WorldWideScience

Sample records for subice mixed layer

  1. Vibroseismic-Streamer Systems to Image Sub-Ice Properties and Englacial Layering on Large Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, A.; Eisen, O.; Lambrecht, A.; Christoph, M.; Hofstede, C. M.; Kristoffersen, Y.; Blenkner, R.; Hilmarsson, S.

    2014-12-01

    After testing different vibroseismic systems on firn from small scale vibrators to heavy trucks we now established an operational vibroseis system, excellent to image englacial layering and sub-ice conditions below ice sheets and shelves. This allowed the longest vibroseismic traverse with continuous data acquisition in Antarctica, along a route from the Ekströmisen over the grounding line onto the ice sheet. We covered about 500 km distance within three weeks including 407 km seismic profile. 110 km of 6-fold data were acquired with 125 m shot spacing and 25 km of 3-fold data with 250 m shot spacing. The remaining distance was covered with 1-fold data. The operational vibroseismic system consists of a vibroseis Buggy 'EnviroVibe' in combination with a 1.5 km long snow streamer towed behind a Pistenbully. The vibroseis on Mattracks was set onto a polyethylene sled to distribute the load of the vibroseis on the surface and allow flexibility on rough surfaces. The highest production was reached for an operation speed of 6 km/h ensuring minimal damage to the 1.5 km streamer, consisting of 60 channels with 8 geophones each. Still the setup allowed for the measurement of 20 km of seismic 6-fold data per day or 40 km/day for 1-fold data. This survey allowed covering the bathymetry below the Ekströmisen, the bed topography within the catchment area of the Ekstömisen as well as englacial features. It was possible to map the ice shelf bottom and produce a clear image of the sea bed. The production speed allowed for high fold-coverage increasing image quality compared to 1-fold seismic data. Especially, the imaging of deepenings within the bed topography and their steep sidewalls shows the advantages and the additional information that can be gained from these seismic surveys compared to airborne or ground-penetrating radar data. We present the overall characteristics of the different vibroseis sources and mounting set-ups investigated over the last six years and provide

  2. An Argo mixed layer climatology and database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holte, James; Talley, Lynne D.; Gilson, John; Roemmich, Dean

    2017-06-01

    A global climatology and database of mixed layer properties are computed from nearly 1,250,000 Argo profiles. The climatology is calculated with both a hybrid algorithm for detecting the mixed layer depth (MLD) and a standard threshold method. The climatology provides accurate information about the depth, properties, extent, and seasonal patterns of global mixed layers. The individual profile results in the database can be used to construct time series of mixed layer properties in specific regions of interest. The climatology and database are available online at http://mixedlayer.ucsd.edu. The MLDs calculated by the hybrid algorithm are shallower and generally more accurate than those of the threshold method, particularly in regions of deep winter mixed layers; the new climatology differs the most from existing mixed layer climatologies in these regions. Examples are presented from the Labrador and Irminger Seas, the Southern Ocean, and the North Atlantic Ocean near the Gulf Stream. In these regions the threshold method tends to overestimate winter MLDs by approximately 10% compared to the algorithm.

  3. Lidar observations of mixed layer dynamics - Tests of parameterized entrainment models of mixed layer growth rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boers, R.; Eloranta, E. W.; Coulter, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Ground based lidar measurements of the atmospheric mixed layer depth, the entrainment zone depth and the wind speed and wind direction were used to test various parameterized entrainment models of mixed layer growth rate. Six case studies under clear air convective conditions over flat terrain in central Illinois are presented. It is shown that surface heating alone accounts for a major portion of the rise of the mixed layer on all days. A new set of entrainment model constants was determined which optimized height predictions for the dataset. Under convective conditions, the shape of the mixed layer height prediction curves closely resembled the observed shapes. Under conditions when significant wind shear was present, the shape of the height prediction curve departed from the data suggesting deficiencies in the parameterization of shear production. Development of small cumulus clouds on top of the layer is shown to affect mixed layer depths in the afternoon growth phase.

  4. Chlorophyll modulation of mixed layer thermodynamics in a mixed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    model used in this study, hereafter referenced to as OPYC, is an updated version of the model developed by Oberhuber (1993). It is an isopyc- nal model with an actively coupled mixed layer and detailed flux parameterization. The model cov- ers global ocean from North Pole to Antarctica, with sea ice processes included.

  5. Cumulus cloud venting of mixed layer ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, J. K. S.; Shipley, S. T.; Browell, E. V.; Brewer, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Observations are presented which substantiate the hypothesis that significant vertical exchange of ozone and aerosols occurs between the mixed layer and the free troposphere during cumulus cloud convective activity. The experiments utilized the airborne Ultra-Violet Differential Absorption Lidar (UV-DIAL) system. This system provides simultaneous range resolved ozone concentration and aerosol backscatter profiles with high spatial resolution. Evening transects were obtained in the downwind area where the air mass had been advected. Space-height analyses for the evening flight show the cloud debris as patterns of ozone typically in excess of the ambient free tropospheric background. This ozone excess was approximately the value of the concentration difference between the mixed layer and free troposphere determined from independent vertical soundings made by another aircraft in the afternoon.

  6. Mixed convection in fluid superposed porous layers

    CERN Document Server

    Dixon, John M

    2017-01-01

    This Brief describes and analyzes flow and heat transport over a liquid-saturated porous bed. The porous bed is saturated by a liquid layer and heating takes place from a section of the bottom. The effect on flow patterns of heating from the bottom is shown by calculation, and when the heating is sufficiently strong, the flow is affected through the porous and upper liquid layers. Measurements of the heat transfer rate from the heated section confirm calculations. General heat transfer laws are developed for varying porous bed depths for applications to process industry needs, environmental sciences, and materials processing. Addressing a topic of considerable interest to the research community, the brief features an up-to-date literature review of mixed convection energy transport in fluid superposed porous layers.

  7. Mixed layer in a stably stratified fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Califano

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a numerical study of the generation and evolution of a mixed layer in a stably stratified layer of Boussinesq fluid. We use an external forcing in the equation of motion to model the experimental situation where the mechanical energy input is due to an oscillating grid. The results of 2D and 3D numerical simulations indicate that the basic mechanism for the entrainment is the advection of the temperature field. This advection tends to produce horizontally thin regions of small temperature vertical gradients (jets where the hydrodynamics forces are nearly zero. At the bottom of these structures, the buoyancy brakes the vertical motions. The jets are also characterized by the presence of very short horizontal scales where the thermal diffusion time turn out to be comparable with the dynamics time. As a result, the temperature field is well mixed in a few dynamics times. This process stops when the mechanical energy injected becomes comparable with the energy dissipated by viscosity.

  8. On the compressibility effects in mixing layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khlifi Hechmi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies of compressible flows carried out in the past few years have shown that the pressure-strain is the main indicator of the structural compressibility effects. Undoubtedly, this terms plays a key role toward strongly changing magnitude of the turbulent Reynolds stress anisotropy. On the other hand, the incompressible models of the pressure-strain correlation have not correctly predicted compressible turbulence at high speed shear flow. Consequently, a correction of these models is needed for precise prediction of compressibility effects. In the present work, a compressibility correction of the widely used incompressible Launder Reece and Rodi model making their standard coefficients dependent on the turbulent and convective Mach numbers is proposed. The ability of the model to predict the developed mixing layers in different cases from experiments of Goebel and Dutton is examined. The predicted results with the proposed model are compared with DNS and experimental data and those obtained by the compressible model of Adumitroiae et al. and the original LRR model. The results show that the essential compressibility effects on mixing layers are well captured by the proposed model.

  9. Linear stability analysis of interactions between mixing layer and boundary layer flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengjun LIU

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The linear instabilities of incompressible confluent mixing layer and boundary layer were analyzed. The mixing layers include wake, shear layer and their combination. The mean velocity profile of confluent flow is taken as a superposition of a hyperbolic and exponential function to model a mixing layer and the Blasius similarity solution for a flat plate boundary layer. The stability equation of confluent flow was solved by using the global numerical method. The unstable modes associated with both the mixing and boundary layers were identified. They are the boundary layer mode, mixing layer mode 1 (nearly symmetrical mode and mode 2 (nearly anti-symmetrical mode. The interactions between the mixing layer stability and the boundary layer stability were examined. As the mixing layer approaches the boundary layer, the neutral curves of the boundary layer mode move to the upper left, the resulting critical Reynolds number decreases, and the growth rate of the most unstable mode increases. The wall tends to stabilize the mixing layer modes at low frequency. In addition, the mode switching behavior of the relative level of the spatial growth rate between the mixing layer mode 1 and mode 2 with the velocity ratio is found to occur at low frequency.

  10. The Bryophyte Flora of Subice Mountain (Aydın

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesut KIRMACI

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the bryophyte flora of Subice Mountain (Aydın has been investigated. At the result of identifications of 1000 bryophyte taxa which collected from the area, totally 148 bryophyte taxa were reported. Among them, 125 moss taxa belonging to 20 families and 55 genera, 22 liverwort taxa belonging to 13 families and 16 genera and 2 hornwort taxa belonging to one families and 2 genera are represented.

  11. Applied model for the growth of the daytime mixed layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, E.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1991-01-01

    A slab model is proposed for developing the height of the mixed layer capped by stable air aloft. The model equations are closed by relating the consumption of energy (potential and kinetic) at the top of the mixed layer to the production of convective and mechanical turbulent kinetic energy with...

  12. Nomogram for the height of the daytime mixed layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyren, K.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1999-01-01

    A method to construct a nomogram of the daytime mixed-layer-height evolution is presented. The nomogram will be specific for a given location and land surface type and is intended to be an easy tool to achieve a general understanding of mixed-layer behaviour. Also it is a pedagogical graphical one......-pager that displays the bulk of data that controls the evolution of the mixed layer. Nomograms from northern, central and southern Europe are presented and discussed. Comparison with data from two sites shows good agreement although the nomograms overestimated the mixing height when it was low....

  13. Chlorophyll modulation of mixed layer thermodynamics in a mixed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the Arabian Sea, as the chlorophyll concentrations peak in October (3mg/m3) after the summer plankton bloom induced by coastal upwelling, the chlorophyll induced biological heating enhanced the sea surface temperature (SST) by as much as 0.6°C and sub-layer temperature decreases and sub-layer thickness ...

  14. Temperature Versus Salinity Gradients Below the Ocean Mixed Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    13] The effects of density compensated gradients below the mixed layer are not limited to ocean circulation and cli- mate. Since sound speed and...The Impact of Spice on Ocean circulation . The second is the 6.2 program element 62435N Full Column Mixing for Numerical Ocean Models. The authors would...and F. Paparella (2003), Compensation and alignment of thermohaline gradients in the ocean mixed layer, J. Phys. Oceanogr., 33, 2214–2223, doi

  15. Analytical solution for the convectively-mixed atmospheric boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwersloot, H.G.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2013-01-01

    Based on the prognostic equations of mixed-layer theory assuming a zeroth order jump at the entrainment zone, analytical solutions for the boundary-layer height evolution are derived with different degrees of accuracy. First, an exact implicit expression for the boundary-layer height for a situation

  16. Structure of binary mixed polymer Langmuir layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardini, C.

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of preparing 2D stable emulsions through mixing of homopolymers in a Langmuir monolayer is the core topic of this thesis. While colloid science has achieved well established results in the study of bulk dispersed systems, accounts on properties of mixed monomolecular films are fewer,

  17. Nomogram for the height of the daytime mixed layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyren, K. [Ericsson EriSoft AB, Umeaa (Sweden); Gryning, S.E. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    We present a nomogram that provide information about the general behaviour of the mixed layer at a given location. The nomogram is meant to be a practical and easy to use tool to determine the height of the mixed layer for i.e. weather forecaster, air pollution studies and planning of meteorological experiments. Use of the nomogram is restricted to flat, relatively homogeneous terrain. Inhomogeneous terrain with patch scales of 10 km or more might create organised circulation like i.e. lake breezes. The data represented in the nomogram is computed using a meteorological preprocessor and climatological temperature data for the location. The nomogram is simplified but retain main physical processes that control the evolution of the mixed layer and can be easily constructed for any chosen location on land. Nomogram of the mixed layer behavior at the location of Cabauw, the Netherlands is shown and discussed. (au)

  18. Constitutive behaviour of mixed mode loaded adhesive layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Högberg, J.L.; Sørensen, Bent F.; Stigh, U.

    2007-01-01

    Mixed mode testing of adhesive layer is performed with the Mixed mode double Cantilever Bean? specimen. During the experiments, the specimens are loaded by transversal and/or shear forces; seven different mode mixities are tested. The J-integral is used to evaluate the energy dissipation in the f......Mixed mode testing of adhesive layer is performed with the Mixed mode double Cantilever Bean? specimen. During the experiments, the specimens are loaded by transversal and/or shear forces; seven different mode mixities are tested. The J-integral is used to evaluate the energy dissipation...... in the failure process zone. The constitutive behaviour of the adhesive layer is obtained by a so called inverse method and fitting an existing mixed mode cohesive model, which uses a coupled formulation to describe a mode dependent constitutive behaviour. The cohesive parameters are determined by optimizing...

  19. Laboratory simulations of the atmospheric mixed-layer in flow ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laboratory study of the influence of complex terrain on the interface between a well-mixed boundary layer and an elevated stratified layer was conducted in the towing-tank facility of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The height of the mixed layer in the daytime boundary layer can have a strong influence on the concentration of pollutants within this layer. Deflections of streamlines at the height of the interface are primarily a function of hill Froude number (Fr), the ratio of mixed-layer height (zi) to terrain height (h), and the crosswind dimension of the terrain. The magnitude of the deflections increases as Fr increases and zi / h decreases. For mixing-height streamlines that are initially below the terrain top, the response is linear with Fr; for those initially above the terrain feature the response to Fr is more complex. Once Fr exceeds about 2, the terrain related response of the mixed layer interface decreases somewhat with increasing Fr (toward more neutral flow). Deflections are also shown to increase as the crosswind dimensions of the terrain increases. Comparisons with numerical modeling, limited field data and other laboratory measurements reported in the literature are favorable. Additionally, visual observations of dye streamers suggests that the flow structure exhibited for our elevated inversions passing over three dimensional hills is similar to that reported in the literature for continuously stratified flow over two-dimensional h

  20. The total energy flux leaving the ocean's mixed layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimac, Antonija; von Storch, Jin-Song; Eden, Carsten

    2017-04-01

    Interior density mixing contributes to drive the large-scale ocean circulation. The energy needed for this mixing is believed to be supplied predominantly by the tidal and wind forcing. In this study, we focus on the wind-power input to three different types of motions, that is, near-inertial waves, sub-inertial fluctuations, and time-mean flows. Surface winds can generate near-inertial waves which propagate freely into the ocean's interior and after escaping the mixed layer contribute to interior mixing. Winds also input power into the ocean to maintain the time-mean circulation and to generate sub-inertial fluctuations, either by the vertical or horizontal shear instability of the large-scale flows, or directly via wind induced fluctuations at the ocean surface. The energy of both the sub-inertial fluctuations and the time-mean flow will be eventually dissipated (or transferred to the internal gravity wave field or small scale turbulence). However, the exact portion of the power that escapes the turbulent mixed layer and that can potentially affect the interior mixing, is still unknown. The total energy flux leaving the ocean's spatially and seasonally varying mixed layer is estimated using a global 1/10° ocean general circulation model. From the total wind-power input of 3.33 TW into near-inertial waves (0.35 TW) sub-inertial fluctuations (0.87 TW), and the time-mean circulation (2.11 TW), 0.92 TW leave the mixed layer; with 0.04 TW (11.4%) due to near-inertial motions, 0.07 TW (8.3%) due to sub-inertial fluctuations, and 0.81 TW (38.4%) due to time-mean motions. Of the 0.81 TW from the time-mean motions, 0.5 TW result from the projection of the horizontal flux onto the sloped bottom of the mixed layer. This projection is negligible for the transient fluxes. The spatial structure of the vertical flux is determined principally by the wind stress curl. The mean and sub-inertial fluxes leaving the mixed layer are approximately 40-50% smaller than the respective

  1. The sensitivity of stratocumulus-capped mixed layers to cloud droplet concentration: do LES and mixed-layer models agree?

    OpenAIRE

    Uchida, J.; C. S. Bretherton; Blossey, P.N.

    2010-01-01

    The sensitivity of a stratocumulus-capped mixed layer to a change in cloud droplet concentration is evaluated with a large-eddy simulation (LES) and a mixed layer model (MLM), to see if the two model types agree on the strength of the second aerosol indirect effect. Good agreement can be obtained if the MLM entrainment closure explicitly reduces entrainment efficiency proportional to the rate of cloud droplet sedimentation at cloud top for cases in which the LES-simulated boundary layer remai...

  2. Internal wave energy radiated from a turbulent mixed layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munroe, James R., E-mail: jmunroe@mun.ca [Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, Newfoundland A1B 3X7 (Canada); Sutherland, Bruce R., E-mail: bsuther@ualberta.ca [Departments of Physics and Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    We examine mixed-layer deepening and the generation of internal waves in stratified fluid resulting from turbulence that develops in response to an applied surface stress. In laboratory experiments the stress is applied over the breadth of a finite-length tank by a moving roughened conveyor belt. The turbulence in the shear layer is characterized using particle image velocimetry to measure the kinetic energy density. The internal waves are measured using synthetic schlieren to determine their amplitudes, frequencies, and energy density. We also perform fully nonlinear numerical simulations restricted to two dimensions but in a horizontally periodic domain. These clearly demonstrate that internal waves are generated by transient eddies at the integral length scale of turbulence and which translate with the background shear along the base of the mixed layer. In both experiments and simulations we find that the energy density of the generated waves is 1%–3% of the turbulent kinetic energy density of the turbulent layer.

  3. High-speed cinematography of compressible mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, R.; Loth, Eric

    1994-07-01

    Experiments are performed using high-speed film cinematography to temporally resolve compressible planar mixing layer structures using shadowgraphs and planar light sheet visualization. The technique is relatively inexpensive and allows multiple images. The time-dependent shadowgraph and Mie scattering images are documented with a rotating mirror camera operating at approximately 350 kHz. The results show the presence of large scale structures in the mixing layer which flatten as they convect downstream. Both spatial and temporal covariances have been obtained through digital image processing which yield, on average, elliptical structures with convective speeds above the isentropic prediction, and non-isotropic streamwise and transverse scalar transport fluctuations.

  4. Thin TaC layer produced by ion mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barna, Árpád; Kotis, László; Pécz, Béla

    2012-01-01

    Ion-beam mixing in C/Ta layered systems was investigated. C 8nm/Ta 12nm and C 20nm/Ta 19nm/C 20nm layer systems were irradiated by Ga+ ions of energy in the range of 2–30keV. In case of the 8nm and 20nm thick C cover layers applying 5–8keV and 20–30keV Ga+ ion energy, respectively resulted...... in strongly asymmetric ion mixing; the carbon was readily transported to the Ta layer, while the reverse process was much weaker. Because of the asymmetrical transport the C/TaC interface remained sharp independently from the applied fluence. The carbon transported to the Ta layer formed Ta......Cx. The stoichiometry of the carbide produced varied along the depth. The TaCx layer contained implanted Ga, the concentration of which decreased with increasing depth. The thickness of the TaCx layer could be tailored by the ion fluence and energy making possible to produce coating layer of desired thickness....

  5. Estimation of urban mixed layer height in Zanjan using LIDAR ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The mixed layer height () for Zanjan city, well above mean sea level compared to other major cities in the world,is found to be between 1.4 km typically in spring and 2.2 km in summer, for synoptic calm conditions. Also, the MM5 forecast model with a proper boundary layer scheme (MRF)is used to estimate which ...

  6. The sensitivity of stratocumulus-capped mixed layers to cloud droplet concentration: do LES and mixed-layer models agree?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Uchida

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of a stratocumulus-capped mixed layer to a change in cloud droplet concentration is evaluated with a large-eddy simulation (LES and a mixed layer model (MLM. The strength of the second aerosol indirect effect simulated by the two model types agrees within 50% for cases in which the LES-simulated boundary layer remains well mixed, if the MLM entrainment closure includes the effects of cloud droplet sedimentation.

    To achieve this agreement, parameters in the MLM entrainment closure and the drizzle parameterization must be retuned to match the LES. This is because the LES advection scheme and microphysical parameterization significantly bias the entrainment rate and precipitation profile compared to observational best guesses. Before this modification, the MLM simulates more liquid water path and much more drizzle at a given droplet concentration than the LES and is more sensitive to droplet concentration, even undergoing a drizzle-induced boundary layer collapse at low droplet concentrations. After this modification, both models predict a comparable decrease of cloud liquid water path as droplet concentration increases, cancelling 30–50% of the Twomey effect for our case. The agreement breaks down at the lowest simulated droplet concentrations, for which the boundary layer in the LES is not well mixed.

    Our results highlight issues with both types of model. Potential LES biases due to inadequate resolution, subgrid mixing and parameterized microphysics must be carefully considered when trying to make a quantitative inference of the second indirect effect from an LES of a stratocumulus-topped boundary layer. On the other hand, even slight internal decoupling of the boundary layer invalidates the central assumption of an MLM, substantially limiting the range of conditions that MLM-predicted sensitivities to droplet concentration are meaningful.

  7. The sensitivity of stratocumulus-capped mixed layers to cloud droplet concentration: do LES and mixed-layer models agree?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, J.; Bretherton, C. S.; Blossey, P. N.

    2010-05-01

    The sensitivity of a stratocumulus-capped mixed layer to a change in cloud droplet concentration is evaluated with a large-eddy simulation (LES) and a mixed layer model (MLM). The strength of the second aerosol indirect effect simulated by the two model types agrees within 50% for cases in which the LES-simulated boundary layer remains well mixed, if the MLM entrainment closure includes the effects of cloud droplet sedimentation. To achieve this agreement, parameters in the MLM entrainment closure and the drizzle parameterization must be retuned to match the LES. This is because the LES advection scheme and microphysical parameterization significantly bias the entrainment rate and precipitation profile compared to observational best guesses. Before this modification, the MLM simulates more liquid water path and much more drizzle at a given droplet concentration than the LES and is more sensitive to droplet concentration, even undergoing a drizzle-induced boundary layer collapse at low droplet concentrations. After this modification, both models predict a comparable decrease of cloud liquid water path as droplet concentration increases, cancelling 30-50% of the Twomey effect for our case. The agreement breaks down at the lowest simulated droplet concentrations, for which the boundary layer in the LES is not well mixed. Our results highlight issues with both types of model. Potential LES biases due to inadequate resolution, subgrid mixing and parameterized microphysics must be carefully considered when trying to make a quantitative inference of the second indirect effect from an LES of a stratocumulus-topped boundary layer. On the other hand, even slight internal decoupling of the boundary layer invalidates the central assumption of an MLM, substantially limiting the range of conditions that MLM-predicted sensitivities to droplet concentration are meaningful.

  8. The Total Energy Flux Leaving the Ocean's Mixed Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rimac, Antonija; von Storch, Jin-Song; Eden, Carsten

    The total energy flux leaving the ocean’s spatially and seasonally varying mixed layer is estimated using a global ⅝1/10° ocean general circulation model. From the total wind-power input of 3.33 TW into near-inertial waves (0.35 TW), subinertial fluctuations (0.87 TW), and the time-mean circulation

  9. Study of Under-ice Blooms In the Chukchi Ecosystem (SUBICE) (HLY1401, EM122)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The primary objectives of SUBICE were to determine the spatial distribution of large under-ice phytoplankton blooms on the Chukchi Shelf and the physical mechanisms...

  10. Measurements of Molecular Mixing in a High Schmidt Number Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueschke, N J; Schilling, O; Youngs, D L; Andrews, M

    2007-12-03

    Molecular mixing measurements are performed for a high Schmidt number (Sc {approx} 10{sup 3}), small Atwood number (A {approx} 7.5 x 10{sup -4}) buoyancy-driven turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer in a water channel facility. Salt was added to the top stream to create the desired density difference. The degree of molecular mixing was measured as a function of time by monitoring a diffusion-limited chemical reaction between the two fluid streams. The pH of each stream was modified by the addition of acid or alkali such that a local neutralization reaction occurred as the two fluids molecularly mixed. The progress of this neutralization reaction was tracked by the addition of phenolphthalein - a pH-sensitive chemical indicator - to the acidic stream. Accurately calibrated backlit optical techniques were used to measure the average concentration of the colored chemical indicator. Comparisons of chemical product formation for pre-transitional buoyancy- and shear-driven mixing layers are given. It is also shown that experiments performed at different equivalence ratios (acid/alkali concentration) can be combined to obtain a mathematical relationship between the colored product formed and the density variance. This relationship was used to obtain high-fidelity, quantitative measures of the degree of molecular mixing which are independent of probe resolution constraints. The dependence of such mixing parameters on the Schmidt and Reynolds numbers is examined by comparing the current Sc {approx} 10{sup 3} measurements with Sc = 0.7 gas-phase and Pr = 7 liquid-phase measurements. This comparison indicates that the Schmidt number has a large effect on the bulk quantity of mixed fluid at small Reynolds numbers Re{sub h} < 10{sup 3}. At late times, all mixing parameters indicated a greater degree of molecular mixing and a decreased Schmidt number dependence. Implications for the development and quantitative assessment of turbulent transport and mixing models appropriate for

  11. Comparison of mixed layer models predictions with experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faggian, P.; Riva, G.M. [CISE Spa, Divisione Ambiente, Segrate (Italy); Brusasca, G. [ENEL Spa, CRAM, Milano (Italy)

    1997-10-01

    The temporal evolution of the PBL vertical structure for a North Italian rural site, situated within relatively large agricultural fields and almost flat terrain, has been investigated during the period 22-28 June 1993 by experimental and modellistic point of view. In particular, the results about a sunny day (June 22) and a cloudy day (June 25) are presented in this paper. Three schemes to estimate mixing layer depth have been compared, i.e. Holzworth (1967), Carson (1973) and Gryning-Batchvarova models (1990), which use standard meteorological observations. To estimate their degree of accuracy, model outputs were analyzed considering radio-sounding meteorological profiles and stability atmospheric classification criteria. Besides, the mixed layer depths prediction were compared with the estimated values obtained by a simple box model, whose input requires hourly measures of air concentrations and ground flux of {sup 222}Rn. (LN)

  12. Numerical investigation of algebraic oceanic turbulent mixing-layer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón-Rebollo, T.; Gómez-Mármol, M.; Rubino, S.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we investigate the finite-time and asymptotic behaviour of algebraic turbulent mixing-layer models by numerical simulation. We compare the performances given by three different settings of the eddy viscosity. We consider Richardson number-based vertical eddy viscosity models. Two of these are classical algebraic turbulence models usually used in numerical simulations of global oceanic circulation, i.e. the Pacanowski-Philander and the Gent models, while the other one is a more recent model (Bennis et al., 2010) proposed to prevent numerical instabilities generated by physically unstable configurations. The numerical schemes are based on the standard finite element method. We perform some numerical tests for relatively large deviations of realistic initial conditions provided by the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO) array. These initial conditions correspond to states close to mixing-layer profiles, measured on the Equatorial Pacific region called the West-Pacific Warm Pool. We conclude that mixing-layer profiles could be considered as kinds of "absorbing configurations" in finite time that asymptotically evolve to steady states under the application of negative surface energy fluxes.

  13. Direct numerical simulations of the double scalar mixing layer. Part I: Passive scalar mixing and dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Chong M.; de Bruyn Kops, Stephen M.; Mortensen, Mikael

    2006-06-01

    The double scalar mixing layer (DSML) is a canonical problem for studying the mixing of multiple streams and, with reaction, combustion of the partially premixed type. In a DSML, a third stream consisting of a premixture of the reactants is introduced in between the pure fuel and air streams of the classic twin-feed or binary mixing problem. The well-known presumed probability density function (PDF), such as the β-PDF, can adequately model passive scalar mixing for the binary mixing problem on which state-of-the-art turbulent combustion models such as conditional moment closure and flamelet approaches rely. However, the β-PDF model, now a standard in CFD simulation, cannot describe turbulent mixing involving multiple streams; e.g., the asymmetric three-stream mixing characterizing the DSML. In this paper, direct numerical simulations of the DSML are performed to make available a high-fidelity database for developing more general, fine-scale mixing models required to compute turbulent combustion problems of practical engineering interest, which usually involve mixing between multiple streams. In this first part of two investigations, nonreacting numerical experiments are presented with emphasis on the nontrivial distributions of the passive scalar and its dissipation rate. Mapping closure modeling is applied to describe the PDFs and conditional dissipation rates of a single mixture fraction.

  14. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program — KClO3sub>/Icing Sugar (-100 mesh) Mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Daniel N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pollard, Colin J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (IHD-NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Sorenson, Daniel N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (IHD-NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Remmers, Daniel L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (IHD-NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Moran, Jesse S. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (IHD-NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Shelley, Timothy J. [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL/RXQF), Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Whipple, Richard E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-05-02

    The Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program is conducting a proficiency study for Small-Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) testing of homemade explosives (HMEs). Described here are the results for impact, friction, electrostatic discharge, and scanning calorimetry analysis of a mixture of KClO3 sized through a 100-mesh sieve mixed with icing sugar, also sized through a 100-mesh sieve—KClO3sub>/icing sugar (-100) mixture. This material was selected because of the challenge of performing SSST testing of a mixture of two solid materials. The mixture was found to be: 1) more sensitive to impact than RDX, with sensitivity similar to PETN, 2) the same or more sensitive to friction than PETN, and 3) less sensitive to spark than RDX. The analysis showed that the mixture has thermally stability similar to RDX and is perhaps more energetic upon decomposition but variable results indicate sampling issues.

  15. Mixing layer height and air pollution levels in urban area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Klaus; Wagner, Patrick; Emeis, Stefan; Jahn, Carsten; Muenkel, Christoph; Suppan, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Ceilometers are applied by KIT/IMK-IFU to detect layering of the lower atmosphere continuously. This is necessary because not only wind speed and direction but also atmospheric layering and especially the mixing layer height (MLH) influence exchange processes of ground level emissions. It will be discussed how the ceilometer monitoring information is used to interpret the air pollution near the ground. The information about atmospheric layering is continuously monitored by uninterrupted remote sensing measurements with the Vaisala ceilometer CL51 which is an eye-safe commercial mini-lidar system. Special software for this ceilometer provides routine retrievals of lower atmosphere layering from vertical profiles of laser backscatter data. An intensive measurement period during the winter 2011/2012 is studied. The meteorological influences upon air pollutant concentrations are investgated and the correlations of air pollutant concentrations with ceilometer MLH are determined. Benzene was detected by department of Applied Climatology and Landscape Ecology, University of Duisburg-Essen (UDE) with a gas chromatograph during the measurement period. The meteorological data are collected by UDE and the monitoring station Essen of the German national meteorological service DWD. The concentrations of the air pollutants NO, NO2 and PM10 are provided by the national air pollution network LANUV.

  16. Fluctuations of a passive scalar in a turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2013-09-19

    The turbulent flow originating downstream of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a mixing layer has great relevance in many applications, ranging from atmospheric physics to combustion in technical devices. The mixing of a substance by the turbulent velocity field is usually involved. In this paper, a detailed statistical analysis of fluctuations of a passive scalar in the fully developed region of a turbulent mixing layer from a direct numerical simulation is presented. Passive scalar spectra show inertial ranges characterized by scaling exponents −4/3 and −3/2 in the streamwise and spanwise directions, in agreement with a recent theoretical analysis of passive scalar scaling in shear flows [Celani et al., J. Fluid Mech. 523, 99 (2005)]. Scaling exponents of high-order structure functions in the streamwise direction show saturation of intermittency with an asymptotic exponent ζ∞=0.4 at large orders. Saturation of intermittency is confirmed by the self-similarity of the tails of the probability density functions of the scalar increments at different scales r with the scaling factor r−ζ∞ and by the analysis of the cumulative probability of large fluctuations. Conversely, intermittency saturation is not observed for the spanwise increments and the relative scaling exponents agree with recent results for homogeneous isotropic turbulence with mean scalar gradient. Probability density functions of the scalar increments in the three directions are compared to assess anisotropy.

  17. On the application of mixed-layer theory to the stratocumulus-topped boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunyan

    In this dissertation, we explore the applicability of mixed-layer theory to represent stratocumulus-topped boundary layer (STBL). Mixed-layer theory is used to study the STBL diurnal cycle. Our results show that the diurnal evolution of cloud thickness is sensitive to the entrainment efficiency. Specifically with low entrainment efficiencies, the cloud thickness evolution is in a better agreement with observations. We explain these effects through a consideration of the equilibrium state of cloud boundaries and their adjustment timescales. The susceptibility of cloud albedo to droplet number density dominates the entrainment effects. This suggests that estimates of aerosol indirect effects from stratocumulus clouds will not be particularly sensitive to the way entrainment is represented in large-scale models. The low-cloud amount (LCA) is diagnosed based on the equilibrium solutions of the mixed-layer model (MLM). ECMWF Reanalysis (ERA-40) data serve as large-scale boundary conditions. Results are compared to the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project D2 data, especially in light of the relationship between the LCA and the lower-troposphere stability (LTS). Our results show that the synoptic variability in divergence contributes to LCA climatology. This climatology reproduced from MLM is more sensitive to processes that redistribute the mass field as compared to heat and moisture. Other large-scale conditions contribute to LCA depending on their correlation with the LTS and the strength of the LTS signal in individual regions. An autoregressive noise model is proposed to represent the synoptic variability in divergence based on analysis of ERA-40 data. Using this model, the equilibrium cloud fraction is shown as a function of the mean divergence value, the noise level, and the noise autocorrelation time scale. Mixed-layer model with such noise produces a reasonable comparison to observations in LCA climatology. An interaction rule is specified based on

  18. Simulation of the convective mixed layer in Athens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, H.P. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    The region of Athens, Greece, has a highly complicated terrain with irregular coastline and mountains next to the sea. This results in complex flow fields. A case study of a simulation of a sea breeze with the Karlsruhe Atmospheric Mesoscale model KAMM is presented together with remarks on the advection of mixed layer air. The valley of Athens is open to the sea towards the south-west and surrounded by mountains on the other sides. Gaps between the mountains channel the flow into the valley. Simulations were done for 14 September 1994 to compare them with measurements at 6 masts by Risoe during the MEDCAPHOT-TRACE experiment. (au)

  19. Mixing layer height as an indicator for urban air quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiß, Alexander; Wiegner, Matthias; Bonn, Boris; Schäfer, Klaus; Forkel, Renate; von Schneidemesser, Erika; Münkel, Christoph; Chan, Ka Lok; Nothard, Rainer

    2017-08-01

    The mixing layer height (MLH) is a measure for the vertical turbulent exchange within the boundary layer, which is one of the controlling factors for the dilution of pollutants emitted near the ground. Based on continuous MLH measurements with a Vaisala CL51 ceilometer and measurements from an air quality network, the relationship between MLH and near-surface pollutant concentrations has been investigated. In this context the uncertainty of the MLH retrievals and the representativeness of ground-based in situ measurements are crucial. We have investigated this topic by using data from the BAERLIN2014 campaign in Berlin, Germany, conducted from June to August 2014. To derive the MLH, three versions of the proprietary software BL-VIEW and a novel approach COBOLT were compared. It was found that the overall agreement is reasonable if mean diurnal cycles are considered. The main advantage of COBOLT is the continuous detection of the MLH with a temporal resolution of 10 min and a lower number of cases when the residual layer is misinterpreted as mixing layer. We have calculated correlations between MLH as derived from the different retrievals and concentrations of pollutants (PM10, O3 and NOx) for different locations in the metropolitan area of Berlin. It was found that the correlations with PM10 are quite different for different sites without showing a clear pattern, whereas the correlation with NOx seems to depend on the vicinity of emission sources in main roads. In the case of ozone as a secondary pollutant, a clear correlation was found. We conclude that the effects of the heterogeneity of the emission sources, chemical processing and mixing during transport exceed the differences due to different MLH retrievals. Moreover, it seems to be unrealistic to find correlations between MLH and near-surface pollutant concentrations representative for a city like Berlin (flat terrain), in particular when traffic emissions are dominant. Nevertheless it is worthwhile to use

  20. Mixing layer height as an indicator for urban air quality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Geiß

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The mixing layer height (MLH is a measure for the vertical turbulent exchange within the boundary layer, which is one of the controlling factors for the dilution of pollutants emitted near the ground. Based on continuous MLH measurements with a Vaisala CL51 ceilometer and measurements from an air quality network, the relationship between MLH and near-surface pollutant concentrations has been investigated. In this context the uncertainty of the MLH retrievals and the representativeness of ground-based in situ measurements are crucial. We have investigated this topic by using data from the BAERLIN2014 campaign in Berlin, Germany, conducted from June to August 2014. To derive the MLH, three versions of the proprietary software BL-VIEW and a novel approach COBOLT were compared. It was found that the overall agreement is reasonable if mean diurnal cycles are considered. The main advantage of COBOLT is the continuous detection of the MLH with a temporal resolution of 10 min and a lower number of cases when the residual layer is misinterpreted as mixing layer. We have calculated correlations between MLH as derived from the different retrievals and concentrations of pollutants (PM10, O3 and NOx for different locations in the metropolitan area of Berlin. It was found that the correlations with PM10 are quite different for different sites without showing a clear pattern, whereas the correlation with NOx seems to depend on the vicinity of emission sources in main roads. In the case of ozone as a secondary pollutant, a clear correlation was found. We conclude that the effects of the heterogeneity of the emission sources, chemical processing and mixing during transport exceed the differences due to different MLH retrievals. Moreover, it seems to be unrealistic to find correlations between MLH and near-surface pollutant concentrations representative for a city like Berlin (flat terrain, in particular when traffic emissions are dominant. Nevertheless it is

  1. Cooling of a layered plate under mixed conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. D. Zaman

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the temperature distribution in an infinite plate composed of two dissimilar materials. We suppose that half of the upper surface (y=h,−∞mixed boundary value problem is reduced to a functional equation of the Wiener-Hopf type by use of the Fourier transform. We then seek the solution using the analytic continuation and an extended form of the Liouville theorem. The temperature distribution in the two layers can then be written in a closed form by use of the inversion integral.

  2. Real-Gas Effects on Binary Mixing Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okong'o, Nora; Bellan, Josette

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a computational study of real-gas effects on the mean flow and temporal stability of heptane/nitrogen and oxygen/hydrogen mixing layers at supercritical pressures. These layers consist of two counterflowing free streams of different composition, temperature, and density. As in related prior studies reported in NASA Tech Briefs, the governing conservation equations were the Navier-Stokes equations of compressible flow plus equations for the conservation of total energy and of chemical- species masses. In these equations, the expressions for heat fluxes and chemical-species mass fluxes were derived from fluctuation-dissipation theory and incorporate Soret and Dufour effects. Similarity equations for the streamwise velocity, temperature, and mass fractions were derived as approximations to the governing equations. Similarity profiles showed important real-gas, non-ideal-mixture effects, particularly for temperature, in departing from the error-function profile, which is the similarity solution for incompressible flow. The temperature behavior was attributed to real-gas thermodynamics and variations in Schmidt and Prandtl numbers. Temporal linear inviscid stability analyses were performed using the similarity and error-function profiles as the mean flow. For the similarity profiles, the growth rates were found to be larger and the wavelengths of highest instability shorter, relative to those of the errorfunction profiles and to those obtained from incompressible-flow stability analysis. The range of unstable wavelengths was found to be larger for the similarity profiles than for the error-function profiles

  3. Uprising measurements for the study of convective mixing in the upper mixed layer of a lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planella, J.; Roget, E.; Sanchez, X.

    2012-04-01

    During periods of calm wind conditions, convective mixing can become the most relevant mixing mechanism in the upper layer, determining the evolution of the water column stratification and leading to the transport of phytoplankton. However, the generation and vanishing of the convective boundary layer, an important process in lakes which affects the surface mixed layer intermittently, is poorly studied because it requires measurements close to the water surface which are difficult to obtain. Here we present the characteristics of a measuring system operated from land to obtain uprising measurements at 200 m from the coast in a lake and which allowed us to sample the water column up to the surface and therefore to follow the night convective cycle. The measuring profiler used in this system contained sensors of small scale shear, fast response temperature and precision conductivity and temperature, together with other optical sensors to obtain the Chlorophyll and turbidity contents. We present a series of 75 profiles measured with this device during 22 hours covering a night convective event. Data were recorded at the Boadella reservoirs in Catalonia, Spain, on the 28th of March 2010. High sampling rates together with slow profiling velocity allowed the small spatial resolution needed to resolve the turbulent scales and obtain several turbulent variables including the dissipation rate of thermal variance and turbulent kinetic energy. Based on these results we discuss the different turbulence characteristics in depth and their evolution during the entire cycle and we review different velocity scalings used for the convective layer by other authors. In addition, meteorological data during the campaign are available from a meteorological station located 1 km from the lake so existing energy parameterizations within the convective layer are compared with our data. Finally, during the second part of the experiment, the velocity of the whole water column was recorded with

  4. Laboratory simulations of the atmospheric mixed layer in flow over complex terrain

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A laboratory study of the influence of complex terrain on the interface between a well-mixed boundary layer and an elevated stratified layer was conducted in the...

  5. Chlorophyll modulation of mixed layer thermodynamics in a mixed-layer isopycnal general circulation model - An example from Arabian Sea and Equatorial Pacific

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nakamoto, S.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Oberhuber, J.M.; Saito, H.; Muneyama, K.

    in the ocean isopycnal general circulation model (OPYC). A higher abundance of chlorophyll increases absorption of solar irradiance and heating rate in the upper ocean, resulting in decreasing the mixed layer thickness than they would be under clear waer...

  6. Amendment to "Analytical Solution for the Convectively-Mixed Atmospheric Boundary Layer": Inclusion of Subsidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwersloot, H.G.; Arellano, de J.V.G.

    2013-01-01

    In Ouwersloot and Vila-Guerau de Arellano (Boundary-Layer Meteorol. doi: 10. 1007/s10546-013-9816-z, 2013, this issue), the analytical solutions for the boundary-layer height and scalar evolutions are derived for the convective boundary layer, based on the prognostic equations of mixed-layer slab

  7. Stochastic Theory of Turbulence Mixing by Finite Eddies in the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, H.; Leeuw, G. de; Maassen van den Brink, A.

    1995-01-01

    Turbulence mixing is treated by means of a novel formulation of nonlocal K-theory, involving sample paths and a stochastic hypothesis. The theory simplifies for mixing by exchange (strong-eddies) and is then applied to the boundary layer (involving scaling). This maps boundary layer turbulence onto

  8. An applied model for the height of the daytime mixed layer and the entrainment zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, E.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1994-01-01

    A model is presented for the height of the mixed layer and the depth of the entrainment zone under near-neutral and unstable atmospheric conditions. It is based on the zero-order mixed layer height model of Batchvarova and Gryning (1991) and the parameterization of the entrainment zone depth prop...

  9. Efficient charge balance in blue phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes by two types of mixed layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hyung Jin; Lee, Ho Won; Lee, Song Eun; Sun, Yong; Hwang, Kyo Min; Yoo, Han Kyu; Lee, Sung Kyu [Department of Information Display, Hongik University, Seoul 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Young, E-mail: wykim@hoseo.edu [Department of Green Energy & Semiconductor Engineering, Hoseo University, Asan 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Kwan, E-mail: kimyk@hongik.ac.kr [Department of Information Display, Hongik University, Seoul 121-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-31

    The authors have demonstrated a highly efficient and long-lifetime blue phosphorescent organic light emitting diode (PHOLED) that uses two types of mixed layers. The mixed layers play the role of carrier injection control and exciton generation zone extension. One of the layers is applied for mixing the hole transport layer (HTL) and host material at the HTL side for carrier injection control. The other works as a mixed electron transporting layer (ETL) and host material at the ETL side. The optimized blue PHOLED has been shown to achieve high performance owing to the mixed layer effects. It gave a maximum luminous efficiency of 25.55 cd/A, maximum external quantum efficiency of 13.05%, and lifetime of 7.24 h under 500 cd/m{sup 2}. These results indicate that applying mixed layers is a simple and efficient method that does not require significant structural change. - Highlights: • Highly efficient blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diode (PHOLEDs) • Hole transporting layer consists with mixed layer for delayed hole injection • The blue PHOLEDs with long lifetime due to suppression of quenching process.

  10. Numerical Investigations of Wave-Induced Mixing in Upper Ocean Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Changlong

    2017-04-01

    The upper ocean layer is playing an important role in ocean-atmosphere interaction. The typical characteristics depicting the upper ocean layer are the sea surface temperature (SST) and the mixed layer depth (MLD). So far, the existing ocean models tend to over-estimate SST and to under-estimate MLD, due to the inadequate mixing in the mixing layer, which is owing to that several processes related mixing in physics are ignored in these ocean models. The mixing induced by surface gravity wave is expected to be able to enhance the mixing in the upper ocean layer, and therefore the over-estimation of SST and the under-estimate of MLD could be improved by including wave-induced mixing. The wave-induced mixing could be accomplished by the physical mechanisms, such as wave breaking (WB), wave-induced Reynolds stress (WR), and wave-turbulence interaction (WT). The General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM) is employed to investigate the effects of the three mechanisms concerning wave-induced mixing. The numerical investigation is carried out for three turbulence closure schemes, say, k-epsilon, k-omega and Mellor-Yamada (1982), with the observational data from OSC Papa station and wave data from ECMWF. The mixing enhancement by various waved-induced mixing mechanisms is investigated and verified.

  11. Convection: a neglected pathway for downward transfer of wind energy in the oceanic mixed layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Wei

    2017-10-01

    Upper-ocean turbulent mixing plays a vital role in mediating air-sea fluxes and determining mixed-layer properties, but its energy source, especially that near the base of the mixed layer, remains unclear. Here we report a potentially significant yet rarely discussed pathway to turbulent mixing in the convective mixed layer. During convection, as surface fluid drops rapidly in the form of convective plumes, intense turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) generated via surface processes such as wave breaking is advected downward, enhancing TKE and mixing through the layer. The related power, when integrated over the global ocean except near the surface where the direct effect of breaking waves dominates, is estimated at O(1)TW, comparable to that required by maintaining the Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC). The mechanism in question therefore deserves greater research attention, especially in view of the potential significance of its proper representation in climate models.

  12. Copper (II) Schiff base complexes and their mixed thin layers with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Copper(II) Schiff base complexes and their mixed thin layers with ZnO nanoparticles. MAGDALENA ... Keywords. Thin layer; ZnO nanoparticles; copper complexes; AFM; SEM; fluorescence. ... Zinc oxide was synthesized using a simple homogeneous precipitation method with zinc acetate as a starting material. Thin layers ...

  13. Determination of the Mixing Layer Height Over two Sites, Using Pilot Balloons During the MILAGRO Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohrnschimmel, H.; Alonso, A. L.; Ángeles, F.; Sosa, G.; Varela, J.; Cárdenas, B.

    2007-12-01

    Among the mechanisms that affect air quality there is a variety of meteorological processes. An important process in this context are the changes in the mixing layer height during a day and over the year. The mixing layer height is the portion of the atmosphere close to the surface layer where air pollutants get diluted, without leaving this layer. Therefore, it is important to describe the variations in the height of the mixing layer, i.e. the vertical dilution of air pollution, since this is a process mitigating naturally the impact of emissions. There exist different methods to obtain information on the mixing layer height, among them radio soundings, the application of vertical wind profilers, and launching pilot balloons. In this study, pilot balloons have been used simultaneously over two sites of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area during the MILAGRO campaign in March 2006. The objective was to determine the vertical wind profiles and derive information on the mixing layer height. Daily, four pilot balloons were launched, at 9:00, 12:00, 15:00, and 18:00 hours, over Tenango del Aire (a rural area in the Southeast of Mexico City), and over Ciudad Universitaria, in the Southern metropolitan area. At some occasions, night time measurements have been carried out at 21:00 and 24:00. A variability of the diurnal evolution of the mixing layer was observed along March, which could be related to surface temperature. The diurnal evolution showed a sudden growth of the mixing layer between 9:00 and 12:00 hours. Data intercomparisons were carried out for pilot balloons versus radio soundings during a few days at a third site, Tula, in the North of Mexico City. Both intercomparisons showed that pilot balloons are an effective method to obtain information about the development of the mixing layer.

  14. Wetting of mixed OHH(2)O layers on Pt(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbitas, Georgina; Gallagher, Mark E; Darling, George R; Hodgson, Andrew

    2008-02-21

    We describe the effect of growth temperature and OHH(2)O composition on the wetting behavior of Pt(111). Changes to the desorption rate of ice films were measured and correlated to the film morphology using low energy electron diffraction and thermal desorption of chloroform to measure the area of multilayer ice and monolayer OHH(2)O exposed. Thin ice films roughen, forming bare (radical39 x radical39)R16 degrees water monolayer and ice clusters. The size of the clusters depends on growth temperature and determines their kinetic stability, with the desorption rate decreasing when larger clusters are formed by growth at high temperature. Continuous films of more than approximately 50 layers thick stabilize an ordered incommensurate ice film that does not dewet. OH coadsorption pins the first layer into registry with Pt, forming an ordered hexagonal (OH+H(2)O) structure with all the H atoms involved in hydrogen bonding. Although this layer has a similar honeycomb OH(x) skeleton to ice Ih, it is unable to reconstruct to match the bulk ice lattice parameter and does not form a stable wetting layer. Water aggregates to expose bare monolayer (OH+H(2)O), forming bulk ice crystallites whose size depend on preparation temperature. Increasing the proportion of water in the first layer provides free OH groups which stabilize the multilayer. The factors influencing multilayer wetting are discussed using density functional theory calculations to compare water adsorption on top of (OH+H(2)O) and on simple models for commensurate water structures. We show that both the (OH+H(2)O) structure and "H-down" water layers are poor proton acceptors, bonding to the first layer being enhanced by the presence of free OH groups. Formation of an ordered ice multilayer requires a water-metal interaction sufficient to wet the surface, but not so strong as to prevent the first layer relaxing to stabilize the interface between the metal and bulk ice.

  15. Seasonal mixed-layer dynamics in an eddy-resolving ocean circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Andreas; Ridgway, Ken R.

    2013-07-01

    Mean and seasonal mixed-layer depths (MLDs) derived from an eddy-resolving ocean general circulation model with a horizontal resolution of (1/10)° are validated with climatological observations. Associated heat budgets on seasonal timescales are analyzed for six boundary current regions with high eddy kinetic energy (Somali Current, Agulhas Current region, Kuroshio, East Australian Current, Gulf Stream, and Brazil-Malvinas/Falkland Confluence). In all of these regions and on seasonal timescales, (a) horizontal advection significantly contributes to the mixed-layer heat budget (MLHB) on eddy scales and locally exceeds ±5°C/month; (b) lateral mixing (calculated as a residual term) is similar in size to surface net heat flux, horizontal advection, and vertical entrainment in defining the mixed-layer temperature; (c) seasonal vertical entrainment has a cooling effect on mixed-layer temperature throughout the year in the regions investigated; and (d) a phase lag between MLD and changes in mixed-layer heat content exists such that local cooling (warming) in the mixed layer precedes maxima (minima) in MLD by 1-3 months. A rather complex picture emerges where the MLHB in ocean boundary currents on larger spatial scales is determined by net surface heat fluxes and entrainment, whereas local, eddy-related advection and stirring modulate the large-scale signals.

  16. A LES Study on Passive Mixing in Supersonic Shear Layer Flows Considering Effects of Baffle Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Zhao-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Under the background of dual combustor ramjet (DCR, a numerical investigation of supersonic mixing layer was launched, focused on the mixing enhancement method of applying baffles with different geometric configurations. Large eddy simulation with high order schemes, containing a fifth-order hybrid WENO compact scheme for the convective flux and sixth-order compact one for the viscous flux, was utilized to numerically study the development of the supersonic mixing layer. The supersonic cavity flow was simulated and the cavity configuration could influence the mixing characteristics, since the impingement process of large scale structures formed inside the cavity could raise the vorticity and promote the mixing. The effect of baffle's configurations on the mixing process was analyzed by comparing the flow properties, mixing efficiency, and total pressure loss. The baffle could induce large scale vortexes, promote the mixing layer to lose its stability easily, and then lead to the mixing efficiency enhancement. However, the baffle could increase the total pressure loss. The present investigation could provide guidance for applying new passive mixing enhancement methods for the supersonic mixing.

  17. Performance properties of asphalt mixes for rich bottom layers (RBL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureš, Petr; Fiedler, Jiří; Kašpar, Jiří; Sýkora, Michal; Hýzl, Petr

    2017-09-01

    The binder content of asphalt mixes has an important influence on the performance properties. Higher binder content improves fatigue resistance. That is why the concept of RBL was developed in USA and applied for “perpetual pavements”. However excessive binder content could lead to the decrease of the mix stiffness and to permanent deformations of asphalt pavement during hot summer. The advantages and limitations of RBL concept have been studied in research project CESTI. Fatigue tests of mixes with road bitumen and polymer modified bitumen and RBL were realised. Deformation behaviour of these mixes was also evaluated. The experience from the test section with RBL laid in 2015 will be presented. The results corresponded to expectations. However, low void content was obtained on one subsection. In spite of it, there were no permanent deformations during summer 2016. The analysis of methods for the prediction of the permanent deformation was also undertaken in research project CESTI. Some information about the results of these analysis related to the use of RBL will be also briefly mentioned.

  18. Development of a Hybrid RANS/LES Method for Compressible Mixing Layer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Reshotko, Eli

    2001-01-01

    A hybrid method has been developed for simulations of compressible turbulent mixing layers. Such mixing layers dominate the flows in exhaust systems of modem day aircraft and also those of hypersonic vehicles currently under development. The hybrid method uses a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) procedure to calculate wall bounded regions entering a mixing section, and a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) procedure to calculate the mixing dominated regions. A numerical technique was developed to enable the use of the hybrid RANS/LES method on stretched, non-Cartesian grids. The hybrid RANS/LES method is applied to a benchmark compressible mixing layer experiment. Preliminary two-dimensional calculations are used to investigate the effects of axial grid density and boundary conditions. Actual LES calculations, performed in three spatial directions, indicated an initial vortex shedding followed by rapid transition to turbulence, which is in agreement with experimental observations.

  19. Estimation of urban mixed layer height in Zanjan using LIDAR ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pollutants on radiation budget of the atmosphere. The lowest part of the atmosphere namely the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) has a thick- ness which is quite variable in time and space over land, ranging from hundreds of meters to a few kilometers (Stull 1988). However, over the ocean as the sea surface temperature ...

  20. Cultivated bacteria from the sub-ice algae-bacterial communities of Lake Baikal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Bashenkhaeva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A collection of pure cultures isolated from the sub-ice algae-bacterial communities inhabiting the lower ice surface of Lake Baikal was obtained. The differences in morphology of the cultured bacteria and their enzymatic activities were revealed by the methods of classical microbiology. The taxonomic affiliation of several cultures was determined by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing. They belong to the genera Pseudomonas putida, P. psychrophila, Methylobacterium extorquens, Rhodococcus aerolatus, Brevundimonas aurantiaca, B. vesicularis, Sphingomonas subarctica, Roseomonas frigidaqua, and Janthinobacterium lividum. These taxa are adapted to low-temperature environments.

  1. Results from Tests of Direct Wave Mixing in the Ocean’s Surface Mixed Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    The parameterization of direct wave mixing proposed by Qiao et al. (2004) was tested with data from the Ocean Weathership Station (OWS) Papa in the...improved the agreement between the predicted and observed sea-surface temperature (SST) at Papa . However, the results of the tests showed two significant...problems with the parameterization of the wave mixing. At OWS Papa , the wave mixing caused too much diffusion of heat through the seasonal

  2. Laboratory simulations of the atmospheric mixed-layer in flow over complex topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Steven G.; Snyder, William H.

    2017-02-01

    A laboratory study of the influence of complex terrain on the interface between a well-mixed boundary layer and an elevated stratified layer was conducted in the towing-tank facility of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The height of the mixed layer in the daytime boundary layer can have a strong influence on the concentration of pollutants within this layer. Deflections of streamlines at the height of the interface are primarily a function of hill Froude number (Fr), the ratio of mixed-layer height (zi) to terrain height (h), and the crosswind dimension of the terrain. The magnitude of the deflections increases as Fr increases and zi/h decreases. For mixing-height streamlines that are initially below the terrain top, the response is linear with Fr; for those initially above the terrain feature the response to Fr is more complex. Once Fr exceeds about 2, the terrain-related response of the mixed layer interface decreases somewhat with increasing Fr (toward more neutral flow). Deflections are also shown to increase as the crosswind dimensions of the terrain increase. Comparisons with numerical modeling, limited field data, and other laboratory measurements reported in the literature are favorable. Additionally, visual observations of dye streamers suggest that the flow structure exhibited for our elevated inversions passing over three dimensional hills is similar to that reported in the literature for continuously stratified flow over two-dimensional hills.

  3. Vortex-Transport Element Simulation of a Confined Mixing Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-01

    Vol. 125, pp. 397-410. Browand, F. E., and Ho, C.-M. (1983) Journal de Mecanique theorique et Aunliauee Numero Special, pp. 99-120. Chorin, A. J...layers was initiated by Givi and Jou (1988) using a hybrid pseudo-spectral second order finite difference scheme. In all cases, the Reynolds number was...confinement. Therefore, they can provide accurate simulations for high Reynolds number, spatially growing flows. Moreover, vortex methods optimize the

  4. Substantial energy input to the mesopelagic ecosystem from the seasonal mixed-layer pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Olmo, Giorgio; Dingle, James; Polimene, Luca; Brewin, Robert J. W.; Claustre, Hervé

    2016-11-01

    The ocean region known as the mesopelagic zone, which is at depths of about 100-1,000 m, harbours one of the largest ecosystems and fish stocks on the planet. Life in this region is believed to rely on particulate organic carbon supplied by the biological carbon pump. Yet this supply appears insufficient to meet mesopelagic metabolic demands. An additional organic carbon source to the mesopelagic zone could be provided by the seasonal entrainment of surface waters in deeper layers, a process known as the mixed-layer pump. Little is known about the magnitude and spatial distribution of this process globally or its potential to transport carbon to the mesopelagic zone. Here we combine mixed-layer depth data from Argo floats with satellite estimates of particulate organic carbon concentrations to show that the mixed-layer pump supplies an important seasonal flux of organic carbon to the mesopelagic zone. We estimate that this process is responsible for a global flux of 0.1-0.5 Pg C yr-1. In high-latitude regions where the mixed layer is usually deep, this flux amounts on average to 23% of the carbon supplied by fast sinking particles, but it can be greater than 100%. We conclude that the seasonal mixed-layer pump is an important source of organic carbon for the mesopelagic zone.

  5. Determination of regional heat fluxes from the growth of the mixed layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryning, S.E. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Batchvarova, E. [National Inst. of Meteorology and Hydrology, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1997-10-01

    The distribution of surface sensible heat flux is a critical factor in producing and modifying the mesoscale atmospheric flows, turbulence and evaporation. Parameterizations that assume homogeneous land characteristics are inappropriate to represent the spatial variability often found in nature. One possibility to overcome this problem is to increase the resolution of the model grid which demands unrealistic computing resources and data for model initialization. Area averaged fluxes can be obtained from aircraft measurements. It is essential that the flights are performed at a height where the individual surface features are not felt. A large number of flights and appropriate pattern to meet the task are needed in order to achieve a fair statistics. The mixed layer grows in response to the regional turbulent fluxes including the aggregation and small scale processes. The region of influence in upwind direction is typically 20 times the height of the mixed layer for convective and 100 times the height of the mixed layer for atmospheric near neutral conditions. In this study we determine the regional integrated sensible heat flux from information on the evolution of the mixed layer over the area. The required information to use the method can be derived from wind speed and temperature profiles obtained by radio-soundings when performed frequently enough to provide a reasonably detailed structure of the development of the mixed-layer. The method is applied to estimate the regional heat flux over the NOPEX experimental area for three days during the campaign in 1994. (au)

  6. Hydrocarbon biodegradation by Arctic sea-ice and sub-ice microbial communities during microcosm experiments, Northwest Passage (Nunavut, Canada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garneau, Marie-Ève; Michel, Christine; Meisterhans, Guillaume; Fortin, Nathalie; King, Thomas L; Greer, Charles W; Lee, Kenneth

    2016-10-01

    The increasing accessibility to navigation and offshore oil exploration brings risks of hydrocarbon releases in Arctic waters. Bioremediation of hydrocarbons is a promising mitigation strategy but challenges remain, particularly due to low microbial metabolic rates in cold, ice-covered seas. Hydrocarbon degradation potential of ice-associated microbes collected from the Northwest Passage was investigated. Microcosm incubations were run for 15 days at -1.7°C with and without oil to determine the effects of hydrocarbon exposure on microbial abundance, diversity and activity, and to estimate component-specific hydrocarbon loss. Diversity was assessed with automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis and Ion Torrent 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bacterial activity was measured by (3)H-leucine uptake rates. After incubation, sub-ice and sea-ice communities degraded 94% and 48% of the initial hydrocarbons, respectively. Hydrocarbon exposure changed the composition of sea-ice and sub-ice communities; in sea-ice microcosms, Bacteroidetes (mainly Polaribacter) dominated whereas in sub-ice microcosms, the contribution of Epsilonproteobacteria increased, and that of Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes decreased. Sequencing data revealed a decline in diversity and increases in Colwellia and Moritella in oil-treated microcosms. Low concentration of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in sub-ice seawater may explain higher hydrocarbon degradation when compared to sea ice, where DOM was abundant and composed of labile exopolysaccharides. © Fisheries and Oceans Canada [2016].

  7. Evolution of a Western Arctic Ice Ocean Boundary Layer and Mixed Layer Across a Developing Thermodynamically Forced Marginal Ice Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    in the Canada Basin seasonal ice zone. The subsections below outline the new contributions to the field of Arctic ice-ocean science discovered during...doi:10.1002/2013GL058956. Paulson, C.A. and W. S. Pegau, 2001: The summertime thermohaline evolution of an Arctic lead: Heat budget of the surface...Menge, 2010: Influences of the ocean surface mixed layer and thermohaline stratification on Arctic Sea ice in the central Canada Basin. J. Geophys. Res

  8. Numerical Study of the Effects of Wave-Induced Forcing on Dynamics in Ocean Mixed Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengan Deng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical experiments using hybrid coordinate ocean model (HYCOM are designed to quantify the effects of wind wave-induced Coriolis-Stokes forcing (CSF on mixed layer (ML dynamics in a global context. CSF calculated by the wave parameters simulated by using the WaveWatch III (WW3 model is introduced as a new driving force for HYCOM. The results show that noticeable influence on ocean circulation in ML can be caused by CSF. Over most of the global oceans the direction of Stokes transport is different from that of the change in current transport caused by CSF. This is not unusual because CSF is normal to Stokes drift. However, the CSF-caused change in current transport and the wave-induced Stokes transport have the same magnitude. The seasonal variabilities of mixed layer temperature (MLT and mixed layer depth (MLD caused by CSF are analyzed, and the possible relationship between them is also given.

  9. Moisture flux and mixing processes in the daytime continental convective boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Robert L.; Gamage, Nimal

    1995-12-01

    This study is used to introduce a conditional sampling technique associated with a heuristic model of the convective boundary layer (CBL) based upon top-down, bottom-up physical processes. A new concept of a distribution of neutral buoyancy levels associated with those two classes of physical processes is included in the CBL model. Analysis of surface, aircraft, and sounding data from June 6, 1987, during FIFE showed two periods of drying in an otherwise moistening fair weather CBL with 7 to 9 ms-1 southerly winds. One period was during the so-called morning boundary layer transition, when the mixed layer was growing rapidly and the other during quasi-steady state afternoon conditions. Similar drying periods were observed on June 1 and 4. On June 6, however, morning and afternoon National Center for Atmospheric Research King Air missions were specifically designed to investigate time variations in the daytime CBL. The conditional sampling technique and the CBL model are used to investigate the composition of the moisture flux and flux divergence. We conclude that the drying effect of strong surface thermals carrying upward moving moist air was substantially decreased by overturning thermals and that compensating downdrafts were the dominant process associated with the net positive flux divergence responsible for part of the observed drying during the morning transition. The remainder was inferred to be due to a combination of vertical and horizontal advection. By afternoon drying due to compensating downdrafts had ceased and was due entirely to advection mitigated by turbulent processes which were moistening the mixed layer. The drying and inversion rise were coupled phenomena that were due to moist surface thermals which penetrated a weak lower inversion into an elevated mixed layer (EML). The EML was left from the previous day, and was well below a much stronger capping inversion. This penetrative convection into the EML suddenly removed moisture from the lower

  10. Photo-polarimetric sensitivities to layering and mixing of absorbing aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Kalashnikova

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate to what extent multi-angle polarimetric measurements are sensitive to vertical mixing/layering of absorbing aerosols, adopting calibration uncertainty of 1.5% in intensity and 0.5% in the degree of linear polarization of Multiangle Spectro-Polarimetric Imager (MSPI. Employing both deterministic and Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes with polarization, we conduct modeling experiments to determine how the measured Stokes vector elements are affected at UV and short visible wavelengths by the vertical distribution, mixing and layering of smoke and dust aerosols for variety of microphysical parameters. We find that multi-angular polarimetry holds the potential to infer dust-layer heights and thicknesses at blue visible channel due to its lesser sensitivity to changes in dust coarse mode optical properties, but higher sensitivity to the dust vertical profiles. Our studies quantify requirements for obtaining simultaneous information on aerosol layer height and absorption under MSPI measurement uncertainties.

  11. SCALE INTERACTION IN A MIXING LAYER. THE ROLE OF THE LARGE-SCALE GRADIENTS

    KAUST Repository

    Fiscaletti, Daniele

    2015-08-23

    The interaction between scales is investigated in a turbulent mixing layer. The large-scale amplitude modulation of the small scales already observed in other works depends on the crosswise location. Large-scale positive fluctuations correlate with a stronger activity of the small scales on the low speed-side of the mixing layer, and a reduced activity on the high speed-side. However, from physical considerations we would expect the scales to interact in a qualitatively similar way within the flow and across different turbulent flows. Therefore, instead of the large-scale fluctuations, the large-scale gradients modulation of the small scales has been additionally investigated.

  12. Turbulent mixing layers in supersonic protostellar outflows, with application to DG Tauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M. C.; Bicknell, G. V.; Sutherland, R. S.; Salmeron, R.; McGregor, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Turbulent entrainment processes may play an important role in the outflows from young stellar objects at all stages of their evolution. In particular, lateral entrainment of ambient material by high-velocity, well-collimated protostellar jets may be the cause of the multiple emission-line velocity components observed in the microjet-scale outflows driven by classical T Tauri stars. Intermediate-velocity outflow components may be emitted by a turbulent, shock-excited mixing layer along the boundaries of the jet. We present a formalism for describing such a mixing layer based on Reynolds decomposition of quantities measuring fundamental properties of the gas. In this model, the molecular wind from large disc radii provides a continual supply of material for entrainment. We calculate the total stress profile in the mixing layer, which allows us to estimate the dissipation of turbulent energy, and hence the luminosity of the layer. We utilize MAPPINGS IV shock models to determine the fraction of total emission that occurs in [Fe II] 1.644 μm line emission in order to facilitate comparison to previous observations of the young stellar object DG Tauri. Our model accurately estimates the luminosity and changes in mass outflow rate of the intermediate-velocity component of the DG Tau approaching outflow. Therefore, we propose that this component represents a turbulent mixing layer surrounding the well-collimated jet in this object. Finally, we compare and contrast our model to previous work in the field.

  13. Fire hazard of titanium powder layers mixed with inert nano TiO2 powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chunmiao; Cai, Jingzhi; Amyotte, Paul; Li, Chang; Bu, Yajie; Liu, Kangfu; Li, Gang

    2017-12-06

    Metallic dust layers are highly sensitive to ignition from common ignition sources, even when mixed with high percentages of inert solids. In turn, dust layer fires are a potential ignition source for dust explosions or other damaging fires. Flame spread velocity (FSV), as a potential parameter for evaluating fire hazard, was investigated for titanium powder layers mixed with inert nano TiO2 powder in both natural convection and in forced airflow conditions. Increased mass percentage of nano TiO2 powder decreased FSV of Ti powder mixtures as expected. The mixing ratio of nano TiO2 to fully suppress layer fires was 80% and 90% for micro and nano Ti powder, respectively. Mechanisms governing flame spread across a layer of nano Ti powder differed from those of a layer of micro Ti powder. FSV in no airflow conditions was higher than in aided airflow for micro Ti powder because conduction was the dominant heat transfer mechanism. However, FSV in no airflow was lower than in opposed airflow for nano Ti powder because convection/radiation was the dominant heat transfer mechanism. A fly fire phenomenon contributed to greater FSVs and higher fire hazard with nano Ti powder mixtures under aided airflow conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program - NaClO3sub>/Icing Sugar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Daniel N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pollard, Colin J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Sorensen, Daniel N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Remmers, Daniel L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Shelley, Timothy J. [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL), Tyndall Air Force Base, FL (United States); Reyes, Jose A. [Applied Research Associates, Tyndall Air Force Base, FL (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-02-11

    The Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program is conducting a proficiency study for Small- Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) testing of homemade explosives (HMEs). Described here are the results for impact, friction, electrostatic discharge, and differential scanning calorimetry analysis of a mixture of NaClO3 and icing sugar—NaClO3sub>/icing sugar mixture. The mixture was found to: be more sensitive than RDX but less sensitive than PETN in impact testing (180-grit sandpaper); be more sensitive than RDX and about the same sensitivity as PETN in BAM fiction testing; be less sensitive than RDX and PETN except for one participant found the mixture more sensitive than PETN in ABL ESD testing; and to have one to three exothermic features with the lowest temperature event occurring at ~ 160°C always observed in thermal testing. Variations in testing parameters also affected the sensitivity.

  15. Mixed layer warming-deepening in the Mediterranean Sea and its effect on the marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivetti, Irene; Boero, Ferdinando; Fraschetti, Simonetta; Zambianchi, Enrico; Lionello, Piero

    2015-04-01

    This work aims at investigating the evolution of the ocean mixed layer in the Mediterranean Sea and linking it to the occurrence of mass mortalities of benthic invertebrates. The temporal evolution of selected parameters describing the mixed layer and the seasonal thermocline is provided for the whole Mediterranean Sea for spring, summer and autumn and for the period 1945-2011. For this analysis all temperature profiles collected in the basin with bottles, Mechanical Bathy-Thermographs (MBT), eXpendable Bathy-Thermographs (XBT), and Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) have been used (166,990). These data have been extracted from three public sources: the MEDAR-MEDATLAS, the World Ocean Database 2013 and the MFS-VOS program. Five different methods for estimating the mixed layer depth are compared using temperature profiles collected at the DYFAMED station in the Ligurian Sea and one method, the so-called three-segment method, has been selected for a systematic analysis of the evolution of the uppermost part of the whole Mediterranean Sea. This method approximates the upper water column with three segments representing mixed layer, thermocline and deep layer and has shown to be the most suitable method for capturing the mixed layer depth for most shapes of temperature profiles. Mass mortalities events of benthic invertebrates have been identified by an extensive search of all data bases in ISI Web of Knowledge considering studies published from 1945 to 2011. Studies reporting the geographical coordinates, the timing of the events, the species involved and the depth at which signs of stress occurred have been considered. Results show a general increase of thickness and temperature of the mixed layer, deepening and cooling of the thermocline base in summer and autumn. Possible impacts of these changes are mass mortalities events of benthic invertebrates that have been documented since 1983 mainly in summer and autumn. It is also shown that most mass mortalities

  16. Seasonal variability of mixed layer in the central Arabian Sea and its implication on nutrients and primary productivity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Narvekar, J.

    was regulated by the incoming solar radiation and wind forcing. The Ekman dynamics associated with the Findlater Jet controlled the mixed layer depth during summer monsoon, while in winter the cooling and convective mixing regulated the MLD. We speculate...

  17. A Hybrid Numerical Method for Turbulent Mixing Layers. Degree awarded by Case Western Reserve Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.

    2001-01-01

    A hybrid method has been developed for simulations of compressible turbulent mixing layers. Such mixing layers dominate the flows in exhaust systems of modern day aircraft and also those of hypersonic vehicles currently under development. The method configurations in which a dominant structural feature provides an unsteady mechanism to drive the turbulent development in the mixing layer. The hybrid method uses a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) procedure to calculate wall bounded regions entering a mixing section, and a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) procedure to calculate the mixing dominated regions. A numerical technique was developed to enable the use of the hybrid RANS-LES method on stretched, non-Cartesian grids. Closure for the RANS equations was obtained using the Cebeci-Smith algebraic turbulence model in conjunction with the wall-function approach of Ota and Goldberg. The wall-function approach enabled a continuous computational grid from the RANS regions to the LES region. The LES equations were closed using the Smagorinsky subgrid scale model. The hybrid RANS-LES method is applied to a benchmark compressible mixing layer experiment. Preliminary two dimensional calculations are used to investigate the effects of axial grid density and boundary conditions. Vortex shedding from the base region of a splitter plate separating the upstream flows was observed to eventually transition to turbulence. The location of the transition, however, was much further downstream than indicated by experiments. Actual LES calculations, performed in three spatial directions, also indicated vortex shedding, but the transition to turbulence was found to occur much closer to the beginning of the mixing section. which is in agreement with experimental observations. These calculations demonstrated that LES simulations must be performed in three dimensions. Comparisons of time-averaged axial velocities and turbulence intensities indicated reasonable agreement with experimental

  18. Estimation of the mixing layer height over a high altitude site in Central Himalayan region by using Doppler lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, K. K.; Phanikumar, D. V.; Newsom, Rob K.; Kumar, Niranjan; Ratnam, Venkat; Naja, M.; Singh, Narendra

    2014-03-01

    A Doppler lidar was installed at Manora Peak, Nainital (29.4 N; 79.2 E, 1958 amsl) to estimate mixing layer height for the first time by using vertical velocity variance as basic measurement parameter for the period September-November 2011. Mixing layer height is found to be located ~0.57 +/- 0.1and 0.45 +/- 0.05km AGL during day and nighttime, respectively. The estimation of mixing layer height shows good correlation (R>0.8) between different instruments and with different methods. Our results show that wavelet co-variance transform is a robust method for mixing layer height estimation.

  19. [Mineralogy and genesis of mixed-layer clay minerals in the Jiujiang net-like red soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ke; Hong, Han-Lie; Li, Rong-Biao; Han, Wen; Wu, Yu; Gao, Wen-Peng; Jia, Jin-Sheng

    2012-10-01

    Mineralogy and genesis were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) to understand the mineralogy and its genesis significance of mixed-layer clay minerals in Jiujiang red soil section. XRD and FTIR results show that the net-like red soil sediments are composed of illite, kaolinite, minor smectite and mixed-layer illite-smectite and minor mixed-layer kaolinite-smectite. HRTEM observation indicates that some smectite layers have transformed into kaolinite layers in net-like red soil. Mixed-layer illite-smectite is a transition phase of illite transforming into smectite, and mixed-layer kaolinite-smectite is a transitional product relative to kaolinite and smectite. The occurrence of two mixed-layer clay species suggests that the weathering sequence of clay minerals in net-like red soil traversed from illite to mixed-layer illite-smectite to smectite to mixed-layer kaolinite-smectite to kaolinite, which indicates that net-like red soil formed under a warm and humid climate with strengthening of weathering.

  20. Shear rheology of mixed protein adsorption layers vs their structure studied by surface force measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danov, K.D.; Kralchevsky, P.A.; Radulova, G.M.; Basheva, E.S.; Stoyanov, S.D.; Pelan, E.G.

    2015-01-01

    The hydrophobins are proteins that form the most rigid adsorption layers at liquid interfaces in comparison with all other investigated proteins. The mixing of hydrophobin HFBII with other conventional proteins is expected to reduce the surface shear elasticity and viscosity, Esh and ¿sh,

  1. Simulated seasonal and interannual variability of mixed layer heat budget in the northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeBoyer Montegut, C.; Vialard, J.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Shankar, D.; Durand, F.; Ethe, C.; Madec, G.

    similarities with the BoB. Interesting new results on seasonal time scales are shown. Penetration of solar heat flux need to be taken into account for two reasons. First an average of 28.6Wm-2 is lost beneath the mixed layer over the year. Second...

  2. Structure of the oceanic mixed layer in western Bay of Bengal during MONEX

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anto, A; Somayajulu, Y

    Based on the hourly BT and six hourly CSTD data, collected from two stations in the western Bay of Bengal during July 1979, the diurnal variations of temperature in the oceanic mixed layer (OML) were analysed as a function of the prevailing surface...

  3. Numerical simulation of a plane turbulent mixing layer, with applications to isothermal, rapid reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, P.; Pratt, D. T.

    1987-01-01

    A hybrid method has been developed for the numerical prediction of turbulent mixing in a spatially-developing, free shear layer. Most significantly, the computation incorporates the effects of large-scale structures, Schmidt number and Reynolds number on mixing, which have been overlooked in the past. In flow field prediction, large-eddy simulation was conducted by a modified 2-D vortex method with subgrid-scale modeling. The predicted mean velocities, shear layer growth rates, Reynolds stresses, and the RMS of longitudinal velocity fluctuations were found to be in good agreement with experiments, although the lateral velocity fluctuations were overpredicted. In scalar transport, the Monte Carlo method was extended to the simulation of the time-dependent pdf transport equation. For the first time, the mixing frequency in Curl's coalescence/dispersion model was estimated by using Broadwell and Breidenthal's theory of micromixing, which involves Schmidt number, Reynolds number and the local vorticity. Numerical tests were performed for a gaseous case and an aqueous case. Evidence that pure freestream fluids are entrained into the layer by large-scale motions was found in the predicted pdf. Mean concentration profiles were found to be insensitive to Schmidt number, while the unmixedness was higher for higher Schmidt number. Applications were made to mixing layers with isothermal, fast reactions. The predicted difference in product thickness of the two cases was in reasonable quantitative agreement with experimental measurements.

  4. Coherent Structures in Turbulent Shear Layers and Relation to Mixing Reaction and Combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-01

    dimensional motion in the turbulent mixing layer. Corcos, G.M. 1983, Journal de Mecanique theorique et appliquee, Numero Special, p. 147-167. The Role of... Reynolds numbers, it is found that such vortices are unstable in shear end are transformed into smaller vortices. The nonlinear evolution of these

  5. Regional heat flux over the NOPEX area estimated from the evolution of the mixed-layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Batchvarova, E.

    1999-01-01

    of forest, agricultural fields, mires and lakes within the boreal zone, was determined for 3 days of the campaign in 1994. It was found to be lower than the heat flux over forest and higher than the heat Aux over agricultural fields. The regional heat flux estimated by the mixed-layer evolution method...

  6. Revealing the Location of the Mixing Layer in a Hot Bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, M. A.; Fang, X.; Chu, Y.-H.; Toalá, J. A.; Gruendl, R. A.

    2017-10-01

    The fast stellar winds can blow bubbles in the circumstellar material ejected from previous phases of stellar evolution. These are found at different scales, from planetary nebulae (PNe) around stars evolving to the white dwarf stage, to Wolf-Rayet (WR) bubbles and up to large-scale bubbles around massive star clusters. In all cases, the fast stellar wind is shock-heated and a hot bubble is produced. Processes of mass evaporation and mixing of nebular material and heat conduction occurring at the mixing layer between the hot bubble and the optical nebula are key to determine the thermal structure of these bubbles and their evolution. In this contribution we review our current understanding of the X-ray observations of hot bubbles in PNe and present the first spatially-resolved study of a mixing layer in a PN.

  7. Buoyant production and consumption of turbulence kinetic energy in cloud-topped mixed layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that studies of the entraining planetary boundary layer (PBL) have generally emphasized the role of buoyancy fluxes in driving entrainment. The buoyancy flux is proportional to the rate of conversion of the potential energy of the mean flow into the kinetic energy of the turbulence. It is not unusual for conversion to proceed in both directions simultaneously. This occurs, for instance, in both clear and cloudy convective mixed layers which are capped by inversions. A partitioning of the net conversion into positive parts, generating turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), and negative parts (TKE-consuming), would make it possible to include the positive part in the gross production rate, and closure would be achieved. Three different approaches to partitioning have been proposed. The present investigation is concerned with a comparison of the three partitioning theories. Particular attention is given to the cloud-topped mixed layer because in this case the differences between two partitioning approaches are most apparent.

  8. Nutrient interleaving below the mixed layer of the Kuroshio Extension Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Takeyoshi; Clayton, Sophie

    2017-08-01

    Nitrate interleaving structures were observed below the mixed layer during a cruise to the Kuroshio Extension in October 2009. In this paper, we investigate the formation mechanisms for these vertical nitrate anomalies, which may be an important source of nitrate to the oligotrphoc surface waters south of the Kuroshio Extension Front. We found that nitrate concentrations below the main stream of the Kuroshio Extension were elevated compared to the ambient water of the same density ( σ 𝜃 = 23.5-25). This appears to be analogous to the "nutrient stream" below the mixed layer, associated with the Gulf Stream. Strong turbulence was observed above the vertical nitrate anomaly, and we found that this can drive a large vertical turbulent nitrate flux >O (1 mmol N m-2 day-1). A realistic, high-resolution (2 km) numerical simulation reproduces the observed Kuroshio nutrient stream and nitrate interleaving structures, with similar lateral and vertical scales. The model results suggest that the nitrate interleaving structures are first generated at the western side of the meander crest on the south side of the Kuroshio Extension, where the southern tip of the mixed layer front is under frontogenesis. Lagrangian analyses reveal that the vertical shear of geostrophic and subinertial ageostrophic flow below the mixed layer tilts the existing along-isopycnal nitrate gradient of the Kuroshio nutrient stream to form nitrate interleaving structures. This study suggests that the multi-scale combination of (i) the lateral stirring of the Kuroshio nutrient stream by developed mixed layer fronts during fall to winter, (ii) the associated tilting of along-isopycnal nitrate gradient of the nutrient stream by subinertial shear, which forms vertical interleaving structures, and (iii) the strong turbulent diffusion above them, may provide a route to supply nutrients to oligotrophic surface waters on the south side of the Kuroshio Extension.

  9. Comparison of organic light emitting diodes with different mixed layer structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kee, Y.Y.; Siew, W.O. [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya (Malaysia); Yap, S.S. [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya (Malaysia); Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Tou, T.Y., E-mail: tytou@mmu.edu.my [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya (Malaysia)

    2014-11-03

    A mixed-source thermal evaporation method was used to fabricate organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with uniformly mixed (UM), continuously graded mixed (CGM) and step-wise graded, mixed (SGM) light-emitting layers. N,N′-Bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N′-diphenylbenzidine and Tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum were used, respectively, as the hole- and electron-transport materials. As compared to the conventional, heterojunction OLED, the maximum brightness of UM-, CGM- and SGM-OLEDs without charge injection layers were improved by 2.2, 3.8 and 2.1 times, respectively, while the maximum power efficiencies improved by 1.5, 3.2 and 1.9 times. These improvements were discussed in terms of more distributed recombination zone and removal of interfacial barrier. - Highlights: • Fabrication of OLEDs using a mixed-source evaporation technique • Three different types of mixed-host OLEDs with better brightness • Improved electroluminescence and power efficiencies as compared to conventional OLED.

  10. Late-Time Mixing Sensitivity to Initial Broadband Surface Roughness in High-Energy-Density Shear Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flippo, K. A.; Doss, F. W.; Kline, J. L.; Merritt, E. C.; Capelli, D.; Cardenas, T.; DeVolder, B.; Fierro, F.; Huntington, C. M.; Kot, L.; Loomis, E. N.; MacLaren, S. A.; Murphy, T. J.; Nagel, S. R.; Perry, T. S.; Randolph, R. B.; Rivera, G.; Schmidt, D. W.

    2016-11-23

    Using a large volume high-energy-density fluid shear experiment (8.5 cm3) at the National Ignition Facility, we have demonstrated for the first time the ability to significantly alter the evolution of a supersonic sheared mixing layer by controlling the initial conditions of that layer. By altering the initial surface roughness of the tracer foil, we demonstrate the ability to transition the shear mixing layer from a highly ordered system of coherent structures to a randomly ordered system with a faster growing mix layer, indicative of strong mixing in the layer at a temperature of several tens of electron volts and at near solid density. Simulations using a turbulent-mix model show good agreement with the experimental results and poor agreement without turbulent mix.

  11. Statistics and scaling of turbulence in a spatially developing mixing layer at Reλ = 250

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2012-03-21

    The turbulent flow originating from the interaction between two parallel streams with different velocities is studied by means of direct numerical simulation. Rather than the more common temporal evolving layer, a spatially evolving configuration, with perturbed laminar inlet conditions is considered. The streamwise evolution and the self-similar state of turbulence statistics are reported and compared to results available in the literature. The characteristics of the transitional region agree with those observed in other simulations and experiments of mixing layers originating from laminar inlets. The present results indicate that the transitional region depends strongly on the inlet flow. Conversely, the self-similar state of turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation agrees quantitatively with those in a temporal mixing layer developing from turbulent initial conditions [M. M. Rogers and R. D. Moser, “Direct simulation of a self-similar turbulent mixing layer,” Phys. Fluids6, 903 (1994)]. The statistical features of turbulence in the self-similar region have been analysed in terms of longitudinal velocity structure functions, and scaling exponents are estimated by applying the extended self-similarity concept. In the small scale range (60 < r/η < 250), the scaling exponents display the universal anomalous scaling observed in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. The hypothesis of isotropy recovery holds in the turbulent mixing layer despite the presence of strong shear and large-scale structures, independently of the means of turbulence generation. At larger scales (r/η > 400), the mean shear and large coherent structures result in a significant deviation from predictions based on homogeneous isotropic turbulence theory. In this second scaling range, the numerical values of the exponents agree quantitatively with those reported for a variety of other flows characterized by strong shear, such as boundary layers, as well as channel and wake flows.

  12. Mixing and trapping of dissolved CO2 in deep geologic formations with shale layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agartan, Elif; Cihan, Abdullah; Illangasekare, Tissa H.; Zhou, Quanlin; Birkholzer, Jens T.

    2017-07-01

    For dissolution trapping, the spatial variability of the geologic properties of naturally complex storage formations can significantly impact flow patterns and storage mechanisms of dissolved CO2. The significance of diffusive mixing that occurs in low permeability layers embedded between relatively higher permeability materials was highlighted by Agartan et al. (2015) using a highly controlled laboratory experimental study on trapping of dissolved CO2 in multilayered systems. In this paper, we present a numerical modeling study on the impacts of low permeability layers on flow and storage of dissolved CO2 in realistic field-scale settings. The simulator of variable-density flow used in this study was first verified using the experimental data in Agartan et al. (2015) to capture the observed processes. The simulator was then applied to a synthetic, field-scale multilayered system, with 19 sensitivity cases having variable permeability and thickness of the shale layers as well as the source strength and geometry of the source zone of dissolved CO2. Simulation results showed that the presence of continuous shale layers in the storage system disrupts the convective mixing by enhancing lateral spreading of dissolved CO2 in sandstone layers and retarding the vertical mixing of dissolved CO2. The effectiveness of trapping of dissolved CO2 depends on the physical properties of the shale layers and configurations of the source zone. The comparison to homogeneous cases with effective vertical permeability shows that it is important to capture these continuous thin shale layers in a storage formation and include them in the models to enhance dissolution trapping.

  13. Eulerian-Lagranigan simulation of aerosol evolution in turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2016-09-23

    The formation and evolution of aerosol in turbulent flows are ubiquitous in both industrial processes and nature. The intricate interaction of turbulent mixing and aerosol evolution in a canonical turbulent mixing layer was investigated by a direct numerical simulation (DNS) in a recent study (Zhou, K., Attili, A., Alshaarawi, A., and Bisetti, F. Simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer. Physics of Fluids, 26, 065106 (2014)). In this work, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of aerosol evolution is carried out along Lagrangian trajectories obtained in the previous simulation, in order to quantify the error of the moment method used in the previous simulation. Moreover, the particle size distribution (PSD), not available in the previous works, is also investigated. Along a fluid parcel moving through the turbulent flow, temperature and vapor concentration exhibit complex fluctuations, triggering complicate aerosol processes and rendering complex PSD. However, the mean PSD is found to be bi-modal in most of the mixing layer except that a tri-modal distribution is found in the turbulent transition region. The simulated PSDs agree with the experiment observations available in the literature. A different explanation on the formation of such PSDs is provided.

  14. The structure of variable property, compressible mixing layers in binary gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozusko, F.; Grosch, C. E.; Jackson, T. L.; Kennedy, Christipher A.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    1996-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the structure of a parallel compressible mixing layer in a binary mixture of gases. The gases included in this study are hydrogen (H2), helium (He), nitrogen (N2), oxygen (02), neon (Ne) and argon (Ar). Profiles of the variation of the Lewis and Prandtl numbers across the mixing layer for all thirty combinations of gases are given. It is shown that the Lewis number can vary by as much as a factor of eight and the Prandtl number by a factor of two across the mixing layer. Thus assuming constant values for the Lewis and Prandtl numbers of a binary gas mixture in the shear layer, as is done in many theoretical studies, is a poor approximation. We also present profiles of the velocity, mass fraction, temperature and density for representative binary gas mixtures at zero and supersonic Mach numbers. We show that the shape of these profiles is strongly dependent on which gases are in the mixture as well as on whether the denser gas is in the fast stream or the slow stream.

  15. Simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2014-06-25

    A large-scale simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer is performed and analyzed with the aim of elucidating the key processes involved. A cold gaseous stream is mixed with a hot stream of vapor, nanometer sized droplets nucleate as the vapor becomes supersaturated, and subsequently grow as more vapor condenses on their surface. All length and time scales of fluid motion and mixing are resolved and the quadrature method of moments is used to describe the dynamics of the condensing, non-inertial droplets. The results show that a region of high nucleation rate is located near the cold, dry stream, while particles undergo intense growth via condensation on the hot, humid vapor side. Supersaturation and residence times are such that number densities are low and neither coagulation nor vapor scavenging due to condensation are significant. The difference in Schmidt numbers of aerosol particles (approximated as infinity) and temperature and vapor (near unity) causes a drift of the aerosol particles in scalar space and contributes to a large scatter in the conditional statistics of aerosol quantities. The spatial distribution of the aerosol reveals high volume fraction on the hot side of the mixing layer. This distribution is due to drift against the mean and is related to turbulent mixing, which displaces particles from the nucleation region (cold side) into the growth region (hot side). Such a mechanism is absent in laminar flows and is a distinct feature of turbulent condensing aerosols.

  16. Pathfinder: applying graph theory to consistent tracking of daytime mixed layer height with backscatter lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruine, Marco; Apituley, Arnoud; Donovan, David Patrick; Klein Baltink, Hendrik; Jorrit de Haij, Marijn

    2017-05-01

    The height of the atmospheric boundary layer or mixing layer is an important parameter for understanding the dynamics of the atmosphere and the dispersion of trace gases and air pollution. The height of the mixing layer (MLH) can be retrieved, among other methods, from lidar or ceilometer backscatter data. These instruments use the vertical backscatter lidar signal to infer MLHL, which is feasible because the main sources of aerosols are situated at the surface and vertical gradients are expected to go from the aerosol loaded mixing layer close to the ground to the cleaner free atmosphere above. Various lidar/ceilometer algorithms are currently applied, but accounting for MLH temporal development is not always well taken care of. As a result, MLHL retrievals may jump between different atmospheric layers, rather than reliably track true MLH development over time. This hampers the usefulness of MLHL time series, e.g. for process studies, model validation/verification and climatology. Here, we introduce a new method pathfinder, which applies graph theory to simultaneously evaluate time frames that are consistent with scales of MLH dynamics, leading to coherent tracking of MLH. Starting from a grid of gradients in the backscatter profiles, MLH development is followed using Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm (Dijkstra, 1959). Locations of strong gradients are connected under the condition that subsequent points on the path are limited to a restricted vertical range. The search is further guided by rules based on the presence of clouds and residual layers. After being applied to backscatter lidar data from Cabauw, excellent agreement is found with wind profiler retrievals for a 12-day period in 2008 (R2 = 0.90) and visual judgment of lidar data during a full year in 2010 (R2 = 0.96). These values compare favourably to other MLHL methods applied to the same lidar data set and corroborate more consistent MLH tracking by pathfinder.

  17. Mixing Acid Salts and Layered Double Hydroxides in Nanoscale under Solid Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Nakayama

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The immobilization of potassium sorbate, potassium aspartate and sorbic acid in layered double hydroxide under solid condition was examined. By simply mixing two solids, immobilization of sorbate and aspartate in the interlayer space of nitrate-type layered double hydroxide, so called intercalation reaction, was achieved, and the uptakes, that is, the amount of immobilized salts and the interlayer distances of intercalation compounds were almost the same as those obtained in aqueous solution. However, no intercalation was achieved for sorbic acid. Although intercalation of sorbate and aspartate into chloride-type layered double hydroxide was possible, the uptakes for these intercalation compounds were lower than those obtained using nitrate-type layered double hydroxide. The intercalation under solid condition could be achieved to the same extent as for ion-exchange reaction in aqueous solution, and the reactivity was similar to that observed in aqueous solution. This method will enable the encapsulation of acidic drug in layered double hydroxide as nano level simply by mixing both solids.

  18. A model study of mixing and entrainment in the horizontally evolving atmospheric convective boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorovich, E.; Kaiser, R. [Univ. Karlsruhe, Inst. fuer Hydrologie und Wasserwirtschaft (Germany)

    1997-10-01

    We present results from a parallel wind-tunnel/large-eddy simulation (LES) model study of mixing and entrainment in the atmospheric convective boundary layer (CBL) longitudinally developing over a heated surface. The advection-type entrainment of warmer air from upper turbulence-free layers into the growing CBL has been investigated. Most of numerical and laboratory model studies of the CBL carried out so far dealt with another type of entrainment, namely the non-steady one, regarding the CBL growth as a non-stationary process. In the atmosphere, both types of the CBL development can take place, often being superimposed. (au)

  19. Spherical electric double layers containing mixed electrolytes: A case study for multivalent counterions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Chandra N.

    2017-10-01

    Spherical electric double layers containing mixed electrolytes with multivalent counterions, is studied using density functional theory and Monte Carlo simulation. The macroion and small ions are represented as uniformly charged hard spheres within a continuum solvent. The theory involves an weighted density approximation for the hard-sphere contribution, whereas the electrical part is evaluated through a functional expansion around the uniform fluid. The system includes a number of parameters, viz. ionic concentrations, macroion charge density, and the valence of the counterion. This study points towards the distinctive evidence of size and charge correlations manifested through layering and charge reversal phenomena.

  20. Influence of external disturbances and compressibility on free turbulent mixing. [in free shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Y. H.; Bushnell, D. M.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown that disturbances in external flow can significantly affect, by as much as an order of magnitude, the turbulent mixing rate in free shear layers and that the length scale of the external flow disturbances is as important as the amplitude. The difference between the effect of wide-band and narrow-band disturbances is stressed. The model for pressure fluctuation term in the kinetic energy equation is included in a two-equation model. The reduced spreading rate in high Mach number, high Reynolds number, adiabatic, free turbulent shear layers is predicted.

  1. Assessment of surface turbulent fluxes using geostationary satellite surface skin temperatures and a mixed layer planetary boundary layer scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diak, George R.; Stewart, Tod R.

    1989-01-01

    A method is presented for evaluating the fluxes of sensible and latent heating at the land surface, using satellite-measured surface temperature changes in a composite surface layer-mixed layer representation of the planetary boundary layer. The basic prognostic model is tested by comparison with synoptic station information at sites where surface evaporation climatology is well known. The remote sensing version of the model, using satellite-measured surface temperature changes, is then used to quantify the sharp spatial gradient in surface heating/evaporation across the central United States. An error analysis indicates that perhaps five levels of evaporation are recognizable by these methods and that the chief cause of error is the interaction of errors in the measurement of surface temperature change with errors in the assigment of surface roughness character. Finally, two new potential methods for remote sensing of the land-surface energy balance are suggested which will relay on space-borne instrumentation planned for the 1990s.

  2. Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) of a Compressible Mixing Layer and the Significance of Inflow Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankbadi, Mina Reda; Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Debonis, James R.

    2017-01-01

    In the context of Large Eddy Simulations (LES), the effects of inflow turbulence are investigated through the Synthetic Eddy Method (SEM). The growth rate of a turbulent compressible mixing layer corresponding to operating conditions of GeobelDutton Case 2 is investigated herein. The effects of spanwise width on the growth rate of the mixing layer is investigated such that spanwise width independence is reached. The error in neglecting inflow turbulence effects is quantified by comparing two methodologies: (1) Hybrid-RANS-LES methodology and (2) SEM-LES methodology. Best practices learned from Case 2 are developed herein and then applied to a higher convective mach number corresponding to Case 4 experiments of GeobelDutton.

  3. Mixed-layered bismuth-oxygen-iodine materials for capture and waste disposal of radioactive iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumhansl, James L; Nenoff, Tina M

    2013-02-26

    Materials and methods of synthesizing mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine materials, which can be synthesized in the presence of aqueous radioactive iodine species found in caustic solutions (e.g. NaOH or KOH). This technology provides a one-step process for both iodine sequestration and storage from nuclear fuel cycles. It results in materials that will be durable for repository conditions much like those found in Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and estimated for Yucca Mountain (YMP). By controlled reactant concentrations, optimized compositions of these mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine inorganic materials are produced that have both a high iodine weight percentage and a low solubility in groundwater environments.

  4. Mixed-layered bismuth--oxygen--iodine materials for capture and waste disposal of radioactive iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumhansl, James L; Nenoff, Tina M

    2015-01-06

    Materials and methods of synthesizing mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine materials, which can be synthesized in the presence of aqueous radioactive iodine species found in caustic solutions (e.g. NaOH or KOH). This technology provides a one-step process for both iodine sequestration and storage from nuclear fuel cycles. It results in materials that will be durable for repository conditions much like those found in Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and estimated for Yucca Mountain (YMP). By controlled reactant concentrations, optimized compositions of these mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine inorganic materials are produced that have both a high iodine weight percentage and a low solubility in groundwater environments.

  5. Inviscid spatial stability of a compressible mixing layer. Part 2: The flame sheet model. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, T.L.; Grosch, C.E.

    1989-03-01

    The results of an inviscid spatial calculation for a compressible reacting mixing layer are reported. The limit of infinitive activation energy is taken and the diffusion flame is approximated by a flame sheet. Results are reported for the phase speeds of the neutral waves and maximum growth rates of the unstable waves as a function of the parameters of the problem: the ratio of the temperature of the stationary stream to that of the moving stream, the Mach number of the moving streams, the heat release per unit mass fraction of the reactant, the equivalence ratio of the reaction, and the frequency of the disturbance. These results are compared to the phase speeds and growth rates of the corresponding nonreacting mixing layer. We show that the addition of combustion has important, and complex effects on the flow stability.

  6. Influence of convective conditions on three dimensional mixed convective hydromagnetic boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauf, A., E-mail: raufamar@ciitsahiwal.edu.pk [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Siddiq, M.K. [Centre for Advanced Studies in Pure and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 63000 (Pakistan); Abbasi, F.M. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Meraj, M.A. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Ashraf, M. [Centre for Advanced Studies in Pure and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 63000 (Pakistan); Shehzad, S.A. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan)

    2016-10-15

    The present work deals with the steady laminar three-dimensional mixed convective magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid over a bidirectional stretching surface. A uniform magnetic field is applied normal to the flow direction. Similarity variables are implemented to convert the non-linear partial differential equations into ordinary ones. Convective boundary conditions are utilized at surface of the sheet. A numerical technique of Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg (RFK45) is used to obtain the results of velocity, temperature and concentration fields. The physical dimensionless parameters are discussed through tables and graphs. - Highlights: • Mixed convective boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid is taken into account. • Impact of magnetic field is examined. • Convective heat and mass conditions are imposed. • Numerical solutions are presented and discussed.

  7. Sodar measurements of the mixed-layer depth over a large city

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shurygin, E.A. [Russia Academy of Sciences, Inst. of Atmospheric Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-10-01

    The results of synchronous sodar`s measurements on a territory of city and suburban area have shown: (a) The types of stratification over centre of the city and periphery considerably differ, and these distinctions are more often displayed in morning and evening transition period. The agreement between types of stratification in the centre and on the periphery was observed in 40% of cases; (b) At equal temperature stratification the mixed-layer depth in centre of the city is about 50-150 m higher at inversions in comparison with a periphery, at advanced convection - these depths are identical; (c) At different stratification between the city and periphery the distinction in the mixed-layer depth can reach 200. (au)

  8. Correcting the aero-optical aberration of the supersonic mixing layer with adaptive optics: concept validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qiong; Jiang, Zongfu; Yi, Shihe; Xie, Wenke; Liao, Tianhe

    2012-06-10

    We describe an adaptive optics (AO) system for correcting the aero-optical aberration of the supersonic mixing layer and test its performance with numerical simulations. The AO system is based on the measurement of distributed Strehl ratios and the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm. The aero-optical aberration is computed by the direct numerical simulation of a two-dimensional supersonic mixing layer. When the SPGD algorithm is applied directly, the AO cannot give effective corrections. This paper suggests two strategies to improve the performance of the SPGD algorithm for use in aero-optics. The first one is using an iteration process keeping finite memory, and the second is based on the frozen hypothesis. With these modifications, the performance of AO is improved and the aero-optical aberration can be corrected to some noticeable extent. The possibility of experimental implementation is also discussed.

  9. Shear rheology of mixed protein adsorption layers vs their structure studied by surface force measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Radulova, Gergana M; Basheva, Elka S; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Pelan, Eddie G

    2015-08-01

    The hydrophobins are proteins that form the most rigid adsorption layers at liquid interfaces in comparison with all other investigated proteins. The mixing of hydrophobin HFBII with other conventional proteins is expected to reduce the surface shear elasticity and viscosity, E(sh) and η(sh), proportional to the fraction of the conventional protein. However, the experiments show that the effect of mixing can be rather different depending on the nature of the additive. If the additive is a globular protein, like β-lactoglobulin and ovalbumin, the surface rigidity is preserved, and even enhanced. The experiments with separate foam films indicate that this is due to the formation of a bilayer structure at the air/water interface. The more hydrophobic HFBII forms the upper layer adjacent to the air phase, whereas the conventional globular protein forms the lower layer that faces the water phase. Thus, the elastic network formed by the adsorbed hydrophobin remains intact, and even reinforced by the adjacent layer of globular protein. In contrast, the addition of the disordered protein β-casein leads to softening of the HFBII adsorption layer. Similar (an even stronger) effect is produced by the nonionic surfactant Tween 20. This can be explained with the penetration of the hydrophobic tails of β-casein and Tween 20 between the HFBII molecules at the interface, which breaks the integrity of the hydrophobin interfacial elastic network. The analyzed experimental data for the surface shear rheology of various protein adsorption layers comply with a viscoelastic thixotropic model, which allows one to determine E(sh) and η(sh) from the measured storage and loss moduli, G' and G″. The results could contribute for quantitative characterization and deeper understanding of the factors that control the surface rigidity of protein adsorption layers with potential application for the creation of stable foams and emulsions with fine bubbles or droplets. Copyright © 2014

  10. Mixing height over water and its role on the correlation between temperature and humidity fluctuations in the unstable surface layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sempreviva, A.M.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2000-01-01

    Results from an experimental investigation of the mixing height over inner Danish waters carried out from September 1990 to October 1992, are discussed. The statistical analysis of the mixed-layer height (z(i)) over the sea does not exhibit the daily variation that is characteristic of the mixed ...

  11. On the Pairing Process in an Excited, Plane, Turbulent Mixing Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-01

    1984). 17. Browand, F.K.; Ho, C.M.: The mixing layer: an example of quasi two- dimensional turbulence. J. de Mcanique Th~orique et Appliqu~e, Numero ...completed when the disturbance becomes neutrally stable to its local environment. Browand and Weidman [13] observed that the Reynolds stress generated...this process. This can be-explained by the- fact that the- Reynolds -! stress produced by large coherent structures vanishes when the pairing process

  12. An analytical solution for the Marangoni mixed convection boundary layer flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, M. A.; Kimiaeifar, Amin; Rahimpour, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, an analytical solution for a Marangoni mixed convection boundary layer flow is presented. A similarity transform reduces the Navier-Stokes equations to a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which are solved analytically by means of the homotopy analysis method (HAM...... the convergence of the solution. The numerical solution of the similarity equations is developed and the results are in good agreement with the analytical results based on the HAM....

  13. Tropical Cyclone Footprint in the Ocean Mixed Layer Observed by Argo in the Northwest Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-25

    atmospheric circulation [Hart et al., 2007]. Several studies, based on observations and modeling, suggest that TC-induced energy input and mixing may play...an important role in climate variability through regulating the oceanic general circulation and its variability [e.g., Emanuel, 2001; Sriver and Huber...shallower than the isothermal layer) to change the thermohaline front [Chu and Wang, 2003], and to reduce the entrainment of the cool thermocline water

  14. MAPLE prepared heterostructures with oligoazomethine: Fullerene derivative mixed layer for photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanculescu, A.; Rasoga, O.; Socol, M.; Vacareanu, L.; Grigoras, M.; Socol, G.; Stanculescu, F.; Breazu, C.; Matei, E.; Preda, N.; Girtan, M.

    2017-09-01

    Mixed layers of azomethine oligomers containing 2,5-diamino-3,4-dicyanothiophene as central unit and triphenylamine (LV5) or carbazol (LV4) at both ends as donor and fullerene derivative, [6,6]-phenyl-C61 butyric acid butyl ester ([C60]PCB-C4) as acceptor, have been prepared by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) on glass/ITO and Si substrates. The effect of weight ratio between donor and acceptor (1:1; 1:2) and solvent type (chloroform, dimethylsulphoxide) on the optical (UV-vis transmission/absorption, photoluminescence) and morphological properties of LV4 (LV5): [C60]PCB-C4 mixed layers has been evidenced. Dark and under illumination I-V characteristics of the heterostructures realized with these mixed layers sandwiched between ITO and Al electrodes have revealed a solar cell behavior for the heterostructures prepared with both LV4 and LV5 using chloroform as matrix solvent. The solar cell structure realized with oligomer LV5, glass/ITO/LV5: [C60]PCB-C4 (1:1) has shown the best parameters.

  15. Initial condition effects on large scale structure in numerical simulations of plane mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, W. A.; Garrett, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, Large Eddy Simulations are performed on the spatially developing plane turbulent mixing layer. The simulated mixing layers originate from initially laminar conditions. The focus of this research is on the effect of the nature of the imposed fluctuations on the large-scale spanwise and streamwise structures in the flow. Two simulations are performed; one with low-level three-dimensional inflow fluctuations obtained from pseudo-random numbers, the other with physically correlated fluctuations of the same magnitude obtained from an inflow generation technique. Where white-noise fluctuations provide the inflow disturbances, no spatially stationary streamwise vortex structure is observed, and the large-scale spanwise turbulent vortical structures grow continuously and linearly. These structures are observed to have a three-dimensional internal geometry with branches and dislocations. Where physically correlated provide the inflow disturbances a "streaky" streamwise structure that is spatially stationary is observed, with the large-scale turbulent vortical structures growing with the square-root of time. These large-scale structures are quasi-two-dimensional, on top of which the secondary structure rides. The simulation results are discussed in the context of the varying interpretations of mixing layer growth that have been postulated. Recommendations are made concerning the data required from experiments in order to produce accurate numerical simulation recreations of real flows.

  16. An assumed pdf approach for the calculation of supersonic mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurle, R. A.; Drummond, J. P.; Hassan, H. A.

    1992-01-01

    In an effort to predict the effect that turbulent mixing has on the extent of combustion, a one-equation turbulence model is added to an existing Navier-Stokes solver with finite-rate chemistry. To average the chemical-source terms appearing in the species-continuity equations, an assumed pdf approach is also used. This code was used to analyze the mixing and combustion caused by the mixing layer formed by supersonic coaxial H2-air streams. The chemistry model employed allows for the formation of H2O2 and HO2. Comparisons are made with recent measurements using laser Raman diagnostics. Comparisons include temperature and its rms, and concentrations of H2, O2, N2, H2O, and OH. In general, good agreement with experiment was noted.

  17. Influence of Subgrade and Unbound Granular Layers Stiffness on Fatigue Life of Hot Mix Asphalts - HMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo A. Rondón-Quintana

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The mainly factors studied to predict fatigue life of hot mix asphalt-HMA in flexible pavements are the loading effect, type of test, compaction methods, design parameters of HMA (e.g., particle size and size distribution curve, fine content, type of bitumen and the variables associated with the environment (mainly moisture, temperature, aging. This study evaluated through a computer simulation, the influence of the granular layers and subgrade on the fatigue life of asphalt layers in flexible pavement structures. Mechanics parameters of granular layers of subgrade, base and subbase were obtained using the mathematical equations currently used for this purpose in the world. The emphasis of the study was the city of Bogotá, where the average annual temperature is 14°C and soils predominantly clay, generally experience CBR magnitudes between 1% and 4%. General conclusion: stiffness of the granular layers and subgrade significantly affect the fatigue resistance of HMA mixtures. Likewise, the use of different equations reported in reference literature in order to characterize granular layers may vary the fatigue life between 4.6 and 48.5 times, varying the thickness of the pavement layers in the design.

  18. Interactions between a tropical mixed boundary layer and cumulus convection in a radiative-convective model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, Caryn L. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    This report details a radiative-convective model, combining previously developed cumulus, stable cloud and radiation parameterizations with a boundary layer scheme, which was developed in the current study. The cloud model was modified to incorporate the effects of both small and large clouds. The boundary layer model was adapted from a mixed layer model was only slightly modified to couple it with the more sophisticated cloud model. The model was tested for a variety of imposed divergence profiles, which simulate the regions of the tropical ocean from approximately the intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) to the subtropical high region. The sounding used to initialize the model for most of the runs is from the trade wind region of ATEX. For each experiment, the model was run with a timestep of 300 seconds for a period of 7 days.

  19. Development of a Hybrid RANS/LES Method for Turbulent Mixing Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Reshotko, Eli

    2001-01-01

    Significant research has been underway for several years in NASA Glenn Research Center's nozzle branch to develop advanced computational methods for simulating turbulent flows in exhaust nozzles. The primary efforts of this research have concentrated on improving our ability to calculate the turbulent mixing layers that dominate flows both in the exhaust systems of modern-day aircraft and in those of hypersonic vehicles under development. As part of these efforts, a hybrid numerical method was recently developed to simulate such turbulent mixing layers. The method developed here is intended for configurations in which a dominant structural feature provides an unsteady mechanism to drive the turbulent development in the mixing layer. Interest in Large Eddy Simulation (LES) methods have increased in recent years, but applying an LES method to calculate the wide range of turbulent scales from small eddies in the wall-bounded regions to large eddies in the mixing region is not yet possible with current computers. As a result, the hybrid method developed here uses a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) procedure to calculate wall-bounded regions entering a mixing section and uses a LES procedure to calculate the mixing-dominated regions. A numerical technique was developed to enable the use of the hybrid RANS-LES method on stretched, non-Cartesian grids. With this technique, closure for the RANS equations is obtained by using the Cebeci-Smith algebraic turbulence model in conjunction with the wall-function approach of Ota and Goldberg. The LES equations are closed using the Smagorinsky subgrid scale model. Although the function of the Cebeci-Smith model to replace all of the turbulent stresses is quite different from that of the Smagorinsky subgrid model, which only replaces the small subgrid turbulent stresses, both are eddy viscosity models and both are derived at least in part from mixing-length theory. The similar formulation of these two models enables the RANS

  20. Observing entrainment mixing, photochemical ozone production, and regional methane emissions by aircraft using a simple mixed-layer framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trousdell, Justin F.; Conley, Stephen A.; Post, Andy; Faloona, Ian C.

    2016-12-01

    In situ flight data from two distinct campaigns during winter and summer seasons in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) of California are used to calculate boundary-layer entrainment rates, ozone photochemical production rates, and regional methane emissions. Flights near Fresno, California, in January and February 2013 were conducted in concert with the NASA DISCOVER-AQ project. The second campaign (ArvinO3), consisting of 11 days of flights spanning June through September 2013 and 2014, focused on the southern end of the SJV between Bakersfield and the small town of Arvin, California - a region notorious for frequent violations of ozone air quality standards. Entrainment velocities, the parameterized rates at which free tropospheric air is incorporated into the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), are estimated from a detailed budget of the inversion base height. During the winter campaign near Fresno, we find an average midday entrainment velocity of 1.5 cm s-1, and a maximum of 2.4 cm s-1. The entrainment velocities derived during the summer months near Bakersfield averaged 3 cm s-1 (ranging from 0.9 to 6.5 cm s-1), consistent with stronger surface heating in the summer months. Using published data on boundary-layer heights we find that entrainment rates across the Central Valley of California have a bimodal annual distribution peaking in spring and fall when the lower tropospheric stability (LTS) is changing most rapidly.Applying the entrainment velocities to a simple mixed-layer model of three other scalars (O3, CH4, and H2O), we solve for ozone photochemical production rates and find wintertime ozone production (2.8 ± 0.7 ppb h-1) to be about one-third as large as in the summer months (8.2 ± 3.1 ppb h-1). Moreover, the summertime ozone production rates observed above Bakersfield-Arvin exhibit an inverse relationship to a proxy for the volatile organic compound (VOC) : NOx ratio (aircraft [CH4] divided by surface [NO2]), consistent with a NOx-limited photochemical

  1. Observation and modeling of mixing-layer development in HED blast-wave-driven shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Stefano, Carlos

    2013-10-01

    This talk describes work exploring the sensitivity to initial conditions of hydrodynamic mixing-layer growth due to shear flow in the high-energy-density regime. This work features an approach in two parts, experimental and theoretical. First, an experiment, conducted at the OMEGA-60 laser facility, seeks to measure the development of such a mixing layer. This is accomplished by placing a layer of low-density (initially of either 0.05 or 0.1 g/cm3, to vary the system's Atwood number) carbon foam against a layer of higher-density (initially 1.4 g/cm3) polyamide-imide that has been machined to a nominally-flat surface at its interface with the foam. Inherent roughness of this surface's finish is precisely measured and varied from piece to piece. Ten simultaneous OMEGA beams, comprising a 4.5 kJ, 1-ns pulse focused to a roughly 1-mm-diameter spot, irradiate a thin polycarbonate ablator, driving a blast wave into the foam, parallel to its interface with the polyamide-imide. The ablator is framed by a gold washer, such that the blast wave is driven only into the foam, and not into the polyamide-imide. The subsequent forward motion of the shocked foam creates the desired shear effect, and the system is imaged by X-ray radiography 35 ns after the beginning of the driving laser pulse. Second, a simulation is performed, intending to replicate the flow observed in the experiment as closely as possible. Using the resulting simulated flow parameters, an analytical model can be used to predict the evolution of the mixing layer, as well as track the motion of the fluid in the experiment prior to the snapshot seen in the radiograph. The ability of the model to predict growth of the mixing layer under the various conditions observed in the experiment is then examined. This work is funded by the Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC via grant DEFC52- 08NA28616, by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE

  2. Comparison of Four Mixed Layer Mesoscale Parameterizations and the Equation for an Arbitrary Tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, V. M.; Dubovikov, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we discuss two issues, the inter-comparison of four mixed layer mesoscale parameterizations and the search for the eddy induced velocity for an arbitrary tracer. It must be stressed that our analysis is limited to mixed layer mesoscales since we do not treat sub-mesoscales and small turbulent mixing. As for the first item, since three of the four parameterizations are expressed in terms of a stream function and a residual flux of the RMT formalism (residual mean theory), while the fourth is expressed in terms of vertical and horizontal fluxes, we needed a formalism to connect the two formulations. The standard RMT representation developed for the deep ocean cannot be extended to the mixed layer since its stream function does not vanish at the ocean's surface. We develop a new RMT representation that satisfies the surface boundary condition. As for the general form of the eddy induced velocity for an arbitrary tracer, thus far, it has been assumed that there is only the one that originates from the curl of the stream function. This is because it was assumed that the tracer residual flux is purely diffusive. On the other hand, we show that in the case of an arbitrary tracer, the residual flux has also a skew component that gives rise to an additional bolus velocity. Therefore, instead of only one bolus velocity, there are now two, one coming from the curl of the stream function and other from the skew part of the residual flux. In the buoyancy case, only one bolus velocity contributes to the mean buoyancy equation since the residual flux is indeed only diffusive.

  3. Boundary-layer turbulence modeling and vorticity dynamics: I. A kangaroo-process mixing model of boundary-layer turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; van den Brink, A. Maassen

    A nonlocal turbulence transport theory is presented by means of a novel analysis of the Reynolds stress, inter alia involving the construct of a sample path space and a stochastic hypothesis. An analytical sampling rate model (satisfying exchange) and a nonlinear scaling relation (mapping the path space onto the boundary layer) lead to an integro-differential equation for the mixing of scalar densities, which represents fully-developed boundary-layer turbulence as a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type stochastic process. The underlying near-wall behavior (i.e. for y +→0) of fluctuating velocities fully agrees with recent direct numerical simulations. The model involves a scaling exponent ɛ, with ɛ→∞ in the diffusion limit. For the (partly analytical) solution for the mean velocity profile, excellent agreement with the experimental data yields ɛ≈0.58. The significance of ɛ as a turbulence Cantor set dimension (in the logarithmic profile region, i.e. for y +→∞) is discussed.

  4. Large-Scale Structure Effects on Particle Motion in a Spatialy Developing Mixing Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E.; Acharya, Sumanta; Ning, Hui

    1996-11-01

    We will present results from a simulation of particle motion in a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer forced by a single frequency. The simulation is based on a model which utilizes Eulerian formulation for the carrier phase flowfield and Lagrangian formulation for the dispersed particles. The carrier-phase mean flow is determined from the classical turbulent boundary layer equations and a traditional k-ɛ turbulence model modified to include interaction terms with the imposed large-scale structure. An integral energy method is used to determine the evolution of the large-scale structure which is modeled as a spatially growing wave. The effect of the carrier phase small-scale turbulent fluctuations is taken into account by using a classical stochastic model with a gaussian PDF. The effects of the particle time scale magnitude relative to the large-scale structure timescale (Stokes number) are discussed as well as the effects of the particle injection conditions. It is found that the Stokes number for which the cross-stream dispersion of the particles is maximized has a strong dependence on the particle injection conditions. The particle injection phase relative to the large-scale structure also has a profound influence on the motion of the particles and their distribution within the mixing layer.

  5. Assessment of mixed-layer height estimation from single-wavelength ceilometer profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knepp, Travis N.; Szykman, James J.; Long, Russell; Duvall, Rachelle M.; Krug, Jonathan; Beaver, Melinda; Cavender, Kevin; Kronmiller, Keith; Wheeler, Michael; Delgado, Ruben; Hoff, Raymond; Berkoff, Timothy; Olson, Erik; Clark, Richard; Wolfe, Daniel; Van Gilst, David; Neil, Doreen

    2017-10-01

    Differing boundary/mixed-layer height measurement methods were assessed in moderately polluted and clean environments, with a focus on the Vaisala CL51 ceilometer. This intercomparison was performed as part of ongoing measurements at the Chemistry And Physics of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (CAPABLE) site in Hampton, Virginia and during the 2014 Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) field campaign that took place in and around Denver, Colorado. We analyzed CL51 data that were collected via two different methods (BLView software, which applied correction factors, and simple terminal emulation logging) to determine the impact of data collection methodology. Further, we evaluated the STRucture of the ATmosphere (STRAT) algorithm as an open-source alternative to BLView (note that the current work presents an evaluation of the BLView and STRAT algorithms and does not intend to act as a validation of either). Filtering criteria were defined according to the change in mixed-layer height (MLH) distributions for each instrument and algorithm and were applied throughout the analysis to remove high-frequency fluctuations from the MLH retrievals. Of primary interest was determining how the different data-collection methodologies and algorithms compare to each other and to radiosonde-derived boundary-layer heights when deployed as part of a larger instrument network. We determined that data-collection methodology is not as important as the processing algorithm and that much of the algorithm differences might be driven by impacts of local meteorology and precipitation events that pose algorithm difficulties. The results of this study show that a common processing algorithm is necessary for light detection and ranging (lidar)-based MLH intercomparisons and ceilometer-network operation, and that sonde-derived boundary layer heights are higher (10-15 % at midday) than lidar

  6. Assessment of mixed-layer height estimation from single-wavelength ceilometer profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Knepp

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Differing boundary/mixed-layer height measurement methods were assessed in moderately polluted and clean environments, with a focus on the Vaisala CL51 ceilometer. This intercomparison was performed as part of ongoing measurements at the Chemistry And Physics of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (CAPABLE site in Hampton, Virginia and during the 2014 Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ field campaign that took place in and around Denver, Colorado. We analyzed CL51 data that were collected via two different methods (BLView software, which applied correction factors, and simple terminal emulation logging to determine the impact of data collection methodology. Further, we evaluated the STRucture of the ATmosphere (STRAT algorithm as an open-source alternative to BLView (note that the current work presents an evaluation of the BLView and STRAT algorithms and does not intend to act as a validation of either. Filtering criteria were defined according to the change in mixed-layer height (MLH distributions for each instrument and algorithm and were applied throughout the analysis to remove high-frequency fluctuations from the MLH retrievals. Of primary interest was determining how the different data-collection methodologies and algorithms compare to each other and to radiosonde-derived boundary-layer heights when deployed as part of a larger instrument network. We determined that data-collection methodology is not as important as the processing algorithm and that much of the algorithm differences might be driven by impacts of local meteorology and precipitation events that pose algorithm difficulties. The results of this study show that a common processing algorithm is necessary for light detection and ranging (lidar-based MLH intercomparisons and ceilometer-network operation, and that sonde-derived boundary layer heights are higher (10–15 % at

  7. Direct numerical simulation of a transitional supercritical binary mixing layer: heptane and nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okong'o, Nora A.; Bellan, Josette

    2002-08-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a supercritical temporal mixing layer are conducted for the purpose of exploring the characteristics of high-pressure transitional mixing behaviour. The conservation equations are formulated according to fluctuation-dissipation (FD) theory, which is consistent with non-equilibrium thermodynamics and converges to kinetic theory in the low-pressure limit. According to FD theory, complementing the low-pressure typical transport properties (viscosity, diffusivity and thermal conductivity), the thermal diffusion factor is an additional transport property which may play an increasingly important role with increasing pressure. The Peng Robinson equation of state with appropriate mixing rules is coupled to the dynamic conservation equations to obtain a closed system. The boundary conditions are periodic in the streamwise and spanwise directions, and of non-reflecting outflow type in the cross-stream direction. Due to the strong density stratification, the layer is considerably more difficult to entrain than equivalent gaseous or droplet-laden layers, and exhibits regions of high density gradient magnitude that become very convoluted at the transitional state. Conditional averages demonstrate that these regions contain predominantly the higher-density, entrained fluid, with small amounts of the lighter, entraining fluid, and that in these regions the mixing is hindered by the thermodynamic properties of the fluids. During the entire evolution of the layer, the dissipation is overwhelmingly due to species mass flux followed by heat flux effects with minimal viscous contribution, and there is a considerable amount of backscatter in the flow. Most of the species mass flux dissipation is due to the molecular diffusion term with significant contributions from the cross-term proportional to molecular and thermal diffusion. These results indicate that turbulence models for supercritical fluids should primarily focus on duplicating the species

  8. Scale interactions in a mixing layer – the role of the large-scale gradients

    KAUST Repository

    Fiscaletti, D.

    2016-02-15

    © 2016 Cambridge University Press. The interaction between the large and the small scales of turbulence is investigated in a mixing layer, at a Reynolds number based on the Taylor microscale of , via direct numerical simulations. The analysis is performed in physical space, and the local vorticity root-mean-square (r.m.s.) is taken as a measure of the small-scale activity. It is found that positive large-scale velocity fluctuations correspond to large vorticity r.m.s. on the low-speed side of the mixing layer, whereas, they correspond to low vorticity r.m.s. on the high-speed side. The relationship between large and small scales thus depends on position if the vorticity r.m.s. is correlated with the large-scale velocity fluctuations. On the contrary, the correlation coefficient is nearly constant throughout the mixing layer and close to unity if the vorticity r.m.s. is correlated with the large-scale velocity gradients. Therefore, the small-scale activity appears closely related to large-scale gradients, while the correlation between the small-scale activity and the large-scale velocity fluctuations is shown to reflect a property of the large scales. Furthermore, the vorticity from unfiltered (small scales) and from low pass filtered (large scales) velocity fields tend to be aligned when examined within vortical tubes. These results provide evidence for the so-called \\'scale invariance\\' (Meneveau & Katz, Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech., vol. 32, 2000, pp. 1-32), and suggest that some of the large-scale characteristics are not lost at the small scales, at least at the Reynolds number achieved in the present simulation.

  9. Defining the ecologically relevant mixed-layer depth for Antarctica's coastal seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Filipa; Kohut, Josh; Oliver, Matthew J.; Schofield, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    Mixed-layer depth (MLD) has been widely linked to phytoplankton dynamics in Antarctica's coastal regions; however, inconsistent definitions have made intercomparisons among region-specific studies difficult. Using a data set with over 20,000 water column profiles corresponding to 32 Slocum glider deployments in three coastal Antarctic regions (Ross Sea, Amundsen Sea, and West Antarctic Peninsula), we evaluated the relationship between MLD and phytoplankton vertical distribution. Comparisons of these MLD estimates to an applied definition of phytoplankton bloom depth, as defined by the deepest inflection point in the chlorophyll profile, show that the maximum of buoyancy frequency is a good proxy for an ecologically relevant MLD. A quality index is used to filter profiles where MLD is not determined. Despite the different regional physical settings, we found that the MLD definition based on the maximum of buoyancy frequency best describes the depth to which phytoplankton can be mixed in Antarctica's coastal seas.

  10. Effect of tungsten and carbon surface mixed layer on deuterium permeation in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, H.Y., E-mail: penghanyee_8388@st.eie.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Lee, H.T.; Ohtsuka, Y.; Ueda, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    Deuterium ion-driven permeation in tungsten under mixed deuterium and carbon irradiation at 1 keV was studied to investigate the incident flux dependency on deuterium permeation. Permeation experiments were performed at three temperatures (T{sub w} = 610 K, 710 K, 850 K) under incident flux of 10{sup 19}–10{sup 20} m{sup −2} s{sup −1}. The variation of incident flux leads to similar temperature-dependent increase in steady-state deuterium permeation flux under mixed deuterium and carbon irradiation as observed in previous study. It is also found that the rise in permeation at high temperature larger than 800 K cannot be explained by changes in front diffusivity of W–C mixed layer. Also, the incident flux dependency in deuterium permeation cannot be explained only by the hydrogen transport theory of Doyle and Brice. It is deducted that a mixed deuterium and carbon irradiation could cause an oversaturation state of deuterium in tungsten at temperature lower than 700 K.

  11. Mixed layer processes of the Arabian Sea Warm Pool during spring intermonsoon: a study based on observational and satellite data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sabu, P.; Revichandran, C.

    The relative importance and contribution of various processes in the total heat budget in the mixed layer of the Arabian Sea Warm Pool (ASWP) during spring intermonsoon (March–April 2004) were studied using in situ observations and satellite data...

  12. Variability of mixed layer depth in the northern Indian Ocean during 1977 and 1979 summer monsoon seasons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Sadhuram, Y.; RameshBabu, V.

    Influences of wind stress (tau) and wind stress curl (Grad Gamma) on the short term variability of the mixed layer depth at different locations in the northern Indian Ocean during different phases of summer monsoon activity were examined...

  13. Ocean bio-geophysical modeling using mixed layer-isopycnal general circulation model coupled with photosynthesis process

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nakamoto, S.; Saito, H.; Muneyama, K.; Sato, T.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Kumar, A.; Frouin, R.

    In the ocean mixed layer, phytoplanktons convert carbon dioxide into organic matter, which is accumulated into the body of phytoplankton, zooplankton, and fish communities. At the end of ocean biological food web, some compounds sink downward...

  14. Implementation of a 3D mixing layer code on parallel computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, K.; Thakur, R.; Dang, T.; Bogucz, E.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes our progress and experience in the development of a Computational-Fluid-Dynamics code on parallel computers to simulate three-dimensional spatially-developing mixing layers. In this initial study, the three-dimensional time-dependent Euler equations are solved using a finite-volume explicit time-marching algorithm. The code was first programmed in Fortran 77 for sequential computers. The code was then converted for use on parallel computers using the conventional message-passing technique, while we have not been able to compile the code with the present version of HPF compilers.

  15. Numerical Study of the Effects of Wave-Induced Forcing on Dynamics in Ocean Mixed Layer

    OpenAIRE

    Zengan Deng; Lian Xie; Ting Yu; Suixiang Shi; Jiye Jin; Kejian Wu

    2013-01-01

    Numerical experiments using hybrid coordinate ocean model (HYCOM) are designed to quantify the effects of wind wave-induced Coriolis-Stokes forcing (CSF) on mixed layer (ML) dynamics in a global context. CSF calculated by the wave parameters simulated by using the WaveWatch III (WW3) model is introduced as a new driving force for HYCOM. The results show that noticeable influence on ocean circulation in ML can be caused by CSF. Over most of the global oceans the direction of Stokes transport i...

  16. Numerical Investigation of Statistical Turbulence Effects on Beam Propagation through 2-D Shear Mixing Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Siegenthaler et al hypothesize centrifugal force seems to be a relevant factor. In light of these discussions, the 2-D shear mixing layer aero-optic like...9 top_inlet Source Riemann Invariant P-Stat T-Stat K Omega Mach Axis End Points Swirl (A,B,C) 101325.0 288.15 -1. -1. 0.6 0. 0...11 outflow Farfield Modified Riemann Invariant P-Stat T-Stat K Omega Mach Alpha Beta -1. -1. -1. -1. -1. -370. -370

  17. Influence of Gas Turbulence on the Instability of an Air-Water Mixing Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matas, Jean-Philippe; Marty, Sylvain; Dem, Mohamed Seydou; Cartellier, Alain

    2015-08-14

    We present the first evidence of the direct influence of gas turbulence on the shear instability of a planar air-water mixing layer. We show with two different experiments that increasing the level of velocity fluctuations in the gas phase continuously increases the frequency of the instability, up to a doubling of frequency for the largest turbulence intensity investigated. A modified spatiotemporal stability analysis taking turbulence into account via a simple Reynolds stress closure provides the right trend and magnitude for this effect.

  18. Sea surface salinity variability from a simplified mixed layer model of the global ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, S.; Chapron, B.; Tournadre, J.; Reul, N.

    2007-01-01

    A bi-dimensional mixed layer model (MLM) of the global ocean is used to investigate the sea surface salinity (SSS) balance and variability at daily to seasonal scales. Thus a simulation over an average year is performed with daily climatological forcing fields. The forcing dataset combines air-sea fluxes from a meteorological model, geostrophic currents from satellite altimeters and in situ data for river run-offs, deep temperature and salinity. The model is based on the "slab mixed layer" formulation, which allows many simplifications in the vertical mixing representation, but requires an accurate estimate for the Mixed Layer Depth. Therefore, the model MLD is obtained from an original inversion technique, by adjusting the simulated temperature to input sea surface temperature (SST) data. The geographical distribution and seasonal variability of this "effective" MLD is validated against an in situ thermocline depth. This comparison proves the model results are consistent with observations, except at high latitudes and in some parts of the equatorial band. The salinity balance can then be analysed in all the remaining areas. The annual tendency and amplitude of each of the six processes included in the model are described, whilst providing some physical explanations. A map of the dominant process shows that freshwater flux controls SSS in most tropical areas, Ekman transport in Trades regions, geostrophic advection in equatorial jets, western boundary currents and the major part of subtropical gyres, while diapycnal mixing leads over the remaining subtropical areas and at higher latitudes. At a global scale, SSS variations are primarily caused by horizontal advection (46%), then vertical entrainment (24%), freshwater flux (22%) and lateral diffusion (8%). Finally, the simulated SSS variability is compared to an in situ climatology, in terms of distribution and seasonal variability. The overall agreement is satisfying, which confirms that the salinity balance is

  19. Measured and calculated optical property profiles in the mixed layer and free troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, James M.; Bodhaine, Barry A.; Boatman, Joe F.; Deluisi, John J.; Post, M. J.; Kim, Young; Schnell, Russell C.; Sheridan, Patrick J.; Garvey, Dennis M.

    1992-01-01

    Nearly simultaneous measurements of the physical and optical properties of mixed layer and free tropospheric aerosols near Boulder, Colorado, were made on several occasions using aircraft, balloon, and ground-based sensors. This effort (Front Range Lidar, Aircraft, and Balloon experiment (FRLAB)) was conducted with the purpose of obtaining a diverse, self-consistent data set that could be used for testing optical model calculations based on measured physical characteristics such as apparent size distribution, composition, and shape. It was found that even with the uncertainties involved, the model predictions are in good agreement with the measurements in the visible and near infrared wavelength regions. At CO2 lidar wavelengths there is considerably more uncertainty in both the calculated and measured values; however, within the estimated errors there appears to be satisfactory agreement except for the highest free tropospheric layer studied. The results also indicate that during FRLAB the aerosol in the boundary layer and free troposphere behaved as spherical particles for optical modeling purposes. The utility of the observations for determining the extinction-to-backscatter ratio relevant to aerosols in the boundary layer and free troposphere is described with typical measured values being in the 20 to 30 sr range.

  20. Soft chemical control of the crystal and magnetic structure of a layered mixed valent manganite oxide sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack N. Blandy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative deintercalation of copper ions from the sulfide layers of the layered mixed-valent manganite oxide sulfide Sr2MnO2Cu1.5S2 results in control of the copper-vacancy modulated superstructure and the ordered arrangement of magnetic moments carried by the manganese ions. This soft chemistry enables control of the structures and properties of these complex materials which complement mixed-valent perovskite and perovskite-related transition metal oxides.

  1. Continuously imaging sub-ice shelf geomorphology with the vibroseismic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Olaf; Lambrecht, Astrid; Hofstede, Coen; Mayer, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Bathymetry, seabed geomorphology and water column thickness are three important quantities to investigate the current and past interaction of ice shelves with the ocean and underlying geologic strata. Water column thickness is important to understand the present water circulation and interaction of ocean water with the overlying ice, geomorphology informs us about the past activity of the ice shelf or even stream, i.e. whether it was grounded and caused megascale glacial lineations, where it was grounded and deposited grounding line wedges or whether it was floating and iceberg scaring took place. Whereas ice thickness of meteoric ice can best be derived with radar, the thickness of accreted (marine) ice, the water column and the stratigraphy of the seabed require seismic techniques. Without an ice shelf, geomorphology can best be obtained with swath sounding methods. With a floating ice shelf, things become more difficult. Although AUVs provided sub-shelf data, their deployment is restricted to regions where the AUV can safely return. In other regions, sub-shelf bathymetry was so far only estimated by sparse seismic point measurements or deduced in coarse resolution from gravimetric surveys. Here we present results from a vibroseismic traverse on the Ekströmisen, Antarctica, which recorded 80 km of high resolution seismic data in 2014 on the ice shelf. Seabed geomorphology shows considerable variations, from undisturbed regions to troughs several tens of meters deep. Some features show a height of 300 m and could be interpreted as past grounding lines of the active ice stream. Our results demonstrate that imaging sub-ice shelf regions with vibroseismic techniques could provide 3D images of the seabed, not as highly resolved as with swath bathymetry in open water, but considerably better than presently available data sets, and should be routinely obtained to improve our understanding of past ice activity and current processes.

  2. Coupling with ocean mixed layer leads to intraseasonal variability in tropical deep convection: Evidence from cloud-resolving simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anber, Usama; Wang, Shuguang; Sobel, Adam

    2017-03-01

    The effect of coupling a slab ocean mixed layer to atmospheric convection is examined in cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations in vertically sheared and unsheared environments without Coriolis force, with the large-scale circulation parameterized using the Weak Temperature Gradient (WTG) approximation. Surface fluxes of heat and moisture as well as radiative fluxes are fully interactive, and the vertical profile of domain-averaged horizontal wind is strongly relaxed toward specified profiles with vertical shear that varies from one simulation to the next. Vertical wind shear is found to play a critical role in the simulated behavior. There exists a threshold value of the shear strength above which the coupled system develops regular oscillations between deep convection and dry nonprecipitating states, similar to those found earlier in a much more idealized model which did not consider wind shear. The threshold value of the vertical shear found here varies with the depth of the ocean mixed layer. The time scale of the spontaneously generated oscillations also varies with mixed layer depth, from 10 days with a 1 m deep mixed layer to 50 days with a 10 m deep mixed layer. The results suggest the importance of the interplay between convection organized by vertical wind shear, radiative feedbacks, large-scale dynamics, and ocean mixed layer heat storage in real intraseasonal oscillations.

  3. Chlorophyll-a Variability in the Southern Ocean Mixed Layer and Euphotic Zone From Elephant Seals and Profiling Floats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, M. M.; Gille, S. T.; Franks, P. J. S.; Johnson, K. S.; Girton, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    The Southern Ocean contains some of the ocean's deepest mixed layers. Because deep mixed layers can transport phytoplankton below the euphotic zone, light levels depend on mixed-layer depth (MLD), and phytoplankton growth is hypothesized to be co-limited by iron and light. Estimates of Chl-a fluorescence, particle backscattering and hydrographic profiles collected by southern elephant seals, EM-APEX, and biogeochemical Argo floats are used to evaluate the extent to which MLD influences phytoplankton bloom development and the vertical structure of chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) in the Southern Ocean. We find that surface Chl-a (i.e., mean Chl-a for the upper light penetration depth) is a relatively good proxy of phytoplankton biomass (i.e., depth-integrated Chl-a) within the euphotic zone but gives an inadequate representation of biomass within the mixed layer, particularly in the summer. Although nearly vertically homogeneous Chl-a within the mixed layer prevails in seasonal mean profiles, subsurface Chl-a maxima are not uncommon from spring through fall. Deep Chl-a maxima that correlate with particle backscattering in summer and fall are found near the base of the mixed layer, closer to the nutrient maximum than the light maximum, suggesting that nutrient limitation (i.e., essentially iron) can play a greater role than light limitation in governing productivity.

  4. A conceptual framework to quantify the influence of convective boundary layer development on carbon dioxide mixing ratios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Peters, W.; Schröter, J.; van Heerwaarden, C. C.; Krol, M. C.

    2012-01-01

    Interpretation of observed diurnal carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios near the surface requires knowledge of the local dynamics of the planetary boundary layer. In this paper, we study the relationship between the boundary layer dynamics and the CO2 budget in convective conditions through a newly

  5. Intercomparison and validation of the mixed layer depth fields of global ocean syntheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Takahiro; Fujii, Yosuke; Kuragano, Tsurane; Kamachi, Masafumi; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Masuda, Shuhei; Sato, Kanako; Awaji, Toshiyuki; Hernandez, Fabrice; Ferry, Nicolas; Guinehut, Stéphanie; Martin, Matthew J.; Peterson, K. Andrew; Good, Simon A.; Valdivieso, Maria; Haines, Keith; Storto, Andrea; Masina, Simona; Köhl, Armin; Zuo, Hao; Balmaseda, Magdalena; Yin, Yonghong; Shi, Li; Alves, Oscar; Smith, Gregory; Chang, You-Soon; Vernieres, Guillaume; Wang, Xiaochun; Forget, Gael; Heimbach, Patrick; Wang, Ou; Fukumori, Ichiro; Lee, Tong

    2017-08-01

    Intercomparison and evaluation of the global ocean surface mixed layer depth (MLD) fields estimated from a suite of major ocean syntheses are conducted. Compared with the reference MLDs calculated from individual profiles, MLDs calculated from monthly mean and gridded profiles show negative biases of 10-20 m in early spring related to the re-stratification process of relatively deep mixed layers. Vertical resolution of profiles also influences the MLD estimation. MLDs are underestimated by approximately 5-7 (14-16) m with the vertical resolution of 25 (50) m when the criterion of potential density exceeding the 10-m value by 0.03 kg m-3 is used for the MLD estimation. Using the larger criterion (0.125 kg m-3) generally reduces the underestimations. In addition, positive biases greater than 100 m are found in wintertime subpolar regions when MLD criteria based on temperature are used. Biases of the reanalyses are due to both model errors and errors related to differences between the assimilation methods. The result shows that these errors are partially cancelled out through the ensemble averaging. Moreover, the bias in the ensemble mean field of the reanalyses is smaller than in the observation-only analyses. This is largely attributed to comparably higher resolutions of the reanalyses. The robust reproduction of both the seasonal cycle and interannual variability by the ensemble mean of the reanalyses indicates a great potential of the ensemble mean MLD field for investigating and monitoring upper ocean processes.

  6. Global and Koopman modes analysis of sound generation in mixing layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, G.; Robinet, J.-C.; Gloerfelt, X. [Laboratoire DynFluid, Arts et Métiers ParisTech, 151 Boulevard de l’Hopital, 75013 Paris (France); Alizard, F. [Laboratoire DynFluid, CNAM, 151 Boulevard de l’Hopital, 75013 Paris (France)

    2013-12-15

    It is now well established that linear and nonlinear instability waves play a significant role in the noise generation process for a wide variety of shear flows such as jets or mixing layers. In that context, the problem of acoustic radiation generated by spatially growing instability waves of two-dimensional subsonic and supersonic mixing layers are revisited in a global point of view, i.e., without any assumption about the base flow, in both a linear and a nonlinear framework by using global and Koopman mode decompositions. In that respect, a timestepping technique based on disturbance equations is employed to extract the most dynamically relevant coherent structures for both linear and nonlinear regimes. The present analysis proposes thus a general strategy for analysing the near-field coherent structures which are responsible for the acoustic noise in these configurations. In particular, we illustrate the failure of linear global modes to describe the noise generation mechanism associated with the vortex pairing for the subsonic regime whereas they appropriately explain the Mach wave radiation of instability waves in the supersonic regime. By contrast, the Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) analysis captures both the near-field dynamics and the far-field acoustics with a few number of modes for both configurations. In addition, the combination of DMD and linear global modes analyses provides new insight about the influence on the radiated noise of nonlinear interactions and saturation of instability waves as well as their interaction with the mean flow.

  7. Simulation of mixed-host emitting layer based organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riku, C.; Kee, Y. Y.; Ong, T. S.; Tou, T. Y. [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 631000 Cyberjaya (Malaysia); Yap, S. S. [Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lampur (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    ‘SimOLED’ simulator is used in this work to investigate the efficiency of the mixed-host organic light emitting devices (MH-OLEDs). Tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum(3) (Alq{sub 3}) and N,N-diphenyl-N,N-Bis(3-methylphenyl)-1,1-diphenyl-4,4-diamine (TPD) are used as the electron transport layer (ETL) material and hole transport layer (HTL) material respectively, and the indium-doped tin oxide (ITO) and aluminum (Al) as anode and cathode. Three MH-OLEDs, A, B and C with the same structure of ITO / HTM (15 nm) / Mixed host (70 nm) / ETM (10 nm) /Al, are stimulated with ratios TPD:Alq{sub 3} of 3:5, 5:5, and 5:3 respectively. The Poole-Frenkel model for electron and hole mobilities is employed to compute the current density-applied voltage-luminance characteristics, distribution of the electric field, carrier concentrations and recombination rate.

  8. Three-dimensional concentration field measurements in a mixing layer using magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Michael J.; Elkins, Christopher J.; Mobley, Paul D.; Alley, Marcus T.; Eaton, John K.

    2010-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to measure the three-dimensional, time-averaged concentration distribution in a turbulent two-stream mixing layer. Test fluids and MRI scanning parameters were chosen to give good signal linearity, and a calibration/normalization procedure was developed to reduce the concentration measurement uncertainty. Plain deionized water mixing with a solution of 0.8% gadopentetate dimeglumine in deionized water were selected as test fluids. The concentration of the marked water was measured on an array of 220,000 0.69 mm3 voxels covering the entire flow apparatus. Planar laser-induced fluorescence experiments were performed on the flow centerplane to provide validation data. The uncertainty of a single voxel measurement was estimated to be less than 12% with the largest source of uncertainty being turbulent dephasing. Averaging two runs in which the marked water was switched between the two streams reduced the uncertainty to only 4%. The complete magnetic resonance concentration (MRC) procedure including the adjustment of scanning parameters, a background run, two reference/calibration runs, and multiple concentration measurement runs can be completed in 2-3 h. This work establishes MRC as a viable technique for studying the mixing in complex turbulent liquid flows.

  9. Highway measurements of vehicle-induced turbulence (VIT) and enhanced mixing in the surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S. J.; Gordon, M.; Staebler, R. M.; Li-Chee-Ming, J.; Taylor, P.

    2016-12-01

    Motor vehicles generate vehicle-induced turbulence (VIT) while in motion, which affects the mixing and transport of emitted trace gases, heat and momentum. During July, 2016 a 40Hz sonic anemometer (ATI) and a co-located 20Hz open path CO2/H2O gas analyzer (LICOR) were assembled and driven on highways in the Greater Toronto Area. An ultra-high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer was employed to measure the total number concentration of particles between 60 and 1000nm at the position of the gas analyzer and sonic anemometer. A video camera with GPS capabilities was also utilized to assess the surrounding features while chasing a specific vehicle type. The following distance of each chased vehicle is calculated as a function of pixel location, with the back edge of each followed vehicle being identified as the initial contrast between the vehicle's shadow and the roadway. Combining the sonic anemometer data with the GPS data allows turbulence statistics to be developed and correlations with vehicle type and following distance to be examined. Vehicle-induced turbulence is assessed using turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), a measure of turbulent mixing, which maximizes near the followed vehicle and decreases with increasing following distance. Vehicle exhaust plumes are identified using the measured CO2 concentration. The CO2 concentration data in conjunction with TKE and turbulent fluxes are used to explore the potential impacts of vehicle-induced turbulence on atmospheric mixing within the surface layer.

  10. Mixed layer depth trends in the Bay of Biscay over the period 1975-2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xurxo Costoya

    Full Text Available Wintertime trends in mixed layer depth (MLD were calculated in the Bay of Biscay over the period 1975-2010 using the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA package. The reliability of the SODA database was confirmed correlating its results with those obtained from the experimental Argo database over the period 2003-2010. An iso-thermal layer depth (TLD and an iso-pycnal layer depth (PLD were defined using the threshold difference method with ΔT = 0.5°C and Δσθ = 0.125 kg/m3. Wintertime trends of the MLD were calculated using winter extended (December-March anomalies and annual maxima. Trends calculated for the whole Bay of Biscay using both parameters (TLD and PLD showed to be dependent on the area. Thus, MLD became deeper in the southeastern corner and shallower in the rest of the area. Air temperature was shown to play a key role in regulating the different spatial behavior of the MLD. Negative air temperature trends localized in the southeastern corner coincide with MLD deepening in this area, while, positive air temperature trends are associated to MLD shoaling in the rest of the bay. Additionally, the temperature trend calculated along the first 700 m of the water column is in good agreement with the different spatial behavior revealed for the MLD trend.

  11. Efficient green phosphorescent tandem organic light emitting diodes with solution processable mixed hosts charge generating layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talik, N.A.; Yeoh, K.H.; Ng, C.Y.B [Low Dimensional Research Center, Department of Physics, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); ItraMAS Corporation. Sdn. Bhd., 542A-B Mukim 1, Lorong Perusahaan Baru 2, Kawasan Perindustrian, Perai 13600, Penang (Malaysia); Yap, B.K. [Center of Microelectronic and Nanotechnology Engineering (CeMNE), College of Engineering, Universiti Tenaga Nasional, Jln. Uniten-Ikram, 4300 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Woon, K.L., E-mail: ph7klw76@um.edu.my [Low Dimensional Research Center, Department of Physics, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-10-15

    A novel solution processable charge generating layer (CGL) that consists of 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene hexacarbonitrile (HATCN{sub 6})/Poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK): 1,1-bis-(4-bis(4-tolyl)-aminophenyl) cyclohexene (TAPC) for a tandem green phosphorescent organic light emitting diode (PHOLED) is demonstrated. The use of orthogonal solvent to dissolve HATCN{sub 6} and PVK:TAPC is the key to overcome the interface erosion problem for the solution processed CGL. The current efficiency of the 2 wt% TAPC mixed with PVK is the highest at 24.2 cd/A, which is more than three-folds higher than that of the single device at 1000 cd/m{sup 2}. - Highlights: • A solution processable tandem OLED is built using a novel charge generating layer. • HATCN{sub 6} and PVK:TAPC are shown to be effective charge generating layers. • The turn on voltages for tandem devices are almost similar to single unit. • 2 wt% TAPC blended with PVK exhibits three-folds increase in efficiency.

  12. [Characteristics of Winter Atmospheric Mixing Layer Height in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region and Their Relationship with the Atmospheric Pollution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Tang, Gui-qian; Huang, Jun; Liu, Zi-rui; An, Jun-lin; Wang, Yue-si

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric mixing layer height (MLH) is one of the main factors affecting the atmospheric diffusion and plays an important role in air quality assessment and distribution of the pollutants. Based on the ceilometers data, this paper has made synchronous observation on MLH in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region (Beijing, Tianjin, Shijiazhuang and Qinhuangdao) in heavy polluted February 2014 and analyzed the respective overall change and its regional features. Results show that in February 2014,the average of mixing layer height in Qinhuangdao is the highest, up to 865 +/- 268 m, and in Shijiazhuang is the lowest (568 +/- 207 m), Beijing's and Tianjin's are in between, 818 +/- 319 m and 834 +/- 334 m respectively; Combined with the meteorological data, we find that radiation and wind speed are main factors of the mixing layer height; The relationship between the particle concentration and mixing layer height in four sites suggests that mixing layer is less than 800 m, concentration of fine particulate matter in four sites will exceed the national standard (GB 3095-2012, 75 microg x m(-3)). During the period of observation, the proportion of days that mixing layer is less than 800 m in Beijing, Tianjin, Shijiazhuang and Qinhuangdao are 50%, 43%, 80% and 50% respectively. Shijiazhuang though nearly formation contaminant concentration is high, within the atmospheric mixed layer pollutant load is not high. Unfavorable atmospheric diffusion conditions are the main causes of heavy pollution in Shijiazhuang for a long time. The results of the study are of great significance for cognitive Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei area pollution distribution, and can provide a scientific reference for reasonable distribution of regional pollution sources.

  13. Embedding a mixed layer model into an ocean general circulation model of the Atlantic: The importance of surface mixing for heat flux and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterl, Andreas; Kattenberg, Arie

    1994-07-01

    A primitive equation ocean general circulation model (OGCM) of the Atlantic is coupled with an explicit mixed layer model (MLM). The coupled model is used to investigate the impact and possible improvement achieved by an MLM on the representation of temperature and heat flux. The MLM improves model performance in regions where mixed layer (ML) formation is governed by wind stirring, which is identified as a major missing process in the OGCM. It is shown that the widely used parameterization of Pacanowski and Philander for the vertical exchange coefficients is not able to properly represent this process. The deepening of the ML by wind stirring leads to temperature and heat flux being in closer agreement with climatology than is the case without MLM. Integrations with a coupled ocean-atmosphere model are needed to show whether this improvement leads to a reduced climate drift in such models. Furthermore, momentum mixing improves the vertical profiles of velocity. The Ekman transport now occurs over the whole depth of the ML instead of just within the upper model layer. Convective adjustment as incorporated in the OGCM already tends to overestimate the depth of the mixed layer in buoyancy-driven situations. Adding the MLM cannot remedy this failure. Thus under these circumstances there are only slight improvments of some model aspects while others become even worse. We conclude that the parameterization of convection has to be improved.

  14. Structure function scaling in a Reλ = 250 turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2011-12-22

    A highly resolved Direct Numerical Simulation of a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer is presented. In the fully developed region, the flow achieves a turbulent Reynolds number Reλ = 250, high enough for a clear separation between large and dissipative scales, so for the presence of an inertial range. Structure functions have been calculated in the self-similar region using velocity time series and Taylor\\'s frozen turbulence hypothesis. The Extended Self-Similarity (ESS) concept has been employed to evaluate relative scaling exponents. A wide range of scales with scaling exponents and intermittency levels equal to homogeneous isotropic turbulence has been identified. Moreover an additional scaling range exists for larger scales; it is characterized by smaller exponents, similar to the values reported in the literature for flows with strong shear.

  15. Unsteady Mixed Convection Boundary Layer from a Circular Cylinder in a Micropolar Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anati Ali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Most industrial fluids such as polymers, liquid crystals, and colloids contain suspensions of rigid particles that undergo rotation. However, the classical Navier-Stokes theory normally associated with Newtonian fluids is inadequate to describe such fluids as it does not take into account the effects of these microstructures. In this paper, the unsteady mixed convection boundary layer flow of a micropolar fluid past an isothermal horizontal circular cylinder is numerically studied, where the unsteadiness is due to an impulsive motion of the free stream. Both the assisting (heated cylinder and opposing cases (cooled cylinder are considered. Thus, both small and large time solutions as well as the occurrence of flow separation, followed by the flow reversal are studied. The flow along the entire surface of a cylinder is solved numerically using the Keller-box scheme. The obtained results are compared with the ones from the open literature, and it is shown that the agreement is very good.

  16. Mixed Convection Boundary Layer Flow Embedded in a Thermally Stratified Porous Medium Saturated by a Nanofluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Hafizi Mat Yasin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the numerical investigation of the steady mixed convection boundary layer flow over a vertical surface embedded in a thermally stratified porous medium saturated by a nanofluid. The governing partial differential equations are reduced to the ordinary differential equations, using the similarity transformations. The similarity equations are solved numerically for three types of metallic or nonmetallic nanoparticles, namely, copper (Cu, alumina (Al2O3, and titania (TiO2, in a water-based fluid to investigate the effect of the solid volume fraction or nanoparticle volume fraction parameter φ of the nanofluid on the flow and heat transfer characteristics. The skin friction coefficient and the velocity and temperature profiles are presented and discussed.

  17. A mechanistic model of an upper bound on oceanic carbon export as a function of mixed layer depth and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Export production reflects the amount of organic matter transferred from the ocean surface to depth through biological processes. This export is in large part controlled by nutrient and light availability, which are conditioned by mixed layer depth (MLD. In this study, building on Sverdrup's critical depth hypothesis, we derive a mechanistic model of an upper bound on carbon export based on the metabolic balance between photosynthesis and respiration as a function of MLD and temperature. We find that the upper bound is a positively skewed bell-shaped function of MLD. Specifically, the upper bound increases with deepening mixed layers down to a critical depth, beyond which a long tail of decreasing carbon export is associated with increasing heterotrophic activity and decreasing light availability. We also show that in cold regions the upper bound on carbon export decreases with increasing temperature when mixed layers are deep, but increases with temperature when mixed layers are shallow. A meta-analysis shows that our model envelopes field estimates of carbon export from the mixed layer. When compared to satellite export production estimates, our model indicates that export production in some regions of the Southern Ocean, particularly the subantarctic zone, is likely limited by light for a significant portion of the growing season.

  18. Mixed oxides derived from layered double hydroxides as novel catalysts for phenol photodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puscasu, C. M.; Carja, G.; Mureseanu, M.; Zaharia, C.

    2017-08-01

    The removal of organic pollutants is nowadays a very challenging aspect of the environmental research. There are strong interests to develop novel semiconducting photocatalysts able to efficiently promote advanced oxidation reactions. The development of photocatalysts based on the mixtures of mixed oxides derived from layered double hydroxides (LDHs) - a family of naturally occurring anionic clays - might offer novel environmental-friendly solutions for the cost effective removal of organic pollutants. This work presents ZnO/ZnAl2O4, ZnO/Zn2TiO4 and ZnO/ZnCr2O4 as novel photocatalytic formulations for phenol degradation under UV irradiation. They were obtained by the controlled thermal treatment of the layered double hydroxides matrices (LDHs), as precursors materials, type ZnM-LDH (M = Al3+, Cr3+ or Ti4+). The LDHs were synthesized by the co-precipitation method at a constant pH. Controlled calcination at 650°C gives rise to solutions of mixed metal oxides. The structural and nanoarchitectonics characteristics of the studied catalysts were described by: XRD, SEM/TEM and TG/DTG techniques. Results show that in the photocatalytic process of the phenol degradation from aqueous solutions, ZnO/ZnCr2O4 and ZnO/ZnAl2O4 showed the best performance degrading ∼98% of phenol after 3.5 hs and 5 hs, respectively; while ZnO/Zn2TiO4 has degraded almost 80 % after 7.5 hs of UV irradiation. These results open new opportunities in the development of new cost effective photoresponsive formulations able to facilitate the photo-degradation of the organic pollution as “green” solution for removal of dangerous pollutants.

  19. Transport of desert dust mixed with North African industrial pollutants in the subtropical Saharan Air Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rodríguez

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of chemical composition data of particulate matter samples (TSP, PM10 and PM2.5 collected from 2002 to 2008 in the North Atlantic free troposphere at the Izaña Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW observatory (Tenerife, Canary Islands shows that desert dust is very frequently mixed with particulate pollutants in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL. The study of this data set with Median Concentrations At Receptor (MCAR plots allowed the identification of the potential source regions of the dust and particulate pollutants. Areas located at the south of the southern slope of the Atlas mountains emerge as the most frequent source of the soil desert dust advected to the northern edge of the SAL in summer. Industrial emissions occurring in Northern Algeria, Eastern Algeria, Tunisia and the Atlantic coast of Morocco appear as the most important source of the nitrate, ammonium and a fraction of sulphate (at least 60 % of the sulphate <10 μm transported from some regions observed in the SAL. These emissions are mostly linked to crude oil refineries, phosphate-based fertilizer industry and power plants. Although desert dust emissions appear as the most frequent source of the phosphorous observed in the SAL, high P concentrations are observed when the SAL is affected by emissions from open mines of phosphate and phosphate based fertilizer industry. The results also show that a significant fraction of the sulphate (up to 90 % of sulphate <10 μm transported from some regions observed in the SAL may be influenced by soil emissions of evaporite minerals in well defined regions where dry saline lakes (chotts are present. These interpretations of the MCAR plots are consistent with the results obtained with the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF2 receptor modelling. The results of this study show that North African industrial pollutants may be mixed with desert dust and exported to the North Atlantic in the Saharan Air Layer.

  20. The warmer the ocean surface, the shallower the mixed layer. How much of this is true?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somavilla, R.; González-Pola, C.; Fernández-Diaz, J.

    2017-09-01

    Ocean surface warming is commonly associated with a more stratified, less productive, and less oxygenated ocean. Such an assertion is mainly based on consistent projections of increased near-surface stratification and shallower mixed layers under global warming scenarios. However, while the observed sea surface temperature (SST) is rising at midlatitudes, the concurrent ocean record shows that stratification is not unequivocally increasing nor is MLD shoaling. We find that while SST increases at three study areas at midlatitudes, stratification both increases and decreases, and MLD deepens with enhanced deepening of winter MLDs at rates over 10 m decade-1. These results rely on the estimation of several MLD and stratification indexes of different complexity on hydrographic profiles from long-term hydrographic time-series, ocean reanalysis, and Argo floats. Combining this information with estimated MLDs from buoyancy fluxes and the enhanced deepening/attenuation of the winter MLD trends due to changes in the Ekman pumping, MLD variability involves a subtle interplay between circulation and atmospheric forcing at midlatitudes. Besides, it is highlighted that the density difference between the surface and 200 m, the most widely used stratification index, should not be expected to reliably inform about changes in the vertical extent of mixing.

  1. Mixing in the surface boundary layer of a tropical freshwater reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anis, A.; Singhal, G.

    2006-12-01

    A combined observational-modeling study was conducted to investigate turbulence mixing, and the relation to surface forcing, in the surface boundary layer (SBL) of a tropical, high-altitude, freshwater reservoir. A suite of vertical profiles of temperature microstructure, collected at three different stations of one-day duration each, provided estimates of dissipation rates of turbulence kinetic energy, ɛ, and temperature variance, χ. Numerical simulations of ɛ and χ, using state-of-the-art, public domain, two-equation turbulence closure models, compared favorably with the observations and reproduced the dynamics of daytime wind mixing as well as the vertical and temporal turbulence structure during nighttime convective conditions. Two independent estimates of vertical eddy diffusivities in the stably stratified (daytime) SBL, computed from the microstructure measurements, agreed closely, and the near surface heat and buoyancy fluxes, computed from the diffusivities, were similar to those computed independently from surface meteorology. Model generated eddy diffusivities agreed closely with the observed values, except those generated by K profile parameterization (KPP) model simulations. The good agreement provides confidence that nutrient fluxes in the SBL may be accurately computed from the models when forced with regularly measured surface meteorological parameters. The consequences are important for estimation of daily primary productivity rates in the euphotic zone and the ability to predict algal blooms such as those observed in the present reservoir.

  2. Transport of desert dust mixed with North African industrial pollutants in the subtropical Saharan Air Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, S.; Alastuey, A.; Alonso-Pérez, S.; Querol, X.; Cuevas, E.; Abreu-Afonso, J.; Viana, M.; Pérez, N.; Pandolfi, M.; de La Rosa, J.

    2011-07-01

    An analysis of chemical composition data of particulate matter samples (TSP, PM10 and PM2.5) collected from 2002 to 2008 in the North Atlantic free troposphere at the Izaña Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) observatory (Tenerife, Canary Islands) shows that desert dust is very frequently mixed with particulate pollutants in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL). The study of this data set with Median Concentrations At Receptor (MCAR) plots allowed the identification of the potential source regions of the dust and particulate pollutants. Areas located at the south of the southern slope of the Atlas mountains emerge as the most frequent source of the soil desert dust advected to the northern edge of the SAL in summer. Industrial emissions occurring in Northern Algeria, Eastern Algeria, Tunisia and the Atlantic coast of Morocco appear as the most important source of the nitrate, ammonium and a fraction of sulphate (at least 60 % of the sulphate exported to the North Atlantic in the Saharan Air Layer.

  3. Mg-Fe-mixed oxides derived from layered double hydroxides: A study of the surface properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinković-Nedučin Radmila P.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of surface properties on the selectivity of the synthesized catalysts was studied, considering that their selectivity towards particular hydrocarbons is crucial for their overall activity in the chosen Fischer- -Tropsch reaction. Magnesium- and iron-containing layered double hydroxides (LDH, with the general formula: [Mg1-xFex(OH2](CO3x/2?mH2O, x = = n(Fe/(n(Mg+n(Fe, synthesized with different Mg/Fe ratio and their thermally derived mixed oxides were investigated. Magnesium was chosen because of its basic properties, whereas iron was selected due to its well-known high Fischer-Tropsch activity, redox properties and the ability to form specific active sites in the layered LDH structure required for catalytic application. The thermally less stable multiphase system (synthesized outside the optimal single LDH phase range with additional Fe-phase, having a lower content of surface acid and base active sites, a lower surface area and smaller fraction of smaller mesopores, showed higher selectivity in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The results of this study imply that the metastability of derived multiphase oxides structure has a greater influence on the formation of specific catalyst surface sites than other investigated surface properties.

  4. Mapping the Interactions between Shocks and Mixing Layers in a 3-Stream Supersonic Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewalle, Jacques; Ruscher, Christopher; Kan, Pinqing; Tenney, Andrew; Gogineni, Sivaram; Kiel, Barry

    2015-11-01

    Pressure is obtained from an LES calculation of the supersonic jet (Ma1 = 1 . 6) issuing from a rectangular nozzle in a low-subsonic co-flow; a tertiary flow, also rectangular with Ma3 = 1 insulates the primary jet from an aft-deck plate. The developing jet exhibits complex three-dimensional interactions between oblique shocks, multiple mixing layers and corner vortices, which collectively act as a skeleton for the flow. Our study is based on several plane sections through the pressure field, with short signals (0.1 s duration at 80 kHz sampling rate). Using wavelet-based band-pass filtering and cross-correlations, we map the directions of propagation of information among the various ``bones'' in the skeleton. In particular, we identify upstream propagation in some frequency bands, 3-dimensional interactions between the various shear layers, and several key bones from which the pressure signals, when taken as reference, provide dramatic phase-locking for parts of the skeleton. We acknowledge the support of AFRL through an SBIR grant.

  5. On the instabilities of supersonic mixing layers - A high-Mach-number asymptotic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsa, Thomas F.; Goldstein, M. E.

    1990-01-01

    The stability of a family of tanh mixing layers is studied at large Mach numbers using perturbation methods. It is found that the eigenfunction develops a multilayered structure, and the eigenvalue is obtained by solving a simplified version of the Rayleigh equation (with homogeneous boundary conditions) in one of these layers which lies in either of the external streams. This analysis leads to a simple hypersonic similarity law which explains how spatial and temporal phase speeds and growth rates scale with Mach number and temperature ratio. Comparisons are made with numerical results, and it is found that this similarity law provides a good qualitative guide for the behavior of the instability at high Mach numbers. In addition to this asymptotic theory, some fully numerical results are also presented (with no limitation on the Mach number) in order to explain the origin of the hypersonic modes (through mode splitting) and to discuss the role of oblique modes over a very wide range of Mach number and temperature ratio.

  6. Evolution of Eighteen Degree Water and deep mixed layer oxygen and properties from profiling floats during CLIMODE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, B.; Talley, L.

    2008-12-01

    As part of the CLIMODE observations of Eighteen Degree Water (EDW) formation and destruction, 9 profiling floats equipped with optical oxygen sensors as well as CTDs profiled temperature, salinity and oxygen every 5 days to 500 m and every 10 days to 1800 m during 2006 and 2007 in the Gulf Stream region. Thick (200- 450 m) late winter mixed layers with EDW properties were observed close to the Gulf Stream at about 52W, and in a separate cluster up to several hundred kilometers south of the Gulf Stream at about 62W, within the westward recirculation. Relatively thick winter mixed layers at 14C were observed north of the Gulf Stream, and also adjacent to the North Atlantic Current much farther to the east. Mixed layer oxygen saturation is a robust indicator of deep mixing: it is depressed in the thick winter mixed layers and increases abruptly upon cessation of deep mixing. EDW layers for these floats, defined by low potential density gradient, were thickest during and just after late- winter outcropping. EDW thickness declined by about 100 m when mixing ceased, with the EDW layer center also shifting physically downward. Oxygen saturation decreased in the EDW by about 10 percent from late winter to late summer, indicating annual aging of the water mass followed by renewal again in the winter. The oxygen-equipped floats provide an excellent opportunity to study the seasonal evolution of oxygen in the upper ocean in the Sargasso Sea. A well-developed oxygen minimum, centered at about 27.2 sigma theta and originating in the tropical Atlantic, underlies the EDW at about 800 m (south of the Gulf Stream). Above the EDW were the seasonally-evolving mixed layer with a thin underlying oxygen maximum layer in spring/summer and a thin oxygen minimum layer in fall/early winter, associated with photosynthesis/respiration. Although the EDW's absolute oxygen content decreased throughout the year following late winter formation, the EDW was marked by a slight vertical oxygen

  7. Heterogeneous distribution of plankton within the mixed layer and its implications for bloom formation in tropical seas

    KAUST Repository

    Calbet, Albert

    2015-06-11

    Intensive sampling at the coastal waters of the central Red Sea during a period of thermal stratification, prior to the main seasonal bloom during winter, showed that vertical patches of prokaryotes and microplankton developed and persisted for several days within the apparently density uniform upper layer. These vertical structures were most likely the result of in situ growth and mortality (e.g., grazing) rather than physical or behavioural aggregation. Simulating a mixing event by adding nutrient-rich deep water abruptly triggered dense phytoplankton blooms in the nutrient-poor environment of the upper layer. These findings suggest that vertical structures within the mixed layer provide critical seeding stocks that can rapidly exploit nutrient influx during mixing, leading to winter bloom formation.

  8. Eulerian and Lagrangian Parameterization of the Oceanic Mixed Layer using Large Eddy Simulation and MPAS-Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Roekel, Luke [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-30

    We have conducted a suite of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) to form the basis of a multi-model comparison (left). The results have led to proposed model improvements. We have verified that Eulerian-Lagrangian effective diffusivity estimates of mesoscale mixing are consistent with traditional particle statistics metrics (right). LES and Lagrangian particles will be utilized to better represent the movement of water into and out of the mixed layer.

  9. The sensitivity of primary productivity to intra-seasonal mixed layer variability in the sub-Antarctic Zone of the Atlantic Ocean

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Joubert, WR

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal cycle of primary productivity is impacted by seasonal and intra-seasonal dynamics of the mixed layer through the changing balance between mixing and buoyancy forcing, which regulates nutrient supply and light availability. Of particular...

  10. Upper mixed layer temperature anomalies at the North Atlantic storm-track zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Moshonkin

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available Synoptic sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTAs were determined as a result of separation of time scales smaller than 183 days. The SSTAs were investigated using daily data of ocean weather station "C" (52.75°N; 35.5°W from 1 January 1976 to 31 December 1980 (1827 days. There were 47 positive and 50 negative significant SSTAs (lifetime longer than 3 days, absolute value greater than 0.10 °C with four main intervals of the lifetime repetitions: 1. 4–7 days (45% of all cases, 2. 9–13 days (20–25%, 3. 14–18 days (10–15%, and 4. 21–30 days (10–15% and with a magnitude 1.5–2.0 °C. An upper layer balance model based on equations for temperature, salinity, mechanical energy (with advanced parametrization, state (density, and drift currents was used to simulate SSTA. The original method of modelling taking into account the mean observed temperature profiles proved to be very stable. The model SSTAs are in a good agreement with the observed amplitudes and phases of synoptic SSTAs during all 5 years. Surface heat flux anomalies are the main source of SSTAs. The influence of anomalous drift heat advection is about 30–50% of the SSTA, and the influence of salinity anomalies is about 10–25% and less. The influence of a large-scale ocean front was isolated only once in February-April 1978 during all 5 years. Synoptic SSTAs develop just in the upper half of the homogeneous layer at each winter. We suggest that there are two main causes of such active sublayer formation: 1. surface heat flux in the warm sectors of cyclones and 2. predominant heat transport by ocean currents from the south. All frequency functions of the ocean temperature synoptic response to heat and momentum surface fluxes are of integral character (red noise, though there is strong resonance with 20-days period of wind-driven horizontal heat advection with mixed layer temperature; there are some other peculiarities on the time scales from 5.5 to 13 days. Observed and

  11. Lack of seasonal and geographic variation in mesozooplankton biomass in the Arabian Sea and its structure in the mixed layer

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhupratap, M.; Gopalakrishnan, T.C.; Haridas, P.; Nair, K.K.C.; Aravindakshan, P.N.; Padmavati, G.; Paul, S.

    in the mixed layer compared to deeper strata. A noteworthy feature was that the standing stocks and abundances did not vary significantly between seasons and areas. Vertical migrations appeared to be in a low key. In all seasons herbivores dominated, followed...

  12. Seasonal variability of the mixed layer in the central Bay of Bengal and associated changes in nutrients and chlorophyll

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Narvekar, J.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    radiation and lighter winds during this period. The deep mixed layer during summer results from two processes: the increased wind forcing and the intrusion of high-salinity waters of Arabian Sea origin. The high winds associated with summer monsoon initiate...

  13. Efficient mixed-solvent exfoliation of few-quintuple layer Bi2S3 and its photoelectric response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yaohui; Zhao, Qiyi; Yao, Zehan; Si, Keyu; Zhou, Yixuan; Xu, Xinlong

    2017-08-01

    A scalable liquid exfoliation of layered Bi2S3 employing a mixed-solvent strategy was used for the fabrication of Bi2S3 nanosheets. We found that 10% deionized water in 90% isopropyl alcohol is the best mixed solvent for the efficient and effective exfoliation of layered Bi2S3. These results are consistent with the absorbance spectra and enthalpy of mixing theory. The obtained Bi2S3 nanosheets had few-quintuple layers and were investigated by transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. These Bi2S3 nanosheets can be used to fabricate large-scale thin films by filtration method; the films demonstrated sensitive photoelectric response with the rise and decay response of photocurrent on the sub-second scale under visible light excitation. The electronic structures of bulk and one-quintuple layer Bi2S3 are calculated by first-principle calculation for better understanding of the photoelectric response. A green mixed-solvent processing of Bi2S3 opens up the potential application of Bi2S3 optoelectric films to photoelectric detection and solar energy conversion devices.

  14. Improvement of the Lateral Distribution Method based on the mixing layer theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, J. N.; Leal, J. B.; Cardoso, A. H.

    2014-07-01

    The accurate prediction of depth-averaged streamwise velocity, boundary shear stress and lateral shear stress are important requisites for the estimation of the flow depth associated with flood events in compound river channels composed of main channel and floodplain. This engineering problem may be tackled through the analytical solution of the depth-averaged momentum equation. Under uniform flow, this solution relies on the calibration of three descriptors of the bottom friction, secondary currents and lateral shear stress. In this paper, the analytical solution materialized in the Lateral Distribution Method is revisited through the consideration of a new panel division. Accurate measurements of streamwise and spanwise velocities as well as of boundary shear stress are used to obtain new predictors of the coefficients describing the effects of bottom friction, secondary currents and lateral shear. The new lateral division of the compound channel into four panels is physically based on the mixing layer width, which is computed by an iterative procedure easily implemented in practical applications.

  15. Mg-Al layered double hydroxides (LDHs) and their derived mixed oxides grown by laser techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matei, A., E-mail: andreeapurice@nipne.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Str., 077125 Bucharest, Magurele (Romania); Birjega, R.; Nedelcea, A.; Vlad, A.; Colceag, D.; Ionita, M.D.; Luculescu, C.; Dinescu, M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Str., 077125 Bucharest, Magurele (Romania); Zavoianu, R.; Pavel, O.D. [University of Bucharest, Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Chemical Technology and Catalysis, 4-12 Regina Elisabeta Bd., Bucharest (Romania)

    2011-04-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) have been widely studied due to their applications as multifunctional materials, catalysts, host materials, anionic exchangers, adsorbents for environmental contaminants and for the immobilization of biological materials. As thin films, LDHs are good candidates for novel applications as sensors, corrosion resistant coatings or components in electro optical devices. For these applications, lamellar orientation-controlled film has to be fabricated. In this work, the successful deposition of LDH and their derived mixed oxides thin films by laser techniques is reported. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) were the methods used for thin films deposition. The ability of Mg-Al LDHs as a carrier for metallic particles (Ag) has been considered. Frozen targets containing 10% powder in water were used for MAPLE, while for PLD the targets consisted in dry-pressed pellets. The structure and the surface morphology of the deposited films were examined by X-ray Diffraction, Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry.

  16. LES of Temporally Evolving Mixing Layers by an Eighth-Order Filter Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjadj, A; Yee, H. C.; Sjogreen, B.

    2011-01-01

    An eighth-order filter method for a wide range of compressible flow speeds (H.C. Yee and B. Sjogreen, Proceedings of ICOSAHOM09, June 22-26, 2009, Trondheim, Norway) are employed for large eddy simulations (LES) of temporally evolving mixing layers (TML) for different convective Mach numbers (Mc) and Reynolds numbers. The high order filter method is designed for accurate and efficient simulations of shock-free compressible turbulence, turbulence with shocklets and turbulence with strong shocks with minimum tuning of scheme parameters. The value of Mc considered is for the TML range from the quasi-incompressible regime to the highly compressible supersonic regime. The three main characteristics of compressible TML (the self similarity property, compressibility effects and the presence of large-scale structure with shocklets for high Mc) are considered for the LES study. The LES results using the same scheme parameters for all studied cases agree well with experimental results of Barone et al. (2006), and published direct numerical simulations (DNS) work of Rogers & Moser (1994) and Pantano & Sarkar (2002).

  17. Vapor phase hydrogenation of furfural over nickel mixed metal oxide catalysts derived from layered double hydroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulmonetti, Taylor P.; Pang, Simon H.; Claure, Micaela Taborga; Lee, Sungsik; Cullen, David A.; Agrawal, Pradeep K.; Jones, Christopher W.

    2016-05-01

    The hydrogenation of furfural is investigated over various reduced nickel mixed metal oxides derived from layered double hydroxides (LDHs) containing Ni-Mg-Al and Ni-Co-Al. Upon reduction, relatively large Ni(0) domains develop in the Ni-Mg-Al catalysts, whereas in the Ni-Co-Al catalysts smaller metal particles of Ni(0) and Co(0), potentially as alloys, are formed, as evidenced by XAS, XPS, STEM and EELS. All the reduced Ni catalysts display similar selectivities towards major hydrogenation products (furfuryl alcohol and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol), though the side products varied with the catalyst composition. The 1.1Ni-0.8Co-Al catalyst showed the greatest activity per titrated site when compared to the other catalysts, with promising activity compared to related catalysts in the literature. The use of base metal catalysts for hydrogenation of furanic compounds may be a promising alternative to the well-studied precious metal catalysts for making biomass-derived chemicals if catalyst selectivity can be improved in future work by alloying or tuning metal-oxide support interactions.

  18. Atomisation and droplet formation mechanisms in a model two-phase mixing layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, Stephane; Ling, Yue; Fuster, Daniel; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2017-11-01

    We study atomization in a turbulent two-phase mixing layer inspired by the Grenoble air-water experiments. A planar gas jet of large velocity is emitted on top of a planar liquid jet of smaller velocity. The density ratio and momentum ratios are both set at 20 in the numerical simulation in order to ease the simulation. We use a Volume-Of-Fluid method with good parallelisation properties, implemented in our code http://parissimulator.sf.net. Our simulations show two distinct droplet formation mechanisms, one in which thin liquid sheets are punctured to form rapidly expanding holes and the other in which ligaments of irregular shape form and breakup in a manner similar but not identical to jets in Rayleigh-Plateau-Savart instabilities. Observed distributions of particle sizes are extracted for a sequence of ever more refined grids, the largest grid containing approximately eight billion points. Although their accuracy is limited at small sizes by the grid resolution and at large size by statistical effects, the distributions overlap in the central region. The observed distributions are much closer to log normal distributions than to gamma distributions as is also the case for experiments.

  19. Direct Numerical Simulation of Concentration and Orientation Distribution of Fibers in a Mixing Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The concentration and orientation of suspended fibers in a mixing layer are investigated numerically. Two cases (diffusive and nondiffusive are investigated for the fiber concentration distribution. The fine structures of the instantaneous distributions under these two cases are very different due to molecular diffusion. Sharp front of concentration is observed in the nondiffusive case. However, there is no obvious difference in the mean concentration between the two cases. With regard to the orientation, a fiber may rotate periodically or approach an asymptotic orientation, which is determined by a determinant defined with the stain rate. The symmetric part of the strain rate tends to make a fiber align to an asymptotic orientation, while the antisymmetric part drives a fiber to rotate. When a fluid parcel passes through a region with relatively high shear rate, fibers carried by the fluid parcel are most likely to rotate incessantly. On the other hand, in the region of relatively high extension rate, fibers tend to align to some asymptotic orientation. Generally, fibers tend to align with the shear plane. This fact has significant implications in predicting the rheological properties of fiber suspension flows.

  20. A Model Chain Application to Estimate Mixing Layer Height Related to PM10 Dispersion Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, F.; Calastrini, F.; Busillo, C.; Messeri, G.; Gozzini, B.

    2015-01-01

    The mixing layer height (MLH) is a crucial parameter in order to investigate the near surface concentrations of air pollutants. The MLH can be estimated by measurements of some atmospheric variables, by indirect estimates based on trace gases concentration or aerosol, or by numerical models. Here, a modelling approach is proposed. The developed modelling system is based on the models WRF-ARW and CALMET. This system is applied on Firenze-Prato-Pistoia area (Central Italy), during 2010, and it is compared with in situ measurements. The aim of this work is to evaluate the use of MLH model estimates to characterize the critical episodes for PM10 in a limited area. In order to find out the meteorological conditions predisposing accumulation of PM10 in the atmosphere's lower level, some indicators are used: daily mean wind speed, cumulated rainfall, and mean MLH estimates from CALMET model. This indicator is linked to orography, which has important consequences on local weather dynamics. However, during critical events the local emission sources are crucial to the determination of threshold exceeding of PM10. Results show that the modelled MLH, together with cumulative rainfall and wind speed, can identify the meteorological conditions predisposing accumulation of air pollutant at ground level. PMID:26618190

  1. Statistics of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface in a spatially evolving mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Cristancho, Juan

    2012-12-01

    The thin interface separating the inner turbulent region from the outer irrotational fluid is analyzed in a direct numerical simulation of a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer. A vorticity threshold is defined to detect the interface separating the turbulent from the non-turbulent regions of the flow, and to calculate statistics conditioned on the distance from this interface. Velocity and passive scalar statistics are computed and compared to the results of studies addressing other shear flows, such as turbulent jets and wakes. The conditional statistics for velocity are in remarkable agreement with the results for other types of free shear flow available in the literature. In addition, a detailed analysis of the passive scalar field (with Sc 1) in the vicinity of the interface is presented. The scalar has a jump at the interface, even stronger than that observed for velocity. The strong jump for the scalar has been observed before in the case of high Schmidt number, but it is a new result for Schmidt number of order one. Finally, the dissipation for the kinetic energy and the scalar are presented. While the kinetic energy dissipation has its maximum far from the interface, the scalar dissipation is characterized by a strong peak very close to the interface.

  2. Statistics of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface in a spatially developing mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2014-06-02

    The thin interface separating the inner turbulent region from the outer irrotational fluid is analysed in a direct numerical simulation of a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer. A vorticity threshold is defined to detect the interface separating the turbulent from the non-turbulent regions of the flow, and to calculate statistics conditioned on the distance from this interface. The conditional statistics for velocity are in remarkable agreement with the results for other free shear flows available in the literature, such as turbulent jets and wakes. In addition, an analysis of the passive scalar field in the vicinity of the interface is presented. It is shown that the scalar has a jump at the interface, even stronger than that observed for velocity. The strong jump for the scalar has been observed before in the case of high Schmidt number (Sc). In the present study, such a strong jump is observed for a scalar with Sc ≈ 1. Conditional statistics of kinetic energy and scalar dissipation are presented. While the kinetic energy dissipation has its maximum far from the interface, the scalar dissipation is characterised by a strong peak very close to the interface. Finally, it is shown that the geometric features of the interfaces correlate with relatively large scale structures as visualised by low-pressure isosurfaces. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  3. Improved layered mixed transition metal oxides for Li-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doeff, Marca M.; Conry, Thomas; Wilcox, James

    2010-03-05

    Recent work in our laboratory has been directed towards development of mixed layered transition metal oxides with general composition Li[Ni, Co, M, Mn]O2 (M=Al, Ti) for Li ion battery cathodes. Compounds such as Li[Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3]O2 (often called NMCs) are currently being commercialized for use in consumer electronic batteries, but the high cobalt content makes them too expensive for vehicular applications such as electric vehicles (EV), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). To reduce materials costs, we have explored partial or full substitution of Co with Al, Ti, and Fe. Fe substitution generally decreases capacity and results in poorer rate and cycling behavior. Interestingly, low levels of substitution with Al or Ti improve aspects of performance with minimal impact on energy densities, for some formulations. High levels of Al substitution compromise specific capacity, however, so further improvements require that the Ni and Mn content be increased and Co correspondingly decreased. Low levels of Al or Ti substitution can then be used offset negative effects induced by the higher Ni content. The structural and electrochemical characterization of substituted NMCs is presented in this paper.

  4. Investigations of boundary layer structure, cloud characteristics and vertical mixing of aerosols at Barbados with large eddy simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jähn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Large eddy simulations (LESs are performed for the area of the Caribbean island Barbados to investigate island effects on boundary layer modification, cloud generation and vertical mixing of aerosols. Due to the presence of a topographically structured island surface in the domain center, the model setup has to be designed with open lateral boundaries. In order to generate inflow turbulence consistent with the upstream marine boundary layer forcing, we use the cell perturbation method based on finite amplitude potential temperature perturbations. In this work, this method is for the first time tested and validated for moist boundary layer simulations with open lateral boundary conditions. Observational data obtained from the SALTRACE field campaign is used for both model initialization and a comparison with Doppler wind and Raman lidar data. Several numerical sensitivity tests are carried out to demonstrate the problems related to “gray zone modeling” when using coarser spatial grid spacings beyond the inertial subrange of three-dimensional turbulence or when the turbulent marine boundary layer flow is replaced by laminar winds. Especially cloud properties in the downwind area west of Barbados are markedly affected in these kinds of simulations. Results of an additional simulation with a strong trade-wind inversion reveal its effect on cloud layer depth and location. Saharan dust layers that reach Barbados via long-range transport over the North Atlantic are included as passive tracers in the model. Effects of layer thinning, subsidence and turbulent downward transport near the layer bottom at z ≈ 1800 m become apparent. The exact position of these layers and strength of downward mixing is found to be mainly controlled atmospheric stability (especially inversion strength and wind shear. Comparisons of LES model output with wind lidar data show similarities in the downwind vertical wind structure. Additionally, the model results

  5. Magnetic properties of mixed spins Ising model on the two alternative layers within the Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabar, A.; Masrour, R.

    2017-10-01

    The magnetic properties of mixed spins-5/2 and -2 Ising model on the two alternative layers on a honeycomb lattice are investigated and are discussed using the Monte Carlo simulations. The different ground-state phase diagrams are found. The eight magnetic stable phases are obtained for a fixed magnetic parameters. The critical temperatures are deduced for different layers. The system exhibits the second order and first order phases transitions. The plateau obtained between the high temperature phase and low-temperature phase at critical temperature can be explain by first-order transition. The second order transitions also show continuity in order magnetization at the reduced critical temperatures. The variation of magnetizations with exchange interactions and crystal field in each layer has been given. Magnetic hysteresis cycle has been obtained for different layers, temperatures and crystal fields.

  6. Upper mixed layer temperature anomalies at the North Atlantic storm-track zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshonkin, S. N.; Diansky, N. A.

    1995-10-01

    Synoptic sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTAs) were determined as a result of separation of time scales smaller than 183 days. The SSTAs were investigated using daily data of ocean weather station C (52.75°N; 35.5°W) from 1 January 1976 to 31 December 1980 (1827 days). There were 47 positive and 50 negative significant SSTAs (lifetime longer than 3 days, absolute value greater than 0.10 °C) with four main intervals of the lifetime repetitions: 1. 4-7 days (45% of all cases), 2. 9-13 days (20-25%), 3. 14-18 days (10-15%), and 4. 21-30 days (10-15%) and with a magnitude 1.5-2.0 °C. An upper layer balance model based on equations for temperature, salinity, mechanical energy (with advanced parametrization), state (density), and drift currents was used to simulate SSTA. The original method of modelling taking into account the mean observed temperature profiles proved to be very stable. The model SSTAs are in a good agreement with the observed amplitudes and phases of synoptic SSTAs during all 5 years. Surface heat flux anomalies are the main source of SSTAs. The influence of anomalous drift heat advection is about 30-50% of the SSTA, and the influence of salinity anomalies is about 10-25% and less. The influence of a large-scale ocean front was isolated only once in February-April 1978 during all 5 years. Synoptic SSTAs develop just in the upper half of the homogeneous layer at each winter. We suggest that there are two main causes of such active sublayer formation: 1. surface heat flux in the warm sectors of cyclones and 2. predominant heat transport by ocean currents from the south. All frequency functions of the ocean temperature synoptic response to heat and momentum surface fluxes are of integral character (red noise), though there is strong resonance with 20-days period of wind-driven horizontal heat advection with mixed layer temperature; there are some other peculiarities on the time scales from 5.5 to 13 days. Observed and modelled frequency functions

  7. A Physically Based Horizontal Subgrid-scale Turbulent Mixing Parameterization for the Convective Boundary Layer in Mesoscale Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bowen; Xue, Ming; Zhu, Kefeng

    2017-04-01

    Compared to the representation of vertical turbulent mixing through various PBL schemes, the treatment of horizontal turbulence mixing in the boundary layer within mesoscale models, with O(10) km horizontal grid spacing, has received much less attention. In mesoscale models, subgrid-scale horizontal fluxes most often adopt the gradient-diffusion assumption. The horizontal mixing coefficients are usually set to a constant, or through the 2D Smagorinsky formulation, or in some cases based on the 1.5-order turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) closure. In this work, horizontal turbulent mixing parameterizations using physically based characteristic velocity and length scales are proposed for the convective boundary layer based on analysis of a well-resolved, wide-domain large-eddy simulation (LES). The proposed schemes involve different levels of sophistication. The first two schemes can be used together with first-order PBL schemes, while the third uses TKE to define its characteristic velocity scale and can be used together with TKE-based higher-order PBL schemes. The current horizontal mixing formulations are also assessed a priori through the filtered LES results to illustrate their limitations. The proposed parameterizations are tested a posteriori in idealized simulations of turbulent dispersion of a passive scalar. Comparisons show improved horizontal dispersion by the proposed schemes, and further demonstrate the weakness of the current schemes.

  8. Lidar characterization of the Arctic atmosphere during ASTAR 2007: four cases studies of boundary layer, mixed-phase and multi-layer clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lampert

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available During the Arctic Study of Tropospheric Aerosol, Clouds and Radiation (ASTAR, which was conducted in Svalbard in March and April 2007, tropospheric Arctic clouds were observed with two ground-based backscatter lidar systems (micro pulse lidar and Raman lidar and with an airborne elastic lidar. In the time period of the ASTAR 2007 campaign, an increase in low-level cloud cover (cloud tops below 2.5 km from 51% to 65% was observed above Ny-Ålesund. Four different case studies of lidar cloud observations are analyzed: With the ground-based Raman lidar, a layer of spherical particles was observed at an altitude of 2 km after the dissolution of a cloud. The layer probably consisted of small hydrated aerosol (radius of 280 nm with a high number concentration (around 300 cm−3 at low temperatures (−30 °C. Observations of a boundary layer mixed-phase cloud by airborne lidar and concurrent airborne in situ and spectral solar radiation sensors revealed the localized process of total glaciation at the boundary of different air masses. In the free troposphere, a cloud composed of various ice layers with very different optical properties was detected by the Raman lidar, suggesting large differences of ice crystal size, shape and habit. Further, a mixed-phase double layer cloud was observed by airborne lidar in the free troposphere. Local orography influenced the evolution of this cloud. The four case studies revealed relations of cloud properties and specific atmospheric conditions, which we plan to use as the base for numerical simulations of these clouds.

  9. Compensation behavior and magnetic properties of a ferrimagnetic mixed-spin (1/2, 1) Ising double layer superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Xue, Feng-li; Wang, Ming-ze

    2017-06-01

    The compensation behavior and magnetic properties of a ferrimagnetic mixed-spin (1/2, 1) Ising double layer superlattice have been investigated by Monte Carlo simulation. The effects of the exchange couplings and the layer thickness of the system on the compensation and transition temperatures, the magnetization, the susceptibility, the internal energy and the specific heat of the system have been examined in detail. In particular, we find some interesting phenomena such as various types of magnetization curves, originating from the competition between the exchange coupling and temperature. Our results can be compared with previous theoretical studies, and a good agreement has been obtained from a qualitative comparison.

  10. Mixing times of organic molecules within secondary organic aerosol particles: a global planetary boundary layer perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, Adrian M.; Butenhoff, Christopher L.; Grayson, James W.; Barsanti, Kelley; Jimenez, Jose L.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2017-11-01

    When simulating the formation and life cycle of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) with chemical transport models, it is often assumed that organic molecules are well mixed within SOA particles on the timescale of 1 h. While this assumption has been debated vigorously in the literature, the issue remains unresolved in part due to a lack of information on the mixing times within SOA particles as a function of both temperature and relative humidity. Using laboratory data, meteorological fields, and a chemical transport model, we estimated how often mixing times are 0.5 µg m-3 at the surface). Next, as a starting point to quantify how often mixing times of organic molecules are good proxy for anthropogenic SOA, 70 and 83 % of the mixing times within anthropogenic SOA in the PBL are < 1 h for January and July, respectively, when concentrations are significant. These percentages are likely lower limits due to the assumptions used to calculate mixing times.

  11. Mixed convection boundary layer flows of a non-Newtonian Jeffrey’s fluid from a non-isothermal wedge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Abdul Gaffar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the nonlinear, steady state mixed convection boundary layer flow, heat and mass transfer of an incompressible non-Newtonian Jeffrey’s fluid past a non-isothermal wedge. The transformed conservation equations are solved numerically subject to physically appropriate boundary conditions using a versatile, implicit finite-difference Keller box technique. The influence of a number of emerging non-dimensional parameters, namely Deborah number (De, ratio of relaxation to retardation times (λ, pressure gradient parameter (m, Buoyancy ratio parameter (N, mixed convection parameter (λ1, radiation parameter (F and heat generation/absorption parameter (Δ on velocity, temperature and concentration evolution in the boundary layer regime is examined in detail. Also, the effects of these parameters on surface heat transfer rate, mass transfer rate and local skin friction are investigated.

  12. Mixed convection boundary layer flow of viscoelastic nanofluid past a horizontal circular cylinder: Case of constant heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahat, Rahimah; Afiqah Rawi, Noraihan; Kasim, Abdul Rahman Mohd; Shafie, Sharidan

    2017-09-01

    The steady of two-dimensional convection boundary layer flow of a viscoelastic nanofluid over a circular cylinder is investigated in this paper. Carboxymethyl cellulose solution (CMC) is chosen as the base fluid and copper as a nanoparticle with the Prandtl number Pr = 6.2. The governing boundary layer partial differential equations are transformed into dimensionless forms. Then they are solved numerically by using the Keller-Box method. This paper focus on the effects of selected parameter on the flow and heat transfer characteristics and be presented in graphs. The results show that, the velocity profiles and the temperature profiles are increased by increasing the values of nanoparticles volume fraction. While velocity profile decreases when viscoelastic parameter is increase. The reverse trend is observed for the temperature profiles. Also, the values of reduced skin friction are increased by increasing mixed convection parameter, but the values of heat transfer coefficient produce an opposite behaviour with an increasing in mixed convection parameter.

  13. High-frequency internal waves and thick bottom mixed layers observed by gliders in the Gulf Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Robert E.

    2017-06-01

    Autonomous underwater gliders are conducting high-resolution surveys within the Gulf Stream along the U.S. East Coast. Glider surveys reveal two mechanisms by which energy is extracted from the Gulf Stream as it flows over the Blake Plateau, a portion of the outer continental shelf between Florida and North Carolina where bottom depths are less than 1000 m. Internal waves with vertical velocities exceeding 0.1 m s-1 and frequencies just below the local buoyancy frequency are routinely found over the Blake Plateau, particularly near the Charleston Bump, a prominent topographic feature. These waves are likely internal lee waves generated by the subinertial Gulf Stream flow over the irregular bathymetry of the outer continental shelf. Bottom mixed layers with O(100) m thickness are also frequently encountered; these thick bottom mixed layers likely form in the lee of topography due to enhanced turbulence generated by O(1) m s-1 near-bottom flows.

  14. The role of PEG conformation in mixed layers: from protein corona substrate to steric stabilization avoiding protein adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Comenge

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Although nanoparticles (NPs have been traditionally modified with a single ligand layer, mixture of ligands might help to combine different functionalities and to further engineer the NP surface. A detailed study of the competition between an alkanethiol (11-mercaptoundecanoic acid and SH-PEG for the surface of AuNPs and the resultant behaviors of this model nanoconjugate is presented here. As a result, the physicochemical properties of these conjugates can be progressively tuned by controlling the composition and especially the conformation of the mixed monolayer. This has implications in the physiological stability. The controlled changes on the SH-PEG conformation rather than its concentration induce a change in the stabilization mechanism from electrostatic repulsion to steric hindrance, which changes the biological fate of NPs. Importantly, the adsorption of proteins on the conjugates can be tailored by tuning the composition and conformation of the mixed layer.

  15. Inferring strength and deformation properties of hot mix asphalt layers from the GPR signal: recent advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosti, Fabio; Benedetto, Andrea; Bianchini Ciampoli, Luca; Adabi, Saba; Pajewski, Lara

    2015-04-01

    , of both the different strength provision of each layer composing the hot mix asphalt pavement structure, and of the attenuation occurring to electromagnetic waves during their in-depth propagation. Promising results are achieved by matching modelled and measured elastic modulus data. This continuous statistically-based model enables to consider the whole set of information related to each single depth, in order to provide a more comprehensive prediction of the strength and deformation behavior of such a complex multi-layered medium. Amongst some further developments to be tackled in the near future, a model improvement could be reached through laboratory activities under controlled conditions and by adopting several frequency bandwidths suited for purposes. In addition, the perspective to compare electromagnetic data with mechanical measurements retrieved continuously, i.e., by means of specifically equipped lorries, could pave the way to considerable enhancements in this field of research. Acknowledgements - This work has benefited from networking activities carried out within the EU funded COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar".

  16. Near-field Development of a Turbulent Mixing Layer Periodically Forced by a Bimorph PVDF Film Actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naka, Yoshitsugu; Tsuboi, Ken-Ichiro; Kametani, Yukinori; Fukagata, Koji; Obi, Shinnosuke

    We have performed experiments in a turbulent mixing layer with periodic forcing introduced by a Piezo Film Actuator (PFA). Three different lengths of PFAs have been used, and the effects of various combinations of forcing amplitudes and frequencies are investigated. The forcing at the first and second sub-harmonic frequencies against the natural frequency enhances the development of the thickness of the mixing layer: the mixing layer spreads due to the forcing. On the other hand, the forcing near the natural frequency suppresses the development: the mean velocity gradient becomes steeper than the no control case. The vector pattern of the periodic velocity components indicated the formation of the vortical structure. By forcing at the natural and its first sub-harmonic frequencies, two counter-rotating vortices are clearly observed in one period of forcing. By forcing at second sub-harmonic frequency, the vortical structure is found only in the downstream region. The distribution of the periodic Reynolds shear stress significantly varies with the forcing frequency and it takes a positive value when forcing occurs near the natural frequency. However, the total value of the Reynolds shear stress remains negative due to the contribution of the turbulent components.

  17. Formation of a mixed Fe(II)-Zn-Al layered hydroxide: Effects of Zn co-sorption on Fe(II) layered hydroxide formation and kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starcher, Autumn N.; Elzinga, Evert J.; Sparks, Donald L.

    2017-08-01

    Previous research demonstrated the formation of single divalent metal (Co, Ni, and ZnAl) and mixed divalent metal (NiZnAl) layered double hydroxide (LDH) phases from reactions of the divalent metal with Al-bearing substrates and soils in both laboratory experiments and in the natural environment. Recently Fe(II)-Al-LDH phases have been found in laboratory batch reaction studies, and although they have yet to be found in the natural environment. Potential locations of Fe(II)-Al-LDH phases in nature include areas with suboxic and anoxic conditions. Because these areas can be environments of significant contaminant accumulation, it is important to understand the possible interactions and impacts of contaminant elements on LDH phase formation. One such contaminant, Zn, can also form as an LDH and has been found to form as a mixed divalent layered hydroxide phase. To understand how Zn impacts the formation of Fe(II)-Al-LDH phase formation and kinetics, 3 mM or 0.8 mM Fe(II) and 0.8 mM Zn were batch reacted with either 10 g/L pyrophyllite or 7.5 g/L γ-Al2O3 for up to three months under anoxic conditions. Aqueous samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and solid samples were analyzed with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Shell-by-shell fits of Fe(II) and co-sorption samples with pyrophyllite show the formation of a mixed divalent metal (Fe(II)-Zn-Al) layered hydroxide phase, while Fe(II) and Zn co-sorption samples with γ-Al2O3 produce Fe(II)-Al-LDH phases and Zn in inner-sphere complexation with the γ-Al2O3. This study demonstrates the formation of a mixed divalent metal layered hydroxide and further iterates the importance of sorbent reactivity on LDH phase formation.

  18. Mixed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau Baya

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Remenat (Catalan (Mixed, "revoltillo" (Scrambled in Spanish, is a dish which, in Catalunya, consists of a beaten egg cooked with vegetables or other ingredients, normally prawns or asparagus. It is delicious. Scrambled refers to the action of mixing the beaten egg with other ingredients in a pan, normally using a wooden spoon Thought is frequently an amalgam of past ideas put through a spinner and rhythmically shaken around like a cocktail until a uniform and dense paste is made. This malleable product, rather like a cake mixture can be deformed pulling it out, rolling it around, adapting its shape to the commands of one’s hands or the tool which is being used on it. In the piece Mixed, the contortion of the wood seeks to reproduce the plasticity of this slow heavy movement. Each piece lays itself on the next piece consecutively like a tongue of incandescent lava slowly advancing but with unstoppable inertia.

  19. Anatomy of a metabentonite: nucleation and growth of illite crystals and their colescence into mixed-layer illite/smectite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, D.D.; Blum, A.E.; Serravezza, M.

    2011-01-01

    The illite layer content of mixed-layer illite/smectite (I/S) in a 2.5 m thick, zoned, metabentonite bed from Montana decreases regularly from the edges to the center of the bed. Traditional X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern modeling using Markovian statistics indicated that this zonation results from a mixing in different proportions of smectite-rich R0 I/S and illite-rich R1 I/S, with each phase having a relatively constant illite layer content. However, a new method for modeling XRD patterns of I/S indicates that R0 and R1 I/S in these samples are not separate phases (in the mineralogical sense of the word), but that the samples are composed of illite crystals that have continuous distributions of crystal thicknesses, and of 1 nm thick smectite crystals. The shapes of these distributions indicate that the crystals were formed by simultaneous nucleation and growth. XRD patterns for R0 and R1 I/S arise by interparticle diffraction from a random stacking of the crystals, with swelling interlayers formed at interfaces between crystals from water or glycol that is sorbed on crystal surfaces. It is the thickness distributions of smectite and illite crystals (also termed fundamental particles, or Nadeau particles), rather than XRD patterns for mixed-layer I/S, that are the more reliable indicators of geologic history, because such distributions are composed of well-defined crystals that are not affected by differences in surface sorption and particle arrangements, and because their thickness distribution shapes conform to the predictions of crystal growth theory, which describes their genesis.

  20. Seasonal mixed layer heat balance of the southwestern tropical Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Foltz, G.R.; Vialard, J.; PraveenKumar, B.; McPhaden, M.J.

    the remainder of the year. Vertical turbulent mixing, estimated as a residual in the heat balance, also undergoes a significant seasonal cycle. Cooling from this term is strongest in boreal summer, when surface wind and buoyancy forcing are strongest...

  1. VOSYSmonitor, a Low Latency Monitor Layer for Mixed-Criticality Systems on ARMv8-A

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas, Pierre; Chappuis, Kevin; Paolino, Michele; Dagieu, Nicolas; Raho, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    With the emergence of multicore embedded System on Chip (SoC), the integration of several applications with different levels of criticality on the same platform is becoming increasingly popular. These platforms, known as mixed-criticality systems, need to meet numerous requirements such as real-time constraints, Operating System (OS) scheduling, memory and OSes isolation. To construct mixed-criticality systems, various solutions, based on virtualization extensions, have been presented whe...

  2. An Experimental Investigation of Forced Mixing of a Turbulent Boundary Layer in an Annular Diffuser. Ph.D. Thesis - Ohio State Univ.; [for boundary layer control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The forced mixing process of a turbulent boundary layer in an axisymmetric annular diffuser using conventional wing-like vortex generators was studied. Flow field measurements were made at four axial locations downstream of the vortex generators. At each axial location, a total of 25 equally spaced profiles were measured behind three consecutive vortex generators which formed two pairs of vortex generators. Hot film anemometry probes measured the boundary layer turbulence structure at the same locations where pressure measurements were made. Both single and cross film probes were used. The diffuser turbulence data was teken only for a nominal inlet Mach number of 0.3. Three vortex generator configurations were tested. The differences between configurations involved changes in size and relative vortex generator positions. All three vortex generator configurations tested provided increases in diffuser performance. Distinct differences in the boundary layer integral properties and skin friction levels were noted between configurations. The axial turbulence intensity and Reynolds stress profiles measured displayed similarities in trends but differences in levels for the three configurations.

  3. Experimental characterization of initial conditions and spatio-temporal evolution of a small Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueschke, N J; Andrews, M J; Schilling, O

    2005-09-26

    The initial multi-mode interfacial velocity and density perturbations present at the onset of a small Atwood number, incompressible, miscible, Rayleigh-Taylor instability-driven mixing layer have been quantified using a combination of experimental techniques. The streamwise interfacial and spanwise interfacial perturbations were measured using high-resolution thermocouples and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), respectively. The initial multi-mode streamwise velocity perturbations at the two-fluid density interface were measured using particle-image velocimetry (PIV). It was found that the measured initial conditions describe an initially anisotropic state, in which the perturbations in the streamwise and spanwise directions are independent of one another. The evolution of various fluctuating velocity and density statistics, together with velocity and density variance spectra, were measured using PIV and high-resolution thermocouple data. The evolution of the velocity and density statistics is used to investigate the early-time evolution and the onset of strongly-nonlinear, transitional dynamics within the mixing layer. The early-time evolution of the density and vertical velocity variance spectra indicate that velocity fluctuations are the dominant mechanism driving the instability development. The implications of the present experimental measurements on the initialization of Reynolds-averaged turbulent transport and mixing models and of direct and large-eddy simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability-induced turbulence are discussed.

  4. Energetics of Wind-Induced Internal Wave Radiation from the Base of the Mixed Layer in the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelker, G. S.; Mertens, C.; Myers, P. G.; Olbers, D. J.; Walter, M.

    2016-02-01

    Energy transfer mechanisms between atmosphere and the deep ocean have been studied for many years. Their importance to the ocean's energy balance and possible implications on mixing are widely accepted. The slab model is a well-established simulation of near-inertial motion and energy inferred through wind-ocean interaction. However, temporally coarse resolution wind forcing data in combination with rough internal wave energy flux assumptions are mainly used. A slab model using hourly wind forcing from the NCEP-CFSR reanalysis allowing computations up to high latitudes without loss of resonance was set up. It was validated with buoy data from 44 sites in the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans and the Mediterranean Sea. Augmenting the one-dimensional model by the horizontal divergence of the near-inertial current field at the mixed layer base led to direct estimates of energy transfer spectra of radiation of internal waves into the ocean interior. No crucial assumptions on transfer physics were made. Results of the hybrid model indicated the presence of internal wave modes at the base of the mixed layer. Spatially-advancing wind stress fronts were identified as their main driver and thus they acted as the major source for internal wave radiation into the deep ocean. Accordingly, mid-latitude storms with a strong seasonal cycle as well as isolated tropical storm tracks are dominant in energy fluxes in the North Atlantic.

  5. Experimental characterization of initial conditions and spatio-temporal evolution of a small Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueschke, N J; Andrews, M J; Schilling, O

    2006-03-24

    The initial multi-mode interfacial velocity and density perturbations present at the onset of a small Atwood number, incompressible, miscible, Rayleigh-Taylor instability-driven mixing layer have been quantified using a combination of experimental techniques. The streamwise interfacial and spanwise interfacial perturbations were measured using high-resolution thermocouples and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), respectively. The initial multi-mode streamwise velocity perturbations at the two-fluid density interface were measured using particle-image velocimetry (PIV). It was found that the measured initial conditions describe an initially anisotropic state, in which the perturbations in the streamwise and spanwise directions are independent of one another. The evolution of various fluctuating velocity and density statistics, together with velocity and density variance spectra, were measured using PIV and high-resolution thermocouple data. The evolution of the velocity and density statistics is used to investigate the early-time evolution and the onset of strongly-nonlinear, transitional dynamics within the mixing layer. The early-time evolution of the density and vertical velocity variance spectra indicate that velocity fluctuations are the dominant mechanism driving the instability development. The implications of the present experimental measurements on the initialization of Reynolds-averaged turbulent transport and mixing models and of direct and large-eddy simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability-induced turbulence are discussed.

  6. Assessing uncertainty in the turbulent upper-ocean mixed layer using an unstructured finite-element solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Luz; Smith, Katherine; Hamlington, Peter; Niemeyer, Kyle

    2017-11-01

    Vertical transport flux in the ocean upper mixed layer has recently been attributed to submesoscale currents, which occur at scales on the order of kilometers in the horizontal direction. These phenomena, which include fronts and mixed-layer instabilities, have been of particular interest due to the effect of turbulent mixing on nutrient transport, facilitating phytoplankton blooms. We study these phenomena using a non-hydrostatic, large eddy simulation for submesoscale currents in the ocean, developed using the extensible, open-source finite element platform FEniCs. Our model solves the standard Boussinesq Euler equations in variational form using the finite element method. FEniCs enables the use of parallel computing on modern systems for efficient computing time, and is suitable for unstructured grids where irregular topography can be considered in the future. The solver will be verified against the well-established NCAR-LES model and validated against observational data. For the verification with NCAR-LES, the velocity, pressure, and buoyancy fields are compared through a surface-wind-driven, open-ocean case. We use this model to study the impacts of uncertainties in the model parameters, such as near-surface buoyancy flux and secondary circulation, and discuss implications.

  7. Towards Automated Characterization of Canopy Layering in Mixed Temperate Forests Using Airborne Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reik Leiterer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Canopy layers form essential structural components, affecting stand productivity and wildlife habitats. Airborne laser scanning (ALS provides horizontal and vertical information on canopy structure simultaneously. Existing approaches to assess canopy layering often require prior information about stand characteristics or rely on pre-defined height thresholds. We developed a multi-scale method using ALS data with point densities >10 pts/m2 to determine the number and vertical extent of canopy layers (canopylayer, canopylength, seasonal variations in the topmost canopy layer (canopytype, as well as small-scale heterogeneities in the canopy (canopyheterogeneity. We first tested and developed the method on a small forest patch (800 ha and afterwards tested transferability and robustness of the method on a larger patch (180,000 ha. We validated the approach using an extensive set of ground data, achieving overall accuracies >77% for canopytype and canopyheterogeneity, and >62% for canopylayer and canopylength. We conclude that our method provides a robust characterization of canopy layering supporting automated canopy structure monitoring.

  8. Vertically-resolved particle size distribution within and above the mixing layer over the Milan metropolitan area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ferrero

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Vertical aerosol profiles were directly measured over the city of Milan during three years (2005–2008 of field campaigns. An optical particle counter, a portable meteorological station and a miniaturized cascade impactor were deployed on a tethered balloon. More than 300 vertical profiles were measured, both in winter and summer, mainly in conditions of clear, dry skies.

    The mixing height was determined from the observed vertical aerosol concentration gradient, and from potential temperature and relative humidity profiles. Results show that inter-consistent mixing heights can be retrieved highlighting good correlations between particle dispersion in the atmosphere and meteorological parameters. Mixing height growth speed was calculated for both winter and summer showing the low potential atmospheric dispersion in winter.

    Aerosol number size distribution and chemical composition profiles allowed us to investigate particle behaviour along height. Aerosol measurements showed changes in size distribution according to mixing height. Coarse particle profiles (dp>1.6 μm were distributed differently than the fine ones (dp<1.6 μm were, at different heights of the mixing layer. The sedimentation process influenced the coarse particle profiles, and led to a reduction in mean particle diameter for those particles observed by comparing data above the mixing height with ground data (−14.9±0.6% in winter and −10.7±1.0% in summer. Conversely, the mean particle diameter of fine particles increased above the mixing height under stable atmospheric conditions; the average increase, observed by comparing data above the mixing height with ground data, was +2.1±0.1% in winter and +3.9±0.3% in summer. A hierarchical statistical model was created to describe the changes in the size distribution of fine particles along height. The proposed model can be used to estimate the typical vertical

  9. Examination of evaporative fraction diurnal behaviour using a soil-vegetation model coupled with a mixed-layer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Lhomme

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In many experimental conditions, the evaporative fraction, defined as the ratio between evaporation and available energy, has been found stable during daylight hours. This constancy is investigated over fully covering vegetation by means of a land surface scheme coupled with a mixed-layer model, which accounts for entrainment of overlying air. The evaporation rate follows the Penman-Monteith equation and the surface resistance is given by a Jarvis type parameterization involving solar radiation, saturation deficit and leaf water potential. The diurnal course of the evaporative fraction is examined, together with the influence of environmental factors (soil water availability, solar radiation input, wind velocity, saturation deficit above the well-mixed layer. In conditions of fair weather, the curves representing the diurnal course of the evaporative fraction have a typical concave-up shape. Around midday (solar time these curves appear as relatively constant, but always lower that the daytime mean value. Evaporative fraction decreases when soil water decreases or when solar energy increases. An increment of saturation deficit above the mixed-layer provokes only a slight increase of evaporative fraction, and wind velocity has almost no effect. The possibility of estimation daytime evaporation from daytime available energy multiplied by the evaporative fraction at a single time of the day is also investigated. It appears that it is possible to obtain fairly good estimates of daytime evaporation by choosing adequately the time of the measurement of the evaporative fraction. The central hours of the day, and preferably about 3 hr before or after noon, are the most appropriate to provide good estimates. The estimation appears also to be much better when soil water availability (or evaporation is high than when it is low.

  10. Nonlocal stochastic mixing-length theory and the velocity profile in the turbulent boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, H.; Leeuw, G. de; Maassen van den Brink, A.

    1995-01-01

    Turbulence mixing by finite size eddies will be treated by means of a novel formulation of nonlocal K-theory, involving sample paths and a stochastic closure hypothesis, which implies a well defined recipe for the calculation of sampling and transition rates. The connection with the general theory

  11. Pristine fullerenes mixed by vacuum-free solution process: Efficient electron transport layer for planar perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Si-Min; Tian, Han-Rui; Zhang, Mei-Lin; Xing, Zhou; Wang, Lu-Yao; Wang, Xin; Wang, Tan; Deng, Lin-Long; Xie, Su-Yuan; Huang, Rong-Bin; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2017-01-01

    Discovery of organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites ignites the dream of next-generation solar cells fabricated by low-cost solution processing. To date, fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C61- butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM), is the most prevalently used electron transport layer for high efficiency p-i-n planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells. Compared with PC61BM, pristine fullerenes, such as C60 and C70, have shown superiority of higher electron mobility and much lower costs. Due to the poor solubility and strong tendency to crystallize for pristine fullerenes in solution process, it is still a challenge to deposit compact and continuous film of pristine fullerenes for p-i-n type perovskite solar cells by solution processing. Herein, solution processed pristine fullerenes (C60 and C70) were used as electron transport layers to replace PC61BM in perovskite solar cells with high performance and enhanced stability. Power conversion efficiency of 14.04% was obtained by using mixture of C60 and C70 as electron transport layer, which is comparable to that of PC61BM based device (13.74%). We demonstrated that the strong tendency of pristine fullerenes to crystallize during solvent removal can be largely mitigated by mixing different kinds of pristine fullerenes. These findings implicate pristine fullerenes as promising electron transport layers for high performance perovskite solar cells.

  12. Effect of an inserted porous layer on heat and fluid flow in a vertical channel with mixed convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celik Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and velocity fields in a vertical channel partially filled with porous medium under mixed convection heat transfer condition are obtained. The heat transfer equation and equation of motion for clear and porous layer regions are written and solved analytically. The nondimensionalization of the governing equations yields two Grashof numbers as Grc and Grd for clear and porous sections where Grd=Da.Grc. The dimensionless governing parameters for the problem are Grc (or Grd, Da, thermal conductivity ratio (i.e., K and thickness of porous layer. The temperature and velocity profiles for different values of Grc, Da, K and thickness of porous layer are plotted and their changes with the governing parameters are discussed. Moreover, the variation of pressure drop with the governing parameters is investigated. The decrease of porous layer thickness or thermal conductivity ratio increases the possibility of the downward flows. Thermal conductivity ratio plays important role on pressure drop, particularly for the channels with high values of Grc/Re.

  13. Copper(II) Schiff base complexes and their mixed thin layers with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the possibility of using the spin coating technique for deposition of the copper(II) complexes and ZnO nanoparticles on different substrates and the likely flu- orescence behavior of the obtained layers, prompted us to synthesize a series of new copper(II) complexes with. Schiff bases derived from ethylenediamine and several.

  14. Performance of a single layer fuel cell based on a mixed proton-electron conducting composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagórski, Krzysztof; Wachowski, Sebastian; Szymczewska, Dagmara; Mielewczyk-Gryń, Aleksandra; Jasiński, Piotr; Gazda, Maria

    2017-06-01

    Many of the challenges in solid oxide fuel cell technology stem from chemical and mechanical incompatibilities between the anode, cathode and electrolyte materials. Numerous attempts have been made to identify compatible materials. Here, these challenges are circumvented by the introduction of a working single layer fuel cell, fabricated from a composite of proton conducting BaCe0.6Zr0.2Y0.2O3-δ and a mixture of semiconducting oxides - Li2O, NiO, and ZnO. Structural and electrical properties of the composite, related to its fuel cell performance are investigated. The single layer fuel cell shows a maximum OCV of 0.83 V and a peak power density of 3.86 mW cm-2 at 600 °C. Activation and mass transport losses are identified as the major limiting factor for efficiency and power output.

  15. The role of snow-surface coupling, radiation, and turbulent mixing in modeling a stable boundary layer over Arctic sea ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    To enhance the understanding of the impact of small-scale processes in the polar climate, this study focuses on the relative role of snow-surface coupling, radiation and turbulent mixing in an Arctic stable boundary layer. We extend the GABLS1 (GEWEX Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Study 1) model

  16. Temporal and spatial changes in mixed layer properties and atmospheric net heat flux in the Nordic Seas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, A; Alekseev, G [SI ' Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute' , St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Korablev, A; Esau, I, E-mail: avsmir@aari.nw.r [Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Centre, Bergen (Norway)

    2010-08-15

    The Nordic Seas are an important area of the World Ocean where warm Atlantic waters penetrate far north forming the mild climate of Northern Europe. These waters represent the northern rim of the global thermohaline circulation. Estimates of the relationships between the net heat flux and mixed layer properties in the Nordic Seas are examined. Oceanographic data are derived from the Oceanographic Data Base (ODB) compiled in the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute. Ocean weather ship 'Mike' (OWS) data are used to calculate radiative and turbulent components of the net heat flux. The net shortwave flux was calculated using a satellite albedo dataset and the EPA model. The net longwave flux was estimated by Southampton Oceanography Centre (SOC) method. Turbulent fluxes at the air-sea interface were calculated using the COARE 3.0 algorithm. The net heat flux was calculated by using oceanographic and meteorological data of the OWS 'Mike'. The mixed layer depth was estimated for the period since 2002 until 2009 by the 'Mike' data as well. A good correlation between these two parameters has been found. Sensible and latent heat fluxes controlled by surface air temperature/sea surface temperature gradient are the main contributors into net heat flux. Significant correlation was found between heat fluxes variations at the OWS 'Mike' location and sea ice export from the Arctic Ocean.

  17. Diversity of planktonic Ostracods (Crustacea: Ostracoda in the mixed layer of northeastern Arabian Sea during the summer monsoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine Purushothaman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Planktonic ostracods contribute significantly to the biomass of zooplankton in the Arabian Sea with an unusually high density due to swarming.  However, due to the small size, their abundance is often underestimated.  In this paper, the diversity of planktonic ostracods in the mixed layer depth of the northeastern Arabian Sea in relation to environmental parameters during the summer monsoon is presented.  The mean abundance in the mixed layer depth was very high.  About 26 species belonging to 17 genera representing two families were recognized.  Out of this, 25 species belonged to (3 sub families, 16 genera the order Myodocopa and one to the order Myodocopida.  The dominant species were Cypridina dentata, Euconchoecia aculeata, Conchoecia subarcuata and Orthoconchoecia atlantica.  Cypridina dentata and Euconchoecia aculeata contributed to about 89% of the total abundance.  The results suggest that the distribution and diversity of ostracods were very much influenced by the hydrographic conditions of the Arabian Sea during the summer monsoon. 

  18. Evaluation of simulated climatological diurnal temperature range in CMIP5 models from the perspective of planetary boundary layer turbulent mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Nan; Zhou, Liming; Dai, Yongjiu

    2017-07-01

    This study examines the effects of modeled planetary boundary layer (PBL) mixing on the simulated temperature diurnal cycle climatology over land in 20 CMIP5 models with AMIP simulations. When compared with observations, the magnitude of diurnal temperature range (DTR) is systematically underestimated over almost all land areas due to a widespread warm bias of daily minimum temperature (Tmin) and mostly a cold bias of daily maximum temperature (Tmax). Analyses of the CMIP5 multi-model ensemble means suggest that the biases of the simulated PBL mixing could very likely contribute to the temperature biases. For the regions with the cold bias in Tmax, the daytime PBL mixing is generally underestimated. The consequent more dry air entrainment from the free atmosphere could help maintain the surface humidity gradient, and thus produce more surface evaporation and potentially lower the Tmax. The opposite situation holds true for the regions with the warm bias of Tmax. This mechanism could be particularly applicable to the regions with moderate and wet climate conditions where surface evaporation depends more on the surface humidity gradient, but less on the available soil moisture. For the widespread warm bias of Tmin, the widely-recognized overestimated PBL mixing at nighttime should play a dominant role by transferring more heat from the atmosphere to the near-surface to warm the Tmin. Further analyses using the high resolution CFMIP2 output also support the CMIP5 results about the connections of the biases between the simulated turbulent mixing and the temperature diurnal cycle. The large inter-model variations of the simulated temperature diurnal cycle primarily appear over the arid and semi-arid regions and boreal arctic regions where the model differences in the PBL turbulence mixing could make equally significant contributions to the inter-model variations of DTR, Tmax and Tmin compared to the model differences in surface radiative processes. These results

  19. Research on Pump Primers for Friction Reduction of Wet-Mix Shotcrete Based on Precreating Lubricating Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoming Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wet-mix shotcrete has lower water content even though looking wet which is generally less than 8% of total content. The inner surface of pipes will absorb water from fresh concrete to wet itself if concrete pump primers is not pumped early; meanwhile, the saturated concrete is transformed into the unsaturated concrete, and pipe blockage often occurs. In order to minimize the loss of water and wet pipes, a new type of pump primers was developed to precreate the lubricating layer that is one of the most dominant factors in determining the pumping capability, which would provide a cost-effective replacement for premium priced cement-based primers. Experiments were conducted to measure the viscosity, stability, and strength of mix solution during development stage. The optimal formula was obtained by orthogonal matching tests with 0.5% sodium stearate, 0.75% xanthan gum, 0.3% polyacrylamide, and 0.4% blender (mass ratio related to mix water. The pressure drop reduction of new primers was larger than that of common primers.

  20. Physiological characteristics and production of mixed layer and chlorophyll maximum phytoplankton populations in the Caribbean Sea and western Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Satoru; DiTullio, Giacomo R.; Laws, Edward A.

    1988-08-01

    Phytoplankton photosynthetic rates and relative and absolute growth rates were estimated using 14C techniques at five stations in the Carribean Sea and two stations in the western Atlantic. Integral photosynthetic rates at the Caribbean stations averaged (±1 S.D.) 633 ± 77 mg C m -2 d -1. Light-saturated growth rates were about 0.6 d -1. Relative growth rates averaged 85% in the surface mixed layer and 93% in the lower euphotic zone. Uptake of 14C at night accounted for 26% of the integral production at the Caribbean stations. The specific activity of Chl a carbon increased at night, and growth rates inferred from this increase were highly correlated with nocturnal 14C uptake. Based on the Chl a carbon specific activity data, about 76% of the nocturnal 14C uptake was attributed to phytoplankton. This uptake may have represented assimilation of labeled DOC excreted during the photoperiod. Over 80% of the Chl a in the chlorophyll maximum layers fell in the picoplankton size range. Incubation of these populations at higher irradiance levels revealed no indication of light adaptation over a 24 h period, a result consistent with recent studies of Synechococcus. Chlorophyll maximum populations occurred at about the 3% light level and were estimated to be growing with a doubling time of a little over 2 days. Estimated phytoplankton carbon concentrations were virtually identical in the mixed layers and chlorophyll maxima. The latter were therefore the result of adaptation of the phytoplankton to low irradiance levels and did not represent biomass maxima.

  1. Feed array metrology and correction layer for large antenna systems in ASIC mixed signal technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centureli, F.; Scotti, G.; Tommasino, P.; Trifiletti, A.; Romano, F.; Cimmino, R.; Saitto, A.

    2014-08-01

    The paper deals with a possible use of the feed array present in a large antenna system, as a layer for measuring the antenna performance with a self-test procedure and a possible way to correct residual errors of the Antenna geometry and of the antenna distortions. Focus has been concentrated on a few key critical elements of a possible feed array metrology program. In particular, a preliminary contribution to the design and development of the feed array from one side, and the subsystem dedicated to antenna distortion monitoring and control from the other, have been chosen as the first areas of investigation. Scalability and flexibility principles and synergic approach with other coexistent technologies have been assumed of paramount importance to ensure ease of integrated operation and therefore allowing in principle increased performance and efficiency. The concept is based on the use of an existing feed array grid to measure antenna distortion with respect to the nominal configuration. Measured data are then processed to develop a multilayer strategy to control the mechanical movable devices (when existing) and to adjust the residual fine errors through a software controlled phase adjustment of the existing phase shifter The signal from the feed array is converted passing through a FPGA/ASIC level to digital data channels. The kind of those typically used for the scientific experiments. One additional channel is used for monitoring the antenna distortion status. These data are processed to define the best correction strategy, based on a software managed control system capable of operating at three different levels of the antenna system: reflector rotation layer, sub reflector rotation and translation layer (assuming the possibility of controlling a Stewart machine), phase shifter of the phased array layer. The project is at present in the design phase, a few elements necessary for a sound software design of the control subsystem have been developed at a

  2. The roles of convection, extratropical mixing, and in-situ freeze-drying in the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. G. Read

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms for transporting and dehydrating air across the tropical tropopause layer (TTL are investigated with a conceptual two dimensional (2-D model. The 2-D TTL model combines the Holton and Gettelman cold trap dehydration mechanism (Holton and Gettelman, 2001 with the two column convection model of Folkins and Martin (2005. We investigate 3 possible transport scenarios through the TTL: 1 slow uniform ascent across the level of zero radiative heating without direct convective mixing, 2 convective mixing of H2O vapor at 100% relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi with no ice retention, and 3 convective mixing of extremely subsaturated air (100% RHi following the moist adiabatic temperature above the level of neutral buoyancy with sufficient ice retention such that total H2O is 100%RHi. The three mechanisms produce similar seasonal cycles for H2O that are in good quantitative agreement with the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS measurements. We use Aura MLS measurement of CO and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer measurement of HDO to distinguish among the transport mechanisms. Model comparisons with the observations support the view that H2O is predominantly controlled by regions having the lowest cold point tropopause temperature but the trace species CO and HDO support the convective mixing of dry air and lofted ice. The model provides some insight into the processes affecting the long term trends observed in stratospheric H2O.

  3. Investigation of the mixing layer height derived from ceilometer measurements in the Kathmandu Valley and implications for local air quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mues

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study 1 year of ceilometer measurements taken in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, in the framework of the SusKat project (A Sustainable Atmosphere for the Kathmandu Valley were analysed to investigate the diurnal variation of the mixing layer height (MLH and its dependency on the meteorological conditions. In addition, the impact of the MLH on the temporal variation and the magnitude of the measured black carbon concentrations are analysed for each season. Based on the assumption that black carbon aerosols are vertically well mixed within the mixing layer and the finding that the mixing layer varies only little during night time and morning hours, black carbon emission fluxes are estimated for these hours and per month. Even though this method is relatively simple, it can give an observationally based first estimate of the black carbon emissions in this region, especially illuminating the seasonal cycle of the emission fluxes. The monthly minimum median MLH values typically range between 150 and 200 m during night and early morning hours, the monthly maximum median values between 625 m in July and 1460 m in March. Seasonal differences are not only found in the absolute MLHs, but also in the duration of the typical daytime maximum ranging between 2 and 3 h in January and 6–7 h in May. During the monsoon season a diurnal cycle has been observed with the smallest amplitude (typically between 400 and 500 m, with the lowest daytime mixing height of all seasons (maximum monthly median values typically between 600 and 800 m, and also the highest night-time and early morning mixing height of all seasons (minimum monthly median values typically between 200 and 220 m. These characteristics can mainly be explained with the frequently present clouds and the associated reduction in incoming solar radiation and outgoing longwave radiation. In general, the black carbon concentrations show a clear anticorrelation with MLH measurements

  4. Investigation of the mixing layer height derived from ceilometer measurements in the Kathmandu Valley and implications for local air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mues, Andrea; Rupakheti, Maheswar; Münkel, Christoph; Lauer, Axel; Bozem, Heiko; Hoor, Peter; Butler, Tim; Lawrence, Mark G.

    2017-07-01

    In this study 1 year of ceilometer measurements taken in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, in the framework of the SusKat project (A Sustainable Atmosphere for the Kathmandu Valley) were analysed to investigate the diurnal variation of the mixing layer height (MLH) and its dependency on the meteorological conditions. In addition, the impact of the MLH on the temporal variation and the magnitude of the measured black carbon concentrations are analysed for each season. Based on the assumption that black carbon aerosols are vertically well mixed within the mixing layer and the finding that the mixing layer varies only little during night time and morning hours, black carbon emission fluxes are estimated for these hours and per month. Even though this method is relatively simple, it can give an observationally based first estimate of the black carbon emissions in this region, especially illuminating the seasonal cycle of the emission fluxes. The monthly minimum median MLH values typically range between 150 and 200 m during night and early morning hours, the monthly maximum median values between 625 m in July and 1460 m in March. Seasonal differences are not only found in the absolute MLHs, but also in the duration of the typical daytime maximum ranging between 2 and 3 h in January and 6-7 h in May. During the monsoon season a diurnal cycle has been observed with the smallest amplitude (typically between 400 and 500 m), with the lowest daytime mixing height of all seasons (maximum monthly median values typically between 600 and 800 m), and also the highest night-time and early morning mixing height of all seasons (minimum monthly median values typically between 200 and 220 m). These characteristics can mainly be explained with the frequently present clouds and the associated reduction in incoming solar radiation and outgoing longwave radiation. In general, the black carbon concentrations show a clear anticorrelation with MLH measurements, although this relation is less

  5. Friction Modifier Using Adherent Metallic Multilayered or Mixed Element Layer Conversion Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Harry F. (Inventor); Defalco, Francis G. (Inventor); Starks, Lloyd L., Sr. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A process for creating conversion coatings and spin, drawing, and extrusion finishes for surfaces, wherein the conversion coatings and spin, drawing, and extrusion finishes contain potassium, phosphorus, nitrogen, and one or more non-alkaline metals and/or one or more metalloids. The process comprises forming an aqueous solution of water, phosphoric acid or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide, an alkali metal hydroxide, and one or more non-alkaline metals and/or one or more metalloids. The aqueous solution forms an anti-friction multilayer conversion and/or mixed element coating or a spin, drawing, and extrusion finish on a surface when applied to the surface, either directly without the use of applied external electromotive force, or as an additive in lubricating fluids.

  6. Mixed infections of Marek's disease and reticuloendotheliosis viruses in layer flocks in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscaglia, Celina

    2013-06-01

    The presence of reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) was examined in flocks affected with Marek's disease (MD). Sera were positive to REV antibodies by agar gel precipitation. However, these findings were not conclusive since fowlpox vaccines can have REV fragments or the whole genome inserted. Frozen sections from tumors were positive for MD virus (MDV) but negative for REV. Chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) and chicken kidney cell (CKC) culture inoculated with buffy coat cells or blood from the affected birds were examined. Positive cells were shown for REV and MDV by fluorescent antibodies tests in CEF and CKC, respectively, indicating the presence of REV in Argentinean layer flocks. This is the first report of REV in Argentina and also in South America.

  7. Sound generated by instability waves of supersonic flows. I Two-dimensional mixing layers. II - Axisymmetric jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, C. K. W.; Burton, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of the phenomenon of sound generation by spatially growing instability waves in high-speed flows. It is pointed out that this process of noise generation is most effective when the flow is supersonic relative to the ambient speed of sound. The inner and outer asymptotic expansions corresponding to an excited instability wave in a two-dimensional mixing layer and its associated acoustic fields are constructed in terms of the inner and outer spatial variables. In matching the solutions, the intermediate matching principle of Van Dyke and Cole is followed. The validity of the theory is tested by applying it to an axisymmetric supersonic jet and comparing the calculated results with experimental measurements. Very favorable agreements are found both in the calculated instability-wave amplitude distribution (the inner solution) and the near pressure field level contours (the outer solution) in each case.

  8. Atomic layer deposition and properties of mixed Ta2O5 and ZrO2 films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaupo Kukli

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Thin solid films consisting of ZrO2 and Ta2O5 were grown by atomic layer deposition at 300 °C. Ta2O5 films doped with ZrO2, TaZr2.75O8 ternary phase, or ZrO2 doped with Ta2O5 were grown to thickness and composition depending on the number and ratio of alternating ZrO2 and Ta2O5 deposition cycles. All the films grown exhibited resistive switching characteristics between TiN and Pt electrodes, expressed by repetitive current-voltage loops. The most reliable windows between high and low resistive states were observed in Ta2O5 films mixed with relatively low amounts of ZrO2, providing Zr to Ta cation ratio of 0.2.

  9. The effect of convective boundary condition on MHD mixed convection boundary layer flow over an exponentially stretching vertical sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, Siti Suzilliana Putri Mohamed; Arifin, Norihan Md.; Nazar, Roslinda; Bachok, Norfifah; Ali, Fadzilah Md

    2017-12-01

    A theoretical study that describes the magnetohydrodynamic mixed convection boundary layer flow with heat transfer over an exponentially stretching sheet with an exponential temperature distribution has been presented herein. This study is conducted in the presence of convective heat exchange at the surface and its surroundings. The system is controlled by viscous dissipation and internal heat generation effects. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations are converted into ordinary differential equations by a similarity transformation. The converted equations are then solved numerically using the shooting method. The results related to skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt number, velocity and temperature profiles are presented for several sets of values of the parameters. The effects of the governing parameters on the features of the flow and heat transfer are examined in detail in this study.

  10. MHD Effect on Unsteady Mixed Convection Boundary Layer Flow past a Circular Cylinder with Constant Wall Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, M. A.; Mohamad, N. F.; Ilias, M. R.; Shafie, S.

    2017-09-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effect is a study on motion of electrical-conducting fluid under magnetic fields. This effect has great intention due to its applications such as design of heat exchanger and nuclear reactor. In the problem in fluid motion, flow of separation can reduced the effectiveness of the system as well as can increased the energy lost. This study will present the results on reducing the flow separation by considering magnetic effect. In this study, unsteady mixed convection boundary layer flow past a circular cylinder is given attention. Focus of study is on the separation times that affected by the magnetic fields. The mathematical models in the form of partial differential equations are transformed into nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations and solved numerically using an implicit finite-difference scheme known as Keller-box method. The effect of magnetic parameter on velocity and temperature profiles as well as skin friction and Nusselt number are studied.

  11. Mixed convection boundary layer flow over a moving vertical flat plate in an external fluid flow with viscous dissipation effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norfifah Bachok

    Full Text Available The steady boundary layer flow of a viscous and incompressible fluid over a moving vertical flat plate in an external moving fluid with viscous dissipation is theoretically investigated. Using appropriate similarity variables, the governing system of partial differential equations is transformed into a system of ordinary (similarity differential equations, which is then solved numerically using a Maple software. Results for the skin friction or shear stress coefficient, local Nusselt number, velocity and temperature profiles are presented for different values of the governing parameters. It is found that the set of the similarity equations has unique solutions, dual solutions or no solutions, depending on the values of the mixed convection parameter, the velocity ratio parameter and the Eckert number. The Eckert number significantly affects the surface shear stress as well as the heat transfer rate at the surface.

  12. On the annual cycle of the sea surface temperature and the mixed layer depth in the Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, V.M.; Villanueva, E.E.; Adem, J. [Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-04-01

    Using an integrated mixed layer model, we carry out a simulation of the annual cycle of the sea surface temperature (SST) and of the mixed layer depth (MLD) in the Gulf of Mexico. We also compute the annual cycle of the entrainment velocity in the deepest region of the Gulf of Mexico. The model is based on the thermal energy equation and on an equation of mechanical and thermal energy balance based on the Kraus-Turner theory; both equation are coupled and are vertically integrated in the mixed layer. The model equations are solved in a uniform grid of 25 km in the Gulf of Mexico, the northwestern region of the Caribbean Sea and the eastern coast of Florida. The surface ocean current velocity and the atmospheric variables are prescribed in the model using observed values. We show the importance of the Ekman pumping in the entrainment velocity. We found that the upwelling plays an important role in increasing the entrainment velocity, producing an important reduction in the SST and diminishing the depth of the mixed layer in the Campeche Bay. In the rest of the Gulf of Mexico the downwelling tends to reduce the entrainment velocity, increasing the SST and the MLD. Comparison of the computed annual cycle of the SST and the MLD with the corresponding observations reported by Robinson (1973) shows a good agreement. In the deepest region of the Gulf of Mexico, the photosynthetic pigment concentration data obtained from the Mexican Pacific Cd-Rom of environmental analysis shows significant correlation with the computed annual cycle of the computed entrainment velocity only in January, April, May, June and September. [Spanish] Usando un modelo integrado en la capa de mezcla hemos obtenido una simulacion del ciclo anual de la temperatura de la superficie del mar (SST), de la profundidad de la capa de mezcla (MLD) en el Golfo de Mexico, asi como el ciclo anual de la velocidad de penetracion vertical turbulenta a traves de la termoclina en la region mas profunda del golfo de

  13. Upper mixed layer temperature and salinity variability in the tropical boundary of the California Current, 1997-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Valdes, Jose; Jeronimo, Gilberto

    2009-03-01

    Spatial and temporal interannual variability of mixed layer (ML) temperature and ML salinity off Baja California are examined using empirical orthogonal functions analysis. Conductivity-temperature-depth data collected from October 1997 through January 2007 over a grid based on Mexican Research of the California Current quarterly survey cruises are analyzed. Net heat flux (NHF) and sea surface height anomaly (SSH) from satellite products are also analyzed. The first leading mode of both ML temperature and ML salinity show a single-signed loading pattern, in which the variability increases southward. Those patterns have been reported before, but they are lacking a quantitative explanation. ML temperature variability is mainly associated with NHF variability, while ML salinity variability is mainly associated with large-scale SSH variability. The principal component (PC) of ML salinity is correlated with North Pacific Gyre Oscillation and Warm Water Volume climate indices, while the PC of ML temperature is only correlated with the latter index. Those results indicate that the principal mode of ML salinity variability is a diagnostic variable of basin-scale process. An abrupt freshening (˜-0.7) and cooling (˜-4°C) event from January 1998 to January 1999 and an abrupt freshening (˜-0.5) event from January 2002 to January 2003 are conspicuous features in the mixed layer. The 1998-1999 events are associated with the major El Niño-La Niña cycle in the 10-year period. The 2002-2003 freshening is related to an enhancement of subarctic water into the equatorward flow that started during the summer of 2002 off Oregon (49°N).

  14. Scaling wind stirring effects in an oceanic bulk mixed layer model with application to an OGCM of the tropical Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuchao; Zhang, Rong-Hua

    2017-11-01

    The mixed layer depth (MLD) plays an important role in the climate system through its influences on sea surface temperature (SST). The Kraus-Turner-Niiler (hereafter referred to as KTN) bulk mixed layer (ML) model is designed for describing the MLD and has been adopted widely by many ocean modeling. However, large biases exist in the MLD simulation using the original KTN model in the tropical Pacific. This is partly due to the uncertainties in representing wind stirring effect in the model, which is scaled by a parameter (m 0). Traditionally, m 0 is taken as a constant uniformly in space. In this study, the m 0 is estimated as spatially and seasonally varying through its inverse calculation from a balance equation describing the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget of the ML. It is illustrated that the m 0 is spatially varying over the tropical Pacific. The derived m 0 fields are then embedded into an ocean general circulation model (OGCM). Compared with the observations and the global ocean data assimilation system (GODAS) analyses, the MLD simulations in the OGCM with varying m 0 are substantially improved in the tropical Pacific Ocean on seasonal and interannual time scales. Additionally, the Pacific subtropical cells (STCs) become intensified, accompanied with the strengthening of upwelling in the eastern equatorial Pacific; thus, more realistic simulations are obtained in spatially and seasonally varying m 0 case compared with the constant m 0 case. As the related cooling effect from the upwelling is enhanced, the simulated SST is slightly cooled down in the eastern equatorial Pacific. Further applications and implications are also discussed.

  15. Wavelet analysis methods for radiography of multidimensional growth of planar mixing layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merritt, E. C., E-mail: emerritt@lanl.gov; Doss, F. W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    The counter-propagating shear campaign is examining instability growth and its transition to turbulence in the high-energy-density physics regime using a laser-driven counter-propagating flow platform. In these experiments, we observe consistent complex break-up of and structure growth in a tracer layer placed at the shear flow interface during the instability growth phase. We present a wavelet-transform based analysis technique capable of characterizing the scale- and directionality-resolved average intensity perturbations in static radiographs of the experiment. This technique uses the complete spatial information available in each radiograph to describe the structure evolution. We designed this analysis technique to generate a two-dimensional power spectrum for each radiograph from which we can recover information about structure widths, amplitudes, and orientations. The evolution of the distribution of power in the spectra for an experimental series is a potential metric for quantifying the structure size evolution as well as a system’s evolution towards isotropy.

  16. Thin layer chromatography of p-aminophenol in urine after mixed exposure to aniline and toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniek, G; Karmańska, K; Wilczok, T

    1984-01-01

    A simple method of evaluating p-aminophenol in the urine of people exposed simultaneously to aniline and toluene relies on separating p-aminophenol from hippuric acid and other physiological components of the urine by thin layer chromatography. The adsorbents and developing system have been thus fixed to make possible the separation of p-aminophenol from hippuric acid, urea, and creatinine and their quantitative determination. This method also makes possible the determination of p-aminophenol in urine in the presence of hippuric acid. Hippuric acid is a physiological component of urine and also the metabolite of toluene, so the determination of p-aminophenol is possible also after simultaneous exposure to both compounds: aniline and toluene. At the same time the concentrations of urea and creatinine as additional factors may be determined. The limit of detection of the method is: 5 micrograms/ml for p-aminophenol, 9 micrograms/ml for hippuric acid, 8 micrograms/ml for urea, and 6 micrograms/ml for creatinine. PMID:6722055

  17. Homotopy analysis method for mixed convective boundary layer flow of a nanofluid over a vertical circular cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinarvand Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the study of the steady axisymmetric mixed convective boundary layer flow of a nanofluid over a vertical circular cylinder with prescribed external flow and surface temperature. By means of similarity transformation, the governing partial differential equations are reduced into highly non-linear ordinary differential equations. The resulting non-linear system has been solved analytically using an efficient technique namely homotopy analysis method (HAM. Expressions for velocity and temperature fields are developed in series form. In this study, three different types of nanoparticles are considered, namely alumina (, titania (, and copper ( with water as the base fluid. For copper-water nanofluid, graphical results are presented to describe the influence of the nanoparticle volume fraction on the velocity and temperature fields for the forced and mixed convection flows. Moreover, the features of the flow and heat transfer characteristics are analyzed and discussed for foregoing nanofluids. It is found that the skin friction coefficient and the heat transfer rate at the surface are highest for copper-water nanofluid compared to the alumina-water and titania-water nanofluids.

  18. Assessment of the presumed mapping function approach for the stationary laminar flamelet modelling of reacting double scalar mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, Ahmad; Mortensen, Mikael; Wen, John Z.

    2014-09-01

    This paper assesses the Presumed Mapping Function (PMF) approach in the context of the Stationary Laminar Flamelet Modelling (SLFM) of a reacting Double Scalar Mixing Layer (DSML). Starting from a prescribed Gaussian reference field, the PMF approach provides a presumed Probability Density Function (PDF) for the mixture fraction that is subsequently employed to close the Conditional Scalar Dissipation Rate (CSDR) upon doubly-integrating the homogeneous PDF transport equation. The PMF approach is unique in its ability to yield PDF and CSDR distributions that capture the effect of multiple fuel injections of different composition. This distinct feature overcomes the shortcomings of the classical SLFM closures (the β-distribution for the PDF and the counterflow solution for the CSDR). The current study analyses the impact of the binary (two-stream) and trinary (three-stream) PMF approaches on the structure of laminar flamelets in a DSML formed by the mixing of a fuel stream and an oxidiser stream separated by a pilot. The conditions of a partially-premixed methane/air piloted jet flame are considered. A parametric assessment is performed by varying the local mixing statistics and the findings are compared to those of the classical SLFM approach. Further, the influence of the PMF approach on flamelet extinction and transport by means of differential diffusion is thoroughly investigated. It is shown that the trinary PMF approach captures the influence of the pilot stream as it is capable of yielding bimodal CSDR and trimodal PDF distributions. It is further demonstrated that, when the influence of the pilot is significant, flamelets generated using the trinary CSDR closure extinguish at higher strain levels compared to flamelets generated using the binary and counterflow closures. Lastly, it is shown that the trinary PMF approach can be critical for accurate SLFM computations of DSMLs when differential diffusion effects are important.

  19. Observations of Mixing Layer Heights from the Micropulse Lidar Network and Potential Implications for Regional and Global Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. R.; Welton, E. J.; Hegarty, J. D.; Henderson, J.; McGrath-Spangler, E. L.; Scarino, A. J.; Berkoff, T.; Ferrare, R. A.; Stewart, S. A.; DeCola, P.

    2016-12-01

    Long-term, continuous measurements of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) height are rare, but necessary to ascertain its seasonal and diurnal changes. Autonomous ground-based lidar measurements from the NASA Micropulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) have the potential to contribute to our current knowledge of the PBL. MPLNET is a global network of micropulse lidars which has operated for over 16 years using a standard instrument and suite of processing algorithms. In this work, we investigate the daytime mixing layer height (MLH) determined from aerosol backscatter profiles using the wavelet covariance transform and a fuzzy-logic scheme. First, we evaluate simulations from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model in the Washington D.C. - Baltimore, MD urban corridor during the July 2011 DISCOVER-AQ field campaign. In addition to MPLNET data, this field campaign utilizes data from field-deployed mini-Micropulse lidars, the CALIPSO satellite, and the NASA Langley Airborne High-Spectral Resolution Lidar. Next, we show a multi-year, multi-site comparison of MPLNET retrievals to PBL heights retrieved from the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, Version 2 (MERRA-2). We discuss differences between the modeled and observed quantities and the potential for future research.

  20. Seasonal development of mixed layer depths, nutrients, chlorophyll and Calanus finmarchicus in the Norwegian Sea - A basin-scale habitat comparison

    KAUST Repository

    Bagøien, Espen

    2012-09-01

    Seasonal patterns for mixed layer depths, nutrients, chlorophyll, and Calanus finmarchicus in different water masses between 62 and 70°N of the Norwegian Sea were compared using spatiotemporally aggregated basin-scale data. Norwegian Coastal Water was stratified throughout the year due to a low-salinity upper layer. The winter mixed layer depth was typically about 50-60m, and the spring phytoplankton bloom peaked in late April. In Atlantic and Arctic Waters the winter mixed layer depths were much greater, typically about 175-250m. Due to the requirement for thermal stratification, the phytoplankton build-ups there were slower and the peaks were delayed until late May. Seasonal development of mixed layer depths, nutrient consumption and chlorophyll was similar for the Atlantic and Arctic areas. Young Calanus copepodites of the first new generation in Coastal Water peaked in early May, preceding the peak in Atlantic Water by about 2weeks, and that in Arctic Water by about 6weeks. While the young G 1 cohorts in Coastal and Atlantic waters coincided rather well in time with the phytoplankton blooms, the timing of the cohort in Arctic Water was delayed compared to the phytoplankton. Two or more Calanus generations in Coastal Water, and two generations in Atlantic Water were observed. Only one generation was found in Arctic Water, where scarce autumn data precludes evaluation of a possible second generation. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. The open-ocean sensible heat flux and its significance for Arctic boundary layer mixing during early fall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ganeshan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The increasing ice-free area during late summer has transformed the Arctic to a climate system with more dynamic boundary layer (BL clouds and seasonal sea ice growth. The open-ocean sensible heat flux, a crucial mechanism of excessive ocean heat loss to the atmosphere during the fall freeze season, is speculated to play an important role in the recently observed cloud cover increase and BL instability. However, lack of observations and understanding of the resilience of the proposed mechanisms, especially in relation to meteorological and interannual variability, has left a poorly constrained BL parameterization scheme in Arctic climate models. In this study, we use multi-year Japanese cruise-ship observations from R/V Mirai over the open Arctic Ocean to characterize the surface sensible heat flux (SSHF during early fall and investigate its contribution to BL turbulence. It is found that mixing by SSHF is favored during episodes of high surface wind speed and is also influenced by the prevailing cloud regime. The deepest BLs and maximum ocean–atmosphere temperature difference are observed during cold air advection (associated with the stratocumulus regime, yet, contrary to previous speculation, the efficiency of sensible heat exchange is low. On the other hand, the SSHF contributes significantly to BL mixing during the uplift (low pressure followed by the highly stable (stratus regime. Overall, it can explain  ∼  10 % of the open-ocean BL height variability, whereas cloud-driven (moisture and radiative mechanisms appear to be the other dominant source of convective turbulence. Nevertheless, there is strong interannual variability in the relationship between the SSHF and the BL height which can be intensified by the changing occurrence of Arctic climate patterns, such as positive surface wind speed anomalies and more frequent conditions of uplift. This study highlights the need for comprehensive BL observations like the R/V Mirai for

  2. The Open-Ocean Sensible Heat Flux and Its Significance for Arctic Boundary Layer Mixing During Early Fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeshan, Manisha; Wu, Dongliang

    2016-01-01

    The increasing ice-free area during late summer has transformed the Arctic to a climate system with more dynamic boundary layer (BL) clouds and seasonal sea ice growth. The open-ocean sensible heat flux, a crucial mechanism of excessive ocean heat loss to the atmosphere during the fall freeze season, is speculated to play an important role in the recently observed cloud cover increase and BL instability. However, lack of observations and understanding of the resilience of the proposed mechanisms, especially in relation to meteorological and interannual variability, has left a poorly constrained BL parameterization scheme in Arctic climate models. In this study, we use multiyear Japanese cruise-ship observations from RV Mirai over the open Arctic Ocean to characterize the surface sensible heat flux (SSHF) during early fall and investigate its contribution to BL turbulence. It is found that mixing by SSHF is favored during episodes of high surface wind speed and is also influenced by the prevailing cloud regime. The deepest BLs and maximum ocean-atmosphere temperature difference are observed during cold air advection (associated with the stratocumulus regime), yet, contrary to previous speculation, the efficiency of sensible heat exchange is low. On the other hand, the SSHF contributes significantly to BL mixing during the uplift (low pressure) followed by the highly stable (stratus) regime. Overall, it can explain 10 of the open ocean BL height variability, whereas cloud-driven (moisture and radiative) mechanisms appear to be the other dominant source of convective turbulence. Nevertheless, there is strong interannual variability in the relationship between the SSHF and the BL height which can be intensified by the changing occurrence of Arctic climate patterns, such as positive surface wind speed anomalies and more frequent conditions of uplift. This study highlights the need for comprehensive BL observations like the RV Mirai for better understanding and

  3. Effect of Strong Acid Functional Groups on Electrode Rise Potential in Capacitive Mixing by Double Layer Expansion

    KAUST Repository

    Hatzell, Marta C.

    2014-12-02

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. The amount of salinity-gradient energy that can be obtained through capacitive mixing based on double layer expansion depends on the extent the electric double layer (EDL) is altered in a low salt concentration (LC) electrolyte (e.g., river water). We show that the electrode-rise potential, which is a measure of the EDL perturbation process, was significantly (P = 10-5) correlated to the concentration of strong acid surface functional groups using five types of activated carbon. Electrodes with the lowest concentration of strong acids (0.05 mmol g-1) had a positive rise potential of 59 ± 4 mV in the LC solution, whereas the carbon with the highest concentration (0.36 mmol g-1) had a negative rise potential (-31 ± 5 mV). Chemical oxidation of a carbon (YP50) using nitric acid decreased the electrode rise potential from 46 ± 2 mV (unaltered) to -6 ± 0.5 mV (oxidized), producing a whole cell potential (53 ± 1.7 mV) that was 4.4 times larger than that obtained with identical electrode materials (from 12 ± 1 mV). Changes in the EDL were linked to the behavior of specific ions in a LC solution using molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The EDL expanded in the LC solution when a carbon surface (pristine graphene) lacked strong acid functional groups, producing a positive-rise potential at the electrode. In contrast, the EDL was compressed for an oxidized surface (graphene oxide), producing a negative-rise electrode potential. These results established the linkage between rise potentials and specific surface functional groups (strong acids) and demonstrated on a molecular scale changes in the EDL using oxidized or pristine carbons.

  4. Validation of an ocean shelf model for the prediction of mixed-layer properties in the Mediterranean Sea west of Sardinia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onken, Reiner

    2017-04-01

    The Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) has been employed to explore the sensitivity of the forecast skill of mixed-layer properties to initial conditions, boundary conditions, and vertical mixing parameterisations. The initial and lateral boundary conditions were provided by the Mediterranean Forecasting System (MFS) or by the MERCATOR global ocean circulation model via one-way nesting; the initial conditions were additionally updated through the assimilation of observations. Nowcasts and forecasts from the weather forecast models COSMO-ME and COSMO-IT, partly melded with observations, served as surface boundary conditions. The vertical mixing was parameterised by the GLS (generic length scale) scheme Umlauf and Burchard (2003) in four different set-ups. All ROMS forecasts were validated against the observations which were taken during the REP14-MED survey to the west of Sardinia. Nesting ROMS in MERCATOR and updating the initial conditions through data assimilation provided the best agreement of the predicted mixed-layer properties with the time series from a moored thermistor chain. Further improvement was obtained by the usage of COSMO-ME atmospheric forcing, which was melded with real observations, and by the application of the k-ω vertical mixing scheme with increased vertical eddy diffusivity. The predicted temporal variability of the mixed-layer temperature was reasonably well correlated with the observed variability, while the modelled variability of the mixed-layer depth exhibited only agreement with the observations near the diurnal frequency peak. For the forecasted horizontal variability, reasonable agreement was found with observations from a ScanFish section, but only for the mesoscale wave number band; the observed sub-mesoscale variability was not reproduced by ROMS.

  5. Effectiveness of three different irrigants - 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, Q-MIX, and phytic acid in smear layer removal: A comparative scanning electron microscope study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janhavi Balasaheb Jagzap

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Removal of smear layer from the root canal walls is important for long-standing endodontic success. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare smear layer removing ability among 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA, Q-MIX, and phytic acid by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Materials and Methods: This in-vitro experimental study assessed smear layer removal using three different irrigants. Thirty single-rooted freshly extracted human permanent premolars were collected, disinfected, and decoronated to a standardized root length of 13 mm. Root canals were cleaned and shaped till F2 universal rotary protaper at working length 1 mm short of the apex. They were randomly divided into three groups, and final irrigation was done accordingly. Group 1 (n = 10: with 1 ml of 17% EDTA, Group 2 (n = 10: with 1 ml of Q-MIX, Group 3 (n = 10: with 1 ml of phytic acid. Samples were then longitudinally sectioned and evaluated under SEM at coronal, middle, and apical levels. Statistical Analysis: Two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc test were performed. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Smear layer removing ability among irrigants and sections in descending order: 17 EDTA > Q-MIX > phytic acid; coronal > middle > apical. Conclusion: 17% EDTA showed better and promising results followed by Q-MIX and then phytic acid.

  6. Effectiveness of Three Different Irrigants - 17% Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid, Q-MIX, and Phytic Acid in Smear Layer Removal: A Comparative Scanning Electron Microscope Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagzap, Janhavi Balasaheb; Patil, Sanjay S; Gade, Vandana Jaykumar; Chandhok, Deepika J; Upagade, Madhura A; Thakur, Deepa A

    2017-01-01

    Removal of smear layer from the root canal walls is important for long-standing endodontic success. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare smear layer removing ability among 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), Q-MIX, and phytic acid by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This in-vitro experimental study assessed smear layer removal using three different irrigants. Thirty single-rooted freshly extracted human permanent premolars were collected, disinfected, and decoronated to a standardized root length of 13 mm. Root canals were cleaned and shaped till F2 universal rotary protaper at working length 1 mm short of the apex. They were randomly divided into three groups, and final irrigation was done accordingly. Group 1 (n = 10): with 1 ml of 17% EDTA, Group 2 (n = 10): with 1 ml of Q-MIX, Group 3 (n = 10): with 1 ml of phytic acid. Samples were then longitudinally sectioned and evaluated under SEM at coronal, middle, and apical levels. Two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc test were performed. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Smear layer removing ability among irrigants and sections in descending order: 17 EDTA > Q-MIX > phytic acid; coronal > middle > apical. 17% EDTA showed better and promising results followed by Q-MIX and then phytic acid.

  7. ASSESSING THE IMPACT OF WIND SPEED AND MIXING-LAYER HEIGHT ON AIR QUALITY IN KRAKOW (POLAND IN THE YEARS 2014-2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert OLENIACZ

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the role of wind speed and mixing-layer height in shaping the levels of pollutant concentrations in the air of Krakow (Southern Poland. The hourly averaged measurements of concentrations of selected air pollutants and wind speed values from the period of 2014-2015, recorded at two of the air quality monitoring stations within Krakow (both industrial and urban background were used for this purpose. Temporal variability of mixing-layer height in the area of the monitoring stations was determined using numerical modelling with the CALMET model and the measurements derived from, i.a., two upper air stations. It was found that wind speed and mixing-layer height are in at least moderate agreement with the concentration values for some pollutants. For PM10, PM2.5, NO2, NOx, CO and C6H6 correlation coefficient is of negative value, which indicates that the low wind speed and low mixing-layer height may be the dominant reason for elevated concentrations of these substances in the air, especially in the winter months. Moderate but positive correlation was found between O3 concentrations and analysed meteorological parameters, proving that the availability of appropriate precursors and their inflow from the neighbouring areas have an important role in the formation of tropospheric ozone. On the other hand, in case of SO2, a weak both positive and negative correlation coefficient was obtained, depending on the period and location of the station concerned.

  8. Application of exciplex in the fabrication of white organic light emitting devices with mixed fluorescent and phosphorescent layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Dan; Duan, Yahui; Yang, Yongqiang [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science & Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Hu, Nan [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science & Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130012 (China); Wang, Xiao [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science & Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Sun, Fengbo [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science & Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130012 (China); Duan, Yu, E-mail: duanyu@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science & Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, a highly efficient fluorescent/phosphorescent white organic light-emitting device (WOLED) was fabricated using exciplex light emission. The hole-transport material 4,4',4''-tris(N-carbazolyl)triphenylamine (TCTA), and electron-transport material, 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Bphen), were mixed to afford a blue-emitting exciplex. The WOLED was fabricated with a yellow phosphorescent dye, Ir(III) bis(4-phenylthieno [3,2-c] pyridinato-N,C{sup 2'}) acetylacetonate (PO-01), combined with the exciplex. In this structure, the energy can be efficiently transferred from the blend layer to the yellow phosphorescent dye, thus improving the efficiency of the utilization of the triplet exciton. The maximum power efficiency of the WOLED reached a value 9.03 lm/W with an external quantum efficiency of 4.3%. The Commission Internationale de I'Eclairage (CIE) color coordinates (x,y) of the device were from (0.39, 0.45) to (0.27, 0.31), with a voltage range of 4–9 V. - Highlights: • An exciplex/phosphorescence hybrid white OLED was fabricated for the first time with blue/orange complementary emitters. • By using exciplex as the blue emitter, non-radiative triplet-states on the exciplex can be harvested for light-emission by transferring them to low triplet-state phosphors.

  9. Mixed colloidal suspensions of reduced graphene oxide and layered metal oxide nanosheets: useful precursors for the porous nanocomposites and hybrid films of graphene/metal oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu Ri; Kim, In Young; Kim, Tae Woo; Lee, Jang Mee; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2012-02-20

    Homogeneously mixed colloidal suspensions of reduced graphene oxide, or RGO, and layered manganate nanosheets have been synthesized by a simple addition of the exfoliated colloid of RGO into that of layered MnO(2). The obtained mixed colloidal suspensions with the RGO/MnO(2) ratio of ≤0.3 show good colloidal stability without any phase separation and a negatively charged state with a zeta (ζ) potential of -30 to -40 mV. The flocculation of these mixed colloidal suspensions with lithium cations yields porous nanocomposites of Li/RGO-layered MnO(2) with high electrochemical activity and a markedly expanded surface area of around 70-100 m(2)  g(-1). Relative to the Li/RGO and Li/layered MnO(2) nanocomposites (≈116 and ≈167 F g(-1)), the obtained Li/RGO-layered MnO(2) nanocomposites deliver a larger capacitance of approximately 210 F g(-1) with good cyclability of around 95-97 % up to the 1000th cycle, thus indicating the positive effect of hybridization on the electrode performances of RGO and lithium manganate. Also, an electrophoretic deposition of the mixed colloidal suspensions makes it possible to easily fabricate uniform hybrid films composed of graphene and manganese oxide. The obtained films show a distinct electrochemical activity and a homogeneous distribution of RGO and MnO(2). The present experimental findings clearly demonstrate that the utilization of the mixed colloidal suspensions as precursors provides a facile and universal methodology to synthesize various types of graphene/metal oxide hybrid materials. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. The Characterization of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Depth and Turbulence in a Mixed Rural and Urban Convective Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Micheal M.

    A comprehensive analysis of surface-atmosphere flux exchanges over a mixed rural and urban convective environment is conducted at Howard University Beltsville, MD Research Campus. This heterogeneous site consists of rural, suburban and industrial surface covers to its south, east and west, within a 2 km radius of a flux sensor. The eddy covariance method is utilized to estimate surface-atmosphere flux exchanges of momentum, heat and moisture. The attributes of these surface flux exchanges are contrasted to those of classical homogeneous sites and assessed for accuracy, to evaluate the following: (I) their similarity to conventional convective boundary layer (CBL) processes and (II) their representativeness of the surrounding environment's turbulent properties. Both evaluations are performed as a function of upwind surface conditions. In particular, the flux estimates' obedience to spectrum power laws and similarity theory relationships is used for performing the first evaluation, and their ability to close the surface energy balance and accurately model CBL heights is used for the latter. An algorithm that estimates atmospheric boundary layer heights from observed lidar extinction backscatter was developed, tested and applied in this study. The derived lidar based CBL heights compared well with those derived from balloon borne soundings, with an overall Pearson correlation coefficient and standard deviation of 0.85 and 223 m, respectively. This algorithm assisted in the evaluation of the response of CBL processes to surface heterogeneity, by deriving high temporal CBL heights and using them as independent references of the surrounding area averaged sensible heat fluxes. This study found that the heterogeneous site under evaluation was rougher than classical homogeneous sites, with slower dissipation rates of turbulent kinetic energy. Flux measurements downwind of the industrial complexes exhibited enhanced efficiency in surface-atmosphere momentum, heat, and

  11. The effects of dilution and mixed layer depth on deliberate ocean iron fertilization: 1-D simulations of the southern ocean iron experiment (SOFeX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Aparna; Moore, J. Keith; Doney, Scott C.

    To better understand the role of iron in driving marine ecosystems, the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) fertilized two surface water patches with iron north and south of the Antarctic Polar Front Zone (APFZ). Using 1-D coupled biological-physical simulations, we examine the biogeochemical dynamics that occurred both inside and outside of the fertilized patches during and shortly after the SOFeX field campaign. We focus, in particular, on three main issues governing the biological response to deliberate iron fertilization: the interaction among phytoplankton, light, macronutrient and iron limitation; dilution and lateral mixing between the fertilized patch and external, unfertilized waters; and the effect of varying mixed layer depth on the light field. At the patch south of the APFZ, sensitivity simulations with no dilution results in the maximum bloom magnitude, whereas dilution with external water extends the development of the north patch bloom by relieving silicon limitation. In model sensitivity studies for both sites, maximum chlorophyll concentration and dissolved inorganic carbon depletion inside the fertilized patches are inversely related to mixed layer depth, similar to the patterns observed across a number of iron fertilization field experiments. Our results suggest that Southern Ocean phytoplankton blooms resulting from natural or deliberate iron fertilization will tend to become iron-light co-limited unless the mixed layer depth is quite shallow.

  12. Alteration of the size distributions and mixing states of black carbon through transport in the boundary layer in east Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, Takuma; Oshima, Naga; Taketani, Fumikazu; Komazaki, Yuichi; Yoshino, Ayako; Takami, Akinori; Kondo, Yutaka; Kanaya, Yugo

    2017-05-01

    Ground-based measurements of black carbon (BC) were performed near an industrial source region in the early summer of 2014 and at a remote island in Japan in the spring of 2015. Here, we report the temporal variations in the transport, size distributions, and mixing states of the BC-containing particles. These particles were characterized using a continuous soot monitoring system, a single particle soot photometer, and an aerosol chemical speciation monitor. The effects of aging on the growth of BC-containing particles were examined by comparing the ground-based observations between the near-source and remote island sites. Secondary formation of sulfate and organic aerosols strongly affected the increases in BC coating (i.e., enhancement of cloud condensation nuclei activity) with air mass aging from the source to the outflow regions. The effects of wet removal on BC microphysics were elucidated by classifying the continental outflow air masses depending on the enhancement ratios of BC to CO (ΔBC / ΔCO), which were used as an indicator of the transport efficiency of BC. It was found that ΔBC / ΔCO ratios were controlled mainly by the wet removal during transport in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) on the timescale of 1-2 days. The meteorological conditions and backward trajectory analyses suggested that air masses strongly affected by wet removal originated mainly from a region in southern China (20-35° N) in the spring of 2015. Removal of large and thickly coated BC-containing particles was detected in the air masses that were substantially affected by the wet removal in the PBL, as predicted by Köhler theory. The size and water solubility of BC-containing particles in the PBL can be altered by the wet removal as well as the condensation of non-BC materials.

  13. Synthesis of ZnO nanowire arrays on ZnO−TiO{sub 2} mixed oxide seed layer for dye sensitized solar cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marimuthu, T. [Advanced Materials and Thin Film Physics Lab, Department of Physics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi (India); Anandhan, N., E-mail: anandhan_kn@rediffmail.com [Advanced Materials and Thin Film Physics Lab, Department of Physics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi (India); Thangamuthu, R. [Electrochemical Materials Science Division, CSIR-Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi (India); Mummoorthi, M. [Advanced Materials and Thin Film Physics Lab, Department of Physics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi (India); Ravi, G. [Photonic Crystal Lab, Department of Physics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi (India)

    2016-08-25

    ZnO nanowire arrays (NWAs) were synthesized on ZnO−TiO{sub 2} mixed oxide seeded FTO conducting glass plate by two-step sol-gel and hydrothermal method, respectively. X-ray diffraction patterns reveal the presence of mixed and hexagonal phases in seed layer and NWAs, respectively. Scanning electron microscope images showed that the FTO glass plate is uniformly covered with grains and a few nanorods in seed layer and dense NWAs are vertically grown on the seed layer. The hexagonal structure and high crystal quality have been confirmed by micro Raman spectra. Photoluminescence spectra also present that NWAs have high crystal quality and less atomic defects. UV spectra indicate that NWAs are absorbed more dye molecules and it has the band gap equal to bulk material. The efficiency of ZnO−TiO{sub 2} mixed oxide seed layer and ZnO NWAs is found to be 0.56 and 0.84% respectively. Electrochemical impedance spectra reveal that NWAs DSSC has high charge transfer recombination resistance than the seed layer DSSC. - Highlights: • ZnO nanowire arrays were synthesized by two-step sol-gel and hydrothermal method. • The crystal structure and crystalline quality of films are confirmed by Raman spectra. • The emission properties of films are investigated by photoluminescence spectra. • ZnO nanowire arrays (NWAs) have higher charge transfer recombination resistance. • The conversion efficiency of the seed layer and NWAs is to be 0.56 and 0.84%.

  14. Broadband Light Absorption and Efficient Charge Separation Using a Light Scattering Layer with Mixed Cavities for High-Performance Perovskite Photovoltaic Cells with Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Byeong Cheul; Park, Jung Hyo; Lee, Dong Ki; Tsvetkov, Nikolai; Ock, Ilwoo; Choi, Kyung Min; Kang, Jeung Ku

    2017-08-01

    CH3 NH3 PbI3 is one of the promising light sensitizers for perovskite photovoltaic cells, but a thick layer is required to enhance light absorption in the long-wavelength regime ranging from PbI2 absorption edge (500 nm) to its optical band-gap edge (780 nm) in visible light. Meanwhile, the thick perovskite layer suppresses visible-light absorption in the short wavelengths below 500 nm and charge extraction capability of electron-hole pairs produced upon light absorption. Herein, we find that a new light scattering layer with the mixed cavities of sizes in 100 and 200 nm between transparent fluorine-doped tin oxide and mesoporous titanium dioxide electron transport layer enables full absorption of short-wavelength photons (λ cell with a light scattering layer of mixed cavities is stabilized due to suppressed charge accumulation. Consequently, this work provides a new route to realize broadband light harvesting of visible light for high-performance perovskite photovoltaic cells. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Assessment of hurricane's effect on the upper mixed layer of the southwestern Mexican Pacific during ENSO 1997-1998: in situ and satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Aguirre-Gómez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Using data from closely spaced CTD profiles and satellite imagery we investigated the effect of hurricane Rick on the sea surface temperature (SST and the upper mixed layer of the southwestern Mexican Pacific coast. Effects of ENSO 1997-1998 in this region are also discussed by analysing SST maps. Coincident hydrographic measurements were carried out during an oceanographic campaign over the area in November 1997. Results revealed an increment of SST between 3 to 4°C above the climatological mean temperature (25° ± 2°C, in the Mexican Tropical Pacific, during ENSO. In situ measurements show instabilities in the upper mixed layer after the pass of the hurricane in oceanic areas. Satellite and historical databases enabled interpretation and analyses of ENSO's effect on the southwest coast of Mexico.

  16. Quantifying the relationship between PM2.5 concentration, visibility and planetary boundary layer height for long-lasting haze and fog–haze mixed events in Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Luan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Air quality and visibility are strongly influenced by aerosol loading, which is driven by meteorological conditions. The quantification of their relationships is critical to understanding the physical and chemical processes and forecasting of the polluted events. We investigated and quantified the relationship between PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter is 2.5 µm and less mass concentration, visibility and planetary boundary layer (PBL height in this study based on the data obtained from four long-lasting haze events and seven fog–haze mixed events from January 2014 to March 2015 in Beijing. The statistical results show that there was a negative exponential function between the visibility and the PM2.5 mass concentration for both haze and fog–haze mixed events (with the same R2 of 0.80. However, the fog–haze events caused a more obvious decrease of visibility than that for haze events due to the formation of fog droplets that could induce higher light extinction. The PM2.5 concentration had an inversely linear correlation with PBL height for haze events and a negative exponential correlation for fog–haze mixed events, indicating that the PM2.5 concentration is more sensitive to PBL height in fog–haze mixed events. The visibility had positively linear correlation with the PBL height with an R2 of 0.35 in haze events and positive exponential correlation with an R2 of 0.56 in fog–haze mixed events. We also investigated the physical mechanism responsible for these relationships between visibility, PM2.5 concentration and PBL height through typical haze and fog–haze mixed event and found that a double inversion layer formed in both typical events and played critical roles in maintaining and enhancing the long-lasting polluted events. The variations of the double inversion layers were closely associated with the processes of long-wave radiation cooling in the nighttime and short-wave solar radiation reduction in the

  17. Forecasting the mixed-layer depth in the Northeast Atlantic: an ensemble approach, with uncertainties based on data from operational ocean forecasting systems

    OpenAIRE

    Drillet, Y.; J. M. Lellouche; B. Levier; Drévillon, M.; Galloudec, O.; Reffray, G.; Regnier, C.; Greiner, E.; Clavier, M.

    2014-01-01

    Operational systems operated by Mercator Ocean provide daily ocean forecasts, and combining these forecasts we can produce ensemble forecast and uncertainty estimates. This study focuses on the mixed-layer depth in the Northeast Atlantic near the Porcupine Abyssal Plain for May 2013. This period is of interest for several reasons: (1) four Mercator Ocean operational systems provide daily forecasts at a horizontal resolution of 1/4, 1/12 and 1/36° with different physics; (2) ...

  18. Assessment of hurricane's effect on the upper mixed layer of the southwestern Mexican Pacific during ENSO 1997-1998: in situ and satellite observations

    OpenAIRE

    Raúl Aguirre-Gómez; Olivia Salmerón-García

    2015-01-01

    Using data from closely spaced CTD profiles and satellite imagery we investigated the effect of hurricane Rick on the sea surface temperature (SST) and the upper mixed layer of the southwestern Mexican Pacific coast. Effects of ENSO 1997-1998 in this region are also discussed by analysing SST maps. Coincident hydrographic measurements were carried out during an oceanographic campaign over the area in November 1997. Results revealed an increment of SST between 3 to 4°C above the climatological...

  19. Grain size, morphometry and mineralogy of airborne input in the Canary basin: evidence of iron particle retention in the mixed layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Jaramillo-Vélez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aeolian dust plays an important role in climate and ocean processes. Particularly, Saharan dust deposition is of importance in the Canary Current due to its content of iron minerals, which are fertilizers of the ocean. In this work, dust particles are characterized mainly by granulometry, morphometry and mineralogy, using image processing and scanning northern Mauritania and the Western Sahara. The concentration of terrigenous material was measured in three environments: the atmosphere (300 m above sea level, the mixed layer at 10 m depth, and 150 m depth. Samples were collected before and during the dust events, thus allowing the effect of Saharan dust inputs in the water column to be assessed. The dominant grain size was coarse silt. Dominant minerals were iron oxy-hydroxides, silicates and Ca-Mg carbonates. A relative increase of iron mineral particles (hematite and goethite was detected in the mixed layer, reflecting a higher permanence of iron in the water column despite the greater relative density of these minerals in comparison with the other minerals. This higher iron particle permanence does not appear to be explained by physical processes. The retention of this metal by colloids or microorganisms is suggested to explain its long residence time in the mixed layer.

  20. Forecasting the mixed-layer depth in the Northeast Atlantic: an ensemble approach, with uncertainties based on data from operational ocean forecasting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drillet, Y.; Lellouche, J. M.; Levier, B.; Drévillon, M.; Le Galloudec, O.; Reffray, G.; Regnier, C.; Greiner, E.; Clavier, M.

    2014-12-01

    Operational systems operated by Mercator Ocean provide daily ocean forecasts, and combining these forecasts we can produce ensemble forecast and uncertainty estimates. This study focuses on the mixed-layer depth in the Northeast Atlantic near the Porcupine Abyssal Plain for May 2013. This period is of interest for several reasons: (1) four Mercator Ocean operational systems provide daily forecasts at a horizontal resolution of 1/4, 1/12 and 1/36° with different physics; (2) glider deployment under the OSMOSIS project provides observation of the changes in mixed-layer depth; (3) the ocean stratifies in May, but mixing events induced by gale force wind are observed and forecast by the systems. Statistical scores and forecast error quantification for each system and for the combined products are presented. Skill scores indicate that forecasts are consistently better than persistence, and temporal correlations between forecast and observations are greater than 0.8 even for the 4-day forecast. The impact of atmospheric forecast error, and for the wind field in particular (miss or time delay of a wind burst forecast), is also quantified in terms of occurrence and intensity of mixing or stratification events.

  1. Forecasting the mixed layer depth in the north east Atlantic: an ensemble approach, with uncertainties based on data from operational oceanic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drillet, Y.; Lellouche, J. M.; Levier, B.; Drévillon, M.; Le Galloudec, O.; Reffray, G.; Regnier, C.; Greiner, E.; Clavier, M.

    2014-06-01

    Operational systems operated by Mercator Océan provide daily ocean forecasts, and combining these forecasts we can produce ensemble forecast and uncertainty estimates. This study focuses on the mixed layer depth in the North East Atlantic near the Porcupine Abyssal Plain for May 2013. This period is of interest for several reasons: (1) four Mercator Océan operational systems provide daily forecasts at a horizontal resolution of 1/4°, 1/12° and 1/36° with different physics; (2) glider deployment under the OSMOSIS project provides observation of the changes in mixed layer depth; (3) the ocean stratifies in May, but mixing events induced by gale force wind are observed and forecasted by the systems. A statistical approach and forecast error quantification for each system and for the combined products are presented. Skill scores indicate that forecasts are in any case better than persistence, and temporal correlations between forecast and observations are greater than 0.8 even for the 4 day forecast. The impact of atmospheric forecast error, and for the wind field in particular, is also quantified in terms of the forecast time delay and the intensity of mixing or stratification events.

  2. The influence of anatase-rutile mixed phase and ZnO blocking layer on dye-sensitized solar cells based on TiO2nanofiberphotoanodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    High performance is expected in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) that utilize one-dimensional (1-D) TiO2 nanostructures owing to the effective electron transport. However, due to the low dye adsorption, mainly because of their smooth surfaces, 1-D TiO2 DSSCs show relatively lower efficiencies than nanoparticle-based ones. Herein, we demonstrate a very simple approach using thick TiO2 electrospun nanofiber films as photoanodes to obtain high conversion efficiency. To improve the performance of the DSCCs, anatase-rutile mixed-phase TiO2 nanofibers are achieved by increasing sintering temperature above 500°C, and very thin ZnO films are deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) method as blocking layers. With approximately 40-μm-thick mixed-phase (approximately 15.6 wt.% rutile) TiO2 nanofiber as photoanode and 15-nm-thick compact ZnO film as a blocking layer in DSSC, the photoelectric conversion efficiency and short-circuit current are measured as 8.01% and 17.3 mA cm−2, respectively. Intensity-modulated photocurrent spectroscopy and intensity-modulated photovoltage spectroscopy measurements reveal that extremely large electron diffusion length is the key point to support the usage of thick TiO2 nanofibers as photoanodes with very thin ZnO blocking layers to obtain high photocurrents and high conversion efficiencies. PMID:23286741

  3. Reassembling Gondwana: A new high quality constraint from vibroseis exploration of the sub-ice shelf geology of the East Antarctic continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Yngve; Hofstede, Coen; Diez, Anja; Blenkner, Richard; Lambrecht, Astrid; Mayer, Christoph; Eisen, Olaf

    2014-12-01

    The breakup of Gondwana is manifested by coeval early Jurassic Karoo magmatism in South Africa and East Antarctica. In South Africa, the large volumes of volcanic rocks of the adjoining Lebombo and Mwenetzi-Save monoclines represent a volcanic rift margin, and in East Antarctica, a corresponding feature, the Explora Wedge is buried below sediments and floating ice shelves on the continental margin of Dronning Maud Land. We use the seismic vibrator source to explore the sub-ice geology in Antarctica, and the new seismic reflection and available regional aeromagnetic data enable us to outline a dogleg landward extent of the Explora Wedge in Dronning Maud Land. The congruent inboard wedge geometries on the two continents define a high quality constraint, which facilitate for the first time, a geologically consistent and tight reconstruction of Africa relative to East Antarctica within Gondwana. The uncertainties in correlations of major geological features (mobile belts) from one continent to the other may now be of the order of ten's of kilometers rather than hundreds of kilometers.

  4. Chlorophyll modulation of sea surface temperature in the Arabian Sea in a mixed-layer isopycnal general circulation model

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nakamoto, S.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Muneyama, K.; Frouin, R.

    , embedded in the ocean isopycnal general circulation model (OPYC). A higher abundance of chlorophyll in October than in April in the Arabian Sea increases absorption of solar irradiance and heating rate in the upper ocean, resulting in decreasing the mixed...

  5. Multi-Layer Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Simulated by a Cloud-Resolving Model: Comparison with ARM Observations and Sensitivity Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yali; Xu, Kuan-Man; Morrison, Hugh; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Wang, Zhien; Zhang, Gong

    2007-01-01

    A cloud-resolving model (CRM) is used to simulate the multiple-layer mixed-phase stratiform (MPS) clouds that occurred during a three-and-a-half day subperiod of the Department of Energy-Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program s Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE). The CRM is implemented with an advanced two-moment microphysics scheme, a state-of-the-art radiative transfer scheme, and a complicated third-order turbulence closure. Concurrent meteorological, aerosol, and ice nucleus measurements are used to initialize the CRM. The CRM is prescribed by time-varying large-scale advective tendencies of temperature and moisture and surface turbulent fluxes of sensible and latent heat. The CRM reproduces the occurrences of the single- and double-layer MPS clouds as revealed by the M-PACE observations. However, the simulated first cloud layer is lower and the second cloud layer thicker compared to observations. The magnitude of the simulated liquid water path agrees with that observed, but its temporal variation is more pronounced than that observed. As in an earlier study of single-layer cloud, the CRM also captures the major characteristics in the vertical distributions and temporal variations of liquid water content (LWC), total ice water content (IWC), droplet number concentration and ice crystal number concentration (nis) as suggested by the aircraft observations. However, the simulated mean values differ significantly from the observed. The magnitude of nis is especially underestimated by one order of magnitude. Sensitivity experiments suggest that the lower cloud layer is closely related to the surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat; the upper cloud layer is probably initialized by the large-scale advective cooling/moistening and maintained through the strong longwave (LW) radiative cooling near the cloud top which enhances the dynamical circulation; artificially turning off all ice-phase microphysical processes results in an increase in LWP by a

  6. The influence of the UV irradiation intensity on photocatalytic activity of ZnAl layered double hydroxides and derived mixed oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadnađev-Kostić Milica S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Layered double hydroxides (LDHs have been studied to a great extent as environmental-friendly complex materials that can be used as photocatalysts or photocatalyst supports. ZnAl layered double hydroxides and their derived mixed oxides were chosen for the investigation of photocatalytic performances in correlation with the UV intensities measured in the South Pannonia region. Low supersaturation coprecipitation method was used for the ZnAl LDH synthesis. For the characterization of LDH and thermal treated samples powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, nitrogen adsorption-desorption were used. The decomposition of azodye, methylene blue was chosen as photocatalytic test reaction. The study showed that the ZnAl mixed oxide obtained by thermal decomposition of ZnAl LDH has stable activity in the broader UV light irradiation range characterizing the selected region. Photocatalytic activity could be mainly attributed to the ZnO phase, detected both in LDH and thermally treated samples. The study showed that the ZnAl mixed oxide obtained by the calcination of ZnAl LDH has a stable activity within the measured UV light irradiation range; whereas the parent ZnAl LDH catalyst did not perform satisfactory when low UV irradiation intensity is implied.

  7. Low temperature absorption edge and photoluminescence study in TlIn(Se1-xSx)2 layered mixed crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasanly, N. M.

    2018-02-01

    Transmission on TlIn(Se1-xSx)2 mixed crystals (0.25 ≤ x ≤ 1) were carried out in the 400-800 nm wavelength range at T = 10 K. Band gap energies of the studied crystals were obtained using the derivative spectra of transmittance. The compositional dependence of direct band gap energy at T = 10 K revealed that as sulfur composition is increased in the mixed crystals, the direct band gap energy rises from 2.26 eV (x = 0.25) to 2.56 eV (x = 1). Photoluminescence spectra of TlIn(Se1-xSx)2 mixed crystals were studied in the wavelength region of 400-620 nm at T = 10 K. The observed bands were attributed to the transitions of electrons from shallow donor levels to the valence band. The shift of the PL bands to higher energies with elevating sulfur content was revealed. Moreover, the composition ratio of the mixed crystals was obtained from the energy dispersive spectroscopy measurements.

  8. Effect of Variable Viscosity on Vortex Instability of Non-Darcy Mixed Convection Boundary Layer Flow Adjacent to a Nonisothermal Horizontal Surface in a Porous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Elaiw

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the effect of variable viscosity on the flow and vortex instability for non-Darcy mixed convection boundary layer flow on a nonisothermal horizontal plat surface in a saturated porous medium. The variation of viscosity is expressed as an exponential function of temperature. The analysis of the disturbance flow is based on linear stability theory. The base flow equations and the resulting eigenvalue problem are solved using finite difference schemes. It is found that the variable viscosity effect enhances the heat transfer rate and destabilizes the flow for liquid heating, while the opposite trend is true for gas heating.

  9. Consequences of inhibition of mixed-layer deepening by the West India coastal current for winter phytoplankton bloom in the northeastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vijith, V.; Vinayachandran, P.N.; Thushara, V.; Amol, P.; Shankar, D.; Anil, A.C.

    , nutrient rich sub-surface water [Banse, 1968, 1987; Le´vy et al., 2007; Mc-43 –2– Creary et al., 2009]. Several studies based on observation [Banse, 1968, 1984;44 Banse and McClain, 1986; Banse and English, 1993; Madhupratap et al., 1996]45 and modelling... [Le´vy et al., 2007; McCreary et al., 2009; Kone´ et al., 2009] de-46 clare that entrainment of nutrients, owing to deepening of the mixed layer (ML)47 forced by convective cooling at the surface of the ocean and, often referred to as48 winter cooling...

  10. Expanding of the fatigue life of thermal barrier coating by mixing MoSl{sub 2} to thermal sprayed layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonoya, K. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Tobe, S. [Ashikaga Inst. of Tech., Ashikaga-shi, Tochigi-ken (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Recent trends of turbine blades of advanced aircraft gas turbine engines are to increase output power of the engines, to increase engine efficiency and to reduce environmental emission, and thus, higher operating temperatures of the engines are required. One of the technologies for increasing the operating temperature is a thermal barrier splayed coating [1,2]. The coating usually consists of a bonding coating layer of an alloy of NiCrAlY on the turbine blade and a top layer of ZrO{sub 2}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, namely, partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ). However, conventional coating systems deteriorate during turbine operation due to thermal and mechanical stresses imposed and corrosion actions by combustion gas coming from combustion chambers. Thus, the main issue is to develop measures against high oxidation rate and low fatigue life of the bonding coating layer. An idea for enhancing oxidation resistance and fatigue life as well of thermal barrier coatings consisting of a zirconia-based coating is to provide with a self-healing capability to the coating by diffusing a suitable substance to fatigue crack surfaces formed in the coating. Excessive oxidation of the NiCrAlY layer beneath is prevented for extending fatigue life of the splayed barrier coating. Several investigations have been conducted on the matter, and a research paper [3] claims that MoSi{sub 2} in a splayed coating has a self-healing capability for cracks formed in the coating by embedding the cracks with SiO{sub 2} formed from MoSi{sub 2} at high temperatures. Thus, a new coating system containing NiCrAlY, MoSi{sub 2}, and PSZ is expected to be developed instead of a two-layer coating system of NiCrAlY and PSZ.

  11. Airborne measurements of hygroscopicity and mixing state of aerosols in the planetary boundary layer during the PEGASOS campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Bernadette; Weingartner, Ernest; Gysel, Martin; Rubach, Florian; Mentel, Thomas; Baltensperger, Urs

    2014-05-01

    Aerosols interact directly with the incident solar radiation by scattering or absorbing the light. The optical properties of an aerosol particle can strongly be altered at enhanced relative humidity (RH). Depending on the particle's chemical composition, it can experience hygroscopic growth, leading to a change in size and index of refraction compared to the dry particle (Zieger et al., 2011). Besides, aerosols can exist in different mixing states which are usually divided into internal and external mixtures. If all particles of a certain size have the same chemical composition, they are described as internally mixed, whereas if particles of equal size have different chemical composition, they are defined as externally mixed. Depending on the mixture the hygroscopic behavior will change: internally mixed aerosols will grow uniformly with increasing RH, while the different substances in external mixtures will experience different growing behaviors leading to a mode-splitting or broadened size distribution. Laboratory studies are commonly performed at dry conditions but it is known that temperature and RH as well as chemical composition are changing with altitude (Morgan et al., 2010). This further leads to the conclusion that the in-situ measurements of optical properties at different heights are crucial for climate forcing calculations. Within the Pan-European Gas-Aerosols-climate interaction Study (PEGASOS) the white- light humidified optical particle spectrometer (WHOPS) was developed and installed on the Zeppelin to investigate changes of light scattering with regard to water uptake and altitude. This instrument firstly selects a dry monodisperse aerosol by its electrical mobility and then exposes it to a well-defined RH (typically 95%). Alternately, the dry and humidified particles are measured in a white-light optical particle spectrometer (WELAS). In this way it is possible to infer the effective index of refraction of the dry particles, their hygroscopic

  12. Mixed Convection Boundary Layer Stagnation-Point Flow of a Jeffery Fluid Past a Permeable Vertical Flat Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad M.; Ioan, Pop

    2014-12-01

    This paper analyzes the combined effects of buoyancy force, mass flux, and variable surface temperature on the stagnation point flow and heat transfer due to a Jeffery fluid over a vertical surface. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations are transformed into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations and then solved numerically using the function bvp4c from computer algebra software Matlab. Numerical results are obtained for skin friction coefficient, Nusselt number as well as dimensionless velocity and temperature profiles for various values of the controlling parameters namely mixed convection parameter λ, mass flux parameter s, elastic parameter (Deborah number) γ, and the ratio of relaxation and retardation time parameter λ1. The results indicate that dual solutions exist in a certain range of the mixed convection and mass flux parameters. In order to establish the physically realizable of these solutions, a stability analysis has also been performed. The results indicate that mixed convection and mass flux significantly affects the nature of the solutions, skin friction, and Nusselt number of a Jeffery fluid.

  13. MHD mixed convective boundary layer flow of a nanofluid through a porous medium due to an exponentially stretching sheet

    KAUST Repository

    Ferdows, M.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer flow of a nanofluid over an exponentially stretching sheet was studied. The governing boundary layer equations are reduced into ordinary differential equations by a similarity transformation. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Nactsheim-Swigert shooting technique together with Runge-Kutta six-order iteration schemes. The effects of the governing parameters on the flow field and heat transfer characteristics were obtained and discussed. The numerical solutions for the wall skin friction coefficient, the heat and mass transfer coefficient, and the velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles are computed, analyzed, and discussed graphically. Comparison with previously published work is performed and excellent agreement is observed. 2012 M. Ferdows et al.

  14. MHD Mixed Convective Boundary Layer Flow of a Nanofluid through a Porous Medium due to an Exponentially Stretching Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ferdows

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD boundary layer flow of a nanofluid over an exponentially stretching sheet was studied. The governing boundary layer equations are reduced into ordinary differential equations by a similarity transformation. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Nactsheim-Swigert shooting technique together with Runge-Kutta six-order iteration schemes. The effects of the governing parameters on the flow field and heat transfer characteristics were obtained and discussed. The numerical solutions for the wall skin friction coefficient, the heat and mass transfer coefficient, and the velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles are computed, analyzed, and discussed graphically. Comparison with previously published work is performed and excellent agreement is observed.

  15. The investigation of Ni-Al and Co-Al based layered double hydroxides and their derived mixed oxides thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birjega, R.; Matei, A.; Filipescu, M.; Stokker-Cheregi, F.; Luculescu, C.; Colceag, D.; Zavoianu, R.; Pavel, O. D.; Dinescu, M.

    2013-08-01

    Layered Double Hydroxides (LDHs) are host-guest materials consisting of positively charged metal/hydroxides sheets with intercalated anions and water molecules. LDHs can be described by the generic formula [[ṡmHO and their structure is formed by layers containing divalent cations (M2+: Mg, Zn, Ni, Co,…) and trivalent cations (M3+: Al, Ga, Cr,…) with an octahedral coordination. LDH films with well-oriented structure and controlled thickness are needed for numerous applications like sensors, protective coatings, catalysts, components for optoelectronics etc. In this work, we report on the deposition of Ni-Al and Co-Al based LDHs and their derived mixed oxides by pulsed laser deposition as a new approach to fabricate oriented LDHs or highly dispersed metallic mixed oxides. The influence of the laser characteristics, such as wavelength and fluence, on the films properties was studied. The films investigation techniques were X-Ray Diffraction, Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry.

  16. The investigation of Ni–Al and Co–Al based layered double hydroxides and their derived mixed oxides thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birjega, R. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Str., 77125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Matei, A., E-mail: andreeapurice@nipne.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Str., 77125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Filipescu, M.; Stokker-Cheregi, F.; Luculescu, C.; Colceag, D. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Str., 77125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Zavoianu, R.; Pavel, O.D. [University of Bucharest, Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Chemical Technology and Catalysis, 4-12 Regina Elisabeta Bd., Bucharest (Romania); Dinescu, M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Str., 77125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2013-08-01

    Layered Double Hydroxides (LDHs) are host-guest materials consisting of positively charged metal/hydroxides sheets with intercalated anions and water molecules. LDHs can be described by the generic formula [M{sub 1−x}{sup 2+}M{sub x}{sup 3+}(OH){sub 2}]{sup x+}[A{sub x/n}]{sup n−}⋅mH{sub 2}O and their structure is formed by layers containing divalent cations (M{sup 2+}: Mg, Zn, Ni, Co,…) and trivalent cations (M{sup 3+}: Al, Ga, Cr,…) with an octahedral coordination. LDH films with well-oriented structure and controlled thickness are needed for numerous applications like sensors, protective coatings, catalysts, components for optoelectronics etc. In this work, we report on the deposition of Ni–Al and Co–Al based LDHs and their derived mixed oxides by pulsed laser deposition as a new approach to fabricate oriented LDHs or highly dispersed metallic mixed oxides. The influence of the laser characteristics, such as wavelength and fluence, on the films properties was studied. The films investigation techniques were X-Ray Diffraction, Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry.

  17. Analytical Study of Microwave Heating of the Coal Layer With Mixed Boundary Conditions of I and III Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salomatov Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is dedicated to the search for the exact analytical dependences of microwave heating due to absorption of a plane electromagnetic wave by coal layer with asymmetric and non-uniform heat dissipation conditions I and III kind. Some of simplifications have been made, such as one-dimensional problem, uniformity and isotropic coal material, and the constancy of the electrical properties of thermal coal during heating of microwave radiation. This has led to the fact that the Maxwell’s task is solved separately from the Fourier’s task, and a heat source generated in the carbon layer is subject to Bouguer law. For the system of equations of heat transfer has been found a new dependent variable, which is to simplify the search for a final solution. All this has given the possibility of finding rigorous analytical solution of the problem of microwave heating of the coal layer in the presence of asymmetric and inhomogeneous boundary conditions I and III kind.

  18. A single-fluid multiphase formulation for diffuse-interface modeling of high-pressure liquid-fueled transcritical mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jofre, Lluis; Urzay, Javier; Mani, Ali; Moin, Parviz

    2015-11-01

    Liquid propellants are often used in propulsion systems. In subcritical conditions, atomization involves the rupture of the liquid volume through the competition between aerodynamic shearing and surface tension. In contrast, the classic atomization description becomes inadequate at supercritical conditions when the characteristic temperature and pressure of the gas environment are above the corresponding critical values. In that limit, the latent heat of vaporization vanishes and there is virtually no surface tension that prevents rupture of the liquid core and diffusive mixing with the gas environment. In particular, in high-pressure gas turbines the liquid fuel is seldom preheated to supercritical temperatures before injection, and the presence of both subcritical and supercritical conditions in the combustion chamber is warranted. Consideration of the liquid phase is therefore required in addition to the gas phase and the supercritical mixture. A single-fluid multiphase formulation of this problem is presented to investigate mixing and combustion in fuel-air transcritical mixing layers. The formulation makes use of diffuse-interface concepts facilitated by the relatively larger interface thicknesses at these high pressures. Funded by AFOSR.

  19. Surface effect on compensation and critical behaviors of a ferrimagnetic mixed-spin (1, 3/2) Ising system with two alternating layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Lv, Dan; Liu, Ying; Yang, Yi; Gao, Zhong-yue; Zhao, Xue-ru

    2017-12-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation has been used to study the magnetic properties and the critical behaviors of a ferrimagnetic mixed spin-1 and spin-3/2 Ising system with two alternating layers on a honeycomb lattice. Particular emphasis is given to the effects of the surface exchange coupling R1 = J1S/J1, R2 = J2S/J1, R3 = J3S/J1, the surface single-ion anisotropy DS/J1 and the layer thickness L on the magnetizations, phase diagrams and hysteresis loops of the system. Some characteristic phenomena have been found, depending on the competition among the surface parameters R1, R2, R3 and DS. In particular, we have also found that, for appropriate values of surface parameters, there exist three critical surface parameters R1C, R3C and DSC/J1, where the phase transition temperature Tc is independent of the layer thickness L.

  20. Wall shear stress fluctuations: Mixed scaling and their effects on velocity fluctuations in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Daniel, Carlos; Laizet, Sylvain; Vassilicos, J. Christos

    2017-05-01

    The present work investigates numerically the statistics of the wall shear stress fluctuations in a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) and their relation to the velocity fluctuations outside of the near-wall region. The flow data are obtained from a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of a zero pressure-gradient TBL using the high-order flow solver Incompact3D [S. Laizet and E. Lamballais, "High-order compact schemes for incompressible flows: A simple and efficient method with quasi-spectral accuracy," J. Comput. Phys. 228(16), 5989 (2009)]. The maximum Reynolds number of the simulation is R e𝜃≈2000 , based on the free-stream velocity and the momentum thickness of the boundary layer. The simulation data suggest that the root-mean-squared fluctuations of the streamwise and spanwise wall shear-stress components τx and τz follow a logarithmic dependence on the Reynolds number, consistent with the empirical correlation of Örlü and Schlatter [R. Örlü and P. Schlatter, "On the fluctuating wall-shear stress in zero pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer flows," Phys. Fluids 23, 021704 (2011)]. These functional dependencies can be used to estimate the Reynolds number dependence of the wall turbulence dissipation rate in good agreement with reference DNS data. Our results suggest that the rare negative events of τx can be associated with the extreme values of τz and are related to the presence of coherent structures in the buffer layer, mainly quasi-streamwise vortices. We also develop a theoretical model, based on a generalisation of the Townsend-Perry hypothesis of wall-attached eddies, to link the statistical moments of the filtered wall shear stress fluctuations and the second order structure function of fluctuating velocities at a distance y from the wall. This model suggests that the wall shear stress fluctuations may induce a higher slope in the turbulence energy spectra of streamwise velocities than the one predicted by the Townsend-Perry attached

  1. Atomic Layer Deposition of Electron Selective SnOx and ZnO Films on Mixed Halide Perovskite: Compatibility and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultqvist, Adam; Aitola, Kerttu; Sveinbjörnsson, Kári; Saki, Zahra; Larsson, Fredrik; Törndahl, Tobias; Johansson, Erik; Boschloo, Gerrit; Edoff, Marika

    2017-09-06

    The compatibility of atomic layer deposition directly onto the mixed halide perovskite formamidinium lead iodide:methylammonium lead bromide (CH(NH2)2, CH3NH3)Pb(I,Br)3 (FAPbI3:MAPbBr3) perovskite films is investigated by exposing the perovskite films to the full or partial atomic layer deposition processes for the electron selective layer candidates ZnO and SnOx. Exposing the samples to the heat, the vacuum, and even the counter reactant of H2O of the atomic layer deposition processes does not appear to alter the perovskite films in terms of crystallinity, but the choice of metal precursor is found to be critical. The Zn precursor Zn(C2H5)2 either by itself or in combination with H2O during the ZnO atomic layer deposition (ALD) process is found to enhance the decomposition of the bulk of the perovskite film into PbI2 without even forming ZnO. In contrast, the Sn precursor Sn(N(CH3)2)4 does not seem to degrade the bulk of the perovskite film, and conformal SnOx films can successfully be grown on top of it using atomic layer deposition. Using this SnOx film as the electron selective layer in inverted perovskite solar cells results in a lower power conversion efficiency of 3.4% than the 8.4% for the reference devices using phenyl-C70-butyric acid methyl ester. However, the devices with SnOx show strong hysteresis and can be pushed to an efficiency of 7.8% after biasing treatments. Still, these cells lacks both open circuit voltage and fill factor compared to the references, especially when thicker SnOx films are used. Upon further investigation, a possible cause of these losses could be that the perovskite/SnOx interface is not ideal and more specifically found to be rich in Sn, O, and halides, which is probably a result of the nucleation during the SnOx growth and which might introduce barriers or alter the band alignment for the transport of charge carriers.

  2. Foaming and adsorption behavior of bovine and camel proteins mixed layers at the air/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajnaf, Roua; Picart-Palmade, Laetitia; Attia, Hamadi; Marchesseau, Sylvie; Ayadi, M A

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this work was to examine foaming and interfacial behavior of three milk protein mixtures, bovine α-lactalbumin-β-casein (M1), camel α-lactalbumin-β-casein (M2) and β-lactoglobulin-β-casein (M3), alone and in binary mixtures, at the air/water interface in order to better understand the foaming properties of bovine and camel milks. Different mixture ratios (100:0; 75:25; 50:50; 25:75; 0:100) were used during foaming tests and interfacial protein interactions were studied with a pendant drop tensiometer. Experimental results evidenced that the greatest foam was obtained with a higher β-casein amount in all camel and bovine mixtures. Good correlation was observed with the adsorption and the interfacial rheological properties of camel and bovine protein mixtures. The proteins adsorbed layers are mainly affected by the presence of β-casein molecules, which are probably the most abundant protein at interface and the most efficient in reducing the interfacial properties. In contrast of, the globular proteins, α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin that are involved in the protein layer composition, but could not compact well at the interface to ensure foams creation and stabilization because of their rigid molecular structure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of mixing-layer height retrieval methods using backscatter lidar returns and microwave-radiometer temperature observations in the context of synergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Umar; Rocadenbosch, Francesc

    2017-04-01

    Mixing Layer Height (MLH) is an important parameter in many different atmospheric and meteorological applications. However, there does not exist a single instrument or method which provides accurate and physically consistent estimates of MLH. Instead, there are several methods for MLH estimation based on the measurements of different atmospheric tracers using different instruments [1, 2]. In this work, MLH retrieval methods using backscattered lidar signals and Microwave Radiometer (MWR)-retrieved potential-temperature profiles are compared in terms of their associated uncertainties. The Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is used for MLH retrieval from backscattered lidar signals [3] and parcel method [4] is used for MLH retrieval from MWR-retrieved potential-temperature profiles. Measurement and retrieval errors are revisited and incorporated into the MLH estimation methods used. Uncertainties on MLH estimates from the two methods are compared along with a combined MLH-retrieval discussion case. The uncertainty analysis is validated using long-term lidar and MWR measurement data, under different atmospheric conditions, from the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) campaign at Jülich, Germany [5]. MLH estimates from a Doppler wind lidar and radiosondes are used as reference. This work has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme, FP7 People, ITN Marie Curie Actions Programme (2012-2016) in the frame of ITaRS project (GA 289923), H2020 programme under ACTRIS-2 project (GA 654109), the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness - European Regional Development Funds under TEC2015-63832-P project, and from the Generalitat de Catalunya (Grup de Recerca Consolidat) 2014-SGR-583. [1] S. Emeis, Surface-based Remote Sensing of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer. 978-90-481-9339-4, Springer, 2010. [2] P. Seibert, F. Beyrich, S.-E. Gryning, S. Joffre, A. Rasmussen, and P. Tercier, "Review and intercomparison of operational methods for the

  4. Enhancement of Fracture Resistance by Multiple Cracks in Layered Structures under Mode I and Mix Mode Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutianos, Stergios; Sørensen, Bent F.

    cohesive zone modelling, that the fracture resistance can be improved by introducing weak layers that result in multiple delaminations next to the damage prone areas. Our model is motivated by the experimental results of Rask and Sørensen [2] who observed that by changing the ply thicknesses of composite...... beams bonded together with a thermoset adhesive, more delamination cracks could be developed next to the main/primary adhesive/laminate crack. An analytical model, based on the J integral, was developed for multiple delaminations [3]. It is shown that the maximum possible increase (upper limit......) of the steady-state fracture resistance, JR,ss, scales linearly with the number of delaminations in agreement with the observations of Rask and Sørensen....

  5. Lidar observations of ice-nucleating particle (INPC) and ice crystal number (ICNC) concentrations: height-resolved INPC-ICNC closure studies in mixed-phase altocumulus layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansmann, Albert; Bühl, Johannes; Mamouri, Rodanthi-Elisavet; Engelmann, Ronny; Seifert, Patric; Nisantzi, Argyro; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos; Sciare, Jean

    2017-04-01

    During the six-week Cyprus-2015 field campaign in March and April 2015, conducted in the framework of the BACCHUS project (Impact of Biogenic versus Anthropogenic emissions on Clouds and Climate: towards a Holistic UnderStanding, collaborative project of the seventh EU framework programme, ENV.2013.6.1-2), we observed the evolution of extended liquid-water altocumulus fields with subsequent heterogeneous ice formation. The altocumulus layers developed in aged Saharan dust layers between 3.5 km (-20°C) and 7.5 km height (-35°C cloud top temperature). We observed such altocumulus developments on 12 days. By applying our recently developed polarization-lidar method we estimated the ice-nucleating particle concentration (INPC, immersion freezing) at cloud level (before the clouds developed and after their dissolution). Simultaneously performed Doppler lidar observations of the terminal velocities of falling ice crystals in virga below the shallow altocumulus layers allowed us to estimate the ice crystal number concentration (ICNC) of the falling ice crystals. In this retrieval, a realistic ice crystal size distribution has to be assumed. In addition, the volume extinction coefficient of the ice crystals has to be known (to obtain the total ice crystal concentration), and is obtained from the polarization lidar observations by using classical backscatter or Raman lidar retrieval methods. We assume that all ice crystals, which nucleated in the 300-500 m thick altocumulus layers, grow fast (according to the literature to about 100 µm size within 1 minute) and immediately fall out of the main shallow cloud layer so that the derived ICNC values provide us with the number of nucleated ice crystals as a function of cloud top temperature and given INP conditions. Based on this unique observational approach we investigated, to our knowledge for the first time, the consistency between the INPC and ICNC in mixed-phase clouds. We found reasonable agreement between INPC

  6. Lie Group Analysis and Similarity Solutions for Mixed Convection Boundary Layers in the Stagnation-Point Flow toward a Stretching Vertical Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkhosh Seddighi Chaharborj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis for the mixed convection boundary layers in the stagnation-point flow toward a stretching vertical sheet is carried out via symmetry analysis. By employing Lie group method to the given system of nonlinear partial differential equations, we can obtain information about the invariants and symmetries of these equations. This information can be used to determine the similarity variables that will reduce the number of independent variables in the system. The transformed ordinary differential equations are solved numerically for some values of the parameters involved using fifth-order Improved Runge-Kutta Method (IRK5 coupled with shooting method. The features of the flow and heat transfer characteristics are analyzed and discussed in detail. Both cases of assisting and opposing flows are considered. This paper' results in comparison with known results are excellent.

  7. Mixed layers of β-lactoglobulin and SDS at air-water interfaces with tunable intermolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Kathrin; Weichsel, Ulrike; Kraft, Elena; Segets, Doris; Peukert, Wolfgang; Braunschweig, Björn

    2014-04-17

    Mixtures of β-lactoglobulin (BLG) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were studied at pH 3.8 and 6.7 under equilibrium conditions. At these pH conditions, BLG carries either a positive or a negative net charge, respectively, which enables tunable electrostatic interactions between anionic SDS surfactants and BLG proteins. For pH 3.8, vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) and ellipsometry indicate strong BLG-SDS complex formation at air-water interfaces that is caused by attractive electrostatic interactions. The latter complexes are already formed in the bulk solution which was confirmed by a thermodynamic study of BLG-SDS mixtures using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). For acidic conditions we determine from our ITC data an exothermal binding enthalpy of -40 kJ mol(-1). Increasing SDS/BLG molar ratios above 10 leads to a surface excess of SDS and thus to a charge reversal from a positive net charge with BLG as the dominating surface adsorbed species to a negatively charged layer with SDS as the dominating surface species. The latter is evidenced by a pronounced minimum in SFG intensities that is also accompanied by a phase change of O-H stretching bands due to a reorientation of H2O within the local electric field. This phase change which occurs at SDS/BLG molar ratio between 1 and 10 causes a polarity change in SFG intensities from BLG aromatic C-H stretching vibrations. Conclusions from SFG spectra are corroborated by ellipsometry which shows a dramatic increase in layer thicknesses at molar ratios where a charge reversal occurs. The formation of interfacial multilayers comprising SDS-BLG complexes is, thus, caused by cancellation of electrostatic interactions which leads to agglomeration at the interface. In contrast to pH 3.8, behavior of BLG-SDS mixtures at pH 6.7 is different due to repulsive electrostatic interactions between SDS and BLG which lead to a significantly reduced binding enthalpy of -17 kJ mol(-1). Finally, it has to be mentioned that

  8. Enhancing Physical Layer Security of Multiuser SIMO Mixed RF/FSO Relay Networks with Multi-Eavesdroppers

    KAUST Repository

    El-Malek, Ahmed H. Abd

    2017-02-09

    In this paper, we investigate the secrecy performance of multiuser (MU) single-input multiple-output (SIMO) mixed radio frequency (RF)/free space optical (FSO) relay network with opportunistic user scheduling and multiple eavesdropping attacks. The considered system includes multiple users, one amplify-and-froward (AF) relay, one destination and multiple eavesdroppers. The users are connected with a multi-antenna relay through RF links and the relay is connected with the destination through an FSO link. Maximal ratio combining (MRC) scheme is used at the relay node to combine the received signals at its different antennas. The RF/FSO channels are assumed to follow Nakagami-m/Gamma-Gamma fading models with considering the effect of pointing errors. In particular, we derive closed- form expressions for the exact and asymptotic outage probabilities. The asymptotic outage results are then used to obtain the optimal RF transmission power based on the dominant link between the RF and FSO links. Then, the considered system secrecy performance is investigated in the presence of multi- eavesdroppers where exact closed-form expression for the intercept probability is derived. Finally, a cooperative jamming model is proposed along with power allocation to enhance the system secrecy performance. Monte-Carlo simulations are provided to validate the achieved exact and asymptotic results.

  9. Physical Layer Security Enhancement in Multiuser Mixed RF#x002F;FSO Relay Networks under RF Interference

    KAUST Repository

    El-Malek, Ahmed H. Abd

    2017-05-12

    In this paper, the impact of radio frequency (RF) co-channel interference (CCI) on the performance of multiuser (MU) mixed RF#x002F;free space optical (FSO) relay network with opportunistic user scheduling is studied. In the considered system, a user is opportunistically selected to communicate with a single destination through an amplify-and- forward (AF) relay in the presence of a single passive eavesdropper. The RF#x002F;FSO channel models are assumed to follow Rayleigh#x002F;Gamma-Gamma fading models, respectively with pointing errors and identical RF CCI signals. Exact closed-form expression for the system outage probability is derived. Then, an asymptotic expression for the outage probability is obtained at the high signal- to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) regime. The asymptotic results are used to formulate a power allocation problem to obtain optimal RF transmission power. Then, the secrecy performance is studied in the presence of CCI at both the authorized relay and eavesdropper by obtaining exact and asymptotic closed-form expressions for the intercept probability. The derived analytical formulas herein are supported by numerical and simulation results to clarify the main contributions of the work.

  10. A FIRE-ACE/SHEBA Case Study of Mixed-Phase Arctic Boundary Layer Clouds: Entrainment Rate Limitations on Rapid Primary Ice Nucleation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridlin, Ann; vanDiedenhoven, Bastiaan; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Avramov, Alexander; Mrowiec, Agnieszka; Morrison, Hugh; Zuidema, Paquita; Shupe, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    Observations of long-lived mixed-phase Arctic boundary layer clouds on 7 May 1998 during the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Regional Experiment (FIRE)Arctic Cloud Experiment (ACE)Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) campaign provide a unique opportunity to test understanding of cloud ice formation. Under the microphysically simple conditions observed (apparently negligible ice aggregation, sublimation, and multiplication), the only expected source of new ice crystals is activation of heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN) and the only sink is sedimentation. Large-eddy simulations with size-resolved microphysics are initialized with IN number concentration N(sub IN) measured above cloud top, but details of IN activation behavior are unknown. If activated rapidly (in deposition, condensation, or immersion modes), as commonly assumed, IN are depleted from the well-mixed boundary layer within minutes. Quasi-equilibrium ice number concentration N(sub i) is then limited to a small fraction of overlying N(sub IN) that is determined by the cloud-top entrainment rate w(sub e) divided by the number-weighted ice fall speed at the surface v(sub f). Because w(sub c) 10 cm/s, N(sub i)/N(sub IN)<< 1. Such conditions may be common for this cloud type, which has implications for modeling IN diagnostically, interpreting measurements, and quantifying sensitivity to increasing N(sub IN) (when w(sub e)/v(sub f)< 1, entrainment rate limitations serve to buffer cloud system response). To reproduce observed ice crystal size distributions and cloud radar reflectivities with rapidly consumed IN in this case, the measured above-cloud N(sub IN) must be multiplied by approximately 30. However, results are sensitive to assumed ice crystal properties not constrained by measurements. In addition, simulations do not reproduce the pronounced mesoscale heterogeneity in radar reflectivity that is observed.

  11. Photocatalytic ability of Bi6Ti3WO18 nanoparticles with a mix-layered Aurivillius structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Longqing; Feng, Yongyi; Cao, Lei; Xue, Mingqiang; Qin, Chuanxiang; Huang, Yanlin; Qin, Lin; Seo, Hyo Jin

    2018-01-01

    Aurivillius phase layered perovskites Bi6Ti3WO18 was prepared by the sol-gel citrate-complexation synthesis. The sample developed into the plate-like nanoparticles with the exposed (001) facets. The phase formation and structure have been verified via X-ray polycrystalline powder diffraction (XRD) Rietveld refinements. The nanoparticles were investigated via the measurements such as FE-SEM, TEM, EDS, and the surface analyses. UV-Vis absorption data revealed that the Aurivillius compound has a direct band characteristic with the band energy of 2.214 eV. The band structure of Bi6Ti3WO18 nanoparticles was discussed on the base of the experiments and theoretical calculation. Bi3+-containing Aurivillius Bi6Ti3WO18 shows efficient photocatalytic degradation for rhodamine B dye (RhB) with the visible light irradiation ( λ > 420 nm). Dynamic characteristic of the light-created excitons was measured by the luminescence and decay lifetime. The multivalent properties of W and Ti ions in the Aurivillius-like lattices of Bi6Ti3WO18 photocatalyst were discussed.

  12. Pillar-Layered Metal-Organic Framework with Sieving Effect and Pore Space Partition for Effective Separation of Mixed Gas C2H2/C2H4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xu-Jia; Wei, Qin; Cai, Yue-Peng; Wu, Bing-Bing; Feng, Hai-Xing; Yu, Ying; Dong, Ren-Feng

    2017-08-30

    The removal of acetylene from the industrial feed gas to purify the ethylene is an important and challenging issue. The adsorption-based separation is a more environmentally friendly and cost-effective method compared to the current removal approaches such as partial hydrogenation and solvent extraction, while facing the challenge of developing materials with high C 2 H 2 /C 2 H 4 selectivity and C 2 H 2 capacity. Herein, by expanding mixed-metal organic frameworks (M'MOFs) structure with high C 2 H 2 /C 2 H 4 selectivity, we report a pillar-layered MOF, {[Cd 5 (MPCZ) 2 (BDC) 3 (NO 3 ) 2 (H 2 O) 4 ]·G} n (MECS-5), which not only inherits the sieving effects of M'MOF series but also develops its own characteristic-the 2D layer with expanding space and the plane pore-partition group to "cover" it. MECS-5 shows higher ideal adsorption solution theory C 2 H 2 /C 2 H 4 selectivity than the most reported MOFs, especially more than 5 times higher than MOF-74 series while displaying great enhancement in the C 2 H 2 capacity, more than 2 times higher compared to the M'MOF. The column breakthrough experiment further proves the possibility of MECS-5a for real industrial ethylene purification.

  13. On the factors governing water vapor turbulence mixing in the convective boundary layer over land: Concept and data analysis technique using ground-based lidar measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Sandip, E-mail: sup252@PSU.EDU

    2016-06-01

    The convective boundary layer (CBL) turbulence is the key process for exchanging heat, momentum, moisture and trace gases between the earth's surface and the lower part of the troposphere. The turbulence parameterization of the CBL is a challenging but important component in numerical models. In particular, correct estimation of CBL turbulence features, parameterization, and the determination of the contribution of eddy diffusivity are important for simulating convection initiation, and the dispersion of health hazardous air pollutants and Greenhouse gases. In general, measurements of higher-order moments of water vapor mixing ratio (q) variability yield unique estimates of turbulence in the CBL. Using the high-resolution lidar-derived profiles of q variance, third-order moment, and skewness and analyzing concurrent profiles of vertical velocity, potential temperature, horizontal wind and time series of near-surface measurements of surface flux and meteorological parameters, a conceptual framework based on bottom up approach is proposed here for the first time for a robust characterization of the turbulent structure of CBL over land so that our understanding on the processes governing CBL q turbulence could be improved. Finally, principal component analyses will be applied on the lidar-derived long-term data sets of q turbulence statistics to identify the meteorological factors and the dominant physical mechanisms governing the CBL turbulence features. - Highlights: • Lidar based study for CBL turbulence features • Water vapor and aerosol turbulence profiles • Processes governing boundary layer turbulence profiles using lidars.

  14. Reversible Single-Crystal-to-Single-Crystal Structural Transformation in a Mixed-Ligand 2D Layered Metal-Organic Framework: Structural Characterization and Sorption Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chieh Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A 3D supramolecular network, [Cd(bipy(C4O4(H2O2]·3H2O (1 (bipy = 4,4′-bipyridine and C4O42− = dianion of H2C4O4, constructed by mixed-ligand two-dimensional (2D metal-organic frameworks (MOFs has been reported and structurally determined by the single-crystal X-ray diffraction method and characterized by other physicochemical methods. In 1, the C4O42− and bipy both act as bridging ligands connecting the Cd(II ions to form a 2D layered MOF, which are then extended to a 3D supramolecular network via the mutually parallel and interpenetrating arrangements among the 2D-layered MOFs. Compound 1 shows a two-step dehydration process with weight losses of 11.0% and 7.3%, corresponding to the weight-loss of three guest and two coordinated water molecules, respectively, and exhibits an interesting reversible single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SCSC structural transformation upon de-hydration and re-hydration for guest water molecules. The SCSC structural transformation have been demonstrated and monitored by single-crystal and X-ray powder diffraction, and thermogravimetic analysis studies.

  15. Integrating seawater desalination and wastewater reclamation forward osmosis process using thin-film composite mixed matrix membrane with functionalized carbon nanotube blended polyethersulfone support layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyeon-Gyu; Son, Moon; Choi, Heechul

    2017-10-01

    Thin-film composite mixed matrix membrane (TFC MMM) with functionalized carbon nanotube (fCNT) blended in polyethersulfone (PES) support layer was synthesized via interfacial polymerization and phase inversion. This membrane was firstly tested in lab-scale integrating seawater desalination and wastewater reclamation forward osmosis (FO) process. Water flux of TFC MMM was increased by 72% compared to that of TFC membrane due to enhanced hydrophilicity. Although TFC MMM showed lower water flux than TFC commercial membrane, enhanced reverse salt flux selectivity (RSFS) of TFC MMM was observed compared to TFC membrane (15% higher) and TFC commercial membrane (4% higher), representing membrane permselectivity. Under effluent organic matter (EfOM) fouling test, 16% less normalized flux decline of TFC MMM was observed compared to TFC membrane. There was 8% less decline of TFC MMM compared to TFC commercial membrane due to fCNT effect on repulsive foulant-membrane interaction enhancement, caused by negatively charged membrane surface. After 10 min physical cleaning, TFC MMM displayed higher recovered normalized flux than TFC membrane (6%) and TFC commercial membrane (4%); this was also supported by visualized characterization of fouling layer. This study presents application of TFC MMM to integrated seawater desalination and wastewater reclamation FO process for the first time. It can be concluded that EfOM fouling of TFC MMM was suppressed due to repulsive foulant-membrane interaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Thermohaline circulation below the Ross Ice Shelf - A consequence of tidally induced vertical mixing and basal melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macayeal, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    The warmest water below parts of the Ross Ice Shelf resides in the lowest portion of the water column because of its high salinity. Vertical mixing caused by tidal stirring can thus induce ablation by lifting the warm but dense water into contact with the ice shelf. A numerical tidal simulation indicates that vertically well-mixed conditions predominate in the southeastern part of the sub-ice shelf cavity, where the water column thickness is small. Basal melting in this region is expected to be between 0.05 and 0.5 m/yr and will drive a thermohaline circulation having the following characteristics: high salinity shelf water (at - 1.8 C), formed by winter sea ice production in the open Ross Sea, flows along the seabed toward the tidal mixing fronts below the ice shelf; and meltwater (at -2.2 C), produced in the well-mixed region, flows out of the sub-ice shelf cavity along the ice shelf bottom. Sensitivity of this ablation process to climatic change is expected to be small because high salinity shelf water is constrained to have the sea surface freezing temperature.

  17. Mixing in explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-12-01

    Explosions always contain embedded turbulent mixing regions, for example: boundary layers, shear layers, wall jets, and unstable interfaces. Described here is one particular example of the latter, namely, the turbulent mixing occurring in the fireball of an HE-driven blast wave. The evolution of the turbulent mixing was studied via two-dimensional numerical simulations of the convective mixing processes on an adaptive mesh. Vorticity was generated on the fireball interface by baroclinic effects. The interface was unstable, and rapidly evolved into a turbulent mixing layer. Four phases of mixing were observed: (1) a strong blast wave phase; (2) and implosion phase; (3) a reshocking phase; and (4) an asymptotic mixing phase. The flowfield was azimuthally averaged to evaluate the mean and r.m.s. fluctuation profiles across the mixing layer. The vorticity decayed due to a cascade process. This caused the corresponding enstrophy parameter to increase linearly with time -- in agreement with homogeneous turbulence calculations of G.K. Batchelor.

  18. The effect of SiC powder mixing electrical discharge machining on white layer thickness, heat flux and fatigue life of AISI D2 die steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al-Khazraji

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with studying the effect of powder mixing electrical discharge machining (PMEDM parameters using copper and graphite electrodes on the white layer thickness (WLT, the total heat flux generated and the fatigue life. Response surface methodology (RSM was used to plan and design the experimental work matrices for two groups of experiments: for the first EDM group, kerosene dielectric was used alone, whereas the second was treated by adding the SiC micro powders mixing to dielectric fluid (PMEDM. The total heat flux generated and fatigue lives after EDM and PMEDM models were developed by FEM using ANSYS 15.0 software. The graphite electrodes gave a total heat flux higher than copper electrodes by 82.4%, while using the SiC powder and graphite electrodes gave a higher total heat flux than copper electrodes by 91.5%. The lowest WLT values of 5.0 µm and 5.57 µm are reached at a high current and low current with low pulse on time using the copper and graphite electrodes and the SiC powder, respectively. This means that there is an improvement in WLT by 134% and 110%, respectively, when compared with the use of same electrodes and kerosene dielectric alone. The graphite electrodes with PMEDM and SiC powder improved the experimental fatigue safety factor by 7.30% compared with the use of copper electrodes and by 14.61% and 18.61% compared with results using the kerosene dielectric alone with copper and graphite electrodes, respectively.

  19. Ocean Mixed Layer responses to intense meteorological events during HyMeX-SOP1 from a high-resolution ocean simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeaupin Brossier, Cindy; Arsouze, Thomas; Béranger, Karine; Bouin, Marie-Noëlle; Bresson, Emilie; Ducrocq, Véronique; Giordani, Hervé; Nuret, Mathieu; Rainaud, Romain; Taupier-Letage, Isabelle

    2014-12-01

    The western Mediterranean Sea is a source of heat and humidity for the atmospheric low-levels in autumn. Large exchanges take place at the air-sea interface, especially during intense meteorological events, such as heavy precipitation and/or strong winds. The Ocean Mixed Layer (OML), which is quite thin at this time of year (∼ 20 m-depth), evolves rapidly under such intense fluxes. This study investigates the ocean responses under intense meteorological events that occurred during HyMeX SOP1 (5 September-6 November 2012). The OML conditions and tendencies are derived from a high-resolution ocean simulation using the sub-regional eddy-resolving NEMO-WMED36 model (1/36°-resolution), driven at the surface by hourly air-sea fluxes from the AROME-WMED forecasts (2.5 km-resolution). The high space-time resolution of the atmospheric forcing allows the highly variable surface fluxes, which induce rapid changes in the OML, to be well represented and linked to small-scale atmospheric processes. First, the simulation results are compared to ocean profiles from several platforms obtained during the campaign. Then, this study focuses on the short-term OML evolution during three events. In particular, we examine the OML cooling and mixing under strong wind events, potentially associated with upwelling, as well as the surface freshening under heavy precipitation events, producing low-salinity lenses. Tendencies demonstrate the major role of the surface forcing in the temperature and/or salinity anomaly formation. At the same time, mixing [restratification] rapidly occurs. As expected, the sign of this tendency term is very dependent on the local vertical stratification which varies at fine scale in the Mediterranean. It also controls [disables] the vertical propagation. In the Alboran Sea, the strong dynamics redistribute the OML anomalies, sometimes up to 7 days after their formation. Elsewhere, despite local amplitude modulations due to internal wave excitation by strong

  20. Structural and electric properties of AgGaTe{sub 2} layers prepared using mixed source of Ag{sub 2}Te and Ga{sub 2}Te{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uruno, Aya [Department of Electrical Engineering and Bioscience, Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan); Kobayashi, Masakazu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Bioscience, Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan); Kagami Memorial Research Institute for Materials Science and Technology, Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-01-15

    AgGaTe{sub 2} layers were prepared on Si substrates by a closed space sublimation method using a mixed powder source of Ag{sub 2}Te and Ga{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. Ag{sub 2}Te buffer layer deposition was introduced to eliminate melt-back etching. The effect of the molar ratio of Ag{sub 2}Te and Ga{sub 2}Te{sub 3} in the mixed source on the crystallinity of the AgGaTe{sub 2} layer was investigated. The composition and the phase of the layer was found to change depending on the molar ratio in the deposits, which could be controlled by the source molar ratio along with the Ag{sub 2}Te buffer layer thickness. It was confirmed that (112) oriented uniform AgGaTe{sub 2} layer with an abrupt interface between AgGaTe{sub 2} and Si was formed after those parameters were tuned. The obtained layer exhibited the acceptor concentration of around 2.5 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}. A solar cell was fabricated using the p-AgGaTe{sub 2}/n-Si heterojunction, and exhibited a conversion efficiency of 1.15%. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. The role of local atmospheric forcing on the modulation of the ocean mixed layer depth in reanalyses and a coupled single column ocean model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pookkandy, Byju; Dommenget, Dietmar; Klingaman, Nicholas; Wales, Scott; Chung, Christine; Frauen, Claudia; Wolff, Holger

    2016-11-01

    The role of local atmospheric forcing on the ocean mixed layer depth (MLD) over the global oceans is studied using ocean reanalysis data products and a single-column ocean model coupled to an atmospheric general circulation model. The focus of this study is on how the annual mean and the seasonal cycle of the MLD relate to various forcing characteristics in different parts of the world's oceans, and how anomalous variations in the monthly mean MLD relate to anomalous atmospheric forcings. By analysing both ocean reanalysis data and the single-column ocean model, regions with different dominant forcings and different mean and variability characteristics of the MLD can be identified. Many of the global oceans' MLD characteristics appear to be directly linked to the different atmospheric forcing characteristics at different locations. Here, heating and wind-stress are identified as the main drivers; in some, mostly coastal, regions the atmospheric salinity forcing also contributes. The annual mean MLD is more closely related to the annual mean wind-stress and the MLD seasonality is more closely related to the seasonality in heating. The single-column ocean model, however, also points out that the MLD characteristics over most global ocean regions, and in particular in the tropics and subtropics, cannot be maintained by local atmospheric forcings only, but are also a result of ocean dynamics that are not simulated in a single-column ocean model. Thus, lateral ocean dynamics are essential in correctly simulating observed MLD.

  2. Investigation of the dye-sensitized solar cell designed by a series of mixed metal oxides based on ZnAl-layered double hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yatong; Wang, Dali; Yang, Xiaoyu; Liu, Sha; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jie; Xiao, Hongdi; Hao, Xiaotao; Liu, Jianqiang

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, the anode materials for dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) were prepared by a facile calcination method using the ZnAl-layered double hydroxide (LDH) as a precursor. The ZnAl-LDHs with different molar ratios (Zn:Al = 2, 4, 6, 8) were prepared by the urea method and the mixed metal oxides (MMO) were prepared by calcining the LDHs at 500 °C. A series of cells were assembled by the corresponding MMOs and different dyes (N3 and N719). The basic parameters were investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis, nitrogen sorption analysis and UV-Vis absorption spectrum. The photovoltaic performance of DSSCs was measured by electrochemical method. It could be seen that ZnAl molar ratios and different dyes had great influence on the efficiency of DSSC. The efficiency improved explicitly with increasing ZnAl molar ratio and the DSSC made of N3 showed better efficiency than that of N719. The best efficiency of N3 conditions reached 0.55% when the ratio of ZnAl-LDH precursor was 8:1.

  3. A Novel Dynamic Physical Layer Impairment-Aware Routing and Wavelength Assignment (PLI-RWA) Algorithm for Mixed Line Rate (MLR) Wavelength Division Multiplexed (WDM) Optical Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Sridhar

    2016-12-01

    The ever-increasing global Internet traffic will inevitably lead to a serious upgrade of the current optical networks' capacity. The legacy infrastructure can be enhanced not only by increasing the capacity but also by adopting advance modulation formats, having increased spectral efficiency at higher data rate. In a transparent mixed-line-rate (MLR) optical network, different line rates, on different wavelengths, can coexist on the same fiber. Migration to data rates higher than 10 Gbps requires the implementation of phase modulation schemes. However, the co-existing on-off keying (OOK) channels cause critical physical layer impairments (PLIs) to the phase modulated channels, mainly due to cross-phase modulation (XPM), which in turn limits the network's performance. In order to mitigate this effect, a more sophisticated PLI-Routing and Wavelength Assignment (PLI-RWA) scheme needs to be adopted. In this paper, we investigate the critical impairment for each data rate and the way it affects the quality of transmission (QoT). In view of the aforementioned, we present a novel dynamic PLI-RWA algorithm for MLR optical networks. The proposed algorithm is compared through simulations with the shortest path and minimum hop routing schemes. The simulation results show that performance of the proposed algorithm is better than the existing schemes.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of the electrical double layer on smectite surfaces contacting concentrated mixed electrolyte (NaCl-CaCl2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-04-01

    We report new molecular dynamics results elucidating the structure of the electrical double layer (EDL) on smectite surfaces contacting mixed NaCl-CaCl{sup 2} electrolyte solutions in the range of concentrations relevant to pore waters in geologic repositories for CO{sub 2} or high-level radioactive waste (0.34-1.83 mol{sub c} dm{sup -3}). Our results confirm the existence of three distinct ion adsorption planes (0-, {beta}-, and d-planes), often assumed in EDL models, but with two important qualifications: (1) the location of the {beta}- and d-planes are independent of ionic strength or ion type and (2) 'indifferent electrolyte' ions can occupy all three planes. Charge inversion occurred in the diffuse ion swarm because of the affinity of the clay surface for CaCl{sup +} ion pairs. Therefore, at concentrations 0.34 mol{sub c} dm{sup -3}, properties arising from long-range electrostatics at interfaces (electrophoresis, electro-osmosis, co-ion exclusion, colloidal aggregation) will not be correctly predicted by most EDL models. Co-ion exclusion, typically neglected by surface speciation models, balanced a large part of the clay mineral structural charge in the more concentrated solutions. Water molecules and ions diffused relatively rapidly even in the first statistical water monolayer, contradicting reports of rigid 'ice-like' structures for water on clay mineral surfaces.

  5. Numerical simulation of inter-annual variations in the properties of the upper mixed layer in the Black Sea over the last 34 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Georgy I.; Wobus, Fred; Zatsepin, Andrei G.; Akivis, Tatiana M.; Zanacchi, Marcus; Stanichny, Sergey

    2014-05-01

    The Black Sea is a nearly land-locked basin where a combination of salt and heat budgets results in a unique thermohaline water mass structure. An important feature of the Black Sea is that oxygen is dissolved and rich sea life made possible only in the upper water levels. This is due to a strong pycnocline which cannot be mixed even by strong winds or winter convection (Shapiro, 2008). The upper mixed layer (UML) with a nearly uniform temperature profile and a very sharp seasonal thermocline at its lower boundary develops during the summer season (Sur & Ilyin, 1997). The deepening of the UML has an important effect on the supply of nutrients into the euphotic upper layer from the underlying nutrient-rich water mass. The temperature of the UML at any given location is dependent on the surface heat flux, horizontal advection of heat, the depth and the rate of deepening of the UML. In this study we use a 3D ocean circulation model, NEMO-SHELF (O'Dea et al, 2012) to simulate the parameters of the UML in the Black Sea over the last 34 years. The model has horizontal resolution of 1/12×1/16 degrees and 33 layers in the vertical. The vertical discretization uses a hybrid enveloped s-z grid developed in Shapiro et al. (2012). The model is spun up from climatology (Suvorov et al., 2004); it is forced by the Drakkar Forcing Set v5.2 (Brodeau et al., 2010, Meinvielle et al., 2013) and river discharges from 8 major rivers are included. For each year the model is run from 1st January and the data for the period April to October are used for analysis. The sea surface temperature produced by the model is compared with satellite data ( Modis-Aqua, 2013) to show a good agreement. The model simulations are validated against in-situ observations (BSERP-3, 2004; Piotukh et al., 2011). The analysis is performed for the deep basin where the depth of the sea is greater than 1000m. It clearly shows the inter-annual variations of both the SST and the depth of UML. The depth of UML is

  6. Comparison of Mixed Layer Heights from Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar, Ground-based Measurements, and the WRP-Chem Model during CalNex and CARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarino, Amy Jo; Obland, Michael; Fast, Jerome D.; Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Berg, Larry K.; Lefer, Barry; Haman, C.; Hair, John; Rogers, Ray; Butler, Carolyn; Cook, A. L.; Harper, David

    2014-06-05

    The California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) and Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) field campaigns during May and June 2010 provided a data set appropriate for studying characteristics of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) was deployed to California onboard the NASA LaRC B-200 aircraft to aid incharacterizing aerosol properties during these two field campaigns. Measurements of aerosol extinction (532 nm), backscatter (532 and 1064 nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064 nm) profiles during 31 flights, many in coordination with other research aircraft and ground sites, constitute a diverse data set for use in characterizing the spatial and temporal distribution of aerosols, as well as the depth and variability of the daytime mixed layer (ML), which is a subset within the PBL. This work illustrates the temporal and spatial variability of the ML in the vicinity of Los Angeles and Sacramento, CA. ML heights derived from HSRL measurements are compared to PBL heights derived from radiosonde profiles, ML heights measured from ceilometers, and simulated PBL heights from the Weather Research and Forecasting Chemistry (WRF-Chem) community model. Comparisons between the HSRL ML heights and the radiosonde profiles in Sacramento result in a correlation coefficient value (R) of 0.93 (root7 mean-square (RMS) difference of 157 m and bias difference (HSRL radiosonde) of 5 m). HSRL ML heights compare well with those from the ceilometer in the LA Basin with an R of 0.89 (RMS difference of 108 m and bias difference (HSRL Ceilometer) of -9.7 m) for distances of up to 30 km between the B-200 flight track and the ceilometer site. Simulated PBL heights from WRF-Chem were compared with those obtained from all flights for each campaign, producing an R of 0.58 (RMS difference of 604 m and a bias difference (WRF-Chem HSRL) of -157 m) for CalNex and 0

  7. The Relationship of PM Variation with Visibility and Mixing-Layer Height under Hazy/Foggy Conditions in the Multi-Cities of Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hujia; Che, Huizheng; Ma, Yanjun; Wang, Yangfeng; Yang, Hongbin; Liu, Yuche; Wang, Yaqiang; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Xiaoye

    2017-04-29

    The variations of visibility, PM-mass concentration and mixing-layer height (MLH) in four major urban/industry regions (Shenyang, Anshan, Benxi and Fushun) of central Liaoning in Northeast China are evaluated from 2009 to 2012 to characterize their dynamic effect on air pollution. The annual mean visibilities are about 13.7 ± 7.8, 13.5 ± 6.5, 12.8 ± 6.1 and 11.5 ± 6.8 km in Shenyang, Anshan, Benxi and Fushun, respectively. The pollution load (PM × MLH) shows a weaker vertical diffusion in Anshan, with a higher PM concentration near the surface. High concentrations of fine-mode particles may be partially attributed to the biomass-burning emissions from September in Liaoning Province and surrounding regions in Northeast China as well as the coal burning during the heating period with lower MLH in winter. The visibility on non-hazy fog days is about 2.5-3.0 times higher than that on hazy and foggy days. The fine-particle concentrations of PM2.5 and PM1.0 on hazy and foggy days are ~1.8-1.9 times and ~1.5 times higher than those on non-hazy foggy days. The MLH declined more severely during fog pollution than in haze pollution. The results of this study can provide useful information to better recognize the effects of vertical pollutant diffusion on air quality in the multi-cities of central Liaoning Province in Northeast China.

  8. Deciphering the Temporal and Spatial Complexity in Submarine Canyons in Antarctica: the Role of Mixed Layer Depth in Regulating Primary Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, F.; Kohut, J. T.; Schofield, O.; Oliver, M. J.; Gorbunov, M. Y.

    2016-02-01

    There is a high spatial and temporal variability in the biophysical processes regulating primary productivity in submarine canyons in the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP). WAP canyon heads are considered biological "hotspots" by providing predictable food resource and driving penguin foraging locations. Because the physiology and composition of the phytoplankton blooms and the physical mechanisms driving them aren't well understood, we aim to characterize the dynamics of the spring phytoplankton bloom at the head of a canyon in the WAP. A 6-year record of Slocum glider deployments is analyzed, corresponding to over 16,000 water column profiles. The mixed layer depth (MLD), determined by the maximum of the buoyancy frequency criteria, was found to be the MLD definition with the highest ecological relevance. The same holds true for other regions in Antarctica such as the Ross and Amundsen Seas. A FIRe sensor on a glider was used to evaluate physiological responses of phytoplankton to canyon dynamics using fluorescence kinetics. Initial results show a spatial influence, with increased photosynthetic efficiencies found at the canyon head. The strongest signal was the seasonal cycle. The shoaling of the MLD in early January results in increased chlorophyll a concentrations and as MLD deepens in mid season due to wind forcing, phytoplankton concentrations decrease, likely due to decreased light availability. A consistent secondary peak in chlorophyll matches a shoaling in MLD later in the growth season. A steady warming and increase in salinity of the MLD is seen throughout the season. Spatial differences were recorded at the head of the canyon and result from the local circulation. Shallower MLD found on the northern region are consistent with a fresher surface ocean (coastal influence) and increased chlorophyll concentrations. The southern region is thought to be more oceanic influenced as intrusions of warm deep water (mUCDW) to the upper water column were recorded

  9. Future changes in tropical cyclone genesis in fully dynamic ocean- and mixed layer ocean-coupled climate models: a low-resolution model study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joo-Hong; Brown, Simon J.; McDonald, Ruth E. [Met Office Hadley Centre, Exeter (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-15

    The global and regional projected changes in tropical cyclone (TC) genesis due to increased CO{sub 2} concentrations has been investigated through a large-scale TC genesis parameter (convective seasonal genesis parameter, ConvGP) in two perturbed physics ensembles. The ensembles are based on the third generation Hadley Centre atmosphere-ocean general circulation model with the first ensemble using a coupled fully dynamic ocean (HadCM3) and the second coupled to a simplified mixed layer thermodynamic ocean (HadSM3) both consisting of 17 members. In each ensemble, parameters are identically perturbed to provide a wide range of climate sensitivity whilst retaining a credible present-day climate simulation. It is found, by comparing the ConvGP climatology from reanalysis data with the best track genesis, that it is possible to reproduce the observed genesis distribution. Future changes in the spatial ConvGP distribution are explored with respect to each tropical ocean basin. Whilst there is a similarity in the gross pattern of the ensemble-mean projected ConvGP change between HadCM3 and HadSM3, there is a non-trivial difference in the tropical Pacific Ocean, arising from different patterns of tropical Pacific sea surface temperature change. This indicates that ocean representation can be important for regional scale projections. The quantitative contribution of individual constituent parameters (i.e. vorticity parameter, shear parameter and convective potential) to the projected ConvGP change is estimated. It is found that all three large-scale parameters generally contribute constructively, but with different magnitude, in the regions where a large doubled CO{sub 2} response is found. (orig.)

  10. Sea-ice melt CO2-carbonate chemistry in the western Arctic Ocean: meltwater contributions to air-sea CO2 gas exchange, mixed layer properties and rates of net community production under sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, N. R.; Garley, R.; Frey, K. E.; Shake, K. L.; Mathis, J. T.

    2014-01-01

    The carbon dioxide (CO2)-carbonate chemistry of sea-ice melt and co-located, contemporaneous seawater has rarely been studied in sea ice covered oceans. Here, we describe the CO2-carbonate chemistry of sea-ice melt (both above sea ice as "melt ponds" and below sea ice as "interface waters") and mixed layer properties in the western Arctic Ocean in the early summer of 2010 and 2011. At nineteen stations, the salinity (~ 0.5 to 1500 μatm) with the majority of melt ponds acting as potentially strong sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. The pH of melt pond waters was also highly variable ranging from mildly acidic (6.1 to 7) to slightly more alkaline than underlying seawater (8 to 10.7). All of observed melt ponds had very low (pH/Ωaragonite than the co-located mixed layer beneath. Sea-ice melt thus contributed to the suppression of mixed layer pCO2 enhancing the surface ocean's capacity to uptake CO2 from the atmosphere. Meltwater contributions to changes in mixed-layer DIC were also used to estimate net community production rates (mean of 46.9 ±29.8 g C m-2 for the early-season period) under sea-ice cover. Although sea-ice melt is a transient seasonal feature, above-ice melt pond coverage can be substantial (10 to > 50%) and under-ice interface melt water is ubiquitous during this spring/summer sea-ice retreat. Our observations contribute to growing evidence that sea-ice CO2-carbonate chemistry is highly variable and its contribution to the complex factors that influence the balance of CO2 sinks and sources (and thereby ocean acidification) is difficult to predict in an era of rapid warming and sea ice loss in the Arctic Ocean.

  11. Physical and chemical properties of the regional mixed layer of Mexico's Megapolis Part II: evaluation of measured and modeled trace gases and particle size distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ochoa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study extends the work of Baumgardner et al. (2009 in which measurements of trace gases and particles, at a remote, high altitude mountain site, 60 km from Mexico City were analyzed with respect to the origin of the air masses. In the current evaluation, the temperature, water vapor mixing ratio (WMR, ozone (O3, carbon monoxide (CO, sulfur dioxide (SO2 and acyl peroxy nitrate (APN are simulated with the WRF-Chem chemical transport model and compared with the measurements at the mountain site. Comparisons between the model and measurements are also evaluated for particle size distributions (PSDs of the mass concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and organic mass (OM. The model predictions of the diurnal trends in temperature, WMR and trace gases were generally well correlated; 13 of the 18 correlations were significant at a confidence level of <0.01. Less satisfactory were the average hourly differences between model and measurements that showed predicted values within expected, natural variation for only 10 of the 18 comparisons. The model performed best when comparing with the measurements during periods when the air originated from the east. In that case all six of the parameters being compared had average differences between the model and measurements less than the expected standard deviation. For the cases when the air masses are from the southwest or west northwest, only two of the comparisons from each case showed differences less than the expected standard deviation. The differences appear to be a result of an overly rapid growth of the boundary layer predicted by the model and too much dilution. There also is more O3 being produced, most likely by photochemical production, downwind of the emission sources than is predicted by the model.

    The measured and modeled PSD compare very well with respect to their general shape and the diameter of the peak concentrations. The spectra are log

  12. Sea-ice melt CO2-carbonate chemistry in the western Arctic Ocean: meltwater contributions to air-sea CO2 gas exchange, mixed-layer properties and rates of net community production under sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, N. R.; Garley, R.; Frey, K. E.; Shake, K. L.; Mathis, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    The carbon dioxide (CO2)-carbonate chemistry of sea-ice melt and co-located, contemporaneous seawater has rarely been studied in sea-ice-covered oceans. Here, we describe the CO2-carbonate chemistry of sea-ice melt (both above sea-ice as "melt ponds" and below sea-ice as "interface waters") and mixed-layer properties in the western Arctic Ocean in the early summer of 2010 and 2011. At 19 stations, the salinity (∼0.5 to 1500 μatm) with the majority of melt ponds acting as potentially strong sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. The pH of melt pond waters was also highly variable ranging from mildly acidic (6.1 to 7) to slightly more alkaline than underlying seawater (>8.2 to 10.8). All of the observed melt ponds had very low (pH/Ωaragonite than the co-located mixed layer beneath. Sea-ice melt thus contributed to the suppression of mixed-layer pCO2, thereby enhancing the surface ocean's capacity to uptake CO2 from the atmosphere. Our observations contribute to growing evidence that sea-ice CO2-carbonate chemistry is highly variable and its contribution to the complex factors that influence the balance of CO2 sinks and sources (and thereby ocean acidification) is difficult to predict in an era of rapid warming and sea-ice loss in the Arctic Ocean.

  13. Composition-tuned band gap energy and refractive index in GaS{sub x}Se{sub 1−x} layered mixed crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isik, Mehmet, E-mail: mehmet.isik@atilim.edu.tr [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Atilim University, 06836, Ankara (Turkey); Gasanly, Nizami [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, 06800, Ankara (Turkey); Virtual International Scientific Research Centre, Baku State University, 1148, Baku (Azerbaijan)

    2017-04-01

    Transmission and reflection measurements on GaS{sub x}Se{sub 1−x} mixed crystals (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) were carried out in the 400–1000 nm spectral range. Band gap energies of the studied crystals were obtained using the derivative spectra of transmittance and reflectance. The compositional dependence of band gap energy revealed that as sulfur (selenium) composition is increased (decreased) in the mixed crystals, band gap energy increases quadratically from 1.99 eV (GaSe) to 2.55 eV (GaS). Spectral dependencies of refractive indices of the mixed crystals were plotted using the reflectance spectra. It was observed that refractive index decreases nearly in a linear behavior with increasing band gap energy for GaS{sub x}Se{sub 1−x} mixed crystals. Moreover, the composition ratio of the mixed crystals was obtained from the energy dispersive spectroscopy measurements. The atomic compositions of the studied crystals are well-matched with composition x increasing from 0 to 1 by intervals of 0.25. - Highlights: • Transmission and reflection experiments were performed on GaS{sub x}Se{sub 1−x} mixed crystals. • Derivative spectra of transmittance and reflectance were used for analyses. • Compositional dependence of band gap energy and refractive index were reported.

  14. Syntheses, structure and properties of three-dimensional pillared-layer Ag(I)-Ln(III) heterometallic coordination polymers based on mixed isonicotinate and hemimellitate ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinfa; Cao, Rong

    2012-12-01

    Three pillared-layer 4d-4f Ag(I)-Ln(III) heterometallic coordination polymers (HCPs), formulated as [Ln2Ag(hma)2(ina)(H2O)2]n nH2O [Ln=La(1), Pr(2), Nd(3); Hina=isonicotinic acid, H3hma=hemimellitic acid], have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. Single-crystal and powder X-ray diffractions confirm that they are isostructural, which features a three-dimensional (3D) pillared-layer heterometallic structure built upon the strictly alternate arrangement of lanthanide-organic layers and [Ag(ina)] pillars. The layers and pillars are connected to each other by Ln-O and Ag-O coordination bonds. The photoluminescent property of the Nd derivative (3) has also been investigated.

  15. Syntheses, structure and properties of three-dimensional pillared-layer Ag(I)-Ln(III) heterometallic coordination polymers based on mixed isonicotinate and hemimellitate ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xinfa, E-mail: xflichem@163.com [Department of Chemistry, Zunyi Normal College, Zunyi 563002 (China); Cao, Rong, E-mail: rcao@fjirsm.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Three pillared-layer 4d-4f Ag(I)-Ln(III) heterometallic coordination polymers (HCPs), formulated as [Ln{sub 2}Ag(hma){sub 2}(ina)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n} nH{sub 2}O [Ln=La(1), Pr(2), Nd(3); Hina=isonicotinic acid, H{sub 3}hma=hemimellitic acid], have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. Single-crystal and powder X-ray diffractions confirm that they are isostructural, which features a three-dimensional (3D) pillared-layer heterometallic structure built upon the strictly alternate arrangement of lanthanide-organic layers and [Ag(ina)] pillars. The layers and pillars are connected to each other by Ln-O and Ag-O coordination bonds. The photoluminescent property of the Nd derivative (3) has also been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Three pillared-layer 4d-4f Ag(I)-Ln(III) heterometallic coordination polymers have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three 3D pillared-layer 4d-4f HCPs were synthesized by hydrothermal reactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The synergistic coordination strategy was employed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It opens new perspective for the construction of structurally diversified 4d-4f HCPs.

  16. To the analysis of the theory of mathematical model of hydrodynamics of a bulk layer of a mix of vegetative materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Bikov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of research work on finding out the interdependence between the dynamic separation of the working apparatus (machine, statistic separation and the degree of filling the apparatus (machine. The final mathematic model of calculating separation - an important hydrodynamic parameter of a layer of vegetable material while extragent is being filtrated through it. The authors worked out a universal method of defining hydrodynamic characteristics of a layer of material which can be applied to any vegetable materials and their mixtures worked up as required.

  17. Nutritive value and fermentation characteristics of alfalfa-mixed grass forage wrapped with minimal stretch film layers and stored for different lengths of time

    Science.gov (United States)

    A key aspect of managing baled silages is to quickly achieve, and then rigorously maintain anaerobic conditions within the silage mass. Recently, the concept of inserting an O2-limiting barrier (OB) into plastic commercial silage wraps has been evaluated in some studies, yielding mixed and/or inconc...

  18. Coffee-Ring-Free Quantum Dot Thin Film Using Inkjet Printing from a Mixed-Solvent System on Modified ZnO Transport Layer for Light-Emitting Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Congbiao; Zhong, Zhiming; Liu, Baiquan; He, Zhiwei; Zou, Jianhua; Wang, Lei; Wang, Jian; Peng, JunBiao; Cao, Yong

    2016-10-05

    Inkjet printing has been considered an available way to achieve large size full-color RGB quantum dots LED display, and the key point is to obtain printed film with uniform and flat surface profile. In this work, mixed solvent of 20 vol % 1,2-dichlorobenzene (oDCB) with cyclohexylbenzene (CHB) was used to dissolve green quantum dots (QDs) with CdSe@ZnS/ZnS core/shell structure. Then, by inkjet printing, a flat dotlike QDs film without the coffee ring was successfully obtained on polyetherimide (PEI)-modified ZnO layer, and the printed dots array exhibited great stability and repeatability. Here, adding oDCB into CHB solutions was used to reduce surface tension, and employing ZnO nanoparticle layer with PEI-modified was used to increase the surface free energy. As a result, a small contact angle is formed, which leads to the enhancement of evaporation rate, and then the coffee ring effect was suppressed. The printed dots with flat surface profile were eventually realized. Moreover, inverted green QD-LEDs with PEI-modified ZnO film as electron transport layer (ETL) and printed green QDs film as emission layer were successfully fabricated. The QD-LEDs exhibited the maximum luminance of 12 000 cd/m2 and the peak current efficiency of 4.5 cd/A at luminance of 1500 cd/m2.

  19. Storage characteristics, nutritive value, and fermentation characteristics of large-round bales of alfalfa-mixed grass forage wrapped with different layers of stretch film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baled silage has become a popular form of forage conservation; however, many practical management questions have not been investigated thoroughly. Our objectives were to evaluate the number of polyethylene wrapping layers and the presence (OB) or absence (SUN) of an O2-limiting barrier within the wr...

  20. A flexible transparent gas barrier film employing the method of mixing ALD/MLD-grown Al2O3 and alucone layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wang; Hui, Duan Ya; Zheng, Chen; Yu, Duan; Qiang, Yang Yong; Ping, Chen; Xiang, Chen Li; Yi, Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been widely reported as a novel method for thin film encapsulation (TFE) of organic light-emitting diodes and organic photovoltaic cells. Both organic and inorganic thin films can be deposited by ALD with a variety of precursors. In this work, the performances of Al2O3 thin films and Al2O3/alucone hybrid films have been investigated. The samples with a 50 nm Al2O3 inorganic layer deposited by ALD at a low temperature of 80°C showed higher surface roughness (0.503 ± 0.011 nm), higher water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) values (3.77 × 10-4 g/m2/day), and lower transmittance values (61%) when compared with the Al2O3 (inorganic)/alucone (organic) hybrid structure under same conditions. Furthermore, a bending test upon single Al2O3 layers showed an increased WVTR of 1.59 × 10-3 g/m2/day. However, the film with a 4 nm alucone organic layer inserted into the center displayed improved surface roughness, barrier performance, and transmittance. After the bending test, the hybrid film with 4 nm equally distributed alucone maintained better surface roughness (0.339 ± 0.014 nm) and barrier properties (9.94 × 10-5 g/m2/day). This interesting phenomenon reveals that multilayer thin films consisting of inorganic layers and decentralized alucone organic components have the potential to be useful in TFE applications on flexible optical electronics.

  1. A flexible transparent gas barrier film employing the method of mixing ALD/MLD-grown Al2O3 and alucone layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wang; Hui, Duan Ya; Zheng, Chen; Yu, Duan; Qiang, Yang Yong; Ping, Chen; Xiang, Chen Li; Yi, Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been widely reported as a novel method for thin film encapsulation (TFE) of organic light-emitting diodes and organic photovoltaic cells. Both organic and inorganic thin films can be deposited by ALD with a variety of precursors. In this work, the performances of Al2O3 thin films and Al2O3/alucone hybrid films have been investigated. The samples with a 50 nm Al2O3 inorganic layer deposited by ALD at a low temperature of 80°C showed higher surface roughness (0.503 ± 0.011 nm), higher water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) values (3.77 × 10(-4) g/m(2)/day), and lower transmittance values (61%) when compared with the Al2O3 (inorganic)/alucone (organic) hybrid structure under same conditions. Furthermore, a bending test upon single Al2O3 layers showed an increased WVTR of 1.59 × 10(-3) g/m(2)/day. However, the film with a 4 nm alucone organic layer inserted into the center displayed improved surface roughness, barrier performance, and transmittance. After the bending test, the hybrid film with 4 nm equally distributed alucone maintained better surface roughness (0.339 ± 0.014 nm) and barrier properties (9.94 × 10(-5) g/m(2)/day). This interesting phenomenon reveals that multilayer thin films consisting of inorganic layers and decentralized alucone organic components have the potential to be useful in TFE applications on flexible optical electronics.

  2. Globorotalia truncatulinoides (dextral) Mg/Ca as a proxy for Gulf of Mexico winter mixed-layer temperature: evidence from a sediment trap in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Jessica W.; Poore, Richard Z.; Quinn, Terrence M.

    2011-01-01

    Three years of weekly- to biweekly-resolved sediment-trap data show that almost 90% of the total flux of tests of the planktic foraminifer Globorotalia truncatulinoides to sediments in the northern Gulf of Mexico occurs in January and February. Comparison of δ18O from tests of non-encrusted Gl. truncatulinoides in sediment-trap samples with calculated calcification depths indicates that the non-encrusted individuals secrete their test in the winter surface-mixed layer, most likely at the bottom of the surface mixed zone. Mg/Ca-temperature estimates from non-encrusted Gl. truncatulinoides in sediment-trap samples are consistent with observed temperatures at the calcification depths inferred from the δ18O data. In contrast, Mg/Ca-temperature estimates from encrusted Gl. truncatulinoides in sediment-trap samples indicate the crust is formed in cooler (deeper) waters. A preliminary study in a core recovered near the sediment-trap site demonstrates that non-encrusted and encrusted forms of Gl. truncatulinoides in sediment samples show a similar offset in Mg/Ca values as observed in sediment-trap samples. A short (~ 100 years) Mg/Ca record from non-encrusted Gl. truncatulinoides indicates a warming trend that coincides with a warming trend in mean-annual sea-surface temperature recorded by Mg/Ca in Globigerinoides ruber (white) from the same core. These findings suggest Mg/Ca from non-encrusted Gl. truncatulinoides has clear potential as a proxy for past winter mixed-layer temperature.

  3. Meteorological and trace gas factors affecting the number concentration of atmospheric Aitken (Dp = 50 nm particles in the continental boundary layer: parameterization using a multivariate mixed effects model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Facchini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of aerosol size distribution and different gas and meteorological parameters, made in three polluted sites in Central and Southern Europe: Po Valley, Italy, Melpitz and Hohenpeissenberg in Germany, were analysed for this study to examine which of the meteorological and trace gas variables affect the number concentration of Aitken (Dp= 50 nm particles. The aim of our study was to predict the number concentration of 50 nm particles by a combination of in-situ meteorological and gas phase parameters. The statistical model needs to describe, amongst others, the factors affecting the growth of newly formed aerosol particles (below 10 nm to 50 nm size, but also sources of direct particle emissions in that size range. As the analysis method we used multivariate nonlinear mixed effects model. Hourly averages of gas and meteorological parameters measured at the stations were used as predictor variables; the best predictive model was attained with a combination of relative humidity, new particle formation event probability, temperature, condensation sink and concentrations of SO2, NO2 and ozone. The seasonal variation was also taken into account in the mixed model structure. Model simulations with the Global Model of Aerosol Processes (GLOMAP indicate that the parameterization can be used as a part of a larger atmospheric model to predict the concentration of climatically active particles. As an additional benefit, the introduced model framework is, in theory, applicable for any kind of measured aerosol parameter.

  4. Simultaneous measurements of cations and anions using diffusive gradients in thin films with a ZrO-Chelex mixed binding layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Ding, Shiming; Shi, Lei; Gong, Mengdan; Xu, Shiwei; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2017-06-15

    A new method for the simultaneous measurements of eight cations [Fe(II), Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II)] and eight oxyanions [P(V), V(V), Cr(VI), As(III)/As(V), Se(VI), Mo(VI), Sb(V), and W(VI)] was established in this study using the diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique with an improved ZrO-Chelex binding gel. The binding kinetics of each analyte in a mixed solution indicated a rapid uptake on the ZrO-Chelex gel. The anions exhibited slower absorption rates compared to the cations, which did not affect the DGT uptake. Stable elution efficiencies for these cations and anions were obtained based on a two-step extraction procedure using 1.0 M HNO3 for elution of the cations followed by a mixed solution containing 0.2 M NaOH and 0.5 M H2O2 for elution of the anions. Simultaneous measurements of the cations and anions with the ZrO-Chelex DGT were validated in mixed solutions and found to be independent of solution pH (5-9) and ionic strength (2-3 mM to 750 mM). The capacities of the ZrO-Chelex DGT for single measurements of Fe(II), P(V), Cd(II), As(III), and As(V) were determined at 99.5, 127.6, 301.2, 33.3, and 87.4 μg cm(-2). Except for Se(VI) in seawater, accurate measurements of all of these cations and anions in natural freshwater and seawater were obtained using the ZrO-Chelex DGT. The performance of this technique for simultaneous measurements of 16 elements was also tested in sediments. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Monsoonal alternation of a mixed and a layered structure in the phytoplankton of the euphotic zone of the banda sea (Indonesia): a mathematical analysis of algal pigment fingerprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieskes, W. W. C.; Kraay, G. W.; Nontji, A.; Setiapermana, D.; Sutomo

    The chlorophyll a concentration of the upper 25 m of the euphotic zone of the Banda Sea was 5 times higher in August 1984, in the upwelling season during the southeast monsoon, than in February 1985, during the northwest monsoon when a deep chlorophyll maximum layer was presented at 40-80 m. Similarity between stations was calculated by means of a cluster analysis of the concentrations of 4 different chlorophylls and 6 carotenoids. High similarity over large areas, one to the west and one to the east of the Banda Arc, is evidence of the importance of large-scale phenomena influencing the phytoplankton during the monsoons. All samples taken in the deep chlorophyll maximum layer during the northwest monsoon were clustered as a separate group. Multiple regression analysis of chlorophyll a and the four most important accessory pigments suggests that in August 1984 (upwelling season) the fucoxanthin-containing group (mainly diatoms) contributed 50% to the chlorophyll a in the euphotic zone; green algae and Prymnesiophyceae contributed each 20%, Cyanobacteria only 9%. In February 1985, during the downwelling season, pico- and nanoplankton containing 19'-hexanoyloxyfucoxanthin (Prymnesiophyceae) and zeaxanthin (Cyanobacteria) each contributed 40% of total chlorophyll a, both near the surface and in the deep chlorophyll maximum layer; 19'-butanoyloxyfucoxanthin (a marker of certain Prymnesiophyceae and Chrysophyceae) was only present at depth. On the assumption that Chl. b is a pigment confined to green algae, this group contributed 14% of the Chl. a in the deep maximum. Other green-algal pigments were, however, scarce at depth (lutein, violaxanthin), which suggests presence of Prochlorophyta. Shifts in pigment ratios (zeaxanthin : Chl. a; Chl. b : Chl. a), probably related to light adaptation, hinder the use of algal pigment fingerprints for estimating quantitative composition of natural phytoplankton; indeed, differences between samples in pigment signature can have both

  6. Glider and satellite high resolution monitoring of a mesoscale eddy in the Algerian basin: effects on the mixed layer depth and biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotroneo, Yuri; Aulicino, Giuseppe; Ruiz, Simón; Pascual, Ananda; Budillon, Giorgio; Fusco, Giannetta; Tintoré, Joaquin

    2016-04-01

    Despite of the extensive bibliography about the circulation of the Mediterranean Sea and its sub-basins, the debate on mesoscale dynamics and its impacts on biochemical processes is still open because of their intrinsic time scales and of the difficulties in sampling. In order to clarify some of these processes, the "Algerian BAsin Circulation Unmanned Survey - ABACUS" project was proposed and realized through access to JERICO Trans National Access (TNA) infrastructures between September and December 2014. In this framework, a deep glider cruise was carried out in the area between Balearic Islands and Algerian coasts to establish an endurance line for monitoring the basin circulation. During the mission, a mesoscale eddy, identified on satellite altimetry maps, was sampled at high-spatial horizontal resolution (4 km) along its main axes and from surface to 1000 m depth. Data were collected by a Slocum glider equipped with a pumped CTD and biochemical sensors that collected about 100 complete casts inside the eddy. In order to describe the structure of the eddy, in situ data were merged with new generation remotely sensed data as daily synoptic sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll concentration (Chl-a) images from MODIS satellites as well as sea surface height and geostrophic velocities from AVISO. From its origin along the Algerian coast in the eastern part of the basin, the eddy propagated to north-west at a mean speed of about 4 km/day with a mean diameter of 112/130 km, a mean elevation of 15.7 cm and clearly distinguished by the surrounding waters thanks to its higher SST and Chl-a values. Temperature and salinity values along the water column confirm the origin of the eddy from the AC showing the presence of recent Atlantic water in the surface layer and Levantine Intermediate Water (LIW) in the deeper layer. Eddy footprint is clearly evident in the multiparametric vertical sections conducted along its main axes. Deepening of temperature, salinity and

  7. Ångström coefficient as an indicator of the atmospheric aerosol type for a well-mixed atmospheric boundary layer: Part 1: Model development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Kuśmierczyk-Michulec

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The physical and optical properties of an atmospheric aerosol mixture depend on a number of factors. The relative humidity influences the size of hydroscopic particles and the effective radius of an aerosol mixture. In consequence, values of the aerosol extinction, the aerosol optical thickness and the Ångström coefficient are modified. A similar effect is observed when the aerosol composition changes. A higher content of small aerosol particles causes the effective radius of an aerosol mixture to decrease and the Ångström coefficient to increase. Both effects are analysed in this paper. The parameters of the size distribution and the type of components used to represent natural atmospheric aerosol mixtures are based on experimental data. The main components are sea-salts (SSA, anthropogenic salts (WS, e.g. NH4HSO4, NH4NO3, (NH42 SO4, organic carbon (OC and black carbon (BC. The aerosol optical thickness is modelled using the external mixing approach. The influence of relative humidity on the optical and physical properties of the following aerosol mixtures is investigated: (SSA & WS, (SSA & OC, (SSA & BC, (SSA, WS & OC and (WS, OC & BC. It is demonstrated that the Ängström coefficient can be used as a rough indicator of the aerosol type.

  8. The effect of tropical islands on the chemical mixing of biogenics and their oxidation products from the surface layer to the upper troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsby, K. E.; Monks, P. S.; Warwick, N. J.; Carver, G. D.; Pyle, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years much interest has been shown in the composition of the tropical atmosphere from the surface to the tropopause. During June 2008 an extensive measurement campaign (OP3) was conducted from the ground level in the canopy of the tropical rainforest of Borneo concurrently with aircraft flights over coastal areas, a mixture of rainforest and palm plantations on the island. The aim of this campaign was to gain a better understanding of the chemical processes governing the tropical boundary layer and emissions from changing vegetation types. Tropical islands present a set of meteorological conditions that have the potential to loft surface emissions into the upper troposphere which can later have an impact on the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere. The experimental data in conjunction with models has been used to assess the impact of introducing surface biogenic emissions to the upper troposphere on the chemical processing throughout the entire air column. The data show the lifting lifetimes are in the order of 1 to 2 hours and that the islands act in effect as a tropical chimney lifting a significant range of biogenics and NOx. The oxidative impact of the tropical region on global oxidative capacity will be explored.

  9. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of TiO2-impregnated with MgZnAl mixed oxides obtained from layered double hydroxides for phenol degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Marciano Fabiano; Bellato, Carlos Roberto; Mounteer, Ann Honor; Ferreira, Sukarno Olavo; Milagres, Jaderson Lopes; Miranda, Liany Divina Lima

    2015-12-01

    A series of TiO2/MgZnAl photocatalysts were successfully synthesized from ternary (Mg, Zn and Al) layered double hydroxides impregnated with TiO2 nanoparticles by the co-precipitation method at variable pH with different Zn2+/Mg2+ molar ratios. The composite photocatalysts were calcined at 500 °C resulting in the incorporation of oxide zinc, in the calcined MgZnAl LDH structure. Synergistic effect between ZnO and TiO2 lead to significant enhancement of TiO2/MgZnAl photocatalytic activity. Composite photocatalysts were characterized by ICP-MS, N2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, SEM, EDS, IR and UV-vis DRS. Phenol in aqueous solution (50 mg/L) was used as a model compound for evaluation of UV-vis (filter cut-off for λ > 300 nm) photocatalytic activity. The most efficient photocatalyst composite was obtained at a 5% Zn2+/Mg2+ molar ratio, in the catalyst identified as TiO2/MgZnAl-5. This composite catalyst had high photocatalytic activity, completely destroying phenol and removing 80% of total organic carbon in solution after 360 min. The TiO2/MgZnAl-5 catalyst remained relatively stable, presenting a 15% decrease in phenol degradation efficiency after five consecutive photocatalytic cycles.

  10. The use of algorithms to predict surface seawater dimethyl sulphide concentrations in the SE Pacific, a region of steep gradients in primary productivity, biomass and mixed layer depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Hind

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dimethyl sulphide (DMS is an important precursor of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN, particularly in the remote marine atmosphere. The SE Pacific is consistently covered with a persistent stratocumulus layer that increases the albedo over this large area. It is not certain whether the source of CCN to these clouds is natural and oceanic or anthropogenic and terrestrial. This unknown currently limits our ability to reliably model either the cloud behaviour or the oceanic heat budget of the region. In order to better constrain the marine source of CCN, it is necessary to have an improved understanding of the sea-air flux of DMS. Of the factors that govern the magnitude of this flux, the greatest unknown is the surface seawater DMS concentration. In the study area, there is a paucity of such data, although previous measurements suggest that the concentration can be substantially variable. In order to overcome such data scarcity, a number of climatologies and algorithms have been devised in the last decade to predict seawater DMS. Here we test some of these in the SE Pacific by comparing predictions with measurements of surface seawater made during the Vamos Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx in October and November of 2008. We conclude that none of the existing algorithms reproduce local variability in seawater DMS in this region very well. From these findings, we recommend the best algorithm choice for the SE Pacific and suggest lines of investigation for future work.

  11. A glimpse beneath Antarctic sea ice: observation of platelet-layer thickness and ice-volume fraction with multi-frequency EM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, S.; Hoppmann, M.; Hunkeler, P. A.; Kalscheuer, T.; Gerdes, R.

    2015-12-01

    In Antarctica, ice crystals (platelets) form and grow in supercooled waters below ice shelves. These platelets rise and accumulate beneath nearby sea ice to form a several meter thick sub-ice platelet layer. This special ice type is a unique habitat, influences sea-ice mass and energy balance, and its volume can be interpreted as an indicator for ice - ocean interactions. Although progress has been made in determining and understanding its spatio-temporal variability based on point measurements, an investigation of this phenomenon on a larger scale remains a challenge due to logistical constraints and a lack of suitable methodology. In the present study, we applied a lateral constrained Marquardt-Levenberg inversion to a unique multi-frequency electromagnetic (EM) induction sounding dataset obtained on the ice-shelf influenced fast-ice regime of Atka Bay, eastern Weddell Sea. We adapted the inversion algorithm to incorporate a sensor specific signal bias, and confirmed the reliability of the algorithm by performing a sensitivity study using synthetic data. We inverted the field data for sea-ice and sub-ice platelet-layer thickness and electrical conductivity, and calculated ice-volume fractions from platelet-layer conductivities using Archie's Law. The thickness results agreed well with drill-hole validation datasets within the uncertainty range, and the ice-volume fraction also yielded plausible results. Our findings imply that multi-frequency EM induction sounding is a suitable approach to efficiently map sea-ice and platelet-layer properties. However, we emphasize that the successful application of this technique requires a break with traditional EM sensor calibration strategies due to the need of absolute calibration with respect to a physical forward model.

  12. I127 NQR spectra of Pb1–xCdxI2 and (BiI3(1–x(PbI2x of mixed layered semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.G. Vertege

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The results of studying the concentration and temperature dependences of NQR spectrum parameters inherent to I127 in mixed layered semiconductors Pbx–1CdxI2 and (BiI3(1–x(PbI2x are presented for x ≤ 0.30 and T = 77…150 K. It has been shown that, for the low content x ≤ 0.08 PbI2 for (BiI3(1–x(PbI2x and x ≤ 0.02 CdI2 for Pb1–хCdxI2, the temperature coefficients of NQR frequency don’t undergo significant changes, which is indicative of conservation of the quasi-two-dimensional nature of the vibration states. The possibility to form nanoclusters of PbI2 and CdI2 as well as their influence on the parameters of the NQR spectra has been discussed.

  13. Mixed spectral finite elements and perfectly matched layers for elastic waves in time domain; Elements finis mixtes spectraux et couches absorbantes parfaitement adaptees pour la propagation d'ondes elastiques en regime transitoire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fauqueux, S.

    2003-02-01

    We consider the propagation of elastic waves in unbounded domains. A new formulation of the linear elasticity system as an H (div) - L{sup 2} system enables us to use the 'mixed spectral finite element method', This new method is based on the definition of new spaces of approximation and the use of mass-lumping. It leads to an explicit scheme with reduced storage and provides the same solution as the spectral finite element method. Then, we model unbounded domains by using Perfectly Matched Layers. Instabilities in the PML in the case of particular 2D elastic media are pointed out and investigated. The numerical method is validated and tested in the case of acoustic and elastic realistic models. A plane wave analysis gives results about numerical dispersion and shows that meshes adapted to the physical and geometrical properties of the media are more accurate than the others. Then, an extension of the method to fluid-solid coupling is introduced for 2D seismic propagation. (author)

  14. Improved electron transport layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention provides: a method of preparing a coating ink for forming a zinc oxide electron transport layer, comprising mixing zinc acetate and a wetting agent in water or methanol; a coating ink comprising zinc acetate and a wetting agent in aqueous solution or methanolic solution......; a method of preparing a zinc oxide electron transporting layer, which method comprises: i) coating a substrate with the coating ink of the present invention to form a film; ii) drying the film; and iii) heating the dry film to convert the zinc acetate substantially to ZnO; a method of preparing an organic...... photovoltaic device or an organic LED having a zinc oxide electron transport layer, the method comprising, in this order: a) providing a substrate bearing a first electrode layer; b) forming an electron transport layer according to the following method: i) coating a coating ink comprising an ink according...

  15. Role of residual layer and large-scale phenomena on the evolution of the boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blay, E.; Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Boer, van de A.; Coster, de O.; Faloona, I.; Garrouste, O.; Hartogensis, O.K.

    2012-01-01

    Mixed-layer theory and large-eddy simulations are used to analyze the dynamics of the boundary layer on two intensive operational periods during the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) campaign: 1st and 2nd of July 2011, when convective boundary layers (CBLs) were observed.

  16. Boundary layer heights derived from velocity spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejstrup, J.; Barthelmie, R.J. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Kaellstrand, B. [Univ. of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1997-10-01

    It is a well-known fact that the height of the mixed layer determines the size of the largest and most energetic eddies that can be observed in the unstable boundary layer, and consequently a peak can be observed in the power spectra of the along-wind velocity component at scales comparable to the mixed layer depth. We will now show how the mixed layer depth can be derived from the u-specta and the results will be compared with direct measurements using pibal and tethersonde measurements. (au)

  17. Mixed Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Helle

    2010-01-01

    levels than those related to building, and this exploration is a special challenge and competence implicit artistic development work. The project Mixed Movements generates drawing-material, not primary as representation, but as a performance-based media, making the body being-in-the-media felt and appear......Mixed Movements is a research project engaged in performance-based architectural drawing. Architectonic implementation questions relations between the human body and a body of architecture by the different ways we handle drawing materials. A drawing may explore architectonic problems at other...

  18. Mixed parentage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang Appel, Helene; Singla, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Despite an increase in cross border intimate relationships and children of mixed parentage, there is little mention or scholarship about them in the area of childhood and migrancy in the Nordic countries. The international literature implies historical pathologisation, contestation and current...

  19. Mixed segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Grutt; Bonde, Anders; Aagaard, Morten

    This book is about using recent developments in the fields of data analytics and data visualization to frame new ways of identifying target groups in media communication. Based on a mixed-methods approach, the authors combine psychophysiological monitoring (galvanic skin response) with textual...

  20. Water types and their relaxation behavior in partially rehydrated CaFe-mixed binary oxide obtained from CaFe-layered double hydroxide in the 155-298 K temperature range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugris, Valéria; Haspel, Henrik; Kukovecz, Ákos; Kónya, Zoltán; Sipiczki, Mónika; Sipos, Pál; Pálinkó, István

    2013-10-29

    Heat-treated CaFe-layered double hydroxide samples were equilibrated under conditions of various relative humidities (11%, 43% and 75%). Measurements by FT-IR and dielectric relaxation spectroscopies revealed that partial to full reconstruction of the layered structure took place. Water types taking part in the reconstruction process were identified via dielectric relaxation measurements either at 298 K or on the flash-cooled (to 155 K) samples. The dynamics of water molecules at the various positions was also studied by this method, allowing the flash-cooled samples to warm up to 298 K.

  1. Mixed-valence, layered, cation radical salts of the ethane-bridged dimeric tetrathiafulvalene [(EDT-TTF-CH2-)2#centre dot#+] [X-][THF]0.5, X-=FeCl4-, GaCl4-

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mézière, C.; Fourmigué, M.; Canadell, E.

    2000-01-01

    ][GaCl4] affords isostructural, mixed-valence conducting 1:1 salts [1(.+)][FeCl4-][THF](0.5) and [1(.+)][GaCl4-][THF](0.5) whose X-ray crystal structures are described. The intercalation of the tetrahedral anions within the organic slabs and the resulting sliding of the molecular diads on top of each...

  2. Combining tower mixing ratio and community model data to estimate regional-scale net ecosystem carbon exchange by boundary layer inversion over four flux towers in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xueri Dang; Chun-Ta Lai; David Y. Hollinger; Andrew J. Schauer; Jingfeng Xiao; J. William Munger; Clenton Owensby; James R. Ehleringer

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated an idealized boundary layer (BL) model with simple parameterizations using vertical transport information from community model outputs (NCAR/NCEP Reanalysis and ECMWF Interim Analysis) to estimate regional-scale net CO2 fluxes from 2002 to 2007 at three forest and one grassland flux sites in the United States. The BL modeling...

  3. Layered materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David; Clarke, Simon; Wiley, John; Koumoto, Kunihito

    2014-06-01

    Layered compounds, materials with a large anisotropy to their bonding, electrical and/or magnetic properties, have been important in the development of solid state chemistry, physics and engineering applications. Layered materials were the initial test bed where chemists developed intercalation chemistry that evolved into the field of topochemical reactions where researchers are able to perform sequential steps to arrive at kinetically stable products that cannot be directly prepared by other approaches. Physicists have used layered compounds to discover and understand novel phenomena made more apparent through reduced dimensionality. The discovery of charge and spin density waves and more recently the remarkable discovery in condensed matter physics of the two-dimensional topological insulating state were discovered in two-dimensional materials. The understanding developed in two-dimensional materials enabled subsequent extension of these and other phenomena into three-dimensional materials. Layered compounds have also been used in many technologies as engineers and scientists used their unique properties to solve challenging technical problems (low temperature ion conduction for batteries, easy shear planes for lubrication in vacuum, edge decorated catalyst sites for catalytic removal of sulfur from oil, etc). The articles that are published in this issue provide an excellent overview of the spectrum of activities that are being pursued, as well as an introduction to some of the most established achievements in the field. Clusters of papers discussing thermoelectric properties, electronic structure and transport properties, growth of single two-dimensional layers, intercalation and more extensive topochemical reactions and the interleaving of two structures to form new materials highlight the breadth of current research in this area. These papers will hopefully serve as a useful guideline for the interested reader to different important aspects in this field and

  4. Rb6(InCo)2(Si9O26): a mixed-metal silicate containing 20-membered-ring silicate single layers with a very low Si:O ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ling-I; Wang, Sue-Lein; Chen, Yen-Hung; Lii, Kwang-Hwa

    2006-03-06

    A new cobalt-indium silicate, Rb6(InCo)2(Si9O26), has been synthesized via a high-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal method and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. It crystallizes in the noncentrosymmetric orthorhombic space group Aba2 (No. 41) with a = 20.779(1) A, b = 12.0944(6) A, c = 10.7761(5) A, V =2708.1(2) A(3), and Z = 4. The structure consists of 20-membered-ring silicate single layers of corner-sharing SiO4 tetrahedra interconnected by dimers of edge-sharing CoO4 tetrahedra and InO6 octahedra into a 3D framework. The Si:O ratio for the title compound is the lowest among the known single-layer silicates. Magnetic susceptibility confirms the divalent state of the cobalt ion. The powder sample has a second-harmonic-generation signal, confirming the absence of a center of symmetry in the structure.

  5. Simulating dynamics of {delta}{sup 13}C of CO{sub 2} in the planetary boundary layer a boreal forest region: covariation between surface fluxes and atmospheric mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Baozhang; Chen, Jing M. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Geography; Tans, Pieter P. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab.; Huang, Lin [Environment Canada, Toronto, ON (Canada). Atmospheric Science and Technology Directorate

    2006-11-15

    Stable isotopes of CO{sub 2} contain unique information on the biological and physical processes that exchange CO{sub 2} between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. Ecosystem exchange of carbon isotopes with the atmosphere is correlated diurnally and seasonally with the planetary boundary layer (PBL) dynamics. The strength of this kind of covariation affects the vertical gradient of {delta}{sup 13}C and thus the global {delta}{sup 13}C distribution pattern. We need to understand the various processes involved in transport/diffusion of carbon isotope ratio in the PBL and between the PBL and the biosphere and the troposphere. In this study, we employ a one-dimensional vertical diffusion/transport atmospheric model (VDS), coupled to an ecosystem isotope model (BEPS-EASS) to simulate dynamics of {sup 13}CO{sub 2} in the PBL over a boreal forest region in the vicinity of the Fraserdale (FRD) tower (49 deg 52 min 29.9 sec N, 81 deg 34 min 12.3 sec W) in northern Ontario, Canada. The data from intensive campaigns during the growing season in 1999 at this site are used for model validation in the surface layer. The model performance, overall, is satisfactory in simulating the measured data over the whole course of the growing season. We examine the interaction of the biosphere and the atmosphere through the PBL with respect to {delta}{sup 13}C on diurnal and seasonal scales. The simulated annual mean vertical gradient of {delta}{sup 13}C in the PBL in the vicinity of the FRD tower was about 0.025% in 1999. The {delta}{sup 13}C vertical gradient exhibited strong diurnal (29%) and seasonal (71%) variations that do not exactly mimic those of CO{sub 2}. Most of the vertical gradient (96.5% {+-}) resulted from covariation between ecosystem exchange of carbon isotopes and the PBL dynamics, while the rest (3.5%{+-}) was contributed by isotopic disequilibrium between respiration and photosynthesis. This disequilibrium effect on {delta}{sup 13}C of CO{sub 2} dynamics in PBL

  6. Simulating dynamics of (delta){sup 13}C of CO{sub 2} in the planetary boundary layer a boreal forest region: covariation between surface fluxes and atmospheric mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Baozhang; Chen, Jing M. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Geography; Tans, Pieter P. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab.; Huang, Lin [Environment Canada, Toronto, ON (Canada). Atmospheric Science and Technology Directorate

    2006-11-15

    Stable isotopes of CO{sub 2} contain unique information on the biological and physical processes that exchange CO{sub 2} between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. Ecosystem exchange of carbon isotopes with the atmosphere is correlated diurnally and seasonally with the planetary boundary layer (PBL) dynamics. The strength of this kind of covariation affects the vertical gradient of (delta){sup 13}C and thus the global (delta){sup 13}C distribution pattern. We need to understand the various processes involved in transport/diffusion of carbon isotope ratio in the PBL and between the PBL and the biosphere and the troposphere. In this study, we employ a one-dimensional vertical diffusion/transport atmospheric model (VDS), coupled to an ecosystem isotope model (BEPS-EASS) to simulate dynamics of {sup 13}CO{sub 2} in the PBL over a boreal forest region in the vicinity of the Fraserdale (FRD) tower (49 deg 52 min 29.9 sec N, 81 deg 34 min 12.3 sec W) in northern Ontario, Canada. The data from intensive campaigns during the growing season in 1999 at this site are used for model validation in the surface layer. The model performance, overall, is satisfactory in simulating the measured data over the whole course of the growing season. We examine the interaction of the biosphere and the atmosphere through the PBL with respect to (delta){sup 13}C on diurnal and seasonal scales. The simulated annual mean vertical gradient of (delta){sup 13}C in the PBL in the vicinity of the FRD tower was about 0.025% in 1999. The (delta){sup 13}C vertical gradient exhibited strong diurnal (29%) and seasonal (71%) variations that do not exactly mimic those of CO{sub 2}. Most of the vertical gradient (96.5% {+-}) resulted from covariation between ecosystem exchange of carbon isotopes and the PBL dynamics, while the rest (3.5%{+-}) was contributed by isotopic disequilibrium between respiration and photosynthesis. This disequilibrium effect on (delta){sup 13}C of CO{sub 2} dynamics in PBL

  7. Nanostructured layers of thermoelectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Jeffrey J.; Lynch, Jared; Coates, Nelson; Forster, Jason; Sahu, Ayaskanta; Chabinyc, Michael; Russ, Boris

    2018-01-30

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to thermoelectric materials. In one aspect, a method includes providing a plurality of nanostructures. The plurality of nanostructures comprise a thermoelectric material, with each nanostructure of the plurality of nanostructures having first ligands disposed on a surface of the nanostructure. The plurality of nanostructures is mixed with a solution containing second ligands and a ligand exchange process occurs in which the first ligands disposed on the plurality of nanostructures are replaced with the second ligands. The plurality of nanostructures is deposited on a substrate to form a layer. The layer is thermally annealed.

  8. Influences on the Height of the Stable Boundary Layer as seen in LES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosovic, B; Lundquist, J

    2004-06-15

    Climate models, numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, and atmospheric dispersion models often rely on parameterizations of planetary boundary layer height. In the case of a stable boundary layer, errors in boundary layer height estimation can result in gross errors in boundary-layer evolution and in prediction of turbulent mixing within the boundary layer.

  9. Polysulfide intercalated layered double hydroxides for metal capture applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Ma, Shulan

    2017-04-04

    Polysulfide intercalated layered double hydroxides and methods for their use in vapor and liquid-phase metal capture applications are provided. The layered double hydroxides comprise a plurality of positively charged host layers of mixed metal hydroxides separated by interlayer spaces. Polysulfide anions are intercalated in the interlayer spaces.

  10. Climatology and evolution of the mixing height over water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sempreviva, A.M. [Istituto di Fisica dell`Atmosfera, CNR, Rome (Italy); Grynig, S.E. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    In this paper we present results from an experimental investigation on the height of the mixed layer h, using a meteorological station located on the Danish island of Anholt. The station was operational for two years from September 1990 to October 1992. We present the analysis of two years of radio-sounding showing the average daily evolution of h. Furthermore observations of the mixed layer growth under near-neutral and unstable atmospheric conditions during six consecutive days has been modelled using a simple zero-order mixed-layer height model. Finally we have compared the evolution of the mixing height from the model with the evolution of the correlation coefficient between temperature and humidity to study the influence of the deepness of the convective layer on the mechanism of the correlation between temperature and humidity in the surface layer. (au)

  11. Visualization of deuterium dead layer by atom probe tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Gemma, Ryota

    2012-12-01

    The first direct observation, by atom probe tomography, of a deuterium dead layer is reported for Fe/V multilayered film loaded with D solute atoms. The thickness of the dead layers was measured to be 0.4-0.5 nm. The dead layers could be distinguished from chemically intermixed layers. The results suggest that the dead layer effect occurs even near the interface of the mixing layers, supporting an interpretation that the dead layer effect cannot be explained solely by electronic charge transfer but also involves a modulation of rigidity. © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mixed-dimensional Bose polaron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loft, Niels Jakob Søe; Wu, Zhigang; Bruun, G. M.

    2017-09-01

    A new generation of cold atom experiments trapping atomic mixtures in species-selective optical potentials opens up the intriguing possibility to create systems in which different atoms live in different spatial dimensions. Inspired by this, we investigate a mixed-dimensional Bose polaron consisting of an impurity particle moving in a two-dimensional (2D) layer immersed in a 3D Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), using a theory that includes the mixed-dimensional vacuum scattering between the impurity and the bosons exactly. We show that similarly to the pure 3D case, this system exhibits a well-defined polaron state for attractive boson-impurity interaction that evolves smoothly into a mixed-dimensional dimer for strong attraction, as well as a well-defined polaron state for weak repulsive interaction, which becomes overdamped for strong interaction. We furthermore find that the properties of the polaron depend only weakly on the gas parameter of the BEC as long as the Bogoliubov theory remains a valid description for the BEC. This indicates that higher-order correlations between the impurity and the bosons are suppressed by the mixed-dimensional geometry in comparison to a pure 3D system, which led us to speculate that the mixed-dimensional polaron has universal properties in the unitarity limit of the impurity-boson interaction.

  13. Performance evaluation of stabilized GSB mix- A quantitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Subrahmanyam, K. V.; Chakravarthi, V.K.; U. Arun Kumar

    2014-01-01

    In general the life and strength of pavements depends on the quality GSB layer. GSB layer is usually provided over subgrade and is influential in distribution of stresses within pavement. In general a GSB layer composes blended aggregates, crushed bricks. The strength of GSB is dependent on the mix proprtions adopted in its preparation. In view of its importance in pavements MORT&H has stipulated guide lines in preparing and grading a GSB layer considering CBR as basis. During recent past ...

  14. Surface boundary layer evolution and near-inertial wind power input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, B. F.; Girton, J. B.

    2015-11-01

    Deep weakly stratified surface layers in the Southern Ocean complicate the identification of the mixed-layer base, which is critical in estimating the wind power input through the ocean surface. Typically used mixed-layer depth criteria often ignore weak stratification, which traps momentum near the surface and significantly enhances the near-inertial-band wind power input. The thickness of the active mixing-layer, the turbulent layer in contact with wind stress, is needed to accurately estimate wind power input. A fine-density-threshold criterion of 0.005 kg m-3, just above the noise floor of most autonomous instruments, was applied to observed profiles of potential density to estimate the thickness of the actively mixing-layer. Vertical shear, Langmuir cells, and buoyant convection are investigated as possible mechanisms maintaining turbulence within the mixing-layer. Over 90% of the observed variance of the mixing-layer thickness is explained by either shear-driven entrainment, which is simulated using the Price-Weller-Pinkel model, or by a parameterization of downwelling plumes due to Langmuir cell convergence. In general, surface buoyancy fluxes are too weak to drive mixed-layer turbulence. Comparison of National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) climatological mixed-layer thickness to those determined using the 0.005 kg m-3 density threshold suggests a multiplicative seasonally varying correction of 1.5-3.5 should be applied to wind work estimates made using the NODC climatological mixed-layer thickness in the Southern Ocean.

  15. Mixed plastics recycling technology

    CERN Document Server

    Hegberg, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    Presents an overview of mixed plastics recycling technology. In addition, it characterizes mixed plastics wastes and describes collection methods, costs, and markets for reprocessed plastics products.

  16. Uncertainties in the CO2 buget associated to boundary layer dynamics and CO2-advection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaikkonen, J.P.; Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between boundary layer dynamics and carbon dioxide (CO2) budget in the convective boundary layer (CBL) is investigated by using mixed-layer theory. We derive a new set of analytical relations to quantify the uncertainties on the estimation of the bulk CO2 mixing ratio and the

  17. Mixing height determination from the momentum balance of the neutral or stable PBL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergmann, J.C. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    The mixing height is defined by the top of the layer of turbulent mixing. This height is equal to the height H of turbulent vertical momentum transport (fiction) in neutral or stable stratification. In very stable cases, the wave induced momentum transport must be excluded if the waves do not have mixing effects (e.g. break) within the frictional layer. Thus the conditions provided by the momentum balance determine the mixing height in most cases of mechanical turbulence. Mixing is a time dependent process and depends also on the height of release of substance to be mixed. It depends on the specific form of the exchange coefficient function whether the mixing time for the mixed layer is finite of infinite. If this time is infinite, an additional mixing time criterion for a substance released close to the ground must be applied for the determination of the corresponding mixing height. (au)

  18. Palm Tree Resort and Hotel Subic Bay: Facilities & Services

    OpenAIRE

    Walter Johnson

    2018-01-01

    Castaway's Bar Enjoy the beautiful view while catching sunrays on the Palm Tree Resort top bar. Features glorious views of scenic shoreline and idyllic sunsets, island-inspired furnishings and a spirit of casual elegance. Bathed in natural light, the gentle hues of nature are infused in every surrounding. It is just the beginning of the refined amenities that will fill your stay with rare pleasures. The Palm Tree Restaurant Daily Specials (From 12NN-10PM): MONDAY -BBQ ...

  19. Palm Tree Resort and Hotel Subic Bay: Accommodations

    OpenAIRE

    Lola Williams

    2018-01-01

    ACCOMMODATIONS "We're more than accommodating." Palm Tree Resort offers sea view rooms and suites, designed from the ground up with guest comfort in mind. Each room is exquisite, featuring individual ventilation units, king size beds, sofas, spacious bathrooms, widescreen television, DVD/CD players, high-speed internet access and reading chairs. All maximize the spectacular views of the sea and surrounding mountains, while providing guests with an upscale residential atmosphere. A...

  20. Tailoring graphene layer-to-layer growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongtao; Wu, Bin; Guo, Wei; Wang, Lifeng; Li, Jingbo; Liu, Yunqi

    2017-06-01

    A layered material grown between a substrate and the upper layer involves complex interactions and a confined reaction space, representing an unusual growth mode. Here, we show multi-layer graphene domains grown on liquid or solid Cu by the chemical vapor deposition method via this ‘double-substrate’ mode. We demonstrate the interlayer-induced coupling effect on the twist angle in bi- and multi-layer graphene. We discover dramatic growth disunity for different graphene layers, which is explained by the ideas of a chemical ‘gate’ and a material transport process within a confined space. These key results lead to a consistent framework for understanding the dynamic evolution of multi-layered graphene flakes and tailoring the layer-to-layer growth for practical applications.

  1. Submesoscale Routes to Lateral Mixing in the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    onset of restratification by mixed layer eddies, and find this to be coincident with the onset of the spring phytoplankton bloom (Mahadevan et al...100m, with a shallow mixed layer (ML) of 20m. Temperature dominates the density, although the salinity front acts to partly compensate. These unforced...Perry, Eddy- driven stratification initiates North Atlantic spring phytoplankton blooms, 2012, Science, 337 (6090), 54-58, DOI:10.1126/science.1218740

  2. Experiences of ZAMG on mixing height determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piringer, M. [Zentralanstalt fuer Meteorologie und Geodynamik, ZAMG, Vienna (Austria)

    1997-10-01

    Temperature inversions in the boundary layer occur quite often, esp. in mountainous terrain by which Austria is covered to a large extent, and can lead to enhanced pollution at the surface because the air volume available for dilution is then vertically limited. The Department of Environmental Meteorology of ZAMG therefore set up several field programs in the past to study such conditions at a variety of sites in Austria, using tethersondes and Sodars. Early investigations aimed at comparing Sodar echo profiles to the tethersonde temperature profiles to derive mixing heights from the Sodar echo structure. More recently, evolving from KONGEX, the `convective boundary layer experiment`, mixing heights calculated for Vienna by the OML model were compared to those derived from radiosonde and tethersonde potential temperature profiles. Results of these investigations will be presented, focussing on the problems when using the different methods. New efforts to derive mixing heights from data were also undertaken and are discussed separately. (au)

  3. Exploring Isothermal Layers in the Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Joseph

    2011-03-01

    Simulating the stable atmospheric boundary-layer presents a significant challenge to numerical models due to the interactions of several processes with widely varying scales. The goal of this project is to more clearly define the cause of isothermal layers observed during the Meteorological Experiment in Arizona's Meteor Crater and to test the National Taiwan University/Purdue University (NTU/P) model in stable environments with complex terrain. The NTU/P model is able to utilize the actual terrain data with minimal smoothing for stability. We have found that isothermal profiles can be generated by the standing wave that develops due to weak wind flowing over the crater. However, the horizontal heterogeneity is greater than observed. Continued effort will explore enhancing horizontal mixing due to turbulence and radiative transfer. Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation Program, Summer Research Opportunities Program.

  4. Interannual variability of the tropical Indian Ocean mixed layer depth

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Keerthi, M.G.; Lengaigne, M.; Vialard, J.; Montegut, C.deB.; Muraleedharan, P.M.

    MLD deepening in the southern Arabian Sea in summer. Finally, positive Indian Ocean Subtropical Dipoles are associated with a MLD deepening between 15 and 30 degrees S. Buoyancy fluxes generally appear to dominate MLD interannual variations except...

  5. Some Properties of Mixed Oxide Layers Having Amorphous Structures,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-04

    rp#H~ne (ulf, B TO B~eMR K3K OCUHXa1R- BeKrop a312 lint! Ha OCIIOBHbX HOCUrTe.RX flO’ITH He oT.i1tTCRq. .1awee, 6u.x Haka ~eH0, CAORMj. Ha ’ITO 3HaqeHte OaH0F0 313 riapameTPOS 3OHb1 A B rir COcta.Iser T0.1b13 1 356

  6. Effects of Mixed Layer Shear on Vertical Heat Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    B.S., Virginia Tech, 2007 Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE IN METEOROLOGY AND PHYSICAL...extent since 1979 (IPCC 2014). 8 Annual average of Northern Hemisphere sea ice extent (103 km2) from 1979 through 2013. Solid black line represents...order of 10–6 m2 s-1. The underlying ridges and plateaus were largely in the Chukchi Borderlands, which consists of the Northwind Ridge, Southern

  7. Innovation in Layer-by-Layer Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Joseph J; Cui, Jiwei; Björnmalm, Mattias; Braunger, Julia A; Ejima, Hirotaka; Caruso, Frank

    2016-12-14

    Methods for depositing thin films are important in generating functional materials for diverse applications in a wide variety of fields. Over the last half-century, the layer-by-layer assembly of nanoscale films has received intense and growing interest. This has been fueled by innovation in the available materials and assembly technologies, as well as the film-characterization techniques. In this Review, we explore, discuss, and detail innovation in layer-by-layer assembly in terms of past and present developments, and we highlight how these might guide future advances. A particular focus is on conventional and early developments that have only recently regained interest in the layer-by-layer assembly field. We then review unconventional assemblies and approaches that have been gaining popularity, which include inorganic/organic hybrid materials, cells and tissues, and the use of stereocomplexation, patterning, and dip-pen lithography, to name a few. A relatively recent development is the use of layer-by-layer assembly materials and techniques to assemble films in a single continuous step. We name this "quasi"-layer-by-layer assembly and discuss the impacts and innovations surrounding this approach. Finally, the application of characterization methods to monitor and evaluate layer-by-layer assembly is discussed, as innovation in this area is often overlooked but is essential for development of the field. While we intend for this Review to be easily accessible and act as a guide to researchers new to layer-by-layer assembly, we also believe it will provide insight to current researchers in the field and help guide future developments and innovation.

  8. 6 The relationship between mixing and stratification regime on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    and 2006 to assess the mixing and stratification regime of the lake on the phytoplankton dynamics. From water samples obtained from a central index station, biomass composition was assessed by converting phytoplankton counts to wet weights-based approximation into cell volume values; whiles mixed layer and euphotic ...

  9. Improved adhesion of metal oxide layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to: a method of preparing a coating ink for forming a zinc oxide layer, which method comprises the steps of: a) mixing zinc acetate and AlOH (OAc)2 in water or methanol and b) filtering out solids; a coating ink comprising zinc acetate and AlOH (OAc)2 in aqueous or m...

  10. Proceedings of the 17th and 18th NAL Workshops on Investigation and Control of Boundary-Layer Transition

    OpenAIRE

    National Aerospace Laboratory; 航空宇宙技術研究所

    1996-01-01

    The following topics were discussed: vortex shedding, laminar boundary layer measurement, vortex ring, turbulent flow measurement, high Reynolds number turbulence, pulsed flow, boundary layer instability, Ekman boundary layer, sound receptivity, Tollmien-Schlichting wave in supersonic boundary layer, flow field instability, turbulent flow pattern, vorticity distribution in shear flow, turbulence wedge, streamwise vortex mixing, thermal convection, oblique wave generation in boundary layer, in...

  11. The Ocean Boundary Layer beneath Hurricane Frances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasaro, E. A.; Sanford, T. B.; Terrill, E.; Price, J.

    2006-12-01

    The upper ocean beneath the peak winds of Hurricane Frances (57 m/s) was measured using several varieties of air-deployed floats as part of CBLAST. A multilayer structure was observed as the boundary layer deepened from 20m to 120m in about 12 hours. Bubbles generated by breaking waves create a 10m thick surface layer with a density anomaly, due to the bubbles, of about 1 kg/m3. This acts to lubricate the near surface layer. A turbulent boundary layer extends beneath this to about 40 m depth. This is characterized by large turbulent eddies spanning the boundary layer. A stratified boundary layer grows beneath this reaching 120m depth. This is characterized by a gradient Richardson number of 1/4, which is maintained by strong inertial currents generated by the hurricane, and smaller turbulent eddies driven by the shear instead of the wind and waves. There is little evidence of mixing beneath this layer. Heat budgets reveal the boundary layer to be nearly one dimensional through much of the deepening, with horizontal and vertical heat advection becoming important only after the storm had passed. Turbulent kinetic energy measurements support the idea of reduced surface drag at high wind speeds. The PWP model correctly predicts the degree of mixed layer deepening if the surface drag is reduced at high wind speed. Overall, the greatest uncertainty in understanding the ocean boundary layer at these extreme wind speeds is a characterization of the near- surface processes which govern the air-sea fluxes and surface wave properties.

  12. Optimal Mixing Evolutionary Algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Thierens (Dirk); P.A.N. Bosman (Peter); N. Krasnogor

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractA key search mechanism in Evolutionary Algorithms is the mixing or juxtaposing of partial solutions present in the parent solutions. In this paper we look at the efficiency of mixing in genetic algorithms (GAs) and estimation-of-distribution algorithms (EDAs). We compute the mixing

  13. Mixed methods research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth; Hickman, Louise

    2015-04-08

    Mixed methods research involves the use of qualitative and quantitative data in a single research project. It represents an alternative methodological approach, combining qualitative and quantitative research approaches, which enables nurse researchers to explore complex phenomena in detail. This article provides a practical overview of mixed methods research and its application in nursing, to guide the novice researcher considering a mixed methods research project.

  14. Mixing of solids in different mixing devices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    as devices for powder mixing, are tested as well as Turbula and V-shaped drum mixer, since those devices .... 1679·90. 13 force on the particles exceeds the pull of gravity), its working capacity is about 50% to 60% of volume. ... In solid/solid mixing the unit is usually vertical with the flow being by gravity only. The material is ...

  15. Defect-induced mix experiment for NIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitt M.J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Defect Induced Mix Experiment (DIME-II will measure the implosion and mix characteristics of CH capsules filled with 5 atmospheres of DT by incorporating mid-Z dopant layers of Ge and Ga. This polar direct drive (PDD experiment also will demonstrate the filling of a CH capsule at target chamber center using a fill tube. Diagnostics for these experiments include areal x-ray backlighting to obtain early time images of the implosion trajectory and a multiple-monochromatic imager (MMI to collect spectrally-resolved images of the capsule dopant line emission near bangtime. The inclusion of two (or more thin dopant layers at separate depths within the capsule shell facilitates spatial correlation of mix between the layers and the hot gas core on a single shot. The dopant layers are typically 2 μm thick and contain dopant concentrations of 1.5%. Three dimensional Hydra simulations have been performed to assess the effects of PDD asymmetry on capsule performance.

  16. Mixing and compaction temperatures for Superpave mixes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Yetkin

    According to Superpave mixture design, gyratory specimens are mixed and compacted at equiviscous binder temperatures corresponding to viscosities of 0.17 and 0.28 Pa.s. respectively. These were the values previously used in the Marshal mix design method to determine optimal mixing and compaction temperatures. In order to estimate the appropriate mixing and compaction temperatures for Superpave mixture design, a temperature-viscosity relationship for the binder needs to be developed (ASTM D 2493, Calculation of Mixing and Compaction Temperatures). The current approach is simple and provides reasonable temperatures for unmodified binders. However, some modified binders have exhibited unreasonably high temperatures for mixing and compaction using this technique. These high temperatures can result in construction problems, damage of asphalt, and production of fumes. Heating asphalt binder to very high temperatures during construction oxidizes the binder and separates the polymer from asphalt binder. It is known that polymer modified asphalt binders have many benefits to the roads, such as; increasing rutting resistance, enhancing low temperature cracking resistance, improving traction, better adhesion and cohesion, elevating tensile strength which are directly related to the service life of the pavement. Therefore, oxidation and separation of the polymer from the asphalt binder results in reduction of the service life. ASTM D 2493 was established for unmodified asphalt binders which are Newtonian fluids at high temperatures. For these materials, viscosity does not depend on shear rate. However, most of the modified asphalt binders exhibit a phenomenon known as pseudoplasticity, where viscosity does depend on shear rate. Thus, at the high shear rates occurring during mixing and compaction, it is not necessary to go to very high temperatures. This research was undertaken to determine the shear rate during compaction such that the effect of this parameter could be

  17. Quantifying mixing using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Emilio J; McCarthy, Kathryn L; Bacca, Lori A; Hartt, William H; McCarthy, Michael J

    2012-01-25

    Mixing is a unit operation that combines two or more components into a homogeneous mixture. This work involves mixing two viscous liquid streams using an in-line static mixer. The mixer is a split-and-recombine design that employs shear and extensional flow to increase the interfacial contact between the components. A prototype split-and-recombine (SAR) mixer was constructed by aligning a series of thin laser-cut Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plates held in place in a PVC pipe. Mixing in this device is illustrated in the photograph in Fig. 1. Red dye was added to a portion of the test fluid and used as the minor component being mixed into the major (undyed) component. At the inlet of the mixer, the injected layer of tracer fluid is split into two layers as it flows through the mixing section. On each subsequent mixing section, the number of horizontal layers is duplicated. Ultimately, the single stream of dye is uniformly dispersed throughout the cross section of the device. Using a non-Newtonian test fluid of 0.2% Carbopol and a doped tracer fluid of similar composition, mixing in the unit is visualized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is a very powerful experimental probe of molecular chemical and physical environment as well as sample structure on the length scales from microns to centimeters. This sensitivity has resulted in broad application of these techniques to characterize physical, chemical and/or biological properties of materials ranging from humans to foods to porous media (1, 2). The equipment and conditions used here are suitable for imaging liquids containing substantial amounts of NMR mobile (1)H such as ordinary water and organic liquids including oils. Traditionally MRI has utilized super conducting magnets which are not suitable for industrial environments and not portable within a laboratory (Fig. 2). Recent advances in magnet technology have permitted the construction of large volume industrially compatible magnets suitable for

  18. Viscoelastic behaviour of cold recycled asphalt mixes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizkova, Zuzana; Suda, Jan

    2017-09-01

    Behaviour of cold recycled mixes depends strongly on both the bituminous binder content (bituminous emulsion or foamed bitumen) and the hydraulic binder content (usually cement). In the case of cold recycled mixes rich in bitumen and with low hydraulic binder content, behaviour is close to the viscoelastic behaviour of traditional hot mix asphalt. With decreasing bituminous binder content together with increasing hydraulic binder content, mixes are characteristic with brittle behaviour, typical for concrete pavements or hydraulically bound layers. The behaviour of cold recycled mixes with low content of both types of binders is similar to behaviour of unbound materials. This paper is dedicated to analysing of the viscoelastic behaviour of the cold recycled mixes. Therefore, the tested mixes contained higher amount of the bituminous binder (both foamed bitumen and bituminous emulsion). The best way to characterize any viscoelastic material in a wide range of temperatures and frequencies is through the master curves. This paper includes interesting findings concerning the dependency of both parts of the complex modulus (elastic and viscous) on the testing frequency (which simulates the speed of heavy traffic passing) and on the testing temperature (which simulates the changing climate conditions a real pavement is subjected to).

  19. Characterization of the atmospheric boundary layer from radiosonde ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    moisture) or substances originating from the sur- face. It is usually flatter than the boundary layer, but fills the whole ABL in the deep convective boundary layers ..... Wea. Rev. 92 235–242. Holzworth G C 1967 Mixing depths, wind speeds and air pollution potential for selected locations in the United. States; J. Appl. Meteorol.

  20. Mixed-effects regression models in linguistics

    CERN Document Server

    Heylen, Kris; Geeraerts, Dirk

    2018-01-01

    When data consist of grouped observations or clusters, and there is a risk that measurements within the same group are not independent, group-specific random effects can be added to a regression model in order to account for such within-group associations. Regression models that contain such group-specific random effects are called mixed-effects regression models, or simply mixed models. Mixed models are a versatile tool that can handle both balanced and unbalanced datasets and that can also be applied when several layers of grouping are present in the data; these layers can either be nested or crossed.  In linguistics, as in many other fields, the use of mixed models has gained ground rapidly over the last decade. This methodological evolution enables us to build more sophisticated and arguably more realistic models, but, due to its technical complexity, also introduces new challenges. This volume brings together a number of promising new evolutions in the use of mixed models in linguistics, but also addres...

  1. The determination of the mixing height. Current progress and problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryning, S.E.; Beyrich, F.; Batchvarova, E. [eds.

    1997-10-01

    This report contains extended abstracts of presentations given at a EURASAP Workshop on The Determination of the Mixing Height - Current Progress and Problems. The Workshop, initiated from discussions with Peter Builtjes, was held at Risoe National Laboratory 1-3 October 1997 within the framework of EURASAP (European Association for the Sciences of Air Pollution). The specific topics and chairpersons of the Workshop were: Theoretical Considerations (Sven-Erik Gryning), Mixing Height Estimation from Turbulence Measurements and In-Situ Soundings (Douw Steyn), Mixing Height Determination from NWP-Models (Han van Dop), Climatology and Global Aspects (Werner Klug), Mixing Height Determination from Remote Systems (Werner Klug), Verification of Mixing Height Parameterizations and Models (Frank Beyrich), Mixing Height over Complex Terrain (Ekaterina Batchvarova), Internal Boundary Layers: Mixing Height in Coastal Areas and Over Cities (Allen White). The discussion at the end of the Workshop was chaired by Robert Bornstein. (au)

  2. MIXED AND MIXING SYSTEMS WORLDWIDE: A PREFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seán Patrick Donlan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This issue of the Potchefstroom Electronic Law Journal (South Africa sees thepublication of a selection of articles derived from the Third International Congress ofthe World Society of Mixed Jurisdiction Jurists (WSMJJ. That Congress was held atthe Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel in the summer of 2011. It reflected athriving Society consolidating its core scholarship on classical mixed jurisdictions(Israel, Louisiana, the Philippines, Puerto Rico, Quebec, Scotland, and South Africawhile reaching to new horizons (including Cyprus, Hong Kong and Macau, Malta,Nepal, etc. This publication reflects in microcosm the complexity of contemporaryscholarship on mixed and plural legal systems. This complexity is, of course, wellunderstoodby South African jurists whose system is derived both from the dominantEuropean traditions as well as from African customary systems, including both thosethat make up part of the official law of the state as well as those non-state norms thatcontinue to be important in the daily lives of many South Africans.

  3. Boundary-Layer & health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costigliola, V.

    2010-09-01

    It has long been known that specific atmospheric processes, such as weather and longer-term climatic fluctuations, affect human health. The biometeorological literature refers to this relationship as meteorotropism, defined as a change in an organism that is correlated with a change in atmospheric conditions. Plenty of (patho)physiological functions are affected by those conditions - like the respiratory diseases - and currently it is difficult to put any limits for pathologies developed in reply. Nowadays the importance of atmospheric boundary layer and health is increasingly recognised. A number of epidemiologic studies have reported associations between ambient concentrations of air pollution, specifically particulate pollution, and adverse health effects, even at the relatively low concentrations of pollution found. Since 1995 there have been over twenty-one studies from four continents that have explicitly examined the association between ambient air pollutant mixes and daily mortality. Statistically significant and positive associations have been reported in data from various locations around the world, all with varying air pollutant concentrations, weather conditions, population characteristics and public health policies. Particular role has been given to atmospheric boundary layer processes, the impact of which for specific patient-cohort is, however, not well understood till now. Assessing and monitoring air quality are thus fundamental to improve Europe's welfare. One of current projects run by the "European Medical Association" - PASODOBLE will develop and demonstrate user-driven downstream information services for the regional and local air quality sectors by combining space-based and in-situ data with models in 4 thematic service lines: - Health community support for hospitals, pharmacies, doctors and people at risk - Public information for regions, cities, tourist industry and sporting event organizers - Compliance monitoring support on particulate

  4. European mixed forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bravo-Oviedo, Andres; Pretzsch, Hans; Ammer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Aim of study: We aim at (i) developing a reference definition of mixed forests in order to harmonize comparative research in mixed forests and (ii) review the research perspectives in mixed forests. Area of study: The definition is developed in Europe but can be tested worldwide. Material...... and Methods: Review of existent definitions of mixed forests based and literature review encompassing dynamics, management and economic valuation of mixed forests. Main results: A mixed forest is defined as a forest unit, excluding linear formations, where at least two tree species coexist at any...... developmental stage, sharing common resources (light, water, and/or soil nutrients). The presence of each of the component species is normally quantified as a proportion of the number of stems or of basal area, although volume, biomass or canopy cover as well as proportions by occupied stand area may be used...

  5. Modeling the summertime Arctic cloudy boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curry, J.A.; Pinto, J.O. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); McInnes, K.L. [CSIRO Division of Atmospheric Research, Mordialloc (Australia)

    1996-04-01

    Global climate models have particular difficulty in simulating the low-level clouds during the Arctic summer. Model problems are exacerbated in the polar regions by the complicated vertical structure of the Arctic boundary layer. The presence of multiple cloud layers, a humidity inversion above cloud top, and vertical fluxes in the cloud that are decoupled from the surface fluxes, identified in Curry et al. (1988), suggest that models containing sophisticated physical parameterizations would be required to accurately model this region. Accurate modeling of the vertical structure of multiple cloud layers in climate models is important for determination of the surface radiative fluxes. This study focuses on the problem of modeling the layered structure of the Arctic summertime boundary-layer clouds and in particular, the representation of the more complex boundary layer type consisting of a stable foggy surface layer surmounted by a cloud-topped mixed layer. A hierarchical modeling/diagnosis approach is used. A case study from the summertime Arctic Stratus Experiment is examined. A high-resolution, one-dimensional model of turbulence and radiation is tested against the observations and is then used in sensitivity studies to infer the optimal conditions for maintaining two separate layers in the Arctic summertime boundary layer. A three-dimensional mesoscale atmospheric model is then used to simulate the interaction of this cloud deck with the large-scale atmospheric dynamics. An assessment of the improvements needed to the parameterizations of the boundary layer, cloud microphysics, and radiation in the 3-D model is made.

  6. High strain rate deformation of layered nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Veysset, David; Singer, Jonathan P.; Retsch, Markus; Saini, Gagan; Pezeril, Thomas; Nelson, Keith A.; Thomas, Edwin L.

    2012-11-01

    Insight into the mechanical behaviour of nanomaterials under the extreme condition of very high deformation rates and to very large strains is needed to provide improved understanding for the development of new protective materials. Applications include protection against bullets for body armour, micrometeorites for satellites, and high-speed particle impact for jet engine turbine blades. Here we use a microscopic ballistic test to report the responses of periodic glassy-rubbery layered block-copolymer nanostructures to impact from hypervelocity micron-sized silica spheres. Entire deformation fields are experimentally visualized at an exceptionally high resolution (below 10 nm) and we discover how the microstructure dissipates the impact energy via layer kinking, layer compression, extreme chain conformational flattening, domain fragmentation and segmental mixing to form a liquid phase. Orientation-dependent experiments show that the dissipation can be enhanced by 30% by proper orientation of the layers.

  7. Evaluations of Threshold and Curvature Mixed Layer Depths by Various Mixing Schemes in the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ORGANIZATION. REPORT...initialized based on the 1/8° climatological monthly mean temperature and salinity fields from the Generalized Digital Environmental Model (CDEM) clima ...during 2003-2006. 5.1. Profile data and quality control In situ T and S profiles were acquired from three data sources: (1) Argo float data (Gould

  8. Tests of Parameterized Langmuir Circulation Mixing in the Oceans Surface Mixed Layer II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-11

    39 8. REFERENCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 APPENDIX A – Calculation of SDC for a...Monocromatic Wave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 APPENDIX B – Calculation of SDC Using Wave Spectra From NOAA Buoy . . . . . . . 45 APPENDIX C...stress multiplied by the vertical shear of the Stokes drift current ( SDC ) from the waves. The additional shear-production terms were added to both the

  9. Mixing of solids in different mixing devices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Agitation of the powder (especially powders with different bulk densities) may result in migration of smaller particles downwards and of larger ones upwards. Another problem is segregation whose main cause is the difference in particle size, density shape and resilience. There are standard mixing devices, such as drum ...

  10. Basic Ozone Layer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about the ozone layer and how human activities deplete it. This page provides information on the chemical processes that lead to ozone layer depletion, and scientists' efforts to understand them.

  11. VSWI Wetlands Advisory Layer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset represents the DEC Wetlands Program's Advisory layer. This layer makes the most up-to-date, non-jurisdictional, wetlands mapping avaiable to the public...

  12. Linking of fractures in layered rocks: Implications for permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Belinda; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2010-09-01

    The permeability of many rocks, including many reservoirs, is mostly attributable to fractures that form interconnected clusters. Here we present the results of field studies and numerical models on the linkage of fractures, using primarily fractures in carbonate rocks from the UK. The numerical models focus on two fracture configurations: five offset fractures in a 5-layer model, and a single hydrofracture in a 3-layer model. In some of the 3-layer models, a weak, open contact is added between the two topmost layers. In the 5-layer models loading is by 5 MPa tensile stress, whereas the 3-layer models the only loading is the internal fluid overpressure of 6 MPa in the hydrofracture itself, located in the lowermost of the three layers. For the 5-layer models, tensile stresses occur between the nearby tips of the offset fracture pairs, but these stresses are generally too low in the soft shale layers to initiate fractures. The tensile stresses, however, commonly concentrate at the contacts between the shale and limestone layers and may therefore result in delamination (debonding), that is, opening of the contacts. By contrast, the shear stresses between the nearby tips of the fracture pairs are often high enough to generate shear or mixed-mode fractures that connect the nearby tips of the original offset fractures, resulting in clusters that can conduct fluids. For the 3-layer models, the fracture-induced tensile stresses in the uppermost layer are suppressed by a comparatively thick compliant (shale) layer and/or the weak, open contact. Thus, no fracture formation is possible in that layer but at their contacts with the compliant layer the hydrofracture apertures increase. Thus, a compliant layer may arrest the vertical hydrofracture propagation from its stiff host layer but, at the same time, increase its maximum aperture and encourage lateral fluid transport at the layer contact between the layers.

  13. Layer-by-layer cell membrane assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matosevic, Sandro; Paegel, Brian M.

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic subcellular membrane systems, such as the nuclear envelope or endoplasmic reticulum, present a rich array of architecturally and compositionally complex supramolecular targets that are as yet inaccessible. Here we describe layer-by-layer phospholipid membrane assembly on microfluidic droplets, a route to structures with defined compositional asymmetry and lamellarity. Starting with phospholipid-stabilized water-in-oil droplets trapped in a static droplet array, lipid monolayer deposition proceeds as oil/water-phase boundaries pass over the droplets. Unilamellar vesicles assembled layer-by-layer support functional insertion both of purified and of in situ expressed membrane proteins. Synthesis and chemical probing of asymmetric unilamellar and double-bilayer vesicles demonstrate the programmability of both membrane lamellarity and lipid-leaflet composition during assembly. The immobilized vesicle arrays are a pragmatic experimental platform for biophysical studies of membranes and their associated proteins, particularly complexes that assemble and function in multilamellar contexts in vivo.

  14. Photonic layered media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2002-01-01

    A new class of structured dielectric media which exhibit significant photonic bandstructure has been invented. The new structures, called photonic layered media, are easy to fabricate using existing layer-by-layer growth techniques, and offer the ability to significantly extend our practical ability to tailor the properties of such optical materials.

  15. The Mixed language Debate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A range of views on mixed languages and their connections to phenomena such as secret languages, massive borrowing, codeswitching and codemixing, and thier origin.......A range of views on mixed languages and their connections to phenomena such as secret languages, massive borrowing, codeswitching and codemixing, and thier origin....

  16. System equivalent model mixing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, Steven W.B.; van der Seijs, M.V.; de Klerk, D.

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces SEMM: a method based on Frequency Based Substructuring (FBS) techniques that enables the construction of hybrid dynamic models. With System Equivalent Model Mixing (SEMM) frequency based models, either of numerical or experimental nature, can be mixed to form a hybrid model.

  17. Interaction of Microphysical Aerosol Processes with Hydrodynamics Mixing

    KAUST Repository

    Alshaarawi, Amjad

    2015-12-15

    This work is concerned with the interaction between condensing aerosol dynamics and hydrodynamic mixing within ow configurations in which aerosol particles form (nucleate) from a supersaturated vapor and supersaturation is induced by the mixing of two streams (a saturated stream and a cold one). Two canonical hydrodynamic configurations are proposed for the investigation. The First is the steady one-dimensional opposed-ow configuration. The setup consists of the two (saturated and cold) streams owing from opposite nozzles. A mixing layer is established across a stagnation plane in the center where nucleation and other aerosol dynamics are triggered. The second is homogeneous isotropic turbulence in a three-dimensional periodic domain. Patches of a hot saturated gas mix with patches of a cold one. A mixing layer forms across the growing interface where the aerosol dynamics of interest occur. In both configurations, a unique analogy is observed. The results reveal a complex response to variations in the mixing rates. Depending on the mixing rate, the response of the number density falls into one of two regimes. For fast mixing rates, the maximum reached number density of the condensing droplets increases with the hydrodynamic time. We refer to this as the nucleation regime. On the contrary, for low mixing rates, the maximum reached number density decreases with the hydrodynamic time. We refer to this as the consumption regime. It is shown that vapor scavenging by the aerosol phase is key to explaining the transition between these two regimes.

  18. High-mix insulins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Premix insulins are commonly used insulin preparations, which are available in varying ratios of different molecules. These drugs contain one short- or rapid-acting, and one intermediate- or long-acting insulin. High-mix insulins are mixtures of insulins that contain 50% or more than 50% of short-acting insulin. This review describes the clinical pharmacology of high-mix insulins, including data from randomized controlled trials. It suggests various ways, in which high-mix insulin can be used, including once daily, twice daily, thrice daily, hetero-mix, and reverse regimes. The authors provide a rational framework to help diabetes care professionals, identify indications for pragmatic high-mix use.

  19. Role of organically modified layered silicate both as an active interfacial modifier and nanofiller for immiscible polymer blends.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ray, SS

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available ) revealed efficient mixing of the polymers in the presence of organically modified layered silicate. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) observations showed that silicate layers were either intercalated or exfoliated...

  20. ADVANCED MIXING MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R; David Tamburello, D

    2008-11-13

    The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four dual-nozzle jet mixers located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The work described in this report establishes the basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, the benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations, and the application of those indicators to SRS waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in height from zero to 10 ft. The sludge has been characterized and modeled as micron-sized solids, typically 1 to 5 microns, at weight fractions as high as 20 to 30 wt%, specific gravities to 1.4, and viscosities up to 64 cp during motion. The sludge is suspended and mixed through the use of submersible slurry jet pumps. To suspend settled sludge, water is added to the tank as a slurry medium and stirred with the jet pump. Although there is considerable technical literature on mixing and solid suspension in agitated tanks, very little literature has been published on jet mixing in a large-scale tank. If shorter mixing times can be shown to support Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) or other feed requirements, longer pump lifetimes can be achieved with associated operational cost and

  1. Artificially stacked atomic layers: toward new van der Waals solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guanhui; Gao, Wei; Cannuccia, E; Taha-Tijerina, Jaime; Balicas, Luis; Mathkar, Akshay; Narayanan, T N; Liu, Zhen; Gupta, Bipin K; Peng, Juan; Yin, Yansheng; Rubio, Angel; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2012-07-11

    Strong in-plane bonding and weak van der Waals interplanar interactions characterize a large number of layered materials, as epitomized by graphite. The advent of graphene (G), individual layers from graphite, and atomic layers isolated from a few other van der Waals bonded layered compounds has enabled the ability to pick, place, and stack atomic layers of arbitrary compositions and build unique layered materials, which would be otherwise impossible to synthesize via other known techniques. Here we demonstrate this concept for solids consisting of randomly stacked layers of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). Dispersions of exfoliated h-BN layers and graphene have been prepared by liquid phase exfoliation methods and mixed, in various concentrations, to create artificially stacked h-BN/G solids. These van der Waals stacked hybrid solid materials show interesting electrical, mechanical, and optical properties distinctly different from their starting parent layers. From extensive first principle calculations we identify (i) a novel approach to control the dipole at the h-BN/G interface by properly sandwiching or sliding layers of h-BN and graphene, and (ii) a way to inject carriers in graphene upon UV excitations of the Frenkell-like excitons of the h-BN layer(s). Our combined approach could be used to create artificial materials, made predominantly from inter planar van der Waals stacking of robust bond saturated atomic layers of different solids with vastly different properties.

  2. Boundary mixing in Orkney Passage outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, K. L.; Garabato, A. C. Naveira; Abrahamsen, E. P.; Jullion, L.; Meredith, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    One of the most remarkable features of contemporary oceanic climate change is the warming and contraction of Antarctic Bottom Water over much of global ocean abyss. These signatures represent changes in ventilation mediated by mixing and entrainment processes that may be location-specific. Here we use available data to document, as best possible, those mixing processes as Weddell Sea Deep and Bottom Waters flow along the South Orkney Plateau, exit the Weddell Sea via Orkney Passage and fill the abyssal Scotia Sea. First, we find that an abrupt transition in topography upstream of Orkney Passage delimits the extent of the coldest waters along the Plateau's flanks and may indicate a region of especially intense mixing. Second, we revisit a control volume budget by Heywood et al. (2002) for waters trapped within the Scotia Sea after entering through Orkney Passage. This budget requires extremely vigorous water mass transformations with a diapycnal transfer coefficient of 39>(±10>)×10-4 m2 s-1. Evidence for such intense diapycnal mixing is not found in the abyssal Scotia Sea interior and, while we do find large rates of diapycnal mixing in conjunction with a downwelling Ekman layer on the western side of Orkney Passage, it is insufficient to close the budget. This leads us to hypothesize that the Heywood budget is closed by a boundary mixing process in which the Ekman layer associated with the Weddell Sea Deep Water boundary current experiences relatively large vertical scale overturning associated with tidal forcing along the southern boundary of the Scotia Sea.

  3. ADVANCED MIXING MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S; Dimenna, R; Tamburello, D

    2011-02-14

    The process of recovering and processing High Level Waste (HLW) the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four mixers (pumps) located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are typically set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The focus of the present work is to establish mixing criteria applicable to miscible fluids, with an ultimate goal of addressing waste processing in HLW tanks at SRS and quantifying the mixing time required to suspend sludge particles with the submersible jet pump. A single-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach was taken for the analysis of jet flow patterns with an emphasis on the velocity decay and the turbulent flow evolution for the farfield region from the pump. Literature results for a turbulent jet flow are reviewed, since the decay of the axial jet velocity and the evolution of the jet flow patterns are important phenomena affecting sludge suspension and mixing operations. The work described in this report suggests a basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, with benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations. Although the indicators are somewhat generic in nature, they are applied to Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in

  4. The mixing of fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ottino, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    What do the eruption of Krakatau, the manufacture of puff pastry and the brightness of stars have in common Each involves some aspect of mixing. Mixing also plays a critical role in modern technology. Chemical engineers rely on mixing to ensure that substances react properly, to produce polymer blends that exhibit unique properties and to disperse drag-reducing agents in pipelines. Yet in spite of its of its ubiquity in nature and industry, mixing is only imperfectly under-stood. Indeed, investigators cannot even settle on a common terminology: mixing is often referred to as stirring by oceanographers and geophysicists, as blending by polymer engineers and as agitation by process engineers. Regardless of what the process is called, there is little doubt that it is exceedingly complex and is found in a great variety of systems. In constructing a theory of fluid mixing, for example, one has to take into account fluids that can be miscible or partially miscible and reactive or inert, and flows that are slow and orderly or very fast and turbulent. It is therefore not surprising that no single theory can explain all aspect of mixing in fluids and that straightforward computations usually fail to capture all the important details. Still, both physical experiments and computer simulations can provide insight into the mixing process. Over the past several years the authors and his colleague have taken both approaches in an effort to increase understanding of various aspect of the process-particularly of mixing involving slow flows and viscous fluids such as oils.

  5. Piezoelectric Resonator with Two Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanou, Philip J. (Inventor); Black, Justin P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A piezoelectric resonator device includes: a top electrode layer with a patterned structure, a top piezoelectric layer adjacent to the top layer, a middle metal layer adjacent to the top piezoelectric layer opposite the top layer, a bottom piezoelectric layer adjacent to the middle layer opposite the top piezoelectric layer, and a bottom electrode layer with a patterned structure and adjacent to the bottom piezoelectric layer opposite the middle layer. The top layer includes a first plurality of electrodes inter-digitated with a second plurality of electrodes. A first one of the electrodes in the top layer and a first one of the electrodes in the bottom layer are coupled to a first contact, and a second one of the electrodes in the top layer and a second one of the electrodes in the bottom layer are coupled to a second contact.

  6. News on Deep Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattanzio, John C.; Dearborn, Davis S. P.; Eggleton, Peter P.

    2008-04-01

    We briefly summarize the abundant observational evidence for the need of a ``deep mixing'' mechanism in first-ascent red-giant stars, and probably in AGB stars as well. By the term ``deep mixing'' we mean some mixing mechanism which operates in the radiative zone below the convective envelope, and which transports material from the convective region to hotter regions, near the top of the hydrogen shell, where nuclear burning may take place. We then discuss a recent discovery of deep-mixing caused by the burning of 3He following first dredge-up in low-mass stars. This is expected to be a thermohaline process and preliminary calculations show that it has many of the properties required to explain the observations.

  7. A comparison of mixing depths observed over horizontally inhomogeneous terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, A.B. [Univ. of Colorado/NOAA Environmental Technology Lab., Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences, Boulder, CO (United States); King, C.W. [NOAA Environmental Technology Lab., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1997-10-01

    In this paper we used wind profiler observations to estimate the mixing depth on either side of the Continental Divide on days when a PTBC (plain-to-basin-circulation) occurred along the Front Range of Colorado during the summer of 1995. The mixing depths on the basin side were significantly deeper than the mountain barrier for all of the PTBC events we analyzed. On the plains side, the mixed layers often extended to or above the level of the mountain barrier. On certain days up-slope flow existed above the mixed layer. We depicted the vertical structure of the flow and features in the humidity profile on one of these days using measurements from a wind profiler. The results were consistent with the conceptual model presented by Wolyn and McKee (1994). (au)

  8. Modeling Transport Layer Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasnauskas, Raimondas; Weingaertner, Elias

    In a layered communication architecture, transport layer protocols handle the data exchange between processes on different hosts over potentially lossy communication channels. Typically, transport layer protocols are either connection-oriented or are based on the transmission of individual datagrams. Well known transport protocols are the connection-oriented Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) [372] and the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) [370] as well as the Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP) [340] and DCCP, the Datagram Congestion Control Protocol [259]. In this chapter, we focus on the modeling process of the transport layer. While we mostly use TCP and UDP as a base of comparison from this point, we emphasize that the methodologies discussed further on are conferrable to virtually any transport layer in any layered communication architecture.

  9. Multi-layers castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In paper is presented the possibility of making of multi-layers cast steel castings in result of connection of casting and welding coating technologies. First layer was composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy, which was put directly in founding process of cast carbon steel 200–450 with use of preparation of mould cavity method. Second layer were padding welds, which were put with use of TIG – Tungsten Inert Gas surfacing by welding technology with filler on Ni matrix, Ni and Co matrix with wolfram carbides WC and on the basis on Fe-Cr-C alloy, which has the same chemical composition with alloy, which was used for making of composite surface layer. Usability for industrial applications of surface layers of castings were estimated by criterion of hardness and abrasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral.

  10. Music Mixing Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Gelineck, Steven; Büchert, Morten; Andersen, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-touch based interface for mixing music. The goal of the interface is to provide users with a more intuitive control of the music mix by implementing the so-called stage metaphor control scheme, which is especially suitable for multi-touch surfaces. Specifically, we discuss functionality important for the professional music technician (main target user) - functionality, which is especially challenging to integrate when implementing the stage metaphor. Finally we pro...

  11. The health marketing mix

    OpenAIRE

    Pralea, A. R.

    2011-01-01

    The well-known marketing mix of the commercial sector has found its application and has been developing in the non-profit sector. In most of the cases, the techniques and tools of commercial marketing are used to change behaviours in order to achieve social good. The targeted behaviours range widely from environmental ones to health related behaviours. The aim of the current paper is to highlight some of the characteristics of the marketing mix when applied to change health related behaviours...

  12. Music Mixing Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelineck, Steven; Büchert, Morten; Andersen, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-touch based interface for mixing music. The goal of the interface is to provide users with a more intuitive control of the music mix by implementing the so-called stage metaphor control scheme, which is especially suitable for multi-touch surfaces. Specifically, we...... discuss functionality important for the professional music technician (main target user) - functionality, which is especially challenging to integrate when implementing the stage metaphor. Finally we propose and evaluate solutions to these challenges....

  13. Layering in Provenance Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Seltzer, Margo I.; Muniswamy-Reddy, Kiran-Kumar; Braun, Uri Jacob; Holland, David A.; Macko, Peter; Maclean, Diana; Margo, Daniel Wyatt; Smogor, Robin

    2009-01-01

    Digital provenance describes the ancestry or history of a digital object. Most existing provenance systems, however, operate at only one level of abstraction: the sys- tem call layer, a workflow specification, or the high-level constructs of a particular application. The provenance collectable in each of these layers is different, and all of it can be important. Single-layer systems fail to account for the different levels of abstraction at which users need to reason about their data and proc...

  14. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The development of robust stable boundary layer parameterizations for use in NWP and climate models is hampered by the multiplicity of processes and their unknown interactions. As a result, these models suffer ...

  15. Robust mixed conducting membrane structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a membrane structure, comprising in said order a first electronically conducting layer, an ionically conducting layer, and a second electronically conducting layer, characterized in that the first and second electronically conducting layers are internally short...... circuited. The present invention further provides a method of producing the above membrane structure, comprising the steps of : providing a ionically conducting layer; applying at least one layer of electronically conducting material on each side of said ionically conducting layer; sintering the multilayer...

  16. Layered plasma polymer composite membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Walter C.

    1994-01-01

    Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is .gtoreq.2 and is the number of selective layers.

  17. Electroless atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, David Bruce; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Sheridan, Leah B.; Stickney, John L.; Benson, David M.

    2017-10-31

    A method of electroless atomic layer deposition is described. The method electrolessly generates a layer of sacrificial material on a surface of a first material. The method adds doses of a solution of a second material to the substrate. The method performs a galvanic exchange reaction to oxidize away the layer of the sacrificial material and deposit a layer of the second material on the surface of the first material. The method can be repeated for a plurality of iterations in order to deposit a desired thickness of the second material on the surface of the first material.

  18. Modelling the development of mixing height in near equatorial region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samah, A.A. [Univ. of Malaya, Air Pollution Research Unit, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    1997-10-01

    Most current air pollution models were developed for mid-latitude conditions and as such many of the empirical parameters used were based on observations taken in the mid-latitude boundary layer which is physically different from that of the equatorial boundary layer. In the equatorial boundary layer the Coriolis parameter f is small or zero and moisture plays a more important role in the control of stability and the surface energy balance. Therefore air pollution models such as the OMLMULTI or the ADMS which were basically developed for mid-latitude conditions must be applied with some caution and would need some adaptation to properly simulate the properties of equatorial boundary layer. This work elucidates some of the problems of modelling the evolution of mixing height in the equatorial region. The mixing height estimates were compared with routine observations taken during a severe air pollution episodes in Malaysia. (au)

  19. A global climatology of boundary layer ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, David; Plant, Robert; Belcher, Stephen

    2013-04-01

    The general circulation pattern of the Earth's atmosphere is well known, however there has been relatively little effort to quantify the climatological effects of the buffer zone known as the atmospheric boundary layer. Turbulent motions in the atmospheric boundary layer act to mix the layer along with its constituent pollutants, below a temperature inversion which separates it from the free troposphere. Exchanges between the boundary layer and free troposphere can occur through the mechanisms of convection, isentropic uplift, and coastal and orographic venting. In particular the rate at which pollutants are removed from the atmosphere can be different depending on whether or not they are resident within the boundary layer or the free troposphere. Thus the limiting factor on the concentrations of, for example, certain eg NOx, pollutants in the free troposphere will be the rate at which they are vented from the boundary layer. A global climatology (spanning 10 years between 1995 and 2005) of boundary layer venting is presented here using the ERA-interim dataset which has a grid scale resolution of 0.7 degrees x 0.7 degrees. The boundary layer height is first calculated using a bulk Richardson number method and then an associated vertical velocity is found by linearly interpolating between the two model levels either side of the boundary layer height. This value along with the change in height of the boundary layer over a 3 hour period is used to give an estimate of the rate of venting. The climatology of this rate allows us to describe and quantify the areas of the globe that are responsible for boundary layer entrainment and boundary layer venting, which could be used as a basis for further comparisons with other suitable datasets. We will also present results for the climatology of the boundary layer height itself. [possibly? That could be attractive for a BL audience anyway] Furthermore we will present and discuss results from a method designed to isolate the

  20. Turbulent entrainment in a strongly stratified barrier layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, H. T.; Sarkar, S.

    2017-06-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) is used to investigate how turbulence in the wind-driven ocean mixed layer erodes the stratification of barrier layers. The model consists of a stratified Ekman layer that is driven by a surface wind. Simulations at a wide range of N0/f are performed to quantify the effect of turbulence and stratification on the entrainment rate. Here, N0 is the buoyancy frequency in the barrier layer and f is the Coriolis parameter. The evolution of the mixed layer follows two stages: a rapid initial deepening and a late-time growth at a considerably slower rate. During the first stage, the mixed layer thickens to the depth that is proportional to u∗/fN0 where u∗ is the frictional velocity. During the second stage, the turbulence in the mixed layer continues to deepen further into the barrier layer, and the turbulent length scale is shown to scale with u∗/N0, independent of f. The late-time entrainment rate E follows the law of E=0.035Ri∗-1/2 where Ri∗ is the Richardson number. The exponent of -1/2 is identical but the coefficient of 0.035 is much smaller relative to the value of 2-3/2 for the nonrotating boundary layer. Simulations using the KPP model (version applicable to this simple case without additional effects of Langmuir turbulence or surface buoyancy flux) also yield the entrainment scaling of E∝Ri∗-1/2; however, the proportionality coefficient varies with the stratification. The structure of the Ekman current is examined to illustrate the strong effect of stratification in the limit of large N0/f.

  1. Hydraulics and mixing in a laterally divergent channel of a highly stratified estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, W. Rockwell; Ralston, David K.; Holleman, Rusty C.

    2017-06-01

    Estuarine mixing is often intensified in regions where topographic forcing leads to hydraulic transitions. Observations in the salt-wedge estuary of the Connecticut River indicate that intense mixing occurs during the ebb tide in regions of supercritical flow that is accelerated by lateral expansion of the channel. The zones of mixing are readily identifiable based on echo-sounding images of large-amplitude shear instabilities. The gradient Richardson number (Ri) averaged across the mixing layer decreases to a value very close to 0.25 during most of the active mixing phase. The along-estuary variation in internal Froude number and interface elevation are roughly consistent with a steady, inviscid, two-layer hydraulic representation, and the fit is improved when a parameterization for interfacial stress is included. The analysis indicates that the mixing results from lateral straining of the shear layer, and that the rapid development of instabilities maintains the overall flow near the mixing threshold value of Ri = 0.25, even with continuous, active mixing. The entrainment coefficient can be estimated from salt conservation within the interfacial layer, based on the finding that the mixing maintains Ri = 0.25. This approach leads to a scaling estimate for the interfacial mixing coefficient based on the lateral spreading rate and the aspect ratio of the flow, yielding estimates of turbulent dissipation within the pycnocline that are consistent with estimates based on turbulence-resolving measurements.

  2. Grain damage, phase mixing and plate-boundary formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, David; Skemer, Philip

    2017-07-01

    The generation of plate tectonics on Earth relies on complex mechanisms for shear localization, as well as for the retention and reactivation of weak zones in the cold ductile lithosphere. Pervasive mylonitization, wherein zones of high deformation coincide with extensive mineral grain size reduction, is an important clue to this process. In that regard, the grain-damage model of lithospheric weakening provides a physical framework for both mylonitization and plate generation, and accounts for the competition between grain size reduction by deformation and damage, and healing by grain growth. Zener pinning at the evolving interface between mineral components, such as olivine and pyroxene, plays a key role in helping drive grains to small mylonitic sizes during deformation, and then retards their growth once deformation ceases. The combined effects of damage and pinning, however, rely on the efficiency of inter-grain mixing between phases (e.g., olivine and pyroxene) and grain dispersal, which likely depends on grain size itself. Here we present a new model for inter-grain mixing and damage and the onset of rapid mixing. The model considers the competition between the formation of new grains behind a receding interphase triple junction (e.g., olivine growing into a boundary between two pyroxene grains) and their severance or spalling during progressive deformation and damage. The newly formed grains of one phase are then transported along the opposing phase's grain-boundaries and the two phases become dispersed at the grain-scale in a growing mixed layer. The small intermixed grains also affect the grain evolution of the surrounding host grains by Zener pinning, and hence influence the rheology and growth of the mixed layer. As the grains in the mixed layer shrink, subsequently spalled new grains are also smaller, causing a feedback that leads to more rapid mixing and shear localization in the mixed layer. The early stages of mixing can be compared to laboratory

  3. Multiple density layered insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alger, Terry W.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed wh provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation.

  4. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The

  5. Mixed waste management options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owens, C.B.; Kirner, N.P. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering Lab.

    1991-12-31

    Disposal fees for mixed waste at proposed commercial disposal sites have been estimated to be $15,000 to $40,000 per cubit foot. If such high disposal fees are imposed, generators may be willing to apply extraordinary treatment or regulatory approaches to properly dispose of their mixed waste. This paper explores the feasibility of several waste management scenarios and attempts to answer the question: Can mixed waste be managed out of existence? Existing data on commercially generated mixed waste streams are used to identify the realm of mixed waste known to be generated. Each waste stream is evaluated from both a regulatory and technical perspective in order to convert the waste into a strictly low-level radioactive or a hazardous waste. Alternative regulatory approaches evaluated in this paper include a delisting petition, no migration petition, and a treatability variance. For each waste stream, potentially available treatment options are identified that could lead to these variances. Waste minimization methodology and storage for decay are also considered. Economic feasibility of each option is discussed broadly.

  6. [Mixed states and schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakra, E; Belzeaux, R; Pringuey, D; Cermolacce, M; Corréard, N; Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A; Azorin, J-M

    2013-12-01

    Because of their compilation of contrasted symptoms and their variable clinical presentation, mixed episodes have been withdrawn from the DSM. However, mixed states question not only the bonds between depression and mania, but also the distinction between bipolar disorders and schizophrenia. Indeed, doubts about the dichotomy introduced by Kraepelin between bipolar disorders and schizophrenia is as old as the nosolgy itself, as attest the later works of this author revealing his hesitations on his own classification. But findings here reviewed issued from recent technical advances, particularly in the imaging and genetic fields, offer a better understanding of the boundaries between these two disorders. Yet, when confronted to an acute episode, clinicians may find it challenging to distinguish a mixed state from a schizophrenic relapse. Indeed, there is no pathognomonic manifestation allowing to retain a diagnosis with confidence. The physician will therefore have to identify a pattern of signs, which will orient his assessment with no certainty. Thus, negative rather than affective or psychotic symptomatology appears to be useful in discriminating schizophrenia (or schizoaffective) disorders from mixed mania. However, a conclusion during this acute stage appears in definitive a formal exercise, first because the final diagnosis will only be ascertained once the symptoms are amended, and second because, according to our classifications, a mood episode, including mania and mixed mania, can be observed without ruling out the diagnosis of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2013 L’Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  7. Mixed waste: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E. [eds.] [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Safety and Health

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

  8. A Thermal Plume Model for the Martian Convective Boundary Layer

    CERN Document Server

    Colaïtis, Arnaud; Hourdin, Frédéric; Rio, Catherine; Forget, François; Millour, Ehouarn

    2013-01-01

    The Martian Planetary Boundary Layer [PBL] is a crucial component of the Martian climate system. Global Climate Models [GCMs] and Mesoscale Models [MMs] lack the resolution to predict PBL mixing which is therefore parameterized. Here we propose to adapt the "thermal plume" model, recently developed for Earth climate modeling, to Martian GCMs, MMs, and single-column models. The aim of this physically-based parameterization is to represent the effect of organized turbulent structures (updrafts and downdrafts) on the daytime PBL transport, as it is resolved in Large-Eddy Simulations [LESs]. We find that the terrestrial thermal plume model needs to be modified to satisfyingly account for deep turbulent plumes found in the Martian convective PBL. Our Martian thermal plume model qualitatively and quantitatively reproduces the thermal structure of the daytime PBL on Mars: superadiabatic near-surface layer, mixing layer, and overshoot region at PBL top. This model is coupled to surface layer parameterizations taking ...

  9. Method of making gas diffusion layers for electrochemical cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisk, Joseph William; Boand, Wayne Meredith; Larson, James Michael

    2002-01-01

    A method is provided for making a gas diffusion layer for an electrochemical cell comprising the steps of: a) combining carbon particles and one or more surfactants in a typically aqueous vehicle to make a preliminary composition, typically by high shear mixing; b) adding one or more highly fluorinated polymers to said preliminary composition by low shear mixing to make a coating composition; and c) applying the coating composition to an electrically conductive porous substrate, typically by a low shear coating method.

  10. Rapid mixing kinetic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stephen R; Schilstra, Maria J

    2013-01-01

    Almost all of the elementary steps in a biochemical reaction scheme are either unimolecular or bimolecular processes that frequently occur on sub-second, often sub-millisecond, time scales. The traditional approach in kinetic studies is to mix two or more reagents and monitor the changes in concentrations with time. Conventional spectrophotometers cannot generally be used to study reactions that are complete within less than about 20 s, as it takes that amount of time to manually mix the reagents and activate the instrument. Rapid mixing techniques, which generally achieve mixing in less than 2 ms, overcome this limitation. This chapter is concerned with the use of these techniques in the study of reactions which reach equilibrium; the application of these methods to the study of enzyme kinetics is described in several excellent texts (Cornish-Bowden, Fundamentals of enzyme kinetics. Portland Press, 1995; Gutfreund, Kinetics for the life sciences. Receptors, transmitters and catalysis. Cambridge University Press, 1995).There are various ways to monitor changes in concentration of reactants, intermediates and products after mixing, but the most common way is to use changes in optical signals (absorbance or fluorescence) which often accompany reactions. Although absorbance can sometimes be used, fluorescence is often preferred because of its greater sensitivity, particularly in monitoring conformational changes. Such methods are continuous with good time resolution but they seldom permit the direct determination of the concentrations of individual species. Alternatively, samples may be taken from the reaction volume, mixed with a chemical quenching agent to stop the reaction, and their contents assessed by techniques such as HPLC. These methods can directly determine the concentrations of different species, but are discontinuous and have a limited time resolution.

  11. Neutrino Mixing: Theoretical Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido

    2013-01-01

    We present a concise review of the recent important experimental developments on neutrino mixing (hints for sterile neutrinos, large $\\theta_{13}$, possible non maximal $\\theta_{23}$, approaching sensitivity on $\\delta_{CP}$) and their implications on models of neutrino mixing. The new data disfavour many models but the surviving ones still span a wide range going from Anarchy (no structure, no symmetry in the lepton sector) to a maximum of symmetry, as for the models based on discrete non-abelian flavour groups that can be improved following the indications from the data.

  12. Mixing navigation on networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tao

    2008-05-01

    In this article, we propose a mixing navigation mechanism, which interpolates between random-walk and shortest-path protocol. The navigation efficiency can be remarkably enhanced via a few routers. Some advanced strategies are also designed: For non-geographical scale-free networks, the targeted strategy with a tiny fraction of routers can guarantee an efficient navigation with low and stable delivery time almost independent of network size. For geographical localized networks, the clustering strategy can simultaneously increase efficiency and reduce the communication cost. The present mixing navigation mechanism is of significance especially for information organization of wireless sensor networks and distributed autonomous robotic systems.

  13. Mixed Reality Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Müller

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Currently one of the most challenging aspects of human computer interaction design is the integration of physical and digital worlds in a single environment. This fusion involves the development of "Mixed Reality Systems”, including various technologies from the domains of augmented and virtual reality. In this paper I will present related concepts and discuss lessons learned from our own research and prototype development. Our recent work involves the use of mixed reality (as opposed to ‘pure’ virtual reality techniques to support seamless collaborative work between remote and hands-on laboratories.

  14. Mixing in a river

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernath, L.; Menegus, R.L.; Ring, H.F.

    1956-05-09

    Many rivers are burdened with tributary streams of warm water and/or liquid wastes containing dissolved or suspended matter. The warm water and waste matter mix thoroughly with the river water some distance downstream from the point of entry of the tributary, but near the point of entry there may be high local temperatures or concentrations of waste. It is often necessary to know the local temperatures or concentrations of waste. The authors have used a formula for computing the turbulent mixing that takes place in such a situation; this formula fits quite well in the case of one Southern river.

  15. Turbulence and Interfacial Mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glimm, James; Li, Xiaolin

    2005-03-15

    The authors study mix from analytical and numerical points of view. These investigations are linked. The analytical studies (in addition to laboratory experiments) provide bench marks for the direct simulation of mix. However, direct simulation is too detailed to be useful and to expensive to be practical. They also consider averaged equations. Here the major issue is the validation of the closure assumptions. They appeal to the direct simulation methods for this step. They have collaborated with several NNSA teams; moreover, Stony Brook alumni (former students, faculty and research collaborators) presently hold staff positions in NNSA laboratories.

  16. Mixed crystal organic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2014-09-16

    A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

  17. Turbulent Mixing on Helium-accreting White Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piro, Anthony L.

    2015-03-01

    An attractive scenario for producing Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is a double detonation, where detonation of an accreted helium layer triggers ignition of a C/O core. Whether or not such a mechanism can explain some or most SNe Ia depends on the properties of the helium burning, which in turn is set by the composition of the surface material. Using a combination of semi-analytic and simple numerical models, I explore when turbulent mixing due to hydrodynamic instabilities during the accretion process can mix C/O core material up into the accreted helium. Mixing is strongest at high accretion rates, large white dwarf (WD) masses, and slow spin rates. The mixing would result in subsequent helium burning that better matches the observed properties of SNe Ia. In some cases, there is considerable mixing that can lead to more than 50% C/O in the accreted layer at the time of ignition. These results will hopefully motivate future theoretical studies of such strongly mixed conditions. Mixing also has implications for other types of WD surface explosions, including the so-called .Ia supernovae, the calcium-rich transients (if they arise from accreting WDs), and metal-enriched classical novae.

  18. Turbulent mixing and entrainment in a gravity current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecke, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Odier, Philippe [ENS-LYON, FRANCE; Chen, Jun [PURDUE UNIV.

    2010-01-01

    We present an experimental study of the mixing processes in a gravity current. The turbulent transport of momentum and buoyancy can be described in a very direct and compact form by a Prandtl mixing length model: the turbulent vertical fluxes of momentum and buoyancy are found to scale quadratically with the vertical mean gradients of velocity and density. The scaling coefficient is the square of the mixing lenth, approximately constant over the mixing zone of the stratified shear layer. We show how, in different flow configurations, this length can be related to the shear length of the flow ({var_epsilon}/{partial_derivative}{sub z}u{sup 3}){sup 1/2}. We also study the fluctuations of the momentum and density turbulent fluxes, showing how they relate to the mixing phenomena, and to the entrainment/detrainment balance.

  19. The Equatorial Ekman Layer

    CERN Document Server

    Marcotte, Florence; Soward, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The steady incompressible viscous flow in the wide gap between spheres rotating about a common axis at slightly different rates (small Ekman number E) has a long and celebrated history. The problem is relevant to the dynamics of geophysical and planetary core flows, for which, in the case of electrically conducting fluids, the possible operation of a dynamo is of considerable interest. A comprehensive asymptotic study, in the limit E<<1, was undertaken by Stewartson (J. Fluid Mech. 1966, vol. 26, pp. 131-144). The mainstream flow, exterior to the E^{1/2} Ekman layers on the inner/outer boundaries and the shear layer on the inner sphere tangent cylinder C, is geostrophic. Stewartson identified a complicated nested layer structure on C, which comprises relatively thick quasi-geostrophic E^{2/7} (inside C) and E^{1/4} (outside C) layers. They embed a thinner E^{1/3} ageostrophic shear layer (on C), which merges with the inner sphere Ekman layer to form the E^{2/5} Equatorial Ekman layer of axial length E^{...

  20. Surface wind mixing in the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Robin; Hartlipp, Paul

    2017-12-01

    Mixing at the ocean surface is key for atmosphere-ocean interactions and the distribution of heat, energy, and gases in the upper ocean. Winds are the primary force for surface mixing. To properly simulate upper ocean dynamics and the flux of these quantities within the upper ocean, models must reproduce mixing in the upper ocean. To evaluate the performance of the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) in replicating the surface mixing, the results of four different vertical mixing parameterizations were compared against observations, using the surface mixed layer depth, the temperature fields, and observed diffusivities for comparisons. The vertical mixing parameterizations investigated were Mellor- Yamada 2.5 level turbulent closure (MY), Large- McWilliams- Doney Kpp (LMD), Nakanishi- Niino (NN), and the generic length scale (GLS) schemes. This was done for one temperate site in deep water in the Eastern Pacific and three shallow water sites in the Baltic Sea. The model reproduced the surface mixed layer depth reasonably well for all sites; however, the temperature fields were reproduced well for the deep site, but not for the shallow Baltic Sea sites. In the Baltic Sea, the models overmixed the water column after a few days. Vertical temperature diffusivities were higher than those observed and did not show the temporal fluctuations present in the observations. The best performance was by NN and MY; however, MY became unstable in two of the shallow simulations with high winds. The performance of GLS nearly as good as NN and MY. LMD had the poorest performance as it generated temperature diffusivities that were too high and induced too much mixing. Further observational comparisons are needed to evaluate the effects of different stratification and wind conditions and the limitations on the vertical mixing parameterizations.

  1. Mixed raster content segmentation, compression, transmission

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlidis, George

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the main concepts in handling digital images of mixed content, traditionally referenced as mixed raster content (MRC), in two main parts. The first includes introductory chapters covering the scientific and technical background aspects, whereas the second presents a set of research and development approaches to tackle key issues in MRC segmentation, compression and transmission. The book starts with a review of color theory and the mechanism of color vision in humans. In turn, the second chapter reviews data coding and compression methods so as to set the background and demonstrate the complexity involved in dealing with MRC. Chapter three addresses the segmentation of images through an extensive literature review, which highlights the various approaches used to tackle MRC segmentation. The second part of the book focuses on the segmentation of color images for optimized compression, including multi-layered decomposition and representation of MRC and the processes that can be employed to op...

  2. Crumb Rubber in cold recycled bituminous mixes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dondi, Giulio; Tataranni, Piergiorgio; Pettinari, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Today recycling is one of the most innovative and interesting techniques for the rehabilitation of destressed road pavements. In recent years the increased interest in this process, has led to the development of various alternative methods for the recovery and the reuse of road bituminous materials....... Cold recycling is, among the recycling techniques, certainly the most studied and developed: it allows the recovering of bituminous material from an existing pavement without the addition of heat, whilst ensuring the creation of high quality bound base layers. A wide range of materials have been tested...... together with Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement (RAP) and, consequently, there is a large number of variables that can be considered in the mix-design process of new eco-friendly Cold Recycled Mixes. In particular, the present research involves the use of Crumb Rubber within a mixture containing 100% Reclaimed...

  3. Supercritical fluid mixing in Diesel Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Luis; Ma, Peter; Kurman, Matthew; Tess, Michael; Ihme, Matthias; Kweon, Chol-Bum

    2014-11-01

    A numerical framework for simulating supercritical fluids mixing with large density ratios is presented in the context of diesel sprays. Accurate modeling of real fluid effects on the fuel air mixture formation process is critical in characterizing engine combustion. Recent work (Dahms, 2013) has suggested that liquid fuel enters the chamber in a transcritical state and rapidly evolves to supercritical regime where the interface transitions from a distinct liquid/gas interface into a continuous turbulent mixing layer. In this work, the Peng Robinson EoS is invoked as the real fluid model due to an acceptable compromise between accuracy and computational tractability. Measurements at supercritical conditions are reported from the Constant Pressure Flow (CPF) chamber facility at the Army Research Laboratory. Mie and Schlieren optical spray diagnostics are utilized to provide time resolved liquid and vapor penetration length measurement. The quantitative comparison presented is discussed. Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU).

  4. Mixed-Halide Perovskites with Stabilized Bandgaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhengguo; Zhao, Lianfeng; Tran, Nhu L; Lin, Yunhui Lisa; Silver, Scott H; Kerner, Ross A; Yao, Nan; Kahn, Antoine; Scholes, Gregory D; Rand, Barry P

    2017-11-08

    One merit of organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites is their tunable bandgap by adjusting the halide stoichiometry, an aspect critical to their application in tandem solar cells, wavelength-tunable light emitting diodes (LEDs), and lasers. However, the phase separation of mixed-halide perovskites caused by light or applied bias results in undesirable recombination at iodide-rich domains, meaning open-circuit voltage (VOC) pinning in solar cells and infrared emission in LEDs. Here, we report an approach to suppress halide redistribution by self-assembled long-chain organic ammonium capping layers at nanometer-sized grain surfaces. Using the stable mixed-halide perovskite films, we are able to fabricate efficient and wavelength-tunable perovskite LEDs from infrared to green with high external quantum efficiencies of up to 5%, as well as linearly tuned VOC from 1.05 to 1.45 V in solar cells.

  5. Rayleigh-Taylor Mix experiment on Pegasus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, M.G.; Atchison, W.L.; Anderson, W.E. [and others

    1997-09-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor Mix project will attempt to diagnose and understand the growth of a mixing layer at the interface between an imploding metal liner and a polystyrene foam core in a series of pulsed power experiments on the Pegasus capacitor bank. Understanding the effects of material strength will be an important part of the study. During the initial phase of the implosion, the linear/foam interface is Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) stable; however, as the foam is compressed, it decelerates the liner, causing it to bound and to go RT unstable. This paper reports 1D and 2D MHD simulations of the first experiment in the series and preliminary results.

  6. Mixed Interaction Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke-Olesen, Andreas; Eriksson, E.; Hansen, T.R.

    In this paper, we describe a new interaction technique for mobile devices named Mixed Interaction Space that uses the camera of the mobile device to track the position, size and rotation of a fixed-point. In this demonstration we will present a system that uses a hand-drawn circle, colored object...

  7. Mediterranean Outflow Mixing Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-02-01

    34 26 FEBRUARY 1993 Our hydrographic data show that the identity at least as far south as the tropics. ( Sociedad Espanola de Estudios para la Commu...mixing that in- tic , it has properties that make it neutrally of the marginal seas, and second, to allow corporates overlying North Atlantic water into

  8. Glueball-meson mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vento, Vicente [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Universidad de Valencia, Burjassot (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Calculations in unquenched QCD for the scalar glueball spectrum have confirmed previous results of Gluodynamics finding a glueball at ∝1750 MeV. I analyze the implications of this discovery from the point of view of glueball-meson mixing in light of the experimental scalar spectrum. (orig.)

  9. Mixed-Initiative Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yifen

    2010-01-01

    Mixed-initiative clustering is a task where a user and a machine work collaboratively to analyze a large set of documents. We hypothesize that a user and a machine can both learn better clustering models through enriched communication and interactive learning from each other. The first contribution or this thesis is providing a framework of…

  10. MixFit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haller, Toomas; Leitsalu, Liis; Fischer, Krista

    2017-01-01

    . Numerical ancestry component scores are assigned to individuals based on comparisons with reference populations. These comparisons are conducted with an existing analytical pipeline making use of genotype phasing, similarity matrix computation and our addition-multidimensional best fitting by Mix...... computer programs and scripts one of which was developed in house (available at: www.geenivaramu.ee/en/tools/mixfit)....

  11. Against Mixed Epistemology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Milburn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We can call any reductive account of knowledge that appeals to both safety and ability conditions a mixed account of knowledge. Examples of mixed accounts of knowledge include Pritchard’s (2012 Anti-Luck Virtue Epistemology, Kelp’s (2013 Safe-Apt account of knowledge, and Turri’s (2011 Ample belief account of knowledge. Mixed accounts of knowledge are motivated by well-known counterexamples to pure safety and pure ability accounts of knowledge. It is thought that by combining both safety and ability conditions we can give an extensionally adequate reductive account of knowledge. In this paper I argue that the putative counterexamples to pure safety and pure ability accounts of knowledge fail to motivate mixed accounts of knowledge. In particular, I argue that if the putative counterexamples are problematic for safety accounts they are problematic for ability accounts and vice-versa. The reason for this, I argue, is that the safety condition and ability condition should be understood as alternative expressions of the same intuition — that knowledge must come from a reliable source.

  12. Mixed Partnering and Parenting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi

    Book of Abstracts ICCP 2016 This proposal deals with psychosocial intervention of couples in mixed-marriages in Denmark, which has barely been scientifically explored due to the homogeneity and colourblindness dominant discourse. The term “mixed” is used for couples who feel that their intimate r...

  13. Sylgard® Mixing Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bello, Mollie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Welch, Cynthia F. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Goodwin, Lynne Alese [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Keller, Jennie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-08-22

    Sylgard® 184 and Sylgard® 186 silicone elastomers form Dow Corning® are used as potting agents across the Nuclear Weapons Complex. A standardized mixing procedure is required for filled versions of these products. The present study is a follow-up to a mixing study performed by MST-7 which established the best mixing procedure to use when adding filler to either 184 or 186 base resins. The most effective and consistent method of mixing resin and curing agent for three modified silicone elastomer recipes is outlined in this report. For each recipe, sample size, mixing type, and mixing time was varied over 10 separate runs. The results show that the THINKY™ Mixer gives reliable mixing over varying batch sizes and mixing times. Hand Mixing can give improved mixing, as indicated by reduced initial viscosity; however, this method is not consistent.

  14. Layered Fault Management Architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sztipanovits, Janos

    2004-01-01

    ... UAVs or Organic Air Vehicles. The approach of this effort was to analyze fault management requirements of formation flight for fleets of UAVs, and develop a layered fault management architecture which demonstrates significant...

  15. The Bottom Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, John H; Lentz, Steven J

    2018-01-03

    The oceanic bottom boundary layer extracts energy and momentum from the overlying flow, mediates the fate of near-bottom substances, and generates bedforms that retard the flow and affect benthic processes. The bottom boundary layer is forced by winds, waves, tides, and buoyancy and is influenced by surface waves, internal waves, and stratification by heat, salt, and suspended sediments. This review focuses on the coastal ocean. The main points are that (a) classical turbulence concepts and modern turbulence parameterizations provide accurate representations of the structure and turbulent fluxes under conditions in which the underlying assumptions hold, (b) modern sensors and analyses enable high-quality direct or near-direct measurements of the turbulent fluxes and dissipation rates, and (c) the remaining challenges include the interaction of waves and currents with the erodible seabed, the impact of layer-scale two- and three-dimensional instabilities, and the role of the bottom boundary layer in shelf-slope exchange.

  16. Method for forming silver-copper mixed kesterite semiconductor film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gershon, Talia S.; Gunawan, Oki; Lee, Yun S.; Mankad, Ravin

    2018-01-23

    After forming a layer of a Cu-deficient kesterite compound having the formula Cu.sub.2-xZn.sub.1+xSn(S.sub.ySe.sub.1-y).sub.4, wherein 0layer on the Cu-deficient kesterite compound layer, the Cu-deficient kesterite compound layer and Ag layer are annealed in a S- and/or Se-rich ambient to provide a film containing a Ag--Cu mixed kesterite compound having the formula Ag.sub.xCu.sub.2-xZnSn(S.sub.ySe.sub.1-y).sub.4, wherein 0

  17. Heteroepitaxial subsurface growth mode resulting in interlayer mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, P.W.; Thorshaug, S.; Stensgaard, I.

    1997-01-01

    A subsurface growth mode which results in interlayer mixing has been revealed from an interplay between scanning tunneling microscopy and ab initio total-energy calculations for the growth of Pd on Cu(110) and Ag(110) surfaces. On Cu(110), the Pd initially alloys into the surface layer forming...

  18. Mixed metal complexes of isoniazid and ascorbic acid: chelation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Novel mixed complexes of isoniazid and ascorbic acid have been synthesized and characterized using infrared, electronic absorption data, elemental analysis, molar conductivity, melting point, thin layer chromatography and solubility. The metal ions involved in the complex formation are Cu2+, Zn2+ and Cd2+. The melting ...

  19. Mixed Metal Complexes of Isoniazid and Ascorbic Acid: Chelation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    email: misitura4real@yahoo.com. ABSTRACT. Novel mixed complexes of isoniazid and ascorbic acid have been synthesized and characterized using infrared, electronic absorption data, elemental analysis, molar conductivity, melting point, thin layer chromatography and solubility. The metal ions involved in the complex ...

  20. Insight into the photocatalytic activity of ZnCr-CO3 LDH and derived mixed oxides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paušová, Š.; Krysa, J.; Jirkovský, Jaromír; Forano, C.; Mailhot, G.; Prevot, V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 170, JUL 01 (2015), s. 25-33 ISSN 0926-3373 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : photocatalysis * layered double hydroxides * mixed oxides Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 8.328, year: 2015

  1. Layered circle packings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Dennis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Given a bounded sequence of integers {d0,d1,d2,…}, 6≤dn≤M, there is an associated abstract triangulation created by building up layers of vertices so that vertices on the nth layer have degree dn. This triangulation can be realized via a circle packing which fills either the Euclidean or the hyperbolic plane. We give necessary and sufficient conditions to determine the type of the packing given the defining sequence {dn}.

  2. PREFACE: Turbulent Mixing and Beyond Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Rosner, Robert

    2008-10-01

    The goals of the International Conference `Turbulent Mixing and Beyond' are to expose the generic problem of Turbulence and Turbulent Mixing in Unsteady Flows to a wide scientific community, to promote the development of new ideas in tackling the fundamental aspects of the problem, to assist in the application of novel approaches in a broad range of phenomena, where the non-canonical turbulent processes occur, and to have a potential impact on technology. The Conference provides the opportunity to bring together scientists from the areas which include, but are not limited to, high energy density physics, plasmas, fluid dynamics, turbulence, combustion, material science, geophysics, astrophysics, optics and telecommunications, applied mathematics, probability and statistics, and to have their attention focused on the long-standing formidable task. The Turbulent Mixing and Turbulence in Unsteady Flows, including multiphase flows, plays a key role in a wide variety of phenomena, ranging from astrophysical to nano-scales, under either high or low energy density conditions. Inertial confinement and magnetic fusion, light-matter interaction and non-equilibrium heat transfer, properties of materials under high strain rates, strong shocks, explosions, blast waves, supernovae and accretion disks, stellar non-Boussinesq and magneto-convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics, premixed and non-premixed combustion, oceanography, atmospheric flows, unsteady boundary layers, hypersonic and supersonic flows, are a few examples to list. A grip on unsteady turbulent processes is crucial for cutting-edge technology such as laser-micromachining and free-space optical telecommunications, and for industrial applications in aeronautics. Unsteady Turbulent Processes are anisotropic, non-local and multi-scale, and their fundamental scaling, spectral and invariant properties depart from the classical Kolmogorov scenario. The singular aspects and similarity of the

  3. Gamma-based Measurement of ``Dark Mix'' in ICF Capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaney, Kevin; Herrmann, H.; Kim, Yh; Zylstra, Ab; Geppert-Kleinrath, H.; Hoffman, Nm; Yi, As

    2017-10-01

    Mix of capsule ablator material into the fusion fuel is a source of yield degradation in inertial confinement fusion. Jetting or chunk mix, such as the elusive ``meteors'' that have been observed at NIF, can be difficult to diagnose because the chunks may not get hot enough to excite dopant x-rays, nor atomized enough for separated-reactants to fuse. Using the gamma reaction history (GRH-6m) diagnostic, (n,n') gammas from strategically placed carbon layer within a beryllium capsule gives a measure of the time-resolved areal density of this carbon during the burn and hence an indication of the compression and spatial distribution of this layer. As the carbon moves further from the fuel, the areal density nominally decreases as 1/r2 for unablated material. However, mix of this carbon into the cold dense fuel layer or hot spot will have a significant effect on the carbon gamma signal. Different types of mix (e.g., jetting, Rayleigh-Taylor fingers, diffusive, ...) as well as features that can seed this mix (eg., tents, fill,...) will be discussed along with their expected effect on the carbon signal. The design for upcoming OMEGA shots, which will demonstrate this technique, and the potential for use on the NIF will be presented.

  4. Charm lifetimes and mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harry W.K. Cheung

    2001-11-28

    A review of the latest results on charm lifetimes and D-mixing is presented. The e{sup +}e{sup -} collider experiments are now able to measure charm lifetimes quite precisely, however comparisons with the latest results from fixed-target experiments show that possible systematic effects could be evident. The new D-mixing results from the B-factories have changed the picture that is emerging. Although the new world averaged value of y{sub CP} is now consistent with zero, there is still a very interesting and favored scenario if the strong phase difference between the Doubly-Cabibbo-suppressed and the Cabibbo-flavored D{sup 0} {yields} K{pi} decay is large.

  5. Renormalization of fermion mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiopu, R.

    2007-05-11

    Precision measurements of phenomena related to fermion mixing require the inclusion of higher order corrections in the calculation of corresponding theoretical predictions. For this, a complete renormalization scheme for models that allow for fermion mixing is highly required. The correct treatment of unstable particles makes this task difficult and yet, no satisfactory and general solution can be found in the literature. In the present work, we study the renormalization of the fermion Lagrange density with Dirac and Majorana particles in models that involve mixing. The first part of the thesis provides a general renormalization prescription for the Lagrangian, while the second one is an application to specific models. In a general framework, using the on-shell renormalization scheme, we identify the physical mass and the decay width of a fermion from its full propagator. The so-called wave function renormalization constants are determined such that the subtracted propagator is diagonal on-shell. As a consequence of absorptive parts in the self-energy, the constants that are supposed to renormalize the incoming fermion and the outgoing antifermion are different from the ones that should renormalize the outgoing fermion and the incoming antifermion and not related by hermiticity, as desired. Instead of defining field renormalization constants identical to the wave function renormalization ones, we differentiate the two by a set of finite constants. Using the additional freedom offered by this finite difference, we investigate the possibility of defining field renormalization constants related by hermiticity. We show that for Dirac fermions, unless the model has very special features, the hermiticity condition leads to ill-defined matrix elements due to self-energy corrections of external legs. In the case of Majorana fermions, the constraints for the model are less restrictive. Here one might have a better chance to define field renormalization constants related by

  6. Observation of Bs mixing

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    A peculiar and most important property of Bs mesons is that they transform spontaneously into their own antiparticles, and back again. These transitions, known as flavor oscillations or mixing, are extremely rapid, rendering their measurement a very challenging experimental task. The determination of the Bs oscillation frequency is, at the same time, of great interest for constraining elements of the Standard Model CKM matrix and its unitarity. Large samples of Bs mesons collected by the CDF and D0 experiments operating at the Fermilab Tevatron have recently yielded unprecedented results, which are here reported. Emphasis is given to details of the analysis developed at CDF, presenting the observation of Bs mixing, the precise measurement of the oscillation frequency, and a discussion of its impact on the description of the flavor sector.

  7. Mixed salt crystallisation fouling

    CERN Document Server

    Helalizadeh, A

    2002-01-01

    The main purpose of this investigation was to study the mechanisms of mixed salt crystallisation fouling on heat transfer surfaces during convective heat transfer and sub-cooled flow boiling conditions. To-date no investigations on the effects of operating parameters on the deposition of mixtures of calcium sulphate and calcium carbonate, which are the most common constituents of scales formed on heat transfer surfaces, have been reported. As part of this research project, a substantial number of experiments were performed to determine the mechanisms controlling deposition. Fluid velocity, heat flux, surface and bulk temperatures, concentration of the solution, ionic strength, pressure and heat transfer surface material were varied systematically. After clarification of the effect of these parameters on the deposition process, the results of these experiments were used to develop a mechanistic model for prediction of fouling resistances, caused by crystallisation of mixed salts, under convective heat transfer...

  8. Marketing Mix in Services

    OpenAIRE

    Cătălin Grădinaru; Sorin-George Toma; Paul Marinescu

    2016-01-01

    In a hypercompetitive environment, one in which it is difficult to gain substantial competitiveadvantages, it is becoming harder and harder to differentiate yourself from the rest, especially whenactivating in the services field. In order for a company to scientifically act, react and manage to satisfyas well as possible the customer’s needs, it should carry out a rigorous management process ofservices marketing. In the past, the marketing mix comprised 4Ps: product, price, place and promotio...

  9. Mixing of solids

    CERN Document Server

    Weinekötter, Ralf

    2000-01-01

    This book is a welcome edition to the Particle Technology Series, formerly Powder Technology Series. It is the second book in the series which describes powder mixing and we make no excuses for that. The topic of powder mixing is fundamental to powder technology and is one which always aroses interest. That will not change. As powder products become more complex they will pose new mixing problems. The solutions lie in the intelligent use of equipment, an understanding of powder properties and a good knowledge of basic statistics. The authors of this book have presented those three ingredients with great clarity. The book is based on long experience and deep thought, I have enjoyed reading it and am pleased to recommend it. Delft University of Technology, NL-Delft, July 1999 Brian Scarlett, Series Editor IX VII Foreword to the English Edition In response to many enquiries from industrial organisations and institutes involved with the technology of processing bulk materials, we are pleased to present the Englis...

  10. MARKETING MIX IN SPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srećko Novaković

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Marketing mix'' along the term of life cycle has robbed the trademark for the conception of marketing and the market direction of company, corporations and institutions. Essence marketing-mixa is in the simultaneous determining of the target market group of consumer (the buyer or stays the public and specially prepared and the coordinated impact of elements mixa, and this is the product, price, distributions and graduation ceremonies. Given that is mix combinations of verified variables, companies he use in order to would achieve are wished the scope sales on the target market. In the wider context significant influence of environment on the chosen structure marketing-mixa have not only technological, economic and competitive services already and socially-owned, legislative, legal and political services. From those reasons chant the marketing -mixa occasionally replaces expression are coordinated term acts on the market. Elements marketing-mix-and at sport marketings same are as well as at marketings every other activity. They contain the sportively product and the service, appreciate the sport product and services, distribution of sport product and services and the promotion of sport product and services.

  11. The Comparison of Engineering Properties Between Single and Double Layer Porous Asphalt made of Packing Gradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardiman M. Y

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available is paper presents the comparison of engineering properties between single and double layer porous asphalt (SLPA and DLPA made of packing gradation. Three nominal maximum aggregate sizes (NMAS were tested each made up of 10, 14, and 20 mm for SLPA. While for the DLPA with 30, 20, and 15 mm top layer are made of 10 and 14 mm NMAS, with a base layer of 20 mm NMAS. Total thickness of all mixes is 70 mm. Binders used are 60/70 penetration base bitumen and polymer binder styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS. The result shows that the properties of SLPA mix namely permeability and resistance to abrasion loss decreases when the NMAS in SLPA decreases. The abrasion loss of DLPA mixes increases when the porous asphalt top layer thickness decreases, while drainage time value decreases. However, SLPA with 20 mm NMAS exhibits higher abrasion loss compared to all DLPA mixes.

  12. Pre-Mix and on-site mixing of fumigants

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, R F; Shore, W. P.

    2010-01-01

    Pre-Mix or On-Site mixing, a common practice with liquid insecticides, has benefits of increased synergy with fumigants. Both Pre-Mix and On-Site mixing have some issues with compatibility (e.g., active ingredient chemical stability; material compatibility; reaction with other ingredients). In addition to its fumigant properties, carbon dioxide (CO₂), has a synergistic effect on other fumigants and reduces flammability. The general consensus on the amount of CO₂ to improve efficacy is in the ...

  13. Calculation of collisional mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, I.; Hautala, M.

    1990-06-01

    Collisional mixing of markers is calculated by splitting the calculation into two parts. Relocation cross sections have been calculated using a realistic potential in a Monte Carlo simulation. The cross sections are used in the computation of marker relocation. The cumulative effect of successive relocations is assumed to be an uncorrelated transport process and it is treated as a weighted random walk. Matrix relocation was not included in the calculations. The results from this two-step simulation model are compared with analytical models. A fit to the simulated differential relocation cross sections has been found which makes the numerical integration of the Bothe formula feasible. The influence of primaries has been treated in this way. When all the recoils are included the relocation profiles are nearly Gaussian and the Pearson IV distributions yield acceptable profiles in the studied cases. The approximations and cut-off procedures which cause the major uncertainties in calculations are pointed out. The choice of the cut-off energy is shown to be the source of the largest uncertainty whereas the mathematical approximations can be used with good accuracy. The methods are used to study the broadening of a Pt marker in Si mixed by 300 keV Xe ions, broadening of a Ti marker in Al mixed by 300 keV Xe ions and broadening of a Ti marker in Hf mixed by 750 keV Kr ions. The fluence in each case is 2 × 10 16{ions}/{cm 2}. The calculated averages of half widths at half maximum vary between 11-18, 9-12 and 10-15 nm, respectively, depending on the cut-off energy and the mixing efficiencies vary between 11-29, 6-11 and 6-14 {Å5}/{eV}, respectively. The broadenings of Pt in Si and Ti in Al are about two times smaller than the measured values and the broadening of Ti in Hf is in agreement with the measured values.

  14. Self-consistent unstirred layers in osmotically driven flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kåre Hartvig; Bohr, Tomas; Bruus, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    on both sides of the membrane remain well mixed due to an external stirring mechanism. We investigate the effects of concentration boundary layers on the efficiency of osmotic pumping processes in the absence of external stirring, i.e. when all advection is provided by the osmosis itself. This case...

  15. Analytical solution of the transpiration on the boundary layer flow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An analysis is carried out to study the effects that blowing/injection and suction on the steady mixed convection or combined forced and free convection boundary layer flows over a vertical slender cylinder with a mainstream velocity and a wall surface temperature proportional to the axial distance along the surface of the ...

  16. Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability induced flow, turbulence, and mixing. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ye

    2017-12-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov(RM) instabilities are well-known pathways towards turbulent mixing layers, in many cases characterized by significant mass and species exchange across the mixing layers (Zhou, 2017. Physics Reports, 720-722, 1-136). Mathematically, the pathway to turbulent mixing requires that the initial interface be multimodal, to permit cross-mode coupling leading to turbulence. Practically speaking, it is difficult to experimentally produce a non-multi-mode initial interface. Numerous methods and approaches have been developed to describe the late, multimodal, turbulent stages of RT and RM mixing layers. This paper first presents the initial condition dependence of RT mixing layers, and introduces parameters that are used to evaluate the level of "mixedness" and "mixed mass" within the layers, as well as the dependence on density differences, as well as the characteristic anisotropy of this acceleration-driven flow, emphasizing some of the key differences between the two-dimensional and three-dimensional RT mixing layers. Next, the RM mixing layers are discussed, and differences with the RT mixing layer are elucidated, including the RM mixing layers dependence on the Mach number of the initiating shock. Another key feature of the RM induced flows is its response to a reshock event, as frequently seen in shock-tube experiments as well as inertial confinement events. A number of approaches to modeling the evolution of these mixing layers are then described, in order of increasing complexity. These include simple buoyancy-drag models, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes models of increased complexity, including K- ε, K-L, and K- L- a models, up to full Reynolds-stress models with more than one length-scale. Multifield models and multiphase models have also been implemented. Additional complexities to these flows are examined as well as modifications to the models to understand the effects of these complexities. These complexities include the

  17. MixSIAR: advanced stable isotope mixing models in R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background/Question/Methods The development of stable isotope mixing models has coincided with modeling products (e.g. IsoSource, MixSIR, SIAR), where methodological advances are published in parity with software packages. However, while mixing model theory has recently been ex...

  18. The Value of Mixed Methods Research: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKim, Courtney A.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this explanatory mixed methods study was to examine the perceived value of mixed methods research for graduate students. The quantitative phase was an experiment examining the effect of a passage's methodology on students' perceived value. Results indicated students scored the mixed methods passage as more valuable than those who…

  19. Use of NDT equipment for construction quality control of hot mix asphalt pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    The focus of the study has been to evaluate the utility of seismic methods in the quality management of the hot mix asphalt layers. Procedures are presented to measure the target field moduli of hot mix asphalt (HMA) with laboratory seismic methods, ...

  20. Superfluid Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, G W; Parker, N G; Barenghi, C F

    2017-03-31

    We model the superfluid flow of liquid helium over the rough surface of a wire (used to experimentally generate turbulence) profiled by atomic force microscopy. Numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation reveal that the sharpest features in the surface induce vortex nucleation both intrinsically (due to the raised local fluid velocity) and extrinsically (providing pinning sites to vortex lines aligned with the flow). Vortex interactions and reconnections contribute to form a dense turbulent layer of vortices with a nonclassical average velocity profile which continually sheds small vortex rings into the bulk. We characterize this layer for various imposed flows. As boundary layers conventionally arise from viscous forces, this result opens up new insight into the nature of superflows.

  1. Novel organic electron injection layer for efficient and stable organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grover, Rakhi [Center for Organic Electronics, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Instrument Design Development Center, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Srivastava, Ritu, E-mail: ritu@mail.nplindia.ernet.in [Center for Organic Electronics, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Kamalasanan, M.N. [Center for Organic Electronics, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Mehta, D.S. [Instrument Design Development Center, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-02-15

    The efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) was significantly improved by introducing a novel organic composition (4,7-diphyenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen): 20 wt% tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ)) as an electron injection layer which could be uniformly deposited over a range of thicknesses. A highly injecting contact was obtained using 1.5 nm thick film of 20 wt% TCNQ mixed BPhen as the electron injection layer. High efficiency and stability of organic light emitting device are ascribed to improved electron injection and hence better charge carrier balance inside the OLEDs. -- Highlights: • • Highly conducting mixed BPhen films were used as electron injection layer in OLEDs for the first time. • Thickness of the proposed film has been optimized for best efficiency of OLEDs. • Proposed layer being organic could be deposited at relatively low temperatures. • TCNQ mixed BPhen films prove to be an efficient n-type layer in OLEDs.

  2. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  3. Physical Layer Network Coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fukui, Hironori; Yomo, Hironori; Popovski, Petar

    2013-01-01

    Physical layer network coding (PLNC) has the potential to improve throughput of multi-hop networks. However, most of the works are focused on the simple, three-node model with two-way relaying, not taking into account the fact that there can be other neighboring nodes that can cause/receive inter......Physical layer network coding (PLNC) has the potential to improve throughput of multi-hop networks. However, most of the works are focused on the simple, three-node model with two-way relaying, not taking into account the fact that there can be other neighboring nodes that can cause...

  4. Tailoring polymer properties with layered silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang

    Polymer layered silicate nanocomposites have found widespread applications in areas such as plastics, oil and gas production, biomedical, automotive and information storage, but their successful commercialization critically depends on consistent control over issues such as complete dispersion of layered silicate into the host polymer and optimal interaction between the layered silicates and the polymers. Polypropylene is a commercially important polymer but usually forms intercalated structures with organically modified layered silicate upon mixing, even it is pre-treated with compatibilizing agent such as maleic anhydride. In this work, layered silicate is well dispersed in ammonium modified polypropylene but does not provide sufficient reinforcement to the host polymer due to poor interactions. On the other hand, interactions between maleic anhydride modified polypropylene and layered silicate are fine tuned by using a small amount of maleic anhydride and mechanical strength of the resultant nanocomposites are significantly enhanced. In particular, the melt rheological properties of layered silicate nanocomposites with maleic anhydride functionalized polypropylene are contrasted to those based on ammonium-terminated polypropylene. While the maleic anhydride treated polypropylene based nanocomposites exhibit solid-like linear dynamic behavior, consistent with the formation of a long-lived percolated nanoparticle network, the single-end ammonium functionalized polypropylene based nanocomposites demonstrated liquid-like behavior at comparable montmorillonite concentrations. The differences in the linear viscoelasticity are attributed to the presence of bridging interaction in maleic anhydride functionalized nanocomposites, which facilitates formation of a long-lived silicate network mediated by physisorbed polymer chains. Further, the transient shear stress of the maleic anhydride functionalized nanocomposites in start-up of steady shear is a function of the shear

  5. Layers in Melas Chasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger annotated version This scene of layered deposits is from Melas Chasma, part of the Valles Marineris valley network. The area consists of a series of plateaus and cliffs that form a step-like terrain similar to the Grand Staircase-Escalante region of southwest Utah. The upper-right half of the image covers the highest plateau, and lower cliffs and plateaus step down in elevation toward the lower left of the image. Dunes of dark sand commonly cover the flat plateaus and distinct layers of bedrock are exposed in the cliffs. The orientations of these layers may help scientists to understand how the layers formed and the kind of environment that the layers formed in. Black rectangles on the left side of the image are areas where the image data was lost during transmission from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to Earth. This subscene [above] shows a series of boulder tracks on the left side of the image. The boulders fell from the cliffs above and left behind a series of small depressions. Each depression was made as the boulder bounced and rolled along the surface. In many cases, the tracks can be followed to the specific boulder that made them. Also visible in this subscene are cross-sections through the layered bedrock. This bedrock likely formed through settling of sand-sized particles out of the air or out of a body of water that has since drained away. These layers are 'cross-bedded', which means that subsequent layers are not parallel to each other but are instead oriented at an angle to other layers. The fact that these layers are cross-bedded indicates that the sand-sized particles were moved horizontally along the surface as they settled, just like sand dunes or ripples at the bottom of a stream. The size and shape of these cross-beds may help scientists to determine if the layers formed underwater or on land. Image PSP_001377_1685 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment

  6. Quantifying Mixing and Scales of Heterogeneity in 2-D Numerical Models of Chaotic Mantle Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A. C.; Naliboff, J.; Prytulak, J.; Vanacore, E.; Cooper, K. M.; Hart, S.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2006-12-01

    Fundamental to our understanding of geochemical reservoirs within the Earth's mantle is the concept of the scale and distribution of heterogeneity. Although many studies approach this concept qualitatively few have attempted a quantitative assessment. Through a collaborative effort at the CIDER (Cooperative Institute for Deep Earth Research) 2006 summer workshop, we applied a 2-D/1-D power spectral and statistical analysis, respectively, to the temperature field and passive tracer distribution within a 2-D numerical model of mantle convection. The resultant data provides a means to objectively describe the scales of mixing and heterogeneity within various model scenarios. The dynamic models used had a 1x10 aspect ratio, included temperature- and pressure-dependent viscosity, had a Rayleigh number of 10^7, and had both internal and basal heating. One end member case includes a layered structure for viscosity and thermal conductivity, with a sharp increase in the mid-mantle. Spectral analysis of the temperature fields indicates that power near the upper and lower boundary layers is concentrated in long-wavelength structures while in the mid-mantle the spectrum is broader. Layering the viscosity structure enhances this dichotomy, but does not isolate the upper from the lower mantle and does not necessarily lead to decreased mixing rates or efficiency. Preliminary results demonstrate that the overall particle distribution, measured as a function of the distance between particles, is not necessarily unimodal. Furthermore, at a given time step this distribution may become multimodal.

  7. Mixed Method Research: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Dewan Mahboob HOSSAIN

    2012-01-01

    This article gives a general overview of mixed method research. In mixed method, the researchers combine both qualitative and quantitative approaches in a single research project. The article first attempts to define mixed method research. Then it gives a comparison of qualitative and quantitative approaches. It also introduces the well-known controversy among the researchers: which of these approaches is superior? By explaining this controversy, the article identifies the need for mixed meth...

  8. Parametric resonant triad interactions in a free shear layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallier, R.; Maslowe, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the weakly nonlinear evolution of a triad of nearly-neutral modes superimposed on a mixing layer with velocity profile u bar equals Um + tanh y. The perturbation consists of a plane wave and a pair of oblique waves each inclined at approximately 60 degrees to the mean flow direction. Because the evolution occurs on a relatively fast time scale, the critical layer dynamics dominate the process and the amplitude evolution of the oblique waves is governed by an integro-differential equation. The long-time solution of this equation predicts very rapid (exponential of an exponential) amplification and we discuss the pertinence of this result to vortex pairing phenomena in mixing layers.

  9. Elastic properties of fly ash-stabilized mixes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Dimter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Stabilized mixes are used in the construction of bearing layers in asphalt and concrete pavement structures. Two nondestructive methods: resonant frequency method and ultrasonic pulse velocity method, were used for estimation of elastic properties of fly ash–stabilized mixes. Stabilized mixes were designed containing sand from the river Drava and binder composed of different share of cement and fly ash. The aim of the research was to analyze the relationship between the dynamic modulus of elasticity determined by different nondestructive methods. Data showed that average value of elasticity modulus obtained by the ultrasound velocity method is lower than the values of elasticity modulus obtained by resonant frequency method. For further analysis and enhanced discussion of elastic properties of fly ash stabilized mixes, see Dimter et al. [1].

  10. Lagrangian Studies of Lateral Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-19

    the Gulf Stream warm core, Ro and Rig O(1) at the Gulf Stream north wall) allowed for efficient investigation of submesoscale mixing resulting from...Float and dye revealed energetic mixing in the negative PV region, with dye spreading indicating lateral mixing rates of ~100 m2/s. Please see

  11. Magnetically coupled system for mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, III, Harlan; Meichel, George; Legere, Edward; Malkiel, Edwin; Woods, Robert Paul; Ashley, Oliver; Katz, Joseph; Ward, Jason; Petersen, Paul

    2015-09-22

    The invention provides a mixing system comprising a magnetically coupled drive system and a foil for cultivating algae, or cyanobacteria, in an open or enclosed vessel. The invention provides effective mixing, low energy usage, low capital expenditure, and ease of drive system component maintenance while maintaining the integrity of a sealed mixing vessel.

  12. Extended Mixed Vector Equilibrium Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijanur Rahaman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study extended mixed vector equilibrium problems, namely, extended weak mixed vector equilibrium problem and extended strong mixed vector equilibrium problem in Hausdorff topological vector spaces. Using generalized KKM-Fan theorem (Ben-El-Mechaiekh et al.; 2005, some existence results for both problems are proved in noncompact domain.

  13. Coloring mixed hypergraphs

    CERN Document Server

    Voloshin, Vitaly I

    2002-01-01

    The theory of graph coloring has existed for more than 150 years. Historically, graph coloring involved finding the minimum number of colors to be assigned to the vertices so that adjacent vertices would have different colors. From this modest beginning, the theory has become central in discrete mathematics with many contemporary generalizations and applications. Generalization of graph coloring-type problems to mixed hypergraphs brings many new dimensions to the theory of colorings. A main feature of this book is that in the case of hypergraphs, there exist problems on both the minimum and th

  14. MixedNotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jokela, Tero; Lucero, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Affinity Diagramming is a technique to organize and make sense of qualitative data. It is commonly used in Contextual Design and HCI research. However, preparing notes for and building an Affinity Diagram remains a laborious process, with a wide variety of different approaches and practices....... In this paper, we present MixedNotes, a novel technique to prepare physical paper notes for Affinity Diagramming, and a software tool to support this technique. The technique has been tested with large real-life Affinity Diagrams with overall positive results....

  15. Hybrid CBC layered concept

    OpenAIRE

    Río Suárez, Olga; Nguyen, D.

    2010-01-01

    The poster introduces some of the preliminary results in case of a last generation of CBC layered samples prepared according to P200930081 CSIC filed patent. This solution, based on nanotechnology concepts which optimize material properties, is rooted in economic considerations, better working conditions and environmental issues.

  16. Physical layer network coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fukui, Hironori; Popovski, Petar; Yomo, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Physical layer network coding (PLNC) has been proposed to improve throughput of the two-way relay channel, where two nodes communicate with each other, being assisted by a relay node. Most of the works related to PLNC are focused on a simple three-node model and they do not take into account...

  17. Our Shrinking Ozone Layer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Depletion of the Earth's ozone layer is one of the major environmental concerns for the new millennium having serious implications on human health, agriculture and cli- mate. In the past decades, research by the international scientific community has been directed towards under- standing the impact of human interference ...

  18. MITRE sensor layer prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Francis; McGarry, Donald; Zasada, David; Foote, Scott

    2009-05-01

    The MITRE Sensor Layer Prototype is an initial design effort to enable every sensor to help create new capabilities through collaborative data sharing. By making both upstream (raw) and downstream (processed) sensor data visible, users can access the specific level, type, and quantities of data needed to create new data products that were never anticipated by the original designers of the individual sensors. The major characteristic that sets sensor data services apart from typical enterprise services is the volume (on the order of multiple terabytes) of raw data that can be generated by most sensors. Traditional tightly coupled processing approaches extract pre-determined information from the incoming raw sensor data, format it, and send it to predetermined users. The community is rapidly reaching the conclusion that tightly coupled sensor processing loses too much potentially critical information.1 Hence upstream (raw and partially processed) data must be extracted, rapidly archived, and advertised to the enterprise for unanticipated uses. The authors believe layered sensing net-centric integration can be achieved through a standardize-encapsulate-syndicateaggregate- manipulate-process paradigm. The Sensor Layer Prototype's technical approach focuses on implementing this proof of concept framework to make sensor data visible, accessible and useful to the enterprise. To achieve this, a "raw" data tap between physical transducers associated with sensor arrays and the embedded sensor signal processing hardware and software has been exploited. Second, we encapsulate and expose both raw and partially processed data to the enterprise within the context of a service-oriented architecture. Third, we advertise the presence of multiple types, and multiple layers of data through geographic-enabled Really Simple Syndication (GeoRSS) services. These GeoRSS feeds are aggregated, manipulated, and filtered by a feed aggregator. After filtering these feeds to bring just the type

  19. Bacteria-induced mixing in natural waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, T.; Danza, F.; Berg, J.; Sengupta, A.; Constantinescu, G.; Tokyay, T.; Bürgmann, H.; Dressler, Y.; Sepúlveda Steiner, O.; Schubert, C. J.; Tonolla, M.; Wüest, A.

    2017-09-01

    Swimming organisms can enhance mixing in their natural environments by creating eddies in their wake and by dragging water along. However, these mixing mechanisms are inefficient for microorganisms, because swimming-induced variations in velocity, temperature, and dissolved substances are evened out before they can be advected. In bioconvection, however, microorganisms induce water movement not by propulsion directly but by locally changing the fluid density, which drives convection. Observations of bioconvection have so far mainly been limited to laboratory settings. We report the first observation and quantification of bioconvection within a stratified natural water body. Using in situ measurements, laboratory experiments, and numerical simulations, we demonstrate that the bacterium Chromatium okenii is capable of mixing 0.3 to 1.2 m thick water layers at around 12 m water depth in the Alpine Lake Cadagno (Switzerland). As many species are capable of driving bioconvection, this phenomenon potentially plays a role in species distributions and influences large-scale phenomena like algal blooms.

  20. Mixing in Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, A. C.; Fryxell, B.; Rosner, R.; Dursi, L. J.; Olson, K.; Ricker, P. M.; Timmes, F. X.; Zingale, M.; Tufo, H. M.; MacNeice, P.

    2000-12-01

    Fluid instabilities and subsequent mixing can play a fundamental role in many astrophysical processes, including the shock of a core-collapse supernova propagating through the outer layers of a massive star and the propagation of a burning front through a white dwarf in a thermonuclear runaway supernova. We present direct numerical simulations of mixing at Rayleigh-Taylor unstable interfaces performed with the Flash code, developed at the ASCI/Alliances Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes at the University of Chicago. We present results of both single- and multi-mode studies in 2- and 3-dimensions. Our results indicate that 3-d perturbations grow significantly faster than 2-d perturbations and that grid resolution can have a significant effect on instability growth rates. We also find that unphysical diffusive mixing occurs at the fluid interface, particularly in poorly resolved simulations, making it difficult to maintain the purity of our fluids. This work was supported by the U.S Department of Energy under grant No. B341495.