in our population, the infection with intestinal parasites (mainly protozoan does not modify the pattern of cytokine production in individuals infected with P. falciparum and P. vivax.

  20. Train, teach; taught? How the content of specific science subject matter knowledge sessions impacts on trainee teachers’ classroom practice and children’s learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Kind

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The impact science sessions for trainee science teachers have on 11-14 year olds’ learning of science was assessed using questionnaires and a “Video-Interview (trainee –Interview (pupils” (V-I-I technique devised for this study. V-I-I involved: video-recording trainee-taught lessons; and two interviews – with a pupil group to probe learning occurring in the lesson and with the trainee.Eighty UK-based trainees taking a one-year postgraduate teacher education course completed the questionnaire probing perceptions about university- and school-based training sessions designed to develop science subject matter knowledge (SMK and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK. Six trainees participated in V-I-I.Most trainees saw all sessions as SMK-based, regardless of teacher educators’ intended purposes. Lesson videos revealed ”describing” activities, task completion and good behaviour as main focii. Explanation of key science ideas and use of materials and /ideas from training sessions were largely absent. Trainee interviews revealed contrasts: most perceived a lesson as “successful” when children completed tasks quietly. Other trainees realised their understanding impacted on pupils’ learning science concepts. Pupil interviews showed positive attitudes towards science and learning difficult ideas, but little specific learning of topics taught.

  1. Preparing Children for Success: Integrating Science, Math, and Technology in Early Childhood Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermani, Hengameh; Aldemir, Jale

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to study if purposeful math, science, and technology curriculum projects and activities would support Pre-K children's performance in these subject matter areas. In this study, 58 Pre-K children from 4 Pre-K classrooms in a public Pre-K programme in North Carolina participated. Through a quasi-experimental,…

  2. Concentration and correlations of perfluoroalkyl substances in whole blood among subjects from three different geographical areas in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chon Rae; Lam, Nguyen Hoang [College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, Chonnam National University, Yeosu 550-749 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Byung Mann [Department of Preventive Medicine and Occupational Medicine, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan 626-770 (Korea, Republic of); Kannan, Kurunthachalam [Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health and Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, State University of New York at Albany, Empire State Plaza PO Box 509, Albany, NY 12201-0509 (United States); Cho, Hyeon Seo, E-mail: hscho@jnu.ac.kr [College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, Chonnam National University, Yeosu 550-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    blood were found in Korea. • Gender was found to influence the concentrations of PFOA, PFNA, PFHxS and PFOSA. • Significant positive associations between PFAS levels and age of subjects were found. • Occupation was a determinant for PFNA and PFHxS concentrations.

  3. Acoustical evaluation of preschool classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wonyoung; Hodgson, Murray

    2003-10-01

    An investigation was made of the acoustical environments in the Berwick Preschool, Vancouver, in response to complaints by the teachers. Reverberation times (RT), background noise levels (BNL), and in-class sound levels (Leq) were measured for acoustical evaluation in the classrooms. With respect to the measured RT and BNL, none of the classrooms in the preschool were acceptable according to the criteria relevant to this study. A questionnaire was administered to the teachers to assess their subjective responses to the acoustical and nonacoustical environments of the classrooms. Teachers agreed that the nonacoustical environments in the classrooms were fair, but that the acoustical environments had problems. Eight different classroom configurations were simulated to improve the acoustical environments, using the CATT room acoustical simulation program. When the surface absorption was increased, both the RT and speech levels decreased. RASTI was dependent on the volumes of the classrooms when the background noise levels were high; however, it depended on the total absorption of the classrooms when the background noise levels were low. Ceiling heights are critical as well. It is recommended that decreasing the volume of the classrooms is effective. Sound absorptive materials should be added to the walls or ceiling.

  4. Using Computer Technology Tools to Improve the\\ud Teaching-Learning Process in Technical and Vocational Education: Mechanical Engineering Subject Area

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulrasool, Salah Mahdi; Mishra, Rakesh

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the integration of computer assisted instructions (CAI) with traditional class room teaching. It describes a teaching method to bring real-world of industrial work into the classroom that underscores the need to learn fundamental principles while adding excitement and relevance to the experience. This paper presents results of a case study undertaken to understand the effect of computer assisted teaching methodology on learning effectiveness in classroom environment. The ...

  5. CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Delceva – Dizdarevik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aiming to discover the paths that enable teachers to manage their work with students in the classroom. To be an efficient teacher means to know with what and how to motivate students to learn. Teacher as an efficient classroom manager needs to have skills to plan and prepare the education process, know how to organize the teaching and how to guide the class. An efficient teacher moreover needs o establish positive classroom climate and working discipline. Also, teacher should be able to evaluate the progress of the students and self-evaluate his own work.In order to examine classroom management skills of teachers in Republic of Macedonia, a research has been made for teachers in primary schools in Republic of Macedonia. Instruments which will be used in order to complete the research and analyses are the following: questionnaire for teachers and educational policy analyses in our country in order to discover whether there is concrete strategy for promotion and implementation of classroom management on local and national level.Analyses of results show that there is a deficit of classroom management skills among teachers, which is due moreover to some lapses in initial education of teachers.

  6. Effect of toe-spread-out exercise on hallux valgus angle and cross-sectional area of abductor hallucis muscle in subjects with hallux valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon-Hwan; Yi, Chung-Hwi; Weon, Jong-Hyuck; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Jung, Do-Young; Kwon, Oh-Yun

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated whether the toe-spread-out exercise affects the hallux valgus angle, the cross-sectional area of the abductor hallucis muscle, and the hallux valgus angle during active abduction. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four subjects with hallux valgus were randomly assigned to orthosis and orthosis plus toe-spread-out exercise groups. The orthosis group wore the orthosis for 8 weeks, while the orthosis plus toe-spread-out group also performed the toe-spread-out exercise. The hallux valgus angle, the cross-sectional area of the abductor hallucis muscle, and the hallux valgus angle during active abduction were measured initially and after 8 weeks by radiography and ultrasonography. [Results] While there were no significant changes in the three parameters in the orthosis group, there were significant differences in the orthosis plus toe-spread-out exercise group after 8 weeks. In addition there were significant differences in the three measures between the two groups. [Conclusion] The toe-spread-out exercise reduces the hallux valgus angle and hallux valgus angle during active abduction, and increases the cross-sectional area of the abductor hallucis muscle. The toe-spread-out exercise is recommended for patients with mild to moderate hallux valgus.

  7. An analysis of subject areas and country participation for all health-related projects in the EU's FP5 and FP6 programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galsworthy, Michael J; Irwin, Rachel; Charlesworth, Kate; Ernst, Kelly; Hristovski, Dimitar; Wismar, Matthias; McKee, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Previous analyses concerning health components of European Union (EU)-funded research have shown low project participation levels of the 12 newest member states (EU-12). Additionally, there has been a lack of subject-area analysis. In the Health Research for Europe project, we screened all projects of the EU's Framework Programmes for research FP5 and FP6 (1998-2006) to identify health research projects and describe participation by country and subject area. FP5 and FP6 project databases were acquired and screened by coders to identify health-related projects, which were then categorized according to the 47 divisions of the EU Health Portal (N = 2728 projects) plus an extra group of 'basic/biotech' projects (N = 1743). Country participation and coordination rates for projects were also analyzed. Approximately 20% of the 26 946 projects (value €29.2bn) were health-related (N = 4756. Value €6.04bn). Within the health categories, the largest expenditures were cancer (11.9%), 'other' (i.e. not mental health or cardiovascular) non-communicable diseases (9.5%) and food safety (9.4%). One hundred thirty-two countries participated in these projects. Of the 27 EU countries (and five partner countries), north-western and Nordic states acquired more projects per capita. The UK led coordination with > 20% of projects. EU-12 countries were generally under-represented for participation and coordination. Combining our findings with the associated literature, we comment on drivers determining distribution of participation and funds across countries and subject areas. Additionally, we discuss changes needed in the core EU projects database to provide greater transparency, data exploitation and return on investment in health research. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  8. Classroom Management in Foreign Language Education: An Exploratory Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Fernando Macías

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This review examines studies in the area of classroom management in foreign language education. It is organized into three large areas: The first area focuses on the distinctive characteristics of foreign language instruction that are more likely to impact classroom management in foreign language classes. The second area provides a description of classroom management issues that foreign language teachers usually encounter in their practice; and the third area centers on the different alternatives to reduce the negative impact of classroom management on foreign language classes. Conclusions suggest a need for more research particularly on the relationship between classroom management and aspects such as target language use and teaching methods.

  9. [Nicotine dependence, smoking-related attitude, and subjective norms across the stages of change for smoking cessation among adults smokers in a rural area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Hee; Seo, Nam Sook; Kang, Hae Young

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify nicotine dependence, smoking-related attitude, and subjective norms across the stages of change for smoking cessation among adult smokers in a rural area. The subjects were 276 current smokers (male=243, female=33). There were 3 stages of change for smoking cessation: pre-contemplation, contemplation, and preparation stage. Data was collected by an interview or self-reporting from February 12th to March 5th 2004, and analyzed with frequency, percentage, chi- square-test, Fisher's exact probability test, ANOVA, and Scheffe test using the SPSS-PC program. According to the stages of change, 114(41.3%) current smokers were in pre-contemplation, 110(39.9%) in contemplation, and 52(18.8%) in the preparation stage. There was a higher percentage of males than females (chi- square=8.99, p=.011) in the preparation stage. The mean score of the smoking-related attitude (F=7.43, p=.001) and subjective norm(F=27.41, p=.001) were both lowest in the pre-contemplation stage and increased positively during the stages of change for smoking cessation. Based on these findings, the authors recommend that community-based smoking cessation programs should be developed by considering the intention or motives of current smokers and should be initiated in the preparation stage and primarily for male groups.

  10. Measurement of vocal doses in virtual classrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottalico, Pasquale; Pelegrin Garcia, David

    2010-01-01

    -worn microphone, convolved in real time with the impulse response of the chosen classroom, and reproduced through 29 loudspeakers placed around the subject. In particular, two different primary school classrooms were selected, with very low and very high reverberation time and, for each of them, two speaker...

  11. Continuous Classroom Assessment at Primary Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Imtiaz; Shah, Syed Manzoor Hussein; Gujjar, Aijaz Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to analyze the continuous classroom assessment at primary level in Pakistan. Findings of the study revealed that the students' achievement of single class teacher in the subject of English, General science, Urdu and mathematics were almost on average and rubric observation during continuous classroom assessment ranked…

  12. Smart Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Rhea, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    What makes a classroom "smart"? Presentation technologies such as projectors, document cameras, and LCD panels clearly fit the bill, but when considering other technologies for teaching, learning, and developing content, the possibilities become limited only by the boundaries of an institution's innovation. This article presents 32 best practices…

  13. Classroom Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozzard, David

    Australian company Antarctica Flights runs summer sightseeing trips out of Australian capital cities to tour the Antarctic coast. The Laby Foundation of the University of Melbourne, through its "Classroom Antarctica" program, sponsored Kent Street High School science teacher, Ms Suzy Urbaniak and 18 of her students to take the trip, to…

  14. Virtual Classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ove

    2013-01-01

    In the Scandinavian countries: Sweden, Norway and Denmark, the project GNU (Grænseoverskridende Nordisk Undervisning, i.e. Transnational Nordic Teaching) is experimenting with ways of conducting teaching across the borders in the elementary schools. The cloud classes are organised with one class ...... and benefits in regard to learning and pedagogy with virtual classroom....

  15. Innovative building and installation education. Part 1. Structured design vision autarkic living area in the classroom; Innovatief bouw- en installatieonderwijs. Deel 1. Gestructureerde ontwerpvisie autarkische leefzone leslokaal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, H.

    2011-01-15

    This is the first of two articles on 'Innovative building and installation education'. The structured design process discussed in these two articles is all about chronologically answering five design questions. The first three questions are discussed in part 1 and the last two questions are dealt with in part 2. The subject vision development at Avans Hogeschool teaches structural designing of living areas. In each renovation or new construction the same design questions need to be addressed: how should the living are be ventilated, heated, cooled and supplied with affordable sustainable energy. Design of a building with installations must be conducted in a structured manner. [Dutch] Dit is het eerste van twee artikelen over 'Innovatief bouw- en installatieonderwijs'. Het gestructureerde ontwerpproces dat in deze twee artikelen wordt besproken draait om de chronologische beantwoording van vijf ontwerpvragen. De eerste drie vragen worden behandeld in deel 1, de laatste twee vragen in deel 2. Het vak Visieontwikkeling bij Avans Hogeschool onderwijst in het structureel ontwerpen van leefzones. Bij elke renovatie en nieuwbouw volgen dezelfde ontwerpvragen: hoe de leefzone te ventileren, te verwarmen, te koelen en van betaalbare duurzame energie te voorzien? Het ontwerpen van gebouwen met installaties moet op een gestructureerde wijze plaatsvinden.

  16. Innovative building and installation education. Part 2. Structured design vision autarkic living area in the classroom; Innovatief bouw- en installatieonderwijs. Deel 2. Gestructureerde ontwerpvisie autarkische leefzone leslokaal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, H.

    2011-02-15

    This is the second of two articles on 'Innovative building and installation education'. The structured design process discussed in these two articles is all about chronologically answering five design questions. The first three questions are discussed in part 1 and the last two questions are dealt with in this part 2. The subject vision development at Avans Hogeschool teaches structural designing of living areas. In each renovation or new construction the same design questions need to be addressed: how should the living are be ventilated, heated, cooled and supplied with affordable sustainable energy. Design of a building with installations must be conducted in a structured manner. [Dutch] Dit is het tweede van twee artikelen over 'Innovatief bouw- en installatieonderwijs'. Het gestructureerde ontwerpproces dat in deze twee artikelen wordt besproken draait om de chronologische beantwoording van vijf ontwerpvragen. De eerste drie vragen worden behandeld in deel 1, de laatste twee vragen in dit deel 2. Het vak Visieontwikkeling bij Avans Hogeschool onderwijst in het structureel ontwerpen van leefzones. Bij elke renovatie en nieuwbouw volgen dezelfde ontwerpvragen: hoe de leefzone te ventileren, te verwarmen, te koelen en van betaalbare duurzame energie te voorzien? Het ontwerpen van gebouwen met installaties moet op een gestructureerde wijze plaatsvinden.

  17. Iodine distribution in natural waters of different chemical composition in relation to water-bearing soils and rocks and water fractions in areas subjected to radioiodine contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmykova, Liudmila; Korobova, Elena

    2017-04-01

    Iodine is an essential microelement required for normal functioning of thyroid gland. Natural deficiency of stable iodine is compensated by its active intake by thyroid and provokes its higher irradiation in case of radiation accidents and contamination of the environment by radioiodine isotopes. The bioavailability of both stable and radioactive iodine and the specificity of its uptake by living organisms largely depends on geochemical parameters of the environment related to natural conditions of water migration. The goal of the study was to investigate spatial distribution of iodine in natural water of different chemical composition in relation to typical water-bearing soils and rocks and water fractions in Bryansk areas subjected to radioiodine contamination after the Chernobyl accident and to evaluate contribution of this factor to the occurrence of endemic thyroid diseases among local population inhabiting geochemically different areas of fluvioglacial and loess-like sedimentary rocks. The highest content of iodine (Me=13.3 µg/l) was observed in surface water of landscapes with H-Ca, Ca and H-Ca-Fe classes of water migration. The lowest microelement level (Me=5.25 µg/l) was noted in groundwater of landscapes with H, H-Fe classes of water migration in areas of Paleogene water bearing rocks. Regardless of the type of source and class of water migration up to 90% of the total content of iodide is present in the fraction membrane filtration). Up to 50% of iodine pass to solution containing particles water in areas of loess-like sedimentary rocks hosts the highest levels of iodine where its associated with calcium mineral aquatic complexes and the suspended particles. The obtained data is believed to be useful in explanation of mobility and intake of iodine and its radioactive analogues by rural population living in different geochemical conditions and using local drinking waters. The data should be accounted of in planning prophylactics of endemic diseases and

  18. Educational role of art history as a school subject area in programmes of formal education in Slovenia: the aspect of vzgoja, according to general European guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjana Dolšina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Programmes of formal education establish a systematic transfer of knowledge as well as universal values from one generation to another. By that, they ensure the survival of social structures, prevent radical disruptions in their continuity, and serve as basis for general development of a society. Their content and didactic arrangements include interweaving of two basic aspects: the cognitive one and the one related to vzgoja (i.e. upbringing, moral/value education etc.. The latter aims to achieve the ideals of a tolerant, just and lifelong learning society, but seems to be facing increasing challenges, mainly emerging from neoliberal capitalist mentality. Art history as a school subject area in elementary and secondary education may provide an insight beneath the surface of historical events. Thus, it helps develop a critical view towards them and consequently towards the present real-life situations, which contributes to ascending the taxonomic scale of conative educational goals.

  19. Universal Design for Learning in the Classroom: Practical Applications. What Works for Special-Needs Learners Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Tracey E., Ed.; Meyer, Anne, Ed.; Rose, David H., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Clearly written and well organized, this book shows how to apply the principles of universal design for learning (UDL) across all subject areas and grade levels. The editors and contributors describe practical ways to develop classroom goals, assessments, materials, and methods that use UDL to meet the needs of all learners. Specific teaching…

  20. [Subjective Workload, Job Satisfaction, and Work-Life-Balance of Physicians and Nurses in a Municipal Hospital in a Rural Area Compared to an Urban University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körber, Michael; Schmid, Klaus; Drexler, Hans; Kiesel, Johannes

    2017-02-15

    Medical and nursing shortages in rural areas represent a current serious public health problem. The healthcare of the rural population is at risk. This study compares perceived workload, job satisfaction and work-life balance of physicians and nurses at a clinic in a rural area with two clinics of a University hospital. Physicians and nurses were interviewed anonymously with a standardized questionnaire (paper and pencil), including questions on job satisfaction, subjective workload and work-life balance. The response rate was almost 50% in the University hospital as well as in the municipal hospital. 32 physicians and 54 nurses from the University hospital and 18 physicians and 137 nurses from the municipal hospital participated in the survey. Nurses at the University hospital assessed the organization of the daily routine with 94.1% as better than those at the municipal hospital (82.4%, p=0.03). Physicians at the University hospital were able to better implement acquired knowledge at a University clinic with 87.5% than their counterparts at the municipal hospital (55.5%, p=0.02). In contrast to their colleagues at the municipal hospital, only 50% of the physicians at the University hospital subjectively considered their workload as just right (83.3% municipal, p=0.02). 96.9% of the physicians at the University hospital were "daily" or "several times a week" under time pressure (municipal 50%, pwork and family life (62.9% University hospital, 72.8% Municipal hospital). In contrast, only 20% of the physicians at the University Hospital but 42.9% of the physicians of the municipal hospital had sufficient opportunities to balance workload and family (p=0.13). The return rate of almost 50% can be described as good. Due to the small number of physicians, especially from the municipal hospital, it can be assumed that some interesting differences could not be detected. There were only slight differences between the nurses from the two hospitals. In contrast, subjective

  1. CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    SAADAT BONAB, Habib; ESSMATI, Alavieh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The students’ greatest need both in and outside the classroom is to learn. Humans are intelligent beings who live in a complex, interdependent world in which their success or failure as individuals depends greatly on what they know about that word and about themselves. People need to learn and to develop the discipline needed to learn, and in most modern society's schools are the institutions in which young people focus their attention on this important task. Therefore, any class in...

  2. Chemical composition of drinking water as a possible environment-specific factor modifying the thyroid risk in the areas subjected to radioiodine contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmykova, Lyudmila; Korobova, Elena; Ryzhenko, Boris

    2015-04-01

    Water is one of the main natural agents providing chemical elements' migration in the environment and food chains. In our opinion a study of spatial variation of the essential trace elements in local drinking water is worth considering as the factor that may contribute to variation of the health risk in areas contaminated by radionuclides and radioiodine in particular. Radioiodine was proved to increase the risk of thyroid cancer among children who lived in areas contaminated during the Chernobyl accident. It was also shown that low stable iodine status of the contaminated area and population also contributed to the risk of this disease in case of radionuclide contamination. The goal of the study was to investigate chemical composition of the drinking water in rural settlements of the Bryansk oblast' subjected to radioiodine contamination and to evaluate speciation of stable I and Se on the basis of their total concentration and chemical composition of the real water samples with the help of thermodynamic modelling. Water samples were collected from different aquifers discharging at different depths (dug wells, local private bore holes and water pipes) in rural settlements located in areas with contrasting soil iodine status. Thermodynamic modelling was performed using original software (HCh code of Y.Shvarov, Moscow State University, RUSSIA) incorporating the measured pH, Corg and elements' concentration values. Performed modelling showed possibility of formation of complex CaI+ ion in aqueous phase, I sorption by goethite and transfer of Se to solid phase as FeSe in the observed pH-Eh conditions. It helped to identify environmental conditions providing high I and Se mobility and their depletion from natural waters. Both the experimental data and modeling showed that I and Se migration and deficiency in natural water is closely connected to pH, Eh conditions and the concentration of typomorphic chemical elements (Ca, Mg, Fe) defining the class of water migration

  3. Classroom Management in Foreign Language Education: An Exploratory Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías, Diego Fernando

    2018-01-01

    This review examines studies in the area of classroom management in foreign language education. It is organized into three large areas: The first area focuses on the distinctive characteristics of foreign language instruction that are more likely to impact classroom management in foreign language classes. The second area provides a description of…

  4. Using Digital Learning Platforms to Extend the Flipped Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzotti, Jonathan M.; McCool, Lynn B.

    2016-01-01

    Although digital environments already play a vital role in the flipped classroom model, this research project shows that in university writing classrooms, innovative content design and delivery systems can extend the walls of the classroom to areas beyond, in which students transfer and connect course content with the professional world. In this…

  5. What Next? Towards an Agenda for Classroom Codeswitching Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Gibson

    2009-01-01

    In this issue, aside from the introduction, there are six papers on classroom code-switching (CS), covering a wide spectrum of geographic and pedagogic contexts: two from Africa focussing on switching in content subject lessons; two from Taiwan looking at CS in EFL language subject classrooms; and two further papers, one looking at written CS and…

  6. Google Tools in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albee, E. M.; Koons, P. O.; Schauffler, M.; Zhu, Y.; Segee, B. E.

    2009-12-01

    The Maine Learning Technology Initiative provides every seventh and eighth grade student in the state with MacBook laptop computers. Limitless education possibilities exist with the inclusion of Google Tools and laptops as learning tools in our modern classrooms. Google Applications allow students to create documents, spreadsheets, charts, graphs, forms, and presentations and easily allows the sharing of information with their fellow classmates and teachers. These applications invite the use of inquiry and critical thinking skills, collaboration among peers, and subject integration to teach students crucial concepts. The benefits for teachers extend into the realm of using Google sites to easily create a teacher website and blog to upload classroom information and create a communication connection for parents and students as well as collaborations between the teachers and University researchers and educators. Google Applications further enhances the possibilities for learning, sharing a wealth of information, and enhancing communication inside and outside of the classroom.

  7. Increasing mortality from ischaemic heart disease in China from 2004 to 2010: disproportionate rise in rural areas and elderly subjects. 438 million person-years follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Khan, Arshad A; Haq, Ehtesham Ul; Rahim, Aadil; Hu, Dayi; Attia, John; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Ma, Xiaoyan; Ding, Rongjing; Boyle, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    We sought to ascertain the changes in mortality from ischaemic heart disease (IHD) from 2004 to 2010 in China as the sheer size of China's population makes disease patterns relevant globally. Data on IHD mortality were obtained from the Chinese Centre for Disease Control and Prevention National Disease Surveillance Point System, which includes 161 counties and a population of over 73 million-a representative sample of over 6% of the entire population of China. Both crude and World Health Organization (WHO)-standardized IHD mortality increased, in both men and women and in both urban and rural locations, during the study period, demonstrating the effect of urbanization, economic growth, and epidemiological transition on cardiovascular health. WHO-standardized IHD mortality increased for rural males by 9.2% per year (95% CI: 6.7-11.7%; P < 0.0001), and the trend was statistically significantly higher (P = 0.0001) than in urban males by 6.4% per year (95% CI: 3-10%; P = 0.02). WHO-standardized IHD mortality rate increased for rural females by 7.0% per year (95% CI: 4.6-9.4%; P < 0.0001); this was statistically significantly higher than urban females by 4.3% per year (95% CI: 1-8%; P = 0.02). The age group over 80 years showed the greatest increase in IHD mortality. Mortality from IHD is increasing in China, in contrast to decreasing in other countries. This is largely driven by increasing IHD mortality in rural areas and subjects over 80 years old. This needs urgent attention by public health workers and policymakers.

  8. Google classroom as a tool for active learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaharanee, Izwan Nizal Mohd; Jamil, Jastini Mohd; Rodzi, Sarah Syamimi Mohamad

    2016-08-01

    As the world is being developed with the new technologies, discovering and manipulating new ideas and concepts of online education are changing rapidly. In response to these changes, many states, institutions, and organizations have been working on strategic plans to implement online education. At the same time, misconceptions and myths related to the difficulty of teaching and learning online, technologies available to support online instruction, the support and compensation needed for high-quality instructors, and the needs of online students create challenges for such vision statements and planning documents. This paper provides analysis and evaluation of the effectiveness of Google Classroom's active learning activities for data mining subject under the Decision Sciences program. Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) has been employed to measure the effectiveness of the learning activities. A total of 100 valid unduplicated responses from students who enrolled data mining subject were used in this study. The results indicated that majority of the students satisfy with the Google Classroom's tool that were introduced in the class. Results of data analyzed showed that all ratios are above averages. In particular, comparative performance is good in the areas of ease of access, perceived usefulness, communication and interaction, instruction delivery and students' satisfaction towards the Google Classroom's active learning activities.

  9. Making Math Real: Effective Qualities of Guest Speaker Presentations and the Impact of Speakers on Student Attitude and Achievement in the Algebra Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKain, Danielle R.

    2012-01-01

    The term real world is often used in mathematics education, yet the definition of real-world problems and how to incorporate them in the classroom remains ambiguous. One way real-world connections can be made is through guest speakers. Guest speakers can offer different perspectives and share knowledge about various subject areas, yet the impact…

  10. A Structural Equation Model Analyzing the Relationship of Student Achievement Motivations and Personality Factors in a Range of Academic Subject-Matter Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempelaar, Dirk T.; Gijselaers, Wim H.; Schim van der Loeff, Sybrand; Nijhuis, Jan F. H.

    2007-01-01

    The question of subject-specificity of achievement motivations is important, both for educational psychology, as well as for educational policy. This study contributes to the investigation of the heterogeneity in achievement motivations in the context of the expectancy-value model. Whereas existing research deals with middle and high school…

  11. Masticatory and cervical muscle tenderness and pain sensitivity in a remote area in subjects with a temporomandibular disorder and neck disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Anelise; Armijo-Olivo, Susan; Gadotti, Inae C; Magee, David

    2014-01-01

    To compare the masticatory and cervical muscle tenderness and pain sensitivity in the hand (remote region) between patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and healthy controls. Twenty female subjects were diagnosed with chronic TMD, and 20 were considered healthy. Subjects completed the Neck Disability Index and Limitations of Daily Functions in a TMD questionnaire. Tenderness of the masticatory and cervical muscles and pain sensitivity in the hand were measured using an algometer. Three-way mixed analysis of variance (ANOVA) evaluated differences in muscle tenderness between groups. One-way ANOVA compared pain sensitivity in the hand between groups. Effect sizes were assessed using Cohen guidelines. Significantly increased masticatory and cervical muscle tenderness and pain sensitivity in the hand were found in subjects with TMD when compared with healthy subjects. Moderate to high effect sizes showed the clinical relevance of the findings. The results of this study have highlighted the importance of assessing TMD patients not only in the craniofacial region but also in the neck and other parts of the body. Future studies should focus on testing the effectiveness of treatments addressing the neck and the pain sensitivity in the hand in patients with TMD.

  12. Tips from the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Natalie; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Six classroom tips for language teachers focus on creating a congenial classroom environment, integrating listening and reading skills, teaching idioms from tabloid newspapers, cooperative learning in honors courses, grammar games, and teaching culture through personalized automobile license plate messages. (MDM)

  13. Classroom Management. TESOL Classroom Practice Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Thomas S. C., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    This series captures the dynamics of the contemporary ESOL classroom. It showcases state-of-the-art curricula, materials, tasks, and activities reflecting emerging trends in language education and seeks to build localized language teaching and learning theories based on teachers' and students' unique experiences in and beyond the classroom. Each…

  14. Immediate Effects of Combining Local Techniques in the Craniomandibular Area and Hamstring Muscle Stretching in Subjects with Temporomandibular Disorders: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Blanco, Cleofás; Cocera-Morata, Francisco Miguel; Heredia-Rizo, Alberto Marcos; Ricard, François; Almazán-Campos, Ginés; Oliva-Pascual-Vaca, Ángel

    2015-08-01

    To assess the immediate effects on vertical mouth opening, orofacial mechanosensitivity, and lumbar and suboccipital mobility after adding a myofascial induction technique to a multimodal protocol in subjects with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). A randomized and double-blind controlled trial was carried out. University-based physical therapy research clinic. Sixty subjects (35±11.22 years) with TMD, and restricted mobility of the mandibular condyles and the first cervical vertebrae, were recruited and randomized to either a control group (CG) (n=30) or an experimental group (EG) (n=30). The CG underwent a neuromuscular technique over the masseter muscles and passive hamstring muscle stretching. A suboccipital muscle inhibition technique was added to this protocol in the EG. Primary measurements were made of vertical mouth opening and pressure pain threshold of the masseter muscles. Secondary outcome measures included pressure algometry of the trigeminal nerve, suboccipital range of motion, and lumbar spine mobility, assessed with the sit-and-reach (SAR) test and lumbar forward bending. All evaluations were collected at baseline and immediately after intervention. In the intragroup comparison, the EG observed an increase in suboccipital flexion (p0.05). The inclusion of a myofascial induction maneuver in a protocol combining local (neuromuscular treatment) and distal techniques (hamstring stretching) in subjects with TMD has no impact on improving mouth opening, suboccipital and lumbar mobility, and orofacial sensitivity to mechanical pressure.

  15. Critical Classroom Discourse Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaravadivelu, B.

    1999-01-01

    Conceptualizes a framework for conducting critical classroom-discourse analysis. Critiques the scope and method of current models of classroom-interaction analysis and classroom-discourse analysis and advocates using poststructuralist and postcolonialist understandings of discourse to develop a critical framework for understanding what actually…

  16. Encouraging Classroom Discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Joseph McKee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Classroom discussion has the potential to enhance the learning environment and encourages students to become active participants in the educational process. Student participation in classroom discussion has been shown to significantly improve the student learning experience. Research suggests that classroom discussion is an effective method for encouraging student classroom participation and for motivating student learning beyond the classroom. Participation in classroom discussion encourages students to become active collaborators in the learning process, while at the same time providing instructors with a practical method of assessing student learning. Classroom discussion is an effective tool for developing higher-level cognitive skills like critical thinking. Despite the potential discussion holds for student learning, many in academia lament the lack of participation in the classroom. The lack of student participation in classroom discussion is not a recent problem; it is one that has frustrated instructors for decades. Instructors report that some of the more current methods for encouraging classroom discussion can be exasperating and at times non-productive. This two-year study of 510 college and university students provides insight into the reasons why some students do not participate in classroom discussion. This study, which also elicited input from sixteen college and university professors and two high school teachers, offers some suggestions for creating and encouraging an environment conducive to student participation in the classroom.

  17. STEM Beyond The Classroom: Creating Authentic Outreach Programs That Build Bridges Between The Classroom And Real World Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, D. L.; Forder, S. E.; Pritchard, M.

    2014-12-01

    The ISF Academy was founded by Charles Kao, a Nobel Prize laureate. In 2011, the Shuyuan programs were established at The ISF Academy to operate both as a "school within a school" and as a "school outside the classroom." The Shuyuan programs work together with the IBO Science and Technology subject areas to develop comprehensive and challenging opportunities that address the 14 Grand Engineering Challenges. The goal is to establish co-curricular programs that go beyond the taught curriculum and support STEM curricula. Several programs outside of the classroom include an onsite robotics researcher, underwater and land based robotics programs, field trips, whole school food waste composting and the implementation of an energy tracking system. Relationships with several local universities allow students to work closely with professors in research settings and, annually, a leading researcher gives a keynote speech to our students. Other signature Shuyuan programs have developed international strategic relationships with the NRI at Cambridge University, where students spend several weeks studying science and civilization in China using primary source materials. Additionally, Shuyuan has supported extension opportunities for classroom teachers with institutional partnerships that include the British Council, governmental organizations, local universities, corporations, and NGOs. In conclusion, the overall goal of the Shuyuan Programs is to provide experiential learning opportunities that challenge conventional curriculum design in a manner that is supportive and innovative!

  18. Making Room for Revolution in Social Studies Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Revolutions of all kinds are a mainstay of social studies and history classes across Canada. While revolution as subject matter is prevalent in Canadian social studies classrooms, it is unclear the degree to which what Howard Gardner calls the "cognitive revolution" has found its way into those same classrooms. This is the revolution in…

  19. A comparison of human jaw muscle cross-sectional area and volume in long- and short-face subjects, using MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, H.P.W.; van Spronsen, P.H.; van Ginkel, F.C.; van Schijndel, R.A.; Castelijns, J.A.; Tuinzing, D.B.

    2008-01-01

    Objective In humans, the vertical craniofacial dimensions vary significantly with the size of the jaw muscles, which are regarded as important controlling factors of craniofacial growth. The functional relevance of the maximum cross-sectional area (CSA), indicating maximum muscle strength, is

  20. A comparison of human jaw muscle cross-sectional area and volume in long- and short-face subjects, using MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spronsena, P. H.; van Ginkel, F. C.; van Schijndel, R. A.; Castelijns, J. A.; Tuinzing, D. B.

    Objective: In humans, the vertical craniofacial dimensions vary significantly with the size of the jaw muscles, which are regarded as important controlling factors of craniofacial growth. The functional relevance of the maximum cross-sectional area (CSA), indicating maximum muscle strength, is

  1. A comparison of human jaw muscle cross-sectional area and volume in long- and short-face subjects, using MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, H.P.; van Spronsen, P.H.; van Ginkel, F.C.; van Schijndel, R.A.; Castelijns, J.A.; Tuinzing, D.B.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: In humans, the vertical craniofacial dimensions vary significantly with the size of the jaw muscles, which are regarded as important controlling factors of craniofacial growth. The functional relevance of the maximum cross-sectional area (CSA), indicating maximum muscle strength, is

  2. Ultrasound screening for asymptomatic carotid stenosis in subjects with calcifications in the area of the carotid arteries on panoramic radiographs: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karp Kjell

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Directed ultrasonic screening for carotid stenosis is cost-effective in populations with > 5% prevalence of the diagnosis. Occasionally, calcifications in the area of the carotid arteries are incidentally detected on odontological panoramic radiographs. We aimed to determine if directed screening for carotid stenosis with ultrasound is indicated in individuals with such calcifications. Methods This was a cross-sectional study. Carotid ultrasound examinations were performed on consecutive persons, with findings of calcifications in the area of the carotid arteries on panoramic radiography that were otherwise eligible for asymptomatic carotid endarterectomy. Results Calcification in the area of the carotid arteries was seen in 176 of 1182 persons undergoing panoramic radiography. Of these, 117 fulfilled the inclusion criterion and were examined with carotid ultrasound. Eight persons (6.8%; 95% CI 2.2-11.5% had a carotid stenosis - not significant over the 5% pre-specified threshold (p = 0.232, Binomial test. However, there was a significant sex difference (p = 0.008, as all stenoses were found in men. Among men, 12.5% (95%CI 4.2-20.8% had carotid stenosis - significantly over the 5% pre-specified threshold (p = 0.014, Binomial test. Conclusions The incidental finding of calcification in the area of the carotid arteries on panoramic radiographs should be followed up with carotid screening in men that are otherwise eligible for asymptomatic carotid endarterectomy. Trial Registration The study was registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00514644

  3. Teenagers' Significant Experiences in Areas of Arts: A Study of the Subjectively Felt Impact and Some Qualitative Aspects of Experiences Involving Productive Arts Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnas, Leif

    2012-01-01

    As a part of a larger project, this study focused primarily on Finland-Swedish ninth-graders' "productive" arts experiences (involving music-making, acting, writing, painting/drawing, dancing), as these had been reported when the pupils had been asked to write down descriptions of "strong" experiences in arts areas (music,…

  4. Use of the Flipped Classroom Instructional Model in Higher Education: Instructors' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Taotao; Cummins, John; Waugh, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The flipped classroom model is an instructional model in which students learn basic subject matter knowledge prior to in-class meetings, then come to the classroom for active learning experiences. Previous research has shown that the flipped classroom model can motivate students towards active learning, can improve their higher-order thinking…

  5. The Development and Validity Investigation of a Classroom Communication Apprehension Scale for Japanese High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Shinobu; Paik, Chie Matsuzawa

    The purpose of this study was to examine the construct validity of a classroom communication apprehension scale. Subjects were 196 high school students in Japan. The original English version of a classroom communication apprehension scale (M. R. Neer, 1987) consisted of 20 items representing 2 hypothesized dimensions of classroom communication…

  6. High Possibility Classrooms as a Pedagogical Framework for Technology Integration in Classrooms: An Inquiry in Two Australian Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how well teachers integrate digital technology in learning is the subject of considerable debate in education. High Possibility Classrooms (HPC) is a pedagogical framework drawn from research on exemplary teachers' knowledge of technology integration in Australian school classrooms. The framework is being used to support teachers who…

  7. Green space as classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentsen, Peter; Schipperijn, Jasper; Jensen, Frank Søndergaard

    2013-01-01

    More and more Danish teachers have started introducing curriculum-based outdoor learning as a weekly or biweekly ‘outdoor school’ day for school children. This move towards schooling in non-classroom spaces presents a challenge for green space managers. Basic managerial knowledge related to what......, who, when and where has thus far only been supported by anecdotal evidence, but seems fundamental to the decision-making of a range of green space providers. The present study aims to describe, characterise and discuss outdoor teachers’ use, preferences and ecostrategies in relation to green space....... A nationwide survey was conducted among Danish teachers practising outdoor teaching (107 respondents), and it showed that a majority used and preferred forest areas. The outdoor teachers used mainly school grounds and local green space for their outdoor teaching with a majority using the same place or mostly...

  8. The nurturing of creativity in the History classroom through teaching methods – the views of teachers and learners.

    OpenAIRE

    Bunt, Byron

    2009-01-01

    Nurturing creative thinking abilities in all learning areas and subjects is one of the cornerstones and ideals of Outcomes-Based Education (OBE) in South Africa. This article reports on the results obtained with a pilot study that set out to determine the extent to which creativity is presently nurtured in the History classroom. A qualitative study by means of semi-structured, one-on-one interviews with learners (n = 4) and teachers (n = 2) of History at a secondary school was ...

  9. Differentiated Instruction: Understanding the personal factors and organizational conditions that facilitate differentiated instruction in elementary mathematics classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Abbati, Diana Guglielmo

    2012-01-01

    Differentiated instruction is a widely held practice used by teachers to provide diverse learners with complex learning opportunities in the area of mathematics. Research on differentiated instruction shows a multitude of factors that support high quality instruction in mixed-ability elementary classrooms. These factors include small-class size, extra time and resources that allow for a highly individualized approach to instruction, teacher commitment, and subject-matter competency in mathema...

  10. Occurrence of Bacteria and Viruses on Elementary Classroom Surfaces and the Potential Role of Classroom Hygiene in the Spread of Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Kelly R.; Boone, Stephanie A.; Gerba, Charles P.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of microorganisms on common classroom contact surfaces (fomites) was determined to identify the areas most likely to become contaminated. Six elementary classrooms were divided into control and intervention groups (cleaned daily with a quaternary ammonium wipe) and tested for heterotrophic bacteria. Three classrooms were also tested…

  11. Expanding subjectivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda; Soldz, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A major theme in recent psychoanalytic thinking concerns the use of therapist subjectivity, especially “countertransference,” in understanding patients. This thinking converges with and expands developments in qualitative research regarding the use of researcher subjectivity as a tool to understa...

  12. A Study of Cell-Phone Usage in University Classrooms : What Do Students Think?

    OpenAIRE

    影山, 陽子; 雨宮, 由紀枝

    2008-01-01

    This research report investigates and discusses student evaluations of cell phone usage in university classrooms. The research study on classroom cell-phone usage targeted eleven classes in four different subjects at the Japan Women's College of Physical Education from April to July 2007, reaching about 650 students total. In these classrooms, we developed a system to instantly display student opinions registered via their cell phones on classroom monitors. In this research study, we analyzed...

  13. THE USE OF GROUP WORK STRATEGY IN CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT OF LANGUAGE HOUSE TEFL IN PRAGUE

    OpenAIRE

    Ernidawati Ernidawati

    2017-01-01

    This paper is aimed to analyze the use of group work strategy to manage teaching learning English in the classroom. It is a case study of groupwork strategy in classroom management of language house TEFL in Prague. The subject of this study is the teacher and the students of language house TEFL in Prague. The object of this study is group work strategy in classroom management. Classroom management strategies focus on implementing strategies on how students should behave in the ...

  14. Does the Flipped Classroom Improve Learning in Graduate Medical Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddell, Jeff; Jhun, Paul; Fung, Cha-Chi; Comes, James; Sawtelle, Stacy; Tabatabai, Ramin; Joseph, Daniel; Shoenberger, Jan; Chen, Esther; Fee, Christopher; Swadron, Stuart P

    2017-08-01

    The flipped classroom model for didactic education has recently gained popularity in medical education; however, there is a paucity of performance data showing its effectiveness for knowledge gain in graduate medical education. We assessed whether a flipped classroom module improves knowledge gain compared with a standard lecture. We conducted a randomized crossover study in 3 emergency medicine residency programs. Participants were randomized to receive a 50-minute lecture from an expert educator on one subject and a flipped classroom module on the other. The flipped classroom included a 20-minute at-home video and 30 minutes of in-class case discussion. The 2 subjects addressed were headache and acute low back pain. A pretest, immediate posttest, and 90-day retention test were given for each subject. Of 82 eligible residents, 73 completed both modules. For the low back pain module, mean test scores were not significantly different between the lecture and flipped classroom formats. For the headache module, there were significant differences in performance for a given test date between the flipped classroom and the lecture format. However, differences between groups were less than 1 of 10 examination items, making it difficult to assign educational importance to the differences. In this crossover study comparing a single flipped classroom module with a standard lecture, we found mixed statistical results for performance measured by multiple-choice questions. As the differences were small, the flipped classroom and lecture were essentially equivalent.

  15. Factors associated with poor nutritional status among community dwelling Lebanese elderly subjects living in rural areas: results of the AMEL study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulos, C; Salameh, P; Barberger-Gateau, P

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the nutritional status, measured by MNA, and its association with socio-demographic indicators and health related characteristics of a representative sample of community dwelling elderly subjects. Cross-sectional study. Community dwelling elderly individuals living in rural communities in Lebanon. 1200 elderly individuals aged 65 years or more. Socio-demographic indicators and health related characteristics were recorded during a standardized interview. Nutritional status was assessed through Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA). The 5-item GDS score and the WHO-5-A score were used to assess mood, whereas Mini Mental Status (MMS) was applied to evaluate cognitive status. The prevalence of malnutrition and risk of malnutrition was 8.0% respective 29.1% of the study sample. Malnutrition was significantly more frequent in elderly subjects aged more than 85 years, in females, widowed and illiterate people. Moreover, participants who reported lower financial status were more often malnourished or at risk of malnutrition. Regarding health status, poor nutritional status was more common among those reporting more than three chronic diseases, taking more than three drugs daily, suffering from chronic pain and those who had worse oral health status. Also, depressive disorders and cognitive dysfunction were significantly related to malnutrition. After multivariate analysis following variables remained independently associated to malnutrition: living in the governorate of Nabatieh (ORa 2.30, 95% CI 1.35 -3.93), reporting higher income (ORa 0.77, 95% CI 0.61-0.97), higher number of comorbidities (ORa 1.22, 95% CI 1.12-1.32), chronic pain (ORa 1.72, 95% CI 1.24-2.39), and depressive disorders (ORa 1.66, 95% CI 1.47-1.88). On the other hand, better cognitive functioning was strongly associated with decreased nutritional risk (ORa 0.27, 95%CI 0.17-0.43). Our results highlighted the close relationship between health status and malnutrition. The

  16. Psychosocial working conditions, school sense of coherence and subjective health complaints. A multilevel analysis of ninth grade pupils in the Stockholm area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modin, Bitte; Ostberg, Viveca; Toivanen, Susanna; Sundell, Knut

    2011-02-01

    This study explores the psychosocial working conditions of 7930 Swedish 9th grade students, distributed over 475 classes and 130 schools, in relation to their subjective health using multilevel modeling. At the individual level, students with "strained" working conditions in school (i.e. those experiencing a high level of demands in combination with a low level of control) demonstrated significantly worse health compared to students in "low-strain" situations. "Strained" conditions in combination with a weak school-related sense of coherence were especially unfavourable for health. These findings remained significant when support from teachers, school marks, norm-breaking behaviours, family-relations and certain class- and school-contextual conditions were adjusted for. Thus, while demands are an essential part of school work, this study suggests that high levels of control and a strong school-related sense of coherence can protect against the more detrimental effects on health that high demands at school may cause. Copyright © 2010 The Association for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Learning to write in science: A study of English language learners' writing experience in sixth-grade science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yang

    , inconsistency of verb tense, and overuse of reiterating thematic patterns and everyday conjunctions to structure and organize their writing. Thematic analysis of teacher interviews and classroom observations revealed that the teachers (a) held different expectations for English language learners than mainstream students, (b) rarely provided explicit instruction on science writing, and (c) did not see themselves as having a shared responsibility of teaching writing in their subject area, despite acknowledgement of the essential role that writing plays in promoting scientific literacy. These findings provide a snapshot of the writing experience that sixth-grade English language learners had in their science classrooms. They suggest that the ELLs needed language and literacy support in science learning, but such support was largely absent in the science classrooms. The implications of the findings for science teaching and teacher education, along with the limitations of the study, are discussed.

  18. Classroom Management through English

    OpenAIRE

    Doyle, Shane

    2009-01-01

    This article aims to examine the problems both foreign and Japanese English Language teachers may have in the classroom. Classroom management through English can be a daunting prospect for both Japanese and non-Japanese language teachers. How to clearly put boundaries in place that students will understand and respect is a problem many educators face. This article deals with problematic issues in classroom management and offers advice and guidance on how these issues can be solved.

  19. Flipped Classroom Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fezile Ozdamli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Flipped classroom is an active, student-centered approach that was formed to increase the quality of period within class. Generally this approach whose applications are done mostly in Physical Sciences, also attracts the attention of educators and researchers in different disciplines recently. Flipped classroom learning which wide-spreads rapidly in the world, is not well recognized in our country. That is why the aim of study is to attract attention to its potential in education field and provide to make it recognize more by educators and researchers. With this aim, in the study what flipped classroom approach is, flipped classroom technology models, its advantages and limitations were explained.

  20. Student Feedback in the College Classroom: A Technology Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, James L.

    2004-01-01

    Technology in the university classroom has made great strides in the area of presentation of materials. Ceiling-mounted projectors and media carts with projection capabilities have made the multimedia classroom presentation a routine event for much of the world of higher education. Now there is technology that permits the instructor to solicit…

  1. Flipped Classroom Research and Trends from Different Fields of Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainuddin, Zamzami; Halili, Siti Hajar

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to analyse the trends and contents of flipped classroom research based on 20 articles that report on flipped learning classroom initiatives from 2013-2015. The content analysis was used as a methodology to investigate methodologies, area of studies, technology tools or online platforms, the most frequently used keywords and works…

  2. Student Teachers' Management Practices in Elementary Classrooms: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildenbrand, Susan M.; Arndt, Katrina

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study of four student teachers completing certification in elementary and special education investigated the classroom management practices of the student teachers. This is an important area of study because management practices are essential for an effective classroom, and student teachers often lack confidence and skill in the…

  3. Otitis Media: Coping with the Effects in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Dorinne S.

    This curriculum adaptation provides a methodology that enables the classroom teacher to recognize the needs of the otitis media-affected child in the classroom. It discusses areas of concern related to otitis media; suggests activities that can enhance these children's language skills; and shows ways to enhance the learning environment by…

  4. Geography Teachers' Attitudes and Beliefs Regarding Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikmenli, Yurdal; Çifçi, Taner

    2016-01-01

    This study scrutinizes geography teachers' attitude and belief levels regarding classroom management. As a matter of fact, classroom management is one of the prominent areas emphasized by all educators. Descriptive correlational survey model was used in the study. Study group includes 58 geography teachers working in Sivas province during the…

  5. O professor intérprete de língua de sinais em sala de aula: ponto de partida para se repensar a relação ensino, sujeito e linguagem/The sign language teacher/interpreter in the classroom: the starting point for a re-evaluation of teaching, subject and language relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Maria de Souza

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho discute a necessária participação educativa do intérprete de língua de sinais em sala de aula. A partir da teoria do Acontecimento Didático sobre o ensino e das idéias de Derrida sobre o ato interpretativo, defende a tese de que tentar estabelecer limites para a atuação do intérprete educacional - na tentativa de fazer com que não se confunda com a figura do/a professor/a em sala de aula - é submeter-se a uma formação discursiva de ensino que o reduz ou ao currículo, ou ao método (técnicas ou a intervenções que consideram tão somente a “capacidade” cognitiva do sujeito. The present paper discusses the necessary educational participation by the sign language interpreter in the classroom. Based on the Didactic Event teaching theory and Derrida´s ideas on the interpretive act, we argue that by setting limits for the educational interpreter’s performance – in an attempt to prevent him/her from being mistaken for a teacher in the classroom –, a discursive position about teaching is adopted, which restricts him/her to the curriculum, to the (technical method or to the interventions that take into account only the cognitive “capacity” of the subject.

  6. Multiple biomarker responses in Prochilodus lineatus subjected to short-term in situ exposure to streams from agricultural areas in Southern Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Carlos Eduardo Delfino [Laboratório de Ecofisiologia Animal — Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Paraná (Brazil); Costa, Patrícia Gomes [Laboratório de Microcontaminantes Orgânicos e Ecotoxicologia — Instituto de Oceanografia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Lunardelli, Bruna; Fernandes de Oliveira, Luciana [Laboratório de Ecofisiologia Animal — Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Paraná (Brazil); Costa Cabrera, Liziara da [Laboratório de Análise de Compostos Orgânicos e Metais — Escola de Química e Alimentos, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Risso, Wagner Ezequiel [Laboratório de Ecofisiologia Animal — Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Paraná (Brazil); Primel, Ednei Gilberto [Laboratório de Análise de Compostos Orgânicos e Metais — Escola de Química e Alimentos, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); and others

    2016-01-15

    In order to assess the quality of streams susceptible to contamination by pesticides we apply biochemical and genotoxic biomarkers in the Neotropical fish Prochilodus lineatus submitted to in situ tests. Fish were caged, for 96 h, in two streams located in areas with intensive use of pesticides, the Apertados (AP) and the Jacutinga (JC), and in a small stream (Godoy stream — GD) found inside a forest fragment adjacent to a State Park. Biochemical parameters, such as biotransformation enzymes 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST), non-protein thiols (NPSH), lipoperoxidation (LPO), protein carbonylation (PCO) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) were evaluated in various fish organs, as well as genotoxic biomarkers (damage to DNA and occurrence of micronuclei and erythrocyte nuclear abnormalities). Samples of water and sediment were collected for analysis of metals (Cu, Cr, Pb, Ni, Mn, Cd and Zn), organochloride pesticides, and triazine and glyphosate herbicides. We observed an increase in liver GST activity in fish at AP and gill GST activity in fish at JC. An increase in liver LPO was also observed in fish exposed to AP and JC. The same animals also exhibited increased DNA damage and erythrocyte nuclear abnormalities (ENAs) compared to the fish kept in GD. A number of compounds showed concentrations higher than the permitted levels, in particular, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), its metabolites dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD), hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCH), heptachloride, diclofluanid and aldrins. These pesticides were detected at higher concentrations in water and sediment samples from AP, followed by JC and GD. The Integrated Biomarker Response Index (IBR) indicated that AP and JC (AP: 21.7 > JC: 18.5 > GD: 12.6) have the worst environmental quality. Integrated biomarker analysis revealed that the alterations observed related well with the levels of environmental contaminants

  7. Hydrogeologic monitoring of the Paraíba do Sul river floodplain area subject to sand mining in the Tremembé municipality, SP, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getulio Teixeira Batista

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available To characterize the geological, hydrogeological, hydrochemical, and hydrobacterial aspects of the surface and groundwater in the floodplain of the Paraíba do Sul river in Tremembé municipality, the water levels of the Quaternary sedimentary aquifer experimental site was monitored based on four wells and eight associated piezometers with daily measures of water levels in continuous operation since December 3, 2009. In addition, data from a modular weather station in operation since March 2010 and data from the quality of surface water and groundwater have been analyzed in the period between March 2010 and March 2011. The water balance between April 2010 and March 2011 was estimated to verify the periods of water deficiency and excess. Data loggers installed in the piezometers enabled daily groundwater levels monitoring to establish the influence of the Paraíba do Sul river in the water levels of the Quaternary sedimentary aquifer and also they allowed the determination of the water loss to the atmosphere. A hydrogeological model with simplified equations, based on hydraulics parameters obtained in the wells pump tests, was implemented to calculate the amount of daily evapotranspiration and the average distance of the water loss from the wells to the atmosphere. An evaporation rate of 83.4 m3/h from the open-pit sand mine located at 212.2 m and of 89.2 m3/h for the one at 885.0 m average distance from the monitoring wells were observed. Chemical and bacteriological analysis involving multiple parameters were performed in the period from March 2010 to March 2011 in groundwater collected in wells, in the open-pit mines and in the waters of the Paraíba do Sul river. The results allowed to observe the influences of the Paraíba do Sul river as well as the contamination from fertilizers and pesticides from the agriculture practiced in the floodplain area on the quality of the groundwater.

  8. SUBJECT INDEX

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subject Index. Variation of surface electric field during geomagnetic disturbed period at Maitri, Antarctica. 1721. Geomorphology. A simple depression-filling method for raster and irregular elevation datasets. 1653. Decision Support System integrated with Geographic. Information System to target restoration actions in water-.

  9. The Implementation of A Flipped Classroom in Foreign Language Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet BASAL

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Alongside the rise of educational technology, many teachers have been taking gradual but innovative steps to redesign their teaching methods. For example, in flipped learning or a flipped classroom, students watch instructional videos outside the classroom and do assignments or engage in activities inside the classroom. Language teachers are one group of educators exploring the flipped classroom. In foreign language classes, such an approach may offer great benefits for both the teachers and students since classroom time can be applied to more interactive tasks. By extending classroom hours in this way, language teachers can focus on successfully addressing all subjects in the curriculum. The aim of this study is (a to gain insights into the perceptions of prospective English language teachers at a state university in Turkey on flipped classrooms and (b to introduce the implementation of a flipped classroom into an English language class. A total of 47 prospective English teachers participated in the study. Qualitative research design was used and data were collected via an open-ended question. Findings of the study indicated that pre-service English teachers had positive perceptions towards the use of the flipped classroom as an integral part of face-to-face courses. It can be concluded that flipped classroom was beneficial in terms of 4 categories based on the content analysis of the responses: learning at one’s own pace, advance student preparation, overcoming the limitations of class time, increasing the participation in the classroom. The study also provides recommendations towards LMS integration into courses in other English language teaching departments and for implementing flipped classrooms in language teaching.

  10. Flipped Classroom Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdamli, Fezile; Asiksoy, Gulsum

    2016-01-01

    Flipped classroom is an active, student-centered approach that was formed to increase the quality of period within class. Generally this approach whose applications are done mostly in Physical Sciences, also attracts the attention of educators and researchers in different disciplines recently. Flipped classroom learning which wide-spreads rapidly…

  11. Relationships in Inclusive Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Graça Duarte; Sardinha, Susana; Reis, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Climate in the classroom is one of the determining factors in the development of practices in Inclusive Education. Many factors contribute to the climate in the classroom. However, there are predominance on affective-relational factors, with impact on action, norms and values, social interactions and learning processes. In this paper, the authors…

  12. Classroom -RE-SONANCE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, or both. "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to· teaching and learning science. Logarithm and agM. In [1] we had discussed the evaluation.

  13. Defining Authentic Classroom Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Bruce B.; Schmitt, Vicki L.; Allen, Justin P.

    2012-01-01

    A commonly advocated best practice for classroom assessment is to make the assessments authentic. Authentic is often used as meaning the mirroring of real-world tasks or expectations. There is no consensus, however, in the actual definition of the term or the characteristics of an authentic classroom assessment. Sometimes, the realistic component…

  14. Classroom Assessment in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shermis, Mark D.; DiVesta, Francis J.

    2011-01-01

    "Classroom Assessment in Action" clarifies the multi-faceted roles of measurement and assessment and their applications in a classroom setting. Comprehensive in scope, Shermis and Di Vesta explain basic measurement concepts and show students how to interpret the results of standardized tests. From these basic concepts, the authors then…

  15. What's in a Name: The Place of Recognition in a Hospitable Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratman, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    In this brief article, I argue that recognition is the key virtue of a hospitable classroom. Whether we are discussing the relationship between the teacher and the student, the student and other students, the student and the subject of study, or the teacher and the subject of study, recognition is the building block to a classroom that welcomes…

  16. Mathematics difficulties & classroom leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Maria Christina Secher

    2016-01-01

    . The findings suggest that the teachers’ pedagogical choices and actions support an active learning environment for students in diverse learning needs, and that the teachers practise dimensions of inclusive classroom leadership that are known to be successful for teaching mathematics to all students. Despite......This article investigates possible links between inclusion, students, for whom mathematics is extensively difficult, and classroom leadership through a case study on teaching strategies and student participation in four classrooms at two different primary schools in Denmark. Three sets of results...... are presented: 1) descriptions of the teachers’ classroom leadership to include all their students in the learning community, 2) the learning community produced by stated and practiced rules for teaching and learning behavior, 3) the classroom behavior of students who experience difficulties with mathematics...

  17. Enhancement of motor learning by focal intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) of either the primary motor (M1) or somatosensory area (S1) in healthy human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platz, Thomas; Adler-Wiebe, Marija; Roschka, Sybille; Lotze, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Motor rehabilitation after brain damage relies on motor re-learning as induced by specific training. Non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) can alter cortical excitability and thereby has a potential to enhance subsequent training-induced learning. Knowledge about any priming effects of NIBS on motor learning in healthy subjects can help to design targeted therapeutic applications in brain-damaged subjects. To examine whether complex motor learning in healthy subjects can be enhanced by intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) to primary motor or sensory cortical areas. Eighteen young healthy subjects trained eight different arm motor tasks (arm ability training, AAT) once a day for 5 days using their left non-dominant arm. Except for day 1 (baseline), training was performed after applying an excitatory form of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (iTBS) to either (I) right M1 or (II) S1, or (III) sham stimulation to the right M1. Subjects were randomly assigned to conditions I, II, or III. A principal component analysis of the motor behaviour data suggested eight independent motor abilities corresponding to the 8 trained tasks. AAT induced substantial motor learning across abilities with generalisation to a non-trained test of finger dexterity (Nine-Hole-Peg-Test, NHPT). Participants receiving iTBS (to either M1 or S1) showed better performance with the AAT tasks over the period of training compared to sham stimulation as well as a bigger improvement with the generalisation task (NHPT) for the trained left hand after training completion. Priming with an excitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation as iTBS of either M1 or S1 can enhance motor learning across different sensorimotor abilities.

  18. Heat stress in urban areas: Indoor and outdoor temperatures in different urban structure types and subjectively reported well-being during a heat wave in the city of Leipzig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Franck

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Climate projections for Leipzig suggest elevated minimum and maximum temperatures as well as more frequent days with high temperatures. Hence, climate change is threatening human well-being and health. People spend the majority of their time indoors. Therefore, indoor temperatures (especially during the night are of special importance with respect to well-being and health. Indoor air temperature depends on outdoor air temperatures, but is for example modified by type of urban structure, housing area, and may be also influenced by differences in the behavior of the inhabitants. Especially in cities, outdoor air temperatures depend on urban structure e.g. housing density, building arrangement, unpaved areas, types of urban structures, urban green, and other factors. Hence, the questions arise how types of urban structures are related to inner-urban temperature differences and how outdoor air temperatures influence indoor temperatures in dependence on urban housing conditions. This work is a part of a pilot study conducted during the summer 2010 which gathered data from remote sensing, mobile measurements, stationary measurements of air temperatures and relative humidity in areas with different housing structures, and of indoor as well as outdoor temperatures in occupied apartments. Household-survey data reported the subjective perception of heat stress. The study resulted in rather complex relationships between type of housing areas, indoor and outdoor temperatures, morning and evening temperatures, indoor and outdoor temperatures as well as subjective heat perception. Green spaces and types of residential areas are related to air temperatures. More green resulted in lower temperatures. Temperatures have a tendency to increase with increasing story number and are significantly higher in the top floor. An indoor heat island effect corresponding to the outdoor effect could be shown for the homes: Distance to city center is a predicting variable for

  19. Classroom Management and the Librarian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Heidi; Hays, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    As librarians take on more instructional responsibilities, the need for classroom management skills becomes vital. Unfortunately, classroom management skills are not taught in library school and therefore, many librarians are forced to learn how to manage a classroom on the job. Different classroom settings such as one-shot instruction sessions…

  20. SUBJECT INDEX

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    sensor for methanol determination in the gas phase. 703. Electrochemically active surface area. Platinum-carbon black-titanium dioxide nanocompo- site electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications. 655. Electrochemistry. Synthesis, spectroscopic and redox properties of the mononuclear Ni. II. , Ni. II. (BPh2)2 containing (B–C) ...

  1. SUBJECT INDEX

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    protected areas of Rajasthan, India. 467. Geochemistry. Geochemical constraints on the evolution of mafic and felsic rocks in the Bathani volcanic and volcano- sedimentary sequence of Chotanagpur Granite Gneiss. Complex. 959. Identification and characterization of tsunami deposits off southeast coast of India from the ...

  2. Instructor Active Empathic Listening and Classroom Incivility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weger, Harry

    2018-01-01

    Instructor listening skill is an understudied area in instructional communication research. This study looks at teachers' active empathic listening behavior association with student incivility. Scholars recognize student incivility as a growing problem and have called for research that identifies classroom behaviors that can affect classroom…

  3. Addressing Orthodox Challenges in the Pluralist Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindewald, Benjamin J.; Rosenblith, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    The American public landscape has shifted in concert with a newly emboldened political right, and the public school has again become an important battlefield in the latest culture wars. In addition to confrontations over educational policy issues is a largely untheorized area where the everyday classroom takes center stage: Teachers face a…

  4. Teaching through Mnemonics in Elementary School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite-McGough, Arianne

    2012-01-01

    Mnemonics and songs are used to help students excel and build are their knowledge in all content areas. This method of teaching and reinforcement of information helps students to commit new information to memory and continue to use this material throughout their lives. Using mnemonics is a lessons way to teach and make the classroom a unique…

  5. Teaching practices and elementary classroom peer ecologies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gest, Scott D; Rodkin, Philip C

    2011-01-01

    ... risk that claims of teacher influence on classroom social processes could become an empty truism that lacks the specificity that could guide teacher professional development efforts. In the present paper, we aim to illustrate one strategy for focusing research efforts in this area by integrating recent advances in the measurement of teacher–student...

  6. Investigating the Potential of the Flipped Classroom Model in K-12 ICT Teaching and Learning: An Action Research Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christoforos Kostaris; Stylianos Sergis; Demetrios G. Sampson; Michail Ν. Giannakos; Lina Pelliccione

    2017-01-01

    The emerging Flipped Classroom approach has been widely used to enhance teaching practices in many subject domains and educational levels, reporting promising results for enhancing student learning experiences...

  7. Making Space Science Elementary!: Broadening our Audience to Include the K-4 Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglierani, R. L.; Schultz, G. R.; McConnell, S. L.

    2008-06-01

    The integration of elementary science with language arts provides a means of keeping science education robust in the elementary classroom. By linking the two subject areas, teachers can take advantage of the highly-motivational content that science provides while using writing as a powerful tool to synthesize science learning. We report on two successful K-4 NASA curricula, Eye on the Sky and Reading, Writing & Rings! which suggest a model for the successful integration of science instruction with language arts through inquiry-based learning.

  8. The effects of departmentalized and self-contained classrooms on fifth-grade students' achievement in science on the Georgia Criterion Referenced Competency Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Lisa S.

    Elementary instruction of fifth grade classrooms was found to be primarily in two organizational models in a school district northwest of Atlanta, Georgia. The self-contained classroom provided a generalist teacher responsible for the instruction of all academic subjects to one group of students throughout the day, while departmentalized classrooms were structured utilizing one teacher for the instruction of one or two content areas, and students rotated throughout the day for each of the academic subjects. The majority of studies looking at the effect of instructional organization were concentrated in the content areas of mathematics and reading. This quantitative study, utilized an ex post facto methodology to determine whether fifth grade students attending departmentalized schools or self-contained classrooms had higher student achievement in science as measured by the Georgia Criterion Referenced Competency Test (CRCT). The statistical data was collected through the Georgia Department of Education and included raw mean scores of over 500 students attending departmentalized schools and 500 students attending self-contained classrooms, along with the various subgroups such as gender, ethnicity status, English language learners (ELL), and students with disability (SWD) placement. This data was analyzed to show if a significant statistical difference emerged from either instructional organization. The overall results that emerged from the archival data suggested no significant difference in student achievement existed for almost all subgroups tested of the total 1000+ participant scores used in the study. The results also did however, showed the departmentalization model of instruction had a slight advantage over self-contained classrooms for male students with disabilities.

  9. Flipping the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riendeau, Diane

    2012-11-01

    A recent trend in education is the ``flipped'' or ``reversed'' classroom. In this educational model, students view videos of the lectures as their homework and class time is used for activities and solving problems that might have been assigned as homework in a traditional classroom. Although far from an expert on flipping the classroom, I can see some merit in the idea. When students watch the videos at home, they can start and restart the lecture as often as they like. The lectures are also available for review before the exam. Class time can be used for higher-order questioning, experiments, and problem solving.

  10. Flipped Classroom, active Learning?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Dyreborg; Levinsen, Henrik; Philipps, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Action research is conducted in three physics classes over a period of eighteen weeks with the aim of studying the effect of flipped classroom on the pupils agency and learning processes. The hypothesis is that flipped classroom teaching will potentially allocate more time to work actively...... are conducted in three different phases corresponding to different teaching sequences During the first phase the classes are taught as they are usually taught. During the next two phases classes are taught on the basis of a common understanding of the flipped classroom teaching model obtained during a 4 day...

  11. The Effects of Classroom Interventions on Off-Task and Disruptive Classroom Behavior in Children with Symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Meta-Analytic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaastra, Geraldina F.; Groen, Yvonne; Tucha, Lara; Tucha, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often exhibit problem behavior in class, which teachers often struggle to manage due to a lack of knowledge and skills to use classroom management strategies. The aim of this meta-analytic review was to determine the effectiveness of several types of classroom interventions (antecedent-based, consequence-based, self-regulation, combined) that can be applied by teachers in order to decrease off-task and disruptive classroom behavior in children with symptoms of ADHD. A second aim was to identify potential moderators (classroom setting, type of measure, students’ age, gender, intelligence, and medication use). Finally, it was qualitatively explored whether the identified classroom interventions also directly or indirectly affected behavioral and academic outcomes of classmates. Separate meta-analyses were performed on standardized mean differences (SMDs) for 24 within-subjects design (WSD) and 76 single-subject design (SSD) studies. Results showed that classroom interventions reduce off-task and disruptive classroom behavior in children with symptoms of ADHD (WSDs: MSMD = 0.92; SSDs: MSMD = 3.08), with largest effects for consequence-based (WSDs: MSMD = 1.82) and self-regulation interventions (SSDs: MSMD = 3.61). Larger effects were obtained in general education classrooms than in other classroom settings. No reliable conclusions could be formulated about moderating effects of type of measure and students’ age, gender, intelligence, and medication use, mainly because of power problems. Finally, classroom interventions appeared to also benefit classmates’ behavioral and academic outcomes. PMID:26886218

  12. The Effects of Classroom Interventions on Off-Task and Disruptive Classroom Behavior in Children with Symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Meta-Analytic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaastra, Geraldina F; Groen, Yvonne; Tucha, Lara; Tucha, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often exhibit problem behavior in class, which teachers often struggle to manage due to a lack of knowledge and skills to use classroom management strategies. The aim of this meta-analytic review was to determine the effectiveness of several types of classroom interventions (antecedent-based, consequence-based, self-regulation, combined) that can be applied by teachers in order to decrease off-task and disruptive classroom behavior in children with symptoms of ADHD. A second aim was to identify potential moderators (classroom setting, type of measure, students' age, gender, intelligence, and medication use). Finally, it was qualitatively explored whether the identified classroom interventions also directly or indirectly affected behavioral and academic outcomes of classmates. Separate meta-analyses were performed on standardized mean differences (SMDs) for 24 within-subjects design (WSD) and 76 single-subject design (SSD) studies. Results showed that classroom interventions reduce off-task and disruptive classroom behavior in children with symptoms of ADHD (WSDs: MSMD = 0.92; SSDs: MSMD = 3.08), with largest effects for consequence-based (WSDs: MSMD = 1.82) and self-regulation interventions (SSDs: MSMD = 3.61). Larger effects were obtained in general education classrooms than in other classroom settings. No reliable conclusions could be formulated about moderating effects of type of measure and students' age, gender, intelligence, and medication use, mainly because of power problems. Finally, classroom interventions appeared to also benefit classmates' behavioral and academic outcomes.

  13. Study on a Quality Evaluation Method for College English Classroom Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-hua Sun

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A quality evaluation method is an important means and the main basis on which to evaluate the college English classroom teaching quality of teachers. To overcome the one-sided subjectivity and resulting imprecision of the traditional classroom teaching quality evaluation method, a scientific and reasonable quality evaluation index system for college English classroom teaching is constructed. The fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method and the analytic hierarchy process method are combined to propose an improved multi-level fuzzy comprehensive evaluation model for obtaining a new college English classroom teaching quality evaluation method. In the proposed method, according to the fuzzy characteristics of a college English classroom teaching quality evaluation, the fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method is used to transform the qualitative evaluation indexes into limited quantitative evaluation indexes, then a judgment matrix is constructed to determine the weights among different levels by using the analytic hierarchy process method. Additionally, the college English classroom teaching quality is evaluated in detail. Finally, an actual case of college English classroom teaching is used to verify the effectiveness of the college English classroom teaching quality evaluation method. The results show that the proposed college English classroom teaching method can overcome the subjectivity and randomness shortcomings of the traditional classroom teaching quality evaluation methods, and improve the reliability, accuracy, and objectivity of fuzzy comprehensive evaluation. It is an effective method to evaluate college English classroom teaching quality.

  14. A peer review process for classroom teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellein, Marlea G; Ragucci, Kelly R; Lapointe, Marc

    2009-08-28

    Describe the planning, implementation, and faculty perceptions of a classroom peer-review process, including an evaluation tool. A process for peer evaluation of classroom teaching and its evaluation tool were developed and implemented by a volunteer faculty committee within our department. At the end of the year, all faculty members were asked to complete an online anonymous survey to evaluate the experience. The majority of faculty members either agreed or strongly agreed that the overall evaluation process was beneficial for both evaluators and for those being evaluated. Some areas of improvement related to the process and its evaluation tool also were identified. The process of developing and implementing a peer-evaluation process for classroom teaching was found to be beneficial for faculty members, and the survey results affirmed the need and continuation of such a process.

  15. In the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    History and Social Science Teacher, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Using cartoons and comic strips to teach the concept of social class and newspapers to teach economic principles are suggested classroom activities for elementary and secondary courses. A lesson plan for teaching democratic values is also included. (JR)

  16. Culture in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medin, Douglas L.; Bang, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Culture plays a large but often unnoticeable role in what we teach and how we teach children. We are a country of immense diversity, but in classrooms the dominant European-American culture has become the language of learning.

  17. Boardgames in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Robert F.

    1979-01-01

    The article describes the program at Wellesley (Massachusetts) High School's Academic Resource Center, a program in which game-playing is used to improve the academic functioning of special needs students in preparation for reintegration into the regular classroom. (SBH)

  18. The Classroom Animal: Mealworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David C., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Describes appearance, longevity, and changes in each step of the mealworm life cycle. Guidelines for starting a classroom colony are given with housing and care instructions. Suggested observations, activities, and questions for students are included. (DH)

  19. The Classroom Animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David C., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the behavior, housing, care, diet, and feeding of painted turtles. Also suggests several classroom activities and provides guidelines related to long-term captivity and human disease prevention. (DH)

  20. DISCIPLINE OR CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulent Tarman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this literature review are twofold. Firstly, it explains discipline and causes of students’ misbehavior and classroom management. In this sense, this review focuses on discipline in the conflict of the educational platform elements; and related the philosophic literature. Secondly, this review draws a conclusion by summarizing the opinions and influencing of discipline upon school environment and students’ learning. In this regard, this study discusses two models for dealing with classroom discipline: psychoanalytic method and behavior modification. Although two models apply different methods for dealing with classroom discipline, this study suggests that, to create a successful classroom management, educators should use both of them instead of applying only the one.

  1. Critters in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert W.; Fleisher, Paul

    1984-01-01

    The use of invertebrates as classroom "pets" can develop students' skills in scientific inquiry and instill respect for science. Few materials are needed for projects involving invertebrates. Suggested activities using snails, crickets, earthworms, crayfish, and guppies are offered. (DF)

  2. Modifying Classroom Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heifetz, Louis J.; Farber, Barry A.

    1976-01-01

    An introductory framework for analyzing and modifying classroom behavior...is followed by presentation of illustrative case materials, discussion of philosophical and ethical issues, analysis of pitfalls to be avoided, and consideration of limitations inherent in behavioral approaches. (Author)

  3. AN ANALYTICAL STUDY RELATED LEARNING WITH FLIPPED CLASSROOMS MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    Okan SARIGÖZ

    2017-01-01

    The Flipped Classroom Model is a student-centeredlearning model in which students effectively assimilate subjects in theclassroom, where they often perform their learning out of school with materialssuch as narrative, film, presentation, or video. The purpose of this study isto examine the effect of the Flipped Classroom Model on the academic success ofprospective teachers.   Experimentalpattern model with pretest-posttest control group was used in the study. Oneexperimental and the other con...

  4. Bridging Classroom Language Ethnography

    OpenAIRE

    Grenfell, Michael James

    2012-01-01

    PUBLISHED Paper #5: Bridging Classroom Language Ethnography, New Literacy Studies and Bourdieu?s Social Philosophy: Principles and Practice The purpose of this paper is to analyze and synthesize the various ways that classroom language ethnography, NLS, and Bourdieu?s social philosophy, were integrated. The goal of the analysis and synthesis is to provide a fresh perspective and fruitful insights on literacy in all its manifestations that provides the foundations for a more robust...

  5. Flipped Classroom Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Fezile Ozdamli; Gulsum Asiksoy

    2016-01-01

    Flipped classroom is an active, student-centered approach that was formed to increase the quality of period within class. Generally this approach whose applications are done mostly in Physical Sciences, also attracts the attention of educators and researchers in different disciplines recently. Flipped classroom learning which wide-spreads rapidly in the world, is not well recognized in our country. That is why the aim of study is to attract attention to its potential in education field and pr...

  6. Classroom Management Information Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Haq, Mohammad Syahidul

    2017-01-01

    Development of Information Technology in the field of education today can not be avoided. In the learning process is now not limited to space and time with the presence of information technology. To realize quality of learning, information technology is one aspect of classroom management. Many strategies are offered in classroom management To realize learning objectives. E-learning is a solution in the management of information technology-based classes are much used in various educational ins...

  7. Classroom Displays as a Tool for Evaluating Young Learners’ Goal-Attainment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    aus der Wieschen, Maria Vanessa

    multimodal conversation analysis, I examined the purpose and use of EFL displays on the walls of 1st grade and 3rd grade classrooms. Specifically, I investigated if and how teachers and students orient to the displays as part of the foreign language classroom interaction. The analysis shows that classroom......In Danish primary schools, each class has their own classroom in which they have (almost) all of their classes, making the walls ideal learning spaces. However, this also means that English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teachers have to share the classroom walls with their colleagues who teach other...... subjects in the same classroom, which limits the available EFL learning space. The present study examines in what way English teachers and young learners do (not) make meaningful use of EFL material on classroom walls as part of goal-oriented teaching and learning (læringsmålstyret undervisning. Using...

  8. CLASSROOM INTERACTION AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF EMPOWERMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Malcom Reed

    2015-01-01

    What is the practical pedagogic value of the zone of proximal development? How might we draw from the writings of Vygotsky and Leontiev with regard to understanding the process of children and young people’s development as socialized intellectual beings? This article applies cultural-historical theory to classroom activity in order to reveal the potential for dynamic change in subjectivity, agency, cooperation and collaboration. After a detailed theoretical contextualization which links prima...

  9. Explore Mediterranean in classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balesevic, Ivana

    2017-04-01

    I am a science teacher at a primary school and my students are very interested in science. Through this year I will work with my students, organizing several workshops and or results will be presented on poster. I will work with several groups (4-6) students 8th grade. In this poster all activities will be presented, showing how science is easy to learn even in a classroom. 1. Workshop > Chemical characteristic of sea water Using school laboratory each group of students will analyze the physical and chemical characteristic of sea water and they have to explain the results to younger student's 5th and 6th grade. The final result will be presented on poster. 2. Workshop> Meet the Mediterranean life During this workshop students will work in different groups. The aim of the workshop is to meet lots of species that we can find in Mediterranean using movies, phone applications, internet explorer, science books and school collections of invertebrates … 3. Workshop>Stop the pollution Several groups of students have to debate about causes of pollution and possibilities for prevention. At the end of workshop we will organize a quiz. Student's answers and suggestions will be shown on the poster. 4. Workshop> How we see the Mediterranean During this workshop students will make models of Mediterranean in 2d and 3d perspective, using different materials. They can show on models parts of Mediterranean area, country, sea... After making models students need to visit 5th and 6th grade classes, to show them and explain the final results. Few models will be presented on poster

  10. Talking about science: An interpretation of the effects of teacher talk in a high school science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moje, Elizabeth B.

    This paper builds on research in science education, secondary education, and sociolinguistics by arguing that high school classrooms can be considered speech communities in which language may be selectively used and imposed on students as a means of fostering academic speech community identification. To demonstrate the ways in which a high school teacher's language use may encourage subject area identification, the results of an interactionist analysis of data from a 2-year ethnographic study of one high school chemistry classroom are presented. Findings indicate that this teacher's uses of language fell into three related categories. These uses of language served to foster identification with the academic speech community of science. As a result of the teacher's talk about science according to these three patterns, students developed or reinforced particular views of science. In addition, talking about science in ways that fostered identity with the discipline promoted the teacher as expert and built classroom solidarity or community. These results are discussed in light of sociolinguistic research on classroom competence and of the assertions of science educators regarding social and ideologic implications of language use in science instruction.Received: 23 September 1993; Revised: 15 September 1994;

  11. The Impact of Certification Type and Student Teaching Experience on Classroom Management in a Rural South Texas District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uriegas, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Teachers are entering the classroom through a variety of certification routes and programs responsible for training prospective teachers in the areas of curriculum, assessment, theory, pedagogy, and classroom management. Once certification is received, these teachers enter the classroom and face many issues, including discipline in the classroom…

  12. Classroom Teachers and Classroom Research. JALT Applied Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffee, Dale T., Ed.; Nunan, David, Ed.

    This collection of papers leads classroom language teachers through the process of developing and completing a classroom research project. Arranged in four sections, they include: "Language Teaching and Research" (David Nunan); "Where Are We Now? Trends, Teachers, and Classroom Research" (Dale T. Griffee); "First Things First: Writing the Research…

  13. Classroom Discussions: Possibilities and Limitations for Democratic Classroom Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasebø, Turid Skarre

    2017-01-01

    Are students offered possibilities to experience democratic practice in classrooms? Using an analysis of empirical data from classroom discussions in lower secondary school, this article identifies and explores two different types of classroom discussions which give students different positions: a conversation in which students are positioned as…

  14. Sherlock Holmes in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faia, Jean E.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a three-day classroom activity combining criminal investigations and scientific skills, especially observation skills. Provides detailed classroom procedures with an illustration of eight basic fingerprint patterns and a classification chart. (YP)

  15. Learning from avatars: Learning assistants practice physics pedagogy in a classroom simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquelyn J. Chini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Preparing and Supporting University Physics Educators.] Undergraduate students are increasingly being used to support course transformations that incorporate research-based instructional strategies. While such students are typically selected based on strong content knowledge and possible interest in teaching, they often do not have previous pedagogical training. The current training models make use of real students or classmates role playing as students as the test subjects. We present a new environment for facilitating the practice of physics pedagogy skills, a highly immersive mixed-reality classroom simulator, and assess its effectiveness for undergraduate physics learning assistants (LAs. LAs prepared, taught, and reflected on a lesson about motion graphs for five highly interactive computer generated student avatars in the mixed-reality classroom simulator. To assess the effectiveness of the simulator for this population, we analyzed the pedagogical skills LAs intended to practice and exhibited during their lessons and explored LAs’ descriptions of their experiences with the simulator. Our results indicate that the classroom simulator created a safe, effective environment for LAs to practice a variety of skills, such as questioning styles and wait time. Additionally, our analysis revealed areas for improvement in our preparation of LAs and use of the simulator. We conclude with a summary of research questions this environment could facilitate.

  16. Development and evaluation of an integrated asthma awareness curriculum for the elementary school classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Emily V; Richmond, Colleen M; Hobson, Angela; Kleiss, Jamie; Wottowa, Jamie; Sterling, David A

    2011-02-01

    Asthma is one of the most common causes of school absenteeism, and many children are affected by, or encounter, it in the school setting. An integrated curriculum that presents asthma as a real world example can raise all children's awareness and understanding of asthma, not just those with the condition. A 15-lesson, asthma-based curriculum was developed to integrate with and enhance the core subjects of math, science, and communication arts. A pilot test was performed in fourth- and fifth-grade classes to assess student asthma knowledge gain, teacher acceptance, and grade appropriateness of the curriculum. During the 2006-2007 school year, 15 teachers were recruited from the St. Louis, MO, USA area to assess the curriculum through teaching and administering pre- and post-unit tests and completing a teacher evaluation for each lesson taught. Four additional classrooms served as comparisons. Paired t tests were used for each lesson taught, to evaluate pre-/post-test and classroom differences, and focus groups were used for qualitative evaluation. There was an increase in asthma knowledge between pre- and post-tests in both grades, individually and combined (p Teacher feedback indicated that the lessons enhanced previously learned skills and increased students' overall understanding of asthma. Offering asthma education in the classroom can provide an opportunity for all students to gain asthma knowledge and build health literacy about a leading chronic disease in school-aged children.

  17. Learning from avatars: Learning assistants practice physics pedagogy in a classroom simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chini, Jacquelyn J.; Straub, Carrie L.; Thomas, Kevin H.

    2016-06-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Preparing and Supporting University Physics Educators.] Undergraduate students are increasingly being used to support course transformations that incorporate research-based instructional strategies. While such students are typically selected based on strong content knowledge and possible interest in teaching, they often do not have previous pedagogical training. The current training models make use of real students or classmates role playing as students as the test subjects. We present a new environment for facilitating the practice of physics pedagogy skills, a highly immersive mixed-reality classroom simulator, and assess its effectiveness for undergraduate physics learning assistants (LAs). LAs prepared, taught, and reflected on a lesson about motion graphs for five highly interactive computer generated student avatars in the mixed-reality classroom simulator. To assess the effectiveness of the simulator for this population, we analyzed the pedagogical skills LAs intended to practice and exhibited during their lessons and explored LAs' descriptions of their experiences with the simulator. Our results indicate that the classroom simulator created a safe, effective environment for LAs to practice a variety of skills, such as questioning styles and wait time. Additionally, our analysis revealed areas for improvement in our preparation of LAs and use of the simulator. We conclude with a summary of research questions this environment could facilitate.

  18. Writing in the elementary science classroom: Teacher beliefs and practices within a narrowing curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Angela K.

    The narrowed curriculum continues to be challenging for science education as teachers strive to impart content that is on the high-stakes assessments. This Qualitative multiple-case study investigated four experienced, elementary classroom teachers' use of writing in science. It was designed to provide insight into teaching beliefs and practices of how teachers use writing in science opportunities within a narrowing curriculum. Triangulation was achieved through teacher interviews, classroom observations, and document analysis. Three major findings were evident through careful examination of data which is representative of the teacher participants within this study: 1.) Writing is combined with dialogue, multiple applications, activity and audience, 2.) Writing is used as an assessment and as a means to enhance learning, 3.) Writing is prioritized in science with differing schedule approaches. Although these are the major findings there were exceptions that were unique to each individual participant. The findings of this study can inform pre-service, novice and experienced classroom teachers on how to interconnect the two subject areas of writing and science to promote enhancement of learning. By gaining this information, it could diminish the global achievement gap in science.

  19. The flipped classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triantafyllou, Evangelia

    2015-01-01

    class time is devoted to clarifications and application of this knowledge. The hypothesis is that there could be deep and creative discussions when teacher and students physically meet. This paper presents design considerations for flipped classrooms, and discusses how Moodle can facilitate......One of the novel ideas in teaching that heavily relies on current technology is the “flipped classroom” approach. In a flipped classroom the traditional lecture and homework sessions are inverted. Students are provided with online material in order to gain necessary knowledge before class, while...... communication and information sharing in such classrooms. Furthermore, it provides guidelines for supporting out-of-class instruction in the flipped model by using quizzes and feedback in Moodle, and comments on the potential to follow student use of resources by using Moodle reports. This paper concludes...

  20. When classroom becomes school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noer, Vibeke Røn

    of the studies primarily focus on the clinical learning context. Based upon educational ethnographic studies following nursing students in and out of both learning contexts (Noer, 2016) and by drawing on concepts of formation (Benner, 2011), learning strategies (Borgnakke, 2008) and positioning strategies...... (Christensen, 2013), this presentation will focus on ‘what’s happening in the classroom’ when classroom is ‘school’ among fellow students opposed to ‘real nursing practice’ among future colleagues. Focusing on student strategies in the classroom, the presentation will further elaborate on the inherent...... & Perrenoud, 2006). In Denmark alone changes have been made numerously times in the last two decades. Concurrently, a considerable amount of studies has been published focusing on the nursing education, stressing a call for transformation. Division of learning contexts into clinical and classroom settings...

  1. Teachers' subjectivities and emotionality in HIV/AIDS teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper draws on qualitative, narrative data gathered from five teachers teaching in a midlands town in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. It finds that teachers' subject positions play a significant role in presenting compassionate, supportive and knowledgeable subjectivities in the classroom; and that their positive and negative ...

  2. Inverting the Linear Algebra Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbert, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The inverted classroom is a course design model in which students' initial contact with new information takes place outside of class meetings, and students spend class time on high-level sense-making activities. The inverted classroom model is so called because it inverts or "flips" the usual classroom design where typically class…

  3. Factors Related to Computer Use by Teachers in Classroom Instruction

    OpenAIRE

    Blankenship, Strader Eric

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which the following factors predict computer use by teachers in classroom instruction: attitudes of teachers toward computers in the classroom, access by teachers and students to computers, training of teachers in computer use, support of teachers in their use of computers, age of the teacher, grade level in which the teacher teaches, curriculum area in which the teacher teaches, gender of the teacher, and number of years the teacher i...

  4. Review of Studies of Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Ci-feng

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety is considered to be one of the key psychological variables as well as one of the important emotional factors that affect language learning. Taken into account that classroom is the main place in which Chinese college students learn English, it is of great significance to study students’language anxiety in the classroom environment. Based on the previous researches, this paper reviews the relevant studies in this area conducted at home and abroad.

  5. Digital Technology and Teachers' Competence for Its Application in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimovic, Jelena; Dimic, Nevena

    2016-01-01

    The subject of the research is focused on questioning teachers' attitudes in reference to using ICT competencies in the classroom, considering the gender, years of service and education, while the problem of the research concerns the question: What are the teachers' attitudes in reference to using ICT competencies in the classroom? Regarding to…

  6. Problem Solving Ability Confidence Levels among Student Teachers after a Semester in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Kevin; Love, John; Mauzey, Ed; Dixon, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Subjective confidence for solving classroom problems while instructing students in appropriate academic material is crucial for effective teaching. One way to develop problem solving confidence may result from the semester most education majors spend in the classroom as student teachers. The problem solving inventory (PSI) was given to university…

  7. The Viability of English Television Programs inside of South Korean Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kines, Scott Wayne

    2012-01-01

    English television programs have been incorporated within public-school classrooms in western countries for a long time to capture student interest in various subjects. Many researchers favor English programs as a partner inside of classrooms while others hold negative perceptions of the concept. However, there is little research to provide a…

  8. Using Biological-Control Research in the Classroom to Promote Scientific Inquiry & Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Matthew L.; Richardson, Scott L.; Hall, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Scientists researching biological control should engage in education because translating research programs into classroom activities is a pathway to increase scientific literacy among students. Classroom activities focused on biological control target all levels of biological organization and can be cross-disciplinary by drawing from subject areas…

  9. The Relationship between Instructor Behaviors and Student Perceptions of Control in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furio, Brian J.

    Employing learned helplessness theory as a trait orientation, a study examined the interrelationships existing between instructor classroom behaviors, student perceptions of control, and student behavioral responses in the college classroom. Subjects, 317 male and female undergraduate students who were enrolled in communication courses at West…

  10. Classroom Contexts for Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghetto, Ronald A.; Kaufman, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Various factors influence the development of creative potential, including everything from individual differences to the kinds of experiences and opportunities that creators experience throughout the lifespan. When it comes to nurturing creativity in the classroom, the learning environment is one of the most important factors--determining, in…

  11. THE CLASSROOM AIDE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FITZPATRICK, MILDRED

    TO RELIEVE THE NON-INSTRUCTIONAL BURDEN UPON THE CLASSROOM TEACHER, THE QUEMADO PUBLIC SCHOOLS EXPERIMENTED WITH A TEACHER AIDE PROGRAM, UTILIZING A SINGLE TEACHER AIDE IN ELEMENTARY LANGUAGE ARTS AND HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAMED MATHEMATICS THE FIRST YEAR OF THE PROJECT. AS A RESULT OF THE EXPERIMENT'S SUCCESS, THE FOLLOWING SCHOOL YEAR (1963-1964)…

  12. In the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997

    Fourteen conference papers on classroom techniques for second language teaching are presented, including: "Cooperative Learning at the Post-Secondary Level in Japan" (Steve McGuire, Patricia Thornton, David Kluge); "Shared Inquiry Fosters Critical Thinking Skills in EFL Students" (Carol Browning, Jerold Halvorsen, Denise…

  13. Singing Smoothes Classroom Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Sarah E.

    2012-01-01

    Just as humming a merry tune helped Snow White and her furry animal friends to quickly clean a filthy cottage in the movie "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (Disney & Cottrell, 1937), singing can be an effective way to help keep young children fully engaged during classroom transitions. The purposes of this article are to: (1) consider why…

  14. Creating a Smart Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domermuth, David

    2005-01-01

    This article provides a description of an affordable, smart classroom built for the Technology Department at Appalachian State university. The system consists of three basic components: a home theater combo, a tablet PC, and a digital projector, costing a total of $7,300, or $8,800 if a podium, screen, and projector mount are purchased. The…

  15. The Classroom Animal: Snails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David S.

    1985-01-01

    Points out that snails are interesting and easily-managed classroom animals. One advantage of this animal is that it requires no special attention over weekends or holidays. Background information, anatomy, reproduction, and feeding are discussed, along with suggestions for housing aquatic and/or land snails. (DH)

  16. The Paperless Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebelhausen, Robin

    2016-01-01

    In an age where the world is becoming ever more aware of paper consumption, educators are turning toward technology to cut back on paper waste. Besides the environmental reasons, a paperless music classroom helps students develop their musicianship in new and exciting ways. This article will look at the considerations for setting up a paperless…

  17. Flipping the Classroom Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riendeau, Diane

    2013-02-01

    I received many emails following the first column on flipping the classroom. Many of my local colleagues also approached me at our physics alliance, Physics Northwest. Teachers are very interested in this new pedagogy. As I result, I wanted to share some more videos to inspire you.

  18. Animals in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Use of animals in middle school science classrooms is a curriculum component worthy of consideration, providing proper investigation and planning are addressed. A responsible approach to this action, including safety, must be adopted for success. In this month's column, the author provides some suggestions on incorporating animals into the…

  19. Tips from the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffman, Doris Yaffe; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Discusses setting up conversation tables on campus in cross-cultural interaction among native and nonnative speakers, presents ways to teach proverbs in the advanced classroom, describes how to use Aesop's fables to integrate all learning skills, tells how to teach make/do, and suggests ways to improve communicative skills for better accuracy and…

  20. Flexible Classroom Furniture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim Hassell,

    2011-01-01

    Classroom design for the 21st-century learning environment should accommodate a variety of learning skills and needs. The space should be large enough so it can be configured to accommodate a number of learning activities. This also includes furniture that provides flexibility and accommodates collaboration and interactive work among students and…

  1. My Classroom: Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Cerise

    2017-01-01

    In his first teaching assignment, as a fifth-grade English teacher, Edgar Manaran had only 20 desks for 48 students. Yet he was able to apply productive classroom strategies throughout his 25-hour teaching week. Some of his students sat on plastic chairs due to the shortage of desks, but that did not change the dynamic of Mr. Manaran's classes. He…

  2. Effective Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansor, Azlin Norhaini; Eng, Wong Kim; Rasul, Mohamad Sattar; Hamzah, Mohd Izham Mohd; Hamid, Aida Hanim A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper attempts to explore and identify the characteristics of an effective teacher who teaches English as a second language to 10 year old students from different ethnics, various social economic background and multi-level language ability, at a private primary school in Malaysia. The study focused on classroom management using a case study…

  3. Classroom Social Signal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raca, Mirko; Dillenbourg, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    We present our efforts towards building an observational system for measuring classroom activity. The goal is to explore visual cues which can be acquired with a system of video cameras and automatically processed to enrich the teacher's perception of the audience. The paper will give a brief overview of our methodology, explored features, and…

  4. A Monopoly Classroom Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxoby, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    Uses a simple classroom experiment to develop the economic model of monopoly. Introduces students to the nature of the monopoly problem and motivates them to think of the associated effects. Highlights the role of information and fairness ideals in determining economic outcomes. (RLH)

  5. Bibliotherapy for Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsenman, Gordon; Harper, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    The focus and goal of classroom management should be first and foremost learning. When trying to prevent interruptions to learning, or dealing with interruptions to learning when they occur, teachers need to move beyond simply imposing a consequence and assuming students have learned from the interaction. Students need to be taught the skills and…

  6. CONSERVATION AND THE CLASSROOM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    field work but who don't attempt it. I can also understand ... Neglected Outdoor Classroom' by Frank Opie in the. May 1986 issue of this ... Group A consited of Biology teachers who went with Mr. A. Gubb, an ecological botanist on the museum staff. Worksheets had been carefully prepared by Miss. Tietz and Mrs. Lloyd to ...

  7. The Flipped Classroom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bill Tucker

    2012-01-01

    ... class time. It's called "the flipped classroom." While there is no one model, the core idea is to flip the common instructional approach: With teacher-created videos and interactive lessons, instruction that used to occur in class is now accessed at home, in advance of class. Class becomes the place to work through problems, advance co...

  8. Assessing Classroom Assessment Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson-Beck, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Classroom assessment techniques (CATs) are teaching strategies that provide formative assessments of student learning. It has been argued that the use of CATs enhances and improves student learning. Although the various types of CATs have been extensively documented and qualitatively studied, there appears to be little quantitative research…

  9. Teachers' Classroom Assessment Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Bruce B.; Schmitt, Vicki L.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined classroom assessment practices of 3rd- through 12th-grade teachers in a Midwestern state. In addition to determining the frequency with which specific assessment item formats were utilized, the level of use of selected "best practice" approaches to assessment was considered ("performance-based assessment,…

  10. Exploration of multidimensional interactive classroom teaching for CCD principle and application course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xinghu; Tan, Ailing; Zhang, Baojun; Fu, Guangwei; Bi, Weihong

    2017-08-01

    The CCD principle and application course is professional and comprehensive. It involves many subject contents. The course content includes eight aspects. In order to complete the teaching tasks within a limited time, improve the classroom teaching quality and prompt students master the course content faster and better, so the multidimensional interactive classroom teaching is proposed. In the teaching practice, the interactive relationship between the frontier science, scientific research project, living example and classroom content is researched detailedly. Finally, it has been proved practically that the proposed multidimensional interactive classroom teaching can achieved good teaching effect.

  11. The Dynamics of Blog Peer Feedback in ESL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedera, Dilani S. P.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade aspects pertinent to the area of feedback have been extensively explored by researchers. While some of the studies show positive effects of peer review, others discuss its problematic areas. In spite of the controversies the new ways of integrating peer feedback in ESL classrooms are being explored. Researchers show an…

  12. Empowering Students in the Process of Social Inquiry Learning through Flipping the Classroom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morris Siu-Yung Jong

    2017-01-01

    ...” core senior secondary subject of social and humanities education in Hong Kong). In this research, we aimed to integrate the idea of the flipped classroom into the process of GSIL for promoting students...

  13. Circular seating arrangements: Approaching the social crux in language classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Falout

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Circular seating arrangements can help instill a sense of belonging within classroom communities with overall positive effects on learning, emotions, and wellbeing. Yet students and their teachers within certain language classroom contexts, due to sociocultural limitations, may be relegated to learning in antisocial environments instilled partly by rank-and-file seating. Attributions for teacher demotivation can often lie in student misbehaviors, while student demotivation, silence, and resistance relate strongly to lack of bodily displays and physical affordances of interpersonal care, understanding, and trust that, if present, would contribute positively to many social aspects of their learning and identity formation. Specifically, rank-and-file seating constricts the area in the classroom most likely to dispose attention and interest to the learning and to others, whereas circular seating potentially expands this area, known as the action zone, to the whole classroom. Seating arrangements therefore can play an important role in the formation of interpersonal dynamics and identity formation among students and their teachers. In this paper, the purposes and ways of using circular seating in language classrooms will be explored from a social psychological perspective. Language teachers are invited to imagine and experiment with possibilities for uses of different seating arrangements in their own classrooms.

  14. Psychological Problems and Challenge In EFL Speaking Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Win Listyaningrum Arifin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Psychological aspect regarding to learning attitudes plays in determining learning achievement. Psychological problems also involve not only to the students but also teacher. Less-confidence, speech anxiety, and low self-esteem are almost common problem in classroom, and occur on both teachers and students. Students who have low of self-confidence are often hardly able to control themselves for public speaking in the classroom, like, Governing his/ her behavior on that his/her peers think, lose belief on self, thinking that his/her friends dis-appraising, afraid of getting mistakes, etc. However, teachers which are low self-esteem and confidence also lose their performance and ability to manage their classroom optimally. Low self-esteem may caused by teacher’s poor understanding on subject matter. Both of psychological problems impact on dis-effectiveness of classroom activities. This paper takes accounts of some psychological problems of students and teachers in English speaking classroom, and some guidelines to overcome. At the last discus, this paper also provides some keys of how to make good classroom atmosphere.

  15. Virtual classroom design for Blended Learning: Human Development and Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Morales Intriago

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The explosive development in all areas of knowledge has evolved the scenarios of generation and transfer of knowledge, in terms of media, channels and supports, parallel to this appear new resources that optimize the processes of vocational training, whether formal, non-formal and informal. The EVA or Virtual Learning Environments evolve the traditional way of teaching a Blended environment, which is, combining classroom education with online training processes. The present work designs a training process set in Blended Learning for the subject Human Development and Quality of Life, summarizing in 8 steps the construction of the virtual and face-to-face environment, where starting from the common to the specific, the system is described systemically. The methodology applied in the present work was of Bibliographic and documentary type. To achieve the proposed objective, a systemic design was designed that divided the research into two stages: the exploration stage and the design stage. In the exploration stage, a large bibliographical collection was revised and in the design stage the virtual classroom model of the subject was constructed. Product of the investigation is a guide that guides step by step in the construction of virtual environments set in the Blended Learning.

  16. CLASSROOM CULTURE OF PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia FĂT

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results obtained during an enquiry based on a questionnaire about the classroom culture. This concept it is understood as a micro-society with its own characteristics derived from the dynamic of socialization and training process. This research aims to investigate certain specific aspects of micro-sociology and emphasis on classroom culture. A relatively new concept is reflected by the normative consensus or the integrated system of values that belongs to the teachers, pupils and school, as a social entity. The integrative ensemble of values, class cohesion degree and training strategies are only a few of the aspects described by 62 pupils aged 17-18 years old, from a very prestigious school in Bucharest. The perception of pupils regarding our concept is the effect of the relational practices and training used constantly by the teachers. Those practices reflect the school’s focus mostly on cognitive performance.

  17. Synchronous distance interactive classroom conferencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz, Halit Hami

    2005-01-01

    New medical schools have been opened in the eastern and southeastern regions of the country. They are also in great need of basic medical science teachers. However, due to security reasons over the past two decades, teachers from the established universities do not desire to travel to these medical schools for lectures. The objective of this study was to develop a synchronous classroom conferencing system to teach basic science courses between two general purpose technology enhanced classrooms of two different universities--Istanbul University (IU) and Istanbul and Harran University (HU), Urfa--located 1,500 miles apart in Turkey. I videostreamed the instructor, content from document camera, Power Point presentations at IU, and the students at both places, IU and HU. In addition, I synchronously broadcast two whiteboards by attaching two mimio devices to the two blackboards in the IU classroom to capture and convert everything written or drawn on them into broadcasting over the intranet. This technique is called "boardcasting," which allows users to stream ink and audio together over the Internet or intranet live. A total of 260 students at IU and 150 students at HU were involved. Off-campus HU students also have asynchronous access to the stored lecture video materials at any time. Midterm and final examinations were administered simultaneously using the same questions at both sites in two universities under the observation of the teaching faculty using the very same system. This system permitted interaction between the students in the class at IU and remote-campus students at HU and the instructor in real time. The instructors at IU were able to maintain a significant level of spontaneity in using their multimedia materials and electronic whiteboards. The mean midterm and final exam scores of students at both universities were similar. The system developed in this study can be used by the medical faculty at the main teaching hospitals to deliver their lectures in

  18. Optimizing Classroom Instruction through Self-Paced Learning Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Romiro G.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the learning impact of self-paced learning prototype in optimizing classroom instruction towards students' learning in Chemistry. Two sections of 64 Laboratory High School students in Chemistry were used as subjects of the study. The Quasi-Experimental and Correlation Research Design was used in the study: a pre-test was…

  19. Energy Geographies: Thinking Critically about Energy Issues in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Elvin

    2016-01-01

    Energy issues are becoming increasingly common subjects of instruction in undergraduate- and graduate-level classrooms across a variety of disciplines. The interdisciplinary character of energy studies provides geographers with a great opportunity to present different applied and theoretical approaches to help students conceptualize energy issues…

  20. Flipped Classroom Learning Model and Its Availability in Turkish Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Erhan

    2016-01-01

    Technological developments, which entered into educational environment, led up new developments on behalf of rescuing education from locking in certain environments by expanding its domain. One of these developments, subject of our study, is the learning model called Flipped Classroom. In this model, students are able to continue their education…

  1. Simultaneous communication and cochlear implants in the classroom?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, H.C.; Marschark, M.

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the potential of simultaneous communication (sign and speech together) to support classroom learning by college students who use cochlear implants (CIs). Metacognitive awareness of learning also was evaluated. A within-subjects design involving 40 implant users

  2. Simultaneous Communication and Cochlear Implants in the Classroom?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, H.C.; Marschark, M.

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the potential of simultaneous communication (sign and speech together) to support classroom learning by college students who use cochlear implants (CIs). Metacognitive awareness of learning also was evaluated. A within-subjects design involving 40 implant users

  3. The Effectiveness of Differentiated Instruction in the Elementary Mathematics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Brian

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine if differentiated instruction improved student growth. The overall effectiveness was studied as well as that of gender and the aptitude of average and above average students. The study was that of a quasi-experimental design using student subjects in the classrooms of three second-grade teachers. The school in…

  4. Who Would Survive the 'Titanic' Today? A Classroom Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riniolo, Todd C.; Torrez, Lorenzo I.; Schmidt, Louis A.

    2001-01-01

    Describes a classroom exercise, based on the "Titanic" sinking, from an undergraduate experimental psychology course. The exercise demonstrates the subjectivity and complexity that accompanies generalizing psychological knowledge to different historical eras. Includes instructions for using the exercise and the results from a student…

  5. Simulating Variation in Order to Learn Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragnemalm, Eva L.; Samuelsson, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Classroom management is an important part of learning to be a teacher. The variation theory of learning provides the insight that it is important to vary the critical aspects of any task or subject that is to be learned. Simulation technology is useful in order to provide a controlled environment for that variation, and text as a medium gives the…

  6. 413 Classroom Climate and Students' Academic Achievement in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Essien, Essien E. - Department of Social Studies, Akwa Ibom State College ... students. The concept of climate as it applies to school (classroom) has been viewed from many perspectives, and defined in a number of ways by different writers. ... Stringer (1968:5) defiend climate “as the perceived subjective effects of a.

  7. Interchangeable Positions in Interaction Sequences in Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Carol; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2017-01-01

    Triadic dialogue, the Initiation, Response, Evaluation sequence typical of teacher /student interactions in classrooms, has long been identified as a barrier to students' access to learning, including science learning. A large body of research on the subject has over the years led to projects and policies aimed at increasing opportunities for…

  8. DISCIPLINE OR CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Bulent Tarman

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this literature review are twofold. Firstly, it explains discipline and causes of students’ misbehavior and classroom management. In this sense, this review focuses on discipline in the conflict of the educational platform elements; and related the philosophic literature. Secondly, this review draws a conclusion by summarizing the opinions and influencing of discipline upon school environment and students’ learning. In this regard, this study discusses two models for dealing w...

  9. Emotions and classroom management

    OpenAIRE

    Santamaría García, M. Carmen

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the emotional consequences of (im)politeness and evaluative language in teacher-student interaction at higher education level together with their influence in learning. In recent years, we have been experiencing an increase in students' challenging attitudes. There seems to be a direct relationship between a good atmosphere in the classroom and an increase in students' and teacher' performances. Therefore, it will be in teachers and students" interest to foster a positiv...

  10. Classroom social climate

    OpenAIRE

    Sivevska, Despina

    2015-01-01

    One of the important factors which effects the educational process is the climate that reigns in the school. School climate is defined as the sum of all the circumstances in which the educational process is realized, as a network of relationships which exist between participants in the educational process. Social climate is part of school climate created in the classroom through general atmosphere in school, in the manner that overall work organization in a school functions and the way tea...

  11. Folklore in the Classroom. Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Barbara; And Others

    Written by experts in the field of folklore for laymen, this three-part volume is intended to help teachers of English, social studies, mathematics and science, home economics, the arts, and other subject areas to become more knowledgeable about folklore and to inject this knowledge into their existing curricula. The first part, on introducing…

  12. The effects of acoustical refurbishment of classrooms on teachers’ perceived noise exposure and noise-related health symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Jesper; Lund, Søren Peter; Persson, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate whether acoustical refurbishment of classrooms for elementary and lower secondary grade pupils affected teachers’ perceived noise exposure during teaching and noise-related health symptoms. Methods: Two schools (A and B) with a total of 102 teachers were subjected...... to an acoustical intervention. Accordingly, 36 classrooms (20 and 16 in school A and school B, respectively) were acoustically refurbished and 31 classrooms (16 and 15 in school A and school B, respectively) were not changed. Thirteen classrooms in school A were interim “sham” refurbished. Control measurements...... classrooms were associated with lower perceived noise exposure and lower ratings of disturbance attributed to noise from equipment in the class compared with unrefurbished classrooms. No associations between the classroom refurbishment and health symptoms were observed. Before acoustical refurbishment...

  13. Rethinking monolingual instructional strategies in multilingual classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Cummins

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Three inter-related assumptions regarding best practice in second/foreign language teaching and bilingual/immersion education continue to dominate classroom instruction. These assumptions are that: (a the target language (TL should be used exclusively for instructional purposes without recourse to students’ first language (L1; (b translation between L1 and TL has no place in the language classroom; and (c within immersion and bilingual programs, the two languages should be kept rigidly separate. Research evidence provides minimal support for these assumptions and they are also inconsistent with the instructional implications of current theory in the areas of cognitive psychology and applied linguistics. Based on current research and theory, a set of bilingual instructional strategies are proposed and concrete examples are provided to illustrate how these strategies can be used together with monolingual strategies in a balanced and complementary way.

  14. Classroom Texting in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettijohn, Terry F.; Frazier, Erik; Rieser, Elizabeth; Vaughn, Nicholas; Hupp-Wilds, Bobbi

    2015-01-01

    A 21-item survey on texting in the classroom was given to 235 college students. Overall, 99.6% of students owned a cellphone and 98% texted daily. Of the 138 students who texted in the classroom, most texted friends or significant others, and indicate the reason for classroom texting is boredom or work. Students who texted sent a mean of 12.21…

  15. Classroom management in physical education

    OpenAIRE

    Hüseyin Ünlü

    2008-01-01

    In schools, classrooms are the first and the most important places in where the interaction of student-teacher is experienced intensively and education-teaching activities are carried out. Classroom is also considered as places where the physical education lessons are taught. In physical education lessons, it is possible to have success in teaching activities and demanded behavior changes with the classrooms where the students can feel themselves comfort and untroubled, meet their needs easil...

  16. Setting a new syllabus: environmental health science in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Valerie J

    2004-10-01

    Environmental health is a subject that has only relatively recently become prominent in the social consciousness. Even as its significance becomes known, finding ways to integrate the subject into education for primary and secondary students is difficult because of federal testing requirements under the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and other demands placed on teachers. A number of efforts are under way, however, to provide teachers with resources to help them bring environment health into their classrooms.

  17. How Students Learn: Mathematics in the Classroom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Donovan, Suzanne; Bransford, John

    .... Each volume begins with the Introductory Chapter from the main text, then focuses on either the "History in the Classroom, Math in the Classroom, or Science in the Classroom segments of the book...

  18. The Emergence of Student Creativity in Classroom Settings: A Case Study of Elementary Schools in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Younsoon; Chung, Hye Young; Choi, Kyoulee; Seo, Choyoung; Baek, Eunjoo

    2013-01-01

    This research explores the emergence of student creativity in classroom settings, specifically within two content areas: science and social studies. Fourteen classrooms in three elementary schools in Korea were observed, and the teachers and students were interviewed. The three types of student creativity emerging in the teaching and learning…

  19. Action Research: A Tool for Improving Teacher Quality and Classroom Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Katherine A.; Greene, H. Carol; Anderson, Patricia J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Action research is a meaningful form of research because it is conducted by the teacher in his or her own classroom. Action research requires a teacher to design a study in an area of interest and conduct it in their own classroom. Action research is a requirement for some masters of education programs in the United States. Purpose: To…

  20. Social Skills Deficits in Autism: A Study among Students with Austim Spectrum Disorder in Inclusive Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Kee Jiar; Teng, Kie Yin

    2015-01-01

    Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) who lack of social skills have been hindered from being included in IE classrooms. The purpose of this study was to identify the most frequently occurring social skills deficits area among students with ASD in IE classrooms so that the mainstream teachers will be ready and well prepared to cater to…

  1. Group Work in the EFL Classroom in China: A Closer Look

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Runyi; Hird, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    Small group work in EFL classrooms has been largely accepted as an effective strategy in the development of students' communicative proficiency in English. This acceptance has occurred despite a lack of research in key areas about what actually happens when students work in groups in real classrooms. This study examines both quantitative and…

  2. Length of Time in Student Teaching: Effects on Classroom Control Orientation and Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Sharon M.; Hardy, James C.

    2005-01-01

    This study used the classroom management framework conceptualized by Wolfgang and Glickman (1980, 1986) to explain the various dimensions of classroom management. This framework defines three broad areas, instructional management, people management, and behavior management. It appears that the lengthened student teaching experience does not impact…

  3. The Effects of Classroom Interventions on Off-Task and Disruptive Classroom Behavior in Children with Symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Meta-Analytic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldina F Gaastra

    Full Text Available Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD often exhibit problem behavior in class, which teachers often struggle to manage due to a lack of knowledge and skills to use classroom management strategies. The aim of this meta-analytic review was to determine the effectiveness of several types of classroom interventions (antecedent-based, consequence-based, self-regulation, combined that can be applied by teachers in order to decrease off-task and disruptive classroom behavior in children with symptoms of ADHD. A second aim was to identify potential moderators (classroom setting, type of measure, students' age, gender, intelligence, and medication use. Finally, it was qualitatively explored whether the identified classroom interventions also directly or indirectly affected behavioral and academic outcomes of classmates. Separate meta-analyses were performed on standardized mean differences (SMDs for 24 within-subjects design (WSD and 76 single-subject design (SSD studies. Results showed that classroom interventions reduce off-task and disruptive classroom behavior in children with symptoms of ADHD (WSDs: MSMD = 0.92; SSDs: MSMD = 3.08, with largest effects for consequence-based (WSDs: MSMD = 1.82 and self-regulation interventions (SSDs: MSMD = 3.61. Larger effects were obtained in general education classrooms than in other classroom settings. No reliable conclusions could be formulated about moderating effects of type of measure and students' age, gender, intelligence, and medication use, mainly because of power problems. Finally, classroom interventions appeared to also benefit classmates' behavioral and academic outcomes.

  4. Documenting changes in a middle school science classroom: An action research case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffy, Herbert Lloyd

    This action research case study of an 8th grade science classroom describes the classroom changes that resulted from the teacher's growing understanding of science reform issues and the teacher's desire to incorporate computer technology directly into a core academic subject classroom. The curriculum that was developed for 8th grade science students at a central Florida middle school was named the Science and Technology Applied Realistically to Society (STARS) Project. This study describes the creation of the STARS project and then documents the collection and analysis of student responses to the project. The study concludes that changes in the classroom can happen; changes in the classroom can be informed by student perceptions to assist the reform process; changes in the classroom can effectively incorporate computer technology into a core academic subject classroom; changes in the classroom can make the learning process enjoyable for students. While the findings of this study cannot be generalized, numerous ideas are presented that have the potential for benefiting increasing numbers of science students as professional educators incorporate these ideas into their own local instructional settings.

  5. Investigation and analysis of human body thermal comfort in classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xue

    2017-05-01

    In this survey, we selected the 11th building of North China Electric Power University as the research object. Data were measured and distributed on each floor. We record the temperature of the classroom, humidity, wind speed, average radiation temperature and other environmental parameters. And we used spare time to create a questionnaire survey of the subjective feeling of the survey, to get everyone in the classroom TSV (hot feeling vote value) and TCV (thermal comfort vote). We analyzed the test data and survey data. What's more we discuss and reflect on the thermal comfort of the human body in different indoor temperature atmospheres.

  6. HTML5 digital classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Osborn, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    This training package - complete with full-color book and instructional video - is the easiest way to learn HTML5!HTML5 boasts extensive new features that allow you to create dynamic web pages and present users with amazing multimedia experiences, and this one-of-a-kind training package is your guide to creating websites that wow! HTML5 Digital Classroom provides step-by-step instruction to help you gain the essential HTML5 knowledge you need to master the latest HTML5 specifications. This book-and-video package will have you creating web pages and web applications using HTML5, styling using

  7. Muuntojoustava opetustila - Flipped Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Ruohonen, Maiju

    2016-01-01

    Tämän opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena oli dokumentoida ja suunnitella muuntojoustava luokkatila, joka tukee Flipped Classroom opetustapaa. Opinnäytetyö on tehty yhteistyössä Itä-Suomen Yliopiston Soveltavan fysiikan laitoksen kanssa Kuopiossa. Suunnitteluprosessiin osallistui suunnittelijan lisäksi monialainen ryhmä, joka koostui muun muassa tilankäyttäjistä. Tilan ensisijaisia käyttökohteita olivat lähiopetus 20 henkilölle ja luennot 30 henkilölle. Näiden lisäksi tilaan haluttiin sijoittaa n...

  8. Mendel in the Modern Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mike U.; Gericke, Niklas M.

    2015-01-01

    Mendel is an icon in the history of genetics and part of our common culture and modern biology instruction. The aim of this paper is to summarize the place of Mendel in the modern biology classroom. In the present article we will identify key issues that make Mendel relevant in the classroom today. First, we recount some of the historical…

  9. Nurturing Creativity in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghetto, Ronald A., Ed.; Kaufman, James C., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Nurturing Creativity in the Classroom" is a groundbreaking collection of essays by leading scholars, who examine and respond to the tension that many educators face in valuing student creativity but believing that they cannot support it given the curricular constraints of the classroom. Is it possible for teachers to nurture creative…

  10. Classroom -70-------------------------------~-----------RESONANCEISep-te ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, or both. "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. Soubhik Chakraborty. Lecturer,. Department of Statistics.

  11. Inverting an Introductory Statistics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraut, Gertrud L.

    2015-01-01

    The inverted classroom allows more in-class time for inquiry-based learning and for working through more advanced problem-solving activities than does the traditional lecture class. The skills acquired in this learning environment offer benefits far beyond the statistics classroom. This paper discusses four ways that can make the inverted…

  12. Reinvention of Classroom Practice Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansom, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Experienced teachers are introduced to classroom practice innovations during in-service education and training (INSET) programmes. Teachers return to particular teaching contexts in schools and other institutions after INSET and it is here teachers implement innovations and change classroom practice. However, this implementation is not certain;…

  13. Classroom Furniture: The Mod Squad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raths, David

    2012-01-01

    This is the first article in a six-part series on the elements of a collaborative classroom: furniture, social media, video/web conferencing tools, collaborative software, interactive devices, and mobile devices. With most universities facing tight budgets, convincing administrators to invest in expensive new classrooms is a challenge. Many higher…

  14. Sharing Power in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard-Amato, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that be sharing power in the classroom teachers allow the development of participatory classrooms in which all students can thrive. Examines participatory teaching and critical pedagogy, components of the participatory learning experience, manifestations of participatory teaching, an application of the language experience approach,…

  15. Trends in Classroom Observation Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casabianca, Jodi M.; Lockwood, J. R.; McCaffrey, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Observations and ratings of classroom teaching and interactions collected over time are susceptible to trends in both the quality of instruction and rater behavior. These trends have potential implications for inferences about teaching and for study design. We use scores on the Classroom Assessment Scoring System-Secondary (CLASS-S) protocol from…

  16. Encouraging Friendships in Preschool Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasnak, Robert; Perez, Karla; Romero, Sandy

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the findings from our research in Head Start classrooms and their potential theoretical importance. Practical suggestions are offered to administrators and teachers as to ways to promote friendships in classroom settings. Some approaches are likely to work better for boys and others for girls. Understanding how children select…

  17. Fight Obesity in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratsis, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    U.S. health experts declared obesity an epidemic over a decade ago. Schools have tried to implement prevention programs for students, but as budgets shrink, educating students about obesity is increasingly falling to classroom instructors, including science teachers. The good news is that obesity-related classroom activities can be engaging, and…

  18. Teaching diagnostic reasoning: using a classroom-as-clinic methodology with videotapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neistadt, M E; Smith, R E

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a "classroom-as-clinic" format, using videotaped occupational therapy evaluations, on students' diagnostic reasoning skills. In the classroom-as-clinic format, students write a problem list on the basis of preliminary client information before viewing the videotape. A post-hoc experimental design was used to compare the accuracy of treatment plan problem lists for two groups of senior occupational therapy students--one group viewed two videotapes of client-therapist interactions without a classroom-as-clinic format (n = 82), and one group viewed the same videotapes within the context of a classroom-as-clinic format (n = 45). Both groups viewed the same two videotapes. Videotape 1 was of a client with a brain stem infarct, and Videotape 2 was of a client with traumatic brain injury. Subjects experiencing a classroom-as-clinic format identified significantly more occupational therapy problems for Videotape 1 than those who did not have preevaluation information. There was no significant difference between the two subject groups in the accuracy of their problem lists for Videotape 2. Only subjects in the non-classroom-as-clinic group showed a significant improvement from Videotape 1 to Videotape 2 in occupational therapy problem identification. This study suggests that to be truly effective when used videotapes, the classroom-as-clinic methodology needs to be combined with explicit coaching in problem sensing and problem definition.

  19. Information and communication technologies in tomorrow's digital classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoeva, Asya

    2014-05-01

    Education has to respond to the new challenges and opportunities offered by the 21-th Century as well as to the main trend in the world community development related to a creation of Knowledge Society. Implementation of ICT at school is a priority of the Global education and helps to develop the four pillars of learning - learning to know, learning to do, learning to be and learning to live together. Digital competence of the students is also a part of the European Union key competences. The essential elements in geographical study are: spatial analysis, with an emphasis on location; ecological analysis, with an emphasis on people-environment relationships; and regional analysis, with an emphasis on areal differentiation. Modern geography is best characterized as the study of distributions and relationships among different natural and social patterns of distributions. Viewing the world from a spatial perspective and employing a holistic approach are important characteristics of contemporary and future Geography learning. Using innovative methods for presenting the global aspects of distribution patterns and their changes is a priority of teaching geosciences at our school. The use of geo-media in classroom helps learners develop their ICT competences. Geolocalised information is used everywhere in society and it is therefore essential for students to learn how to use different forms of geographic media Geo-media is now being used in scientific researches and reasoning. One of the geo-media tools that I use in my classes is Google Earth for presenting different geographic processes and phenomena like visualization of current global weather conditions, global warming, deforestation areas, earthquake areas, etc. Using Geographic Information systems for presenting and studying geographical processes is also one way to identify, analyze, and understand the locations. Our school is a part of digital-earth.eu network which is under development now. The European Centers of

  20. The flipped classroom for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Helen; McLean, Karen; Chapman, Chris; Fitzgerald, James; Yousuf, Aisha; Hammoud, Maya

    2015-06-01

    The objectives of this curricular innovation project were to implement a flipped classroom curriculum for the gynaecologic oncology topics of the obstetrics and gynaecology medical student clerkship, and to evaluate student satisfaction with the change. Four short online videos on the topics of endometrial hyperplasia, cervical dysplasia, evaluation of an adnexal mass, and ovarian cancer were created, and students were instructed to view them prior to a class-time active learning session. The Learning Activity Management System (lams) open-source online platform was used to create an active learning class-time activity that consisted of a coached discussion of cases. Student satisfaction with the two aspects of the flipped curriculum was obtained. In addition, lecture assessment for the gynaecologic oncology topics and aggregate student performance on the gynaecological oncology questions of the US National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Subject Examination were compared before and after implementation of the curriculum. Eighty-nine students rotated on the clerkship during the pilot period of analysis. Seventy-one students (80%) viewed the videos prior to the class session, and 84 (94%) attended the session. Student satisfaction was very high for both parts of the curriculum. There was no significant difference in aggregate student performance on the gynaecological oncology questions of the NBME Subject Examination. The flipped classroom curriculum demonstrates a promising platform for using technology to make better use of students' time Our implementation of the flipped classroom curriculum for the gynaecologic oncology topics successfully demonstrates a promising platform for using technology to make better use of our students' time, and for increasing their satisfaction with the necessary didactic learning of the clerkship. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Integrated Curriculum and Subject-based Curriculum: Achievement and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casady, Victoria

    The research conducted for this mixed-method study, qualitative and quantitative, analyzed the results of an academic year-long study to determine whether the use of an integrated fourth grade curriculum would benefit student achievement in the areas of English language arts, social studies, and science more than a subject-based traditional curriculum. The research was conducted based on the international, national, and state test scores, which show a slowing or lack of growth. Through pre- and post-assessments, student questionnaires, and administrative interviews, the researcher analyzed the phenomenological experiences of the students to determine if the integrated curriculum was a beneficial restructuring of the curriculum. The research questions for this study focused on the achievement and attitudes of the students in the study and whether the curriculum they were taught impacted their achievement and attitudes over the course of one school year. The curricula for the study were organized to cover the current standards, where the integrated curriculum focused on connections between subject areas to help students make connections to what they are learning and the world beyond the classroom. The findings of this study indicated that utilizing the integrated curriculum could increase achievement as well as students' attitudes toward specific content areas. The ANOVA analysis for English language arts was not determined to be significant; although, greater growth in the students from the integrated curriculum setting was recorded. The ANOVA for social studies (0.05) and the paired t-tests (0.001) for science both determined significant positive differences. The qualitative analysis led to the discovery that the experiences of the students from the integrated curriculum setting were more positive. The evaluation of the data from this study led the researcher to determine that the integrated curriculum was a worthwhile endeavor to increase achievement and attitudes

  2. Young Scientist in Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Rosa

    very powerful tool that allows educators to address a diversity of topics ranging from ICT tools to the Exploration of our Universe. Instead of using traditional methods to teach about certain subjects for instance: stellar spectra, extra-solar planets or the classification of galaxies, they can use these powerful tools. Among other advantages a clear benefit of such tool is that teachers can use telescopes during regular classroom hours, provided they choose one located in the opposite part of the planet, where it is night time. Participants will also have the opportunity to use one of the radio antennas devoted for education from the EUHOU Consortium (European Hands-on Universe). A map of the arms of our galaxy will be built during the training session. Image Processing - After acquiring the images participants will be introduced to Salsa J, an image processing software that allows educators to explore the potential of astronomical images. The first example will be a simple measurement task: measuring craters on the Moon. Further exploration will guide them from luminosity studies to the construction of colour images, from making movies exhibiting the circular motion of the Sun to Jupiter Moons dance around the planet. e-learning repositories - In the ICT age it is very important that educators have support and know where to find meaningful and curriculum adapted resources for the construction of modern lessons. Some repositories will be presented in this session. Examples of such repositories are: Discover the Cosmos and EUHOU or a congregator of such repositories with quite advanced possibilities to support the work of teachers, the Open Discovery Space portal. This type of sessions are being successfully implemented by the Galileo Teacher Training Program team in Portugal under the scope of the EC funded GO-LAB project. This is a project devoted to demonstrate innovative ways to involve teachers and students in e-Science through the use of virtual labs, that

  3. I See What You Are Doing: Student Views on Lecturer Use of Tablet PCs in the Engineering Mathematics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclaren, Peter; Wilson, David; Klymchuk, Sergiy

    2017-01-01

    Mathematically intensive engineering subjects at a tertiary level have traditionally been taught in classroom environments using whiteboards or blackboards. This paper reports on student views of the effectiveness of board and alternative technologies used within existing classroom contexts. Students in this study revealed a strong preference for…

  4. PROFICIENT CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT THROUGH FOCUSED MATHEMATIC TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Samuelsson

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A not entirely unusual position among teachers is that they believe that they must first establish a peaceful classroom before they can begin to teach the subject. This research, shows how a proficient mathematics teacher teaches his subject and thereby creates a quiet and focused classroom and exerts effective leadership, just by teaching mathematics. The researchers observed a male mathematics teacher for almost half a year, i.e. one semester. The results of research present several patterns that the researchers saw during the observations of his teaching. The teacher showed an interest in each student’s mathematical thinking and expressed explicitly how students were expected to learn mathematics. He also directed students’ attention to mathematics and established a culture where all solutions were important in the teaching process. In the teaching process, he used multiple representations to motivate students and a lot of supportive expressions that made them feel that they were able to learn mathematics. He worked patiently to establish structures, and there was almost no disruptive behaviour. Students simply did not have time to interfere because they were so engaged in learning mathematics.

  5. Praxis, subjectivity and sense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Gómez-Muller

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available A primordial aspect of the Sartrian critique of alienation concerns understanding the analytic ideology as the domination of materiality over the symbolic, in other words as the reification of the human, and therefore as anticulture. In the context of contemporary nihilism, the decoding of the mechanisms which consign praxis to the practico-inert requires a critique of the relations between the social sciences and philosophy, which in its turn implies a new theory of the relation between what Sartre calls the "notion" (the area of subjectivity and the "concept" (objectivity, From this perspective, the deconstruction of the established frontiers between the social sciences and philosophy, and between the conceptual and the narrative, is corelative to a redefinition of the relation between theory and practice.

  6. Second Language Classroom Research. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David

    The purpose of second (or foreign) language classroom research is to answer important questions about the learning and teaching of foreign languages. This kind of research collects data from genuine language classrooms or from experimental settings sometimes established to replicate what takes place in the classroom. Classroom research can focus…

  7. Guidance for Technology Decisions from Classroom Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielefeldt, Talbot

    2012-01-01

    Correlational analysis of two years of classroom observation indicates relationships between technology use and various classroom characteristics, including teacher roles and instructional strategies. Three observers used the ISTE Classroom Observation Tool (ICOT) to record 144 observations of classrooms participating in a variety of educational…

  8. Examining the Flipped Classroom through Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chung Kwan

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing interest in using a flipped classroom format in day-to-day teaching. Direct computer-based individual instruction outside the classroom and interactive group learning activities inside the classroom are the two essential components of the flipped classroom model. By watching instructional videos, students can work through some…

  9. Barbie Against Superman: Gender Stereotypes and Gender Equity in the Classroom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aksu, Bengü

    2005-01-01

    ... in the classroom.Since education is a significant social area where gender segregation and the reproductionof gender stereotypes are generated, there is, without doubt, much can be done in this areato prevent this phenomenon...

  10. Gender Differences and Equal Opportunities in the ESL Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehadeh, Ali

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how English-as-Second/Foreign-Language teachers, equipped with a good syllabus and methodology, should be able to engineer aspects that create equal opportunities for both males and females in all areas of classroom interaction. Suggests that more research is needed on the origins of gender differences and its effect on second-language…

  11. Discovering Learning Preferences and Learning Differences in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargar, June R.; And Others

    Understanding learning differences and how they function in the classroom is important to both students and teachers. The learning preferences described in this handbook are based on the concepts of psychological type developed by Carl Jung. Jung identified three sets of psychological processes, the areas of attitude (orientation), perception, and…

  12. Discipline-Based Philosophy of Education and Classroom Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    This article concentrates on the necessity for teachers in just one discipline area, namely, science, having philosophical competence and using it to inform their professional life--in their classroom teaching, assessing and institutional engagements--in other words, having a philosophy of science teaching. This group of questions and issues might…

  13. The Significance of Constructivist Classroom Practice in National Curricular Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booyse, Celia; Chetty, Rajendra

    2016-01-01

    Evidence of the value of constructivist theory in the classroom is especially important for educational practice in areas of poverty and social challenge. Research was undertaken in 2010 into the application of constructivist theory on instructional design. The findings of this research are particularly relevant to the current curricular crisis in…

  14. Establishing Mathematics for Teaching within Classroom Interactions in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryve, Andreas; Nilsson, Per; Mason, John

    2012-01-01

    Teacher educators' processes of establishing "mathematics for teaching" in teacher education programs have been recognized as an important area for further research. In this study, we examine how two teacher educators establish and make explicit features of mathematics for teaching within classroom interactions. The study shows how the…

  15. From Classroom to Workplace: Tracking Socio-Pragmatic Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Janet; Riddiford, Nicky

    2011-01-01

    Socio-pragmatic skills have been identified as important components of communicative competence in the workplace, yet relatively few studies have undertaken an evaluation of the effects of classroom-based support in developing both cognitive control and social competence in these areas of language proficiency. This paper reports on a collaborative…

  16. Learning with Interactive Computer Graphics in the Undergraduate Neuroscience Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, John R.; Chariker, Julia H.; Naaz, Farah; Mattingly, William; Roberts, Joshua; Sephton, Sandra E.

    2014-01-01

    Instruction of neuroanatomy depends on graphical representation and extended self-study. As a consequence, computer-based learning environments that incorporate interactive graphics should facilitate instruction in this area. The present study evaluated such a system in the undergraduate neuroscience classroom. The system used the method of…

  17. From Classroom Teaching to Remote Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Ole; Helbo, Jan; Knudsen, Morten

    2000-01-01

    Abundant research has taken place in the area of remote learning. When it comes to remote teaching, it really hurts the developing teacher - who is used to perform classroom teaching - in terms of time consumption and way of thinking. This article describes how courses and project work can be build...... and at the same time easy to learn and use by both developer and students. Two in-house project groups have tested the project work with success after a short learning period. 35 remote students under Open Education in Multimedia Industrial Information Technology (MII) are using the Luvit[1] tool and the methods...

  18. Sensibility and Subjectivity: Levinas’ Traumatic Subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmika Pandya

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The importance of Levinas’ notions of sensibility and subjectivity are evident in the revision of phenomenological method by current phenomenologists such as Jean-Luc Marion and Michel Henry. The criticisms of key tenants of classical phenomenology, intentionality and reduction, are of a particular note. However, there are problems with Levinas’ characterization of subjectivity as essentially sensible. In “Totality and Infinity” and “Otherwise than Being”, Levinas criticizes and recasts a traditional notion of subjectivity, particularly the notion of the subject as the first and foremost rational subject. The subject in Levinas’ works is characterized more by its sensibility and affectedness than by its capacity to reason or affect its world. Levinas ties rationality to economy and suggests an alternative notion of reason that leads to his analysis of the ethical relation as the face-to-face encounter. The ‘origin’ of the social relation is located not in our capacity to know but rather in a sensibility that is diametrically opposed to the reason understood as economy. I argue that the opposition in Levinas’ thought between reason and sensibility is problematic and essentially leads to a self-conflicted subject. In fact, it would seem that violence characterizes the subject’s self-relation and, thus, is also inscribed at the base of the social relation. Rather than overcoming a problematic tendency to dualistic thought in philosophy Levinas merely reverses traditional hierarchies of reason/emotion, subject/object and self/other. 

  19. Fuel cell technology for classroom instruction. Basic principles, experiments, work sheets. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voigt, Cornelia; Hoeller, Stefan; Kueter, Uwe

    2009-07-01

    This book provides a clear introduction and overview to fuel cell technology and its associated subject areas. Examples of experiments using solar cells, electrolysis and fuel cells convey the knowledge for forthcoming tests in an understandable manner. The preparation of classroom experiments is made considerably easier for the teacher thanks to the experiment work sheets. These contain the necessary information concerning the material, set-up and execution of the experiment, and questions for evaluation purposes. Online-Shop The training documents and student work sheets combine the basic knowledge, questions and answers, and are ideal for copying. A comprehensive glossary at the end of the book explains all the important technical terms. (orig.)

  20. Trout in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Trout in the Classroom (TIC) is a conservation-oriented environmental education program for elementary, middle, and high school students. During the year each teacher tailors the program to fit his or her curricular needs. Therefore, each TIC program is unique. TIC has interdisciplinary applications in science, social studies, mathematics, language arts, fine arts, and physical education. In the program, students and teachers raise trout from fertilized eggs supplied by Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VGIF) hatcheries, in aquariums equipped with special chillers designed to keep the water near 50 degrees F. The students make daily temperature measurements, and monitor pH, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, and ammonia levels. They record their data, plot trends, and make sure that the water quality is sufficient to support trout development. The fingerlings, which hatch in late October, are almost an inch and a half long by mid-January. And towards the end of the school year, students will release the fry into VGIF approved watersheds. TIC programs have been in place all across the country for more than 20 years, and are the result of numerous collaborations between teachers, volunteers, government agencies, and local organizations like Trout Unlimited. The programs were designed specifically for teachers who wanted to incorporate more environmental education into their curriculum. While the immediate goal of Trout in the Classroom is to increase student knowledge of water quality and cold water conservation, its long-term goal is to reconnect an increasingly urbanized population of youth to the system of streams, rivers, and watersheds that sustain them. Successful programs have helped: connect students to their local environments and their local watersheds; teach about watershed health and water quality, and; get students to care about fish and the environment. In Virginia, the TIC program is now in its 8th year. Over the past year, the program

  1. The Societal Nature of Subjectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Henning Salling

    2013-01-01

    The HSR Focus presents a psycho-societal approach to qualitative empirical research in several areas of everyday social life. It is an approach which integrates a theory of subjectivity and an interpretation methodology which integrates hermeneutic experiences from text analysis and psychoanalysis...

  2. Randomized Controlled Study of a Remote Flipped Classroom Neuro-otology Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrick, Frederick Robert; Abdulrahman, Mahera; Hankir, Ahmed; Zayaruzny, Maksim; Najem, Kinda; Lungchukiet, Palita; Edwards, Roger A

    2017-01-01

    Medical Education can be delivered in the traditional classroom or via novel technology including an online classroom. To test the hypothesis that learning in an online classroom would result in similar outcomes as learning in the traditional classroom when using a flipped classroom pedagogy. Randomized controlled trial. A total of 274 subjects enrolled in a Neuro-otology training program for non-Neuro-otologists of 25 h held over a 3-day period. Subjects were randomized into a "control" group attending a traditional classroom and a "trial" group of equal numbers participating in an online synchronous Internet streaming classroom using the Adobe Connect e-learning platform. Subjects were randomized into a "control" group attending a traditional classroom and a "treatment" group of equal numbers participating in an online synchronous Internet streaming classroom. Pre- and post-multiple choice examinations of VOR, Movement, Head Turns, Head Tremor, Neurodegeneration, Inferior Olivary Complex, Collateral Projections, Eye Movement Training, Visual Saccades, Head Saccades, Visual Impairment, Walking Speed, Neuroprotection, Autophagy, Hyperkinetic Movement, Eye and Head Stability, Oscilllatory Head Movements, Gaze Stability, Leaky Neural Integrator, Cervical Dystonia, INC and Head Tilts, Visual Pursuits, Optokinetic Stimulation, and Vestibular Rehabilitation. All candidates took a pretest examination of the subject material. The 2-9 h and 1-8 h sessions over three consecutive days were given live in the classroom and synchronously in the online classroom using the Adobe Connect e-learning platform. Subjects randomized to the online classroom attended the lectures in a location of their choice and viewed the sessions live on the Internet. A posttest examination was given to all candidates after completion of the course. Two sample unpaired t tests with equal variances were calculated for all pretests and posttests for all groups including gender differences. All 274

  3. Randomized Controlled Study of a Remote Flipped Classroom Neuro-otology Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Robert Carrick

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ContextMedical Education can be delivered in the traditional classroom or via novel technology including an online classroom.ObjectiveTo test the hypothesis that learning in an online classroom would result in similar outcomes as learning in the traditional classroom when using a flipped classroom pedagogy.DesignRandomized controlled trial. A total of 274 subjects enrolled in a Neuro-otology training program for non-Neuro-otologists of 25 h held over a 3-day period. Subjects were randomized into a “control” group attending a traditional classroom and a “trial” group of equal numbers participating in an online synchronous Internet streaming classroom using the Adobe Connect e-learning platform.InterventionsSubjects were randomized into a “control” group attending a traditional classroom and a “treatment” group of equal numbers participating in an online synchronous Internet streaming classroom.Main outcome measuresPre- and post-multiple choice examinations of VOR, Movement, Head Turns, Head Tremor, Neurodegeneration, Inferior Olivary Complex, Collateral Projections, Eye Movement Training, Visual Saccades, Head Saccades, Visual Impairment, Walking Speed, Neuroprotection, Autophagy, Hyperkinetic Movement, Eye and Head Stability, Oscilllatory Head Movements, Gaze Stability, Leaky Neural Integrator, Cervical Dystonia, INC and Head Tilts, Visual Pursuits, Optokinetic Stimulation, and Vestibular Rehabilitation.MethodsAll candidates took a pretest examination of the subject material. The 2–9 h and 1–8 h sessions over three consecutive days were given live in the classroom and synchronously in the online classroom using the Adobe Connect e-learning platform. Subjects randomized to the online classroom attended the lectures in a location of their choice and viewed the sessions live on the Internet. A posttest examination was given to all candidates after completion of the course. Two sample unpaired t tests with equal variances

  4. The Social Network Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunus, Peter

    Online social networking is an important part in the everyday life of college students. Despite the increasing popularity of online social networking among students and faculty members, its educational benefits are largely untested. This paper presents our experience in using social networking applications and video content distribution websites as a complement of traditional classroom education. In particular, the solution has been based on effective adaptation, extension and integration of Facebook, Twitter, Blogger YouTube and iTunes services for delivering educational material to students on mobile platforms like iPods and 3 rd generation mobile phones. The goals of the proposed educational platform, described in this paper, are to make the learning experience more engaging, to encourage collaborative work and knowledge sharing among students, and to provide an interactive platform for the educators to reach students and deliver lecture material in a totally new way.

  5. Are Virtual Classrooms Colorblind?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killion, Cheryl M; Gallagher-Lepak, Susan; Reilly, Janet

    2015-01-01

    E-learning, increasingly employed in nursing education, has been embraced as a means to enhance options for all students, particularly those with limited educational opportunities. Although a desire to increase access for underserved students is often cited, disparities in availability, usage, and quality of e-learning persist among diverse households and student populations when compared to the general population. In this article, these issues will be examined along with reflection on the extent to which culture has been integrated into on-line design and instruction. Historical and cultural aspects, circumscribing virtual classrooms, are discussed using African Americans as an exemplar. The imperative to harness the democratizing potential of this educational format is underscored. In this article, culture will be examined in light of the significant growth in on-line nursing education over the past several decades. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prospective teachers’ opinions of argument culture in the classroom environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senar ALKIN-ŞAHİN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the opinions of prospective teachers’ related to argument culture in the classroom environment. The data stems from a phenomenological study including 12 prospective teachers attending the education faculty of a Turkish state university for the 2013-2014 academic year. Data collected from focus group interviews were thematically analyzed. Findings indicated that prospective teachers were aware of the pedagogical value of the argument culture. Argument culture was mostly associated with democratic environment, effective listening, and critical thinking skills, respect and tolerance. Nevertheless, prospective teachers did not characterize their classroom environment as open to argument. These perceptions stem from being silenced, suppressed or negatively criticized when opposing thoughts were presented. Results revealed that political, philosophical and sexual topics were avoided in classroom settings. Additionally, valued people and evolution are among the most avoided subjects. Students’ prejudices and taboos related to specific subjects were found to be barriers to the argument culture. Teacher training programs and social culture were seen to be the other factors negatively affecting argument culture. Overall, argument culture in the classroom environment seems to be problematic in several ways. Especially, the question of how to build an argument culture is worth thinking about.

  7. Spatiotemporal characteristics of gaze of children with autism spectrum disorders while looking at classroom scenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Higuchi

    Full Text Available Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD who have neurodevelopmental impairments in social communication often refuse to go to school because of difficulties in learning in class. The exact cause of maladaptation to school in such children is unknown. We hypothesized that these children have difficulty in paying attention to objects at which teachers are pointing. We performed gaze behavior analysis of children with ASD to understand their difficulties in the classroom. The subjects were 26 children with ASD (19 boys and 7 girls; mean age, 8.6 years and 27 age-matched children with typical development (TD (14 boys and 13 girls; mean age, 8.2 years. We measured eye movements of the children while they performed free viewing of two movies depicting actual classes: a Japanese class in which a teacher pointed at cartoon characters and an arithmetic class in which the teacher pointed at geometric figures. In the analysis, we defined the regions of interest (ROIs as the teacher's face and finger, the cartoon characters and geometric figures at which the teacher pointed, and the classroom wall that contained no objects. We then compared total gaze time for each ROI between the children with ASD and TD by two-way ANOVA. Children with ASD spent less gaze time on the cartoon characters pointed at by the teacher; they spent more gaze time on the wall in both classroom scenes. We could differentiate children with ASD from those with TD almost perfectly by the proportion of total gaze time that children with ASD spent looking at the wall. These results suggest that children with ASD do not follow the teacher's instructions in class and persist in gazing at inappropriate visual areas such as walls. Thus, they may have difficulties in understanding content in class, leading to maladaptation to school.

  8. Classroom Management to Support Active Middle Level Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Lloyd McCoy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available

    This article presents a discussion of connections between middle level concepts of teaching and learning and managing a classroom through creating opportunities for active and engaged learning. The article argues and concludes that classroom management is more about managing learning than managing behavior and that one effective way to manage student behavior is to create an environment where students continuously engage in active learning (Haydon, Borders, Embury, & Clarke, 2009.

  9. Classroom Management to Support Active Middle Level Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Lloyd McCoy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a discussion of connections between middle level concepts of teaching and learning and managing a classroom through creating opportunities for active and engaged learning. The article argues and concludes that classroom management is more about managing learning than managing behavior and that one effective way to manage student behavior is to create an environment where students continuously engage in active learning (Haydon, Borders, Embury, & Clarke, 2009.

  10. Electromyography (EMG) analysis on impact of classroom chair and table usage among primary school students in Perlis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Ewe Hui; Shan, Lim Shaiu; Effendi, M. S. M.; Rosli, Muhamad Farizuan

    2017-09-01

    The existing design of primary school classroom chair and table had brought low back pain, neck pain and shoulder pain problems respectively among students in primary school. The purpose of this study is to relate the electromyography (EMG) analysis with the most critical area of the body during sitting and writing. Six male and six female primary school students from SK Seri Perlis with no back pain, neck pain and shoulder pain problems involved were invited as respondents in this study. EMG experiment was carried out by first determined the critical point at T9 and L3 from thoracic and lumbar segment respectively for ECG electrode placement and performed with a series of sitting trials for analysis. The sitting trials performed were slouch to lumbopelvic sitting and slouch to thoracic sitting follow by instruction. Next, the electrode placement was identified at C2-C3 on cervical spine for neck and at midpoint between C7 to the lateral edge of acromion spanning for shoulder respectively. These points were identified for a series of writing task performing for the EMG analysis. There were two type of writing task which included writing by looking at the whiteboard and paper placed on the table. The subjects were instructed to rest during the experiment when necessary. During lumbopelvic sitting posture, the average muscle activation on lumbar area was at the highest peak. The peak indicated that there was critical effect from the experimental finding. The performance of writing task from whiteboard gave rise a higher impact on neck muscle while writing task from paper had a greater impact on shoulder muscle. The critical affected muscle on these areas was proven on these written tasks. The EMG experiment showed that the existing design of primary school classroom chair and table had brought impact on lumbar, neck and shoulder towards the students who were using. A future recommendation suggests that to redesign primary school classroom chair and table which

  11. No effect of classroom sharing on educational achievement in twins: a prospective, longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polderman, T J C; Bartels, M; Verhulst, F C; Huizink, A C; van Beijsterveldt, C E M; Boomsma, D I

    2010-01-01

    A returning dilemma for families with multiple births is whether twins should share the same, or a parallel classroom, or in other words, whether they should be separated at school or not. This study investigated the effects of sharing a classroom during primary school on cognitive achievement in twins. Subjects were 839 monozygotic and 1164 dizygotic twin pairs who were registered at birth at The Netherlands Twin Register. A prospective, longitudinal study design was used with educational achievement at age 12 years, measured with a standardised test (CITO test), as outcome measure. Most twin pairs (72%) shared a classroom during their schooling, 19% were in separate, but parallel, classes, and 9% "partly" shared a classroom. Twins who were in parallel classrooms had higher CITO scores (mean 539.51; SD 8.12), compared to twins who shared a classroom (537.99; SD 8.52). When controlling for socioeconomic status, and externalising problems before starting primary school (age 3), there was no significant difference in educational achievement between separated and non-separated twin pairs (p = 0.138). In addition, there was no interaction with sex or zygosity of the twins (p = 0.798). There is no difference in educational achievement between twins who share a classroom and twins who do not share a classroom during their primary school time. The choice of separation should be made by teachers, parents and their twin children, based on individual characteristics of a twin pair.

  12. The Impact of Self-Perceived Subject Matter Knowledge on Pedagogical Decisions in EFL Grammar Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Hugo Santiago

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in language teacher cognition research highlight the need to explore subject matter knowledge in relation to classroom practice. This study examines the impact of two foreign language teachers' knowledge about grammar upon their pedagogical decisions. The primary database consisted of classroom observations and post-lesson…

  13. A Review of Classroom Management Studies of Teachers’ Teaching and Students’ Learning about Classroom Rules

    OpenAIRE

    笹屋, 孝允

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviewed classroom management studies of teachers ’ teaching and students ’ learning about classroom rules since 1990s. Teachers decide classroom rules and teach them to students in class in the beginning time of the school year. Classroom rules divide students into students in primary adjustment and students in secondary adjustment. Misbehavior of Students in secondary adjustment provides opportunities to learn classroom rules, to negotiate modification of classroom rules with a t...

  14. Rap Music in the Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Edward

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the background of rap music, its definition, its themes and messages, and rap as a blend of language and music. Offers ideas for its use in the classroom as a way to motivate and instruct students. (SR)

  15. Skinner and the Open Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Peter C.

    1972-01-01

    Author examines the implications of a major scientific work of behavioral ressearch and concludes that positive reinforcement techniques will make possible the creation of an open classroom, that, in itself, will minimize the negative effects of control. (Author/RK)

  16. Concussion Management in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Danielle M; Caperell, Kerry S

    2016-12-01

    There is a new emphasis on the team approach to pediatric concussion management, particularly in the classroom. However, it is expected that educators are unfamiliar with the "Returning to Learning" recommendations. The authors' primary objective was to assess and improve high school educators' knowledge regarding concussions and management interventions using an online education tool. A total of 247 high school educators completed a 12 question pretest to assess core knowledge of concussions and classroom management followed by a 20-minute online literature-based education module. Participants then completed an identical posttest. The improvement in core knowledge was statistically significant (P classroom management also showed a statistically significant increase in scores (P classroom management as well as the significant improvement after an online educational module. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Behavior Modification in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Mryon; Whitman, Joan

    1971-01-01

    This article presents the theoretical rationale for behavior modification, principally through its comparison with traditional psychotherapies, and suggests some behavior modification techniques for the classroom management of maladaptive behavior. (Author)

  18. Making Rainbows in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royalty, Fred B.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures for demonstrating rainbows in the classroom are provided. Materials required include a clear plastic box (the size of a shoebox), water, and an overhead projector. Also tells how to make a rainbow on the chalkboard using colored chalk. (JN)

  19. Systems approach to managing educational quality in the engineering classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grygoryev, Kostyantyn

    increased the students' satisfaction with the instructor, but the students' overall satisfaction with the course did not change significantly, and their attitude toward the course subject actually became more negative. This research brought performance measurement to the level of a classroom, created a dynamic model of the classroom system based on the cause-and-effect relationships discovered by using statistical analysis, and used a systematic, continuous improvement approach to modify the course in order to improve selected educational processes and outcomes.

  20. Making Creative Spaces: The Art and Design Classroom as a Site of Performativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Rather than taking a transformational role in schools, new art and design teachers quickly become subject to "school art" orthodoxy. Theories of subjectivity and the development of professional identity within communities of practice can feel far removed from the classroom. This article seeks to make clearer the processes by which teacher identity…

  1. The Content-based Reading Approaches (COBRA) Model in the ELL and LD Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei-Yi

    2010-01-01

    The Content-based Reading Approaches (COBRA) framework, constructed by Heerman (2002), was made up of the instructional goals designed for reading-learning integrations in subject matter classrooms. ELL and LD students often fail to have sufficient reading skills to succeed within their different academic subjects, consequently it is important for…

  2. Classroom versus Computer-Based CPR Training: A Comparison of the Effectiveness of Two Instructional Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehberg, Robb S.; Gazzillo Diaz, Linda; Middlemas, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine whether computer-based CPR training is comparable to traditional classroom training. Design and Setting: This study was quantitative in design. Data was gathered from a standardized examination and skill performance evaluation which yielded numerical scores. Subjects: The subjects were 64…

  3. Students' perceptions of academic dishonesty in a chemistry classroom laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Carlo, Dawn Irene

    Academic dishonesty has been an important issue in the classroom for as long as the classroom has been in use. Most reports pertain to exams, homework, and plagiarism of term papers but, one area that has not been studied extensively is that of the classroom laboratory. My work focuses on three guiding questions: (1) What are students' perceptions toward academic dishonesty in a laboratory based class? (2) What distinction if any do students make between this type of academic dishonesty compared to dishonesty that may occur in a research laboratory? (3) How if at all do these perceptions change with age and/or research experience? Four major assertions come from this work. The first is that students do not think that what they do in the classroom laboratory is science and consequently do not treat the classroom laboratory differently than any other academic class. Additionally, they make a clear distinction between what happens in a class lab and what happens in a research or industrial lab. Consequently, students perceive there to be a significant difference in dishonesty between those two settings. Finally, this distinction is not as pronounced in graduate students and is seen as an element of maturity. In the process of determining the above assertions, students perceptions on the nature of science were revealed and are also discussed. These beliefs have direct relevance to students' perceptions of dishonesty in both lab atmospheres.

  4. Teachers’ approaches to language classroom assessment in Cameroon primary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achu Charles Tante

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Assessment has a huge impact on ESL primary pupils, in part, because on the curriculum English is both a subject and also a language of learning all the other subjects. For children still acquiring L1 it is daunting sometimes to be expected to understand concepts in L2. It may be difficult then to gather information to make an impartial judgement with regards to a pupil’s language level. This study is a preliminary inquiry that attempts to find out teachers’ approaches to classroom assessment in Cameroon primary schools. Using a qualitative open-ended question the researcher finds out three main categories of assessment approaches used by teachers. From the categories extrapolations on possible assumptions that guide teachers’ choices of assessment procedures are described and suggested for future study. Keywords Classroom assessment approach, Cameroon, scheme of work, ESL/EFL, Young Learners 

  5. EEG in the classroom: Synchronised neural recordings during video presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Andreas Trier; Kamronn, Simon; Dmochowski, Jacek; Parra, Lucas C.; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2017-03-01

    We performed simultaneous recordings of electroencephalography (EEG) from multiple students in a classroom, and measured the inter-subject correlation (ISC) of activity evoked by a common video stimulus. The neural reliability, as quantified by ISC, has been linked to engagement and attentional modulation in earlier studies that used high-grade equipment in laboratory settings. Here we reproduce many of the results from these studies using portable low-cost equipment, focusing on the robustness of using ISC for subjects experiencing naturalistic stimuli. The present data shows that stimulus-evoked neural responses, known to be modulated by attention, can be tracked for groups of students with synchronized EEG acquisition. This is a step towards real-time inference of engagement in the classroom.

  6. Invertebrates in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Charles I.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive program using invertebrates as subjects in conditioning demonstrations and experiments. Provides a bibliography of reviews about invertebrate learning in addition to information on obtaining required apparatus and invertebrates.

  7. Investigating the emotional and physical aspects of the language classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Adam John

    2015-01-01

    What exactly do we mean by classroom management? The way I see it, we have to split this particular subject right down the middle: we have the emotional side (the people) and we have the physical side (arranging furniture, placement of the whiteboard, seating plans, etc.). The various theories I’ll be introducing and discussing over the course of several chapters in the first half of this book focus on the former, encompassing the methods of organization, administration, teaching and ...

  8. Spaces, Times, and Knowledge for a Reflective Subjectivity in the Bellaterra Primary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Bosco

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article we present the results of a narrative inquiry into the construction of subjectivity in primary schools. In this study the researchers' own subjectivities came under the same scrutiny as those who were the focus of the research, and were placed in relation to them. We will discuss the doubts that arose as we carried out our research as well as how our positions as researchers changed over the course of the study. We will also describe our attempts to give voice to teachers and learners through our narratives. This goal led us to produce an account of subjectivity that was relational, process-based, and, sometimes, fragmented. Our interpretation of the representation of childhood/learners and learning in school is based upon how the teachers we have worked with shared a reflective, integral, cooperative, and community view of learning. We will also discuss how learners develop forms of positioning, identification, and differentiation depending on their relationships with others. In this way we have been able to reconstruct the way in which learners' subjectivities are formed by narrating scenes observed in classrooms with different groups of peers, and in other areas of the school where these groups carry out different activities. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0902273

  9. International Energy: Subject Thesaurus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raridon, M.H. (ed.)

    1990-01-01

    The International Energy Subject Thesaurus contains the standard vocabulary to indexing terms (descriptors) developed and structured to build and maintain energy information databases. Involved in this cooperative task are (1) the technical staff of the USDOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) in cooperation with the member countries of the Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE) and (2) the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) staff representing the more than ninety countries and organizations recording and indexing information for the international nuclear information community. ETDE member countries are also members of the International Nuclear Information System (INIS). Nuclear information indexed and recorded for INIS by these ETDE member countries is also included in the ETDE Energy Data Base, and indexing terminology is therefore cooperatively standardized for use in both information systems. This structured vocabulary reflects the scope of international energy research, development, and technological programs and encompasses terminology derived not only from the basic sciences but also from the areas of energy resources, conservation, safety, environmental impact, and regulation.

  10. Welcome to Our Web: Integrating Subjects through Entomology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevebaugh, Tara

    2001-01-01

    Shares how the study of insects became a focal point for cross-curricular convergence in the author's classroom. Describes the design of a unit of study that focused on entomology but integrated academic areas, especially language arts. Concludes that students must develop a sense of interdependence and an understanding of possible relationships…

  11. Interchangeable Positions in Interaction Sequences in Science Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Rees

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Triadic dialogue, the Initiation, Response, Evaluation sequence typical of teacher /student interactions in classrooms, has long been identified as a barrier to students’ access to learning, including science learning. A large body of research on the subject has over the years led to projects and policies aimed at increasing opportunities for students to learn through interactive dialogue in classrooms. However, the triadic dialogue pattern continues to dominate, even when teachers intend changing this. Prior quantitative research on the subject has focused on identifying independent variables such as style of teacher questioning that have an impact, while qualitative researchers have worked to interpret the use of dialogue within the whole context of work in the classroom. A recent paper offers an alternative way to view the triadic dialogue pattern and its origin; the triadic dialogue pattern is an irreducible social phenomenon that arises in a particular situation regardless of the identity of the players who inhabit the roles in the turn-taking sequence (Roth & Gardner, 2012. According to this perspective, alternative patterns of dialogue would exist which are alternative irreducible social phenomena that arise in association with different situations. The aim of this paper is to examine as precisely as possible, the characteristics of dialogue patterns in a seventh-eighth grade classroom during science inquiry, and the precise situations from which these dialogue patterns emerge, regardless of the staffing (teacher or students in the turn-taking sequence. Three different patterns were identified each predominating in a particular situation. This fine-grained analysis could offer valuable insights into ways to support teachers working to alter the kinds of dialogue patterns that arise in their classrooms.

  12. An Extensive Reading Strategy to Promote Online Writing for Elementary Students in the 1:1 Digital Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhong; Yang, Xian Min; He, Ke Kang

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of the digital classroom has made it possible to combine extensive reading with online writing, yet research and development in this area are lacking. This study explores the impact of online writing after extensive reading in a classroom setting in China where there was one computer for each student (a 1:1 digital…

  13. Teachers' Analyses of Classroom Video Predict Student Learning of Mathematics: Further Explorations of a Novel Measure of Teacher Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersting, Nicole B.; Givvin, Karen B.; Sotelo, Francisco L.; Stigler, James W.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between teacher knowledge and student learning in the area of mathematics by developing and evaluating an innovative approach to assessing teacher knowledge. This approach is based on teachers' analyses of classroom video clips. Teachers watched 13 video clips of classroom instruction and then provided written…

  14. [Acoustic characteristics of classrooms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszarny, Zbigniew; Chyla, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    Quality and usefulness of school rooms for transmission of verbal information depends on the two basic parameters: form and quantity of the reverberation time, and profitable line measurements of school rooms from the acoustic point of view. An analysis of the above-mentioned parameters in 48 class rooms and two gymnasiums in schools, which were built in different periods, shows that the most important problem is connected with too long reverberation time and inappropriate acoustic proportions. In schools built in the 1970s, the length of reverberation time is mostly within a low frequency band, while in schools built contemporarily, the maximum length of disappearance time takes place in a quite wide band of 250-2000 Hz. This exceeds optimal values for that kind of rooms at least twice, and five times in the newly built school. A long reverberation time is connected with a low acoustic absorption of school rooms. Moreover, school rooms are characterised by inappropriate acoustic proportions. The classrooms, in their relation to the height, are too long and too wide. It is connected with deterioration of the transmission of verbal information. The data show that this transmission is unequal. Automatically, it leads to a speech disturbance and difficulties with understanding. There is the need for adaptation of school rooms through increase of an acoustic absorption.

  15. NASA Classroom Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Exploration of space provides a compelling need for cell-based research into the basic mechanisms that underlie the profound changes that occur in terrestrial life that is transitioned to low gravity environments. Toward that end, NASA developed a rotating bioreactor in which cells are cultured while continuously suspended in a cylinder in which the culture medium rotates with the cylinder. The randomization of the gravity vector accomplished by the continuous rotation, in a low shear environment, provides an analog of microgravity. Because cultures grown in bioreactors develop structures and functions that are much closer to those exhibited by native tissue than can be achieved with traditional culture methods, bioreactors have contributed substantially to advancing research in the fields of cancer, diabetes, infectious disease modeling for vaccine production, drug efficacy, and tissue engineering. NASA has developed a Classroom Bioreactor (CB) that is built from parts that are easily obtained and assembled, user-friendly and versatile. It can be easily used in simple school settings to examine the effect cultures of seeds or cells. An educational brief provides assembly instructions and lesson plans that describes activities in science, math and technology that explore free fall, microgravity, orbits, bioreactors, structure-function relationships and the scientific method.

  16. Tetrahymena in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joshua J; Wiley, Emily A; Cassidy-Hanley, Donna M

    2012-01-01

    Tetrahymena has been a useful model in basic research in part due to the fact it is easy to grow in culture and exhibits a range of complex processes, all within a single cell. For these same reasons Tetrahymena has shown enormous potential as a teaching tool for fundamental principles of biology at multiple science education levels that can be integrated into K-12 classrooms and undergraduate and graduate college laboratory courses. These Tetrahymena-based teaching modules are inquiry-based experiences that are also effective at teaching scientific concepts, retaining students in science, and exciting students about the scientific process. Two learning communities have been developed that utilize Tetrahymena-based teaching modules. Advancing Secondary Science Education with Tetrahymena (ASSET) and the Ciliate Genomics Consortium (CGC) have developed modules for K-12 students and college-level curriculums, respectively. These modules range from addressing topics in ecology, taxonomy, and environmental toxicity to more advanced concepts in biochemistry, proteomics, bioinformatics, cell biology, and molecular biology. An overview of the current modules and their learning outcomes are discussed, as are assessment, dissemination, and sustainability strategies for K-12 and college-level curriculum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A subjective scheduler for subjective dedicated networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suherman; Fakhrizal, Said Reza; Al-Akaidi, Marwan

    2017-09-01

    Multiple access technique is one of important techniques within medium access layer in TCP/IP protocol stack. Each network technology implements the selected access method. Priority can be implemented in those methods to differentiate services. Some internet networks are dedicated for specific purpose. Education browsing or tutorial video accesses are preferred in a library hotspot, while entertainment and sport contents could be subjects of limitation. Current solution may use IP address filter or access list. This paper proposes subjective properties of users or applications are used for priority determination in multiple access techniques. The NS-2 simulator is employed to evaluate the method. A video surveillance network using WiMAX is chosen as the object. Subjective priority is implemented on WiMAX scheduler based on traffic properties. Three different traffic sources from monitoring video: palace, park, and market are evaluated. The proposed subjective scheduler prioritizes palace monitoring video that results better quality, xx dB than the later monitoring spots.

  18. Energy data base: subject thesaurus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redford, J.S. (ed.)

    1981-10-01

    The technical staff of the DOE Technical Information Center, during its subject indexing activities, develops and structures a vocabulary that allows consistent machine storage and retrieval of information necessary to the accomplishment of the DOE mission. This thesaurus incorporates that structured vocabulary. The terminology of this thesaurus is used for the subject control of information announced in DOE Energy Research Abstracts, Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis, and various update journals and bulletins in specialized areas. This terminology also facilitates subject searching of the DOE Energy Data Base on the DOE/RECON on-line retrieval system and on other commercial retrieval systems. The rapid expansion of the DOE's activities will result in a commitant thesaurus expansion as information relating to new activities is indexed. Only the terms used in the indexing of documents at the Technical Information Center to date are included. (JSR)

  19. Writing and reading in a multicultural classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Gitte Holten

    2007-01-01

    linguistic minority. The few students with a Danish origin all come from backgrounds with a limited tradition for reading fiction. Another aim of the study was to investigate a possible relation between the students? conception of learning and of reading and interpreting literary texts in the subject...... of Danish literature in order to give teachers broader insight into the underlying factors in a multicultural classroom with regard to writing and reading on the one hand and conceptions of learning on the other.......The study investigates how interpretive reading skills and literary understanding may be enhanced through initial narrative writing tasks. In the class in question the majority of students are children of migrant workers in Denmark. The class in question belongs to what is called an ethnic...

  20. Out of Classroom Instruction in the Flipped Classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triantafyllou, Evangelia; Timcenko, Olga

    2015-01-01

    This article presents experiences and student perceptions on the introduction of the flipped classroom model in two consecutive semesters at Media Technology department of Aalborg University, Copenhagen, Denmark. We introduced the flipped instruction model to a statistics course and a mathematics...... workshop. We collected data by two online survey studies, which show support for student perceptions that out-of-classroom instruction with online resources enhances learning, by providing visual and in depth explanations, and can engage the learner. However, students stated that they miss just......-in-time explanations when learning with online resources and they questioned the quality and validity of some of them. Based on these findings and our own experience, we discuss requirements for resources and activities in flipped classrooms in order for the student to engage and learn. Finally, we present a framework...

  1. Teaching and learning science in linguistically diverse classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Emilee; Evnitskaya, Natalia; Ramos-de Robles, S. Lizette

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we reflect on the article, Science education in a bilingual class: problematising a translational practice, by Zeynep Ünsal, Britt Jakobson, Bengt-Olav Molander and Per-Olaf Wickman (Cult Stud Sci Educ, 10.1007/s11422-016-9747-3). In their article, the authors present the results of a classroom research project by responding to one main question: How is continuity between everyday language and the language of science construed in a bilingual science classroom where the teacher and the students do not speak the same minority language? Specifically, Ünsal et al. examine how bilingual students construe relations between everyday language and the language of science in a class taught in Swedish, in which all students also spoke Turkish, whereas the teacher also spoke Bosnian, both being minority languages in the context of Swedish schools. In this forum, we briefly discuss why close attention to bilingual dynamics emerging in classrooms such as those highlighted by Ünsal et al. matters for science education. We continue by discussing changing ontologies in relation to linguistic diversity and education more generally. Recent research in bilingual immersion classroom settings in so-called "content" subjects such as Content and Language Integrated Learning, is then introduced, as we believe this research offers some significant insights in terms of how bilingualism contributes to knowledge building in subjects such as science. Finally, we offer some reflections in relation to the classroom interactional competence needed by teachers in linguistically diverse classrooms. In this way, we aim to further the discussion initiated by Ünsal et al. and to offer possible frameworks for future research on bilingualism in science education. In their article, Ünsal et al. conclude the analysis of the classroom data by arguing in favor of a translanguaging pedagogy, an approach to teaching and learning in which students' whole language repertoires are used as

  2. Using Self-Experimentation and Single-Subject Methodology to Promote Critical Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J. Cowley, PhD, BCBA

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Critical thinking is often absent from classroom endeavor because it is hard to define (Gelder, 2005 or is difficult to assess (Bissell & Lemons, 2006. Critical thinking is defined as application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation (Browne & Minnick, 2005. This paper shows how self-experimentation and single-subject methodology can be used to promote many levels of critical thinking in an Applied Behavior Analysis course. Two classroom assignment examples of this process and a grading rubric are provided.

  3. Using Self-Experimentation and Single-Subject Methodology to Promote Critical Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Langdon

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical thinking is often absent from classroom endeavor because it is hard to define (Gelder, 2005 or is difficult to assess (Bissell & Lemons, 2006. Critical thinking is defined as application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation (Browne & Minnick, 2005. This paper shows how self-experimentation and single-subject methodology can be used to promote many levels of critical thinking in an Applied Behavior Analysis course. Two classroom assignment examples of this process and a grading rubric are provided.

  4. Using Self-Experimentation and Single-Subject Methodology to Promote Critical Thinking

    OpenAIRE

    David Langdon; Ann Lindgren; Brian Cowley

    2006-01-01

    Critical thinking is often absent from classroom endeavor because it is hard to define (Gelder, 2005) or is difficult to assess (Bissell & Lemons, 2006). Critical thinking is defined as application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation (Browne & Minnick, 2005). This paper shows how self-experimentation and single-subject methodology can be used to promote many levels of critical thinking in an Applied Behavior Analysis course. Two classroom assignment examples of this process and a grading ...

  5. Simple environmental sensor webs for classroom inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatland, D. R.

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes a platform for inquiry-driven learning in environmental science at the secondary and undergraduate levels including preliminary results from two pilot sensor web-driven projects, in progress. The work presented here emphasizes - Documenting construction and use of the platform - Analysis of results over technology used - Open-ended iteration of the inquiry process Cognitive theory suggests that pedagogical modes of 'information-transfer' fall short as a means of building (arguably useful) problem solving and critical thinking skills in comparison with inquiry-driven modes. In view of limited classroom time and constraints such as standardized testing, sensor web-driven environmental inquiry faces a two-fold challenge: Minimize time-intrusion into the curriculum and make that time highly productive and valuable for students. The technology employed here is a wireless microcomputer network ruggedized for outdoor use, interfaces to simple environmental sensors, supplemental data from a low-cost meteorological station, and data recovery and analysis by means of a laptop PC. Target cost of the system (not including the PC) is 2000USD. The baseline study subject is watershed hydrology, with a corollary aim of "identifiying the doorways" into related subjects and story lines. The general plan of action proceeds in these steps: - Build and test the system - Students work with the system in the classroom - Students formulate a deployment plan - Instruments deployed, data acquired and formatted - Student analysis, hypothesis generation, research - Reiterate the previous three steps as possible Once this platform/program is established the idea is to expand to include personalized reflection and self- expression per the curriculum established by the River of Words non-profit organization. The second expansion idea is (per the eScience model) to facilitate Internet-based exchanges and equipment sharing with students located in other geographical regions

  6. The Discursive Construction of Power in Teacher Partnerships: Language and Subject Specialists in Mainstream Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creese, Angela

    2002-01-01

    Shows how language and subject teachers in London secondary schools are positioned differently through their discursive performance of pedagogues and knowledge and how members of classroom communities view language and subject teachers as unequal. Data analysis dew on ethnography of communication and semiotic functional approaches to explain the…

  7. Single-Subject Designs and Action Research in the K-12 Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Sean A.; Ross, Margaret E.; Chesser, Svetlana S.

    2011-01-01

    In as much as educational research is concerned with individual student assessment and development, it is surprising that single-subject designs are not more readily utilized in classroom-based action research. The purpose of this article is to emphasize benefits of single-subject research in the K-12 setting, given that teachers teach and assess…

  8. An Investigation of the Use of the ‘Flipped Classroom’ Pedagogy in Secondary English Language Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Cheung Ruby Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose\t: To examine the use of a flipped classroom in the English Language subject in secondary classrooms in Hong Kong. Background:\tThe research questions addressed were: (1 What are teachers’ perceptions towards the flipped classroom pedagogy? (2 How can teachers transfer their flipped classroom experiences to teaching other classes/subjects? (3 What are students’ perceptions towards the flipped classroom pedagogy? (4 How can students transfer their flipped classroom experiences to studying other subjects? (5 Will students have significant gain in the knowledge of the lesson topic trialled in this study? Methodology: A total of 57 students from two Secondary 2 classes in a Band 3 secondary school together with two teachers teaching these two classes were involved in this study. Both quantitative and quantitative data analyses were conducted. Contribution: Regarding whether the flipped classroom pedagogy can help students gain significantly in their knowledge of a lesson topic, only one class of students gained statistically significantly in the subject knowledge but not for another class. Findings: Students in general were positive about the flipped classroom. On the other hand, although the teachers considered that the flipped classroom pedagogy was creative, they thought it may only be useful for teaching English grammar. Recommendations for Practitioners: Teachers thought that flipping a classroom may only be useful for more motivated students, and the extra workload of finding or making suitable pre-lesson online videos is the main concern for teachers. Recommendations for Researchers: Both quantitative and qualitative analyses should be conducted to investigate the effectiveness of a flipped classroom on students’ language learning. Impact on Society\t: Teachers and students can transfer their flipped classroom experiences in English Language to teaching and studying other subjects. Future Research:\tMore classes should be

  9. CLASSROOM INTERACTION ANALYSIS IN INDONESIAN EFL SPEAKING CLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinta Hoerun Nisa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study entitles “Classroom Interaction Analysis in the EFL Speaking Class” aimed at analyzing the categories of teacher talk, student talk and classroom interaction types used during EFL speaking class. The research employed a qualitative design and applied a case study. Subjects of the research were an English teacher and 25 students at the second semester of English Education Department of the University of Kuningan. The data were gained through naturalistic observation and document analysis. The data were analyzed by using FLINT (Foreign Language Interaction system as developed by Moskowitz (1971 and types of classroom interaction of Malamah-Thomas’ (1987 frameworks. The findings revealed that both teacher and students applied all categories of talk as mentioned in FLINT system and classroom interaction types. It is recommended for the teacher to apply more categories of ‘praises and encourages’ to build students’ confidence in speaking, ‘asks questions’ to promote their communicative skill and to encourage students to use English during speaking activities, particularly in group work activities.

  10. Sustained Attention in Real Classroom Settings: An EEG Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Wei Ko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sustained attention is a process that enables the maintenance of response persistence and continuous effort over extended periods of time. Performing attention-related tasks in real life involves the need to ignore a variety of distractions and inhibit attention shifts to irrelevant activities. This study investigates electroencephalography (EEG spectral changes during a sustained attention task within a real classroom environment. Eighteen healthy students were instructed to recognize as fast as possible special visual targets that were displayed during regular university lectures. Sorting their EEG spectra with respect to response times, which indicated the level of visual alertness to randomly introduced visual stimuli, revealed significant changes in the brain oscillation patterns. The results of power-frequency analysis demonstrated a relationship between variations in the EEG spectral dynamics and impaired performance in the sustained attention task. Across subjects and sessions, prolongation of the response time was preceded by an increase in the delta and theta EEG powers over the occipital region, and decrease in the beta power over the occipital and temporal regions. Meanwhile, implementation of the complex attention task paradigm into a real-world classroom setting makes it possible to investigate specific mutual links between brain activities and factors that cause impaired behavioral performance, such as development and manifestation of classroom mental fatigue. The findings of the study set a basis for developing a system capable of estimating the level of visual attention during real classroom activities by monitoring changes in the EEG spectra.

  11. Deep ocean research meets the special education classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, A.; Turner, M.; Edwards, K. J.; Scientific Team Of Iodp Expedition 327

    2010-12-01

    The scientific activities carried out on board the JOIDES Resolution during IODP Expedition 327: Juan de Fuca Hydrogeology (summer 2010) are exciting to elementary-level students and provide an excellent opportunity to use that enthusiasm to teach concepts outlined in state-mandated curricula. This is especially important for special education classrooms where individualized education plans are implemented to bring students up to these standards when regular classrooms have failed to do so. Using concepts from drilling and coring to geobiology and sedimentology, we have developed cross-curricular lesson plans for elementary special education students with learning and cognitive disabilities. All lesson plans include hands-on, visual and auditory activities and are aimed at using students' natural interest in real research to drive home simple concepts like integers, geography, pressure and descriptive writing. Because special education classrooms more often than not include children with variable abilities in all subjects, the lesson plans developed in this project can be adapted for several levels so that every child in the classroom can participate.

  12. MOTIVATIONAL FACTORS IN THE INDONESIAN EFL WRITING CLASSROOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yustinus Calvin Gai mali

    2015-04-01

    Abstract Despite the essence of motivation as one of primary determinants for students’ learning achievement, issues of factors influencing students’ motivation in learning a particular subject, particularly English as a Foreign Language (EFL writing with regard to Indonesian university students, have not been discussed sufficiently. The study reported in this paper aims to explore motivational factors perceived by Indonesian university students in their EFL writing classroom. The participants of the study were 19 freshmen at Creative Writing Class F within the English Language Education Study Program, Faculty of Language and Literature, Satya Wacana Christian University (ED-SWCU, academic year 2014/2015. Data was collected through reflective journals in which the participants wrote their reflections dealing with the issues. The data analysis appeared to prove that positive teacher’s performance, inspiring classmates, motivational parents, and positive classroom atmosphere were primary factors influencing the students’ learning motivation in their classroom. Finally, the present study would seem to indicate the importance of constructive collaboration among teachers, students, and parents in determining the students’ learning motivation and academic achievement in their EFL writing classroom. Keywords: motivation, motivational factors, EFL writing, Creative Writing class

  13. Classroom Environment and Student Learning: Classroom-Level Effects on Achievement Trajectories in Late Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskins, Clare Smith

    2010-01-01

    This study uses a three-level model (within-student, between-student, and between-classroom) to examine the effects of 4th and 5th grade classroom environments on student achievement trajectories during the school year. Between-classroom differences in teacher warmth and classroom order were tested as predictors of student rates of achievement…

  14. Teacher classroom practices and Mathematics performance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Mathematics teacher questionnaire, administered as part of the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2011, comprised questions pertaining to the classroom practices of Teacher Clarity, Classroom Discussion, Feedback, Formative Assessment, Problem Solving and Metacognitive Strategies, ...

  15. Classroom Racial Balance and Students' Interracial Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koslin, Sandra; And Others

    1972-01-01

    Relationships between classroom racial balance and third graders' interracial attitudes were analyzed. Interracial attitudes were more favorable in balanced than in unbalanced classes. Results suggest that classroom racial balance is strongly related to students' interracial attitudes. (Author)

  16. How Computers Will Invade Law School Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, Charles H.; Kelso, J. Clark

    1985-01-01

    Computers will be an increasingly pervasive part of the law school classroom environment, used by faculty for word processing, classroom management, mathematical and statistical analyses and instruction, and by students for preparation of briefs. (MSE)

  17. Classroom interventions for children with ADHD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Yvonne; Gaastra, Geraldina F.; Tucha, Lara I.; Tucha, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    In a typical classroom, children are instructed to remain seated, perform independent seatwork and follow teachers’ instructions. Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may find these classroom demands particularly difficult to adhere to because, by definition, children with

  18. My Classroom: India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Blaire Creamer

    2017-01-01

    Dr. Santosh Kumar Mahapatra did not grow up speaking English, and studying English in secondary school was not easy for him. In fact, he almost failed the subject in Grades 10 and 12. Later, after he earned a master's degree in English Literature but still felt he could not speak the language well, he improved his English-speaking skills while…

  19. My Classroom: Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellick, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the teaching experiences of Dawit Negeri, a teacher in the English Department at Ambo University for the past five years. With a bachelor's degree in English and a master's degree in Teaching English as a Foreign Language, Mr. Negeri is familiar with the subject, using his knowledge to share with students the importance of…

  20. Teaching Trauma: A Model for Introducing Traumatic Materials in the Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica D. Cless

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available niversity courses in disciplines such as social work, family studies, humanities, and other areas often use classroom materials that contain traumatic material (Barlow & Becker-Blease, 2012. While many recommendations based on trauma theory exist for instructors at the university level, these are often made in the context of clinical training programs, rather than at the undergraduate level across disciplines. Furthermore, no organized model exists to aid instructors in developing a trauma-informed pedagogy for teaching courses on traumatic stress, violence, and other topics that may pose a risk for secondary traumatic stress in the classroom (Kostouros, 2008. This paper seeks to bridge the gap between trauma theory and implementation of sensitive content in classrooms of higher education, and presents a model of trauma-informed teaching that was developed in the context of an undergraduate trauma studies program. Implications and future directions for research in the area of trauma-informed university classrooms are discussed.

  1. Moving toward heutagogical learning: Illuminating undergraduate nursing students' experiences in a flipped classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rebecca D; Schlairet, Maura C

    2017-02-01

    Nurse educators rely on the tenets of educational theory and evidence-based education to promote the most effective curriculum and facilitate the best outcomes. The flipped classroom model, in which students assume personal responsibility for knowledge acquisition in a highly engaging and interactive environment, supports self-directed learning and the unique needs of clinical education. To understand how students perceived their experiences in the flipped classroom and how students' learning dispositions were affected by the flipped classroom experience. A phenomenological approach was used to gain deeper understanding about students' perspectives, perceptions and subjective experiences of the flipped classroom model. The focus of the study was on characteristics of student learning. Fourteen Bachelors of Science of Nursing (BSN) students at a regional university in the southeastern United States. Using data transcribed from face-to-face, semi-structured interviews, experiential themes were extracted from the qualitative data (student-reported experiences, attributes, thoughts, values, and beliefs regarding teaching and learning in the context of their experience of the flipped classroom) using Graneheim's and Lundman's (2004) guidelines; and were coded and analyzed within theoretical categories based on pedagogical, andragogical or heutagogical learning dispositions. Experiential themes that emerged from students' descriptions of their experiences in the flipped classroom included discernment, challenge, relevance, responsibility, and expertise. The flipped classroom model offers promising possibilities for facilitating students' movement from learning that is characteristic of pedagogy and andragogy toward heutagogical learning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Classroom Action Research: Penelitian Tindakan Kelas

    OpenAIRE

    Juliandi, Azuar

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this article is to provide a basic knowledge of classroom action research, systematic proposal and classroom action reporting. The Knowledge is so important because a professional lecturer must be able to understand the problems themselves and their learning environment through classroom action research activities. Various issues in classroom action research, including: planning, process, use of methods, media, resources and learning evaluations and other relevant issues. ...

  3. Nurturing creativity in the classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufman, James C

    2010-01-01

    Nurturing Creativity in the Classroom is a groundbreaking collection of essays by leading scholars, who examine and respond to the tension that many educators face in valuing student creativity but believing that they cannot support it given the curricular constraints of the classroom. Is it possible for teachers to nurture creative development and expression without drifting into curricular chaos? Do curricular constraints necessarily lead to choosing conformity over creativity? This book combines the perspectives of top educators and psychologists to generate practical advice for considering and addressing the challenges of supporting creativity within the classroom. It is unique in its balance of practical recommendations for nurturing creativity and thoughtful appreciation of curricular constraints. This approach helps ensure that the insights and advice found in this collection will take root in educators’ practice, rather than being construed as yet another demand placed on their overflowing plate of ...

  4. Brain correlates of subjective freedom of choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filevich, Elisa; Vanneste, Patricia; Brass, Marcel; Fias, Wim; Haggard, Patrick; Kühn, Simone

    2013-01-01

    The subjective feeling of free choice is an important feature of human experience. Experimental tasks have typically studied free choice by contrasting free and instructed selection of response alternatives. These tasks have been criticised, and it remains unclear how they relate to the subjective feeling of freely choosing. We replicated previous findings of the fMRI correlates of free choice, defined objectively. We introduced a novel task in which participants could experience and report a graded sense of free choice. BOLD responses for conditions subjectively experienced as free identified a postcentral area distinct from the areas typically considered to be involved in free action. Thus, the brain correlates of subjective feeling of free action were not directly related to any established brain correlates of objectively-defined free action. Our results call into question traditional assumptions about the relation between subjective experience of choosing and activity in the brain’s so-called voluntary motor areas. PMID:24021855

  5. Creating catastrophes in the classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Thommy

    2013-04-01

    Buildings, infrastructure and human life are being destroyed by wind and landslides. To interest and motivate pupils and to help them understand abstract knowledge, a practical experiment could be useful. These experiments will show why strong winds circulate around tropical cyclones and how fluvial geological processes affect nature and communities. The experiments are easy to set up and the equipment is not expensive. Experiment 1: Exogenic processes of water are often slow processes. This experiment will simulate water processes that can take thousands of years, in less than 40 minutes. This experiment can be presented for and understood by pupils at all levels. Letting the pupils build up the scenery will make them more curious about the course of events. During that time they will see the geomorphological genesis of landforms such as landslides, sandurs, deltas, canyons sedimentations, selective erosions. Placing small houses, bridges etc. we can lead to discussions about natural catastrophes and community planning. Material needed for the experiment is a water bucket, erosion gutter, clay (simulating rock), sand and smaller pebbles (simulating the soil), houses of "Monopoly" size and tubes. By using a table with wheels it is easy to reuse the result for other lessons. Installation of a pump can make the experiment into a closed loop system. This installation can be used for presentations outside the classroom. Experiment 2: The Coriolis Effect explains why the wind (moving objects) deflects when moving. In the northern hemisphere the deflection is clockwise and anti-clockwise in the southern hemisphere. This abstract effect is often hard for upper secondary pupils to understand. This experiment will show the effect and thus make the theory real and visible. Material needed for this experiment is a bucket, pipes, a string. At my school we had cooperation with pupils from the Industrial Technology programme who made a copper pipe construction. During the

  6. Designing Multimodal Classrooms for Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Arlene

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the ways in which multimodal classroom discourse could inform a social justice agenda through broadening the base for representation in the classroom. It identifies some of the challenges and opportunities of designing multimodal classrooms in diverse and developing contexts, where there are vast differentials in terms of…

  7. Hey, There's a Forest in that Classroom!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Scott; Coppedge, Ginny

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author describes another teacher's unique approach to teaching science in one unusual second grade classroom. Immediately upon entering the classroom, the author was surrounded by an array of colors, shapes, and objects typically found in a forest. A multitude of puppets, stuffed animals, and live animals filled the classroom.…

  8. The Dance of Elementary School Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    At times, classroom management and guidance elude even the most seasoned teachers. Yet, students need guidance and practice in self-regulatory skills to assist in the learning that occurs in classrooms. Teachers need both practical and research-based classroom management strategies that benefit the environment and help create a space conducive to…

  9. Research Agenda: Language Learning beyond the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinders, Hayo; Benson, Phil

    2017-01-01

    Most language learning research is carried out either in classrooms or among classroom learners. As Richards (2015) points out, however, there are two dimensions to successful learning: what happens inside classrooms and what happens outside them. Rapid development of online media, communications technologies and opportunities for travel has also…

  10. STEM Teacher Efficacy in Flipped Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Daniel; Denson, Cameron

    2017-01-01

    The flipped classroom instructional model continues to grow in adoption and use in K-12 classrooms. Although there are an increasing number of studies into the implementation of the flipped classroom, there is limited empirical research into its effectiveness and even fewer into the educational, psychological, and theoretical constructs underlying…

  11. Diverse Perspectives on a Flipped Biostatistics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Todd A.; Andridge, Rebecca R.; Sainani, Kirstin L.; Stangle, Dalene K.; Neely, Megan L.

    2016-01-01

    "Flipping" the classroom refers to a pedagogical approach in which students are first exposed to didactic content outside the classroom and then actively use class time to apply their newly attained knowledge. The idea of the flipped classroom is not new, but has grown in popularity in recent years as the necessary technology has…

  12. Understanding Mathematics Classroom Teaching: Hermeneutics Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiong

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand meaning of mathematics classroom teaching, this paper uses narrative to present the meaning through hermeneutics inquiry from the author's research experiences. There are two threads in the research experience: research on classroom teaching and students' understanding in classroom teaching. The narrative provides not only a…

  13. Exploring Alternative Assessment Strategies in Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stears, Michèle; Gopal, Nirmala

    2010-01-01

    The knowledge children bring to the classroom or construct in the classroom may find expression in a variety of activities and is often not measurable with the traditional assessment instruments used in science classrooms. Different approaches to assessment are required to accommodate the various ways in which learners construct knowledge in…

  14. Maximizing Learning Potential in the Communicative Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaravadivelu, B.

    1993-01-01

    A classroom observational study is presented to assess whether a macrostrategies framework will help communicative language teaching teachers to maximize learner potential in the classroom. Analysis of two classroom episodes revealed that one episode was evidently more communicative than the other. (seven references) (VWL)

  15. Routines Are the Foundation of Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Robin Rawlings; Allanson, Patricia Bolton; Notar, Charles E.

    2017-01-01

    Classroom management is the key to learning. Routines are the foundation of classroom management. Students require structure in their lives. Routines provide that in all of their life from the time they awake until the time they go to bed. Routines in a school and in the classroom provide the environment for learning to take place. The paper is…

  16. Exploring alternative assessment strategies in science classrooms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The knowledge children bring to the classroom or construct in the classroom may find expression in a variety of activities and is often not measurable with the traditional assessment instruments used in science classrooms. Different approaches to assessment are required to accommodate the various ways in which learners ...

  17. Curriculum Integration in the General Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munroe, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Arts integration is a topic that has been researched and discussed by music educators and general educators alike. Some feel this is a worthwhile endeavor in both the arts classroom and the general classroom, while others feel that we should be spending what little time we have in the music classroom focusing on music goals. This article will…

  18. Classroom Management, Bullying, and Teacher Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kathleen P.

    2010-01-01

    While bullying in schools has begun to receive attention, little is known about the relationship between classroom management and bullying in the classroom. The process for exploring this relationship will be a review of research and literature related to bullying in the school environment, classroom management, teacher practices, and student…

  19. Learning Road Safety Skills in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Freddy Jackson; Gillard, Duncan

    2009-01-01

    This case study demonstrates the effectiveness of a classroom based learning programme in the acquisition of road safety skills. The participant, a child with severe learning disabilities, was taught road safety behaviours in the classroom with the aid of photograph cards. When he had mastered these skills in the classroom, he returned to the…

  20. The Flipped Classroom in Counselor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Kristen; Milsom, Amy

    2015-01-01

    The flipped classroom is proposed as an effective instructional approach in counselor education. An overview of the flipped-classroom approach, including advantages and disadvantages, is provided. A case example illustrates how the flipped classroom can be applied in counselor education. Recommendations for implementing or researching flipped…

  1. Differentiated Instruction in the Elementary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Susan G.

    2008-01-01

    As classrooms become more culturally diverse, it becomes more imperative that differentiated instruction occur in elementary classrooms. Today's classrooms usually contain students with a wide range of abilities and varied experiential backgrounds. These students learn at different rates and in different ways. Differentiation is important in the…

  2. The Flipped Classroom: A Twist on Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Stacy M. P.; Ralph, David L.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional classroom has utilized the "I Do", "We Do", "You Do" as a strategy for teaching for years. The flipped classroom truly flips that strategy. The teacher uses "You Do", "We Do", "I Do" instead. Homework, inquiry, and investigation happen in the classroom. At home students…

  3. Mother Tongue in the EFL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Amirabbas

    2012-01-01

    The use of students' mother tongue (MT/L1) in the second/foreign language classroom has been debated in language teaching theory and practice for many decades. Most language teaching methods advocate the use of the target language (TL) in the classroom. However, recent research has elevated the role of L1 in the classroom. This paper illustrates…

  4. The Correlation between Level of Classroom Teachers’ Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Classroom Management Ability Perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Babaoğlan, Emine; Korkut, Kübra

    2010-01-01

    This research aims to determine the level of classroom teachers’ self-efficacy beliefs and classroom management ability perceptions and the correlation between these beliefs and perceptions. The study group were 401 classroom teachers who were working as a classroom teacher in public elementary schools, in 2009, in Burdur, Ağlasun, Kemer, Gölhisar, in Türkiye. The data was collected with the “Teacher Self-Efficacy Belief Scale” and “Classroom Management Ability Scale”. Numerous statistical...

  5. Formative Classroom Assessment and Large-Scale Assessment: Toward a More Balanced System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Martínez Rizo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Given the proliferation of large-scale standardized tests that has occurred in Mexico in recent years, this article constitutes a review of the international literature on the subject for the purpose of reflecting on the possible consequences of this phenomenon and exploring the progress of alternative assessment approaches. It also reviews the development of concepts related to formative classroom assessment, and summarizes current thinking on this subject. It emphasizes the importance of such approaches for improving educational quality. In conclusion, it argues that it is necessary to move toward assessment systems that combine large-scale assessment and classroom assessment in a more balanced fashion.

  6. Toward Mobile-Assisted Language Learning (MALL: Reaping Mobile Phone Benefits in Classroom Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rully Yudhiantara

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mobile phone has been studied by researchers in its connection with education-related activies.  This study was aimed at investigating two research questions: 1 what are students’ perception toward mobile phone to support classroom activities; 2 How do students experience mobile phone use to support classoom activities? This study employed qualitative method. To collect data, there were some technique used: questionnaire and observation.  Students participated in this study were 70 students. Findings showed that student had positive perception and attitude toward mobile phone to support classroom activities. In classroom they used mobile phone to support classroom activitis. Reading E-Book that support subject, playing Audio and Video File, operating offline dictionary were activities supported by mobile phone use.

  7. Classroom tandem – Outlining a model for language learning and ınstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katri Karjalaınen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to outline classroom tandem by comparing it with informal tandem learning contexts and other language instruction methods. Classroom tandem is used for second language instruction in mixed language groups in the subjects of Finnish and Swedish as L2. Tandem learning entails that two persons with different mother tongues learn each other’s native languages in reciprocal cooperation. The students function, in turns, as a second language learner and as a model in the native language. We aim to give an overview description of the interaction in classroom tandem practice. The empirical data consists of longitudinal video recordings of meetings of one tandem dyad within a co-located Swedishmedium and Finnish-medium school. Focus in the analysis is on the language aspects the informants orient to and topicalize in their interaction. The language aspects vary depending on what classroom activities they are engaged in, text-based or oral activities.

  8. Classroom Management and Students' Self-Esteem: Creating Positive Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirdag, Seyithan

    2015-01-01

    Middle school students experience substantial changes in their emotion and cognition while they grow. They have mixed feelings, which may negatively affect their motivation, self-esteem, and academic success due to different classroom management strategies of their teachers. There is available research about motivation of middle school students…

  9. Transitions in Classroom Technology: Instructor Implementation of Classroom Management Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, David; Chung, Christina; Sun, Jerry Chih-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The authors look at how business instructor needs are fulfilled by classroom management software (CMS), such as Moodle, and why instructors are sometimes slow to implement it. Instructors at different universities provided both qualitative and quantitative responses regarding their use of CMS. The results indicate that the top needs fulfilled by…

  10. The Single and Combined Effects of Multiple Intensities of Behavior Modification and Methylphenidate for Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in a Classroom Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiano, Gregory A.; Pelham, William E., Jr.; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Burrows-MacLean, Lisa; Coles, Erika K.; Chacko, Anil; Wymbs, Brian T.; Walker, Kathryn S.; Arnold, Fran; Garefino, Allison; Keenan, Jenna K.; Onyango, Adia N.; Hoffman, Martin T.; Massetti, Greta M.; Robb, Jessica A.

    2007-01-01

    Currently behavior modification, stimulant medication, and combined treatments are supported as evidence-based interventions for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in classroom settings. However, there has been little study of the relative effects of these two modalities and their combination in classrooms. Using a within-subject design, the…

  11. Estimating Subjective Probabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Fountain, John; Harrison, Glenn W.

    Subjective probabilities play a central role in many economic decisions, and act as an immediate confound of inferences about behavior, unless controlled for. Several procedures to recover subjective probabilities have been proposed, but in order to recover the correct latent probability one must...

  12. Estimating Subjective Probabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Fountain, John; Harrison, Glenn W.

    2014-01-01

    Subjective probabilities play a central role in many economic decisions and act as an immediate confound of inferences about behavior, unless controlled for. Several procedures to recover subjective probabilities have been proposed, but in order to recover the correct latent probability one must ...

  13. Subjective meaning: an introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijnbergen-Huitink, Janneke; van Wijbergen-Huitink, Janneke; Meier, Cécile

    This introductory chapter traces some of the considerations on the basis of which relativistic approaches to subjective meaning became en vogue. In doing so, the chapter provides an overview of the relevant linguistic and philosophical issues when developing a treatment of subjectivity. In addition,

  14. Subjective safety in traffic.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    The term ‘subjective safety in traffic’ refers to people feeling unsafe in traffic or, more generally, to anxiety regarding being unsafe in traffic for oneself and/or others. Subjective safety in traffic can lead to road users limiting their mobility and social activities, which is one of the

  15. Subjective poverty line definitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Flik; B.M.S. van Praag (Bernard)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we will deal with definitions of subjective poverty lines. To measure a poverty threshold value in terms of household income, which separates the poor from the non-poor, we take into account the opinions of all people in society. Three subjective methods will be discussed

  16. Control Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This feature class represents electric power Control Areas. Control Areas, also known as Balancing Authority Areas, are controlled by Balancing Authorities, who are...

  17. Using the Flipped Classroom to Bridge the Gap to Generation Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillispie, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    The flipped classroom is a student-centered approach to learning that increases active learning for the student compared to traditional classroom-based instruction. In the flipped classroom model, students are first exposed to the learning material through didactics outside of the classroom, usually in the form of written material, voice-over lectures, or videos. During the formal teaching time, an instructor facilitates student-driven discussion of the material via case scenarios, allowing for complex problem solving, peer interaction, and a deep understanding of the concepts. A successful flipped classroom should have three goals: (1) allow the students to become critical thinkers, (2) fully engage students and instructors, and (3) stimulate the development of a deep understanding of the material. The flipped classroom model includes teaching and learning methods that can appeal to all four generations in the academic environment. During the 2015 academic year, we implemented the flipped classroom in the obstetrics and gynecology clerkship for the Ochsner Clinical School in New Orleans, LA. Voice-over presentations of the lectures that had been given to students in prior years were recorded and made available to the students through an online classroom. Weekly problem-based learning sessions matched to the subjects of the traditional lectures were held, and the faculty who had previously presented the information in the traditional lecture format facilitated the problem-based learning sessions. The knowledge base of students was evaluated at the end of the rotation via a multiple-choice question examination and the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) as had been done in previous years. We compared demographic information and examination scores for traditional teaching and flipped classroom groups of students. The traditional teaching group consisted of students from Rotation 2 and Rotation 3 of the 2014 academic year who received traditional

  18. Operational Area Environmental Evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey-White, Brenda Eileen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nagy, Michael David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wagner, Katrina Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Goodman, Thomas Richard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Herring, Allen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Catechis, Christopher S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kinghorn, Aubrianna Nicole [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johnson, Ellie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Barthel, Michael David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Casaus, Benito [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The Operational Area Environmental Evaluation update provides a description of activities that have the potential to adversely affect natural and cultural resources, including soil, air, water, biological, ecological, and historical resources. The environmental sensitivity of an area is evaluated and summarized, which may facilitate informed management decisions as to where development may be prohibited, restricted, or subject to additional requirements.

  19. Flipped classroom: a bridge towards new challenges in elementary education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Llanos García

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, the educational stage in Spain has been characterized by an evident transformation with regards to the methodology to apply in classrooms of the different educational stages. The lack of motivation largely of the students invites to restructure an educational system anchored in the time. There is a need to adapt the contents and the methods of transmission, following the new reality that surrounds to the students of the present. In this sense, the information and communications technology (ICT, aims to be an instrument of transmission and engine of change towards new bridges of learning. In particular, the flipped classroom model consists of inverting the way of explaining the educational contents that transform the figure of the teacher and the student. This work proposes a methodology to implement the flipped classroom model in the area of elementary education. In this way, the education and the ICT are merged in transforming the classroom in an environment that incites to be creative, to enhance collaborative working practices, to establish discussion, and to encourage to think about.

  20. Educators who believe: understanding the enthusiasm of teachers who use digital games in the classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen Stieler-Hunt

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study used qualitative methods to explore why some educators embrace the use of digital game-play (DGP in the classroom. The results indicated that these teachers had a very strong belief that DGP could be beneficial for learning which stemmed from experiencing their own form of subjective success with using DGP in the classroom, availing themselves of information and advocacy about using DGP in the classroom and personal experiences with DGP either through their own DGP or through watching their own children play games. They also shared positive attitudes towards information and communication technologies generally and had initially been invited to use DGP in the classroom by someone in authority. Their use of DGP was also something that they felt made them different to other teachers. Applying these findings to Rogers’ Diffusion of Innovations theory predicted that the diffusion rate of using DGP in the classroom will continue to be slow. Finally, this study indicates that teachers need to experience their own form of subjective ‘success’ in order to find DGP valuable and this subjective ‘success’ often goes beyond test score performance.

  1. Sustaining Change in Every Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidemann, Sandra; Chang, Claire; Hewitt, Deb; Menninga, Beth

    2007-01-01

    Words Work! and Community Action Head Start have been working together for seven years to provide training, consultation, mentoring, and resources to teachers in pilot classrooms as they learned to implement effective early literacy strategies. In its work with teachers, Words Work! developed a culture "where ongoing assessment, reflective…

  2. A Classroom Experiment on Banking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassis, Mary Mathewes; Hazlett, Denise; Ygosse Battisti, Jolanda E.

    2012-01-01

    This classroom experiment uses double oral auction credit markets to illustrate the role of banks as financial intermediaries. The experiment demonstrates how risk affects market interest rates in the presence of asymmetric information. It provides fodder for a discussion of the moral-hazard problem of deposit insurance and its impact on depositor…

  3. Alternative Approaches to Classroom Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David

    1992-01-01

    Reexamines the notion of "teaching." Drawing on data from a range of classrooms, as well as from recently published teaching texts, particular attention is focused on the question: "What do we mean by teaching/instruction?" (eight references) (Author/JL)

  4. Distractions in the Wireless Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugeja, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the difficulty faced by educators in fighting inappropriate use of technology among students inside the classrooms. It is not uncommon for teachers to find some of their students logging on to MySpace and eBay during lectures. Due to these types of scenarios, some teachers have started to ban laptops and cellular phones…

  5. Robotics Competitions and Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benke, Gertraud

    2012-01-01

    This paper looks at the distinctions between science classrooms and the robotics competition described in the article "Examining the mediation of power in a collaborative community: engaging in informal science as authentic practice" written by Anton Puvirajah, Geeta Verma and Horace Webb. Using the framework of "productive disciplinary…

  6. Relationships in the Flipped Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollum, Brett M.; Fleming, Cassidy L.; Plotnikoff, Kara M.; Skagen, Darlene N.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of flipped classrooms in chemistry, and identifies relationships as a major factor impacting the success of flipped instruction methods. Examination of student interview data reveals factors that affect the development of peer-peer, peer-peer leader, and peer-expert relationships in firstyear general chemistry…

  7. Mental Mapping: A Classroom Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Les

    1978-01-01

    Examines potential uses of mental maps in the classroom by reviewing research efforts, providing an example of the differences between mental maps of two student groups, and suggesting how to use mental maps in the geography curriculum. Mental mapping (or cognitive mapping) refers to individuals' processes of collecting, storing, and retrieving…

  8. Creative Drama in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annarella, Lorie A.

    The use of creative drama in the classroom is a student-focused process where experiential learning can be fostered and developed within any given curriculum. It can help students to develop divergent thinking skills, inventive creativity, and cognitive thinking skills, and it can stimulate the development of oral and written communication skills.…

  9. Acoustical Modifications for the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandell, Carl C.; Smaldino, Joseph J.

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews procedures for evaluating, measuring, and modifying noise and reverberation levels in the classroom environment. Recommendations include: relocating children away from high noise sources, such as fans, air conditioners, heating ducts, and faulty lighting fixtures, using sound-absorbing materials, using acoustical ceiling tile…

  10. Crisis Intervention in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, J. R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Provides information and specific checklists for understanding and implementing classroom crisis intervention. Includes (1) definition of a crisis; (2) development of a crisis plan; (3) phases of a crisis; and (4) steps in crisis intervention. Stresses the role of the teacher in recognizing and intervening in a crisis. (KS)

  11. Raising Beetles in a Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Erla

    This guide is designed to provide elementary school teachers with a harmless, inexpensive, clean, odorless, and easy-to-care-for insect-rearing project for the classroom. The following topics are included: (1) instructions for the care and feeding of the beetle larvae; (2) student activities for observing larval characteristics and behavior…

  12. The Classroom Animal: Flour Beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David C.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the flour beetle, "Tribolium confusum," and its life cycle, habitat, culturing requirements, and some possible uses of this beetle as a classroom animal. Discusses what children could learn from flour beetles. Explains how to get rid of beetles found in foods at home. (CW)

  13. Mapping the Classroom Emotional Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Shane T.; Bimler, David; Evans, Ian M.; Kirkland, John; Pechtel, Pia

    2012-01-01

    Harvey and Evans (2003) have proposed that teachers' emotional skills, as required in the classroom, can be organized into a five-dimensional model. Further research is necessary to validate this model and evaluate the importance of each dimension of teacher emotion competence for educational practice. Using a statistical method for mapping…

  14. The STEAM-Powered Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Charlie

    2017-01-01

    An instructional coach argues that STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics) programming combined with problem-based learning can offer rich academic experiences--and not just in science classrooms. He outlines relevant problem-based lesson ideas, and discusses ways school leaders can better support instructional practices…

  15. Classroom Management with Exceptional Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Diane; Freeman, Jennifer; Simonsen, Brandi; Sugai, George

    2017-01-01

    Effective and engaging instruction is the cornerstone of any well-managed classroom. Even the best behavior support practices will not lead to academic achievement if the academic instruction is ineffective. Specific teacher practices associated with improved student behavior include high rates of opportunities to respond, direct instruction, and…

  16. Multiple Intelligence for Every Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Pokey

    2003-01-01

    An overview is presented of multiple intelligence (MI) theory along with practical applications of the model. Three basic aspects of the theory (teaching strategies, curricular adaptations, and student assessment) are described relative to the infusion of MI theory in general education classrooms to ensure appropriate inclusion for students with…

  17. Using Technology in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boles, Stephanie Reeve

    2011-01-01

    The author describes how she has come to use technology in her classroom over the years. Her main topics include using the internet, experiencing podcasts, using technology for assessment, and recording results from science research. (Contains 3 online resources and 5 figures.)

  18. Practicing Hospitality in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwell, Rebecca; Huyser, Mackenzi

    2013-01-01

    This article explores pedagogical approaches to teaching students how to practice hospitality toward the other. Using case examples from the college classroom, the authors discuss the roots of Christian hospitality and educational theory on transformative learning to explore how students experience engaging with others after they have…

  19. Bringing reality into the classroom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heck, A.

    2009-01-01

    Technology offers ample opportunities to bring reality into the classroom. Students and teachers nowadays have many tools to work in an authentic way with real data in mathematics and science education. However, much research and development are still needed to create a consistent learning

  20. Intercultural Communication in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Steven P.; Guerra, Patricia L.; Garcia, Shernaz B.

    This document reviews the existing literature on intercultural communication (ICC) and ties it to teacher-student classroom interactions, exploring ways that teachers can respond to cultural incongruities and reduce the cultural clashes they experience between themselves and students from different cultural backgrounds. Section 1,…

  1. Using QR Codes in Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetner, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    For years, many schools and districts have had strict policies banning the use of students' personal electronic devices in classrooms. However, some schools are beginning to embrace the educational value of handheld Web-enabled devices that students already bring to school each day. As teachers begin to explore the educational opportunities that…

  2. Constructivist Pedagogy in Primary Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainer, Julie; Guyton, Edi; Bowen, Christie

    Noting the difficulty in translating constructivist theory into effective practice, this study examined how primary school teachers implemented constructivist education into their kindergarten through second-grade classrooms. Participating in the study were six teachers who had received master's degrees from a constructivist program and who had…

  3. Language Alternation in University Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, T. A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the alternate use of Arabic and English in the context of a university classroom, where a policy to use the former language in place of the latter was being implemented. Analysis of a sample of recorded university lectures of English and Arabic medium classes in sciences and humanities reveals that teachers use code switching,…

  4. Population Materials for Classroom Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social Education, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Presents classroom materials developed by the Population Reference Bureau for use by teachers and students in exploring population trends, urban development, immigration patterns, demographic shifts, and relationship of human beings to their environments. Included are graphs, charts, tables, and maps. (Author/DB)

  5. Multitasking in the University Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burak, Lydia

    2012-01-01

    Although research evidence indicates that multitasking results in poorer learning and poorer performance, many students engage with text messaging, Facebook, internet searching, emailing, and instant messaging, while sitting in university classrooms. Research also suggests that multitasking may be related to risk behaviors. This study's purpose…

  6. Creating a Literate Classroom Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGrella, Jeanne Berthelot

    A literate classroom environment immerses a student in a rich, stimulating, interactive, and purposeful print and language environment which is designed to provide for success in reading, writing, listening, and speaking and the needs of individuals responsible for their own learning in a natural, non-competitive, non-threatening, risk-taking…

  7. English Teachers Classroom Assessment Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saefurrohman; Balinas, Elvira S.

    2016-01-01

    The new language assessment policies in the Philippines and in Indonesia have impact on English teachers' assessment practices. Classroom assessment; as mandated in the current curriculum of both countries swifts from sources of information to the inseparable process of teaching and learning. This study describes Filipino and Indonesian high…

  8. Teachers' Regulation of the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, William K., Jr.

    The nature of teachers' control in classrooms is explored in order: to understand the tension created when noneducators superimpose their rules on the regime of teachers at work and to learn something of a general nature about the antagonism between regulators and those they regulate. Teachers' regulatory powers are based on coercion, exchange, or…

  9. "Project Psychology": A Classroom Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Bethany K. B.; Hussey, Heather D.

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe an original and unique series of classroom group-work activities organized as a competitive game called "Project Psychology," which was implemented in an Introduction to Psychology course. The project goals included increasing student participation, interest, content comprehension, and motivation. Fostering…

  10. Group Work in Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Debbie; Tolmie, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    This article considers how students might work together in small groups, from two to eight, in either a primary or secondary science classroom. The nature of group work can vary widely and could include, for example, a pair carrying out an illustrative experiment, a trio or quad debating climate change, or six or seven rehearsing how they will…

  11. Student Presentations in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, David L.

    2008-01-01

    For many years, the author has been involving his students in classroom teaching of their own classes. The day-to-day practice is described, and the advantages and disadvantages for both the instructor and the students are discussed. Comparisons with the Moore Method of teaching are made.

  12. Flipping the statistics classroom in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Todd A

    2014-04-01

    Flipped classrooms are so named because they substitute the traditional lecture that commonly encompasses the entire class period with active learning techniques, such as small-group work. The lectures are delivered instead by using an alternative mode--video recordings--that are made available for viewing online outside the class period. Due to this inverted approach, students are engaged with the course material during the class period, rather than participating only passively. This flipped approach is gaining popularity in many areas of education due to its enhancement of student learning and represents an opportunity for utilization by instructors of statistics courses in nursing education. This article presents the author's recent experiences with flipping a statistics course for nursing students in a PhD program, including practical considerations and student outcomes and reaction. This transformative experience deepened the level of student learning in a way that may not have occurred using a traditional format. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. A Classroom Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Ruth E.

    Operations at the Boston Center for Blind Children's day preschool for visually-impaired, multihandicapped children (3- to 8-years-old) are described. The following stages of evaluation and planning are identified: development of a treatment plan based on performance in the developmental areas of self-help, language, motor skills, socialization,…

  14. A Review of Criteria for Outdoor Classroom in Selected Tertiary Educational Institutions in Kuala Lumpur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheran, Y.; Fadzidah, A.; Nur Fadhilah, R.; Farha, S.

    2017-12-01

    A proper design outdoor environment in higher institutions contributes to the students’ learning performances and produce better learning outcomes. Campus surrounding has the potential to provide an informal outdoor learning environment, especially when it has the existing physical element, like open spaces and natural features, that may support the learning process. However, scholarly discourses on environmental aspects in tertiary education have minimal environmental inputs to fulfill students’ needs for outdoor exposure. Universities have always emphasized on traditional instructional methods in classroom settings, without concerning the importance of outdoor classroom towards students’ learning needs. Moreover, the inconvenience and discomfort outdoor surrounding in campus environment offers a minimal opportunity for students to study outside the classroom, and students eventually do not favor to utilize the spaces because no learning facility is provided. Hence, the objective of this study is to identify the appropriate criteria of outdoor areas that could be converted to be outdoor classrooms in tertiary institutions. This paper presents a review of scholars’ work in regards to the characteristics of the outdoor classrooms that could be designed as part of contemporary effective learning space, for the development of students’ learning performances. The information gathered from this study will become useful knowledge in promoting effective outdoor classroom and create successful outdoor learning space in landscape campus design. It I hoped that the finding of this study could provide guidelines on how outdoor classrooms should be designed to improve students’ academic achievement.

  15. Unifying Subjectivity and Objectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murugesan Chandrasekaran

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of modern science to the progress of civilization is immeasurable. Even its tendency toward exclusive concentration on the objective world has had salutary effects of great value. Modern science has wiped away much that was merely superstitious or speculative. Its rejection of unfounded opinions and prejudices has helped the thinking mind question conventional beliefs, shed preferences and prejudices, and challenge established authority. But modern systems thinking inherited from natural science is the suppression of the subjective dimension of reality. Many complex systems are an attempt to define and represent all subjective experience in physical terms. The modern man has a bias towards objectivity. The powerful influence of sense impressions on his mind and thinking makes him ignore the subjective experience and consider only objective facts as a valid, legitimate and representation of reality. Observing objective factors that are physical is easier than observing subjective factors that are subtle. The mechanistic view of reality has led to the rejection of the role of the individual in social development as insignificant. The individuals determine the development of society. Their social power has its roots both in subjective factors and objective factors. Economy, politics, society, and culture are inseparable dimensions of a single integrated reality. Subject and object constitute an integrated whole. The mind sees them as separate and independent. Or it views one as completely subordinate to the other. Unbiased approach to the study of all human experiences may prove that subject and object are interdependent dimensions or elements of reality.

  16. Climate Change Education Today in K-12: What's Happening in the Earth and Space Science Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, M. A.; National Earth Science Teachers Association

    2011-12-01

    Climate change is a highly interdisciplinary topic, involving not only multiple fields of science, but also social science and the humanities. There are many aspects of climate change science that make it particularly well-suited for exploration in the K-12 setting, including opportunities to explore the unifying processes of science such as complex systems, models, observations, change and evolution. Furthermore, this field of science offers the opportunity to observe the nature of science in action - including how scientists develop and improve their understanding through research and debate. Finally, climate change is inherently highly relevant to students - indeed, students today will need to deal with the consequences of the climate change. The science of climate change is clearly present in current science education standards, both at the National level as well as in the majority of states. Nonetheless, a significant number of teachers across the country report difficulties addressing climate change in the classroom. The National Earth Science Teachers Association has conducted several surveys of Earth and space science educators across the country over the past several years on a number of issues, including their needs and concerns, including their experience of external influences on what they teach. While the number of teachers that report external pressures to not teach climate change science are in the minority (and less than the pressure to not teach evolution and related topics), our results suggest that this pressure against climate change science in the K-12 classroom has grown over the past several years. Some teachers report being threatened by parents, being encouraged by administrators to not teach the subject, and a belief that the "two sides" of climate change should be taught. Survey results indicate that teachers in religious or politically-conservative districts are more likely to report difficulties in teaching about climate change than in

  17. RUSSIAN LAW SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.N. Bakhrakh

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The question about the subjects of law branches is concerning the number of most important and difficult in law science. Its right decision influences on the subject of law regulation, precise definition of addressees of law norms, the volume of their rights and duties, the limits of action of norms of Main part of the branch, its principles. Scientific investigations, dedicated to law subjects system, promote the development of recommendations for the legislative and law applying activity; they are needed for scientific work organization and student training, for preparing qualified lawyers.

  18. Florida Master Teacher Program: Testing Teacher Subject Matter Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavely, Carolyn; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The efforts of the Florida Institute for Instructional Research and Practice in designing, developing, and analyzing the subject area knowledge tests of the Florida Master Teacher Program are described. A total of 13 subject area examinations was developed in 1984-85, and 5 additional tests were developed the following year. For each subject area…

  19. Energy Data Base: Subject Thesaurus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raridon, M.H. (ed.)

    1987-09-01

    This seventh edition of the subject thesaurus contains the standard vocabulary of indexing terms (descriptors) developed and structured by the technical staff of the Office of Scientific and Technical Information as part of its subject indexing activities for building and maintaining the Energy Data Base (EDB) and other energy information data bases for the Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of this thesaurus is to enhance the efficiency of information retrieval from these data bases. This structured vocabulary reflects the scope of DOE's research, development, and technological programs and encompasses terminology derived not only from the basic sciences for also from areas of energy resources, conservation, safety, environmental impact, and regulation. There are 21,080 valid descriptors and 5683 forbidden terms in this edition of the Thesaurus. These descriptors are listed alphabetically.

  20. The effects of acoustical refurbishment of classrooms on teachers' perceived noise exposure and noise-related health symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, Jesper; Lund, Søren Peter; Persson, Roger; Challi, Rasmus; Lindskov, Janni Moon; Nielsen, Per Møberg; Larsen, Per Knudgaard; Toftum, Jørn

    2016-02-01

    To investigate whether acoustical refurbishment of classrooms for elementary and lower secondary grade pupils affected teachers' perceived noise exposure during teaching and noise-related health symptoms. Two schools (A and B) with a total of 102 teachers were subjected to an acoustical intervention. Accordingly, 36 classrooms (20 and 16 in school A and school B, respectively) were acoustically refurbished and 31 classrooms (16 and 15 in school A and school B, respectively) were not changed. Thirteen classrooms in school A were interim "sham" refurbished. Control measurements of RT and activity sound levels were measured before and after refurbishment. Data on perceived noise exposure, disturbance attributed to different noise sources, voice symptoms, and fatigue after work were collected over a year in a total of six consecutive questionnaires. Refurbished classrooms were associated with lower perceived noise exposure and lower ratings of disturbance attributed to noise from equipment in the class compared with unrefurbished classrooms. No associations between the classroom refurbishment and health symptoms were observed. Before acoustical refurbishment, the mean classroom reverberation time was 0.68 (school A) and 0.57 (school B) and 0.55 s in sham refurbished classrooms. After refurbishment, the RT was approximately 0.4 s in both schools. Activity sound level measurements confirmed that the intervention had reduced the equivalent sound levels during lessons with circa 2 dB(A) in both schools. The acoustical refurbishment was associated with a reduction in classroom reverberation time and activity sound levels in both schools. The acoustical refurbishment was associated with a reduction in the teachers' perceived noise exposure, and reports of disturbance from equipment in the classroom decreased. There was no significant effect of the refurbishment on the teachers' voice symptoms or fatigue after work.