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Sample records for subharmonic pressure estimation

  1. Noninvasive LV pressure estimation using subharmonic emissions from microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Jaydev K; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Eisenbrey, John R; Raichlen, Joel S; Liu, Ji-Bin; McDonald, Maureen E; Dickie, Kris; Wang, Shumin; Leung, Corina; Forsberg, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    To develop a new noninvasive approach to quantify left ventricular (LV) pressures using subharmonic emissions from microbubbles, an ultrasound scanner was used in pulse inversion grayscale mode; unprocessed radiofrequency data were obtained with pulsed wave Doppler from the aorta and/or LV during Sonazoid infusion. Subharmonic data (in dB) were extracted and processed. Calibration factor (mm Hg/dB) from the aortic pressure was used to estimate LV pressures. Errors ranged from 0.19 to 2.50 mm Hg when estimating pressures using the aortic calibration factor, and were higher (0.64 to 8.98 mm Hg) using a mean aortic calibration factor. Subharmonic emissions from ultrasound contrast agents have the potential to noninvasively monitor LV pressures. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigating the efficacy of subharmonic aided pressure estimation for portal vein pressures and portal hypertension monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Jaydev K; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Eisenbrey, John R; Merton, Daniel A; Liu, Ji-Bin; Zhou, Jian-Hua; Wang, Hsin-Kai; Park, Suhyun; Dianis, Scott; Chalek, Carl L; Lin, Feng; Thomenius, Kai E; Brown, Daniel B; Forsberg, Flemming

    2012-10-01

    The efficacy of using subharmonic emissions from Sonazoid microbubbles (GE Healthcare, Oslo, Norway) to track portal vein pressures and pressure changes was investigated in 14 canines using either slow- or high-flow models of portal hypertension (PH). A modified Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, USA) operating in subharmonic mode (f(transmit): 2.5 MHz, f(receive): 1.25 MHz) was used to collect radiofrequency data at 10-40% incident acoustic power levels with 2-4 transmit cycles (in triplicate) before and after inducing PH. A pressure catheter (Millar Instruments, Inc., Houston, TX, USA) provided reference portal vein pressures. At optimum insonification, subharmonic signal amplitude changes correlated with portal vein pressure changes; r ranged from -0.82 to -0.94 and from -0.70 to -0.73 for PH models considered separately or together, respectively. The subharmonic signal amplitudes correlated with absolute portal vein pressures (r: -0.71 to -0.79). Statistically significant differences between subharmonic amplitudes, before and after inducing PH, were noted (p ≤ 0.01). Portal vein pressures estimated using subharmonic aided pressure estimation did not reveal significant differences (p > 0.05) with respect to the pressures obtained using the Millar pressure catheter. Subharmonic-aided pressure estimation may be useful clinically for portal vein pressure monitoring. Copyright © 2012 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Chronic Liver Disease: Noninvasive Subharmonic Aided Pressure Estimation of Hepatic Venous Pressure Gradient

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenbrey, John R.; Dave, Jaydev K.; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G.; Merton, Daniel A.; Miller, Cynthia; Gonzalez, José M.; Machado, Priscilla; Park, Suhyun; Dianis, Scott; Chalek, Carl L.; Kim, Christopher E.; Baliff, Jeffrey P.; Thomenius, Kai E.; Brown, Daniel B.; Navarro, Victor

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we correlated subharmonic aided pressure estimation data with the hepatic venous pressure gradient and found good overall agreement, indicating that this noninvasive technique may be a useful screening tool for predicting the presence of clinically important portal hypertension in patients undergoing transjugular liver biopsy.

  4. On the implementation of an automated acoustic output optimization algorithm for subharmonic aided pressure estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, J K; Halldorsdottir, V G; Eisenbrey, J R; Merton, D A; Liu, J B; Machado, P; Zhao, H; Park, S; Dianis, S; Chalek, C L; Thomenius, K E; Brown, D B; Forsberg, F

    2013-04-01

    Incident acoustic output (IAO) dependent subharmonic signal amplitudes from ultrasound contrast agents can be categorized into occurrence, growth or saturation stages. Subharmonic aided pressure estimation (SHAPE) is a technique that utilizes growth stage subharmonic signal amplitudes for hydrostatic pressure estimation. In this study, we developed an automated IAO optimization algorithm to identify the IAO level eliciting growth stage subharmonic signals and also studied the effect of pulse length on SHAPE. This approach may help eliminate the problems of acquiring and analyzing the data offline at all IAO levels as was done in previous studies and thus, pave the way for real-time clinical pressure monitoring applications. The IAO optimization algorithm was implemented on a Logiq 9 (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI) scanner interfaced with a computer. The optimization algorithm stepped the ultrasound scanner from 0% to 100% IAO. A logistic equation fitting function was applied with the criterion of minimum least squared error between the fitted subharmonic amplitudes and the measured subharmonic amplitudes as a function of the IAO levels and the optimum IAO level was chosen corresponding to the inflection point calculated from the fitted data. The efficacy of the optimum IAO level was investigated for in vivo SHAPE to monitor portal vein (PV) pressures in 5 canines and was compared with the performance of IAO levels, below and above the optimum IAO level, for 4, 8 and 16 transmit cycles. The canines received a continuous infusion of Sonazoid microbubbles (1.5 μl/kg/min; GE Healthcare, Oslo, Norway). PV pressures were obtained using a surgically introduced pressure catheter (Millar Instruments, Inc., Houston, TX) and were recorded before and after increasing PV pressures. The experiments showed that optimum IAO levels for SHAPE in the canines ranged from 6% to 40%. The best correlation between changes in PV pressures and in subharmonic amplitudes (r=-0.76; p=0

  5. Noninvasive estimation of dynamic pressures in vitro and in vivo using the subharmonic response from microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Jaydev K; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Eisenbrey, John R; Liu, Ji-Bin; McDonald, Maureen E; Dickie, Kris; Leung, Corina; Forsberg, Flemming

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a noninvasive pressure estimation technique based on subharmonic emissions from a commercially available ultrasound contrast agent and scanner, unlike other studies that have either adopted a single-element transducer approach and/ or use of in-house contrast agents. Ambient pressures were varied in a closed-loop flow system between 0 and 120 mmHg and were recorded by a solid-state pressure catheter as the reference standard. Simultaneously, the ultrasound scanner was operated in pulse inversion mode transmitting at 2.5 MHz, and the unprocessed RF data were captured at different incident acoustic pressures (from 76 to 897 kPa). The subharmonic data for each pulse were extracted using band-pass filtering with averaging, and subsequently processed to eliminate noise. The incident acoustic pressure most sensitive to ambient pressure fluctuations was determined, and then the ambient pressure was tracked over 20 s. In vivo validation of this technique was performed in the left ventricle (LV) of 2 canines. In vitro, the subharmonic signal could track ambient pressure values with r(2) = 0.922 (p 0.790 (p < 0.001) showing a maximum error of 2.84 mmHg compared with the reference standard. In conclusion, a subharmonic ultrasound-based pressure estimation technique, which can accurately track left ventricular pressures, has been established.

  6. Subharmonic contrast microbubble signals for noninvasive pressure estimation under static and dynamic flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Dave, Jaydev K; Leodore, Lauren M; Eisenbrey, John R; Park, Suhyun; Hall, Anne L; Thomenius, Kai; Forsberg, Flemming

    2011-07-01

    Our group has proposed the concept of subharmonic aided pressure estimation (SHAPE) utilizing microbubble-based ultrasound contrast agent signals for the noninvasive estimation of hydrostatic blood pressures. An experimental system for in vitro SHAPE was constructed based on two single-element transducers assembled confocally at a 60 degree angle to each other. Changes in the first, second and subharmonic amplitudes of five different ultrasound contrast agents were measured in vitro at static hydrostatic pressures from 0-186 mmHg, acoustic pressures from 0.35-0.60 MPa peak-to-peak and frequencies of 2.5-6.6 MHz. The most sensitive agent and optimal parameters for SHAPE were determined using linear regression analysis and implemented on a Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI). This implementation of SHAPE was then tested under dynamic-flow conditions and compared to pressure-catheter measurements. Over the pressure range studied, the first and second harmonic amplitudes reduced approximately 2 dB for all contrast agents. Over the same pressure range, the subharmonic amplitudes decreased by 9-14 dB and excellent linear regressions were achieved with the hydrostatic pressure variations (r = 0.98, p < 0.001). Optimal sensitivity was achieved at a transmit frequency of 2.5 MHz and acoustic pressure of 0.35 MPa using Sonazoid (GE Healthcare, Oslo, Norway). A Logiq 9 scanner was modified to implement SHAPE on a convex transducer with a frequency range from 1.5-4.5 MHz and acoustic pressures from 0-3.34 MPa. Results matched the pressure catheter (r2 = 0.87). In conclusion, subharmonic contrast signals are a good indicator of hydrostatic pressure. Out of the five ultrasound contrast agents tested, Sonazoid was the most sensitive for subharmonic pressure estimation. Real-time SHAPE has been implemented on a commercial scanner and offers the possibility of allowing pressures in the heart and elsewhere to be obtained noninvasively.

  7. Chronic liver disease: noninvasive subharmonic aided pressure estimation of hepatic venous pressure gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbrey, John R; Dave, Jaydev K; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Merton, Daniel A; Miller, Cynthia; Gonzalez, José M; Machado, Priscilla; Park, Suhyun; Dianis, Scott; Chalek, Carl L; Kim, Christopher E; Baliff, Jeffrey P; Thomenius, Kai E; Brown, Daniel B; Navarro, Victor; Forsberg, Flemming

    2013-08-01

    To compare subharmonic aided pressure estimation (SHAPE) with pressure catheter-based measurements in human patients with chronic liver disease undergoing transjugular liver biopsy. This HIPAA-compliant study had U.S. Food and Drug Administration and institutional review board approval, and written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Forty-five patients completed this study between December 2010 and December 2011. A clinical ultrasonography (US) scanner was modified to obtain SHAPE data. After transjugular liver biopsy with pressure measurements as part of the standard of care, 45 patients received an infusion of a microbubble US contrast agent and saline. During infusion, SHAPE data were collected from a portal and hepatic vein and were compared with invasive measurements. Correlations between data sets were determined by using the Pearson correlation coefficient, and statistical significance between groups was determined by using the Student t test. The 45 study patients included 27 men and 18 women (age range, 19-71 years; average age, 55.8 years). The SHAPE gradient between the portal and hepatic veins was in good overall agreement with the hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) (R = 0.82). Patients at increased risk for variceal hemorrhage (HVPG ≥ 12 mm Hg) had a significantly higher mean subharmonic gradient than patients with lower HVPGs (1.93 dB ± 0.61 [standard deviation] vs -1.47 dB ± 0.29, P < .001), with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 81%, indicating that SHAPE may be a useful tool for the diagnosis of clinically important portal hypertension. Preliminary results show SHAPE to be an accurate noninvasive technique for estimating portal hypertension.

  8. Noninvasive Ambient Pressure Estimation using Ultrasound Contrast Agents -- Invoking Subharmonics for Cardiac and Hepatic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Jaydev K.

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are encapsulated microbubbles that provide a source for acoustic impedance mismatch with the blood, due to difference in compressibility between the gas contained within these microbubbles and the blood. When insonified by an ultrasound beam, these UCAs act as nonlinear scatterers and enhance the echoes of the incident pulse, resulting in scattering of the incident ultrasound beam and emission of fundamental (f0), subharmonic (f0/2), harmonic (n*f0; n ∈ N) and ultraharmonic (((2n-1)/2)*f0; n ∈ N & n > 1) components in the echo response. A promising approach to monitor in vivo pressures revolves around the fact that the ultrasound transmit and receive parameters can be selected to induce an ambient pressure amplitude dependent subharmonic signal. This subharmonic signal may be used to estimate ambient pressure amplitude; such technique of estimating ambient pressure amplitude is referred to as subharmonic aided pressure estimation or SHAPE. This project develops and evaluates the feasibility of SHAPE to noninvasively monitor cardiac and hepatic pressures (using commercially available ultrasound scanners and UCAs) because invasive catheter based pressure measurements are used currently for these applications. Invasive catheter based pressure measurements pose risk of introducing infection while the catheter is guided towards the region of interest in the body through a percutaneous incision, pose risk of death due to structural or mechanical failure of the catheter (which has also triggered product recalls by the USA Food and Drug Administration) and may potentially modulate the pressures that are being measured. Also, catheterization procedures require fluoroscopic guidance to advance the catheter to the site of pressure measurements and such catheterization procedures are not performed in all clinical centers. Thus, a noninvasive technique to obtain ambient pressure values without the catheterization process is clinically

  9. Subharmonic aided pressure estimation for monitoring interstitial fluid pressure in tumours--in vitro and in vivo proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldorsdottir, V G; Dave, J K; Eisenbrey, J R; Machado, P; Zhao, H; Liu, J B; Merton, D A; Forsberg, F

    2014-09-01

    The feasibility of using subharmonic aided pressure estimation (SHAPE) to noninvasively estimate interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) was studied. In vitro, radiofrequency signals, from 0.2 ml/l of Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, N Billerica, MA) were acquired within a water-tank with a Sonix RP ultrasound scanner (Analogic Ultrasound, Richmond, BC, Canada; fT/R=6.7/3.35 MHz and fT/R=10/5 MHz) and the subharmonic amplitudes of the signals were compared over 0-50 mmHg. In vivo, five swine with naturally occurring melanomas were studied. Subharmonic signals were acquired from tumours and surrounding tissue during infusion of Definity and compared to needle-based pressure measurements. Both in vitro and in vivo, an inverse linear relationship between hydrostatic pressure and subharmonic amplitude was observed with r(2)=0.63-0.95; p<0.05, maximum amplitude drop 11.36 dB at 10 MHz and -8 dB, and r(2) as high as 0.97; p<0.02 (10 MHz and -4/-8 dB most promising), respectively, indicating that SHAPE may be useful in monitoring IFP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Subharmonic aided pressure estimation for monitoring interstitial fluid pressure in tumours -in vitro and in vivo proof of concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldorsdottir, V G; Dave, J K; Eisenbrey, J R; Machado, P; Zhao, H; Liu, J B; Merton, D A; Forsberg, F

    2014-01-01

    The feasibility of using subharmonic aided pressure estimation (SHAPE) to noninvasively estimate interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) was studied. In vitro, radiofrequency signals, from 0.2 ml/l of Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, N Billerica, MA) were acquired within a water-tank with a Sonix RP ultrasound scanner (Ultrasonix, Richmond, BC, Canada; fT/R=6.7/3.35 MHz and fT/R =10/5 MHz) and the subharmonic amplitudes of the signals were compared over 0–50 mmHg. In vivo, five swine with naturally occurring melanomas were studied. Subharmonic signals were acquired from tumours and surrounding tissue during infusion of Definity and compared to needle-based pressure measurements. Both in vitro and in vivo, an inverse linear relationship between hydrostatic pressure and subharmonic amplitude was observed with r2=0.63–0.95; p<0.05, maximum amplitude drop 11.36 dB at 10 MHz and −8 dB, and r2 as high as 0.97; p<0.02 (10 MHz and −4/−8 dB most promising), respectively, indicating that SHAPE may be useful in monitoring IFP. PMID:24856899

  11. Subharmonic Imaging and Pressure Estimation for Monitoring Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision unless so designated by other documentation. REPORT DOCUMENTATION...Noninvasive Manometry Based on Pressure Dependent Resonant Shift of Elastic Microcapsules in Ultrasonic Frequency Characteristics Japanese Journal of...Ultrasonics, 2013. 53(4): p. 880 – 888. 16 Appendix I The Statement of Work from the original proposal: Objective 1 Task 1: Design and implementation

  12. Effect of Pulse Shaping on Subharmonic Aided Pressure Estimation In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ipshita; Eisenbrey, John; Stanczak, Maria; Sridharan, Anush; Dave, Jaydev K; Liu, Ji-Bin; Hazard, Christopher; Wang, Xinghua; Wang, Ping; Li, Huiwen; Wallace, Kirk; Forsberg, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    Subharmonic imaging (SHI) is a technique that uses the nonlinear oscillations of microbubbles when exposed to ultrasound at high pressures transmitting at the fundamental frequency ie, fo and receiving at half the transmit frequency (ie, fo /2). Subharmonic aided pressure estimation (SHAPE) is based on the inverse relationship between the subharmonic amplitude of the microbubbles and the ambient pressure change. Eight waveforms with different envelopes were optimized with respect to acoustic power at which the SHAPE study is most sensitive. The study was run with four input transmit cycles, first in vitro and then in vivo in three canines to select the waveform that achieved the best sensitivity for detecting changes in portal pressures using SHAPE. A Logiq 9 scanner with a 4C curvi-linear array was used to acquire 2.5 MHz radio-frequency data. Scanning was performed in dual imaging mode with B-mode imaging at 4 MHz and a SHI contrast mode transmitting at 2.5 MHz and receiving at 1.25 MHz. Sonazoid, which is a lipid stabilized gas filled bubble of perfluorobutane, was used as the contrast agent in this study. A linear decrease in subharmonic amplitude with increased pressure was observed for all waveforms (r from -0.77 to -0.93; P < .001) in vitro. There was a significantly higher correlation of the SHAPE gradient with changing pressures for the broadband pulses as compared to the narrowband pulses in both in vitro and in vivo results. The highest correlation was achieved with a Gaussian windowed binomial filtered square wave with an r-value of -0.95. One of the three canines was eliminated for technical reasons, while the other two produced very similar results to those obtained in vitro (r from -0.72 to -0.98; P <.01). The most consistent in vivo results were achieved with the Gaussian windowed binomial filtered square wave (r = -0.95 and -0.96). Using this waveform is an improvement to the existing SHAPE technique (where a square wave was used) and

  13. Subharmonic microbubble emissions for noninvasively tracking right ventricular pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Jaydev K; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Eisenbrey, John R; Raichlen, Joel S; Liu, Ji-Bin; McDonald, Maureen E; Dickie, Kris; Wang, Shumin; Leung, Corina; Forsberg, Flemming

    2012-07-01

    Right heart catheterization is often required to monitor intra-cardiac pressures in a number of disease states. Ultrasound contrast agents can produce pressure modulated subharmonic emissions that may be used to estimate right ventricular (RV) pressures. A technique based on subharmonic acoustic emissions from ultrasound contrast agents to track RV pressures noninvasively has been developed and its clinical potential evaluated. The subharmonic signals were obtained from the aorta, RV, and right atrium (RA) of five anesthetized closed-chest mongrel dogs using a SonixRP ultrasound scanner and PA4-2 phased array. Simultaneous pressure measurements were obtained using a 5-French solid state micromanometer tipped catheter. Initially, aortic subharmonic signals and systemic blood pressures were used to obtain a calibration factor in units of millimeters of mercury per decibel. This factor was combined with RA pressures (that can be obtained noninvasively) and the acoustic data from the RV to obtain RV pressure values. The individual calibration factors ranged from -2.0 to -4.0 mmHg/dB. The subharmonic signals tracked transient changes in the RV pressures within an error of 0.6 mmHg. Relative to the catheter pressures, the mean errors in estimating RV peak systolic and minimum diastolic pressures, and RV relaxation [isovolumic negative derivative of change in pressure over time (-dP/dt)] by use of the subharmonic signals, were -2.3 mmHg, -0.8 mmHg, and 2.9 mmHg/s, respectively. Overall, acoustic estimates of RV peak systolic and minimum diastolic pressures and RV relaxation were within 3.4 mmHg, 1.8 mmHg, and 5.9 mmHg/s, respectively, of the measured pressures. This pilot study demonstrates that subharmonic emissions from ultrasound contrast agents have the potential to noninvasively track in vivo RV pressures with errors below 3.5 mmHg.

  14. Monitoring Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer by Using Three-dimensional Subharmonic Aided Pressure Estimation and Imaging with US Contrast Agents: Preliminary Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kibo; Eisenbrey, John R; Stanczak, Maria; Sridharan, Anush; Berger, Adam C; Avery, Tiffany; Palazzo, Juan P; Forsberg, Flemming

    2017-10-01

    Purpose To determine whether three-dimensional subharmonic aided pressure estimation (SHAPE) and subharmonic imaging can help predict the response of breast cancer to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Materials and Methods In this HIPAA-compliant prospective study, 17 women (age range, 45-70 years) scheduled to undergo neoadjuvant therapy for breast cancer underwent ultrasonography (US) immediately before therapy and at completion of 10%, 60%, and 100% of chemotherapy. All patients provided written informed consent. At each examination, radiofrequency data were collected from SHAPE and subharmonic imaging during infusion of a US contrast agent. Maximum-frequency magnitude and mean intensity were calculated for SHAPE and subharmonic imaging. The signal differences in the tumor relative to the surrounding area were compared with the final treatment response by using the Student t test. Results Four patients left the study, and data from two patients were discarded because of technical problems. Eight patients completed the entire imaging protocol, and an additional three patients dropped out after the imaging session at completion of 10% of chemotherapy as a result of disease progression (these patients were counted as nonresponders). Patients' imaging outcomes consisted of six responders (tumor volume reduction >90%) and five partial responders or nonresponders. The results at completion of 10% of therapy showed that the subharmonic signal increased more in the tumor than in the surrounding area for responders than in partial responders or nonresponders (mean ± standard deviation, 3.23 dB ± 1.41 vs -0.88 dB ± 1.46 [P = .001], respectively, for SHAPE and 1.32 dB ± 0.73 vs -0.82 dB ± 0.88 [P = .002], respectively, for subharmonic imaging). Moreover, three patients whose tumor measurements initially increased were correctly predicted to be responders with SHAPE and subharmonic imaging after completion of 10% of therapy. Conclusion SHAPE and subharmonic imaging have the

  15. Subharmonic-Aided Pressure Estimation for Monitoring Interstitial Fluid Pressure in Tumors: Calibration and Treatment with Paclitaxel in Breast Cancer Xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Dave, Jaydev K; Marshall, Andrew; Forsberg, Anya I; Fox, Traci B; Eisenbrey, John R; Machado, Priscilla; Liu, Ji-Bin; Merton, Daniel A; Forsberg, Flemming

    2017-07-01

    Interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) in rats with breast cancer xenografts was non-invasively estimated using subharmonic-aided pressure estimation (SHAPE) versus an invasive pressure monitor. Moreover, monitoring of IFP changes after chemotherapy was assessed. Eighty-nine rats (calibration n = 25, treatment n = 64) were injected with 5 × 10(6) breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). Radiofrequency signals were acquired (39 rats successfully imaged) with a Sonix RP scanner (BK Ultrasound, Richmond, BC, Canada) using a linear array (L9-4, transmit/receive: 8/4 MHz) after administration of Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, North Billerica, MA, USA; 180 μL/kg) and compared with readings from an invasive pressure monitor (Stryker, Berkshire, UK). An inverse linear relationship was established between tumor IFP and SHAPE (y = -1.06x + 28.27, r = -0.69, p = 0.01) in the calibration group. Use of this relationship in the treatment group resulted in r = 0.74 (p < 0.05) between measured (pressure monitor) and SHAPE-estimated IFP (average error: 6.24 mmHg). No significant before/after differences were observed with respect to paclitaxel treatment (5 mg/kg, Mayne Pharma, Paramus, NJ, USA) with either method (p ≥ 0.15). Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Processing of subharmonic signals from ultrasound contrast agents to determine ambient pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Jaydev K; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Eisenbrey, John R; Forsberg, Flemming

    2012-04-01

    Subharmonic-aided pressure estimation (SHAPE) is a technique that utilizes the subharmonic emissions, occurring at half the insonation frequency, from ultrasound contrast agents to estimate ambient pressures. The purpose of this work was to compare the performance of different processing techniques for the raw radiofrequency (rf) data acquired for SHAPE. A closed loop flow system was implemented circulating reconstituted Sonazoid (GE Healthcare, Oslo, Norway; 0.2 ml for 750 ml diluent) and the beam-formed unprocessed rf data were obtained from a 4 mm diameter lumen of a Doppler flow phantom (ATS Laboratories, Inc., Bridgeport, CT) using a SonixRP scanner (Ultrasonix, Richmond, BC, Canada). The transmit frequency and incident acoustic pressures were set to 2.5 MHz and 0.22 MPa, respectively, in order to elicit Sonazoid subharmonic emissions that are ambient-pressure sensitive. The time-varying ambient pressures within the flow phantom were recorded by a Millar pressure catheter. Four techniques for extracting the subharmonic amplitude from the rf data were tested along with two noise filtering techniques to process this data. Five filter orders were tested for the noise removing filters. The performance was evaluated based on the least root-mean-square errors reported after linear least-square regression analyses of the subharmonic data and the pressure catheter data and compared using a repeated ANOVA. When the subharmonic amplitudes were extracted as the mean value within a 0.2 MHz bandwidth about 1.25 MHz and when the resulting temporally-varying subharmonic signal was median filtered with an order of 500, the filtered subharmonic signal significantly predicted the ambient pressures (r2 = 0.90; p < 0.001) with the least error. The resulting root mean square and mean absolute errors were 8.16 +/- 0.26 mmHg and 6.70 +/- 0.17 mmHg, respectively. Thus, median processing the subharmonic data extracted as the mean value within a 0.2 MHz bandwidth about the theoretical

  17. Perfusion estimation using contrast-enhanced 3-dimensional subharmonic ultrasound imaging: an in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Anush; Eisenbrey, John R; Liu, Ji-Bin; Machado, Priscilla; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Dave, Jaydev K; Zhao, Hongjia; He, Yu; Park, Suhyun; Dianis, Scott; Wallace, Kirk; Thomenius, Kai E; Forsberg, Flemming

    2013-09-01

    The ability to estimate tissue perfusion (in milliliter per minute per gram) in vivo using contrast-enhanced 3-dimensional (3D) harmonic and subharmonic ultrasound imaging was investigated. A LOGIQ™ 9 scanner (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI) equipped with a 4D10L probe was modified to perform 3D harmonic imaging (HI; f(transmit), 5 MHz and f(receive), 10 MHz) and subharmonic imaging (SHI; f(transmit), 5.8 MHz and f(receive), 2.9 MHz). In vivo imaging was performed in the lower pole of both kidneys in 5 open-abdomen canines after injection of the ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, N Billerica, MA). The canines received a 5-μL/kg bolus injection of Definity for HI and a 20-μL/kg bolus for SHI in triplicate for each kidney. Ultrasound data acquisition was started just before the injection of UCA (to capture the wash-in) and continued until washout. A microvascular staining technique based on stable (nonradioactive) isotope-labeled microspheres (Biophysics Assay Laboratory, Inc, Worcester, MA) was used to quantify the degree of perfusion in each kidney (the reference standard). Ligating a surgically exposed branch of the renal arteries induced lower perfusion rates. This was followed by additional contrast-enhanced imaging and microsphere injections to measure post-ligation perfusion. Slice data were extracted from the 3D ultrasound volumes and used to generate time-intensity curves offline in the regions corresponding to the tissue samples used for microvascular staining. The midline plane was also selected from the 3D volume (as a quasi-2-dimensional [2D] image) and compared with the 3D imaging modes. Perfusion was estimated from the initial slope of the fractional blood volume uptake (for both HI and SHI) and compared with the reference standard using linear regression analysis. Both 3D HI and SHI were able to provide visualization of flow and, thus, perfusion in the kidneys. However, SHI provided near-complete tissue suppression

  18. Perfusion estimation using contrast enhanced three-dimensional subharmonic ultrasound imaging: an in vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Anush; Eisenbrey, John R.; Liu, Ji-Bin; Machado, Priscilla; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G.; Dave, Jaydev K.; Zhao, Hongjia; He, Yu; Park, Suhyun; Dianis, Scott; Wallace, Kirk; Thomenius, Kai E.; Forsberg, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The ability to estimate tissue perfusion (in mL/min/g) in vivo using contrast-enhanced three-dimensional (3D) harmonic and subharmonic ultrasound imaging was investigated. Materials and Methods A Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI) equipped with a 4D10L probe was modified to perform 3D harmonic imaging (HI; ftransmit = 5 MHz and freceive = 10 MHz) and subharmonic imaging (SHI; ftransmit= 5.8 MHz and freceive= 2.9 MHz). In vivo imaging was performed in the lower pole of both kidneys in five open-abdomen canines after injection of the ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, N Billerica, MA). The canines received a 5 μL/kg bolus injection of Definity for HI and a 20 μL/kg bolus for SHI in triplicate for each kidney. Ultrasound data acquisition was started just prior to injection of UCA (in order to capture the wash-in) and continued until washout. A microvascular staining technique based on stable (non-radioactive) isotope-labeled microspheres (Biophysics Assay Laboratory Inc, Worcester, MA) was used to quantify the degree of perfusion in each kidney (the reference standard). Ligating a surgically exposed branch of the renal arteries induced lower perfusion rates. This was followed by additional contrast-enhanced imaging and microsphere injections to measure post-ligation perfusion. Slice data were extracted from the 3D ultrasound volumes and used to generate time-intensity curves off-line in the regions corresponding to the tissue samples used for microvascular staining. The mid-line plane was also selected from the 3D volume (as a quasi-2D image) and compared to the 3D imaging modes. Perfusion was estimated from the initial slope of the fractional blood volume uptake (for both HI and SHI) and compared to the reference standard using linear regression analysis. Results Both 3D HI and SHI were able to provide visualization of flow and, thus, perfusion in the kidneys. However, SHI provided near complete tissue

  19. Non-invasive estimation of blood pressure using ultrasound contrast agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Scheldrup; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-01-01

    experiment. To compensate for variations in bubble response and to make the estimates more robust, the relation between the energy of the subharmonic and the fundamental component was chosen as a measure over the subharmonic peak amplitude. The preliminary study revealed the growth stage of the subharmonic...... measurement series at 485 kPa showed a sensitivity of 0.41 dB/kPa with a correlation coefficient of 0.89. Based on the measurements at 500 kPa, this acoustic driving pressure was concluded to be too high causing the bubbles to be destroyed. The pressure sensitivity for these two measurement series were 0......Local blood pressure measurements provide important information on the state of health of organs in the body and can be used to diagnose diseases in the heart, lungs, and kidneys. This paper presents an experimental setup for investigating the ambient pressure sensitivity of a contrast agent using...

  20. Impact of acoustic pressure on ambient pressure estimation using ultrasound contrast agent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Scheldrup; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2010-01-01

    on a preliminary experiment. To compensate for variations in bubble response and to make the estimates more robust, the relation between the energy of the subharmonic and the fundamental component was chosen as a measure over the subharmonic peak amplitude. The preliminary study revealed the growth stage.......94. The second measurement series at 485 kPa showed a sensitivity of 0.41 dB/kPa with a correlation coefficient of 0.89. Based on the measurements at 500 kPa, this acoustic driving pressure was concluded to be too high causing the bubbles to be destroyed. The pressure sensitivity for these two measurement series......Local blood pressure measurements provide important information on the state of health of organs in the body and can be used to diagnose diseases in the heart, lungs, and kidneys. This paper presents an approach for investigating the ambient pressure sensitivity of a contrast agent using diagnostic...

  1. Non-invasive estimation of blood pressure using ultrasound contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Klaus Scheldrup; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2010-01-01

    Local blood pressure measurements provide important information on the state of health of organs in the body and can be used to diagnose diseases in the heart, lungs, and kidneys. This paper presents an experimental setup for investigating the ambient pressure sensitivity of a contrast agent using diagnostic ultrasound. The setup resembles a realistic clinical setup utilizing a single array transducer for transmit and receive. The ambient pressure sensitivity of SonoVue (Bracco, Milano, Italy) was measured twice using two different acoustic driving pressures, which were selected based on a preliminary experiment. To compensate for variations in bubble response and to make the estimates more robust, the relation between the energy of the subharmonic and the fundamental component was chosen as a measure over the subharmonic peak amplitude. The preliminary study revealed the growth stage of the subharmonic component to occur at acoustic driving pressures between 300 and 500 kPa. Based on this, the pressure sensitivity was investigated using a driving pressure of 485 and 500 kPa. At 485 kPa, a linear pressure sensitivity of 0.42 dB/kPa was found having a linear correlation coefficient of 0.94. The second measurement series at 485 kPa showed a sensitivity of 0.41 dB/kPa with a correlation coefficient of 0.89. Based on the measurements at 500 kPa, this acoustic driving pressure was concluded to be too high causing the bubbles to be destroyed. The pressure sensitivity for these two measurement series were 0.42 and 0.25 dB/kPa with linear correlation coefficients of 0.98 and 0.93, respectively.

  2. Subharmonic emissions from microbubbles: effect of the driving pulse shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagi, Elena; Breschi, Luca; Vannacci, Enrico; Masotti, Leonardo

    2006-11-01

    The aims of this work are to investigate the response of the ultrasonic contrast agents (UCA) insonified by different arbitrary-shaped pulses at different acoustic pressures and concentration of the contrast agent focusing on subharmonic emission. A transmission setup was developed in order to insonify the contrast agent contained in a measurement chamber. The transmitted ultrasonic signals were generated by an arbitrary wave generator connected to a linear power amplifier able to drive a single-element transducer. The transmitted ultrasonic pulses that passed through the contrast agent-filled chamber were received by a second transducer or a hydrophone aligned with the first one. The radio frequency (RF) signals were acquired by fast echographic multiparameters multi-image novel apparatus (FEMMINA), which is an echographic platform able to acquire ultrasonic signals in a real-time modality. Three sets of ultrasonic signals were devised in order to evaluate subharmonic response of the contrast agent respect with sinusoidal burst signals used as reference pulses. A decreasing up to 30 dB in subharmonic response was detected for a Gaussian-shaped pulse; differences in subharmonic emission up to 21 dB were detected for a composite pulse (two-tone burst) for different acoustic pressures and concentrations. Results from this experimentation demonstrated that the transmitted pulse shape strongly affects subharmonic emission in spite of a second harmonic one. In particular, the smoothness of the initial portion of the shaped pulses can inhibit subharmonic generation from the contrast agents respect with a reference sinusoidal burst signal. It also was shown that subharmonic generation is influenced by the amplitude and the concentration of the contrast agent for each set of the shaped pulses. Subharmonic emissions that derive from a nonlinear mechanism involving nonlinear coupling among different oscillation modes are strongly affected by the shape of the ultrasonic

  3. Noninvasive Subharmonic Pressure Estimation for Monitoring Breast Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    labeling of each specimen by specimen- ink marking the true front, back, right and left [23]. Then specimens were placed in 10 % formalin phosphate...Evaluation of the temporal window for drug delivery following ultrasound-mediated membrane permeability enhancement. Mol Imaging Biol. 2011; 13:239

  4. Stable and transient subharmonic emissions from isolated contrast agent microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagi, Elena; Breschi, Luca; Vannacci, Enrico; Masotti, Leonardo

    2007-03-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have been widely studied in recent years in order to improve and develop new, sophisticated imaging techniques for clinical applications. In order to improve the understanding of microbubble-ultrasound interactions, an acoustic dynamic characterization of UCA microbubble behavior was performed in this work using a high frame-rate acquiring and processing system. This equipment is connected to a commercial scanner that provides RF beam-formed data with a frame-rate of 30 Hz. Acquired RF sequences allows us to follow the dynamics of cavitation mechanisms in its temporal evolution during different insonifying conditions. The experimental setup allowed us to keep the bubbles free in a spatial region of the supporting medium, thus avoiding boundary effects that can alter the ultrasound field and the scattered echo from bubbles. The work focuses on the study of subharmonic emission from an isolated bubble of contrast agent. In particular, the acoustic pressure threshold for a subharmonic stable emission was evaluated for a subset of 50 microbubbles at 3.3 MHz and at 5 MHz of insonation frequencies. An unexpected second pressure threshold, which caused the stand still of the subharmonic emission, was detected at 3.3 MHz and 5 MHz excitation frequencies. A transient subharmonic emission, which is hypothesized as being related to the formation of new free gas bubbles, was detected during the ultrasound-induced destruction of microbubbles. An experimental procedure was devised in order to investigate these behaviors and several sequences of RF echo signals and the related spectra, acquired from an isolated bubble in different insonation conditions, are presented and discussed in this paper.

  5. Estimated vapor pressure for WTP process streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pike, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Poirier, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-01-01

    Design assumptions during the vacuum refill phase of the Pulsed Jet Mixers (PJMs) in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) equate the vapor pressure of all process streams to that of water when calculating the temperature at which the vacuum refill is reduced or eliminated. WTP design authority asked the authors to assess this assumption by performing calculations on proposed feed slurries to calculate the vapor pressure as a function of temperature. The vapor pressure was estimated for each WTP waste group. The vapor pressure suppression caused by dissolved solids is much greater than the increase caused by organic components such that the vapor pressure for all of the waste group compositions is less than that of pure water. The vapor pressure for each group at 145°F ranges from 81% to 98% of the vapor pressure of water. If desired, the PJM could be operated at higher temperatures for waste groups with high dissolved solids that suppress vapor pressure. The SO4 group with the highest vapor pressure suppression could be operated up to 153°F before reaching the same vapor pressure of water at 145°F. However, most groups would reach equivalent vapor pressure at 147 to 148°F. If any of these waste streams are diluted, the vapor pressure can exceed the vapor pressure of water at mass dilution ratios greater than 10, but the overall effect is less than 0.5%.

  6. Subharmonic resonances of the parametrically driven pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butikov, Eugene I.

    2002-08-01

    A simple qualitative physical explanation is suggested for the phenomenon of subharmonic resonances of a rigid planar pendulum whose axis is forced to oscillate with a high frequency in the vertical direction. An approximate quantitative theory based on the suggested approach is developed. The spectral composition of the subharmonic resonances is investigated quantitatively, and the boundaries of these modes in the parameter space are determined. New related modes of regular behaviour are described and explained. The conditions of the inverted pendulum stability are determined with greater precision than previous results. A computer program simulating the physical system supports the analytical investigation.

  7. Harmonic balance analysis of the subharmonic ferroresonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akpinar, A.S. (Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Blacksea Technical Univ., Trabzon (TR)); Nasar, S.A. (Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (USA). Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    An increasing use of series capacitors to overcome the inductive voltage drops and to improve the power factor in distribution systems has revived the interest in ferrorsonance phenomenon. In this paper, an analytical approach and stability criteria for the sustained subharmonic ferroresonance phenomenon is presented. Certain comparisons between experimental and calculated results are included.

  8. Recent Experiences and Advances in Contrast-Enhanced Subharmonic Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Eisenbrey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging schemes strive to suppress tissue signals in order to better visualize nonlinear signals from blood-pooling ultrasound contrast agents. Because tissue does not generate a subharmonic response (i.e., signal at half the transmit frequency, subharmonic imaging has been proposed as a method for isolating ultrasound microbubble signals while suppressing surrounding tissue signals. In this paper, we summarize recent advances in the use of subharmonic imaging in vivo. These advances include the implementation of subharmonic imaging on linear and curvilinear arrays, intravascular probes, and three-dimensional probes for breast, renal, liver, plaque, and tumor imaging.

  9. Recent Experiences and Advances in Contrast-Enhanced Subharmonic Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbrey, John R; Sridharan, Anush; Liu, Ji-Bin; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging schemes strive to suppress tissue signals in order to better visualize nonlinear signals from blood-pooling ultrasound contrast agents. Because tissue does not generate a subharmonic response (i.e., signal at half the transmit frequency), subharmonic imaging has been proposed as a method for isolating ultrasound microbubble signals while suppressing surrounding tissue signals. In this paper, we summarize recent advances in the use of subharmonic imaging in vivo. These advances include the implementation of subharmonic imaging on linear and curvilinear arrays, intravascular probes, and three-dimensional probes for breast, renal, liver, plaque, and tumor imaging.

  10. Periodic and subharmonic solutions for second order p-Laplacian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of periodic and subharmonic solutions to second order p-Laplacian difference equa- tions are obtained by using the critical point theory. The proof is based on the Linking theorem in combination with variational technique. Keywords. Periodic and subharmonic solutions; p-Laplacian; difference equations; discrete variational ...

  11. A subharmonic vibratory pattern in normal vocal folds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svec, JG; Schutte, HK; Miller, DG

    This study observes in detail an F-0/2 (sounding an octave below an original tone) subharmonic vibratory pattern produced in a normal larynx. Simultaneous electroglottographic and photoglottographic measurements reveal two different open phases within a subharmonic cycle-the first shorter with a

  12. Iliac venous pressure estimates central venous pressure after laparotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Brian A; Kirk, Katherine A; Tucker, Nikia; Gunn, Scott; Forsythe, Raquel

    2014-09-01

    Central venous pressure (CVP) is traditionally obtained through subclavian or internal jugular central catheters; however, many patients who could benefit from CVP monitoring have only femoral lines. The accuracy of illiac venous pressure (IVP) as a measure of CVP is unknown, particularly following laparotomy. This was a prospective, observational study. Patients who had both internal jugular or subclavian lines and femoral lines already in place were eligible for the study. Pressure measurements were taken from both lines in addition to measurement of bladder pressure, mean arterial pressure, and peak airway pressure. Data were evaluated using paired t-test, Bland-Altman analysis, and linear regression. Measurements were obtained from 40 patients, 26 of which had laparotomy. The mean difference between measurements was 2.2 mm Hg. There were no significant differences between patients who had laparotomy and nonsurgical patients (P = 0.93). Bland-Altman analysis revealed a bias of 1.63 ± 2.44 mm Hg. There was no correlation between IVP accuracy and bladder pressure, mean arterial pressure, or peak airway pressure. IVP is an adequate measure of CVP, even in surgical patients who have had recent laparotomy. Measurement of IVP to guide resuscitation is encouraged in patients who have only femoral venous catheter access. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Estimation of vapour pressure and partial pressure of subliming ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    temperature curves are calculated at 80, 160 and 1000 mbar for salicylic acid and vanadyl bis-2,4- pentanedionate, a precursor used for chemical vapour deposition of vanadium oxides. Using a modification of the Langmuir equation, the partial pressure of these materials at different total pressures is also determined.

  14. SHM of single lap adhesive joints using subharmonic frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, D.; Ciampa, F.; Scarselli, G.; Meo, M.

    2017-10-01

    The increased usage of adhesive bonding as a joining method in modern aerospace components has led to developing reliable ultrasonic health monitoring systems for detection of regions of poor adhesion. Nonlinear acousto-ultrasonic techniques based on higher harmonics and subharmonic frequencies have shown to be sensitive to the detection of micro-voids and disbonds. Nonlinear resonance properties of disbonds generate various nonlinear phenomena such as self-modulation, subharmonics, hysteresis and so on. By exploiting the local natures of these phenomena, this paper demonstrates the use of subharmonics for detection and imaging of flaws in bonded structures. To optimise the experimental testing a two-dimensional analytical model and a three-dimensional finite element analysis simulation were developed for understanding the generation of nonlinear elastic effects with emphasis on subharmonic frequency components. The proposed analytical model qualitatively described the generation of subharmonics but also higher harmonics due to the nonlinear intermodulation of the driving and resonance frequencies associated with the disbonded region. The numerical model was developed by modifying the user defined cohesive element formulation with a bi-linear traction-displacement relationship in order to simulate the interaction of elastic waves with the structural disbond. Whilst the analytical model supported the selection of the driving frequency, the numerical one successfully predicted the generation of subharmonic frequencies originating in the disbonded area. Experimental tests were conducted on a disbonded single lap joint structure using surface-bonded piezoelectric transducers and a laser-Doppler vibrometer, and allowed to validate the analytical and numerical results. It was clearly demonstrated that the nonlinear resonance effects in the form of subharmonics could be used to discriminate reliably regions of poor adhesion in bonded structures. This work can lead to new

  15. Nonlinear Stochastic Analysis of Subharmonic Response of a Shallow Cable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Q.; Stærdahl, Jesper Winther; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2007-01-01

    The paper deals with the subharmonic response of a shallow cable due to time variations of the chord length of the equilibrium suspension, caused by time varying support point motions. Initially, the capability of a simple nonlinear two-degree-of-freedom model for the prediction of chaotic...... time-consuming for the finite difference model, most of the results are next based on the reduced model. Under harmonical varying support point motions the stable subharmonic motion consists of a harmonically varying component in the equilibrium plane and a large subharmonic out-of-plane component......, the slowly varying phase of the excitation implies that the phase difference between the in-plane and out-of-plane displacement components is not locked at a fixed value. In turn this implies that the trajectory of the displacement components is slowly rotating around the chord line. Hence, a large...

  16. Self-excited and subharmonic vibrations in a pilot rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumenko, A. I.; Kostyukov, V. N.; Kuzminykh, N. Yu.; Timin, A. V.

    2017-08-01

    The paper reviews the publications on low-frequency vibration in power plants. It is noted that the regulatory literature poorly defines the issues of rating and diagnosing self-excited and subharmonic vibrations. Analysis of the literature and ISO standards shows that despite the considerable experience gained by specialists in low-frequency vibration control, a number of issues, such as subharmonic resonances and nonlinear properties of complicated multi-seated rotor systems supported by journal bearings, are still understudied and require further calculations and experiments. The paper presents some results obtained in experiments of low-frequency vibrations for a rotor supported by journal bearings and having a residual deflection. The experimental results confirmed the classical hysteresis of self-excited vibrations - the difference in the boundaries of self-excited vibrations during ascent and descent is about 4 Hz. The arears of appearance and disappearance of subharmonic vibrations are shown using the spectral characteristics of vibrations and cascade spectra.

  17. Intraocular pressure estimation using proper orthogonal decomposition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, N

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available for corresponding pressures. The obtained numerical results are compared with the experimental data [5] in Figure 2 for three different age groups, with the corresponding material coefficients (c.f. Equation (2)) given in Table 3. It is clear from the RMSE, which...) for each material coefficient will be used for the sampling range in the POD analysis. Table 3. Optimized material coefficients obtained from the optimization process for the different age groups (maximum values are shown in red, and minimum in blue). C...

  18. Microwave dependence of subharmonic gap structure in superconducting junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O. Hoffman; Kofoed, Bent; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1974-01-01

    Experiments on both point-contact junctions (Nb-Nb) and on small area thin-film tunnel junctions (Sn-O-Sn) show that applied 4-mm radiation produces satellites associated with "subharmonic" gap structure as well as the familiar microwave-assisted tunneling structure associated with the supercondu...

  19. Sub-harmonic bunching with the AGOR cyclotron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandenburg, S; Roobol, LP; Stokroos, M; Marti, F

    2001-01-01

    A quasi-single gap buncher with saw-tooth voltage has been designed and is currently being built at the KVI. It operates at a sub-harmonic of the RF frequency and has a duty cycle of 80% at 15 MHz. We report on the design of the new buncher, and on results of tests with our sinusoidal buncher to

  20. A novel L-band polarimetric radiometer featuring subharmonic sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotbøll, J.; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Skou, Niels

    2003-01-01

    A novel L-band radiometer trading analog components for digital circuits has been designed, built and operated. It is a fully polarimetric radiometer of the correlation type, and it is based on the subharmonic sampling principle in which the L-band signal is directly sampled by a fast A to D...

  1. L-Band Polarimetric Correlation Radiometer with Subharmonic Sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotbøll, Jesper; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Skou, Niels

    2001-01-01

    A novel L-band radiometer trading analog complexity for digital ditto has been designed and built. It is a fully polarimetric radiometer of the correlation type and it is based on the sub-harmonic sampling principle in which the L-band signal is directly sampled by a fast A to D converter...

  2. Estimating the burden of disease attributable to high blood pressure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To estimate the burden of disease attributable to high blood pressure (BP) in adults aged 30 years and older in South Africa in 2000. Design. World Health Organization comparative risk assessment (CRA) methodology was followed. Mean systolic BP (SBP) estimates by age and sex were obtained from the 1998 ...

  3. Bayesian fusion algorithm for improved oscillometric blood pressure estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forouzanfar, Mohamad; Dajani, Hilmi R; Groza, Voicu Z; Bolic, Miodrag; Rajan, Sreeraman; Batkin, Izmail

    2016-11-01

    A variety of oscillometric algorithms have been recently proposed in the literature for estimation of blood pressure (BP). However, these algorithms possess specific strengths and weaknesses that should be taken into account before selecting the most appropriate one. In this paper, we propose a fusion method to exploit the advantages of the oscillometric algorithms and circumvent their limitations. The proposed fusion method is based on the computation of the weighted arithmetic mean of the oscillometric algorithms estimates, and the weights are obtained using a Bayesian approach by minimizing the mean square error. The proposed approach is used to fuse four different oscillometric blood pressure estimation algorithms. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated on a pilot dataset of 150 oscillometric recordings from 10 subjects. It is found that the mean error and standard deviation of error are reduced relative to the individual estimation algorithms by up to 7 mmHg and 3 mmHg in estimation of systolic pressure, respectively, and by up to 2 mmHg and 3 mmHg in estimation of diastolic pressure, respectively. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cuffless differential blood pressure estimation using smart phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Vikram; Dantu, Ram; Jonnada, Srikanth; Thiyagaraja, Shanti; Subbu, Kalyan Pathapati

    2013-04-01

    Smart phones today have become increasingly popular with the general public for their diverse functionalities such as navigation, social networking, and multimedia facilities. These phones are equipped with high-end processors, high-resolution cameras, and built-in sensors such as accelerometer, orientation-sensor, and light-sensor. According to comScore survey, 26.2% of U.S. adults use smart phones in their daily lives. Motivated by this statistic and the diverse capability of smart phones, we focus on utilizing them for biomedical applications. We present a new application of the smart phone with its built-in camera and microphone replacing the traditional stethoscope and cuff-based measurement technique, to quantify vital signs such as heart rate and blood pressure. We propose two differential blood pressure estimating techniques using the heartbeat and pulse data. The first method uses two smart phones whereas the second method replaces one of the phones with a customized external microphone. We estimate the systolic and diastolic pressure in the two techniques by computing the pulse pressure and the stroke volume from the data recorded. By comparing the estimated blood pressure values with those measured using a commercial blood pressure meter, we obtained encouraging results of 95-100% accuracy.

  5. The effect of velocity filtering in pressure estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavazzi, D. E.; Nemes, A.; Schmitter, S.; Coletti, F.

    2017-05-01

    Velocity field measurements allow, in principle, the evaluation of the pressure field by integrating the equations of fluid motion. Unavoidable experimental uncertainty, however, may result in unreliable estimates. In this study, we use the Poisson pressure equation to estimate the relative pressure from experimental velocities, and investigate how pre-processing with smoothing and solenoidal filters affects this estimate. For diffusion dominated laminar flow or for turbulent flow modeled through an eddy viscosity, measurement noise significantly affects the results. In this case, solenoidal filtering provides superior performance over other smoothing approaches, as it preserves the second spatial derivatives of the velocity field. For laminar flows dominated by advection or acceleration components of the pressure gradient, the choice of the filter appears to have little effect under limited noise, while smoothing produces improved relative pressure estimates for higher noise intensities. The above statements are verified using idealized flow conditions, numerical fluid dynamics simulations, and velocity fields from in-vivo and in-vitro magnetic resonance velocimetry.

  6. Energy expenditure estimation using triaxial accelerometry and barometric pressure measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voleno, Matteo; Redmond, Stephen J; Cerutti, Sergio; Lovell, Nigel H

    2010-01-01

    Energy expenditure (EE) is a parameter of great relevance in studies involving the assessment of physical activity. However, most reliable techniques for EE estimation are impractical for use in free-living environments, and those which are practically useful often poorly track EE when the subject is working to change their altitude, for example when ascending or descending stairs or slopes. The aim of this study is to evaluate the utility of adding barometric pressure related features, as a surrogate measure for altitude, to existing accelerometry related features to estimate the subject's EE. The EE estimation system described is based on a triaxial accelerometer (triax) and a barometric pressure sensor. The device is wireless, with Bluetooth connectivity for data retrieval, and is mounted at the subject's waist. Using a number of features extracted from the triax and barometric pressure signals, a linear model is trained for EE estimation. This EE estimation model is compared to its counterpart, which solely utilizes accelerometry signals. A protocol (comprising lying, sitting, standing, walking phases) was performed by 13 healthy volunteers (8 male and 5 female; age: 23.8 ± 3.7 years; weight: 70.5 ± 14.9 kg), whose instantaneous oxygen uptake was measured by means of an indirect calorimetry system. The model incorporating barometric pressure information estimated the oxygen uptake with the lowest mean square error of 4.5 ± 1.7 (mlO(2).min(-1).kg(-1))(2), in comparison to 7.1 ± 2.3 (mlO(2).min(-1).kg(-1))(2) using only accelerometry-based features.

  7. Explosion yield estimation from pressure wave template matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrowsmith, Stephen; Bowman, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    A method for estimating the yield of explosions from shock-wave and acoustic-wave measurements is presented. The method exploits full waveforms by comparing pressure measurements against an empirical stack of prior observations using scaling laws. The approach can be applied to measurements across a wide-range of source-to-receiver distances. The method is applied to data from two explosion experiments in different regions, leading to mean relative errors in yield estimates of 0.13 using prior data from the same region, and 0.2 when applied to a new region. PMID:28618805

  8. Estimation of tracheostomy tube cuff pressure by pilot balloon palpation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, C; Koury, E; Philpott, J; Sharma, S; Tolley, N; Narula, A

    2007-09-01

    Two methods can be used to assess the intra-cuff pressure of tracheostomy tubes: digital palpation of the pilot balloon and use of a hand-held manometer. We conducted a telephone survey to determine the prevalence of both methods in intensive care units within 21 teaching hospitals across the United Kingdom. Forty-two per cent of the intensive care units surveyed used a protocol for monitoring cuff pressure with a manometer.A study to compare these two methods, using the manometer as the reference standard, was then carried out. The cuff pressure was correctly estimated in pre-inflated tracheostomy tubes, in a tracheal model, by 61 per cent of a cross-section of intensive care unit and otolaryngology staff.Using pilot balloon palpation is inaccurate and leaves a significant proportion of patients at risk of tracheal injury. We advocate the wider availability of hand-held pressure manometers in intensive care units and the institution of protocols for monitoring cuff pressure for any patient with a tracheostomy tube with an inflated cuff in situ.

  9. Estimation of central venous pressure using inferior vena caval pressure from a femoral endovascular cooling catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung Kook; Lee, Hyoung Youn; Jeung, Kyung Woon; Jung, Yong Hun; Lee, Geo Sung

    2013-01-01

    Endovascular cooling using the femoral cooling catheter is widely practiced. Central venous pressure (CVP) monitoring in patients undergoing femoral endovascular cooling may require the placement of another catheter near the right atrium (RA). We sought to estimate the agreement between the CVP recorded from catheters placed in the superior vena caval pressure (SVCP) and the inferior vena caval pressure (IVCP) recorded from the femoral cooling catheter in patients undergoing femoral endovascular cooling. We enrolled adult cardiac arrest survivors undergoing femoral endovascular cooling. A commercially available central venous catheter was placed in the SVC (superior vena cava) near the RA via subclavian venous access. Both SVCP and IVCP were recorded every 4 hours during therapeutic hypothermia. Arterial pressure, heart rate, peak inspiratory pressure (PIP), and positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) at the time of vena caval pressure measurements were obtained. A total of 323 pairs of SVCP and IVCP measurements were collected. The correlation coefficient between SVCP and IVCP was 0.965 (P monitoring CVP. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Doppler echocardiography inaccurately estimates right ventricular pressure in children with elevated right heart pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groh, Georgeann K; Levy, Philip T; Holland, Mark R; Murphy, Joshua J; Sekarski, Timothy J; Myers, Craig L; Hartman, Diana P; Roiger, Rebecca D; Singh, Gautam K

    2014-02-01

    Doppler echocardiography (DE) is widely used as a surrogate for right heart catheterization (RHC), the gold standard, to assess and monitor elevated right heart pressure in children. However, its accuracy has not been prospectively validated in children. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the accuracy of DE in predicting simultaneously measured right ventricular (RV) pressure by RHC in pediatric patients and to determine if the degree of RV hypertension affects the accuracy of DE in assessing right heart pressure. Eighty children (age range, 0-17.9 years; median age, 5.5 years) with two-ventricle physiology and a wide range of right heart pressures underwent simultaneous DE and RHC. The pressure gradient between the right ventricle and the right atrium was directly measured by RHC and simultaneously estimated by DE using tricuspid regurgitation. Patients were then grouped on the basis of RHC-measured RV systolic pressure (RVSP): group 1 (n = 43), with RVSP children with elevated right heart pressure. It should not be relied on as the sole method of assessing right heart hemodynamics in children with RV hypertension. Copyright © 2014 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Experimental observation of subharmonic gap structures in long Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahn, M.A.; Manscher, Martin; Mygind, Jesper

    1999-01-01

    The subharmonic gap structure (SGS) in long-overlap Nb-AlOx-Nb Josephson tunnel junctions has been investigated. The experimental results show peaks in the differential conductance at both odd and even integer fractions of the gap voltage, VG Furthermore, the conductance peaks at V-G/2 has been...... observed to split into two peaks with different characteristics. At high magnetic fields, the I-V characteristics approach a single curve, while retaining the SGS conductance peaks. The gap structure and the SGS show the same temperature dependence. The SGS can be explained by a Josephson self...

  12. Application of subharmonics for active sound design of electric vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Doo Young; Yoon, Kiseop; Seong, Yeolwan; Lee, Soogab

    2014-12-01

    The powertrain of electric vehicles generates an unfamiliar acoustical environment for customers. This paper seeks optimal interior sound for electric vehicles based on psychoacoustic knowledge and musical harmonic theory. The concept of inserting a virtual sound, which consists of the subharmonics of an existing high-frequency component, is suggested to improve sound quality. Subjective evaluation results indicate that the impression of interior sound can be enhanced in this manner. Increased appeal is achieved through two designed stimuli, which proves the effectiveness of the method proposed.

  13. A personalized-model-based central aortic pressure estimation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Sheng; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Fang; Wu, Jian-Kang

    2016-12-08

    Central Aortic Pressure (CAP) can be used to predict cardiovascular structural damage and cardiovascular events, and the development of simple, well-validated and non-invasive methods for CAP waveforms estimation is critical to facilitate the routine clinical applications of CAP. Existing widely applied methods, such as generalized transfer function (GTF-CAP) method and N-Point Moving Average (NPMA-CAP) method, are based on clinical practices, and lack a mathematical foundation. Those methods also have inherent drawback that there is no personalisation, and missing individual aortic characteristics. To overcome this pitfall, we present a personalized-model-based central aortic pressure estimation method (PM-CAP)in this paper. This PM-CAP has a mathematical foundation: a human aortic network model is proposed which is developed based on viscous fluid mechanics theory and could be personalized conveniently. Via measuring the pulse wave at the proximal and distal ends of the radial artery, the least square method is then proposed to estimate patient-specific circuit parameters. Thus the central aortic pulse wave can be obtained via calculating the transfer function between the radial artery and central aorta. An invasive validation study with 18 subjects comparing PM-CAP with direct aortic root pressure measurements during percutaneous transluminal coronary intervention was carried out at the Beijing Hospital. The experimental results show better performance of the PM-CAP method compared to the GTF-CAP method and NPMA-CAP method, which illustrates the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Automatic estimation of pressure-dependent rate coefficients

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Joshua W.

    2012-01-01

    A general framework is presented for accurately and efficiently estimating the phenomenological pressure-dependent rate coefficients for reaction networks of arbitrary size and complexity using only high-pressure-limit information. Two aspects of this framework are discussed in detail. First, two methods of estimating the density of states of the species in the network are presented, including a new method based on characteristic functional group frequencies. Second, three methods of simplifying the full master equation model of the network to a single set of phenomenological rates are discussed, including a new method based on the reservoir state and pseudo-steady state approximations. Both sets of methods are evaluated in the context of the chemically-activated reaction of acetyl with oxygen. All three simplifications of the master equation are usually accurate, but each fails in certain situations, which are discussed. The new methods usually provide good accuracy at a computational cost appropriate for automated reaction mechanism generation. This journal is © the Owner Societies.

  15. Estimation of mean arterial pressure from the oscillometric cuff pressure: comparison of different techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dingchang; Amoore, John N; Mieke, Stephan; Murray, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Mean arterial pressure (MAP) is determined in most automated oscillometric blood pressure devices, but its derivation has been little studied. In this research, different techniques were studied and compared with the auscultatory technique. Auscultatory systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP) were obtained in 55 healthy subjects by two trained observers, and auscultatory MAP was estimated. Automated MAP was determined by six techniques from oscillometric cuff pressures recorded digitally and simultaneously during manual measurement. MAPs were derived from the peak and foot of the largest oscillometric pulse, and from time domain curves fitted to the sequence of oscillometric pulse amplitudes (4th order and three versions of the 6th order polynomial curve). The agreement between automated and auscultatory MAPs was assessed. Compared with the auscultatory MAP, the automated MAP from the baseline cuff pressure at the peak of the 6th order polynomial curve had the smallest mean paired difference (-1.0 mmHg), and smallest standard deviation of paired differences (3.7 mmHg). These values from the peak of the largest oscillometric pulse were -1.3 and 6.2 mmHg, respectively. Determining MAP from a model of the oscillometric pulse waveform had the smallest differences from the manual auscultatory technique.

  16. Oscillometric Blood Pressure Estimation: Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forouzanfar, Mohamad; Dajani, Hilmi R; Groza, Voicu Z; Bolic, Miodrag; Rajan, Sreeraman; Batkin, Izmail

    2015-01-01

    The use of automated blood pressure (BP) monitoring is growing as it does not require much expertise and can be performed by patients several times a day at home. Oscillometry is one of the most common measurement methods used in automated BP monitors. A review of the literature shows that a large variety of oscillometric algorithms have been developed for accurate estimation of BP but these algorithms are scattered in many different publications or patents. Moreover, considering that oscillometric devices dominate the home BP monitoring market, little effort has been made to survey the underlying algorithms that are used to estimate BP. In this review, a comprehensive survey of the existing oscillometric BP estimation algorithms is presented. The survey covers a broad spectrum of algorithms including the conventional maximum amplitude and derivative oscillometry as well as the recently proposed learning algorithms, model-based algorithms, and algorithms that are based on analysis of pulse morphology and pulse transit time. The aim is to classify the diverse underlying algorithms, describe each algorithm briefly, and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. This paper will also review the artifact removal techniques in oscillometry and the current standards for the automated BP monitors.

  17. Bispectra of Internal Tides and Parametric Subharmonic Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Frajka-Williams, Eleanor; MacKinnon, Jennifer A

    2014-01-01

    Bispectral analysis of the nonlinear resonant interaction known as parametric subharmonic instability (PSI) for a coherence semidiurnal internal tide demonstrates the ability of the bispectrum to identify and quantify the transfer rate. Assuming that the interaction is confined to a vertical plane, energy equations transform in such a way that nonlinear terms become the third-moment spectral quantity known as the bispectrum. Bispectral transfer rates computed on PSI in an idealized, fully-nonlinear, non-hydrostatic Boussinesq model compare well to model growth rates of daughter waves. Bispectra also identify the nonlinear terms responsible for energy transfer. Using resonance conditions for an M2 tide, the locus of PSI wavenumber triads is determined as a function of parent-wave frequency and wavenumbers, latitude and range of daughter-wave frequencies. The locus is used to determine the expected bispectral signal of PSI in wavenumber space. Bispectra computed using velocity profiles from the HOME experiment ...

  18. Estimation of lung volume and pressure from electrocardiogram

    KAUST Repository

    Elsayed, Gamal Eldin Fathy Amin

    2011-05-01

    The Electrocardiography (ECG) is a tool measuring the electrical excitation of the heart that is extensively used for diagnosis and monitoring of heart diseases. The ECG signal reflects not only the heart activity but also many other physiological processes. The respiratory activity is a prominent process that affects the ECG signal due to the close proximity of the heart and the lungs and, on the other hand, due to neural regulatory processes. In this paper, several means for the estimation of the respiratory process from the ECG signal are presented. The results show a strong correlation of the voltage difference between the R and S peak of the ECG and the lung\\'s volume and pressure. Correlation was also found for some features of the vector ECG, which is a two dimensional graph of two different ECG signals. The potential benefit of the multiparametric evaluation of the ECG signal is a reduction of the number of sensors connected to patients, which will increase the patients\\' comfort and reduce the costs associated with healthcare. In particular, it is relevant for sleep monitoring, where a reduction of the number of different sensors would facilitate a more natural sleeping environment and hence a higher sensitivity of the diagnosis. © 2011 IEEE.

  19. The effect of binding on the subharmonic emissions from individual lipid-encapsulated microbubbles at transmit frequencies of 11 and 25 MHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfield, Brandon L; Cherin, Emmanuel; Foster, F Stuart; Goertz, David E

    2013-02-01

    Targeted microbubble imaging at ultrasound frequencies above 5 MHz has applications in both a preclinical context for a range of disease processes and clinically for the assessment of atherosclerosis and superficial tumors. Although the feasibility of ultrasound molecular imaging has been well demonstrated for a range of target molecules, little work has examined the effects of binding on microbubble oscillations, which is of potential relevance to improving the sensitivity, specificity, and quantification of bound-bubble detection. In this study we investigated the influence of binding on the subharmonic response of bubbles at transmit frequencies of 11 and 25 MHz. Individual bubbles were situated adjacent to a boundary in either a bound or an unbound state, optically sized and acoustically interrogated with pressures ranging from 0.02 to 1.2 MPa. At 11 MHz, unbound bubbles (n = 53) were found to have strong subharmonic activity for sizes between 2.4 and 2.6 μm, whereas bound bubbles (n = 50) were most active from 2.6 to 3.0 μm. Destruction thresholds were found to be lower for bound bubbles. At 25 MHz, bound-bubble (n = 57) activity was found to peak at 1.9 μm as compared to 2.1 μm in the unbound cases (n = 53), with a 20% increase in amplitude. Comparison with simulations indicates that both unbound and bound bubbles undergo compression-only behavior at 11 MHz, and expansion-dominated behavior at 25 MHz. Subharmonic emissions elicited from 0 radian transmit pulses were found to be π/2 radians out of phase with those elicited from a π radian transmit pulse, suggesting inefficient subharmonic preservation from pulse inversion schemes. With the appropriate postprocessed phase correction, an increase in the subharmonic amplitude of up to 60% was shown, depending on the bubble size and transmit frequency. Copyright © 2013 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Self-demodulation effect on subharmonic response of ultrasound contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daeichin, V.; Faez, T.; Needles, A.; Renaud, G.; Bosch, J. G.; van der Steen, A. F. W.; de Jong, N.

    2012-03-01

    In this work the use of the self-demodulation (S-D) signal as a mean of microbubble excitation at the subharmonic (SH) frequency to enhance the SH emission of ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) is studied. SH emission from the UCA is of interest since it is produced only by the UCA and is free of the artifacts produced in harmonic imaging modes. The S-D wave is a low-frequency signal produced by nonlinear propagation of an ultrasound wave in the medium. Single element transducer experiments and numerical simulations were conducted at 10 MHz to study the effect of the S-D signal on the SH response of the UCA by modifying the envelope of the excitation bursts. For 6 and 20 transmitted cycles, the SH response is increased up to 25 dB and 22 dB because of the S-D stimulation for a burst with a rectangular envelope compared with a Gaussian envelope burst. Such optimized excitations were used in an array-based micro-ultrasound system (Vevo 2100, VisualSonics Inc., Toronto, ON, Canada) at 18 MHz for in vitro validation of SH imaging. This study suggests that a suitable design of the envelope of the transmit excitation to generate a S-D signal at the SH frequency can enhance the SH emission of UCA and real-time SH imaging is feasible with shorter transmit burst (6- cycle) and low acoustic pressure (~150 KPa) at high frequencies (>15 MHz).

  1. Broadband mid-IR subharmonic OPOs for molecular spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leindecker, Nick; Marandi, Alireza; Vodopyanov, Konstantin L.; Byer, Robert L.

    2012-02-01

    We generate broadband mid-infrared frequency combs via degenerate optical parametric oscillation in a subharmonic OPO. This technique efficiently transfers the desirable properties of shorter wavelength mode-locked sources to the mid- IR. Our OPO resonator is a 3m or 4m ring cavity composed of one pair of concave mirrors with R=50mm and four flat mirrors, all but one of which are gold coated with > 99% reflection. A single dielectric mirror is used to introduce the pump (2.05 micron from IMRA America, 75 MHz, 80 fs, 600mW or 1.55 micron from Menlo Systems C-fiber, 100 MHz, 70 fs, 350 mW or 1.56 micron from Toptica Photonics FemtoFiber Pro, 80 MHz, 85 fs, 380 mW). The dielectric mirror is transmissive for the pump and reflective in a 2.5- 4 micron or 3- 6 micron (for 2 micron pump) range. Broadband parametric gain around the 3.1-micron subharmonic is provided by short (0.2-0.5mm) periodically poled lithium niobate (MgO:PPLN) at Brewster angle. Crystals were cut from Crystal Technology Inc. material having QPM period of 34.8 microns for type 0 (e=e+e) phase matching at t=32 deg. C. With the 2-micron pump, orientation patterned gallium arsenide from BAE systems is used as the non-linear material In both systems, the enormous acceptance bandwidth at degeneracy, typical for OPOs with type 0 (or type I) phase-matching, gives broad bandwidth and makes temperature tuning insignificant. Broadband oscillation is achieved when signal/idler are brought into degenerate resonance by fine-tuning the cavity length with a mirror on a piezo stage. Using an 8% reflective pellicle, we outcouple a frequency comb of more than 1000nm bandwidth, centered around 3.1 microns from the Er/PPLN system. A 1mm or 2.5mm thick ZnSe plate at Brewster angle provides 2nd-order group velocity dispersion compensation, improving the OPO bandwidth. The OPO threshold was measured to be < 30mW. When locked, the OPO outputs 60 mW of average power centered at 3.1 microns. With the Tm/OP-GaAs system we

  2. Subharmonic Oscillations and Chaos in Dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of dynamic atomic force microscopy (d-AFM) for nanoscale materials characterization calls for a deeper understanding of the cantilever dynamics influencing scan stability, predictability, and image quality. Model development is critical to such understanding. Renormalization of the equations governing d- AFM provides a simple interpretation of cantilever dynamics as a single spring and mass system with frequency dependent cantilever stiffness and damping parameters. The renormalized model is sufficiently robust to predict the experimentally observed splitting of the free-space cantilever resonance into multiple resonances upon cantilever-sample contact. Central to the model is the representation of the cantilever sample interaction force as a polynomial expansion with coefficients F(sub ij) (i,j = 0, 1, 2) that account for the effective interaction stiffness parameter, the cantilever-to-sample energy transfer, and the amplitude of cantilever oscillation. Application of the Melnikov method to the model equation is shown to predict a homoclinic bifurcation of the Smale horseshoe type leading to a cascade of period doublings with increasing drive displacement amplitude culminating in chaos and loss of image quality. The threshold value of the drive displacement amplitude necessary to initiate subharmonic generation depends on the acoustic drive frequency, the effective damping coefficient, and the nonlinearity of the cantilever-sample interaction force. For parameter values leading to displacement amplitudes below threshold for homoclinic bifurcation other bifurcation scenarios can occur, some of which lead to chaos.

  3. Damage detection of fatigue cracks under nonlinear boundary condition using subharmonic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mengyang; Xiao, Li; Qu, Wenzhong; Lu, Ye

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, the nonlinear ultrasonic technique has been widely utilized for detecting fatigue crack, one of the most common forms of damage. However, one of limitations associated with this technique is that nonlinearities can be produced not only by damage but also by various intrinsic effects such as boundary conditions. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the application of a nonlinear ultrasonic subharmonic method for detecting fatigue cracks with nonlinear boundary conditions. The fatigue crack was qualitatively modeled as two elastic, frictionless half spaces that enter into contact during vibration and where the contact obeys the basic Hertz contact law. The nonlinear ordinary differential equation drawn from the developed model was solved with the method of multiple scales. The threshold of subharmonic generation was studied. Different threshold behaviors between the nonlinear boundary condition and the fatigue crack were found that can be used to distinguish the source of nonlinear subharmonic features. To evaluate the proposed method, experiments using an aluminum plate with a fatigue crack were conducted to quantitatively verify the subharmonic resonance range. Two surface-bonded piezoelectric transducers were used to generate and receive ultrasonic wave signals. The experimental results demonstrated that the subharmonic component of the sensing signal could be used to detect the fatigue crack and further to distinguish it from inherent nonlinear boundary conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Estimation of bladder contractility from intravesical pressure-volume measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Christopher H; Gammie, Andrew; Drake, Marcus John; Abrams, Paul; Kitney, Darryl Graham; Vahabi, Bahareh

    2017-04-01

    To describe parameters from urodynamic pressure recordings that describe urinary bladder contractility through the use of principles of muscle mechanics. Subtracted detrusor pressure and voided flow were recorded from patients undergoing filling cystometry. The isovolumetric increase of detrusor pressure, P, of a voluntary bladder contraction before voiding was used to generate a plot of (dP/dt)/P versus P. Extrapolation of the plot to the y-axis and the x-axis generated a contractility parameter, vCE (the maximum rate of pressure development) and the maximum isovolumetric pressure, P0 , respectively. Similar curves were obtained in ex vivo pig bladders with different concentrations of the inotropic agent carbachol and shown in a supplement. Values of vCE , but not P0 , diminished with age in female subjects. vCE was most significantly associated with the 20-80% duration of isovolumetric contraction t20-80 ; and a weaker association with maximum flow rate and BCI in women. P0 was not associated with any urodynamic variable in women, but in men was with t20-80 and isovolumetric pressure indices. The rate of isovolumetric subtracted detrusor pressure (t20-80 ) increase shows a very significant association with indices of bladder contractility as derived from a derived force-velocity curve. We propose that t20-80 is a detrusor contractility parameter (DCP). Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:1009-1014, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Estimation of turgor pressure through comparison between single plant cell and pressurized shell mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand-Smet, P.; Gauquelin, E.; Chastrette, N.; Boudaoud, A.; Asnacios, A.

    2017-10-01

    While plant growth is well known to rely on turgor pressure, it is challenging to quantify the contribution of turgor pressure to plant cell rheology. Here we used a custom-made micro-rheometer to quantify the viscoelastic behavior of isolated plant cells while varying their internal turgor pressure. To get insight into how plant cells adapt their internal pressure to the osmolarity of their medium, we compared the mechanical behavior of single plant cells to that of a simple, passive, pressurized shell: a soccer ball. While both systems exhibited the same qualitative behavior, a simple mechanical model allowed us to quantify turgor pressure regulation at the single cell scale.

  6. Stable subharmonic solutions and asymptotic behavior in reaction-diffusion equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Polacik

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-periodic reaction-diffusion equations can be discussed in the context of discrete-time strongly monotone dynamical systems. It follows from the general theory that typical trajectories approach stable periodic solutions. Among these periodic solutions, there are some that have the same period as the equation, but, possibly, there might be others with larger minimal periods (these are called subharmonic solutions. The problem of existence of stable subharmonic solutions is therefore of fundamental importance in the study of the behavior of solutions. We address this problem for two classes of reaction diffusion equations under Neumann boundary conditions. Namely, we consider spatially inhomogeneous equations, which can have stable subharmonic solutions on any domain, and spatially homogeneous equations, which can have such solutions on some (necessarily non-convex domains.

  7. A new device to noninvasively estimate the intraocular pressure produced during ocular compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korenfeld MS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael S Korenfeld,1,2 David K Dueker3 1Comprehensive Eye Care, Ltd., 2Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, Washington, MO, USA; 3Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar Purpose: To describe a noninvasive instrument that estimates intraocular pressure during episodes of external globe compression and to demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of this device by comparing it to the intraocular pressures simultaneously and manometrically measured in cannulated eyes. Methods: A thin fluid-filled bladder was constructed from flexible and inelastic plastic sheeting and was connected to a pressure transducer with high pressure tubing. The output of the pressure transducer was sent to an amplifier and recorded. This device was validated by measuring induced pressure in the fluid-filled bladder while digital pressure was applied to one surface, and the other surface was placed directly against a human cadaver eye or in vivo pig eye. The human cadaver and in vivo pig eyes were each cannulated to provide a manometric intraocular pressure control. Results: The measurements obtained with the newly described device were within ~5% of simultaneously measured manometric intraocular pressures in both a human cadaver and in vivo pig eye model for a pressure range of ~15–100 mmHg. Conclusion: This novel noninvasive device is useful for estimating the intraocular pressure transients induced during any form of external globe compression; this is a clinical setting where no other devices can be used to estimate intraocular pressure. Keywords: glaucoma, intraocular pressure, tonometer, ocular compression

  8. Estimation of pressure drop in gasket plate heat exchangers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neagu Anisoara Arleziana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present comparatively different methods of pressure drop calculation in the gasket plate heat exchangers (PHEs, using correlations recommended in literature on industrial data collected from a vegetable oil refinery. The goal of this study was to compare the results obtained with these correlations, in order to choose one or two for practical purpose of pumping power calculations. We concluded that pressure drop values calculated with Mulley relationship and Buonopane & Troupe correlation were close and also Bond’s equation gave results pretty close to these but the pressure drop is slightly underestimated. Kumar correlation gave results far from all the others and its application will lead to oversize. In conclusion, for further calculations we will chose either the Mulley relationship or the Buonopane & Troupe correlation.

  9. Parametric subharmonic imaging using a commercial intravascular ultrasound scanner: an in vivo feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbrey, John R; Sridharan, Anush; deMuinck, Ebo D; Doyley, Marvin M; Forsberg, Flemming

    2012-03-01

    The feasibility of visualizing atherosclerotic plaque using parametric subharmonic intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was investigated in vivo. Atherosclerosis was induced in the aorta of 2 rabbits. Following injection of Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, North Billerica, MA), radiofrequency IVUS signals were acquired at 40 MHz with a Galaxy IVUS scanner (Boston Scientific/Scimed, Natick, MA). Subharmonic imaging (SHI; receiving at 20 MHz) was performed offline by applying an 8-order equalization filter. Contrast-to-tissue ratios (CTRs) were computed for the vessel relative to the plaque area over 4 time points. Contrast-to-tissue ratios were also calculated for the plaque-tissue and vessel-tissue from 4 tissue regions of interest at 4 time points. Finally, parametric images showing the cumulative maximum intensity (CMI), time to peak, perfusion (PER), and time-integrated intensity (TII) were generated for the fundamental and subharmonic data sets, and CTR measurements were repeated. Injection of the contrast agent resulted in improved delineation between plaque and the vessel lumen. Subharmonic imaging resulted in noticeable tissue suppression, although the intensity from the contrast agent was reduced. No significant improvement in the plaque to vessel lumen CTR was observed between the subharmonic and fundamental IVUS (2.1 ± 3.64 versus 2.2 ± 4.20; P = .5). However, the CTR for plaque-tissue was improved (11.8 ± 7.32 versus 9.9 ± 7.06; P < .0001) for SHI relative to fundamental imaging. Cumulative-maximum-intensity and TII maps of both fundamental and subharmonic data provided increased CTRs relative to nonparametric data sets (P < .002). Additionally, the CMI, PER, and TII of SHI IVUS showed significantly improved vessel-plaque CTRs for SHI relative to the fundamental (P < .04). Parametric SHI IVUS of atherosclerotic plaque is feasible and improves the visualization of the plaque.

  10. Parametric Subharmonic Imaging Using a Commercial Intravascular Ultrasound Scanner An In Vivo Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbrey, John R.; Sridharan, Anush; deMuinck, Ebo D.; Doyley, Marvin M.; Forsberg, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The feasibility of visualizing atherosclerotic plaque using parametric subharmonic intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was investigated in vivo. Methods Atherosclerosis was induced in the aorta of 2 rabbits. Following injection of Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, North Billerica, MA), radiofrequency IVUS signals were acquired at 40 MHz with a Galaxy IVUS scanner (Boston Scientific/Scimed, Natick, MA). Subharmonic imaging (SHI; receiving at 20 MHz) was performed offline by applying an 8-order equalization filter. Contrast-to-tissue ratios (CTRs) were computed for the vessel relative to the plaque area over 4 time points. Contrast-to-tissue ratios were also calculated for the plaque-tissue and vessel-tissue from 4 tissue regions of interest at 4 time points. Finally, parametric images showing the cumulative maximum intensity (CMI), time to peak, perfusion (PER), and time-integrated intensity (TII) were generated for the fundamental and subharmonic data sets, and CTR measurements were repeated. Results Injection of the contrast agent resulted in improved delineation between plaque and the vessel lumen. Subharmonic imaging resulted in noticeable tissue suppression, although the intensity from the contrast agent was reduced. No significant improvement in the plaque to vessel lumen CTR was observed between the subharmonic and fundamental IVUS (2.1 ± 3.64 versus 2.2 ± 4.20; P = .5). However, the CTR for plaque-tissue was improved (11.8 ± 7.32 versus 9.9 ± 7.06; P < .0001) for SHI relative to fundamental imaging. Cumulative-maximum-intensity and TII maps of both fundamental and subharmonic data provided increased CTRs relative to nonparametric data sets (P< .002). Additionally, the CMI, PER, and TII of SHI IVUS showed significantly improved vessel-plaque CTRs for SHI relative to the fundamental (P < .04). Conclusions Parametric SHI IVUS of atherosclerotic plaque is feasible and improves the visualization of the plaque. PMID:22368126

  11. Contrast-Enhanced Subharmonic and Harmonic Ultrasound of Renal Masses Undergoing Percutaneous Cryoablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbrey, John R; Shaw, Colette M; Lyshchik, Andrej; Machado, Priscilla; Lallas, Costas D; Trabulsi, Edouard J; Merton, Daniel A; Fox, Traci B; Liu, Ji-Bin; Brown, Daniel B; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare contrast-enhanced subharmonic and harmonic ultrasound as tools for characterizing solid renal masses and monitoring their response to cryoablation therapy. Sixteen patients undergoing percutaneous ablation of a renal mass provided informed consent to undergo ultrasound examinations the morning before and approximately 4 months after cryoablation. Ultrasound contrast parameters during pretreatment imaging were compared to biopsy results obtained during ablation (n = 13). Posttreatment changes were evaluated by a radiologist and compared to contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/computed tomography (CT) follow-up. All masses initially showed heterogeneous enhancement with both subharmonic and harmonic ultrasound. Early contrast washout in the mass relative to the cortex was observed in 6 of 9 malignant and 0 of 4 benign lesions in subharmonic mode and 8 of 9 malignant and 1 of 4 benign lesions in harmonic imaging. In cases where the lesion was adequately visualized at follow-up (n = 12), subharmonic and harmonic ultrasound showed accuracies of 83% and 75%, respectively, in predicting treatment outcome. Although harmonic imaging showed less overall error, no significant differences (P > .29) in ablation cavity volumes were observed between MRI/CT and either contrast-imaging mode. Subharmonic and harmonic contrast-enhanced ultrasound may be a safe and accurate imaging alternative for characterizing renal masses and evaluating their response to cryoablation therapy. Although subharmonic imaging was more accurate in detecting effective cryoablation, harmonic imaging was superior in quantifying ablation cavity volumes. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. 3D Subharmonic Ultrasound Imaging In Vitro and In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbrey, John R.; Sridharan, Anush; Machado, Priscilla; Zhao, Hongjia; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G.; Dave, Jaydev K.; Liu, Ji-Bin; Park, Suhyun; Dianis, Scott; Wallace, Kirk; Thomenius, Kai E.; Forsberg, F.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives While contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging techniques such as harmonic imaging (HI) have evolved to reduce tissue signals using the nonlinear properties of the contrast agent, levels of background suppression have been mixed. Subharmonic imaging (SHI) offers near-complete tissue suppression by centering the receive bandwidth at half the transmitting frequency. In this work we demonstrate the feasibility of 3D SHI and compare it to 3D HI. Materials and Methods 3D HI and SHI were implemented on a Logiq 9 ultrasound scanner (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, Wisconsin) with a 4D10L probe. Four-cycle SHI was implemented to transmit at 5.8 MHz and receive at 2.9 MHz, while 2-cycle HI was implemented to transmit at 5 MHz and receive at 10 MHz. The ultrasound contrast agent Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, North Billerica, MA) was imaged within a flow phantom and the lower pole of two canine kidneys in both HI and SHI modes. Contrast to tissue ratios (CTR) and rendered images were compared offline. Results SHI resulted in significant improvement in CTR levels relative to HI both in vitro (12.11±0.52 vs. 2.67±0.77, p<0.001) and in vivo (5.74±1.92 vs. 2.40±0.48, p=0.04). Rendered 3D SHI images provided better tissue suppression and a greater overall view of vessels in a flow phantom and canine renal vasculature. Conclusions The successful implementation of SHI in 3D allows imaging of vascular networks over a heterogeneous sample volume and should improve future diagnostic accuracy. Additionally, 3D SHI provides improved CTR values relative to 3D HI. PMID:22464198

  13. Pulsed-squeezed-light generation in a waveguide with second-subharmonic generation and periodic corrugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peřina, Jan, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Quantum pulsed second-subharmonic generation in a planar waveguide with a small periodic corrugation at the surface is studied. Backscattering of the interacting fields on the corrugation enhances the nonlinear interaction, giving larger values of squeezing. The problem of backscattering is treated by perturbation theory, using the Fourier transform for nondispersion propagation, and by numerical approach in the general case. Optimum spectral modes for squeezed-light generation are found using the Bloch-Messiah reduction. An improvement in squeezing and increase of the numbers of generated photons are quantified for the corrugation resonating with the fundamental and second-subharmonic field. Splitting of the generated pulse by the corrugation is predicted.

  14. Challenges in estimating insecticide selection pressures from mosquito field data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Barbosa

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Insecticide resistance has the potential to compromise the enormous effort put into the control of dengue and malaria vector populations. It is therefore important to quantify the amount of selection acting on resistance alleles, their contributions to fitness in heterozygotes (dominance and their initial frequencies, as a means to predict the rate of spread of resistance in natural populations. We investigate practical problems of obtaining such estimates, with particular emphasis on Mexican populations of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti. Selection and dominance coefficients can be estimated by fitting genetic models to field data using maximum likelihood (ML methodology. This methodology, although widely used, makes many assumptions so we investigated how well such models perform when data are sparse or when spatial and temporal heterogeneity occur. As expected, ML methodologies reliably estimated selection and dominance coefficients under idealised conditions but it was difficult to recover the true values when datasets were sparse during the time that resistance alleles increased in frequency, or when spatial and temporal heterogeneity occurred. We analysed published data on pyrethroid resistance in Mexico that consists of the frequency of a Ile1,016 mutation. The estimates for selection coefficient and initial allele frequency on the field dataset were in the expected range, dominance coefficient points to incomplete dominance as observed in the laboratory, although these estimates are accompanied by strong caveats about possible impact of spatial and temporal heterogeneity in selection.

  15. Cuff-Free Blood Pressure Estimation Using Pulse Transit Time and Heart Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruiping; Jia, Wenyan; Mao, Zhi-Hong; Sclabassi, Robert J; Sun, Mingui

    2014-10-01

    It has been reported that the pulse transit time (PTT), the interval between the peak of the R-wave in electrocardiogram (ECG) and the fingertip photoplethysmogram (PPG), is related to arterial stiffness, and can be used to estimate the systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). This phenomenon has been used as the basis to design portable systems for continuously cuff-less blood pressure measurement, benefiting numerous people with heart conditions. However, the PTT-based blood pressure estimation may not be sufficiently accurate because the regulation of blood pressure within the human body is a complex, multivariate physiological process. Considering the negative feedback mechanism in the blood pressure control, we introduce the heart rate (HR) and the blood pressure estimate in the previous step to obtain the current estimate. We validate this method using a clinical database. Our results show that the PTT, HR and previous estimate reduce the estimated error significantly when compared to the conventional PTT estimation approach (p<0.05).

  16. Estimating Shock Pressures in Chondrites From High-Pressure Minerals in Shock-induced Melt Veins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Z.; Sharp, T. G.

    2002-12-01

    High-pressure minerals are common in highly shocked (S6) L6 chondrites, occurring within or adjacent to shock-induced melt veins and melt pockets. They provide natural examples of high-pressure minerals that make up the Earth's transition zone (410 to 660 km depth) and lower mantle, as well as a record of high-pressure and temperature conditions during impact events on chondrite parent bodies. The high-pressure minerals that crystallize in melt veins and pockets can be used as an alternative means of investigating shock pressure. We used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to characterize the shock-vein mineralogy in seven L6 chondrites ranging from shock stage S6 to S3: Tenham (S6), Umbarger (S6), Roy (S3-5), Ramsdorf (S4), Kunashak (S4), Nakhon Pathon (S4) and La Lande (S4). Tenham contains assemblages that reflect variable cooling rates during crystallization. Majorite plus magnesiow\\x81stite occur in the center of melt veins, whereas ringwoodite, akimotoite and round amorphous grains (probably vitrified MgSiO3-pervoskite) occur along melt-vein edges. In addition, a symplectitic intergrowth of majorite and an amorphous phase has been observed, which probably represents clinopyroxene that has disassociated into majorite plus CaSiO3-pervoskite. High pressure minerals in the Umbarger melt veins include: ringwoodite, akimotoite ((Mg,Fe)SiO3-ilmenite), augite, and hollandite-structured plagioclase. In addition, Fe2SiO4-spinel (new mineral) and stishovite occur in SiO2-FeO rich melt. High-pressure minerals in the Roy melt veins include ringwoodite and majorite. Melt veins in Ramsdorf, Kunashak, Nakhon Pathon and La lande contain fine-grained olivines and pyroxenes that are defect free and interpreted as having crystallized from the melt. Crystallization pressures can be inferred from the mineral assemblages in the melt veins and available phase equilibrium data. Melt veins in Tenham crystallized at pressure of approximately 25 GPa; Umbarger at pressure between 18

  17. On Using Maximum a Posteriori Probability Based on a Bayesian Model for Oscillometric Blood Pressure Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soojeong Lee

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The maximum amplitude algorithm (MAA is generally utilized in the estimation of the pressure values, and it uses heuristically obtained ratios of systolic and diastolic oscillometric amplitude to the mean arterial pressure (known as systolic and diastolic ratios in order to estimate the systolic and diastolic pressures. This paper proposes a Bayesian model to estimate the systolic and diastolic ratios. These ratios are an improvement over the single fixed systolic and diastolic ratios used in the algorithms that are available in the literature. The proposed method shows lower mean difference (MD with standard deviation (SD compared to the MAA for both SBP and DBP consistently in all the five measurements.

  18. On Using Maximum a Posteriori Probability Based on a Bayesian Model for Oscillometric Blood Pressure Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soojeong; Jeon, Gwanggil; Lee, Gangseong

    2013-01-01

    The maximum amplitude algorithm (MAA) is generally utilized in the estimation of the pressure values, and it uses heuristically obtained ratios of systolic and diastolic oscillometric amplitude to the mean arterial pressure (known as systolic and diastolic ratios) in order to estimate the systolic and diastolic pressures. This paper proposes a Bayesian model to estimate the systolic and diastolic ratios. These ratios are an improvement over the single fixed systolic and diastolic ratios used in the algorithms that are available in the literature. The proposed method shows lower mean difference (MD) with standard deviation (SD) compared to the MAA for both SBP and DBP consistently in all the five measurements. PMID:24152924

  19. Pressure Field Estimates in a Three-Dimensional Turbulent Wall Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Adam; Ukeiley, Lawrence; Reger, Robert; Cattafesta, Louis

    2017-11-01

    Low-order estimates of turbulent velocity fields are useful for understanding large-scale motions in turbulent flows. The use of these estimates for the calculation of coupled quantities such as the hydrodynamic pressure however has not been fully evaluated in terms of the quantitative features that are reproduced in many three-dimensional flows. In this work, 16 individual spanwise aligned particle image velocimetry measurement planes of an aspect ratio 8 wall jet are independently obtained, synchronously with 32 surface pressure transducer measurements. An estimate of the three-dimensional velocity field is calculated via modified stochastic estimation and used to solve Poisson's equation for pressure fluctuations throughout the measurement ``volume.'' The large scale vortical motion captured by the velocity estimates result in convecting, intermittent positive and negative pressure regions throughout the wall jet. The estimated surface pressure spectrum captures similar features as the measurements in the most energetic portion of the spectrum and matches measured spectral magnitudes well in the region impacted by the breakdown of the jet core where the near wall region is impacted by the large scale motion. Knowledge of the pressure field also allows for the calculation of pressure related terms from the Reynolds stress transport equation, which can be of use in the construction of turbulence models. Florida Center for Advanced Aero-Propulsion.

  20. Subharmonic Resonance of Van Der Pol Oscillator with Fractional-Order Derivative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Shen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The subharmonic resonance of van der Pol (VDP oscillator with fractional-order derivative is studied by the averaging method. At first, the first-order approximate solutions are obtained by the averaging method. Then the definitions of equivalent linear damping coefficient (ELDC and equivalent linear stiffness coefficient (ELSC for subharmonic resonance are established, and the effects of the fractional-order parameters on the ELDC, the ELSC, and the dynamical characteristics of system are also analysed. Moreover, the amplitude-frequency equation and phase-frequency equation of steady-state solution for subharmonic resonance are established. The corresponding stability condition is presented based on Lyapunov theory, and the existence condition for subharmonic resonance (ECSR is also obtained. At last, the comparisons of the fractional-order and the traditional integer-order VDP oscillator are fulfilled by the numerical simulation. The effects of the parameters in fractional-order derivative on the steady-state amplitude, the amplitude-frequency curves, and the system stability are also studied.

  1. Subharmonic solutions of planar Hamiltonian systems via the Poincaré́-Birkhoff theorem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Boscaggin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We revisit some recent results obtained in [1] about the existence of subharmonic solutions for a class of (nonautonomous planar Hamiltonian systems, and we compare them with the existing literature. New applications to undamped second order equations are discussed, as well.

  2. Subharmonic generation in Josephson junction fluxon oscillators biased on Fiske steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Peter; Christiansen, Peter Leth; Parmentier, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    Numerical integration of the perturbed sine-Gordon equation describing a long overlap-geometry Josephson junction in a magnetic field indicates a branched structure of the first Fiske step. The major portion of the step corresponds to a simply periodic fluxon oscillation whereas the branches are ...... are characterized by subharmonic generation. Applied Physics Letters is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  3. Effect of self-demodulation on the subharmonic response of contrast agent microbubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Daeichin (Verya); T. Faez (Telli); G. Renaud (G.); J.G. Bosch (Hans); A.F.W. van der Steen (Ton); N. de Jong (Nico)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractSubharmonic (SH) emission from the ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) is of interest since it is produced only by the UCA and not by tissue, opposite to harmonic imaging modes where both tissue and microbubble show harmonics. In this work, the use of the self-demodulation (S-D) signal as a

  4. An InP HBT sub-harmonic mixer for E-band wireless communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Krozer, Viktor

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a novel balanced HBT subharmonic mixer (SHM) for E-band wireless communication. An LO spiral type Marchand balun is integrated with the SHM. The SHM has been fabricated in a InP double heterojunction bipolar transistor (DHBT) circuit-oriented technology with fT /fmax = 180GHz...

  5. Parametric imaging using subharmonic signals from ultrasound contrast agents in patients with breast lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbrey, John R; Dave, Jaydev K; Merton, Daniel A; Palazzo, Juan P; Hall, Anne L; Forsberg, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    Parametric maps showing perfusion of contrast media can be useful tools for characterizing lesions in breast tissue. In this study we show the feasibility of parametric subharmonic imaging (SHI), which allows imaging of a vascular marker (the ultrasound contrast agent) while providing near complete tissue suppression. Digital SHI clips of 16 breast lesions from 14 women were acquired. Patients were scanned using a modified LOGIQ 9 scanner (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) transmitting/receiving at 4.4/2.2 MHz. Using motion-compensated cumulative maximum intensity (CMI) sequences, parametric maps were generated for each lesion showing the time to peak (TTP), estimated perfusion (EP), and area under the time-intensity curve (AUC). Findings were grouped and compared according to biopsy results as benign lesions (n = 12, including 5 fibroadenomas and 3 cysts) and carcinomas (n = 4). For each lesion CMI, TTP, EP, and AUC parametric images were generated. No significant variations were detected with CMI (P = .80), TTP (P = .35), or AUC (P = .65). A statistically significant variation was detected for the average pixel EP (P = .002). Especially, differences were seen between carcinoma and benign lesions (mean ± SD, 0.10 ± 0.03 versus 0.05 ± 0.02 intensity units [IU]/s; P = .0014) and between carcinoma and fibroadenoma (0.10 ± 0.03 versus 0.04 ± 0.01 IU/s; P = .0044), whereas differences between carcinomas and cysts were found to be nonsignificant. In conclusion, a parametric imaging method for characterization of breast lesions using the high contrast to tissue signal provided by SHI has been developed. While the preliminary sample size was limited, results show potential for breast lesion characterization based on perfusion flow parameters.

  6. Noninvasive estimation of 2-D pressure gradients in steady flow using ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Traberg, Marie Sand; Pihl, Michael Johannes

    2014-01-01

    A noninvasive method for estimating 2-D pressure gradients from ultrasound vector velocity data is presented. It relies on vector velocity fields acquired using the transverse oscillation method during steady flow conditions. The pressure gradients are calculated from the velocity fields using...... phantom. The geometry of the model is determined from magnetic resonance imaging. The presented study is conducted assuming steady flow using velocity data acquired at 18 frames per second. The proposed method shows pressure gradients at the constricted region from -8 kPa/m to 9 kPa/m, with a maximum bias...... of -7% for the axial component and -8% for the lateral component. The relative standard deviation of the estimator is 5% (axial component) and 30% (lateral component) when studying the pressure gradient across the constriction using 3 velocity frames per pressure estimate. The study shows that 2-D...

  7. Estimated daily salt intake in relation to blood pressure and blood lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Betina H; Toft, Ulla; Buhelt, Lone

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Excessive salt intake causes increased blood pressure which is considered the leading risk for premature death. One major challenge when evaluating associations between daily salt intake and markers of non-communicable diseases is that a high daily salt intake correlates with obesity......, which is also a well described risk factor for poor cardiometabolic outcome. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship of estimated daily salt intake with blood pressure and blood lipids and to investigate the effect of taking different measures of obesity into account. METHODS: We included...... of estimated 24-hour sodium excretion with blood pressure and blood lipids were evaluated by linear regression models. RESULTS: The daily mean estimated intake of salt was 10.80 g and 7.52 g among men and women, respectively. Daily salt intake was significantly associated with blood pressure (β-estimates 1...

  8. Cuff-Free Blood Pressure Estimation Using Pulse Transit Time and Heart Rate

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ruiping; Jia, Wenyan; Mao, Zhi-Hong; Sclabassi, Robert J.; Sun, Mingui

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported that the pulse transit time (PTT), the interval between the peak of the R-wave in electrocardiogram (ECG) and the fingertip photoplethysmogram (PPG), is related to arterial stiffness, and can be used to estimate the systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). This phenomenon has been used as the basis to design portable systems for continuously cuff-less blood pressure measurement, benefiting numerous people with heart conditions. However, the PTT-ba...

  9. Reappraisal of disparities between osmolality estimates by freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winzor, Donald J

    2004-02-15

    As a response to recent expression of concern about possible unreliability of vapor pressure deficit measurements (K. Kiyosawa, Biophys. Chem. 104 (2003) 171-188), the results of published studies on the temperature dependence of the osmotic pressure of aqueous polyethylene glycol solutions are shown to account for the observed discrepancies between osmolality estimates obtained by freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit osmometry--the cause of the concern.

  10. Estimating central systolic blood pressure during oscillometric determination of blood pressure: proof of concept and validation by comparison with intra-aortic pressure recording and arterial tonometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Sally Emma; Guilcher, Antoine; Clapp, Brian; Chowienczyk, Phil

    2012-06-01

    Central systolic blood pressure is usually estimated by transformation of a peripheral arterial waveform obtained by tonometry and calibrated from conventional measurements of brachial artery blood pressure from a brachial cuff using the oscillometric principle. We investigated whether central blood pressure could be obtained directly from a brachial cuff waveform, allowing the measurement of central blood pressure to be incorporated into the standard oscillometric determination of blood pressure. Values of central systolic blood pressure obtained from a brachial cuff waveform were compared with those obtained using a pressure-tipped intra-aortic catheter in 29 individuals undergoing cardiac catheterization. To remove errors introduced by the measurement of peripheral blood pressure, transformed brachial waveforms were calibrated using values of mean and diastolic pressure from the intra-aortic catheter. In a second study, the values obtained from the brachial cuff were compared with those obtained using a noninvasive tonometric method using calibration from mean and diastolic and from systolic and diastolic blood pressure derived from a standard oscillometric algorithm in 100 individuals (46 women, 19-81 years) with blood pressure ranging from 89/52 to 230/117 mmHg. In study 1, the mean difference ± SD of brachial cuff-derived values and intra-aortic values was 0.0 ± 5.9 mmHg. In study 2, the mean difference for brachial cuff-derived values and tonometer values was -0.6 ± 3.9 and 1.6 ± 4.5 mmHg when calibrated using brachial mean and diastolic and brachial systolic and diastolic pressures, respectively. Central systolic blood pressure can be obtained from a brachial cuff waveform with an accuracy comparable to that of a tonometer.

  11. Methods for estimating the vapour pressure of organic chemicals; Application to five pesticides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leistra, M.

    2011-01-01

    When studying and modelling the volatilisation of pesticides from crops, their vapour pressure is an essential property. In the critical evaluation of vapour pressures stated by various sources, problems were encountered. Therefore, an inventory was made of readily-usable methods for estimating

  12. Validation of the urine column measurement as an estimation of the intra-abdominal pressure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeg, H.J.J. van der; Akkeren, J.P. van; Houterman, S.; Roumen, R.M.H.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of the urine column (UC) measurement compared to the intra-vesicular pressure (IVP) measurement as an estimation of intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) in patients with IAP up to 30 mmHg. METHODS: Fifteen patients undergoing a laparoscopic cholecystectomy were studied.

  13. Non-invasive estimation of cerebrospinal fluid pressure waveforms by means of retinal venous pulsatility and central aortic blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golzan, S Mojtaba; Kim, Mi Ok; Seddighi, Amir Saied; Avolio, Alberto; Graham, Stuart L

    2012-09-01

    Current techniques used for cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFp) measurements are invasive. They require a surgical procedure for placement of a pressure catheter in the brain ventricles or in the brain tissue. The human eye provides direct visualisation of its physiological structures and due to its anatomical connection with CSF via the retrolaminar optic nerve it may provide accessible information about CSFp. A total of 25 subjects were included in this study. 15 subjects were used to characterise the relationship between intraocular pressure (IOP), spontaneous retinal venous pulsatility (SRVP), and CSFp. IOP was manipulated and SRVP amplitudes recorded dynamically using the dynamic vessel analyzer (DVA). The relationship between IOP and SRVP amplitude was established to estimate CSFp. Additionally Doppler blood flow velocity of the middle cerebral artery and arterial blood pressure (ABP) were acquired for all subjects. This was to compare and validate our findings with an alternative approach (ICM+) which uses these values to estimate CSFp. A CSFp waveform was extracted from central blood pressure (CBP) waveform by removing its cardiac component frequency. Furthermore to calibrate the CSFp to CBP waveform ratio, invasive CSFp, and ABP was measured from 10 subjects with brain tumours who had a range of normal to elevated CSFp (i.e., 0-30 mmHg). Results show good agreement between the two methods (correlation r (2) = 0.55) Mean estimated CSFp for the two techniques did not show any significant difference (p > 0.05). A significant correlation between CBP pulse (CBPp) and invasive CSFp pulse (CSFpp) was observed (i.e., CSFpp = 0.0654CBBp + 3.91, p invasively and may provide a novel method to estimate CSF waveforms non-invasively.

  14. Non-destructive estimation of root pressure using sap flow, stem diameter measurements and mechanistic modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Swaef, Tom; Hanssens, Jochen; Cornelis, Annelies; Steppe, Kathy

    2013-02-01

    Upward water movement in plants via the xylem is generally attributed to the cohesion-tension theory, as a response to transpiration. Under certain environmental conditions, root pressure can also contribute to upward xylem water flow. Although the occurrence of root pressure is widely recognized, ambiguity exists about the exact mechanism behind root pressure, the main influencing factors and the consequences of root pressure. In horticultural crops, such as tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), root pressure is thought to cause cells to burst, and to have an important impact on the marketable yield. Despite the challenges of root pressure research, progress in this area is limited, probably because of difficulties with direct measurement of root pressure, prompting the need for indirect and non-destructive measurement techniques. A new approach to allow non-destructive and non-invasive estimation of root pressure is presented, using continuous measurements of sap flow and stem diameter variation in tomato combined with a mechanistic flow and storage model, based on cohesion-tension principles. Transpiration-driven sap flow rates are typically inversely related to stem diameter changes; however, this inverse relationship was no longer valid under conditions of low transpiration. This decoupling between sap flow rates and stem diameter variations was mathematically related to root pressure. Root pressure can be estimated in a non-destructive, repeatable manner, using only external plant sensors and a mechanistic model.

  15. Non-invasive Estimation of Pressure Changes along a Streamline using Vector Velocity Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Traberg, Marie Sand

    2015-01-01

    A non-invasive method for estimating pressure changes along a streamline using ultrasound is presented. The suggested method estimates pressure gradients from 2-D vector velocity fields. Changes in pressure are derived using a model based on the Navier-Stokes equations. Scans of a carotid...... bifurcation phantom with a 70% constriction are performed using a linear array transducer connected to the experimental scanner, SARUS. 2-D fields of angle-independent vector velocities are acquired to a depth of 3 cm using directional synthetic aperture vector flow imaging. The performance of the suggested...

  16. Simulation of microbubble response to ambient pressure changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Scheldrup; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2008-01-01

    The theory on microbubbles clearly indicates a relation between the ambient pressure and the acoustic behavior of the bubble. The purpose of this study was to optimize the sensitivity of ambient pressure measurements, using the subharmonic component, through microbubble response simulations....... The behaviour of two different contrast agents was investigated as a function of driving pulse and ambient overpressure, pov. Simulations of Levovist using a rectangular driving pulse show an almost linear reduction in the subharmonic component as pov is increased. For a 20 cycles driving pulse, a reduction...... is not completely linear as a function of the ambient pressure....

  17. Estimation of Seismic Centroid Moment Tensor Using Ocean Bottom Pressure Gauges as Seismometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Tatsuya; Saito, Tatsuhiko; Suzuki, Wataru; Hino, Ryota

    2017-11-01

    We examined the dynamic pressure change at the seafloor to estimate the centroid moment tensor solutions of the largest and second largest foreshocks (Mw 7.2 and 6.5) of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. Combination of onshore broadband seismograms and high-frequency ( 20-200 s) seafloor pressure records provided the resolution of the horizontal locations of the centroids, consistent with the results of tsunami inversion using the long-period (≳10 min) seafloor pressure records although the depth was not constrained well, whereas the source locations were poorly constrained by the onshore seismic data alone. Also, the waveforms synthesized from the estimated CMT solution demonstrated the validity of the theoretical relationship between pressure change and vertical acceleration at the seafloor. The results of this study suggest that offshore pressure records can be utilized as offshore seismograms, which would be greatly useful for revealing the source process of offshore earthquakes.

  18. Estimated daily salt intake in relation to blood pressure and blood lipids: the role of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuesen, Betina H; Toft, Ulla; Buhelt, Lone P; Linneberg, Allan; Friedrich, Nele; Nauck, Matthias; Wallaschofski, Henri; Jørgensen, Torben

    2015-12-01

    Excessive salt intake causes increased blood pressure which is considered the leading risk for premature death. One major challenge when evaluating associations between daily salt intake and markers of non-communicable diseases is that a high daily salt intake correlates with obesity, which is also a well described risk factor for poor cardiometabolic outcome. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship of estimated daily salt intake with blood pressure and blood lipids and to investigate the effect of taking different measures of obesity into account. We included 3294 men and women aged 18-69 years from a general population based study in Copenhagen, Denmark. Estimated 24-hour sodium excretion was calculated by measurements of creatinine and sodium concentration in spot urine in combination with information of sex, age, height and weight. The relations of estimated 24-hour sodium excretion with blood pressure and blood lipids were evaluated by linear regression models. The daily mean estimated intake of salt was 10.80 g and 7.52 g among men and women, respectively. Daily salt intake was significantly associated with blood pressure (β-estimates 1.18 mm Hg/g salt (systolic) and 0.74 mm Hg/g salt (diastolic), p lipids were highly affected by adjustment for obesity. Associations of estimated daily salt intake with blood pressure and blood lipids were highly affected by adjustment for obesity. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  19. A METHOD FOR ESTIMATING GAS PRESSURE IN 3013 CONTAINERS USING AN ISP DATABASE QUERY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friday, G; L. G. Peppers, L; D. K. Veirs, D

    2008-07-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Integrated Surveillance Program (ISP) is responsible for the storage and surveillance of plutonium-bearing material. During storage, plutonium-bearing material has the potential to generate hydrogen gas from the radiolysis of adsorbed water. The generation of hydrogen gas is a safety concern, especially when a container is breached within a glove box during destructive evaluation. To address this issue, the DOE established a standard (DOE, 2004) that sets the criteria for the stabilization and packaging of material for up to 50 years. The DOE has now packaged most of its excess plutonium for long-term storage in compliance with this standard. As part of this process, it is desirable to know within reasonable certainty the total maximum pressure of hydrogen and other gases within the 3013 container if safety issues and compliance with the DOE standards are to be attained. The principal goal of this investigation is to document the method and query used to estimate total (i.e. hydrogen and other gases) gas pressure within a 3013 container based on the material properties and estimated moisture content contained in the ISP database. Initial attempts to estimate hydrogen gas pressure in 3013 containers was based on G-values (hydrogen gas generation per energy input) derived from small scale samples. These maximum G-values were used to calculate worst case pressures based on container material weight, assay, wattage, moisture content, container age, and container volume. This paper documents a revised hydrogen pressure calculation that incorporates new surveillance results and includes a component for gases other than hydrogen. The calculation is produced by executing a query of the ISP database. An example of manual mathematical computations from the pressure equation is compared and evaluated with results from the query. Based on the destructive evaluation of 17 containers, the estimated mean absolute pressure was significantly

  20. Sub-Harmonics in Wind Driven SM-DFIG in the Super-Synchronous Range of Operation

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud A. Saleh,; Mona N. Eskander,; Maged N. F. Nashed

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the sub-harmonics associated with a specially designed single machine brushless doubly fed induction generator (SM-BDFIG) are analyzed at supersynchronous speeds. The SM-BDFIG is coupled to a variable speed wind turbine, and its rotor circuit is connected to a 3- phase rectifier feeding Li-ion batteries. A mathematical model, using Fourier expansion, is developed to define the subharmonics created by the time harmonics of the rotor currents irrespective of any ...

  1. Simultaneous grayscale and subharmonic ultrasound imaging on a modified commercial scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbrey, J R; Dave, J K; Halldorsdottir, V G; Merton, D A; Machado, P; Liu, J B; Miller, C; Gonzalez, J M; Park, S; Dianis, S; Chalek, C L; Thomenius, K E; Brown, D B; Navarro, V; Forsberg, F

    2011-12-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of simultaneous dual fundamental grayscale and subharmonic imaging on a modified commercial scanner. The ability to generate signals at half the insonation frequency is exclusive to ultrasound contrast agents (UCA). Thus, subharmonic imaging (SHI; transmitting at f(0) and receiving at f(0)/2) provides improved visualization of UCA within the vasculature via suppression of the surrounding tissue echoes. While this capability has proven useful in a variety of clinical applications, the SHI suppression of surrounding tissue landmarks (which are needed for sonographic navigation) also limits it use as a primary imaging modality. In this paper we present results using a commercial ultrasound scanner modified to allow imaging in both grayscale (f(0)=4.0 MHz) and SHI (f(0)=2.5 MHz, f(0)/2=1.25 MHz) modes in real time. A Logiq 9 ultrasound scanner (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI) with a 4C curvilinear probe was modified to provide this capability. Four commercially available UCA (Definity, Lantheus Medical Imaging, North Billerica, MA; Optison, GE Healthcare, Princeton, NJ; SonoVue, Bracco Imaging, Milan, Italy; and Sonazoid, GE Healthcare, Oslo, Norway) were all investigated in vitro over an acoustic output range of 3.34 MPa. In vivo the subharmonic response of Sonazoid was investigated in the portal veins of four canines (open abdominal cavity) and four patients with suspected portal hypertension. In vitro, the four UCA showed an average maximum subharmonic amplitude of 44.1±5.4 dB above the noise floor with a maximum subharmonic amplitude of 48.6±1.6 dB provided by Sonazoid. The average in vivo maximum signal above the noise floor from Sonazoid was 20.8±2.3 dB in canines and 33.9±5.2 dB in humans. Subharmonic amplitude as a function of acoustic output in both groups matched the S-curve behavior of the agent observed in vitro. The dual grayscale imaging provided easier sonographic navigation, while the degree of tissue suppression in SHI

  2. Non-invasive estimation of aortic blood pressures: a close look at current devices and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millasseau, Sandrine; Agnoletti, Davide

    2015-01-01

    While for years clinicians have used cuff pressure to assess patients' cardiovascular risk, recent evidences has shown that aortic pressure, or more specifically aortic systolic and aortic pulse pressures, have a better prognostic value to predict cardiovascular events and mortality. This led to the emergence of multiple methods and devices to assess aortic pressure non-invasively. Some use scaled waveforms measured at the carotid level with tonometry, or ultrasounds. Others use transfer function or mathematical modelling from radial or brachial traces acquired from volume plethsymography or applanation tonometry. Not all these techniques are equivalent and most of them have the major flaw of using brachial cuff pressure to scale their results. The purpose of this review is to present the strengths and weaknesses of techniques and various commercial devices to estimate aortic systolic pressure.

  3. Oscillometric blood pressure estimation by combining nonparametric bootstrap with Gaussian mixture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soojeong; Rajan, Sreeraman; Jeon, Gwanggil; Chang, Joon-Hyuk; Dajani, Hilmi R; Groza, Voicu Z

    2017-06-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is one of the most important vital indicators and plays a key role in determining the cardiovascular activity of patients. This paper proposes a hybrid approach consisting of nonparametric bootstrap (NPB) and machine learning techniques to obtain the characteristic ratios (CR) used in the blood pressure estimation algorithm to improve the accuracy of systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) estimates and obtain confidence intervals (CI). The NPB technique is used to circumvent the requirement for large sample set for obtaining the CI. A mixture of Gaussian densities is assumed for the CRs and Gaussian mixture model (GMM) is chosen to estimate the SBP and DBP ratios. The K-means clustering technique is used to obtain the mixture order of the Gaussian densities. The proposed approach achieves grade "A" under British Society of Hypertension testing protocol and is superior to the conventional approach based on maximum amplitude algorithm (MAA) that uses fixed CR ratios. The proposed approach also yields a lower mean error (ME) and the standard deviation of the error (SDE) in the estimates when compared to the conventional MAA method. In addition, CIs obtained through the proposed hybrid approach are also narrower with a lower SDE. The proposed approach combining the NPB technique with the GMM provides a methodology to derive individualized characteristic ratio. The results exhibit that the proposed approach enhances the accuracy of SBP and DBP estimation and provides narrower confidence intervals for the estimates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A subharmonic detrending or data-smoothing approach for longitudinal road profile measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaunholt, Hans

    2001-01-01

    Commonly used figure-of-merits for longitudinal road profiles such as the International Roughness Index (IRI) and the Ride Number (RN) are based on statistical properties. Raw measured longitudinal road profile data may contain large trending components especially when the measurements are made...... with walking profilers in hilly regions. To obtain approximate stationary data suitable for statistical processing measurements should be subjected to detrending before calculating the IRI- or RN- value. In this paper a novel detrending method is proposed which is well suited for removing large profile trends...... without significantly corrupting the short wavelength content of the profile data. The method called sub-harmonic detrending works by fitting sub-harmonic sinusoids to the data followed by circular filtering in order to remove the trend. The method is also well suited for data-smoothing....

  5. Subharmonic anti-phase dynamics in coupled mode-locked semiconductor lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Sudarshan; Winful, Herbert G

    2017-12-01

    We show that coupled mode-locked semiconductor lasers can operate in a subharmonic regime in which the two lasers pulsate in an anti-phase manner at one-half the fundamental mode-locking frequency of the solitary lasers. In the subharmonic mode, each pulse has almost twice the energy carried by the isolated lasers in the fundamental mode-locked regime and is also significantly shorter in duration. Depending on the unsaturated gain and coupling strength, the lasers can also exhibit bistability, perfect synchronization, and delayed synchronization, as well as three-halves and five-halves harmonic mode locking. The observed behaviors are robust and persist in the presence of noise.

  6. Estimating seabed pressure from demersal trawls, seines, and dredges based on gear design and dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Eigaard, O.R.; Bastardie, F.; Breen, M.; Hintzen, N.T.; Rijnsdorp, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    This study assesses the seabed pressure of towed fishing gears and models the physical impact (area and depth of seabed penetration) from trip-based information of vessel size, gear type, and catch. Traditionally fishing pressures are calculated top-down by making use of large-scale statistics such as logbook data. Here, we take a different approach starting from the gear itself (design and dimensions) to estimate the physical interactions with the seabed at the level of the individual fishin...

  7. Infinity of Subharmonics for Asymmetric Duffing Equations with the Lazer-Leach-Dancer Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Dingbian

    2001-04-01

    In this paper, based on a generalized version of the Poincaré-Birkhoff twist theorem by Franks, we establish the existence of infinitely many subharmonics for the asymmetric Duffing equation with the classical Lazer-Leach-Dancer condition. As a consequence of our result, we obtain a sufficient and necessary condition for existence of arbitrarily large amplitude periodic solutions for a class of asymmetric Duffing equations at resonance.

  8. The delayed onset of subharmonic and ultraharmonic emissions from a phospholipid-shelled microbubble contrast agent

    OpenAIRE

    Shekhar, Himanshu; Awuor, Ivy; Thomas, Keri; Rychak, Joshua J.; Doyley, Marvin M.

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing the nonlinear response of microbubble contrast agents is important for their efficacious use in imaging and therapy. In this paper, we report that the subharmonic and ultraharmonic response of lipid-shelled microbubble contrast agents exhibits a strong temporal dependence. We characterized nonlinear emissions from Targestar-P® microbubbles (Targeson Inc., San Diego, CA, USA) periodically for 60 minutes, at 10 MHz excitation frequency. The results revealed a considerable increas...

  9. High and low frequency subharmonic imaging of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model

    OpenAIRE

    Dahibawkar, Manasi; Forsberg, Mark A.; Gupta, Aditi; Jaffe, Samantha; Dulin, Kelly; Eisenbrey, John R.; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G.; Forsberg, Anya I.; Dave, Jaydev K.; Marshall, Andrew; Machado, Priscilla; Fox, Traci B.; Liu, Ji-Bin; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    This project compared quantifiable measures of tumor vascularity obtained from contrast-enhanced high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) subharmonic ultrasound imaging (SHI) to 3 immunohistochemical markers of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model (since angiogenesis is an important marker of malignancy and the target of many novel cancer treatments). Nineteen athymic, nude, female rats were implanted with 5×106 breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) in the mammary fat pad. The contrast a...

  10. Uncertainty analysis of an optical method for pressure estimation in fluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomit, Guillaume; Acher, Gwenael; Chatellier, Ludovic; David, Laurent

    2018-02-01

    The analysis of the error propagation from the velocity field to the pressure field using the pressure estimation method proposed by Jeon et al (2015 11th Int. In Symp. Part. Image Velocim. PIV15) is achieved. The accuracy of the method is assessed based on numerical data. The flow around a rigid profile (NACA0015) with a free tip is considered. From the numerical simulation data, tomographic-PIV (TPIV)-like data are generated. Two types of error are used to distort the data: a Gaussian noise and a pixel-locking effect are modelled. Propagation of both types of error during the pressure estimation process and the effect of the TPIV resolution are evaluated. Results highlight the importance of the resolution to accurately estimate the pressure in presence of small structures but also to limit the propagation of error from the velocity to the pressure. The study of the sensitivity of the method for the two models of errors, Gaussian or pixel-locking, shows different trends. This reveals also the importance of the model of errors for the analysis of the uncertainties for PIV-based pressure.

  11. Design of a ×4 subharmonic sub-millimeter wave diode mixer, based on an analytic expression for small-signal conversion admittance parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelsen, Rasmus Schandorph; Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Krozer, Viktor

    2013-01-01

    Instead of using frequency multipliers before a fundamental mixer, subharmonic mixers can be used. In order to develop novel subharmonic mixer architectures it is necessary to know the exact signal phase at the nonlinear element. The purpose of this paper is to generalize the description of the s......Instead of using frequency multipliers before a fundamental mixer, subharmonic mixers can be used. In order to develop novel subharmonic mixer architectures it is necessary to know the exact signal phase at the nonlinear element. The purpose of this paper is to generalize the description...

  12. Air mass flow estimation in turbocharged diesel engines from in-cylinder pressure measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desantes, J.M.; Galindo, J.; Guardiola, C.; Dolz, V. [CMT - Motores Termicos, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain)

    2010-01-15

    Air mass flow determination is needed for the control of current internal combustion engines. Current methods are based on specific sensors (as hot wire anemometers) or indirect estimation through manifold pressure. With the availability of cylinder pressure sensors for engine control, methods based on them can be used for replacing or complementing standard methods. Present paper uses in cylinder pressure increase during the intake stroke for inferring the trapped air mass. The method is validated on two different turbocharged diesel engines and compared with the standard methods. (author)

  13. Nonlinear and subharmonic stability anaysis in film-driven geomorphological patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertagni, Matteo; Camporeale, Carlo

    2017-04-01

    Similar fascinating wavy patterns can be found widespread both in caves and ice-falls, as a result of the interaction of a gravity-driven water film with a deformable surface (calcite or ice). Thanks to such a remarkable parallelism, a unified approach is adopted in the study of patterns formation of longitudinally oriented organ-pipe-like structures, called flutings. However, the morphological time scales differentiate noticeably the two cases: in fact, while in the ice-falls, flutings fully develop within some days, cave patterns can evolve for millenia, gaining an additional value as the silent repository of the past climate. In the present work, flutings formation has been studied both linearly and nonlinearly with the aid of two novel techniques, in the context of morphodynamics: gradient expansion and center manifold projection. In this way, closed form relationships for the selected wavenumber and for the finite amplitude have been achieved, thus defining the flutings spatial structure in the parameters space in a complete way. However, finite amplitude monochromatic waves may be destabilised by nonlinear interactions with other modes. In particular, in the present case, the range of unstable wavenumbers spans from zero to a finite value; hence the 1/2 subharmonic of any excited wave within this range is linearly unstable, including the 1/2 subharmonic of the fundamental. We find that this condition, despite different statements in previous works, is not sufficient to trigger the instability and that the fundamental mode results stable to subharmonic disturbances.

  14. On a sufficient condition for the subharmonicity of functions, satisfying the discrete mean value inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telyakovskii, D. S.

    2017-12-01

    We obtain a sufficient condition for subharmonicity of functions of two variables that uses Laplace difference operator of Schwartz type. M.A. Kreines proved that an upper semi-continuous function is subharmonic, if for some n ≥ 3 for every point ζ of its domain one can construct of a sufficiently small radius with the center at ζ such that the right n-gon can be inscribed in the circle, while the function value at the point ζ does not exceed the arithmetic mean of its values at the vertices of this n-gon. In this note the semi-continuity condition for the function is replaced by some conditions of function directional continuity an summability (with respect to the planar Lebesgue measure.) We also provide the position of nodes for the Laplace difference operator such that the proposition similar to the Kreines’s Theorem on a sufficient condition for the subharmonicity is valid for the functions of three variables.

  15. Non-Invasive Blood Pressure Estimation Using Ultrasound and Simple Finite Element Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewski, Aaron M; Anthony, Brian

    2017-06-12

    Many commercially-available arterial blood pressure measurement devices suffer from a range of weaknesses. For example, common weaknesses include being inaccurate, invasive, and ad hoc; many also require explicit user calibration or cut off blood flow to a limb. A novel algorithmic approach is presented to accurately estimate systolic and diastolic blood pressure in a way that does not require any explicit user calibration, is non-invasive, and does not cut off blood flow. The approach uses ultrasound images of the arterial wall and corresponding contact force data to obtain blood pressure estimates. To acquire data, an ultrasound probe was placed on the patient's carotid artery and the contact force was increased from 1.5 to 12 Newtons. The artery was then algorithmically segmented from the recorded DICOM B-Mode data. The segmentation data and the contact force were used as input into the Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method to solve for the parameters, including blood pressure, of a simple finite element model of the carotid artery. The algorithm was validated on 24 healthy volunteers. Algorithm arterial blood pressure predictions were compared to oscillometric blood pressure cuff readings. Regression and Bland- Altman analyses were performed on the data. Both systolic pressure and diastolic pressure can be estimated using this novel non-invasive ultrasound-based method (systolic accuracy/precision: -2.36 mmHg/10.21 mmHg; diastolic accuracy/precision: -0.32/8.23 mmHg). The method occupies a clinical middle ground between the arterial catheter and cuff-based techniques. It has the potential to give accurate results for patients with hypertension and atherosclerosis.

  16. Estimated Pulse Wave Velocity Calculated from Age and Mean Arterial Blood Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, S. V.; Laurent, Stéphane; Olsen, M. H.

    2016-01-01

    In a recently published paper, Greve et al [J Hypertens 2016;34:1279-1289] investigate whether the estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (ePWV), calculated using an equation derived from the relationship between carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), age, and blood pressure, predicts...

  17. Estimation of sound pressure levels of voiced speech from skin vibration of the neck

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svec, JG; Titze, IR; Popolo, PS

    How accurately can sound pressure levels (SPLs) of speech be estimated from skin vibration of the neck? Measurements using a small accelerometer were carried out in 27 subjects (10 males and 17 females) who read Rainbow and Marvin Williams passages in soft, comfortable, and loud voice, while skin

  18. Lubrication process at the wall in foam flow : application to pressure drop estimation in underbalanced drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peysson, Y.; Herzhaft, B. [Institut Francais du Petrole (France)

    2005-07-01

    Underbalanced drilling (UBD) is an effective solution to prevent formation damage, differential sticking or fluid losses. Low density drilling fluids such as gas, aerated mud or foams are used for underbalanced drilling, and the pressure of the drilling fluid is maintained at a value below the formation pressure. Foam is particularly useful for drilling because of its low density and good carrying capability, but its use remains hazardous due to the incomplete knowledge of its bottom-hole properties and flowing properties. Pressure drop estimation is crucial for UBD operations. This study evaluated the pressure drop variation with the flow rate in a circular pipe for different foam qualities and formulations. Experiments conducted in a pressure and temperature circular conduct flow showed that lubrication at the wall plays a crucial role. The intrinsic viscosity of the foam can be very high leading to the development of a water layer at the wall responsible for the lubrication of the flow. A two-phase description of the system allows the analytical estimation of the pressure drop. The size of the lubricated layer was then deduced and discussion of its range of existence was presented. Main parameters of its formation were also discussed. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  19. The friction measuring tool: Real-time estimates of sandface pressure during fracture treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, R.L.; Amick, P.C.; Shaw, J.S. [Reuben L. Graham, Inc., Charleston, WV (United States); Hill, D.G.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a Friction Measuring Tool (FMT) and how it is used to estimate pressure loss from friction in the wellbore while a foam fracture treatment is being pumped. Combined with standard surface equipment, such as densitometers, flowmeters, and pressure transducers, this tool (located on the surface) offers real-time estimates of bottomhole treating pressures during the fracture treatment. Field examples are presented comparing calculated bottomhole treating pressures, based on the FMT, to actual pressures measured with downhole electronic pressure gauges (installed in the casing just below the treated zone) during stimulation treatments. In addition to the provided field examples which verify application of the FMT, the theory and mathematical background underlying the use of the FMT are described. Construction of the tool, actual use in the field, and trouble-shooting are also presented. This tool is also applicable to foam for coiled tubing operations or stable foam drilling. Development of the FMT is one product of a cooperative research program sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) where one of the broad research objectives is improved stimulation techniques.

  20. Review of the Palisades pressure vessel accumulated fluence estimate and of the least squares methodology employed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, P.J.

    1998-05-01

    This report provides a review of the Palisades submittal to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission requesting endorsement of their accumulated neutron fluence estimates based on a least squares adjustment methodology. This review highlights some minor issues in the applied methodology and provides some recommendations for future work. The overall conclusion is that the Palisades fluence estimation methodology provides a reasonable approach to a {open_quotes}best estimate{close_quotes} of the accumulated pressure vessel neutron fluence and is consistent with the state-of-the-art analysis as detailed in community consensus ASTM standards.

  1. Estimating of turbulent velocity fluctuations in boundary layer with pressure gradient by Smoke Image Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikheev, N. I.; Goltsman, A. E.; Saushin, I. I.

    2017-11-01

    The results of the experimental estimating of the velocity profiles and turbulent pulsations in the boundary layer for adverse and favorable pressure gradients are presented. The profiles of characteristics based on the dynamics of two-component instantaneous velocity vector fields measured by the field optical method of Smoke Image Velocimetry are estimated. The measurements are performed with a large spatial and temporal resolution, the measurement results are relevant for estimating the terms of the conservation equation of turbulent energy in the boundary layer and for improving semiempirical turbulence models.

  2. Cost estimation of hypertension management based on home blood pressure monitoring alone or combined office and ambulatory blood pressure measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubouchairopoulou, Nadia; Karpettas, Nikos; Athanasakis, Kostas; Kollias, Anastasios; Protogerou, Athanase D; Achimastos, Apostolos; Stergiou, George S

    2014-10-01

    This study aims at estimating the resources consumed and subsequent costs for hypertension management, using home blood pressure (BP) monitoring (HBPM) alone versus combined clinic measurements and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (C/ABPM). One hundred sixteen untreated hypertensive subjects were randomized to use HBPM or C/ABPM for antihypertensive treatment initiation and titration. Health resources utilized within 12-months follow-up, their respective costs, and hypertension control were assessed. The total cost of the first year of hypertension management was lower in HBPM than C/ABPM arm (€1336.0 vs. €1473.5 per subject, respectively; P cost was identical in both arms. There was no difference in achieved BP control and drug expenditure (HBPM: €233.1 per subject; C/ABPM: €247.6 per subject; P = not significant), whereas the cost of BP measurements and/or visits was higher in C/ABPM arm (€393.9 vs. €516.9, per patient, respectively P cost for subsequent years (>1) was €348.9 and €440.2 per subject, respectively for HBPM and C/ABPM arm and €2731.4 versus €3234.3 per subject, respectively (P cost than C/ABPM, and the same trend is observed in 5-year projection. The results on the resources consumption can be used to make cost estimates for other health-care systems.

  3. Blood pressure estimation from pulse wave velocity measured on the chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puke, Sawa; Suzuki, Takuji; Nakayama, Kanako; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Minami, Shigenobu

    2013-01-01

    Recently, monitoring of blood pressure fluctuation in the daily life is focused on in the hypertension care area to predict the risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease events. In this paper, in order to propose an alternative system to the existed ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) sphygmomanometer, we have developed a prototype of small wearable device consisting of electrocardiogram (ECG) and photopelthysmograph (PPG) sensors. In addition, it was examined whether blood pressure can be estimated based on pulse wave transit time (PWTT) only by attaching that device on the surface of the chest. We indicated that our system could also sense tendency of time-dependent change of blood pressure by measuring pulse of vessel over the sternum while its propagation distance is short.

  4. Two-Step Pseudomaximum Amplitude-Based Confidence Interval Estimation for Oscillometric Blood Pressure Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soojeong; Jeon, Gwanggil; Kang, Seokhoon

    2015-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is an important vital sign to determine the health of an individual. Although the estimation of average arterial blood pressure using oscillometric methods is possible, there are no established methods for obtaining confidence intervals (CIs) for systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). In this paper, we propose a two-step pseudomaximum amplitude (TSPMA) as a novel approach to obtain improved CIs of SBP and DBP using a double bootstrap approach. The weighted median (WM) filter is employed to reduce impulsive and Gaussian noises in the step of preprocessing. Application of the proposed method provides tighter CIs and smaller standard deviation of CIs than the pseudomaximum amplitude-envelope and maximum amplitude algorithms with Student's t-method.

  5. Two-Step Pseudomaximum Amplitude-Based Confidence Interval Estimation for Oscillometric Blood Pressure Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soojeong Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood pressure (BP is an important vital sign to determine the health of an individual. Although the estimation of average arterial blood pressure using oscillometric methods is possible, there are no established methods for obtaining confidence intervals (CIs for systolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP. In this paper, we propose a two-step pseudomaximum amplitude (TSPMA as a novel approach to obtain improved CIs of SBP and DBP using a double bootstrap approach. The weighted median (WM filter is employed to reduce impulsive and Gaussian noises in the step of preprocessing. Application of the proposed method provides tighter CIs and smaller standard deviation of CIs than the pseudomaximum amplitude-envelope and maximum amplitude algorithms with Student’s t-method.

  6. Spurious barometric pressure acceleration in Antarctica and propagation into GRACE Antarctic mass change estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byeong-Hoon; Eom, Jooyoung; Seo, Ki-Weon; Wilson, Clark R.

    2016-08-01

    Apparent acceleration in Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Antarctic ice mass time-series may reflect both ice discharge and surface mass balance contributions. However, a recent study suggests there is also contamination from errors in atmospheric pressure de-aliasing fields [European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) operational products] used during GRACE data processing. To further examine this question, we compare GRACE atmospheric pressure de-aliasing (GAA) fields with in situ surface pressure data from coastal and inland stations. Differences between the two are likely due to GAA errors, and provide a measure of error in GRACE solutions. Time-series of differences at individual weather stations are fit to four presumed error components: annual sinusoids, a linear trend, an acceleration term and jumps at times of known ECMWF model changes. Using data from inland stations, we estimate that atmospheric pressure error causes an acceleration error of about +7.0 Gt yr-2, which is large relative to prior GRACE estimates of Antarctic ice mass acceleration in the range of -12 to -14 Gt yr-2. We also estimate apparent acceleration rates from other barometric pressure (reanalysis) fields, including ERA-Interim, MERRA and NCEP/DOE. When integrated over East Antarctica, the four mass acceleration estimates (from GAA and the three reanalysis fields) vary considerably (by ˜2-16 Gt yr-2). This shows the need for further effort to improve atmospheric mass estimates in this region of sparse in situ observations, in order to use GRACE observations to measure ice mass acceleration and related sea level change.

  7. Pressure estimation for diamond anvils cell under very-low pressures, hydrostatic conditions -evaluation for quartz Raman peak shifts-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, K.; Okamoto, K.

    2016-12-01

    Pressure shift of the ruby R1 luminescent shift has been used as primary pressure gauge in diamond-anvils experiments. However, the pressure calibration under low-pressure conditions (quartz Raman-shift pressure gauge reported by Schmidt and Ziemenn (2000). At pressure lower than 1 GPa, their pressure calibration give 0.2 GPa lower conditions than the Ruby pressure gauge at 1 GPa.

  8. Finite element analysis to estimate burst pressure of mild steel pressure vessel using Ramberg–Osgood model

    OpenAIRE

    Deolia, Puneet; Firoz A. Shaikh

    2016-01-01

    Burst pressure is the pressure at which vessel burst/crack and internal fluid leaks. An accurate prediction of burst pressure is necessary in chemical, medical and aviation industry. Burst pressure is a design safety limit, which should not be exceeded. If this pressure is exceeded it may lead to the mechanical breach and permanent loss of pressure containment. So burst pressure calculation is necessary for all the critical applications. To numerically calculate burst pressure material curve ...

  9. Estimating the state of charge of MH-Ni batteries by measuring their stable internal pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Shao, Guangjie; Guo, Weiwen; Lou, Yuwan; Xia, Baojia

    2017-03-01

    Nickel metal hydride (MH-Ni) batteries are widely used in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Estimating a battery's state of charge (SOC) remains challenging in practical applications, and it is also the core technology. Because MH-Ni batteries exhibit high rates of self-discharge and have flat and broad charge-discharge voltage plateaus, the estimation of their SOC through their voltage, current, internal resistance, and temperature is not accurate and has a large cumulative error. In this study, a new method for estimating SOC based on battery's stable internal pressure is proposed using the one-to-one correspondence between the hydrogen equilibrium pressure and the reversible hydrogen-storage capacity described by the pressure-concentration-isotherm (P-C-T) curves of hydrogen storage alloys. The actual SOC and the stable internal pressure of the battery have a one-to-one correspondence after the battery was stored at different temperatures and SOCs, and this relationship is maintained after different cycling number and after four years of storage.

  10. Particle tracking velocimetry applied to estimate the pressure field around a Savonius turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Yuichi; Nakada, Taishi; Suzuki, Takao; Yamamoto, Fujio

    2007-08-01

    Particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) is applied to flows around a Savonius turbine. The velocity vector field measured with PTV is utilized to estimate the pressure field around the turbine, as well as to evaluate the torque performance. The main objective of the work is the establishment of the pressure estimation scheme required to discuss the turbine performance. First, the PTV data are interpolated on a regular grid with a fourth-order ellipsoidal differential equation to generate velocity vectors satisfying the third-order spatio-temporal continuity both in time and space. Second, the phase-averaged velocity vector information with respect to the turbine angle is substituted into three different types of pressure-estimating equations, i.e. the Poisson equation, the Navier-Stokes equation and the sub-grid scale model of turbulence. The results obtained based on the Navier-Stokes equation are compared with those based on the Poisson equation, and have shown several merits in employing the Navier-Stokes-based method for the PTV measurement. The method is applied to a rotating turbine with the tip-speed ratio of 0.5 to find the relationship between torque behaviour and flow structure in a phase-averaged sense. We have found that a flow attached to the convex surface of the blades induces low-pressure regions to drive the turbine, namely, the lift force helps the turbine blades to rotate even when the drag force is insufficient. Secondary mechanisms of torque generation are also discussed.

  11. An innovative technique for estimating water saturation from capillary pressure in clastic reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeoti, Lukumon; Ayolabi, Elijah Adebowale; James, Logan

    2017-11-01

    A major drawback of old resistivity tools is the poor vertical resolution and estimation of hydrocarbon when applying water saturation (Sw) from historical resistivity method. In this study, we have provided an alternative method called saturation height function to estimate hydrocarbon in some clastic reservoirs in the Niger Delta. The saturation height function was derived from pseudo capillary pressure curves generated using modern wells with complete log data. Our method was based on the determination of rock type from log derived porosity-permeability relationship, supported by volume of shale for its classification into different zones. Leverette-J functions were derived for each rock type. Our results show good correlation between Sw from resistivity based method and Sw from pseudo capillary pressure curves in wells with modern log data. The resistivity based model overestimates Sw in some wells while Sw from the pseudo capillary pressure curves validates and predicts more accurate Sw. In addition, the result of Sw from pseudo capillary pressure curves replaces that of resistivity based model in a well where the resistivity equipment failed. The plot of hydrocarbon pore volume (HCPV) from J-function against HCPV from Archie shows that wells with high HCPV have high sand qualities and vice versa. This was further used to predict the geometry of stratigraphic units. The model presented here freshly addresses the gap in the estimation of Sw and is applicable to reservoirs of similar rock type in other frontier basins worldwide.

  12. Application of quantitative structure-property relationship analysis to estimate the vapor pressure of pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, Mohammad; Coelho, Leandro dos Santos; Honarparvar, Bahareh; Ortiz, Erlinda V; Duchowicz, Pablo R

    2016-06-01

    The application of molecular descriptors in describing Quantitative Structure Property Relationships (QSPR) for the estimation of vapor pressure (VP) of pesticides is of ongoing interest. In this study, QSPR models were developed using multiple linear regression (MLR) methods to predict the vapor pressure values of 162 pesticides. Several feature selection methods, namely the replacement method (RM), genetic algorithms (GA), stepwise regression (SR) and forward selection (FS), were used to select the most relevant molecular descriptors from a pool of variables. The optimum subset of molecular descriptors was used to build a QSPR model to estimate the vapor pressures of the selected pesticides. The Replacement Method improved the predictive ability of vapor pressures and was more reliable for the feature selection of these selected pesticides. The results provided satisfactory MLR models that had a satisfactory predictive ability, and will be important for predicting vapor pressure values for compounds with unknown values. This study may open new opportunities for designing and developing new pesticide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Estimates of the eigenvalues of operator arising in swelling pressure model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanguzhin, Baltabek [Institute of Mathematics and Mathematical Modeling, 050010, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Zhapsarbayeva, Lyailya [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2016-08-10

    Swelling pressures from materials confined by structures can cause structural deformations and instability. Due to the complexity of interactions between expansive solid and solid-liquid equilibrium, the forces exerting on retaining structures from swelling are highly nonlinear. This work is our initial attempt to study a simplistic spectral problem based on the Euler-elastic beam theory and some simplistic swelling pressure model. In this work estimates of the eigenvalues of some initial/boundary value problem for nonlinear Euler-elastic beam equation are obtained.

  14. Delineation of atherosclerotic plaque using subharmonic imaging filtering techniques and a commercial intravascular ultrasound system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Anush; Eisenbrey, John R; Machado, Priscilla; deMuinck, Ebo D; Doyley, Marvin M; Forsberg, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    The ability to delineate atherosclerotic plaque from the surrounding tissue using custom-developed subharmonic imaging (SHI) digital filtering techniques was investigated in vivo using a commercially available system. Atherosclerosis was induced in the aorta of two Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic rabbits following which injections of an ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, N Billerica, Massachusetts) were administered. Imaging was performed using a Galaxy intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) scanner (Boston Scientific, Natick, Massachusetts) equipped with an Atlantis® SR Pro Imaging Catheter (Boston Scientific). Four preliminary band-pass filters were designed to isolate the subharmonic signal (from surrounding tissue) and applied to the radio-frequency (RF) data. Preliminary filter performances were compared in terms of vessel-tissue contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) and visual examination. Based on preliminary results, a subharmonic adaptive filter and a stopband (SB) filter were designed and applied to the RF data. Images were classified as fundamental, SHI, and SB. Four readers performed qualitative analysis of 168 randomly selected images (across all three imaging modes). The images were scored for overall image quality, image noise, plaque visualization, and vessel lumen visualization. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare the scores followed by intraclass correlation (ICC) evaluation. Quantitative analysis was performed by calculating the CTRs for the vessel-to-plaque and vessel-to-tissue (compared using a paired student's t test). Qualitative analysis showed SHI and SB to have significantly less image noise relative to the fundamental mode (p < 0.001). Fundamental mode scored significantly higher than SHI and SB for the remaining three categories. ICC showed mixed results among reader evaluation for delineation of plaque. However, quantitatively, SHI produced the best vessel-plaque CTR.

  15. Sensitivity coefficients for the stochastic estimation of the radiation damage to the reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, C.M.; Hernandez Valle, S. [Centro de Investigaciones Tecnologicas, Nucleares y Ambientales, La Habana (Cuba). E-mail: calvarez@ctn.isctn.edu.cu; svalle@ctn.isctn.edu.cu

    2000-07-01

    The construction of the sensitivity matrix in the case of the vessel radiation damage estimation by Monte Carlo techniques poses new problems related to the uncertainties of the obtained responses. In the case of deterministic calculations, the sensitivity coefficient obtention is a straightforward procedure based on the perturbation formalism through the calculation of the adjoint fluxes. In the paper an alternative procedure implementation based on the differential operator method is described with the modifications needed to the used HEXANN-EVALU code for the response estimations in the VVER-440 pressure vessel. (author)

  16. Evaluation of Vapor Pressure Estimation Methods for Use in Simulating the Dynamic of Atmospheric Organic Aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Komkoua Mbienda

    2013-01-01

    Lee and Kesler (LK, and Ambrose-Walton (AW methods for estimating vapor pressures ( are tested against experimental data for a set of volatile organic compounds (VOC. required to determine gas-particle partitioning of such organic compounds is used as a parameter for simulating the dynamic of atmospheric aerosols. Here, we use the structure-property relationships of VOC to estimate . The accuracy of each of the aforementioned methods is also assessed for each class of compounds (hydrocarbons, monofunctionalized, difunctionalized, and tri- and more functionalized volatile organic species. It is found that the best method for each VOC depends on its functionality.

  17. Experimental Feasibility Study of Estimation of the Normalized Central Blood Pressure Waveform from Radial Photoplethysmogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmond Zahedi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of a novel system to reliably estimate the normalized central blood pressure (CBPN from the radial photoplethysmogram (PPG is investigated. Right-wrist radial blood pressure and left-wrist PPG were simultaneously recorded in five different days. An industry-standard applanation tonometer was employed for recording radial blood pressure. The CBP waveform was amplitude-normalized to determine CBPN. A total of fifteen second-order autoregressive models with exogenous input were investigated using system identification techniques. Among these 15 models, the model producing the lowest coefficient of variation (CV of the fitness during the five days was selected as the reference model. Results show that the proposed model is able to faithfully reproduce CBPN (mean fitness = 85.2% ± 2.5% from the radial PPG for all 15 segments during the five recording days. The low CV value of 3.35% suggests a stable model valid for different recording days.

  18. Theoretical estimates of magnitudes of earthquakes induced by pore-pressure perturbations with large aspect ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galis, Martin; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Mai, P. Martin; Cappa, Frédéric

    2017-04-01

    Being able to reliably and accurately estimate the possible maximum magnitude of fluid-injection-induced earthquakes is of critical importance to quantify the associated seismic hazard and to define operational constraints for geo-reservoirs. In previous studies, we developed theoretical estimates of the magnitude of fluid-injection-induced earthquakes based fracture mechanics, assuming circular pressure perturbations. However, natural reservoirs are typically much wider than thicker. Therefore, here we discuss the application of our model to horizontally elongated pressurized regions with realistic aspect ratios. Assuming circular pressure perturbations, we derived a physical model estimating how large a rupture will grow on a given fault and for a given pore-pressure perturbation. We used two approaches. The first, semi-analytical approach is based on pore pressure evolution obtained by solving the diffusion equation for a cylindrical reservoir with no-flow boundaries. The second approach is an approximation to the first one, based on a point-load approximation of the pres-sure perturbation on the fault, allowing derivation of a complete analytical formula relating the magnitude of the largest arrested rupture, Mmax-arr, to injection and slip-weakening friction parameters. We found that the Mmax-arr scales with cumulative injected fluid volume as a power law with exponent of 3/2. In contrast, the Mmax relation by McGarr (2014) is a linear scaling (exponent of 1). While for the dataset used by McGarr (2014) the difference between our and McGarr's models is relatively small, inclusion of datasets with broad range of injected fluid volumes (from 10-10m3 to 1010m3) suggests better agreement with our model. However, inclusion of extended pressure perturbations into our two models, while maintaining the (semi-)analytical character, is not viable. Therefore, we perform numerical dynamic-rupture simulations to investigate rupture nucleation and arrest for pressure

  19. 670 GHz Schottky Diode Based Subharmonic Mixer with CPW Circuits and 70 GHz IF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Schlecht, Erich T. (Inventor); Lee, Choonsup (Inventor); Lin, Robert H. (Inventor); Gill, John J. (Inventor); Sin, Seth (Inventor); Mehdi, Imran (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A coplanar waveguide (CPW) based subharmonic mixer working at 670 GHz using GaAs Schottky diodes. One example of the mixer has a LO input, an RF input and an IF output. Another possible mixer has a LO input, and IF input and an RF output. Each input or output is connected to a coplanar waveguide with a matching network. A pair of antiparallel diodes provides a signal at twice the LO frequency, which is then mixed with a second signal to provide signals having sum and difference frequencies. The output signal of interest is received after passing through a bandpass filter tuned to the frequency range of interest.

  20. Transient subharmonic and ultraharmonic acoustic emission during dissolution of free gas bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagi, Elena; Breschi, Luca; Masotti, Leonardo

    2005-06-01

    This work concerns the study of free gas bubble behavior, a basic step in contrast agent study. In order to improve the understanding of microbubble-ultrasound interaction, we propose an acoustic dynamic observation of microbubble behavior performed by a high frame-rate acquiring and processing system. Results from ultrasonic observations of free gas microbubbles are discussed and compared with theoretical simulation. Peculiar radio frequency (RF) echo signals back-propagated from bubbles during dissolution up to their destruction are shown and their behavior is discussed. In particular, the different orders of subharmonic emissions related to changes in bubble sizes during dissolution were observed.

  1. An algorithm to estimate unsteady and quasi-steady pressure fields from velocity field measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabiri, John O; Bose, Sanjeeb; Gemmell, Brad J; Colin, Sean P; Costello, John H

    2014-02-01

    We describe and characterize a method for estimating the pressure field corresponding to velocity field measurements such as those obtained by using particle image velocimetry. The pressure gradient is estimated from a time series of velocity fields for unsteady calculations or from a single velocity field for quasi-steady calculations. The corresponding pressure field is determined based on median polling of several integration paths through the pressure gradient field in order to reduce the effect of measurement errors that accumulate along individual integration paths. Integration paths are restricted to the nodes of the measured velocity field, thereby eliminating the need for measurement interpolation during this step and significantly reducing the computational cost of the algorithm relative to previous approaches. The method is validated by using numerically simulated flow past a stationary, two-dimensional bluff body and a computational model of a three-dimensional, self-propelled anguilliform swimmer to study the effects of spatial and temporal resolution, domain size, signal-to-noise ratio and out-of-plane effects. Particle image velocimetry measurements of a freely swimming jellyfish medusa and a freely swimming lamprey are analyzed using the method to demonstrate the efficacy of the approach when applied to empirical data.

  2. Verification of two minimally invasive methods for the estimation of the contact pressure in human vocal folds during phonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Jen; Mongeau, Luc

    2011-09-01

    The contact pressure on the vocal fold surface during high pitch or amplitude voice production is believed to be one major source of phonotrauma. Models for the quantitative estimate of the contact pressure may be valuable for prevention and treatment. Various indirect and minimally invasive approaches have been purported to estimate contact pressure. But the accuracy of these methods has not yet been objectively verified in controlled laboratory settings. In the present study, two indirect approaches for the estimation of the contact pressure were investigated. One is based on a Hertzian impact model, and the other on a finite element model. A probe microphone was used for direct measurements of the contact pressure and verifications of the indirect approaches. A silicone replica of human vocal folds was used as a test bed. Consistent contact pressure estimations were obtained using all three methods. The advantages and disadvantages of each approach for eventual clinical applications are described. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  3. Explicit modelling of SOA formation from α-pinene photooxidation: sensitivity to vapour pressure estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Valorso

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA to the estimated vapour pressures of the condensable oxidation products is explored. A highly detailed reaction scheme was generated for α-pinene photooxidation using the Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A. Vapour pressures (Pvap were estimated with three commonly used structure activity relationships. The values of Pvap were compared for the set of secondary species generated by GECKO-A to describe α-pinene oxidation. Discrepancies in the predicted vapour pressures were found to increase with the number of functional groups borne by the species. For semi-volatile organic compounds (i.e. organic species of interest for SOA formation, differences in the predicted Pvap range between a factor of 5 to 200 on average. The simulated SOA concentrations were compared to SOA observations in the Caltech chamber during three experiments performed under a range of NOx conditions. While the model captures the qualitative features of SOA formation for the chamber experiments, SOA concentrations are systematically overestimated. For the conditions simulated, the modelled SOA speciation appears to be rather insensitive to the Pvap estimation method.

  4. Manifold absolute pressure estimation using neural network with hybrid training algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muslim, Mohd Taufiq; Selamat, Hazlina; Alimin, Ahmad Jais; Haniff, Mohamad Fadzli

    2017-01-01

    In a modern small gasoline engine fuel injection system, the load of the engine is estimated based on the measurement of the manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor, which took place in the intake manifold. This paper present a more economical approach on estimating the MAP by using only the measurements of the throttle position and engine speed, resulting in lower implementation cost. The estimation was done via two-stage multilayer feed-forward neural network by combining Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm, Bayesian Regularization (BR) algorithm and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm. Based on the results found in 20 runs, the second variant of the hybrid algorithm yields a better network performance than the first variant of hybrid algorithm, LM, LM with BR and PSO by estimating the MAP closely to the simulated MAP values. By using a valid experimental training data, the estimator network that trained with the second variant of the hybrid algorithm showed the best performance among other algorithms when used in an actual retrofit fuel injection system (RFIS). The performance of the estimator was also validated in steady-state and transient condition by showing a closer MAP estimation to the actual value.

  5. Manifold absolute pressure estimation using neural network with hybrid training algorithm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Taufiq Muslim

    Full Text Available In a modern small gasoline engine fuel injection system, the load of the engine is estimated based on the measurement of the manifold absolute pressure (MAP sensor, which took place in the intake manifold. This paper present a more economical approach on estimating the MAP by using only the measurements of the throttle position and engine speed, resulting in lower implementation cost. The estimation was done via two-stage multilayer feed-forward neural network by combining Levenberg-Marquardt (LM algorithm, Bayesian Regularization (BR algorithm and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO algorithm. Based on the results found in 20 runs, the second variant of the hybrid algorithm yields a better network performance than the first variant of hybrid algorithm, LM, LM with BR and PSO by estimating the MAP closely to the simulated MAP values. By using a valid experimental training data, the estimator network that trained with the second variant of the hybrid algorithm showed the best performance among other algorithms when used in an actual retrofit fuel injection system (RFIS. The performance of the estimator was also validated in steady-state and transient condition by showing a closer MAP estimation to the actual value.

  6. Estimation of foot pressure from human footprint depths using 3D scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Dwi Basuki; Haryadi, Gunawan Dwi; Priambodo, Agus

    2016-03-01

    The analysis of normal and pathological variation in human foot morphology is central to several biomedical disciplines, including orthopedics, orthotic design, sports sciences, and physical anthropology, and it is also important for efficient footwear design. A classic and frequently used approach to study foot morphology is analysis of the footprint shape and footprint depth. Footprints are relatively easy to produce and to measure, and they can be preserved naturally in different soils. In this study, we need to correlate footprint depth with corresponding foot pressure of individual using 3D scanner. Several approaches are used for modeling and estimating footprint depths and foot pressures. The deepest footprint point is calculated from z max coordinate-z min coordinate and the average of foot pressure is calculated from GRF divided to foot area contact and identical with the average of footprint depth. Evaluation of footprint depth was found from importing 3D scanner file (dxf) in AutoCAD, the z-coordinates than sorted from the highest to the lowest value using Microsoft Excel to make footprinting depth in difference color. This research is only qualitatif study because doesn't use foot pressure device as comparator, and resulting the maximum pressure on calceneus is 3.02 N/cm2, lateral arch is 3.66 N/cm2, and metatarsal and hallux is 3.68 N/cm2.

  7. Cuffless and Continuous Blood Pressure Estimation from the Heart Sound Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Chao Peng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease, like hypertension, is one of the top killers of human life and early detection of cardiovascular disease is of great importance. However, traditional medical devices are often bulky and expensive, and unsuitable for home healthcare. In this paper, we proposed an easy and inexpensive technique to estimate continuous blood pressure from the heart sound signals acquired by the microphone of a smartphone. A cold-pressor experiment was performed in 32 healthy subjects, with a smartphone to acquire heart sound signals and with a commercial device to measure continuous blood pressure. The Fourier spectrum of the second heart sound and the blood pressure were regressed using a support vector machine, and the accuracy of the regression was evaluated using 10-fold cross-validation. Statistical analysis showed that the mean correlation coefficients between the predicted values from the regression model and the measured values from the commercial device were 0.707, 0.712, and 0.748 for systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressure, respectively, and that the mean errors were less than 5 mmHg, with standard deviations less than 8 mmHg. These results suggest that this technique is of potential use for cuffless and continuous blood pressure monitoring and it has promising application in home healthcare services.

  8. Deep learning ensemble with asymptotic techniques for oscillometric blood pressure estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soojeong; Chang, Joon-Hyuk

    2017-11-01

    This paper proposes a deep learning based ensemble regression estimator with asymptotic techniques, and offers a method that can decrease uncertainty for oscillometric blood pressure (BP) measurements using the bootstrap and Monte-Carlo approach. While the former is used to estimate SBP and DBP, the latter attempts to determine confidence intervals (CIs) for SBP and DBP based on oscillometric BP measurements. This work originally employs deep belief networks (DBN)-deep neural networks (DNN) to effectively estimate BPs based on oscillometric measurements. However, there are some inherent problems with these methods. First, it is not easy to determine the best DBN-DNN estimator, and worthy information might be omitted when selecting one DBN-DNN estimator and discarding the others. Additionally, our input feature vectors, obtained from only five measurements per subject, represent a very small sample size; this is a critical weakness when using the DBN-DNN technique and can cause overfitting or underfitting, depending on the structure of the algorithm. To address these problems, an ensemble with an asymptotic approach (based on combining the bootstrap with the DBN-DNN technique) is utilized to generate the pseudo features needed to estimate the SBP and DBP. In the first stage, the bootstrap-aggregation technique is used to create ensemble parameters. Afterward, the AdaBoost approach is employed for the second-stage SBP and DBP estimation. We then use the bootstrap and Monte-Carlo techniques in order to determine the CIs based on the target BP estimated using the DBN-DNN ensemble regression estimator with the asymptotic technique in the third stage. The proposed method can mitigate the estimation uncertainty such as large the standard deviation of error (SDE) on comparing the proposed DBN-DNN ensemble regression estimator with the DBN-DNN single regression estimator, we identify that the SDEs of the SBP and DBP are reduced by 0.58 and 0.57  mmHg, respectively. These

  9. Blood Pressure Estimation Using Pulse Transit Time From Bioimpedance and Continuous Wave Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxi, Dilpreet; Redout, Jean-Michel; Yuce, Mehmet Rasit

    2017-04-01

    We have developed and tested a new architecture for pulse transit time (PTT) estimation at the central arteries using electrical bioimpedance, electrocardiogram, and continuous wave radar to estimate cuffless blood pressure. A transmitter and receiver antenna are placed at the sternum to acquire the arterial pulsation at the aortic arch. A four-electrode arrangement across the shoulders acquires arterial pulse across the carotid and subclavian arteries from bioimpedance as well as a bipolar lead I electrocardiogram. The PTT and pulse arrival times (PATs) are measured on six healthy male subjects during exercise on a bicycle ergometer. Using linear regression, the estimated PAT and PTT values are calibrated to the systolic and mean as well as diastolic blood pressure from an oscillometric device. For all subjects, the Pearson correlation coefficients for PAT-SBP and PTT-SBP are -0.66 (p = 0.001) and -0.48 (p = 0.0029), respectively. Correlation coefficients for individual subjects ranged from -0.54 to -0.9 and -0.37 to -0.95, respectively. The proposed system architecture is promising in estimating cuffless arterial blood pressure at the central, proximal arteries, which obey the Moens-Korteweg equation more closely when compared to peripheral arteries. An important advantage of PTT from the carotid and subclavian arteries is that the PTT over the central elastic arteries is measured instead of the peripheral arteries, which potentially reduces the changes in PTT due to vasomotion. Furthermore, the sensors can be completely hidden under a patients clothes, making them more acceptable by the patient for ambulatory monitoring.

  10. A compact D-band monolithic APDP-based sub-harmonic mixer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengzhou; Sun, Lingling; Wang, Xiang; Wen, Jincai; Liu, Jun

    2017-11-01

    The paper presents a compact D-band monolithic sub-harmonic mixer (SHM) with 3 μm planar hyperabrupt schottky-varactor diodes offered by 70 nm GaAs mHEMT technology. According to empirical equivalent-circuit models, a wide-band large signal equivalent circuit model of the diode is proposed. Based on the extracted model, the mixer is implemented and optimized with a shunt-mounted anti-parallel diode pair (APDP) to fulfill the sub-harmonic mixing mechanism. Furthermore, a modified asymmetric three-transmission-line coupler is devised to achieve high-level coupling and minimize the chip size. The measured results show that the conversion gain varies between -13.9 dB and -17.5 dB from 110 GHz to 145 GHz, with a local oscillator (LO) power level of 14 dBm and an intermediate frequency (IF) of 1 GHz. The total chip size including probe GSG pads is 0.57 × 0.68mm2. In conclusion, the mixer exhibits outstanding figure-of-merits.

  11. Noise and loss in balanced and subharmonically pumped mixers. I - Theory. II - Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, A. R.

    1979-01-01

    The theory of noise and frequency conversion for two-diode balanced and subharmonically pumped mixers is presented. The analysis is based on the equivalent circuit of the Schottky diode, having nonlinear capacitance, series resistance, and shot and thermal noise. Expressions for the conversion loss, noise temperature, and input and output impedances are determined in a form suitable for numerical analysis. In Part II, the application of the theory to practical mixers is demonstrated, and the properties of some two-diode mixers are examined. The subharmonically pumped mixer is found to be much more strongly affected by the loop inductance than the balanced mixer, and the ideal two-diode mixer using exponential diodes has a multiport noise-equivalent network (attenuator) similar to that of the ideal single-diode mixer. It is concluded that the theory can be extended to mixers with more than two diodes and will be useful for their design and analysis, provided a suitable nonlinear analysis is available to determine the diode waveforms.

  12. Sub-harmonic gap structure and Magneto-transport in suspended graphene -Superconductor ballistic junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaravadivel, Piranavan; Du, Xu

    2015-03-01

    Inducing superconductivity in graphene via the proximity effect enables to study the rich transport of the massless Dirac fermions at the Superconductor(S) - Graphene (G) interface. Some of the predictions are pseudo diffusive transport in Ballistic SGS junctions at low carrier densities and the unique specular and retro Andreev reflections in graphene. One of the challenges in observing these experimentally is to fabricate highly transparent ballistic SGS junctions that can be probed at low carrier densities near the Dirac point. In this talk we will present our recent results on suspended graphene- Niobium Josephson weak links. Our devices exhibit a mobility of ~ 350000 cm2V-1s-1 with a carrier density as low as 109 cm-2. Below the Superconducting transition temperature (Tc) ~ 9K, the devices show supercurrent and sub-harmonic gap structure due to Multiple Andreev reflections. In the vicinity of the Dirac point, the sub-harmonic gap structure becomes more pronounced, which as predicated, is indicative of pseudo-diffusive transport. With a fine scanning of gate voltage close to Dirac point we see emergence of some unusual sub- gap structures. We also report on our study of these samples below the upper critical field of Nb (~ 3.5T), where superconducting proximity effect coexists with Quantum Hall effect.

  13. Energy expenditure estimation during normal ambulation using triaxial accelerometry and barometric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingjing; Redmond, Stephen J; Voleno, Matteo; Narayanan, Michael R; Wang, Ning; Cerutti, Sergio; Lovell, Nigel H

    2012-11-01

    Energy expenditure (EE) is an important parameter in the assessment of physical activity. Most reliable techniques for EE estimation are too impractical for deployment in unsupervised free-living environments; those which do prove practical for unsupervised use often poorly estimate EE when the subject is working to change their altitude by walking up or down stairs or inclines. This study evaluates the augmentation of a standard triaxial accelerometry waist-worn wearable sensor with a barometric pressure sensor (as a surrogate measure for altitude) to improve EE estimates, particularly when the subject is ascending or descending stairs. Using a number of features extracted from the accelerometry and barometric pressure signals, a state space model is trained for EE estimation. An activity classification algorithm is also presented, and this activity classification output is also investigated as a model input parameter when estimating EE. This EE estimation model is compared against a similar model which solely utilizes accelerometry-derived features. A protocol (comprising lying, sitting, standing, walking, walking up stairs, walking down stairs and transitioning between activities) was performed by 13 healthy volunteers (8 males and 5 females; age: 23.8 ± 3.7 years; weight: 70.5 ± 14.9 kg), whose instantaneous oxygen uptake was measured by means of an indirect calorimetry system (K4b(2), COSMED, Italy). Activity classification improves from 81.65% to 90.91% when including barometric pressure information; when analyzing walking activities alone the accuracy increases from 70.23% to 98.54%. Using features derived from both accelerometry and barometry signals, combined with features relating to the activity classification in a state space model, resulted in a VO(2) estimation bias of -0.00 095 and precision (1.96SD) of 3.54 ml min(-1) kg(-1). Using only accelerometry features gives a relatively worse performance, with a bias of -0.09 and precision (1.96SD) of 5

  14. Transportation-cyber-physical-systems-oriented engine cylinder pressure estimation using high gain observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-Fu; Xiao-Pei, Kou; Zheng, Tai-Xiong; Li, Yin-Guo

    2015-05-01

    In transportation cyber-physical-systems (T-CPS), vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications play an important role in the coordination between individual vehicles as well as between vehicles and the roadside infrastructures, and engine cylinder pressure is significant for engine diagnosis on-line and torque control within the information exchange process under V2V communications. However, the parametric uncertainties caused from measurement noise in T-CPS lead to the dynamic performance deterioration of the engine cylinder pressure estimation. Considering the high accuracy requirement under V2V communications, a high gain observer based on the engine dynamic model is designed to improve the accuracy of pressure estimation. Then, the analyses about convergence, converge speed and stability of the corresponding error model are conducted using the Laplace and Lyapunov method. Finally, results from combination of Simulink with GT-Power based numerical experiments and comparisons demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach with respect to robustness and accuracy. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61304197), the Scientific and Technological Talents of Chongqing, China (Grant No. cstc2014kjrc-qnrc30002), the Key Project of Application and Development of Chongqing, China (Grant No. cstc2014yykfB40001), the Natural Science Funds of Chongqing, China (Grant No. cstc2014jcyjA60003), and the Doctoral Start-up Funds of Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, China (Grant No. A2012-26).

  15. Comparison of the SphygmoCor and Omron devices in the estimation of pressure amplification against the invasive catheter measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Feng-Hua; Li, Yan; Zhang, Rui-Yan; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2013-01-01

    We previously tested the accuracy of the SphygmoCor and Omron HEM-9000AI devices in the estimation of central blood pressure. In the present study, we investigated these two devices in the estimation of central-to-brachial pressure amplification against the invasive catheter measurement. In 33 individuals undergoing cardiac catheterization, we measured central blood pressure simultaneously by the invasive catheter and each of the two noninvasive devices and brachial blood pressure by the invasive catheter and an automated oscillometric blood pressure monitor of the Omron device. Pressure amplification was calculated as central-to-brachial systolic pressure difference and pulse pressure difference and ratio. The agreement between each of these two noninvasive devices and the invasive catheter was evaluated using the Student's t-test, intraclass correlation analysis, and the Bland-Altman method. The mean central-to-brachial systolic pressure difference and pulse pressure difference and ratio estimated by Omron were significantly lower than those measured by the catheter (P pressure difference and pulse pressure difference and ratio between the noninvasive and invasive catheter measurements were similar for the two devices, being 0.11 (P = 0.56), 0.38 (P = 0.03), and 0.40 (P = 0.02), respectively, for SphygmoCor, and 0.15 (P = 0.41), 0.23 (P = 0.20), and 0.53 (P = 0.002), respectively, for Omron. If the invasive catheter measurement would be considered as standard, the two noninvasive devices have similar accuracy in the estimation of pressure amplification, but apparently require device-specific criteria for diagnosis. Pulse pressure ratio seems to be a more consistent measure of central-to-brachial pressure amplification.

  16. Ground reaction force estimation using an insole-type pressure mat and joint kinematics during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yihwan; Jung, Moonki; Lee, Kunwoo; Koo, Seungbum

    2014-08-22

    Kinetic analysis of walking requires joint kinematics and ground reaction force (GRF) measurement, which are typically obtained from a force plate. GRF is difficult to measure in certain cases such as slope walking, stair climbing, and track running. Nevertheless, estimating GRF continues to be of great interest for simulating human walking. The purpose of the study was to develop reaction force models placed on the sole of the foot to estimate full GRF when only joint kinematics are provided (Type-I), and to estimate ground contact shear forces when both joint kinematics and foot pressure are provided (Type-II and Type-II-val). The GRF estimation models were attached to a commercial full body skeletal model using the AnyBody Modeling System, which has an inverse dynamics-based optimization solver. The anterior-posterior shear force and medial-lateral shear force could be estimated with approximate accuracies of 6% BW and 2% BW in all three methods, respectively. Vertical force could be estimated in the Type-I model with an accuracy of 13.75% BW. The accuracy of the force estimation was the highest during the mid-single-stance period with an average RMS for errors of 3.10% BW, 1.48% BW, and 7.48% BW for anterior-posterior force, medial-lateral force, and vertical force, respectively. The proposed GRF estimation models could predict full and partial GRF with high accuracy. The design of the contact elements of the proposed model should make it applicable to various activities where installation of a force measurement system is difficult, including track running and treadmill walking. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Estimation of the Time Constant of the Human Inner Ear Pressure Change by Noninvasive Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghida Traboulsi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a noninvasive method to estimate the time constant. The calculation of this factor permits us to understand the pressure variations of the inner ear and also predict the behavior of the flow resistance of the cochlear aqueduct. A set of mathematical relationships incorporating the intralabyrinthine pressure, the intracranial pressure, and the time constant was applied. The modeling process describes the hydrodynamic effects of the cerebrospinal fluid in the intralabyrinthine fluid space, where the input and output of the created model are, respectively, the sinusoidal variation of the respiration signal and the distortion product of otoacoustic emissions. The obtained results were compared with those obtained by different invasive techniques. A long time constant was detected each time when the intracranial pressure increased; this phenomenon is related to the role of the cochlear aqueduct described elsewhere. The interpretation of this model has revealed the ability of these predictions to provide a greater precision for hydrodynamic variation of the inner ear, consequently the variation of the dynamic process of the cerebrospinal fluid.

  18. Invasive validation of arteriograph estimates of central blood pressure in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossen, Niklas Blach; Laugesen, Esben; Peters, Christian Daugaard; Ebbehøj, Eva; Knudsen, Søren Tang; Poulsen, Per Løgstrup; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Hansen, Klavs Würgler

    2014-05-01

    Central blood pressure (BP) has attracted increasing interest because of a potential superiority over brachial BP in predicting cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Several devices estimating central BP noninvasively are now available. The aim of our study was to determine the validity of the Arteriograph, a brachial cuff-based, oscillometric device, in patients with type 2 diabetes. We measured central BP invasively and compared it with the Arteriograph-estimated values in 22 type 2 diabetic patients referred to elective coronary angiography. The difference (invasively measured BP minus Arteriograph-estimated BP) in central systolic BP (SBP) was 4.4±8.7 mm Hg (P = 0.03). The limits of agreement were ±17.1 mm Hg. Compared with invasively measured central SBP, we found a systematic underestimation by the Arteriograph. However, the limits of agreement were similar to the previous Arteriograph validation study and to the invasive validation studies of other brachial cuff-based, oscillometric devices. A limitation in our study was the large number of patients (n = 14 of 36) in which the Arteriograph was unable to analyze the pressure curves. In a research setting, the Arteriograph seems applicable in patients with type 2 diabetes. ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01538290.

  19. A simple algorithm to estimate pressure fields from velocity field measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Dabiri, John O

    2014-01-01

    This note briefly describes and characterizes a method for estimating the pressure field corresponding to instantaneous velocity field measurements. The algorithm is based on median polling of several integration paths through the measurement domain in order to reduce the effect of measurement errors that accumulate along individual integration paths. Integration paths are restricted to the nodes of the measured velocity field, thereby eliminating the need for measurement interpolation during integration of the pressure gradient field and significantly reducing the computational cost of the algorithm relative to previous approaches. The algorithm is validated using a numerically-simulated bluff-body flow to study the effects of spatial resolution, domain size, and signal-to-noise ratio.

  20. Estimating seabed pressure from demersal trawls, seines, and dredges based on gear design and dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eigaard, Ole Ritzau; Bastardie, Francois; Breen, Mike

    2016-01-01

    This study assesses the seabed pressure of towed fishing gears and models the physical impact (area and depth of seabed penetration) from trip-based information of vessel size, gear type, and catch. Traditionally fishing pressures are calculated top-down by making use of large-scale statistics...... such as logbook data. Here, we take a different approach starting from the gear itself (design and dimensions) to estimate the physical interactions with the seabed at the level of the individual fishing operation. We defined 14 distinct towed gear groups in European waters (eight otter trawl groups, three beam...... trawl groups, two demersal seine groups, and one dredge group), for which we established gear “footprints”. The footprint of a gear is defined as the relative contribution from individual larger gear components, such as trawl doors, sweeps, and groundgear, to the total area and severity of the gear...

  1. TRAC-PF1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

    1984-02-01

    The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light water reactors. The TRAC-PF1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic experimental facilities. The code features either a one-dimensional or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals; a two-phase, two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field; flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment; optional reflood tracking capability for both bottom flood and falling-film quench fronts; and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. This report describes the thermal-hydraulic models and the numerical solution methods used in the code. Detailed programming and user information also are provided.

  2. A novel numerical model for estimating the collapse pressure of flexible pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Victor P.P.; Antoun Netto, Theodoro [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia], e-mail: victor@lts.coppe.ufrj.br

    2009-07-01

    As the worldwide oil and gas industry operational environments move to ultra-deep waters, failure mechanisms in flexible pipes such as instability of the armor layers under compression and hydrostatic collapse are more likely to occur. Therefore, it is important to develop reliable numerical tools to reproduce the failure mechanisms that may occur in flexible pipes. This work presents a representative finite element model of flexible pipe capable to reproduce its pre and post-collapse behavior under hydrostatic pressure. The model, developed in the scope of this work, uses beam elements and includes nonlinear kinematics and material behavior influences. The dependability of the numerical results is assessed in light of experimental tests on flexible pipes with 4 inches and 8 inches nominal diameter available in the literature (Souza, 2002). The applied methodology provided coherent values regarding the estimation of the collapse pressures and results have shown that the proposed model is capable to reproduce experimental results. (author)

  3. A 38 to 44GHz sub-harmonic balanced HBT mixer with integrated miniature spiral type marchand balun

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Krozer, Viktor

    2013-01-01

    This work presents an active balanced sub-harmonic mixer (SHM) using InP double heterojunction bipolar transistor technology (DHBT) for Q-band applications. A miniature spiral type Marchand balun with five added capacitances for improved control of amplitude and phase balance is integrated with t...

  4. Automated midline shift and intracranial pressure estimation based on brain CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenan; Belle, Ashwin; Cockrell, Charles; Ward, Kevin R; Najarian, Kayvan

    2013-04-13

    In this paper we present an automated system based mainly on the computed tomography (CT) images consisting of two main components: the midline shift estimation and intracranial pressure (ICP) pre-screening system. To estimate the midline shift, first an estimation of the ideal midline is performed based on the symmetry of the skull and anatomical features in the brain CT scan. Then, segmentation of the ventricles from the CT scan is performed and used as a guide for the identification of the actual midline through shape matching. These processes mimic the measuring process by physicians and have shown promising results in the evaluation. In the second component, more features are extracted related to ICP, such as the texture information, blood amount from CT scans and other recorded features, such as age, injury severity score to estimate the ICP are also incorporated. Machine learning techniques including feature selection and classification, such as Support Vector Machines (SVMs), are employed to build the prediction model using RapidMiner. The evaluation of the prediction shows potential usefulness of the model. The estimated ideal midline shift and predicted ICP levels may be used as a fast pre-screening step for physicians to make decisions, so as to recommend for or against invasive ICP monitoring.

  5. Review of external ocular compression: clinical applications of the ocular pressure estimator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korenfeld MS

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Michael S Korenfeld,1,2 David K Dueker3 1Comprehensive Eye Care, Ltd. Washington, MO, USA; 2Washington University Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, St Louis, MO, USA; 3Ophthalmology, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar Purpose: The authors have previously validated an Ocular Pressure Estimator (OPE that can estimate the intraocular pressure (IOP during external ocular compression (EOC. The authors now apply the OPE in clinical states where EOC is clinically important. The original work is described for two periods of risk: during sleep and during the digital ocular massage (DOM maneuver used by surgeons after trabeculectomy to keep the operation functional. Other periods of risk for external ocular compression are then reviewed.Methods: The first protocol estimated the IOP in the dependent eye during simulated sleep. Subjects had their IOPs initially measured in an upright-seated position, immediately upon assuming a right eye dependent side sleeping position (with nothing contacting the eye, and then 5 minutes later while still in this position. While maintaining this position, the fluid filled bladder of the OPE was then placed between the subject’s closed eye and a pillow during simulated sleep. The IOP was continuously estimated in this position for 5 minutes. The subjects then had the IOP measured in both eyes in an upright-seated position. The second protocol determined if a larger vertical cup-to-disc ratio was more common on the side that patients reported they preferred to sleep on. The hypothesis was that chronic asymmetric, compression induced, elevations of IOP during sleep would be associated with otherwise unexplained asymmetry of the vertical cup-to-disc ratio. The third protocol assessed the IOP during DOM. The OPE was used to characterize the IOP produced during the DOM maneuver of five glaucoma surgeons. After this, 90 mmHg was chosen as a target pressure for DOM. The surgeons were then verbally coached

  6. A Novel Continuous Blood Pressure Estimation Approach Based on Data Mining Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Fen; Fu, Nan; Zhang, Yuan-Ting; Ding, Xiao-Rong; Hong, Xi; He, Qingyun; Li, Ye

    2017-11-01

    Continuous blood pressure (BP) estimation using pulse transit time (PTT) is a promising method for unobtrusive BP measurement. However, the accuracy of this approach must be improved for it to be viable for a wide range of applications. This study proposes a novel continuous BP estimation approach that combines data mining techniques with a traditional mechanism-driven model. First, 14 features derived from simultaneous electrocardiogram and photoplethysmogram signals were extracted for beat-to-beat BP estimation. A genetic algorithm-based feature selection method was then used to select BP indicators for each subject. Multivariate linear regression and support vector regression were employed to develop the BP model. The accuracy and robustness of the proposed approach were validated for static, dynamic, and follow-up performance. Experimental results based on 73 subjects showed that the proposed approach exhibited excellent accuracy in static BP estimation, with a correlation coefficient and mean error of 0.852 and -0.001 ± 3.102 mmHg for systolic BP, and 0.790 and -0.004 ± 2.199 mmHg for diastolic BP. Similar performance was observed for dynamic BP estimation. The robustness results indicated that the estimation accuracy was lower by a certain degree one day after model construction but was relatively stable from one day to six months after construction. The proposed approach is superior to the state-of-the-art PTT-based model for an approximately 2-mmHg reduction in the standard derivation at different time intervals, thus providing potentially novel insights for cuffless BP estimation.

  7. Estimating outflow facility through pressure dependent pathways of the human eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David W; Gardiner, Bruce S

    2017-01-01

    We develop and test a new theory for pressure dependent outflow from the eye. The theory comprises three main parameters: (i) a constant hydraulic conductivity, (ii) an exponential decay constant and (iii) a no-flow intraocular pressure, from which the total pressure dependent outflow, average outflow facilities and local outflow facilities for the whole eye may be evaluated. We use a new notation to specify precisely the meaning of model parameters and so model outputs. Drawing on a range of published data, we apply the theory to animal eyes, enucleated eyes and in vivo human eyes, and demonstrate how to evaluate model parameters. It is shown that the theory can fit high quality experimental data remarkably well. The new theory predicts that outflow facilities and total pressure dependent outflow for the whole eye are more than twice as large as estimates based on the Goldman equation and fluorometric analysis of anterior aqueous outflow. It appears likely that this discrepancy can be largely explained by pseudofacility and aqueous flow through the retinal pigmented epithelium, while any residual discrepancy may be due to pathological processes in aged eyes. The model predicts that if the hydraulic conductivity is too small, or the exponential decay constant is too large, then intraocular eye pressure may become unstable when subjected to normal circadian changes in aqueous production. The model also predicts relationships between variables that may be helpful when planning future experiments, and the model generates many novel testable hypotheses. With additional research, the analysis described here may find application in the differential diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of glaucoma.

  8. Propargyl Recombination: Estimation of the High Temperature, Low Pressure Rate Constant from Flame Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christian Lund; Skjøth-Rasmussen, Martin Skov; Jensen, Anker

    2005-01-01

    The most important cyclization reaction in hydrocarbon flames is probably recombination of propargyl radicals. This reaction may, depending on reaction conditions, form benzene, phenyl or fulvene, as well as a range of linear products. A number of rate measurements have been reported for C3H3 + C3H......3 at temperatures below 1000 K, while data at high temperature and low pressure only can be obtained from flames. In the present work, an estimate of the rate constant for the reaction at 1400 +/- 50 K and 20 Torr is obtained from analysis of the fuel-rich acetylene flame of Westmoreland, Howard......, and Longwell. Based on an accurate modeling of the flame structure, in particular the concentration profile of propargyl, we estimate the rate constant by fitting the kinetic modeling predictions to the measured benzene and phenyl profiles. The best agreement is obtained with k = 1.3 x 10(12) cm(3)/mol...

  9. Preliminary investigation of an ultrasound method for estimating pressure changes in deep-positioned vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Traberg, Marie Sand

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method for measuring pressure changes in deep-tissue vessels using vector velocity ultrasound data. The large penetration depth is ensured by acquiring data using a low frequency phased array transducer. Vascular pressure changes are then calculated from 2-D angle...... varying from -40 Pa to 15 Pa with a standard deviation of 32%, and a bias of 25% found relative to the peak simulated pressure drop. This preliminary study shows that pressure can be estimated non-invasively to a depth that enables cardiac scans, and thereby, the possibility of detecting the pressure...

  10. Laryngeal mask airway intracuff pressure estimation by digital palpation of the pilot balloon: a comparison of reusable and disposable masks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, C; Brimacombe, J R

    1999-02-01

    Digital palpation of the pilot balloon provides information about the intracuff pressure of the laryngeal mask airway. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate this technique for the reusable and disposable laryngeal mask airway. Ten anaesthetists and 10 recovery-unit nurses estimated intracuff pressures from low/high initial pressures before/after training. In the pretraining phase, the mean (95% CI) pressure was 99 (94-105) cmH2O, but this was significantly lower for the reusable laryngeal mask airway (91 vs. 103 cmH2O) and if the initial pressure was low (81 vs. 112 cmH2O). In the post-training phase, there was a significant overall improvement to 75 (66-85) cmH2O, but target pressures remained more accurate if the initial pressure was low. Subjects in the training group could estimate 95% of pressures for both devices to within +/-10 cmH2O of the target if the initial pressure was low. We conclude that anaesthetists and recovery-unit nurses are capable of accurate estimation of intracuff pressures using the digital palpation technique following a brief period of training.

  11. Simplified Methodology to Estimate the Maximum Liquid Helium (LHe) Cryostat Pressure from a Vacuum Jacket Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Richards, W. Lance

    2015-01-01

    The aircraft-based Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a platform for multiple infrared astronomical observation experiments. These experiments carry sensors cooled to liquid helium temperatures. The liquid helium supply is contained in large (i.e., 10 liters or more) vacuum-insulated dewars. Should the dewar vacuum insulation fail, the inrushing air will condense and freeze on the dewar wall, resulting in a large heat flux on the dewar's contents. The heat flux results in a rise in pressure and the actuation of the dewar pressure relief system. A previous NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) assessment provided recommendations for the wall heat flux that would be expected from a loss of vacuum and detailed an appropriate method to use in calculating the maximum pressure that would occur in a loss of vacuum event. This method involved building a detailed supercritical helium compressible flow thermal/fluid model of the vent stack and exercising the model over the appropriate range of parameters. The experimenters designing science instruments for SOFIA are not experts in compressible supercritical flows and do not generally have access to the thermal/fluid modeling packages that are required to build detailed models of the vent stacks. Therefore, the SOFIA Program engaged the NESC to develop a simplified methodology to estimate the maximum pressure in a liquid helium dewar after the loss of vacuum insulation. The method would allow the university-based science instrument development teams to conservatively determine the cryostat's vent neck sizing during preliminary design of new SOFIA Science Instruments. This report details the development of the simplified method, the method itself, and the limits of its applicability. The simplified methodology provides an estimate of the dewar pressure after a loss of vacuum insulation that can be used for the initial design of the liquid helium dewar vent stacks. However, since it is not an exact

  12. Crack opening displacement estimation for engineering Leak-Before-Break analyses of pressurized nuclear piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jae Boong; Chang, Yoon Suk [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Nam Su [Univ. of Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany); Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Jun Seok [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-10-01

    This study presents methods to estimate elastic-plastic Crack Opening Displacement (COD) for circumferential through-wall cracked pipes for the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) analysis of pressurized piping. Proposed methods are based not only on the GE/EPRI approach but also on the reference stress approach. For each approach, two different estimation schemes are given, one for the case when full stress-strain data are available, and the other for the case when only yield and ultimate tensile strengths are available. For the GE/EPRI approach, a robust way of determining the Ramberg-Osgood(R-O) parameters is proposed, not only for the case when detailed information on full stress-strain data is available but also for the case when only yield and ultimate tensile strengths are available. The COD estimates according to the GE/EPRI approach, using the R-O parameters determined from the proposed R-O fitting procedures, generally compare well with the published pipe test data. For the reference stress approach, the COD estimates according to the method based on both full stress-strain data and limited tensile properties are in good agreement with pipe test data. In conclusion, experimental validation given in the present study provides sufficient confidence in the use of the proposed method to practical LBB analyses even though when information on material's tensile properties is limited.

  13. Individualized estimation of the central aortic blood pressure waveform: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Jin-Oh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative study on the relative performance of alternative strategies for estimating an individualized central aortic blood pressure (BP) waveform. Based on the transmission line representation of the central aortic-radial arterial line, a fully individualized (ITF 1), two partially individualized (ITF 2 and ITF 3 ), and a fully nonindividualized (NITF) transfer functions (i.e., frequency-dependent central aortic-radial BP relationships) were constructed using experimental data collected from nine swine subjects. The central aortic BP waveforms estimated by these transfer functions were compared against their measured gold standards, with the root-mean-squared waveform error and the absolute errors associated with systolic and pulse pressures as performance measures. Overall, the advantage of the individualized over the nonindividualized approach was modest but significant. The superiority of the individualized approach to its nonindividualized counterpart was increasingly pronounced under nonnominal or extreme physiologic conditions, as the subject's pulse transit time deviated from the averaged nominal value. The results suggest that the use of a fully individualized transfer function (ITF 1) is strongly recommended for nonnominal physiologic conditions, whereas a partially (ITF 2 and ITF 3) or even fully nonindividualized transfer function (NITF) may also yield acceptable performance under nominal physiologic conditions.

  14. Crack opening area estimates in pressurized through-wall cracked elbows under bending

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, C.; Gilles, P.; Pignol, M.

    1997-04-01

    One of the most important aspects in the leak-before-break approach is the estimation of the crack opening area corresponding to potential through-wall cracks at critical locations during plant operation. In order to provide a reasonable lower bound to the leak area under such loading conditions, numerous experimental and numerical programs have been developed in USA, U.K. and FRG and widely discussed in literature. This paper aims to extend these investigations on a class of pipe elbows characteristic of PWR main coolant piping. The paper is divided in three main parts. First, a new simplified estimation scheme for leakage area is described, based on the reference stress method. This approach mainly developed in U.K. and more recently in France provides a convenient way to account for the non-linear behavior of the material. Second, the method is carried out for circumferential through-wall cracks located in PWR elbows subjected to internal pressure. Finite element crack area results are presented and comparisons are made with our predictions. Finally, in the third part, the discussion is extended to elbows under combined pressure and in plane bending moment.

  15. Estimating shock pressures based on high-pressure minerals in shock-induced melt veins of L chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhidong; Sharp, Thomas G.; de Carli, Paul S.

    Here we report the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations of the mineral assemblages and textures in shock-induced melt veins from seven L chondrites of shock stages ranging from S3 to S6. The mineral assemblages combined with phase equilibrium data are used to constrain the crystallization pressures, which can be used to constrain shock pressure in some cases. Thick melt veins in the Tenham L6 chondrite contain majorite and magnesiowüstite in the center, and ringwoodite, akimotoite, vitrified silicate-perovskite, and majorite in the edge of the vein, indicating crystallization pressure of ˜25 GPa. However, very thin melt veins (5-30 μm wide) in Tenham contain glass, olivine, clinopyroxene, and ringwoodite, suggesting crystallization during transient low-pressure excursions as the shock pressure equilibrated to a continuum level. Melt veins of Umbarger include ringwoodite, akimotoite, and clinopyroxene in the vein matrix, and Fe2SiO4-spinel and stishovite in SiO2-FeO-rich melt, indicating a crystallization pressure of ˜18 GPa. The silicate melt veins in Roy contain majorite plus ringwoodite, indicating pressure of ˜20 GPa. Melt veins of Ramsdorf and Nakhon Pathon contain olivine and clinoenstatite, indicating pressure of less than 15 GPa. Melt veins of Kunashak and La Lande include albite and olivine, indicating crystallization at less than 2.5 GPa. Based upon the assemblages observed, crystallization of shock veins can occur before, during, or after pressure release. When the assemblage consists of high-pressure minerals and that assemblage is constant across a larger melt vein or pocket, the crystallization pressure represents the equilibrium shock pressure.

  16. Finite element analysis to estimate burst pressure of mild steel pressure vessel using Ramberg–Osgood model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Deolia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Burst pressure is the pressure at which vessel burst/crack and internal fluid leaks. An accurate prediction of burst pressure is necessary in chemical, medical and aviation industry. Burst pressure is a design safety limit, which should not be exceeded. If this pressure is exceeded it may lead to the mechanical breach and permanent loss of pressure containment. So burst pressure calculation is necessary for all the critical applications. To numerically calculate burst pressure material curve is essential. There are various material models which are used to define material curve, amongst them Ramberg–Osgood is very popular. Ramberg–Osgood accurately capture material curve in strain hardening region. This approach is applicable for different material grades. In this paper a finite element method is used to predict burst pressure using Ramberg–Osgood equation. These results are then compared with results obtained from elasto-plastic curve and true stress strain curve. Results obtained by finite element analysis are validated with experimental data which is considered from open literature.

  17. Methods for estimating pressure and thermal loads induced by elevon deflections on hypersonic-vehicle surfaces with turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, L. G., II; Johnson, C. B.

    1981-09-01

    Empirical anaytic methods are presented for calculating thermal and pressure distributions in three-dimensional, shock-wave turbulent-boundary-layer, interaction-flow regions on the surface of controllable hypersonic aircraft and missiles. The methods, based on several experimental investigations, are useful and reliable for estimating both the extent and magnitude of the increased thermal and pressure loads on the vehicle surfaces.

  18. Subharmonic Venture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Faez (Telli)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAs a person, always fascinated with the presence of physics in the daily life challenges, let me share this joy with you! But before leaving you with complicated medical terms, allow me to tell you a story. My grandmother passed away when I was nine years old. She was the sweetest

  19. Subharmonic energy-gap structure and heating effects in superconducting niobium point contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flensberg, Karsten; Hansen, Jørn Bindslev

    1989-01-01

    superconducting weak links that includes the heating effects self-consistently. Our model is combined with that of Octavio, Blonder, Klapwijk, and Tinkham [Phys. Rev. B 27, 6739 (1983)], which is based on the idea of multiple Andreev scattering in the contact. The shape and the temperature variation......We present experimental data of the temperature-dependent subharmonic energy-gap structure (SGS) in the current-voltage (I-V) curves of superconducting niobium point contacts. The observed SGS is modified by heating effects. We construct a model of the quasiparticle conductance of metallic...... of the calculated SGS is found to be in good agreement with the experimental curves for contacts with resistance larger than 5 Ω....

  20. Periodic and subharmonic solutions for a 2nth-order difference equation containing both advance and retardation with -Laplacian: Doc 781

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Genghong Lin; Zhan Zhou

    2014-01-01

      In this paper, by using critical point theory, we obtain some new sufficient conditions on the existence and multiplicity of periodic and subharmonic solutions to a 2nth-order nonlinear difference...

  1. Three-dimensional subharmonic ultrasound imaging in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbrey, John R; Sridharan, Anush; Machado, Priscilla; Zhao, Hongjia; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Dave, Jaydev K; Liu, Ji-Bin; Park, Suhyun; Dianis, Scott; Wallace, Kirk; Thomenius, Kai E; Forsberg, Flemming

    2012-06-01

    Although contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging techniques such as harmonic imaging (HI) have evolved to reduce tissue signals using the nonlinear properties of the contrast agent, levels of background suppression have been mixed. Subharmonic imaging (SHI) offers near complete tissue suppression by centering the receive bandwidth at half the transmitting frequency. The aims of this study were to demonstrate the feasibility of three-dimensional (3D) SHI and to compare it to 3D HI. Three-dimensional HI and SHI were implemented on a Logiq 9 ultrasound scanner with a 4D10L probe. Four-cycle SHI was implemented to transmit at 5.8 MHz and receive at 2.9 MHz, while two-cycle HI was implemented to transmit at 5 MHz and receive at 10 MHz. The ultrasound contrast agent Definity was imaged within a flow phantom and the lower pole of two canine kidneys in both HI and SHI modes. Contrast-to-tissue ratios and rendered images were compared offline. SHI resulted in significant improvement in contrast-to-tissue ratios relative to HI both in vitro (12.11 ± 0.52 vs 2.67 ± 0.77, P< .001) and in vivo (5.74 ± 1.92 vs 2.40 ± 0.48, P = .04). Rendered 3D subharmonic images provided better tissue suppression and a greater overall view of vessels in a flow phantom and canine renal vasculature. The successful implementation of SHI in 3D allows imaging of vascular networks over a heterogeneous sample volume and should improve future diagnostic accuracy. Additionally, 3D SHI provides improved contrast-to-tissue ratios relative to 3D HI. Copyright © 2012 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparing Quantitative Immunohistochemical Markers of Angiogenesis to Contrast-Enhanced Subharmonic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aditi; Forsberg, Mark A; Dulin, Kelly; Jaffe, Samantha; Dave, Jaydev K; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Marshall, Andrew; Forsberg, Anya I; Eisenbrey, John R; Machado, Priscilla; Fox, Traci B; Liu, Ji-Bin; Forsberg, Flemming

    2016-09-01

    Different methods for obtaining tumor neovascularity parameters based on immunohistochemical markers were compared to contrast-enhanced subharmonic imaging (SHI). Eighty-five athymic nude female rats were implanted with 5 × 10(6) breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) in the mammary fat pad. The contrast agent Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, North Billerica, MA) was injected, and SHI was performed using a modified Sonix RP scanner (Analogic Ultrasound, Richmond, British Columbia, Canada) with a L9-4 linear array (transmitting/receiving frequencies, 8/4 MHz). Afterward, specimens were stained for endothelial cells (CD31), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2). Tumor neovascularity was assessed in 4 different ways using a histomorphometry system (×100 magnification: (1) over the entire tumor; (2) in small sub-regions of interest (ROIs); (3) in the tumor periphery and centrally; and (4) in 3 regions of maximum marker expression (so-called hot spots). Results from specimens and from SHI were compared by linear regression. Fifty-four rats (64%) showed tumor growth, and 38 were successfully imaged. Subharmonic imaging depicted the tortuous morphologic characteristics of tumor neovessels and delineated small areas of necrosis. The immunohistochemical markers did not correlate with SHI measures over the entire tumor area or over small sub-ROIs (P > .18). However, when the specimens were subdivided into central and peripheral regions, COX-2 and VEGF correlated with SHI in the periphery (r = -0.42; P = .005; and r = -0.32; P = .049, respectively). When comparing quantitative contrast measures of tumor neovascularity to immunohistochemical markers of angiogenesis in xenograft models, ROIs corresponding to the biologically active region should be used to account for tumor heterogeneity.

  3. Evaluation of oscillometric and Doppler ultrasonic methods of indirect blood pressure estimation in conscious dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberman, Christopher E.; Kang, Chang W.; Morgan, Jefferson D.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract To assess the accuracy and precision of indirect measurements of systemic arterial blood pressure (BP), results obtained with an oscillometric device (BPo) and a Doppler ultrasonic device (BPud) were compared with those obtained by direct radiotelemetry (BPrt) in 12 conscious beagles. The correlation between indirectly obtained and directly measured values for BP parameters ranged widely for the different indirect methods and sites of cuff placement, with R2 between 0.001 and 0.901. Both indirect methods underestimated all BP parameters, the degree of underestimation increasing at higher values for the BP. The highest correlation occurred when estimates were the average of 5 values consecutively obtained with the oscillometric device and cuff placement at the coccygeal artery (R2 = 0.854 for mean BPo, 0.886 for systolic BPo, and 0.901 for diastolic BPo; P < 0.0001 for all parameters) or with the ultrasonic Doppler device at the metatarsal arteries (R2 = 0.810 for systolic BPud; P < 0.0001). Multiple consecutively obtained values are advised, as this approach improves the reliability of indirect BP measurements. The strong correlation between directly measured values and estimates derived as the average of 5 consecutive indirectly obtained values indicates that the latter approach provides a useful estimate of BP in conscious dogs and is likely to be useful in monitoring disease progress and treatment in dogs with abnormal BP. PMID:16850944

  4. Estimating the prevalence of hypertension corrected for the effect of within-person variability in blood pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klungel, O.H.; de Boer, A; Paes, A.H.P.; Nagelkerke, N.J.; Seidell, J C; Bakker, A

    2000-01-01

    The objective of our study was to assess the applicability of using estimates of within-person variance (WPV) from reproducibility studies for a correction of blood pressure values in another study to improve the accuracy of the prevalence estimation of hypertension. Data were collected from two

  5. Feasibility study for the non-invasive blood pressure estimation based on ppg morphology: normotensive subject study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hangsik; Min, Se Dong

    2017-01-10

    Blood pressure is a critical bio-signal and its importance has been increased with the aged society and the growth of cardiovascular disease population. However, most of hypertensive patients have been suffered the inconvenience in monitoring blood pressure in daily life because the measurement of the blood pressure depends on the cuff-based technique. Nowadays there are many trials to measure blood pressure without cuff, especially, photoplethysmography (PPG) based research is carried out in various ways. Our research is designed to hypothesis the relationship between vessel wall movement and pressure-flow relationship of PPG and to validate its appropriateness by experimental methods. PPG waveform is simplified by approximate model, and then it is analyzed as the velocity and the acceleration of blood flow using the derivatives of PPG. Finally, we develop pressure index (PI) as an estimation factor of blood pressure by combining of statistically significant segments of photoplethysmographic waveform. Twenty-five subjects were participated in the experiment. As a result of simulation, correlation coefficients between developed PI and blood pressure were represented with R = 0.818, R = 0.827 and R = 0.615 in systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure, respectively, and both of result showed the meaningful statistically significance (P blood pressure but could not find the absolute pressure value. Moreover, proposed index has the limitation of diastolic pressure tracing. However, the result shows that the proposed PI is statistically significantly correlated with blood pressures, and it suggests that the proposed PI as a promising additional parameter for the cuff less blood pressure monitoring.

  6. Low cycle fatigue numerical estimation of a high pressure turbine disc for the AL-31F jet engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spodniak Miroslav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the description of an approximate numerical estimation approach of a low cycle fatigue of a high pressure turbine disc for the AL-31F turbofan jet engine. The numerical estimation is based on the finite element method carried out in the SolidWorks software. The low cycle fatigue assessment of a high pressure turbine disc was carried out on the basis of dimensional, shape and material disc characteristics, which are available for the particular high pressure engine turbine. The method described here enables relatively fast setting of economically feasible low cycle fatigue of the assessed high pressure turbine disc using a commercially available software. The numerical estimation of accuracy of a low cycle fatigue depends on the accuracy of required input data for the particular investigated object.

  7. Low cycle fatigue numerical estimation of a high pressure turbine disc for the AL-31F jet engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spodniak, Miroslav; Klimko, Marek; Hocko, Marián; Žitek, Pavel

    This article deals with the description of an approximate numerical estimation approach of a low cycle fatigue of a high pressure turbine disc for the AL-31F turbofan jet engine. The numerical estimation is based on the finite element method carried out in the SolidWorks software. The low cycle fatigue assessment of a high pressure turbine disc was carried out on the basis of dimensional, shape and material disc characteristics, which are available for the particular high pressure engine turbine. The method described here enables relatively fast setting of economically feasible low cycle fatigue of the assessed high pressure turbine disc using a commercially available software. The numerical estimation of accuracy of a low cycle fatigue depends on the accuracy of required input data for the particular investigated object.

  8. The critical assessment of vapour pressure estimation methods for use in modelling the formation of atmospheric organic aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Barley

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A selection of models for estimating vapour pressures have been tested against experimental data for a set of compounds selected for their particular relevance to the formation of atmospheric aerosol by gas-liquid partitioning. The experimental vapour pressure data (all <100 Pa of 45 multifunctional compounds provide a stringent test of the estimation techniques, with a recent complex group contribution method providing the best overall results. The effect of errors in vapour pressures upon the formation of organic aerosol by gas-liquid partitioning in an atmospherically relevant example is also investigated. The mass of organic aerosol formed under typical atmospheric conditions was found to be very sensitive to the variation in vapour pressure values typically present when comparing estimation methods.

  9. Estimated Pulse Wave Velocity Calculated from Age and Mean Arterial Blood Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, S. V.; Laurent, Stéphane; Olsen, M. H.

    2016-01-01

    In a recently published paper, Greve et al [J Hypertens 2016;34:1279-1289] investigate whether the estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (ePWV), calculated using an equation derived from the relationship between carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), age, and blood pressure, predicts...... cardiovascular disease (CVD) as good as the measured cfPWV. Because ePWV predicts CVD as good as cfPWV, some might wonder whether ePWV could be replaced by cfPWV, which is a time-consuming measurement requiring an expensive apparatus. This question is addressed in this mini-review. (C) 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel...

  10. Iron Deficiency in COPD Associates with Increased Pulmonary Artery Pressure Estimated by Echocardiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesner, Louis L; Schoos, Mikkel M; Dalsgaard, Morten

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Iron deficiency (ID) might augment chronic pulmonary hypertension in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This observational study investigates the association between ID and systolic pulmonary artery pressure estimated by echocardiography in non-anaemic COPD outpatients....... METHODS: Non-anaemic COPD patients (GOLD II-IV) with no history of cardiovascular disease were recruited from outpatient clinics. Iron deficiency was defined as ferritin...0.05). Ferritin inversely correlated with TR Vmax in ID patients (-0.37 (p=0.04)). The prevalence of TR Vmax ≥ 2.9 m/s was twice as high in patients with ID (58% vs. 29%) and odds ratio of pulmonary hypertension in ID...

  11. EVAPORATION: a new vapour pressure estimation methodfor organic molecules including non-additivity and intramolecular interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Compernolle

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present EVAPORATION (Estimation of VApour Pressure of ORganics, Accounting for Temperature, Intramolecular, and Non-additivity effects, a method to predict (subcooled liquid pure compound vapour pressure p0 of organic molecules that requires only molecular structure as input. The method is applicable to zero-, mono- and polyfunctional molecules. A simple formula to describe log10p0(T is employed, that takes into account both a wide temperature dependence and the non-additivity of functional groups. In order to match the recent data on functionalised diacids an empirical modification to the method was introduced. Contributions due to carbon skeleton, functional groups, and intramolecular interaction between groups are included. Molecules typically originating from oxidation of biogenic molecules are within the scope of this method: aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, ethers, esters, nitrates, acids, peroxides, hydroperoxides, peroxy acyl nitrates and peracids. Therefore the method is especially suited to describe compounds forming secondary organic aerosol (SOA.

  12. Limitations of stroke volume estimation by non-invasive blood pressure monitoring in hypergravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manen, Olivier; Dussault, Caroline; Sauvet, Fabien; Montmerle-Borgdorff, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    Altitude and gravity changes during aeromedical evacuations induce exacerbated cardiovascular responses in unstable patients. Non-invasive cardiac output monitoring is difficult to perform in this environment with limited access to the patient. We evaluated the feasibility and accuracy of stroke volume estimation by finger photoplethysmography (SVp) in hypergravity. Finger arterial blood pressure (ABP) waveforms were recorded continuously in ten healthy subjects before, during and after exposure to +Gz accelerations in a human centrifuge. The protocol consisted of a 2-min and 8-min exposure up to +4 Gz. SVp was computed from ABP using Liljestrand, systolic area, and Windkessel algorithms, and compared with reference values measured by echocardiography (SVe) before and after the centrifuge runs. The ABP signal could be used in 83.3% of cases. After calibration with echocardiography, SVp changes did not differ from SVe and values were linearly correlated (pinvasive ABP photoplethysmographic monitoring is an interesting technique to estimate relative stroke volume changes in moderate and sustained hypergravity. This method may aid physicians for aeronautic patient monitoring.

  13. Non-invasive method for the aortic blood pressure waveform estimation using the measured radial EBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivoshei, Andrei; Lamp, Jürgen; Min, Mart; Uuetoa, Tiina; Uuetoa, Hasso; Annus, Paul

    2013-04-01

    The paper presents a method for the Central Aortic Pressure (CAP) waveform estimation from the measured radial Electrical Bio-Impedance (EBI). The method proposed here is a non-invasive and health-safe approach to estimate the cardiovascular system parameters, such as the Augmentation Index (AI). Reconstruction of the CAP curve from the EBI data is provided by spectral domain transfer functions (TF), found on the bases of data analysis. Clinical experiments were carried out on 30 patients in the Center of Cardiology of East-Tallinn Central Hospital during coronary angiography on patients in age of 43 to 80 years. The quality and reliability of the method was tested by comparing the evaluated augmentation indices obtained from the invasively measured CAP data and from the reconstructed curve. The correlation coefficient r = 0.89 was calculated in the range of AICAP values from 5 to 28. Comparing to the traditional tonometry based method, the developed one is more convenient to use and it allows long-term monitoring of the AI, what is not possible with tonometry probes.

  14. Estimations of the Seismic Pressure Noise on Mars Determined from Large Eddy Simulations and Demonstration of Pressure Decorrelation Techniques for the Insight Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Naomi; Kenda, Balthasar; Kawamura, Taichi; Spiga, Aymeric; Lognonné, Philippe; Mimoun, David; Banerdt, William B.

    2017-10-01

    The atmospheric pressure fluctuations on Mars induce an elastic response in the ground that creates a ground tilt, detectable as a seismic signal on the InSight seismometer SEIS. The seismic pressure noise is modeled using Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of the wind and surface pressure at the InSight landing site and a Green's function ground deformation approach that is subsequently validated via a detailed comparison with two other methods: a spectral approach, and an approach based on Sorrells' theory (Sorrells, Geophys. J. Int. 26:71-82, 1971; Sorrells et al., Nat. Phys. Sci. 229:14-16, 1971). The horizontal accelerations as a result of the ground tilt due to the LES turbulence-induced pressure fluctuations are found to be typically ˜ 2 - 40 nm/s2 in amplitude, whereas the direct horizontal acceleration is two orders of magnitude smaller and is thus negligible in comparison. The vertical accelerations are found to be ˜ 0.1-6 nm/s2 in amplitude. These are expected to be worst-case estimates for the seismic noise as we use a half-space approximation; the presence at some (shallow) depth of a harder layer would significantly reduce quasi-static displacement and tilt effects. We show that under calm conditions, a single-pressure measurement is representative of the large-scale pressure field (to a distance of several kilometers), particularly in the prevailing wind direction. However, during windy conditions, small-scale turbulence results in a reduced correlation between the pressure signals, and the single-pressure measurement becomes less representative of the pressure field. The correlation between the seismic signal and the pressure signal is found to be higher for the windiest period because the seismic pressure noise reflects the atmospheric structure close to the seismometer. In the same way that we reduce the atmospheric seismic signal by making use of a pressure sensor that is part of the InSight Auxiliary Payload Sensor Suite, we also the use the

  15. Subharmonic energy gap structure in the Josephson radiation at 35 GHz from a superconducting thin-film microbridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørn Bindslev; Levinsen, M. T.; Lindelof, Poul Erik

    1979-01-01

    Nonresonant detection of the Josephson radiation 35 GHz from a superconducting thin-film microbridge is reported. The high frequency and the accuracy of these measurements lead to a new important observation: subharmonic energy gap structure in the detected integral power. The maximum integral po...... power measured was as large as 8×10−11 W. Applied Physics Letters is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  16. Models of venous return and their application to estimate the mean systemic filling pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, E.A. den

    2007-01-01

    Mean systemic filling pressure is the equilibrium pressure in the systemic circulation when the heart is arrested and there is no flow. This pressure is a measure of the stressed volume of the systemic circulation and regarded as the driving pressure for the venous return during steady states [1-3].

  17. Models of venous return and their application to estimate the mean systemic filling pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A. den Hartog (Emiel)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractMean systemic filling pressure is the equilibrium pressure in the systemic circulation when the heart is arrested and there is no flow. This pressure is a measure of the stressed volume of the systemic circulation and regarded as the driving pressure for the venous return during steady

  18. Residual Stress Estimation and Fatigue Life Prediction of an Autofrettaged Pressure Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kyung Jin; Kim, Eun Kyum; Koh, Seung Kee [Kunsan Nat’l Univ., Kunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Fatigue failure of an autofrettaged pressure vessel with a groove at the outside surface occurs owing to the fatigue crack initiation and propagation at the groove root. In order to predict the fatigue life of the autofrettaged pressure vessel, residual stresses in the autofrettaged pressure vessel were evaluated using the finite element method, and the fatigue properties of the pressure vessel steel were obtained from the fatigue tests. Fatigue life of a pressure vessel obtained through summation of the crack initiation and propagation lives was calculated to be 2,598 cycles for an 80% autofrettaged pressure vessel subjected to a pulsating internal pressure of 424 MPa.

  19. Multifrequency and edge breathers in the discrete sine-Gordon system via subharmonic driving: Theory, computation and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmero, F. [Grupo de Física No Lineal, Departamento de Física Aplicada I, ETSI Informática, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes, s/n, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA 17013 (United States); Han, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA 17013 (United States); English, L.Q., E-mail: englishl@dickinson.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA 17013 (United States); Alexander, T.J. [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, UNSW Canberra, 2610 (Australia); Kevrekidis, P.G. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-4515 (United States); Center for Nonlinear Studies and Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States)

    2016-01-28

    We consider a chain of torsionally-coupled, planar pendula shaken horizontally by an external sinusoidal driver. It has been known that in such a system, theoretically modeled by the discrete sine-Gordon equation, intrinsic localized modes, also known as discrete breathers, can exist. Recently, the existence of multifrequency breathers via subharmonic driving has been theoretically proposed and numerically illustrated by Xu et al. (2014) [21]. In this paper, we verify this prediction experimentally. Comparison of the experimental results to numerical simulations with realistic system parameters (including a Floquet stability analysis), and wherever possible to analytical results (e.g. for the subharmonic response of the single driven–damped pendulum), yields good agreement. Finally, we report the period-1 and multifrequency edge breathers which are localized at the open boundaries of the chain, for which we have again found good agreement between experiments and numerical computations. - Highlights: • We have confirmed experimentally the existence of subharmonic ILM/breather structures in a chain of coupled torsion pendula. • Experiments are in line with our theoretical analysis and numerical computations. • We have also revealed surface breather modes in this chain, both experimentally and numerically.

  20. High and low frequency subharmonic imaging of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahibawkar, Manasi; Forsberg, Mark A; Gupta, Aditi; Jaffe, Samantha; Dulin, Kelly; Eisenbrey, John R; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Forsberg, Anya I; Dave, Jaydev K; Marshall, Andrew; Machado, Priscilla; Fox, Traci B; Liu, Ji-Bin; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-09-01

    This project compared quantifiable measures of tumor vascularity obtained from contrast-enhanced high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) subharmonic ultrasound imaging (SHI) to 3 immunohistochemical markers of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model (since angiogenesis is an important marker of malignancy and the target of many novel cancer treatments). Nineteen athymic, nude, female rats were implanted with 5×10(6) breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) in the mammary fat pad. The contrast agent Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, N Billerica, MA) was injected in a tail vein (dose: 180μl/kg) and LF pulse-inversion SHI was performed with a modified Sonix RP scanner (Analogic Ultrasound, Richmond, BC, Canada) using a L9-4 linear array (transmitting/receiving at 8/4MHz in SHI mode) followed by HF imaging with a Vevo 2100 scanner (Visualsonics, Toronto, ON, Canada) using a MS250 linear array transmitting and receiving at 24MHz. The radiofrequency data was filtered using a 4th order IIR Butterworth bandpass filter (11-13MHz) to isolate the subharmonic signal. After the experiments, specimens were stained for endothelial cells (CD31), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Fractional tumor vascularity was calculated as contrast-enhanced pixels over all tumor pixels for SHI, while the relative area stained over total tumor area was calculated from specimens. Results were compared using linear regression analysis. Out of 19 rats, 16 showed tumor growth (84%) and 11 of them were successfully imaged. HF SHI demonstrated better resolution, but weaker signals than LF SHI (0.06±0.017 vs. 0.39±0.059; p<0.001). The strongest overall correlation in this breast cancer model was between HF SHI and VEGF (r=-0.38; p=0.03). In conclusion, quantifiable measures of tumor neovascularity derived from contrast-enhanced HF SHI appear to be a better method than LF SHI for monitoring angiogenesis in a murine xenograft model of breast cancer

  1. Subharmonic and Endoscopic Contrast Imaging of Pancreatic Masses: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Flemming; Stanczak, Maria; Lyshchik, Andrej; Loren, David; O'Kane, Patrick; Siddiqui, Ali; Kowalski, Thomas E; Miller, Cynthia; Fox, Traci; Liu, Ji-Bin; Eisenbrey, John R

    2017-07-06

    To use subharmonic imaging (SHI) to depict the vascularity of pancreatic masses compared to contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and pathologic results. Sixteen patients scheduled for biopsy of a pancreatic mass were enrolled in an Institutional Review Board-approved study. Pulse-inversion SHI (transmitting/receiving at 2.5/1.25 MHz) was performed on a LOGIQ 9 system (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI) with a 4C transducer, whereas contrast harmonic EUS (transmitting/receiving at 4.7/9.4 MHz) was performed with a radial endoscope (GF-UTC180; Olympus Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) connected to a ProSound SSD α-10 scanner (Hitachi Aloka, Tokyo, Japan). Two injections of the contrast agent Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, North Billerica, MA) were administrated (0.3-0.4 and 0.6-0.8 mL for EUS and SHI, respectively). Contrast-to-tissue ratios (CTRs) in the mass and an adjacent vessel were calculated. Four physicians independently scored the images (benign to malignant) for diagnostic accuracy and inter-reader agreement. One patient dropped out before imaging, leaving 11 adenocarcinomas, 1 gastrointestinal stromal tumor with pancreatic infiltration, and 3 benign masses. Marked subharmonic signals were obtained in all patients, with intratumoral blood flow clearly visualized with SHI. Significantly greater CTRs were obtained in the masses with SHI than with EUS (mean ± SD, 1.71 ± 1.63 versus 0.63 ± 0.89; P = .016). There were no differences in the CTR in the surrounding vessels or when grouped by pathologic results (P > .60). The accuracies for contrast EUS and SHI were low (<53%), albeit with a greater κ value for SHI (0.34) than for EUS (0.13). Diagnostic accuracy of contrast EUS and transabdominal SHI for assessment of pancreatic masses was quite low in this pilot study. However, SHI had improved tumoral CTRs relative to contrast EUS. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  2. Estimating the irreversible pressure drop across a stenosis by quantifying turbulence production using 4D Flow MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Hojin; Lantz, Jonas; Ziegler, Magnus; Casas, Belen; Karlsson, Matts; Dyverfeldt, Petter; Ebbers, Tino

    2017-04-20

    The pressure drop across a stenotic vessel is an important parameter in medicine, providing a commonly used and intuitive metric for evaluating the severity of the stenosis. However, non-invasive estimation of the pressure drop under pathological conditions has remained difficult. This study demonstrates a novel method to quantify the irreversible pressure drop across a stenosis using 4D Flow MRI by calculating the total turbulence production of the flow. Simulation MRI acquisitions showed that the energy lost to turbulence production can be accurately quantified with 4D Flow MRI within a range of practical spatial resolutions (1-3 mm; regression slope = 0.91, R2 = 0.96). The quantification of the turbulence production was not substantially influenced by the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), resulting in less than 2% mean bias at SNR > 10. Pressure drop estimation based on turbulence production robustly predicted the irreversible pressure drop, regardless of the stenosis severity and post-stenosis dilatation (regression slope = 0.956, R2 = 0.96). In vitro validation of the technique in a 75% stenosis channel confirmed that pressure drop prediction based on the turbulence production agreed with the measured pressure drop (regression slope = 1.15, R2 = 0.999, Bland-Altman agreement = 0.75 ± 3.93 mmHg).

  3. Estimation of cerebral vascular tone during exercise; evaluation by critical closing pressure in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Brothers, R Matthew; Jeschke, Monica

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to calculate critical closing pressure (CCP) of the cerebral vasculature at rest and during exercise to estimate cerebral vascular tone. Five men and two women were seated upright for 15 min and then performed 15 min of right-legged knee extension exercise at 40, ......, P = 0.564) or adrenaline concentrations (right, P = 0.138; left, P = 0.108). We consider that an exercise-induced increase in cerebral vascular tone serves to protect the blood-brain barrier from the exercise-induced hypertension....... and the left MCA. In both arteries, the CCP increased (right MCA, +6.6 +/- 8.5 mmHg, P = 0.023; left MCA, +7.3 +/- 9.1 mmHg, P = 0.016) during 75% WL(max) without changes in resistance-area product, while femoral vascular resistance of the non-exercising leg decreased (from 0.32 +/- 0.07 to 0.18 +/- 0.05 mm......Hg min ml(1); P right and left MCA (P = 0.31). These findings suggest an increase in cerebral vascular tone in both the right and the left MCA from rest to exercise despite a decrease in vascular resistance of the systemic vasculature...

  4. 670-GHz Schottky Diode-Based Subharmonic Mixer with CPW Circuits and 70-GHz IF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Schlecht, Erich T.; Lee, Choonsup; Lin, Robert H.; Gill, John J.; Mehdi, Imran; Sin, Seth; Deal, William; Loi, Kwok K.; Nam, Peta; hide

    2012-01-01

    GaAs-based, sub-harmonically pumped Schottky diode mixers offer a number of advantages for array implementation in a heterodyne receiver system. Since the radio frequency (RF) and local oscillator (LO) signals are far apart, system design becomes much simpler. A proprietary planar GaAs Schottky diode process was developed that results in very low parasitic anodes that have cutoff frequencies in the tens of terahertz. This technology enables robust implementation of monolithic mixer and frequency multiplier circuits well into the terahertz frequency range. Using optical and e-beam lithography, and conventional epitaxial layer design with innovative usage of GaAs membranes and metal beam leads, high-performance terahertz circuits can be designed with high fidelity. All of these mixers use metal waveguide structures for housing. Metal machined structures for RF and LO coupling hamper these mixers to be integrated in multi-pixel heterodyne array receivers for spectroscopic and imaging applications. Moreover, the recent developments of terahertz transistors on InP substrate provide an opportunity, for the first time, to have integrated amplifiers followed by Schottky diode mixers in a heterodyne receiver at these frequencies. Since the amplifiers are developed on a planar architecture to facilitate multi-pixel array implementation, it is quite important to find alternative architecture to waveguide-based mixers.

  5. Nonlinear and subharmonic stability analysis in film-driven morphological patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertagni, Matteo Bernard; Camporeale, Carlo

    2017-11-01

    The interaction of a gravity-driven water film with an evolving solid substrate (calcite or ice) results in the formation of fascinating wavy patterns similar both in caves and in ice-falls. Due to their remarkable similarity, we adopt a unified approach in the study of pattern formation of longitudinally oriented organ-pipe-like structures, called flutings. Since the morphogenesis of cave patterns can evolve for millennia, they have an additional value as silent repositories of past climates. Fluting formation is studied with the aid of gradient expansion and center manifold projection. In particular, through gradient expansion, a Benney-type equation accounting for the movable boundary is obtained. The coupling with a wall evolution equation provides a morphodynamic model for fluting formation, explored through linear and nonlinear analyses. In this way, closed relationships for the selected wave number and for the finite amplitude are achieved. However, as finite-amplitude monochromatic waves may be destabilized by nonlinear interactions with other modes, we verify, through center manifold projection, the stability of the fundamental to subharmonic disturbances. Conclusively, we perform numerical simulations of the fully nonlinear equations to validate the theory results.

  6. Assessing algorithms for defining vascular architecture in subharmonic images of breast lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenbrey, John R; Joshi, Neha; Dave, Jaydev K; Forsberg, Flemming, E-mail: Flemming.Forsberg@jefferson.edu [Department of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson University, 137 South 10th St, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)

    2011-02-21

    The ability to accurately and non-invasively characterize breast lesions and their vasculature would greatly limit the number of unneeded biopsies performed annually. Subharmonic ultrasound imaging (SHI) allows exclusive imaging of vasculature in real time, while completely suppressing tissue signals. Previously, cumulative maximum intensity (CMI) projections of SHI data were shown to be useful for characterization, but lacked means of quantification. In this study we investigate three potential thinning algorithms for defining breast lesion architecture. Sequential thinning, parallel thinning, and distance transformation algorithms were compared using 40 in vitro test images. Sequential thinning was selected due to superior connectivity, minimal rotational variance, and sufficient data reduction. This algorithm was then applied to 16 CMI SHI images of breast lesions, out of which 13 were successfully skeletonized. Average bifurcations were 9.8 {+-} 8.18 and 6.9 {+-} 6.50 in malignant and benign lesions, respectively (p > 0.60). Average vessel-chain length was 88.9 {+-} 79.10 pixels versus 63.2 {+-} 45.65 pixels in malignant versus benign lesions (p > 0.40). While the sequential thinning algorithm was promising for quantifying breast vasculature, its ability to significantly differentiate between malignant and benign lesions in this study was limited by a high degree of variability and limited sample size.

  7. Assessing algorithms for defining vascular architecture in subharmonic images of breast lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbrey, John R; Joshi, Neha; Dave, Jaydev K; Forsberg, Flemming

    2011-02-21

    The ability to accurately and non-invasively characterize breast lesions and their vasculature would greatly limit the number of unneeded biopsies performed annually. Subharmonic ultrasound imaging (SHI) allows exclusive imaging of vasculature in real time, while completely suppressing tissue signals. Previously, cumulative maximum intensity (CMI) projections of SHI data were shown to be useful for characterization, but lacked means of quantification. In this study we investigate three potential thinning algorithms for defining breast lesion architecture. Sequential thinning, parallel thinning, and distance transformation algorithms were compared using 40 in vitro test images. Sequential thinning was selected due to superior connectivity, minimal rotational variance, and sufficient data reduction. This algorithm was then applied to 16 CMI SHI images of breast lesions, out of which 13 were successfully skeletonized. Average bifurcations were 9.8 ± 8.18 and 6.9 ± 6.50 in malignant and benign lesions, respectively (p > 0.60). Average vessel-chain length was 88.9 ± 79.10 pixels versus 63.2 ± 45.65 pixels in malignant versus benign lesions (p > 0.40). While the sequential thinning algorithm was promising for quantifying breast vasculature, its ability to significantly differentiate between malignant and benign lesions in this study was limited by a high degree of variability and limited sample size.

  8. Freddie Mercury-acoustic analysis of speaking fundamental frequency, vibrato, and subharmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Christian T; Hertegard, Stellan; Zangger-Borch, Daniel; Lindestad, Per-Åke

    2017-04-01

    Freddie Mercury was one of the twentieth century's best-known singers of commercial contemporary music. This study presents an acoustical analysis of his voice production and singing style, based on perceptual and quantitative analysis of publicly available sound recordings. Analysis of six interviews revealed a median speaking fundamental frequency of 117.3 Hz, which is typically found for a baritone voice. Analysis of voice tracks isolated from full band recordings suggested that the singing voice range was 37 semitones within the pitch range of F#2 (about 92.2 Hz) to G5 (about 784 Hz). Evidence for higher phonations up to a fundamental frequency of 1,347 Hz was not deemed reliable. Analysis of 240 sustained notes from 21 a-cappella recordings revealed a surprisingly high mean fundamental frequency modulation rate (vibrato) of 7.0 Hz, reaching the range of vocal tremor. Quantitative analysis utilizing a newly introduced parameter to assess the regularity of vocal vibrato corroborated its perceptually irregular nature, suggesting that vibrato (ir)regularity is a distinctive feature of the singing voice. Imitation of subharmonic phonation samples by a professional rock singer, documented by endoscopic high-speed video at 4,132 frames per second, revealed a 3:1 frequency locked vibratory pattern of vocal folds and ventricular folds.

  9. Cardiomyopathy in children: Can we rely on echocardiographic tricuspid regurgitation gradient estimates of right ventricular and pulmonary arterial pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Simon; Lytrivi, Irene D; Roytman, Zhanna; Ko, Hyun-Sook Helen; Vinograd, Cheryl; Srivastava, Shubhika

    2016-10-01

    Introduction Agreement between echocardiography and right heart catheterisation-derived right ventricular systolic pressure is modest in the adult heart failure population, but is unknown in the paediatric cardiomyopathy population. All patients at a single centre from 2001 to 2012 with a diagnosis of cardiomyopathy who underwent echocardiography and catheterisation within 30 days were included in this study. The correlation between tricuspid regurgitation gradient and catheterisation-derived right ventricular systolic pressure and mean pulmonary artery pressure was determined. Agreement between echocardiography and catheterisation-derived right ventricular systolic pressure was assessed using Bland-Altman plots. Analysis was repeated for patients who underwent both procedures within 7 days. Haemodynamic data from those with poor agreement and good agreement between echocardiography and catheterisation were compared. A total of 37 patients who underwent 48 catheterisation procedures were included in our study. The median age was 11.8 (0.1-20.6 years) with 22 males (58% total). There was a modest correlation (r=0.65) between echocardiography and catheterisation-derived right ventricular systolic pressure, but agreement was poor. Agreement between tricuspid regurgitation gradient and right ventricular systolic pressure showed wide 95% limits of agreement. There was a modest correlation between the tricuspid regurgitation gradient and mean pulmonary artery pressure (r=0.6). Shorter time interval between the two studies did not improve agreement. Those with poor agreement between echocardiography and catheterisation had higher right heart pressures, but this difference became insignificant after accounting for right atrial pressure. Transthoracic echocardiography estimation of right ventricular systolic pressure shows modest correlation with right heart pressures, but has limited agreement and may underestimate the degree of pulmonary hypertension in paediatric

  10. Non-invasive estimate of blood glucose and blood pressure from a photoplethysmograph by means of machine learning techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monte-Moreno, Enric

    2011-10-01

    This work presents a system for a simultaneous non-invasive estimate of the blood glucose level (BGL) and the systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure, using a photoplethysmograph (PPG) and machine learning techniques. The method is independent of the person whose values are being measured and does not need calibration over time or subjects. The architecture of the system consists of a photoplethysmograph sensor, an activity detection module, a signal processing module that extracts features from the PPG waveform, and a machine learning algorithm that estimates the SBP, DBP and BGL values. The idea that underlies the system is that there is functional relationship between the shape of the PPG waveform and the blood pressure and glucose levels. As described in this paper we tested this method on 410 individuals without performing any personalized calibration. The results were computed after cross validation. The machine learning techniques tested were: ridge linear regression, a multilayer perceptron neural network, support vector machines and random forests. The best results were obtained with the random forest technique. In the case of blood pressure, the resulting coefficients of determination for reference vs. prediction were R(SBP)(2)=0.91, R(DBP)(2)=0.89, and R(BGL)(2)=0.90. For the glucose estimation, distribution of the points on a Clarke error grid placed 87.7% of points in zone A, 10.3% in zone B, and 1.9% in zone D. Blood pressure values complied with the grade B protocol of the British Hypertension society. An effective system for estimate of blood glucose and blood pressure from a photoplethysmograph is presented. The main advantage of the system is that for clinical use it complies with the grade B protocol of the British Hypertension society for the blood pressure and only in 1.9% of the cases did not detect hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Blood pressure and estimated risk of stroke in the elderly population of Spain: the PREV-ICTUS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redón, Josep; Cea-Calvo, Luis; Lozano, José V; Martí-Canales, Juan C; Llisterri, José L; Aznar, Jose; González-Esteban, Jorge

    2007-04-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the high blood pressure values and the 10-year risk of stroke in the Spanish general population aged 60 years or older using the Framingham scale. This was a multicenter, population-based, cross-sectional study performed in Spanish primary care centers. A randomized selection of centers and recruitment population was used. We collected clinical, biochemical, and electrocardiographic data. We analyzed 7343 subjects (mean age, 71.6 years; standard deviation, 7.0; 53.4% females, 34.4% obese subjects, and 27.1% diabetic subjects). Electrocardiographic-left ventricle hypertrophy was present in 12.9% of the subjects, atrial fibrillation in 8.4%, and established cardiovascular disease in 28.9%; 73.0% already had hypertension diagnosed, and 12.8% showed high blood pressure without a prior diagnosis of hypertension. Among hypertensive subjects, 29.1% had high blood pressure on therapeutic objective, and of the total population 35.7% had high blood pressure under control. Those with hypertension already diagnosed showed a higher prevalence of other stroke risk factors (left ventricle hypertrophy, atrial fibrillation, diabetes, or established cardiovascular disease). The estimated 10-year stroke risk was 19.6% (standard deviation, 17.3%), and was greater in hypertensive patients (23.7%; standard deviation, 18.5) than in patients with high blood pressure without known hypertension (12.4%; standard deviation, 9.2), or in normotensive subjects (5.3%; standard deviation, 0.2; P<0.001). The 10-year estimated stroke risk was 19.6%, and it was greater in hypertensive patients as compared with the remainder people at any blood pressure range. The concomitant stroke risk factors are more prevalent in patients with hypertension already diagnosed, which implies an important additional estimated risk of stroke.

  12. Improved Confidence Interval Estimation for Oscillometric Blood Pressure Measurement by Combining Bootstrap-After-Jackknife Function with Non-Gaussian Models

    OpenAIRE

    Soojeong Lee

    2014-01-01

    Confidence intervals (CIs) are generally not provided along with estimated systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) measured using oscillometric blood pressure devices. No criteria exist to determine the CI from a small sample set of oscillometric blood pressure measurements. We provide an extended methodology to improve estimation of CIs of SBP and DBP based on a nonparametric bootstrap-after-jackknife function and a Bayesian approach. We use the nonparametric bootstr...

  13. Estimating vertical and lateral pressures in periodically structured montmorillonite clay particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo A. Narsilio

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Given a montmorillonitic clay soil at high porosity and saturated by monovalent counterions, we investigate the particle level responses of the clay to different external loadings. As analytical solutions are not possible for complex arrangements of particles, we employ computational micromechanical models (based on the solution of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations using the finite element method, to estimate counterion and electrical potential distributions for particles at various angles and distances from one another. We then calculate the disjoining pressures using the Van't Hoff relation and Maxwell stress tensor. As the distance between the clay particles decreases and double-layers overlap, the concentration of counterions in the micropores among clay particles increases. This increase lowers the chemical potential of the pore fluid and creates a chemical potential gradient in the solvent that generates the socalled 'disjoining' or 'osmotic' pressure. Because of this disjoining pressure, particles do not need to contact one another in order to carry an 'effective stress'. This work may lead towards theoretical predictions of the macroscopic load deformation response of montmorillonitic soils based on micromechanical modelling of particles.Dada uma argila montmorilonítica de alta porosidade e saturada por counteríons monovalentes, investigamos as respostas da argila ao nível de partículas para diferentes cargas externas. Como soluções analíticas não são possíveis para arranjos complexos de partículas, empregamos modelos computacionais micro-mecânicos (baseados na solução das equações de Poisson-Nernst-Planck, utilizando o método de elementos finitos, para estimar counteríons e distribuições de potencial elétrico para partículas em diversos ângulos e distâncias uma da outra. Nós então calculamos as pressões de separação usando a relação de Van't Hoff e a tensão de cisalhamento de Maxwell. À medida que a

  14. A new estimate technology of non-invasive continuous blood pressure measurement based on electrocardiograph

    OpenAIRE

    Chung-Min Wu; Chueh Yu Chuang; Yeou-Jiunn Chen; Shih-Chung Chen

    2016-01-01

    Various physiological parameters have been widely used in the prevention and detection of diseases. In particular, the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases can be observed through daily measurement of blood pressure. Currently, the most common blood pressure measurement method records blood pressure on the upper arm. This can lead to the subject feeling uncomfortable and tension in the arm from the stress may lead to measurement errors. An electrocardiogram represents the electrical activity...

  15. Estimation of Power Production Potential from Natural Gas Pressure Reduction Stations in Pakistan Using ASPEN HYSYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Nazir Unar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pakistan is a gas rich but power poor country. It consumes approximately 1, 559 Billion cubic feet of natural gas annually. Gas is transported around the country in a system of pressurized transmission pipelines under a pressure range of 600-1000 psig exclusively operated by two state owned companies i.e. SNGPL (Sui Northern Gas Pipelines Limited and SSGCL (Sui Southern Gas Company Limited. The gas is distributed by reducing from the transmission pressure into distribution pressure up to maximum level of 150 psig at the city gate stations normally called SMS (Sales Metering Station. As a normal practice gas pressure reduction at those SMSs is accomplished in pressure regulators (PCVs or in throttle valves where isenthalpic expansion takes place without producing any energy. Pressure potential of natural gas is an untapped energy resource which is currently wasted by its throttling. This pressure reduction at SMS (pressure drop through SMS may also be achieved by expansion of natural gas in TE, which converts its pressure into the mechanical energy, which can be transmitted any loading device for example electric generator. The aim of present paper is to explore the expected power production potential of various Sales Metering Stations of SSGCL company in Pakistan. The model of sales metering station was developed in a standard flow sheeting software Aspen HYSYS®7.1 to calculate power and study other parameters when an expansion turbine is used instead of throttling valves. It was observed from the simulation results that a significant power (more than 140 KW can be produced at pressure reducing stations of SSGC network with gas flows more than 2.2 MMSCFD and pressure ration more than 1.3.

  16. Estimating seabed pressure from demersal trawls, seines, and dredges based on gear design and dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eigaard, O.R.; Bastardie, F.; Breen, M.; Hintzen, N.T.; Rijnsdorp, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    This study assesses the seabed pressure of towed fishing gears and models the physical impact (area and depth of seabed penetration) from trip-based information of vessel size, gear type, and catch. Traditionally fishing pressures are calculated top-down by making use of large-scale statistics such

  17. Non-invasive ambient pressure estimation using non-linear ultrasound contrast agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Scheldrup

    Many attempts to find a non-invasive procedure to measure the blood pressure locally in the body have been made. This dissertation focuses on the approaches which utilize highly compressible ultrasound contrast agents as ambient pressure sensors. The literature within the topic has been reviewed...

  18. The impact of intraocular pressure on elastic wave velocity estimates in the crystalline lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Suhyun; Yoon, Heechul; Larin, Kirill V.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.; Aglyamov, Salavat R.

    2017-02-01

    Intraocular pressure (IOP) is believed to influence the mechanical properties of ocular tissues including cornea and sclera. The elastic properties of the crystalline lens have been mainly investigated with regard to presbyopia, the age-related loss of accommodation power of the eye. However, the relationship between the elastic properties of the lens and IOP remains to be established. The objective of this study is to measure the elastic wave velocity, which represents the mechanical properties of tissue, in the crystalline lens ex vivo in response to changes in IOP. The elastic wave velocities in the cornea and lens from seven enucleated bovine globe samples were estimated using ultrasound shear wave elasticity imaging. To generate and then image the elastic wave propagation, an ultrasound imaging system was used to transmit a 600 µs pushing pulse at 4.5 MHz center frequency and to acquire ultrasound tracking frames at 6 kHz frame rate. The pushing beams were separately applied to the cornea and lens. IOP in the eyeballs was varied from 5 to 50 mmHg. The results indicate that while the elastic wave velocity in the cornea increased from 0.96  ±  0.30 m s-1 to 6.27  ±  0.75 m s-1 as IOP was elevated from 5 to 50 mmHg, there were insignificant changes in the elastic wave velocity in the crystalline lens with the minimum and the maximum speeds of 1.44  ±  0.27 m s-1 and 2.03  ±  0.46 m s-1, respectively. This study shows that ultrasound shear wave elasticity imaging can be used to assess the biomechanical properties of the crystalline lens noninvasively. Also, it was observed that the dependency of the crystalline lens stiffness on the IOP was significantly lower in comparison with that of cornea.

  19. Estimation of the pore pressure distribution from three dimensional groundwater flow model at mine sites in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sangsoo; Jang, Myounghwan; Kim, Gyoungman; Kim, Donghui; Kim, Daehoon; Baek, Hwanjo

    2016-04-01

    Mining activities continually change the groundwater flow and associated pore pressure distributions within the rockmass around the mine openings or the open-pit bench during the operational periods. As the pore pressure distributions may substantially affect the mechanical behaviour or stability of the rockmass, it is important to monitor the variation of pore pressure incurred by mining operation. The pore pressure distributions within the rockmass can be derived using a two- or three-dimensional finite element groundwater flow model, adopted to simulate the groundwater flow. While the groundwater inflow at mines has generally been dealt with respect to the working environment, detailed case studies on the distribution of pore water pressure related to the stability analysis of mine openings have been relatively rare in Korea. Recently, however, as the health and safety problems are emerged for sustainable mining practice, these issues are of the major concerns for the mining industries. This study aims to establish a three dimensional groundwater flow model to estimate the pore pressure distributions in order to employ as an input parameter for numerical codes such as the FLAC 3D. Also, the groundwater flow simulated can be used for de-watering design at a mine site. The MINEDW code, a groundwater flow model code specifically developed to simulate the complicated hydro-geologic conditions related to mining, has mainly been used in this study. Based on the data collected from field surveys and literature reviews, a conceptual model was established and sensitivity analysis was performed.

  20. PAF: A software tool to estimate free-geometry extended bodies of anomalous pressure from surface deformation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, A. G.; Fernández, J.; Cannavò, F.

    2018-02-01

    We present a software package to carry out inversions of surface deformation data (any combination of InSAR, GPS, and terrestrial data, e.g., EDM, levelling) as produced by 3D free-geometry extended bodies with anomalous pressure changes. The anomalous structures are described as an aggregation of elementary cells (whose effects are estimated as coming from point sources) in an elastic half space. The linear inverse problem (considering some simple regularization conditions) is solved by means of an exploratory approach. This software represents the open implementation of a previously published methodology (Camacho et al., 2011). It can be freely used with large data sets (e.g. InSAR data sets) or with data coming from small control networks (e.g. GPS monitoring data), mainly in volcanic areas, to estimate the expected pressure bodies representing magmatic intrusions. Here, the software is applied to some real test cases.

  1. Estimating the parameters of a positive column of the halogen-containing glow discharge at moderate pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander P. Golovitskii

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The methodical recommendations for estimating the plasma parameters of an electronegative glow discharge containing halogens at moderate pressures (up to 40 Torr with the use of simple analytic formulae and without numerical modeling are given. The initial data are easily measureable discharge parameters such as a discharge current, a voltage and a gas mixture pressure and composition as well. It is shown how one can easily consider such important plasma features as non-Maxwellian electron energy distribution function and halogen molecules dissociation by electron impact. As a result, such plasma parameters as the absolute degree of electronegativity, the value of border coordinate between ion–ion and electron–ion plasmas, and the forms of transversal profiles of electron and negative ion concentrations can be evaluated. The comparison of the results with the ones given by a global numerical model shows the suitability of said analytic approach to estimate plasma parameters of real discharges.

  2. Comparison of the Orotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure Estimated by Palpation vs. the Measurement Taken with a Manometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojica S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The pressure exerted by the cuff of endotracheal tube (ETT on the mucosa to be blown, should be kept in a safe range to avoid complications by on inflation or deflation. In our context, the objective measurement instruments are not commonly used. Objective: To evaluate the correlation between ETT cuff pressure estimated by palpation, and that obtained with a manual gauge in adult patients undergoing general anesthesia. Materials and methods: It was performed a cross-sectional study by obtaining the sample of adult patients undergoing general anesthesia requiring endotracheal intubation. We included forty patients who were intubated and then two blind anesthesiologists, other than the one who intubated, estimated insufflation of ETT cuff by palpation categorizing as over-inflated, normal or deflated. One of the observers subsequently, carried out the measurement of pressure with a manometer, both in inspiration and expiration. It was considered as normal pressure range 20 to 30 cm H2O. Results: The correlation of the estimation by palpation between the two anesthesiologists was weak (Kappa = 0.21, ES: 0.11. The correlation of the estimation by palpation and measurement with manual gauge was very weak. Between the first anesthesiologist and observers, in inspiration the κ was 0.08 (ES: 0.09, in expiration was 0.08 (ES: 0.07, also between the second anesthesiologist and the observers, κ 0.05 (ES: 0.07 and 0.02 (ES: 0.06 respectively. Conclusion: The study shows that the correlation between subjective and objective methods to determine if the cuff of ETT is properly inflated was weak. It suggests the use of more objective methods for its determination.

  3. Estimated Trans-Lamina Cribrosa Pressure Differences in Low-Teen and High-Teen Intraocular Pressure Normal Tension Glaucoma: The Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si Hyung Lee

    Full Text Available To investigate the association between estimated trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference (TLCPD and prevalence of normal tension glaucoma (NTG with low-teen and high-teen intraocular pressure (IOP using a population-based study design.A total of 12,743 adults (≥ 40 years of age who participated in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES from 2009 to 2012 were included. Using a previously developed formula, cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP in mmHg was estimated as 0.55 × body mass index (kg/m2 + 0.16 × diastolic blood pressure (mmHg-0.18 × age (years-1.91. TLCPD was calculated as IOP-CSFP. The NTG subjects were divided into two groups according to IOP level: low-teen NTG (IOP ≤ 15 mmHg and high-teen NTG (15 mmHg < IOP ≤ 21 mmHg groups. The association between TLCPD and the prevalence of NTG was assessed in the low- and high-teen IOP groups.In the normal population (n = 12,069, the weighted mean estimated CSFP was 11.69 ± 0.04 mmHg and the weighted mean TLCPD 2.31 ± 0.06 mmHg. Significantly higher TLCPD (p < 0.001; 6.48 ± 0.27 mmHg was found in the high-teen NTG compared with the normal group. On the other hand, there was no significant difference in TLCPD between normal and low-teen NTG subjects (p = 0.395; 2.31 ± 0.06 vs. 2.11 ± 0.24 mmHg. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that TLCPD was significantly associated with the prevalence of NTG in the high-teen IOP group (p = 0.006; OR: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.15, but not the low-teen IOP group (p = 0.636. Instead, the presence of hypertension was significantly associated with the prevalence of NTG in the low-teen IOP group (p < 0.001; OR: 1.65; 95% CI: 1.26, 2.16.TLCPD was significantly associated with the prevalence of NTG in high-teen IOP subjects, but not low-teen IOP subjects, in whom hypertension may be more closely associated. This study suggests that the underlying mechanisms may differ between low-teen and high-teen NTG patients.

  4. Estimation of influence of myofascial release techniques on esophageal pressure in patients after total laryngectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marszałek, Sławomir; Zebryk-Stopa, Anna; Kraśny, Jacek; Obrebowski, Andrzej; Golusiński, Wojciech

    2009-08-01

    In patients after total laryngectomy, increased tension in myofascial neck and arm areas might be observed. Via fascial continuity it has an adverse impact on the superior esophageal constrictor forming the "mouth of the oesophagus", which hinders learning of esophageal speech. The aim is to assess the effect of manual myofascial release techniques on esophageal pressure in patients after total laryngectomy. Forty patients (12 F, 28 M), aged 43-75 (mean 56.8 years), 9 months to 13 years (average 3 years) after total laryngectomy, 35 patients (87.5%) after neck lymph node resection, 38 patients (95%) after radiotherapy. Esophageal pressure was assessed using modified Seeman's method. Manual myofascial release techniques were applied within head, neck, arms, upper trunk and upper limb areas. Wilcoxon and Shapiro-Wilk's test was used for the purpose of statistical analysis. Statistically significant decrease of the mean esophageal pressure was observed after the physiotherapy treatment. The average pressure among the examined patients decreased from 37.9 to 26.6 mmHg. The application of myofascial manual techniques decreases esophageal pressure, thus allowing patients to learn esophagus speech at a faster pace.

  5. Estimating the solar wind pressure at comet 67P from Rosetta magnetic field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Z.; Dósa, M.; Goetz, C.; Madanian, H.; Opitz, A.; Richter, I.; Szego, K.; Timar, A.

    2017-09-01

    The solar wind pressure is an important parameter of planetary space weather, which plays a crucial role in the interaction of the solar wind with the planetary plasma environment. Unfortunately, it is not always possible to measure its value at every locations where it would be useful or needed. Spacecraft observing the internal dynamics of a planetary magnetosphere, for example, would benefit greatly from solar wind pressure data, but as the solar wind does not penetrate to their locations, direct measurements are impossible. It is well known that the maximum of the magnetic field in the pile-up region of a magnetosphere is proportional to the square root of the solar wind pressure. Recent investigation of Rosetta data revealed that the maximum of the magnetic field in the pile-up region can be approximated by magnetic field measurements performed in the inner regions of the cometary magnetosphere close to the boundary of the diamagnetic cavity. This relationship holds for several months spanning from June 2015 to January 2016. Here we investigate the possibility to use this relationship to determine a solar wind pressure proxy for this time interval using magnetic field data measured by the Rosetta Magnetometer. This pressure proxy would be useful not only for other Rosetta related studies, but could also serve as a new independent input database for space weather propagation to other locations in the Solar System.

  6. Estimated Cerebrospina Fluid Pressure and the 5-Year Incidence of Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma in a Chinese Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Li

    Full Text Available We aim to assess the longitudinal association between baseline estimated cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP and 5-year incident primary open angle glaucoma (POAG in a population-based sample of Bai Chinese living in rural China.Among the 2133 Bai Chinese aged 50 years or older who had participated in the baseline examination of the Yunnan Minority Eye Study, 1520 (71.3% attended the follow-up examination after five years and 1485 were at risk of developing POAG. Participants underwent comprehensive ophthalmic examinations at both baseline and follow-up surveys. CSFP in mmHg was estimated as 0.55 × body mass index (kg/m2 + 0.16 × diastolic blood pressure (mmHg-0.18 × age (years-1.91. Glaucoma was defined using the International Society of Geographical and Epidemiological Ophthalmology Classification criteria. Multivariate logistic regression models were established to determine the association between baseline CSFP and incident POAG.After a mean follow-up time of 5 years, 19 new cases of POAG were detected, with an incidence rate of 1.3% (95% confidence interval, 0.7-1.9%. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for age, gender, education, intraocular pressure, central corneal thickness, hypertension and diabetes, no significant associations, nor any trends, were evident between baseline estimated CSFP and incident POAG. The association between estimated CSFP per mmHg increase in baseline and 5-year incidence of POAG was also non-significant, with adjusted relative risk of 0.96 (P = 0.11 in multivariate analysis.This longitudinal cohort study does not support previously observed cross-sectional association between estimated CSFP and POAG in population-based studies.

  7. Viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow with quasi-pulsatile modulation of rotary blood pump for a total artificial heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurimoto, Terumi; Hara, Shintaro; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Ono, Toshiya; Abe, Yusuke

    2016-09-01

    Estimation of pressure and flow has been an important subject for developing implantable artificial hearts. To realize real-time viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow for a total artificial heart, we propose the table estimation method with quasi-pulsatile modulation of rotary blood pump in which systolic high flow and diastolic low flow phased are generated. The table estimation method utilizes three kinds of tables: viscosity, pressure and flow tables. Viscosity is estimated from the characteristic that differential value in motor speed between systolic and diastolic phases varies depending on viscosity. Potential of this estimation method was investigated using mock circulation system. Glycerin solution diluted with salty water was used to adjust viscosity of fluid. In verification of this method using continuous flow data, fairly good estimation could be possible when differential pulse width modulation (PWM) value of the motor between systolic and diastolic phases was high. In estimation under quasi-pulsatile condition, inertia correction was provided and fairly good estimation was possible when the differential PWM value was high, which was not different from the verification results using continuous flow data. In the experiment of real-time estimation applying moving average method to the estimated viscosity, fair estimation could be possible when the differential PWM value was high, showing that real-time viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow would be possible with this novel estimation method when the differential PWM value would be set high.

  8. Estimation of Kubo number and correlation length of fluctuating magnetic fields and pressure in BOUT + + edge pedestal collapse simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaewook; Lee, W.-J.; Jhang, Hogun; Kaang, H. H.; Ghim, Y.-C.

    2017-10-01

    Stochastic magnetic fields are thought to be as one of the possible mechanisms for anomalous transport of density, momentum and heat across the magnetic field lines. Kubo number and Chirikov parameter are quantifications of the stochasticity, and previous studies show that perpendicular transport strongly depends on the magnetic Kubo number (MKN). If MKN is smaller than one, diffusion process will follow Rechester-Rosenbluth model; whereas if it is larger than one, percolation theory dominates the diffusion process. Thus, estimation of Kubo number plays an important role to understand diffusion process caused by stochastic magnetic fields. However, spatially localized experimental measurement of fluctuating magnetic fields in a tokamak is difficult, and we attempt to estimate MKNs using BOUT + + simulation data with pedestal collapse. In addition, we calculate correlation length of fluctuating pressures and Chirikov parameters to investigate variation correlation lengths in the simulation. We, then, discuss how one may experimentally estimate MKNs.

  9. Estimation of barometric pressure response in borehole strainmeter with typhoon events in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chun-Ying; Hu, Jyr-Ching; Liu, Chi-Ching

    2017-04-01

    Taiwan is located in an active collisional boundary of Philippine Sea plate and Eurasian plate in a convergence rate of 82 mm/yr, which results in high frequent seismicity and destructive big earthquakes. In order to monitor the strain change from pre-slip events, 13 Gladwin Tensor Strainmeters (GTSM) were installed in a depth of 200 m in western Foothills of Taiwan since 2003. The previous studies demonstrated that the broad environmental signs of barometry, rainfall, tide and groundwater should be calibrated to detect the tectonic signal. The previous study from borehole strainmeter of PBO in western US suggested that the strainmeter gauge time series were divided into records of approximately 60 days, overlapping when possible by 30 days. In order to determine the barometric pressure response of each gauge, the gauge outputs and atmospheric pressure data were band-pass-filtered to exclude frequencies outside the 4-6 day band. The results showed that sixty day records had a good correlation between the atmospheric pressure and the strainmeter gauge time series. Due to the climatic characteristics of annual rainfall could reach to 2500 mm in Taiwan, the long duration of gauge time series will be distributed by rainfall signal. Thus we suggest to divide the gauge time series records of approximately 30 days, overlapping when possible by 5 days. A good correlation of between the atmospheric pressure and the strainmeter gauge time series were identified by using a band-pass-filtered to exclude frequencies outside the 3-7 day band. In addition, we can use the linear regression from gauge time series and barometric drop due to the before the typhoon events with no interference of rainfall events. The average atmospheric pressure response coefficients of the strainmeters are about -0.14 -0.38 µstrain/KPa.

  10. Effect of change in systolic blood pressure between clinic visits on estimated 10-year cardiovascular disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Siqin; Wang, Y Claire; Shimbo, Daichi; Newman, Jonathan D; Levitan, Emily B; Muntner, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Systolic blood pressure (SBP) often varies between clinic visits within individuals, which can affect estimation of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. We analyzed data from participants with two clinic visits separated by a median of 17 days in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n = 808). Ten-year CVD risk was calculated with SBP obtained at each visit using the Pooled Cohort Equations. The mean age of participants was 46.1 years, and 47.3% were male. The median SBP difference between the two visits was -1 mm Hg (1st to 99th percentiles: -23 to 32 mm Hg). The median estimated 10-year CVD risk was 2.5% and 2.4% at the first and second visit, respectively (1st to 99th percentiles -5.2% to +7.1%). Meaningful risk reclassification (ie, across the guideline recommended 7.5% threshold for statin initiation) occurred in 12 (11.3%) of 106 participants whose estimated CVD risk was between 5% and 10%, but only in two (0.3%) of 702 participants who had a 10-year estimated CVD risk of 10%. SBP variability can affect CVD risk estimation, and can influence statin eligibility for individuals with an estimated 10-year CVD risk between 5% and 10%. Copyright © 2014 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A Green's Function Approach to PIV Pressure Estimates with an Application to Micro Energy Harvesters in Turbulent and Vortical Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goushcha, Oleg

    layer flow, PPE solution was used to estimate pressure fluctuations that are present in the turbulent boundary layer. A simple cantilever harvester is then placed inside the boundary layer. The beam is placed inside the boundary layer at various distances from the wall (y/delta~0-1.5) and at various orientations with respect to the free stream flow angle of attack beta=0o°- -- 180°) for free stream flows 2--11 m/s. Power maps are presented showing the power harvested for various heights and orientations of the harvester. In a self-excited harvester experiment, a harvester with a cylindrical tip mass attached is placed in a uniform cross flow. The PPE solution is used to estimate the strength of pressure inside vortices that are shed off the cylinder forcing it into oscillation. In another experiment to characterize the performance of harvesters inside turbulent flows several simple-cantilever harvesters were placed downstream of passive, semi-passive or an active grid. Passive grid consists of square rods spanning the width and the height of the wind tunnel, semi passive grid is similar to passive but has threaded balls attached to the grid in order to increase turbulence intensity. Active grid has flaps attached to the rods that actively control the closing and opening of sections of the flow thus dramatically increasing turbulence intensity. It is shown that as long as the motion of the harvester actuator does not affect the flow field locally, the power produced to the harvester is proportional to the turbulent kinetic energy of the flow locally.

  12. Body height, estimated cerebrospinal fluid pressure and open-angle glaucoma. The Beijing Eye Study 2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jost B Jonas

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To examine potential associations between body height, cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP, trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference (TLCPD and prevalence of open-angle glaucoma (OAG in a population-based setting. METHODS: The population-based Beijing Eye Study 2011 included 3468 individuals with a mean age of 64.6 ± 9.8 years (range:50-93 years. A detailed ophthalmic examination was performed. Based on a previous study with lumbar cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP measurements, CSFP was calculated as CSFP[mmHg] = 0.44 × Body Mass Index[kg/m(2] + 0.16 × Diastolic Blood Pressure[mmHg]-0.18 × Age[Years]-1.91. RESULTS: Data of IOP and CSFP were available for 3353 (96.7% subjects. Taller body height was associated with higher CSFP (P<0.001; standardized correlation coefficient beta:0.13; regression coefficient B:0.29; 95% confidence interval (CI:0.25,0.33 after adjusting for male gender, urban region of habitation, higher educational level, and pulse rate. If TLCPD instead of CSFP was added, taller body height was associated with lower TLCPD (P<0.001;beta:-0.10;B:-0.20;95%CI:-0.25,-0.15. Correspondingly, higher CSFP was associated with taller body height (P = 0.003;beta:0.02;B:0.01;95%CI:0.00,0.02, after adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, pulse, systolic blood pressure, and blood concentration of cholesterol. If IOP was added to the model, higher CSFP was associated with higher IOP (P<0.001;beta:0.02;B:0.02;95%CI:0.01,0.03. TLCPD was associated with lower body height (P = 0.003;beta:-0.04;B -0.02,95%CI:-0.04,-0.01 after adjusting for age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, pulse, blood concentrations of triglycerides, axial length, central corneal thickness, corneal curvature radius, and anterior chamber depth. Adding the prevalence of OAG to the multivariate analysis revealed, that taller body height was associated with a lower OAG prevalence (P = 0.03;beta:-0.03;B:-1.20;95%CI:-2.28,-0.12 after adjusting for

  13. Estimation of Pressure Index and Temperature Sensitivity Coefficient of Solid Rocket Propellants by Static Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Himanshu Shekhar

    2009-01-01

    Burning rate of a solid rocket propellant depends on pressure and temperature. Conventional strand burner and Crawford bomb test on propellant strands was conducted to assess these dependent parameters. However, behaviour of propellant in rocket motor is different from its behaviour in strand form. To overcome this anomaly, data from static evaluation of rocket motor was directly used for assessment of these burningrate controlling parameters. The conventional empirical power law (r=aoexp[p{T...

  14. Equilibrium based analytical model for estimation of pressure magnification during deflagration of hydrogen air mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karanam, Aditya; Sharma, Pavan K.; Ganju, Sunil; Singh, Ram Kumar [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai (India). Reactor Safety Div.

    2016-12-15

    During postulated accident sequences in nuclear reactors, hydrogen may get released from the core and form a flammable mixture in the surrounding containment structure. Ignition of such mixtures and the subsequent pressure rise are an imminent threat for safe and sustainable operation of nuclear reactors. Methods for evaluating post ignition characteristics are important for determining the design safety margins in such scenarios. This study presents two thermo-chemical models for determining the post ignition state. The first model is based on internal energy balance while the second model uses the concept of element potentials to minimize the free energy of the system with internal energy imposed as a constraint. Predictions from both the models have been compared against published data over a wide range of mixture compositions. Important differences in the regions close to flammability limits and for stoichiometric mixtures have been identified and explained. The equilibrium model has been validated for varied temperatures and pressures representative of initial conditions that may be present in the containment during accidents. Special emphasis has been given to the understanding of the role of dissociation and its effect on equilibrium pressure, temperature and species concentrations.

  15. Estimating effect of terlipressin on portal pressure in cirrhosis by observing hepatic vein Doppler waveform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Qurban; Haider, Shahbaz; Solangi, Noor Muhammad; Ali, Liaquat; Liaquat, Hammad; Ahmed, Fayyaz; Shahbaz, Sumera

    2013-05-01

    To observe the changes in Doppler waveform of hepatic vein after the administration of terlipressin, and to assess indirectly the efficacy of the drug to reduce the Hepatic Vein Pressure Gradient and portal pressure. The quasi-experimental study was conducted at the Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from April 1 to November 25, 2011, and comprised 50 patients with cirrhosis with abnormal Doppler waveform of the hepatic vein. Patients with diseases causing abnormal hepatic vein doppler waveform were excluded. Doppler waveforms were studied for 20 minutes before and for 20 minutes after the administration of terlipressin. Tracings with best waveform before and after injection were saved for analysis. Changes in waveform after vasoactive drug were defined as mild, significant, marked and gross changes. SPSS 10 was used for statistical analysis. Of the 50 patients, 36 (72%) were males and 14 (28%) females. Commonest waveform was monophasic 38 (76%). Gross changes i.e. turning triphasic from monophasic waveform was observed in 8 (16%) patients. Significant gross changes were seen in 24 (48%) patients. Total number of patients showing improvement in waveform was 36 (72%). In no case, waveform deteriorated after the administration of terlipressin (p = 0.001). Non-invasive method of observing the improvement of hepatic vein waveform by duplex ultrasound, after more studies, may be an important tool for assessing and monitoring the effects of portal pressure lowering drugs.

  16. Noninvasive and quantitative intracranial pressure estimation using ultrasonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Juan; Yao, Yan; Feng, Liang-Shu; Wang, Yu-Zhi; Zheng, Nan-Nan; Feng, Jia-Chun; Xing, Ying-Qi

    2017-02-07

    We aimed to quantitatively assess intracranial pressure (ICP) using optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) measurements. We recruited 316 neurology patients in whom ultrasonographic ONSD was measured before lumbar puncture. They were randomly divided into a modeling and a test group at a ratio of 7:3. In the modeling group, we conducted univariate and multivariate analyses to assess associations between ICP and ONSD, age, sex, BMI, mean arterial blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure. We derived the mathematical function "Xing &Wang" from the modelling group to predict ICP and evaluated the function in the test group. In the modeling group, ICP was strongly correlated with ONSD (r = 0.758, p Durbin-Watson value = 1.94). In the test group, a significant correlation was found between the observed and predicted ICP (r = 0.76, p < 0.001). Bland-Altman analysis yielded a mean difference between measurements of -0.07 ± 41.55 mmH2O. The intraclass correlation coefficient and its 95%CIs for noninvasive ICP assessments using our prediction model was 0.86 (0.79-0.90). Ultrasonographic ONSD measurements provide a potential noninvasive method to quantify ICP that can be conducted at the bedside.

  17. Impact of Spatial Resolution on Wind Field Derived Estimates of Air Pressure Depression in the Hurricane Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linwood Jones

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the near surface horizontal wind field in a hurricane with spatial resolution of order 1–10 km are possible using airborne microwave radiometer imagers. An assessment is made of the information content of the measured winds as a function of the spatial resolution of the imager. An existing algorithm is used which estimates the maximum surface air pressure depression in the hurricane eye from the maximum wind speed. High resolution numerical model wind fields from Hurricane Frances 2004 are convolved with various HIRAD antenna spatial filters to observe the impact of the antenna design on the central pressure depression in the eye that can be deduced from it.

  18. Online estimation of respiratory mechanics in non-invasive pressure support ventilation: a bench model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulqueeny, Qestra; Tassaux, Didier; Vignaux, Laurence; Jolliet, Philippe; Schindhelm, Klaus; Redmond, Stephen; Lovell, Nigel H

    2010-01-01

    An online algorithm for determining respiratory mechanics in patients using non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in pressure support mode was developed and embedded in a ventilator system. Based on multiple linear regression (MLR) of respiratory data, the algorithm was tested on a patient bench model under conditions with and without leak and simulating a variety of mechanics. Bland-Altman analysis indicates reliable measures of compliance across the clinical range of interest (± 11-18% limits of agreement). Resistance measures showed large quantitative errors (30-50%), however, it was still possible to qualitatively distinguish between normal and obstructive resistances. This outcome provides clinically significant information for ventilator titration and patient management.

  19. Thermal Contact Resistance Estimation: Influence of the Pressure Contact and the Coating Layer during a Hot Forming Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulhay, B.; Bourouga, B.; Dessain, C.

    2011-05-01

    The application of hot stamping in the automotive industry has experienced a fast growth due to the need for higher passive safety and weight reduction. Today, it is absolutely necessary to have reliable and accurate simulation predictions in order to assess the forming feasibility of a part as early as possible during the car design phase. In this paper, an original experimental procedure developed to estimate the thermal conductance at the Part-Tools interfaces during a hot stamping process, is presented. The tools set (punch and die) have been designed to form samples with an omega shape. Two types of material have been stamped: the Usibor 1500P® and the 22MnB5 galvanized steel. The object is to describe correctly the thermal boundary conditions at the Part-Tools interfaces; the adopted procedure consists in estimating accurately the thermal contact resistance TCR at different contact points for different contact pressure values.

  20. Estimation of lower-bound K{sub Jc} on pressure vessel steels from invalid data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCable, D.E.; Merkle, J.G.

    1996-10-01

    Statistical methods are currently being introduced into the transition temperature characterization of ferritic steels. Objective is to replace imprecise correlations between empirical impact test methods and universal K{sub Ic} or K{sub Ia} lower-bound curves with direct use of material-specific fracture mechanics data. This paper introduces a computational procedure that couples order statistics, weakest-link statistical theory, and a constraint model to arrive at estimates of lower-bound K{sub Jc} values. All of the above concepts have been used before to meet various objectives. In the present case, scheme is to make a best estimate of lower-bound fracture toughness when resource K{sub Jc} data are too few to use conventional statistical analyses. Utility of the procedure is of greatest value in the middle-to-high toughness part of the transition range where specimen constraint loss and elevated lower-bound toughness interfere with conventional statistical analysis methods.

  1. A probabilistic approach for estimating water permeability in pressure-driven membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boateng, Linkel K; Madarshahian, Ramin; Yoon, Yeomin; Caicedo, Juan M; Flora, Joseph R V

    2016-08-01

    A probabilistic approach is proposed to estimate water permeability in a cellulose triacetate (CTA) membrane. Water transport across the membrane is simulated in reverse osmosis mode by means of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Different membrane configurations obtained by an annealing MD simulation are considered and simulation results are analyzed by using a hierarchical Bayesian model to obtain the permeability of the different membranes. The estimated membrane permeability is used to predict full-scale water flux by means of a process-level Monte Carlo simulation. Based on the results, the parameters of the model are observed to converge within 5-ns total simulation time. The results also indicate that the use of unique structural configurations in MD simulations is essential to capture realistic membrane properties at the molecular scale. Furthermore, the predicted full-scale water flux based on the estimated permeability is within the same order of magnitude of bench-scale experimental measurement of 1.72×10(-5) m/s.

  2. Impact of the capillary pressure-saturation pore-size distribution parameter on geological carbon sequestration estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu-Lin Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cost estimates for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS are vital for policy and decision makers evaluating carbon capture and storage strategies. Numerical models are often used in feasibility studies for the different stages of carbon injection and redistribution. Knowledge of the capillary pressure-saturation function for a selected storage rock unit is essential in applications used for simulating multiphase fluid flow and transport. However, the parameters describing these functions (e.g. the van Genuchten m pore size distribution parameter are often not measured or neglected compared to other physical properties such as porosity and intrinsic permeability. In addition, the use of average instead of point estimates of m for numerical simulations of flow and transport can result in significant errors, especially in the case of coarse-grained sediments and fractured rocks. Such erroneous predictions can pose great risks and challenges to decision-making. We present a comparison of numerical simulation results based on average and point estimates of the van Genuchten m parameter for different porous media. Forward numerical simulations using the STOMP code were employed to illustrate the magnitudes of the differences in carbon sequestration predictions resulting from the use of height-averaged instead of point parameters. The model predictions were converted into cost estimates and the results indicate that varying m values in GCS modeling can cause cost differences of up to hundreds of millions dollars.

  3. Estimation of Flow Channel Parameters for Flowing Gas Mixed with Air in Atmospheric-pressure Plasma Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Saito, Hidetoshi

    2017-12-01

    When the working gas of an atmospheric-pressure non-equilibrium (cold) plasma flows into free space, the diameter of the resulting flow channel changes continuously. The shape of the channel is observed through the light emitted by the working gas of the atmospheric-pressure plasma. When the plasma jet forms a conical shape, the diameter of the cylindrical shape, which approximates the conical shape, defines the diameter of the flow channel. When the working gas flows into the atmosphere from the inside of a quartz tube, the gas mixes with air. The molar ratio of the working gas and air is estimated from the corresponding volume ratio through the relationship between the diameter of the cylindrical plasma channel and the inner diameter of the quartz tube. The Reynolds number is calculated from the kinematic viscosity of the mixed gas and the molar ratio. The gas flow rates for the upper limit of laminar flow and the lower limit of turbulent flow are determined by the corresponding Reynolds numbers estimated from the molar ratio. It is confirmed that the plasma jet length and the internal plasma length associated with strong light emission increase with the increasing gas flow rate until the rate for the upper limit of laminar flow and the lower limit of turbulent flow, respectively. Thus, we are able to explain the increasing trend in the plasma lengths with the diameter of the flow channel and the molar ratio by using the cylindrical approximation.

  4. Solubilities of selected organic electronic materials in pressurized hot water and estimations of aqueous solubilities at 298.15 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karásek, Pavel; Hohnová, Barbora; Planeta, Josef; Št'avíková, Lenka; Roth, Michal

    2013-02-01

    Increasing production and disposal of organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays for smartphones and tablets may have impact on the environment depending on the aqueous solubility of the pertinent chemicals. Here, aqueous solubilities are presented for several compounds, mostly aromatic amines, used as hole transport materials in the OLED displays. Solute selection includes 1,4-bis(diphenylamino)benzene, tetra-N-phenylbenzidine, 4,4'-bis(N-carbazolyl)-1,1'-biphenyl, 1,3,5-tris(diphenylamino)benzene, and 9,10-bis(phenylethynyl)anthracene. The solubilities are those in pressurized hot water (PHW), i.e., measured at elevated temperature (up to 260 °C) and pressure. The semi-quantitative estimates of room-temperature solubilities of the solutes have been obtained from extrapolations of the solubilities in PHW. For the compounds studied, the estimated aqueous solubilities at room temperature do not exceed 2×10(-11) g of the solute per 1 kg of water. Aqueous solubilities of triphenylamine have also been measured and used to upgrade a recent group-contribution model of aqueous solubilities of organic nonelectrolytes with the parameters for the nitrogen atom in aromatic amines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pre-drill Pore pressure estimation in shale gas reservoirs using seismic genetic inversion: Application to Barnett shale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouadfeul, Sid-Ali; Aliouane, Leila; Eladj, Said

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the seismic genetic inversion is used for estimation of the pore pressure before drilling, the first stage is to invert the 3D seismic cube recorded in the Fot Worth basin located in the United States of America using the artificial neural network. The Multilayer Perceptron neural network is trained in a supervised mode using the stacked 3D seismic amplitudes near three wells as an input and the calculated acoustic impedances derived from the density and sonic logs recorded in these wells as an output. During the training the weights of connections between neurons are optimized, then the whole seismic cube is propagated though the neural machine. The output of this machine is the cube of the acoustic impedance. A linear relationship between the depth and velocity are derived using sonic well-log data of a vertical well, this relationship will be us ed as a vertical trend in the Eaton's model. The acoustic impedances are used to deduce the pore pressure from the Eaton's model. The proposed process is applied to derive the pore pressure in the Lower Barnett shale, obtained results can be used for well-bore stability and hydraulic fracture planning and simulation.

  6. On the estimation of maximum stress in cushions for wheelchair patients who are prone to develop pressure injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayol-Mérida, Diana A; Plascencia, Gabriel

    2017-08-09

    Pressure injuries are an important health care issue. This problem is even more evident with patients with neurological conditions. This study aims to develop an analytical tool to predict the magnitude of the maximum stresses developed at the wheelchair cushion-patient contact area. Newton's polynomial interpolation method was applied in order to obtain correlations between the maximum stress developed and the weight of the patient and the maximum pressure and body mass index (BMI) of the participants. For this study it was recruited five able-bodies and nine patients with spinal cord injury. The agreement between the computed stress values and those measured with the able-bodied group is excellent, but in the patients within the spinal cord injury group, the concordance is poor. The correlations were applied in data from Crawford's study, and predictions of pressures show lack of agreement. Correlation between the weight of a person and the maximum stress developed by him or her while sitting for extended periods of time has been demonstrated. The lack of agreement between estimated and measured values in spinal cord injuries and Crawford's data can be mainly attributed to some sort of neurological status.

  7. Pulse-Inversion Subharmonic Ultrafast Active Cavitation Imaging in Tissue Using Fast Eigenspace-Based Adaptive Beamforming and Cavitation Deconvolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Chen; Xu, Shanshan; Duan, Junbo; Jing, Bowen; Yang, Miao; Wan, Mingxi

    2017-08-01

    Pulse-inversion subharmonic (PISH) imaging can display information relating to pure cavitation bubbles while excluding that of tissue. Although plane-wave-based ultrafast active cavitation imaging (UACI) can monitor the transient activities of cavitation bubbles, its resolution and cavitation-to-tissue ratio (CTR) are barely satisfactory but can be significantly improved by introducing eigenspace-based (ESB) adaptive beamforming. PISH and UACI are a natural combination for imaging of pure cavitation activity in tissue; however, it raises two problems: 1) the ESB beamforming is hard to implement in real time due to the enormous amount of computation associated with the covariance matrix inversion and eigendecomposition and 2) the narrowband characteristic of the subharmonic filter will incur a drastic degradation in resolution. Thus, in order to jointly address these two problems, we propose a new PISH-UACI method using novel fast ESB (F-ESB) beamforming and cavitation deconvolution for nonlinear signals. This method greatly reduces the computational complexity by using F-ESB beamforming through dimensionality reduction based on principal component analysis, while maintaining the high quality of ESB beamforming. The degraded resolution is recovered using cavitation deconvolution through a modified convolution model and compressive deconvolution. Both simulations and in vitro experiments were performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. Compared with the ESB-based PISH-UACI, the entire computation of our proposed approach was reduced by 99%, while the axial resolution gain and CTR were increased by 3 times and 2 dB, respectively, confirming that satisfactory performance can be obtained for monitoring pure cavitation bubbles in tissue erosion.

  8. [Barometric pressure and respiratory quotient for estimating the alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya Martínez, M; Carrión Valero, F; Díaz López, J; Marín Pardo, J

    2000-05-01

    To evaluate how they influence in the calculatión of the alveolar-arterial oxygen difference (AaPO2) the measurement of the barometric pressure (Pb) and respiratory quotient (R), in patients with chronic respiratory disease. Prospective study of 39 patients with chronic respiratory disease in stable situation. We calculate: 1. AaPO2 (PAO2 - PaO2) through the equation of the alveolar air [PAO2 = PIO2 - PaCO2 [FiO2 + (1 - FiO2)/R)], assuming Pb = 760 mmHg and R = 0.8 and 2. Real AaPO2, with the figures measured of Pb and R. The values of AaPO2 and real AaPO2 were (mean +/- SD) 27.85 +/- 9.32 mmHg and 34.23 +/- 11.17 mmHg, respectively (p = 0.000). The figure of real AaPO2 is greater than AaPO2 in 34 patients, of those which in 21 cases (53.8%) is > or = 5 mm Hg and in 8 cases (20.5%) is > or = 10 mmHg. The traditional calculation of AaPO2 minimizes the severity of the pulmonary disease and it can contribute, in part, to the mistakes in the physiopathologic classification of the origin of the respiratory insufficiency (hipoxemia caused by alveolar hypoventilation and hipoxemia caused by alveolar hipoventilation complicated by other abnormalities of gas exchange).

  9. Simulating cartilage conduction sound to estimate the sound pressure level in the external auditory canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokura, Ryota; Hosoi, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Tadashi; Iwakura, Takashi; Yamanaka, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    When the aural cartilage is made to vibrate it generates sound directly into the external auditory canal which can be clearly heard. Although the concept of cartilage conduction can be applied to various speech communication and music industrial devices (e.g. smartphones, music players and hearing aids), the conductive performance of such devices has not yet been defined because the calibration methods are different from those currently used for air and bone conduction. Thus, the aim of this study was to simulate the cartilage conduction sound (CCS) using a head and torso simulator (HATS) and a model of aural cartilage (polyurethane resin pipe) and compare the results with experimental ones. Using the HATS, we found the simulated CCS at frequencies above 2 kHz corresponded to the average measured CCS from seven subjects. Using a model of skull bone and aural cartilage, we found that the simulated CCS at frequencies lower than 1.5 kHz agreed with the measured CCS. Therefore, a combination of these two methods can be used to estimate the CCS with high accuracy.

  10. An Integrated 520-600 GHz Sub-Harmonic Mixer and Tripler Combination Based on GaAs MMIC Membrane Planar Schottky Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, B.; Gill, J.; Maestrini, A.; Lee, C.; Lin, R.; Sin, S.; Peralta, A.; Mehdi, I.

    2011-01-01

    We present here the design, development and test of an integrated sub-millimeter front-end featuring a 520-600 GHz sub-harmonic mixer and a 260-300 GHz frequency tripler in a single cavity. Both devices used GaAs MMIC membrane planar Schottky diode technology. The sub-harmonic mixer/tripler circuit has been tested using conventional machined as well as silicon micro-machined blocks. Measurement results on the metal block give best DSB mixer noise temperature of 2360 K and conversion losses of 7.7 dB at 520 GHz. Preliminary results on the silicon micro-machined blocks give a DSB mixer noise temperature of 4860 K and conversion losses of 12.16 dB at 540 GHz. The LO input power required to pump the integrated tripler/sub-harmonic mixer for both packages is between 30 and 50 mW

  11. Pressure - temperature estimates of a phengite eclogite from the Grapesvåre Nappe, Norrbotten, Swedish Caledonides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukała, Michał; Majka, Jarosław; Walczak, Katarzyna; Barnes, Christopher; Klonowska, Iwona

    2017-04-01

    The Seve Nappe Complex (SNC) of the Scandinavian Caledonides has well documented history of high pressure (HP) and ultra-high pressure (UHP) metamorphism (e.g. Klonowska et al. 2014). Eclogites of the SNC occur in two areas in Sweden, namely Jämtland and Norrbotten. The Jämtland eclogites and associated rocks are well studied and provide evidence for the Late Ordovician UHP metamorphism, whereas the Norrbotten eclogites, formed during the Late Cambrian/Early Ordovician, have not been studied in detail, especially in terms of pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions of their formation. Within the SNC in Norrbotten, eclogites are limited to two tectonic lenses - Vaimok and Tsäkkok (e.g. Albrecht, 2000). Within the Vaimok Lens three nappes have been distinguished: (1) the eclogite-free Lower Seve Nappe, (2) the Grapesvåre Nappe and (3) the Maddåive Nappe. The two latter nappes are eclogite-bearing. For this study eclogites were collected from the lowermost part of the Grapesvåre Nappe (from the highly heterogeneous Daunasvagge unit dominated by garnet-bearing mica schists, quartzites and marbles). Eclogite boudins (former dolerite dikes and sills) are usually highly altered due to retrogressive recrystallization. Rare fresh eclogites occur within large boudins (>5m in diameter) and display only minor alteration limited to the scarce veinlets composed of amphibole + feldspar + garnet + zoisite + biotite + rutile + titanite. Metamorphic peak conditions mineral assemblage consists of garnet + omphacite + phengite + quartz + rutile. For P-T estimates the geothermobarometric method of Ravna & Terry (2004) has been used. The garnet-clinopyroxene Fe2+-Mg exchange thermometer and the net-transfer reaction barometer based on the garnet-phengite-omphacite equilibrium yielded a maximum pressure of 26.7 kbar and temperature of 677°C. The obtained temperature might be underestimated due to uncertainties in Fe2+/Fe3+ ratio in pyroxene. Therefore Zr-in-rutile geothermometer by

  12. Ambient pressure sensitivity of microbubbles investigated through a parameter study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Scheldrup; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-01-01

    Measurements on microbubbles clearly indicate a relation between the ambient pressure and the acoustic behavior of the bubble. The purpose of this study was to optimize the sensitivity of ambient pressure measurements, using the subharmonic component, through microbubble response simulations...... cycles driving pulse, a reduction of 4.6 dB is observed when changing pov from 0 to 25 kPa. Increasing the pulse duration makes the reduction even more clear. For a pulse with 64 cycles, the reduction is 9.9 dB. This simulation is in good correspondence with measurement results presented by Shi et al...

  13. Sub-harmonic frequency lock-in and vortex shedding synchronization due to regular and irregular surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnoo, Hans; Abcha, Nizar; Bennis, Anne-claire; Levacher, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    The influence of both regular and irregular surface waves on a turbulent Von Karman vortex street has been investigated experimentally with the help of the phase modulation of the signals. The experiments have been performed in a hydrodynamic flume, where the Von Karman Street created behind a vertical cylinder is created by a steady current. The surface waves propagating upstream are excited by a computer controlled wave maker. It is found that the regular surface wave can give rise to different regimes of vortex shedding in the Von Karman Street: Sub-harmonic frequency lock-in arise if the frequency of the wave is approximately two times that of the vortex shedding frequency. We also observed another regime called harmonic frequency lock-in when the shedding frequency coincides with the frequency of the surface wave. Phase synchronization can also be obtained with irregular surface waves. In this case, the peak frequency of the applied surface wave spectrum is twice that of the vortex shedding frequency. The relationship between the vortex shedding frequency and the amplitude of the surface waves has been studied. It was found that an increase in the amplitude of the applied waves causes the shedding frequency to decrease and tends to half of the frequency of the applied wave. For a more detailed study of this effect, Hilbert transformation is applied. Using this transformation, the continuous phases of the surface waves fw and that of the Von Karman vortex street fk are calculated. The relation between the phases combination F= 2fk- fwand the surface wave amplitude is studied. It was found that the time-evolution of F has a step-like shape. The time interval of F having a slope around 0, corresponds to synchronization-like effect. This explains the changes obtained in the spectrum of the turbulent vortex shedding with an increase in the amplitude of the irregular surface waves. We then decided to compare the evolution of the scouring and the sandy patterns

  14. Estimation of the Young's modulus of the human pars tensa using in-situ pressurization and inverse finite-element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohani, S Alireza; Ghomashchi, Soroush; Agrawal, Sumit K; Ladak, Hanif M

    2017-03-01

    Finite-element models of the tympanic membrane are sensitive to the Young's modulus of the pars tensa. The aim of this work is to estimate the Young's modulus under a different experimental paradigm than currently used on the human tympanic membrane. These additional values could potentially be used by the auditory biomechanics community for building consensus. The Young's modulus of the human pars tensa was estimated through inverse finite-element modelling of an in-situ pressurization experiment. The experiments were performed on three specimens with a custom-built pressurization unit at a quasi-static pressure of 500 Pa. The shape of each tympanic membrane before and after pressurization was recorded using a Fourier transform profilometer. The samples were also imaged using micro-computed tomography to create sample-specific finite-element models. For each sample, the Young's modulus was then estimated by numerically optimizing its value in the finite-element model so simulated pressurized shapes matched experimental data. The estimated Young's modulus values were 2.2 MPa, 2.4 MPa and 2.0 MPa, and are similar to estimates obtained using in-situ single-point indentation testing. The estimates were obtained under the assumptions that the pars tensa is linearly elastic, uniform, isotropic with a thickness of 110 μm, and the estimates are limited to quasi-static loading. Estimates of pars tensa Young's modulus are sensitive to its thickness and inclusion of the manubrial fold. However, they do not appear to be sensitive to optimization initialization, height measurement error, pars flaccida Young's modulus, and tympanic membrane element type (shell versus solid). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Estimation of minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) of CO2 and liquid n-alkane systems using an improved MRI technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Jiang, Lanlan; Song, Yongchen; Zhao, Yuechao; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Dayong

    2016-02-01

    Minimum miscible pressure (MMP) of gas and oil system is a key parameter for the injection system design of CO2 miscible flooding. Some industrial standard approaches such as the experiment using a rising bubble apparatus (RBA), the slim tube tests (STT), the pressure-density diagram (PDD), etc. have been applied for decades to determine the MMP of gas and oil. Some theoretical or experiential calculations of the MMP were also applied to the gas-oil miscible system. In the present work, an improved technique based on our previous research for the estimation of the MMP by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was proposed. This technique was then applied to the CO2 and n-alkane binary and ternary systems to observe the mixing procedure and to study the miscibility. MRI signal intensities, which represent the proton concentration of n-alkane in both the hydrocarbon rich phase and the CO2 rich phase, were plotted as a reference for determining the MMP. The accuracy of the MMP obtained by using this improved technique was enhanced comparing with the data obtained from our previous works. The results also show good agreement with other established techniques (such as the STT) in previous published works. It demonstrates increases of MMPs as the temperature rise from 20 °C to 37.8 °C. The MMPs of CO2 and n-alkane systems are also found to be proportional to the carbon number in the range of C10 to C14. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of force plate-less estimation of the trajectory of the centre of pressure during gait. Comparison of two anthropometric models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillet, Hélène; Bonnet, Xavier; Lavaste, François; Skalli, Wafa

    2010-02-01

    The estimation of the trajectory of the centre of pressure during gait is possible without using force plate by modelling the whole body as a multi-segment chain. The kinematics and inertial parameters of each segment are necessary to determine the ground reaction forces and moments. The position of the centre of pressure can then be calculated at each frame of time. The objective of the study was to evaluate the accuracy of the estimation of the position of the centre of pressure during gait obtained without force plate data. Segment inertial parameters were determined using a proportional model and a geometric model. The modelling and calculations were computed for six volunteers and the estimated centres of pressure were compared to the centre of pressure measured using force plates considered as the gold standard. The estimation was better using the geometric model with an accuracy of 33 mm (4.1% of the peak-to-peak amplitude) on the longitudinal axis and 14.2 mm (12.9% of the peak-to-peak amplitude) on the lateral axis. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Real-Time Wing-Vortex and Pressure Distribution Estimation on Wings Via Displacements and Strains in Unsteady and Transitional Flight Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-07

    TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 15 Aug 2012 to 14 Feb 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Real-time wing- vortex and pressure distribution estimation on...10/13/2016https://livelink.ebs.afrl.af.mil/livelink/llisapi.dll Real-Time Wing- Vortex And Pressure Distribution Estimation on Wings Via Displacements...is done to reduce the size of the IFEM problem, to avoid distortions in the mesh of the IFEM model, and to obtain an initial spatial filtering of the

  18. Beam Dynamics Feasibility Study for an RFQ Sub-harmonic Pre-buncher at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Magdau, I B

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of using an external multi-harmonic buncher placed before the existing RFQ at REX-ISOLDE to increase the bunch spacing of post-accelerated beams at HIE-ISOLDE was confirmed. It was found that with a pre-buncher operating at a subharmonic frequency of 10.128 MHz (a factor 10 below the fundamental frequency of the RFQ) transmissions as high as 80% could be achieved in the main bunches separated by 98.7 ns. Such a time-structure will allow particle identification employing time-offlight techniques to be carried out by the users at HIE-ISOLDE. The optimal effective voltage for a drift length of 1.4 m between the pre-buncher and RFQ was found to be Veff = 0:8 kV, without any deterioration in the simulated nominal rms longitudinal emittance of rms = 0:28 ns keV/u. Significant reduction in the rms longitudinal emittance formed inside the RFQ was observed as the drift distance between the pre-buncher and RFQ was increased and the energy spread imparted by the pre-buncher decreased; within the physica...

  19. Robust Sub-harmonic Mixer at 340 GHz Using Intrinsic Resonances of Hammer-Head Filter and Improved Diode Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; He, Yue; Lu, Bin; Jiang, Jun; Miao, Li; Deng, Xian-Jin; Xiong, Yong-zhong; Zhang, Jian

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a sub-harmonic mixer at 340 GHz based on anti-parallel Schottky diodes (SBDs). Intrinsic resonances in low-pass hammer-head filter have been adopted to enhance the isolation for different harmonic components, while greatly minimizing the transmission loss. The application of new DC grounding structure, impedance matching structure, and suspended micro-strip mitigates the negative influences of fabrication errors from metal cavity, quartz substrate, and micro-assembly. An improved lumped element equivalent circuit model of SBDs guarantees the accuracy of simulation, which takes current-voltage (I/V) behavior, capacitance-voltage (C/V) behavior, carrier velocity saturation, DC series resistor, plasma resonance, skin effect, and four kinds of noise generation mechanisms into consideration thoroughly. The measurement indicates that with local oscillating signal of 2 mW, the lowest double sideband conversion loss is 5.5 dB at 339 GHz; the corresponding DSB noise temperature is 757 K. The 3 dB bandwidth of conversion loss is 50 GHz from 317 to 367 GHz.

  20. Improved Confidence Interval Estimation for Oscillometric Blood Pressure Measurement by Combining Bootstrap-After-Jackknife Function with Non-Gaussian Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soojeong Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Confidence intervals (CIs are generally not provided along with estimated systolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP measured using oscillometric blood pressure devices. No criteria exist to determine the CI from a small sample set of oscillometric blood pressure measurements. We provide an extended methodology to improve estimation of CIs of SBP and DBP based on a nonparametric bootstrap-after-jackknife function and a Bayesian approach. We use the nonparametric bootstrap-after-jackknife function to reduce maximum amplitude outliers. Improved pseudomaximum amplitudes (PMAs and pseudoenvelopes (PEs are derived from the pseudomeasurements. Moreover, the proposed algorithm uses an unfixed ratio obtained by employing non-Gaussian models based on the Bayesian technique to estimate the SBP and DBP ratios for individual subjects. The CIs obtained through our proposed approach are narrower than those obtained using the traditional Student t-distribution method. The mean difference (MD and standard deviation (SD of the SBP and DBP estimates using our proposed approach are better than the estimates obtained by conventional fixed ratios based on the PMA and PE (PMAE.

  1. Short range shooting distance estimation using variable pressure SEM images of the surroundings of bullet holes in textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Ruth; Frank, Paulo Ricardo Ost; Vasconcellos, M A Z

    2017-03-01

    Modifications of cotton and polyester textiles due to shots fired at short range were analyzed with a variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VP-SEM). Different mechanisms of fiber rupture as a function of fiber type and shooting distance were detected, namely fusing, melting, scorching, and mechanical breakage. To estimate the firing distance, the approximately exponential decay of GSR coverage as a function of radial distance from the entrance hole was determined from image analysis, instead of relying on chemical analysis with EDX, which is problematic in the VP-SEM. A set of backscattered electron images, with sufficient magnification to discriminate micrometer wide GSR particles, was acquired at different radial distances from the entrance hole. The atomic number contrast between the GSR particles and the organic fibers allowed to find a robust procedure to segment the micrographs into binary images, in which the white pixel count was attributed to GSR coverage. The decrease of the white pixel count followed an exponential decay, and it was found that the reciprocal of the decay constant, obtained from the least-square fitting of the coverage data, showed a linear dependence on the shooting distance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Estimation of beat-to-beat changes in stroke volume from arterial pressure: a comparison of two pressure wave analysis techniques during head-up tilt testing in young, healthy men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jellema, W. T.; Imholz, B. P.; Oosting, H.; Wesseling, K. H.; van Lieshout, J. J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare beat-to-beat changes in stroke volume (SV) estimated by two different pressure wave analysis techniques during orthostatic stress testing: pulse contour analysis and Modelflow, i.e., simulation of a three-element model of aortic input impedance.

  3. Estimation of beat-to-beat changes in stroke volume from arterial pressure: A comparison of two pressure wave analysis techniques during head- up tilt testing in young, healthy men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jellema, W.T.; Imholz, B.P.M.; Oosting, H.; Wesseling, K.H.; Lieshout, J.J. van

    1999-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare beat-to-beat changes in stroke volume (SV) estimated by two different pressure wave analysis techniques during orthostatic stress testing: pulse contour analysis and Modelflow, ie, simulation of a three-element model of aortic input impedance. Methods:

  4. Estimation of the in-cylinder air/fuel ratio of an internal combustion engine by the use of pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunestaal, Per

    2000-03-01

    This thesis investigates the use of cylinder pressure measurements for estimation of the in-cylinder air/fuel ratio in a spark ignited internal combustion engine. An estimation model which uses the net heat release profile for estimating the cylinder air/fuel ratio of a spark ignition engine is developed. The net heat release profile is computed from the cylinder pressure trace and quantifies the conversion of chemical energy of the reactants in the charge into thermal energy. The net heat release profile does not take heat- or mass transfer into account. Cycle-averaged air/fuel ratio estimates over a range of engine speeds and loads show an RMS error of 4.1% compared to measurements in the exhaust. A thermochemical model of the combustion process in an internal combustion engine is developed. It uses a simple chemical combustion reaction, polynominal fits of internal energy as function of temperature, and the first law of thermodynamics to derive a relationship between measured cylinder pressure and the progress of the combustion process. Simplifying assumptions are made to arrive at an equation which relates the net heat release to the cylinder pressure. Two methods for estimating the sensor offset of a cylinder pressure transducer are developed. Both methods fit the pressure data during the pre-combustion phase of the compression stroke to a polytropic curve. The first method assumes a known polytropic exponent, and the other estimates the polytropic exponent. The first method results in a linear least-squares problem, and the second method results in a nonlinear least-squares problem. The nonlinear least-squares problem is solved by separating out the nonlinear dependence and solving the single-variable minimization problem. For this, a finite difference Newton method is derived. Using this method, the cost of solving the nonlinear least-squares problem is only slightly higher than solving the linear least-squares problem. Both methods show good statistical

  5. Estimation of fracture toughness of Zr 2.5% Nb pressure tube of Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor using cyclic ball indentation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, S., E-mail: subrata@barc.gov.in; Panwar, Sanjay; Madhusoodanan, K.; Rama Rao, A.

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Measurement of fracture toughness of pressure tube is required for its fitness assessment. • Pressure tube removal from the core consumes large amount of radiation for laboratory test. • A remotely operable In situ Property Measurement System (IProMS) has been designed in house. • Conventional and IProMS tests conducted on pressure tube spool pieces having different mechanical properties. • Correlation has been established between the conventional and IProMS estimated fracture properties. - Abstract: In Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) fuel bundles are located inside horizontal pressure tubes made up of Zr 2.5 wt% Nb alloy. Pressure tubes undergo degradation during its service life due to high pressure, high temperature and radiation environment. Measurement of mechanical properties of degraded pressure tubes is important for assessing their fitness for further operation. Presently as per safety guidelines imposed by the regulatory body, a few pre-decided pressure tubes are removed from the reactor core at regular intervals during the planned reactor shut down to carry out post irradiation examination (PIE) in a laboratory which consumes lots of man-rem and imposes economic penalties. Hence a system is indeed felt necessary which can carry out experimental trials for measurement of mechanical properties of pressure tubes under in situ conditions. The only way to accomplish this important objective is to develop a system based on an in situ measurement technique. In the field of in situ estimation of properties of materials, cyclic ball indentation is an emerging technique. Presently, commercial systems are available for doing an indentation test either on the outside surface of a component at site or on a test piece in a laboratory. However, these systems cannot be used inside a pressure tube for carrying out ball indentation trials under in situ conditions. Considering the importance of such measurements, an In situ Property

  6. A Fast Multimodal Ectopic Beat Detection Method Applied for Blood Pressure Estimation Based on Pulse Wave Velocity Measurements in Wearable Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Maik Pflugradt; Kai Geissdoerfer; Matthias Goernig; Reinhold Orglmeister

    2017-01-01

    Automatic detection of ectopic beats has become a thoroughly researched topic, with literature providing manifold proposals typically incorporating morphological analysis of the electrocardiogram (ECG). Although being well understood, its utilization is often neglected, especially in practical monitoring situations like online evaluation of signals acquired in wearable sensors. Continuous blood pressure estimation based on pulse wave velocity considerations is a prominent example, which depen...

  7. A fast multimodal ectopic beat detection method applied for blood pressure estimation based on pulse wave velocity measurements in wearable sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Pflugradt, Maik; Geißdörfer, Kai; Görnig, Matthias; Orglmeister, Reinhold

    2017-01-01

    Automatic detection of ectopic beats has become a thoroughly researched topic, with literature providing manifold proposals typically incorporating morphological analysis of the electrocardiogram (ECG). Although being well understood, its utilization is often neglected, especially in practical monitoring situations like online evaluation of signals acquired in wearable sensors. Continuous blood pressure estimation based on pulse wave velocity considerations is a prominent example, which depen...

  8. Quantitative analysis of vascular heterogeneity in breast lesions using contrast-enhanced 3-D harmonic and subharmonic ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Anush; Eisenbrey, John R; Machado, Priscilla; Ojeda-Fournier, Haydee; Wilkes, Annina; Sevrukov, Alexander; Mattrey, Robert F; Wallace, Kirk; Chalek, Carl L; Thomenius, Kai E; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-03-01

    Ability to visualize breast lesion vascularity and quantify the vascular heterogeneity using contrast-enhanced 3-D harmonic (HI) and subharmonic (SHI) ultrasound imaging was investigated in a clinical population. Patients (n = 134) identified with breast lesions on mammography were scanned using power Doppler imaging, contrast-enhanced 3-D HI, and 3-D SHI on a modified Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare). A region of interest corresponding to ultrasound contrast agent flow was identified in 4D View (GE Medical Systems) and mapped to raw slice data to generate a map of time-intensity curves for the lesion volume. Time points corresponding to baseline, peak intensity, and washout of ultrasound contrast agent were identified and used to generate and compare vascular heterogeneity plots for malignant and benign lesions. Vascularity was observed with power Doppler imaging in 84 lesions (63 benign and 21 malignant). The 3-D HI showed flow in 8 lesions (5 benign and 3 malignant), whereas 3-D SHI visualized flow in 68 lesions (49 benign and 19 malignant). Analysis of vascular heterogeneity in the 3-D SHI volumes found benign lesions having a significant difference in vascularity between central and peripheral sections (1.71 ± 0.96 vs. 1.13 ± 0.79 dB, p < 0.001, respectively), whereas malignant lesions showed no difference (1.66 ± 1.39 vs. 1.24 ± 1.14 dB, p = 0.24), indicative of more vascular coverage. These preliminary results suggest quantitative evaluation of vascular heterogeneity in breast lesions using contrast-enhanced 3-D SHI is feasible and able to detect variations in vascularity between central and peripheral sections for benign and malignant lesions.

  9. Real-time monitoring of focused ultrasound blood-brain barrier opening via subharmonic acoustic emission detection: implementation of confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chih-Hung; Zhang, Jia-Wei; Liao, Yi-Yi; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-04-07

    Burst-tone focused ultrasound exposure in the presence of microbubbles has been demonstrated to be effective at inducing temporal and local opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which promises significant clinical potential to deliver therapeutic molecules into the central nervous system (CNS). Traditional contrast-enhanced imaging confirmation after focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure serves as a post-operative indicator of the effectiveness of FUS-BBB opening, however, an indicator that can concurrently report the BBB status and BBB-opening effectiveness is required to provide effective feedback to implement this treatment clinically. In this study, we demonstrate the use of subharmonic acoustic emission detection with implementation on a confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric ceramic structure to perform real-time monitoring of FUS-BBB opening. A confocal dual-frequency (0.55 MHz/1.1 MHz) focused ultrasound transducer was designed. The 1.1 MHz spherically-curved ceramic was employed to deliver FUS exposure to induce BBB-opening, whereas the outer-ring 0.55 MHz ceramic was employed to detect the subharmonic acoustic emissions originating from the target position. In stage-1 experiments, we employed spectral analysis and performed an energy spectrum density (ESD) calculation. An optimized 0.55 MHz ESD level change was shown to effectively discriminate the occurrence of BBB-opening. Wideband acoustic emissions received from 0.55 MHz ceramics were also analyzed to evaluate its correlations with erythrocyte extravasations. In stage-2 real-time monitoring experiments, we applied the predetermined ESD change as a detection threshold in PC-controlled algorithm to predict the FUS exposure intra-operatively. In stage-1 experiment, we showed that subharmonic ESD presents distinguishable dynamics between intact BBB and opened BBB, and therefore a threshold ESD change level (5.5 dB) can be identified for BBB-opening prediction. Using this ESD change threshold detection as a

  10. The association between pressure pain sensitivity, and answers to questionnaires estimating psychological stress level in the workplace. A feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Søren; Petersen, Pernille; Gyntelberg, Finn

    2012-01-01

    To examine the association between pressure pain sensitivity (PPS) at the sternum as a measure of persistent stress assessed by questionnaires in a working population.......To examine the association between pressure pain sensitivity (PPS) at the sternum as a measure of persistent stress assessed by questionnaires in a working population....

  11. A New Approach in Pressure Transient Analysis: Using Numerical Density Derivatives to Improve Diagnosis of Flow Regimes and Estimation of Reservoir Properties for Multiple Phase Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Torkiowei Biu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the numerical density derivative approach (another phase of numerical welltesting in which each fluid’s densities around the wellbore are measured and used to generate pressure equivalent for each phase using simplified pressure-density correlation, as well as new statistical derivative methods to determine each fluid phase’s permeabilities, and the average effective permeability for the system with a new empirical model. Also density related radial flow equations for each fluid phase are derived and semilog specialised plot of density versus Horner time is used to estimate k relative to each phase. Results from 2 examples of oil and gas condensate reservoirs show that the derivatives of the fluid phase pressure-densities equivalent display the same wellbore and reservoir fingerprint as the conventional bottom-hole pressure BPR method. It also indicates that the average effective kave ranges between 43 and 57 mD for scenarios (a to (d in Example 1.0 and 404 mD for scenarios (a to (b in Example 2.0 using the new fluid phase empirical model for K estimation. This is within the k value used in the simulation model and likewise that estimated from the conventional BPR method. Results also discovered that in all six scenarios investigated, the heavier fluid such as water and the weighted average pressure-density equivalent of all fluid gives exact effective k as the conventional BPR method. This approach provides an estimate of the possible fluid phase permeabilities and the % of each phase contribution to flow at a given point. Hence, at several dp' stabilisation points, the relative k can be generated.

  12. Pump flow estimation from pressure head and power uptake for the HeartAssist5, HeartMate II, and HeartWare VADs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennings, Kim A M A; Martina, Jerson R; Rodermans, Ben F M; Lahpor, Jaap R; van de Vosse, Frans N; de Mol, Bas A J M; Rutten, Marcel C M

    2013-01-01

    The use of long-term mechanical circulatory support (MCS) for heart failure by means of implanted continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (cf-LVADs) will increase, either to enable recovery or to provide a destination therapy. The effectiveness and user-friendliness of MCS will depend on the development of near-physiologic control strategies for which accurate estimation of pump flow is essential. To provide means for the assessment of pump flow, this study presents pump models, estimating pump flow (Q(lvad)) from pump speed (n) and pressure difference across the LVAD (Δp(lvad)) or power uptake (P). The models are evaluated for the axial-flow LVADs HeartAssist5 (HA5) and HeartMate II (HMII), and for a centrifugal pump, the HeartWare (HW). For all three pumps, models estimating Q(lvad) from Δp(lvad) only is capable of describing pump behavior under static conditions. For the axial pumps, flow estimation from power uptake alone was not accurate. When assuming an increase in pump flow with increasing power uptake, low pump flows are overestimated in these pumps. Only for the HW, pump flow increased linearly with power uptake, resulting in a power-based pump model that estimates static pump flow accurately. The addition of pressure head measurements improved accuracy in the axial cf-LVAD estimation models.

  13. Empirical Method to Estimate Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals as a Function of Hydrogen Gas Pressure at Constant Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    High pressure Hydrogen (H) gas has been known to have a deleterious effect on the mechanical properties of certain metals, particularly, the notched tensile strength, fracture toughness and ductility. The ratio of these properties in Hydrogen as compared to Helium or Air is called the Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) Index, which is a useful method to classify the severity of H embrittlement and to aid in the material screening and selection for safety usage H gas environment. A comprehensive world-wide database compilation, in the past 50 years, has shown that the HEE index is mostly collected at two conveniently high H pressure points of 5 ksi and 10 ksi near room temperature. Since H embrittlement is directly related to pressure, the lack of HEE index at other pressure points has posed a technical problem for the designers to select appropriate materials at a specific H pressure for various applications in aerospace, alternate and renewable energy sectors for an emerging hydrogen economy. Based on the Power-Law mathematical relationship, an empirical method to accurately predict the HEE index, as a function of H pressure at constant temperature, is presented with a brief review on Sievert's law for gas-metal absorption.

  14. A Fast Multimodal Ectopic Beat Detection Method Applied for Blood Pressure Estimation Based on Pulse Wave Velocity Measurements in Wearable Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflugradt, Maik; Geissdoerfer, Kai; Goernig, Matthias; Orglmeister, Reinhold

    2017-01-14

    Automatic detection of ectopic beats has become a thoroughly researched topic, with literature providing manifold proposals typically incorporating morphological analysis of the electrocardiogram (ECG). Although being well understood, its utilization is often neglected, especially in practical monitoring situations like online evaluation of signals acquired in wearable sensors. Continuous blood pressure estimation based on pulse wave velocity considerations is a prominent example, which depends on careful fiducial point extraction and is therefore seriously affected during periods of increased occurring extrasystoles. In the scope of this work, a novel ectopic beat discriminator with low computational complexity has been developed, which takes advantage of multimodal features derived from ECG and pulse wave relating measurements, thereby providing additional information on the underlying cardiac activity. Moreover, the blood pressure estimations' vulnerability towards ectopic beats is closely examined on records drawn from the Physionet database as well as signals recorded in a small field study conducted in a geriatric facility for the elderly. It turns out that a reliable extrasystole identification is essential to unsupervised blood pressure estimation, having a significant impact on the overall accuracy. The proposed method further convinces by its applicability to battery driven hardware systems with limited processing power and is a favorable choice when access to multimodal signal features is given anyway.

  15. Method for estimating critical properties of heavy compounds suitable for cubic equations of state and its application to the prediction of vapor pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Ioannis, Smirlis; Iakovos, Yakoumis

    1997-01-01

    Cubic equations of state (EoS) are often used for correlating and predicting phase equilibria. Before extending any EoS to mixtures, reliable vapor-pressure prediction is essential. This requires experimental, if possible, critical temperatures T-c, pressures P-c, and acentric factor omega...... or extensive pure-compound vapor-pressure data which, for heavy and/or complex compounds, are often not available. This work presents a method for estimating T-c, P-c, and omega values for heavy compounds (typically with MW > 130) suitable for vapor-pressure calculations with generalized cubic Eo......S at a single experimental vapor-pressure point (e.g., the normal boiling point). We have employed a modified version of the Peng-Robinson EoS, but we have verified that any cubic EoS yields similar results at least for n-alkanes up to n-octacosane (MW = 394). The method is applied to the prediction of vapor...

  16. A Fast Multimodal Ectopic Beat Detection Method Applied for Blood Pressure Estimation Based on Pulse Wave Velocity Measurements in Wearable Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maik Pflugradt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic detection of ectopic beats has become a thoroughly researched topic, with literature providing manifold proposals typically incorporating morphological analysis of the electrocardiogram (ECG. Although being well understood, its utilization is often neglected, especially in practical monitoring situations like online evaluation of signals acquired in wearable sensors. Continuous blood pressure estimation based on pulse wave velocity considerations is a prominent example, which depends on careful fiducial point extraction and is therefore seriously affected during periods of increased occurring extrasystoles. In the scope of this work, a novel ectopic beat discriminator with low computational complexity has been developed, which takes advantage of multimodal features derived from ECG and pulse wave relating measurements, thereby providing additional information on the underlying cardiac activity. Moreover, the blood pressure estimations’ vulnerability towards ectopic beats is closely examined on records drawn from the Physionet database as well as signals recorded in a small field study conducted in a geriatric facility for the elderly. It turns out that a reliable extrasystole identification is essential to unsupervised blood pressure estimation, having a significant impact on the overall accuracy. The proposed method further convinces by its applicability to battery driven hardware systems with limited processing power and is a favorable choice when access to multimodal signal features is given anyway.

  17. Accuracy of commercial devices and methods for noninvasive estimation of aortic systolic blood pressure a systematic review and meta-analysis of invasive validation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Theodore G; Karageorgopoulou, Theofani D; Sergentanis, Theodoros N; Protogerou, Athanase D; Psaltopoulou, Theodora; Sharman, James E; Weber, Thomas; Blacher, Jacques; Daskalopoulou, Stella S; Wassertheurer, Siegfried; Khir, Ashraf W; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Stergiopulos, Nikolaos; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Nichols, Wilmer W; Tousoulis, Dimitrios

    2016-07-01

    Although compelling evidence has established the physiological and clinical relevance of aortic SBP (a-SBP), no consensus exists regarding the validity of the available methods/techniques that noninvasively measure it. The systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to determine the accuracy of commercial devices estimating a-SBP noninvasively, which have been validated by invasive measurement of a-SBP. Moreover their optimal mode of application, in terms of calibration, as well as specific technique and arterial site of pulse wave acquisition were further investigated. The study was performed according to the PRISMA guidelines; 22 eligible studies were included, which validated invasively 11 different commercial devices in 808 study participants. Overall, the error in a-SBP estimation (estimated minus actual value) was -4.49 mmHg [95% confidence interval (CI): -6.06 to -2.92 mmHg]. The estimated (noninvasive) a-SBP differed from the actual (invasive) value depending on calibration method: by -1.08 mmHg (95% CI: -2.81, 0.65 mmHg) and by -5.81 mmHg (95% CI: -7.79, -3.84 mmHg), when invasively and noninvasively measured brachial BP values were used respectively; by -1.83 mmHg, (95% CI: -3.32, -0.34 mmHg), and by 7.78 mmHg (95% CI: -10.28, -5.28 mmHg), when brachial mean arterial pressure/DBP and SBP/DBP were used, respectively. Automated recording of waveforms, calibrated noninvasively by brachial mean arterial pressure/DBP values seems the most promising approach that can provide relatively more accurate, noninvasive estimation of a-SBP. It is still uncertain whether a specific device can be recommended as 'gold standard'; however, a consensus is currently demanding.

  18. Muscle activation and estimated relative joint force during running with weight support on a lower-body positive pressure treadmill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bente Rona; Hovgaard-Hansen, Line; Cappelen, Katrine Louise

    2016-01-01

    estimated. Leg muscles responded differently to unweighting during running, reflecting different relative contribution to propulsion and anti-gravity forces. At 20%BW, knee extensor EMGpeak decreased to 22% at 2.22 m/s and 28% at 3.33 m/s of 100%BW values. Plantar flexors decreased to 52% and 58% at 20%BW...

  19. Instantaneous spectral span of 2.85 - 8.40 μm achieved in a Cr:ZnS laser pumped subharmonic OPO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ru, Qitian; Zhong, Kai; Lee, Nathaniel P.; Loparo, Zachary E.; Schunemann, Peter G.; Vasilyev, Sergey; Mirov, Sergey B.; Vodopyanov, Konstantin L.

    2017-02-01

    Degenerate (subharmonic) optical parametric oscillators (OPO) show great promise for the generation of broadband mid-infrared (MIR) frequency combs. Their main features are low pump threshold, dramatic extension of the spectrum of the pump laser, and phase locking to the pump frequency comb. Here we report on obtaining instantaneous spectrum ranging from 2.85 to 8.40 μm at -40 dB level from a subharmonic OPO pumped by an ultrafast Cr2+:ZnS laser. Our experimental setup includes a free running Kerr lens mode locked 2.35 μm Cr2+:ZnS laser, with 62-fs time-bandwidth limited pulse duration, 630-mW average power, and 79 MHz repetition rate that synchronously pumps a ring-cavity orientation-patterned (OP-GaAs) based OPO. A 0.5-mm-long OP-GaAs crystal has a quasi-phase-matching (QPM) period of 88 μm and is designed to provide a broadband parametric gain at OPO degeneracy. A 0.3-mm-thick ZnSe wedge inside the cavity was used to minimize group velocity dispersion. Spectral span of 1.56 octaves in the MIR that we achieved can be further improved by fabricating an in-coupling dielectric mirror with (i) broader reflectivity range and (ii) with compensation of the residual group velocity dispersion. The broad spectrum achieved, 2.85 - 8.40 μm (2320 cm-1 wide instantaneous span), overlaps with a plethora of fundamental molecular IR resonances and can be used for frequency comb spectroscopic detection applied to such fields as remote sensing, study of fast combustion dynamics and medical diagnostics, to name a few.

  20. Crack Orientation and Depth Estimation in a Low-Pressure Turbine Disc Using a Phased Array Ultrasonic Transducer and an Artificial Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Chen, Shili; Jin, Shijiu; Chang, Wenshuang

    2013-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracks (SCC) in low-pressure steam turbine discs are serious hidden dangers to production safety in the power plants, and knowing the orientation and depth of the initial cracks is essential for the evaluation of the crack growth rate, propagation direction and working life of the turbine disc. In this paper, a method based on phased array ultrasonic transducer and artificial neural network (ANN), is proposed to estimate both the depth and orientation of initial cracks in the turbine discs. Echo signals from cracks with different depths and orientations were collected by a phased array ultrasonic transducer, and the feature vectors were extracted by wavelet packet, fractal technology and peak amplitude methods. The radial basis function (RBF) neural network was investigated and used in this application. The final results demonstrated that the method presented was efficient in crack estimation tasks. PMID:24064602

  1. Risk Stratification by 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure and Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate in 5322 Subjects From 11 Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boggia, José; Thijs, Lutgarde; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    subjects (median age, 51.8 years; 43.1% women) randomly recruited from 11 populations, who had baseline measurements of 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (ABP(24)) and eGFR. We computed hazard ratios using multivariable-adjusted Cox regression. Median follow-up was 9.3 years. In fully adjusted models......, which included both ABP(24) and eGFR, ABP(24) predicted (P≤0.008) both total (513 deaths) and cardiovascular (206) mortality; eGFR only predicted cardiovascular mortality (P=0.012). Furthermore, ABP(24) predicted (P≤0.0056) fatal combined with nonfatal events as a result of all cardiovascular causes...... (555 events), cardiac disease (335 events), or stroke (218 events), whereas eGFR only predicted the composite cardiovascular end point and stroke (P≤0.035). The interaction terms between ABP(24) and eGFR were all nonsignificant (P≥0.082). For cardiovascular mortality, the composite cardiovascular end...

  2. Muscle Activation and Estimated Relative Joint Force During Running with Weight Support on a Lower-Body Positive-Pressure Treadmill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Bente R; Hovgaard-Hansen, Line; Cappelen, Katrine L

    2016-08-01

    Running on a lower-body positive-pressure (LBPP) treadmill allows effects of weight support on leg muscle activation to be assessed systematically, and has the potential to facilitate rehabilitation and prevent overloading. The aim was to study the effect of running with weight support on leg muscle activation and to estimate relative knee and ankle joint forces. Runners performed 6-min running sessions at 2.22 m/s and 3.33 m/s, at 100%, 80%, 60%, 40%, and 20% body weight (BW). Surface electromyography, ground reaction force, and running characteristics were measured. Relative knee and ankle joint forces were estimated. Leg muscles responded differently to unweighting during running, reflecting different relative contribution to propulsion and antigravity forces. At 20% BW, knee extensor EMGpeak decreased to 22% at 2.22 m/s and 28% at 3.33 m/s of 100% BW values. Plantar flexors decreased to 52% and 58% at 20% BW, while activity of biceps femoris muscle remained unchanged. Unweighting with LBPP reduced estimated joint force significantly although less than proportional to the degree of weight support (ankle). It was concluded that leg muscle activation adapted to the new biomechanical environment, and the effect of unweighting on estimated knee force was more pronounced than on ankle force.

  3. The value of E/Em ratio in the estimation of left ventricular filling pressures: impact of acute load reduction: a comparative simultaneous echocardiographic and catheterization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manouras, Aristomenis; Nyktari, Evangelia; Sahlén, Anders; Winter, Reidar; Vardas, Panagiotis; Brodin, Lars-Åke

    2013-07-01

    The ratio of the early transmitral flow velocity to the early diastolic tissue velocity (E/Em) has been suggested as a reliable estimate of left ventricular diastolic pressures (LVDP). However, the evidence regarding the ability of E/Em to detect LVDP changes is relatively equivocal. Our aim was to evaluate the validity of the ratio following acute load reduction. 68 consecutive patients referred for coronary angiography underwent LV catheterization and echocardiography simultaneously. Doppler signals of transmitral flow and spectral TD signals at the level of the mitral annulus were obtained before and directly after intravenous administration of nitroglycerin (NTG). The predictive ability of E/Em to identify elevated LVDP was modest (area under curve=0.71 ± 0.08, pEm lacked any predictive potential for elevated LVDP whereas changes LVDP could not be reliably tracked using E/Em. The predictive capacity of E/Em for elevated LVDP was weak and declined significantly following acute reduction in LV load. Changes in LVDP were not reliably predicted by E/Em. The current findings derived from a real-world patient population with relatively high filling pressures indicate that E/Em may not be sufficiently robust to be employed as a single non-invasive estimate of LVDP nor for monitoring load reducing medical therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Low-dimensional dynamical model for the diversity of pressure patterns used in canary song.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Leandro M; Alliende, Jorge A; Goller, F; Mindlin, Gabriel B

    2009-04-01

    During song production, oscine birds produce large air sac pressure pulses. During those pulses, energy is transferred to labia located at the juncture between the bronchii and the trachea, inducing the high frequency labial oscillations which are responsible for airflow modulations, i.e., the uttered sound. In order to generate diverse syllables, canaries (Serinus canaria) use a set of air sac pressure patterns with characteristic shapes. In this work we show that these different shapes can be approximated by the subharmonic solutions of a forced normal form. This simple model is built from identifying dynamical elements which allow to reproduce the shape of the pressure pattern corresponding to one syllable type. Remarkably, integrating that simple model for other parameters allows to recover the other pressure patterns used during song. Interpreting the diversity of these physiological gestures as subharmonic solutions of a simple nonlinear system allows us to account simultaneously for their morphological features as well as for the syllabic timing and suggests a strategy for the generation of complex motor patterns.

  5. Statistically optimal estimation of degree-1 and C20 coefficients based on GRACE data and an ocean bottom pressure model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Ditmar, Pavel; Riva, Riccardo

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we develop a methodology to estimate monthly variations in degree-1 and C20 coefficients by combing Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data with oceanic mass anomalies (combination approach). With respect to the method by Swenson et al., the proposed approach exploits noise covariance information of both input data sets and thus produces stochastically optimal solutions supplied with realistic error information. Numerical simulations show that the quality of degree-1 and -2 coefficients may be increased in this way by about 30 per cent in terms of RMS error. We also proved that the proposed approach can be reduced to the approach of Sun et al. provided that the GRACE data are noise-free and noise in oceanic data is white. Subsequently, we evaluate the quality of the resulting degree-1 and C20 coefficients by estimating mass anomaly time-series within carefully selected validation areas, where mass transport is small. Our validation shows that, compared to selected Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and joint inversion degree-1 solutions, the proposed combination approach better complements GRACE solutions. The annual amplitude of the SLR-based C10 is probably overestimated by about 1 mm. The performance of the C20 coefficients, on the other hand, is similar to that of traditionally used solution from the SLR technique.

  6. Changes in estimating echocardiography pulmonary capillary wedge pressure after hypersaline plus furosemide versus furosemide alone in decompensated heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrinello, Gaspare; Paterna, Salvatore; Di Pasquale, Pietro; Torres, Daniele; Mezzero, Manuela; Cardillo, Mauro; Fasullo, Sergio; La Rocca, Gabriella; Licata, Giuseppe

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the study was to verify the effects of hypertonic saline solution (HSS) plus a high furosemide dose and light restriction of sodium intake compared with a high-dose infusion of furosemide alone on pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), as determined by Doppler echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging in patients suffering from decompensated heart failure. Consecutive patients in New York Heart Association functional class IV, unresponsive to oral high doses of furosemide up to 250-500 mg/d and/or combinations of diuretics, with ejection fraction function was significantly improved in the HSS group. Both groups showed a significant reduction in Echo-PCWP, but the HHS group revealed a faster reduction and significant lower values at 6 days compared with the group taking furosemide alone. We observed a positive correlation between values of Echo-PCWP and BNP and an inverse correlation between BIA parameters and Echo-PCWP. Our data show that the combination of high diuretic dose and HSS infusion plus light restriction in dietary sodium intake determine a more rapid and significant hemodynamic stabilization through the improvement of echo-PCWP, BNP levels, and BIA parameters than the group treated without HSS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Estimation of pulmonary arterial pressure by a neural network analysis using features based on time-frequency representations of the second heart sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranulis, C; Durand, L G; Senhadji, L; Pibarot, P

    2002-03-01

    The objective of the study was to develop a non-invasive method for the estimation of pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) using a neural network (NN) and features extracted from the second heart sound (S2). To obtain the information required to train and test the NN, an animal model of pulmonary hypertension (PHT) was developed, and nine pigs were investigated. During the experiments, the electrocardiogram, phonocardiogram and PAP were recorded. Subsequently, between 15 and 50 S2 heart sounds were isolated for each PAP stage and for each animal studied. A Coiflet wavelet decomposition and a pseudo smoothed Wigner-Ville distribution were used to extract features from the S2 sounds and train a one-hidden-layer NN using two-thirds of the data. The NN performance was tested on the remaining one-third of the data. NN estimates of the systolic and mean PAPs were obtained for each S2 and then ensemble averaged over the 15-50 S2 sounds selected for each PAP stage. The standard errors between the mean and systolic PAPs estimated by the NN and those measured with a catheter were 6.0 mmHg and 8.4 mmHg, respectively, and the correlation coefficients were 0.89 and 0.86, respectively. The classification accuracy, using 23 mmHg mean PAP and 30 mmHg systolic PAP thresholds between normal PAP and PHT, was 97% and 91%, respectively.

  8. Estimation of pulmonary arterial pressure by a neural network analysis using features based on time-frequency representations of the second heart sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranulis, Constantin; Durand, Louis-Gilles; Senhadji, Lotfi; Pibarot, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a non-invasive method for the estimation of pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) using a neural network (NN) and features extracted from the second heart sound (S2). To obtain the information required to train and test the NN, an animal model of pulmonary hypertension (PHT) was developed and 9 pigs were investigated. During the experiments, the electrocardiogram, the phonocardiogram, and the PAP were recorded. Subsequently, between 15 and 50 S2 were isolated for each PAP stage and for each animal studied. A Coiflet wavelet decomposition and a pseudo smoothed Wigner-Ville distribution were used to extract features from the S2 and train a one-hidden layer NN using 2/3 of the data. The NN performance was tested on the remaining 1/3 of the data. NN estimates of the systolic and mean PAPs were obtained for each S2 and then ensemble averaged over the 15 to 50 S2 selected for each PAP stage. The standard errors between the mean and systolic PAPs estimated by the NN and those measured with a catheter were of 6.0 mmHg and 8.4 mmHg, respectively, and the correlation coefficients were 0.89 and 0.86, respectively. The classification accuracy, using a 23 mmHg mean PAP and a 30 mmHg systolic PAP thresholds between normal PAP and PHT was 97% and 91% respectively. PMID:12043802

  9. Ankle-brachial pressure index estimated by laser Doppler in patients suffering from peripheral arterial obstructive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludyga, Tomasz; Kuczmik, Waclaw B; Kazibudzki, Marek; Nowakowski, Przemyslaw; Orawczyk, Tomasz; Glanowski, Michal; Kucharzewski, Marcin; Ziaja, Damion; Szaniewski, Krzysztof; Ziaja, Krzysztof

    2007-07-01

    Ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurements are widely used for evaluating the functional state of circulation in the lower limbs. However, there is some evidence that the value of ABI does not accurately reflect the degree of walking impairment in symptomatic patients with peripheral arterial obstructive disease (PAOD). We investigated the diagnostic value of ABI estimated by means of laser Doppler flowmetry (IT) for evaluating limb ischemia. We wanted to know whether laser Doppler could be more sensitive than the Doppler method in predicting walking capacity in patients with stable intermittent claudication. We analyzed a group of 30 patients with intermittent claudication (Fontain II, II/III) who were admitted for reconstructive treatment. There were 21 men and 9 women, aged 46-74 (mean 61) years. All patients underwent the treadmill test, and pain-free walking distances were measured. In each patient, we measured ABI using the two different methods: Doppler ultrasound device (ABI-Doppler) and laser Doppler (ABI-laser Doppler). The claudication distances were 25-200 m (mean 73 +/- 50.2 m). ABI-Doppler was 0.2-0.7 (0.582 +/- 0.195). ABI-laser Doppler measurements were 0.581 (+/-0.218). A correlation was found between ABI-Doppler and claudication distance (r = 0.46, P = 0.009). Also, ABI-laser Doppler values significantly correlated with claudication distances (r = 0.536, P = 0.002). The ABI evaluated by laser Doppler correlated well with claudication distances in patients with PAOD. Comparison of Doppler and laser Doppler measurements used for determining ABI showed that both methods have similar predictive power for walking capacity; however, higher correlation was observed between claudication distances and ABI measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. ABI-laser Doppler measurements are easier, are quicker, and seem to be better suited for noncompliant patients. Further investigation should be undertaken to determine whether laser Doppler is superior to the Doppler

  10. Estimating average shock pressures recorded by impactite samples based on universal stage investigations of planar deformation features in quartz - Sources of error and recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm-Alwmark, S.; Ferrière, L.; Alwmark, C.; Poelchau, M. H.

    2018-01-01

    Planar deformation features (PDFs) in quartz are the most widely used indicator of shock metamorphism in terrestrial rocks. They can also be used for estimating average shock pressures that quartz-bearing rocks have been subjected to. Here we report on a number of observations and problems that we have encountered when performing universal stage measurements and crystallographically indexing of PDF orientations in quartz. These include a comparison between manual and automated methods of indexing PDFs, an evaluation of the new stereographic projection template, and observations regarding the PDF statistics related to the c-axis position and rhombohedral plane symmetry. We further discuss the implications that our findings have for shock barometry studies. Our study shows that the currently used stereographic projection template for indexing PDFs in quartz might induce an overestimation of rhombohedral planes with low Miller-Bravais indices. We suggest, based on a comparison of different shock barometry methods, that a unified method of assigning shock pressures to samples based on PDFs in quartz is necessary to allow comparison of data sets. This method needs to take into account not only the average number of PDF sets/grain but also the number of high Miller-Bravais index planes, both of which are important factors according to our study. Finally, we present a suggestion for such a method (which is valid for nonporous quartz-bearing rock types), which consists of assigning quartz grains into types (A-E) based on the PDF orientation pattern, and then calculation of a mean shock pressure for each sample.

  11. TRAC-PF1/MOD1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor thermal-hydraulic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

    1986-07-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light-water reactors. The TRAC-PF1/MOD1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic test facilities. The code features either a one- or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals, a two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field and solute tracking, flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment, optional reflood tracking capability for bottom-flood and falling-film quench fronts, and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. The stability-enhancing two-step (SETS) numerical algorithm is used in the one-dimensional hydrodynamics and permits this portion of the fluid dynamics to violate the material Courant condition. This technique permits large time steps and, hence, reduced running time for slow transients.

  12. A Bayesian neural network approach to compare the spectral information from nasal pressure and thermistor airflow in the automatic sleep apnea severity estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Tobal, Gonzalo C; de Frutos, Julio; Alvarez, Daniel; Vaquerizo-Villar, Fernando; Barroso-Garcia, Veronica; Crespo, Andrea; Del Campo, Felix; Hornero, Roberto

    2017-07-01

    In the sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS) context, airflow signal plays a key role for the simplification of the diagnostic process. It is measured during the standard diagnostic test by the acquisition of two simultaneous sensors: a nasal prong pressure (NPP) and a thermistor (TH). The current study focuses on the comparison of their spectral content to help in the automatic SAHS-severity estimation. The spectral analysis of 315 NPP and corresponding TH recordings is firstly proposed to characterize the conventional band of interest for SAHS (0.025-0.050 Hz.). A magnitude squared coherence analysis is also conducted to quantify possible differences in the frequency components of airflow from both sensors. Then, a feature selection stage is implemented to assess the relevance and redundancy of the information extracted from the spectrum of NPP and TH airflow. Finally, a multiclass Bayesian multi-layer perceptron (BY-MLP) was used to perform an automatic estimation of SAHS severity (no-SAHS, mild, moderate, and severe), by the use of the selected spectral features from: airflow NPP alone, airflow TH alone, and both sensors jointly. The highest diagnostic performance was reached by BY-MLP only trained with NPP spectral features, reaching Cohen's κ = 0.498 in the overall four-class classification task. It also achieved 91.3%, 84.9%, and 83.3% of accuracy in the binary evaluation of the 3 apnea-hypopnea index cut-offs (5, 15, and 30 events/hour) that define the four SAHS degrees. Our results suggest that TH sensor might be not necessary for SAHS severity estimation if an automatic comprehensive characterization approach is adopted to simplify the diagnostic process.

  13. Full-scale 3-D finite element modeling of a two-loop pressurized water reactor for heat transfer, thermal–mechanical cyclic stress analysis, and environmental fatigue life estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish, E-mail: smohanty@anl.gov; Soppet, William K.; Majumdar, Saurindranath; Natesan, Krishnamurti

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Full-scale 3-D finite element model. • Pressurized water reactor. • Heat transfer analysis. • Thermal–mechanical stress analysis. • Environmental fatigue life estimation. - Abstract: This paper discusses a system-level finite element model of a two-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR). Based on this model, system-level heat transfer analysis and subsequent sequentially coupled thermal–mechanical stress analysis were performed for typical thermal–mechanical fatigue cycles. The in-air fatigue lives of example components, such as the hot and cold legs, were estimated on the basis of stress analysis results, ASME in-air fatigue life estimation criteria, and fatigue design curves. Furthermore, environmental correction factors and associated PWR environment fatigue lives for the hot and cold legs were estimated by using estimated stress and strain histories and the approach described in US-NRC report: NUREG-6909.

  14. Time-dependent wellbore breakout growth caused by drilling-induced pore pressure transients: Implications for estimations of far field stress magnitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olcott, K. A.; Saffer, D. M.; Elsworth, D.

    2013-12-01

    One method used to constrain principal stress orientations and magnitudes in the crust combines estimates of rock strength with observations of wellbore failures, including drilling-induced tensile fractures (DITF) and compressional borehole breakouts (BO). This method has been applied at numerous Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) boreholes drilled into sediments in a wide range of settings, including the Gulf of Mexico, the N. Japan and Costa Rican subduction margins, and the Nankai Trough Accretionary Prism. At Nankai and N. Japan, BO widths defined by logging-while-drilling (LWD) resistivity images have been used to estimate magnitudes of far-field horizontal tectonic stresses. At several drillsites (C0010, C0002, and C0011), sections of the borehole were relogged with LWD after the hole was left open for times ranging from ~30 min to 3 days; times between acquisition were associated with pipe connections (~30 min), cleaning and circulating the hole (up to ~3 hr), and evacuation of the site for weather (~3 days). Relogged portions exhibit widening of BO, hypothesized to reflect time-dependent re-equilibration of instantaneous changes in pore fluid pressure (Pf) induced by opening the borehole. In this conceptual model, Pf decrease caused by initial excavation of the borehole and resulting changes in the state of stress at the borehole wall lead to an initial strengthening of the sediment. Re-equilibration of Pf results in time-dependent weakening of the sediment and subsequent BO growth. If correct, this hypothesis implies that stress magnitudes estimated by BO widths could be significantly underestimated. We test this idea using a finite-element model in COMSOL multiphysics that couples fluid flow and deformation in a poroelastic medium. We specify far-field horizontal principal stresses (SHmax and Shmin) in the model domain. At the start of simulations/at the time of borehole opening, we impose a decreased stress at the borehole wall. We consider a

  15. Estimation of diastolic filling pressure with cardiac CT in comparison with echocardiography using tissue doppler imaging: Determination of optimal CT reconstruction parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Ji Sun; Suh, Jon; Lee, Heon [Soonchunhyang University Hospital Bucheon, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Bora [Dept. of Biostatistics, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soo Jeong [Terarecon Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jou, Sung Shick [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Hospital Cheonan, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Hyun Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Hospital Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    To determine the optimal CT image reconstruction parameters for the measurement of early transmitral peak velocity (E), early peak mitral septal tissue velocity (E′), and E / E′. Forty-six patients underwent simultaneous cardiac CT and echocardiography on the same day. Four CT datasets were reconstructed with a slice thickness/interval of 0.9/0.9 mm or 3/3 mm at 10 (10% RR-interval) or 20 (5% RR-interval) RR-intervals. The E was calculated by dividing the peak transmitral flow (mL/s) by the corresponding mitral valve area (cm{sup 2}). E′ was calculated from the changes in the left ventricular length per cardiac phase. E / E′ was then estimated and compared with that from echocardiography. For assessment of E / E′, CT and echocardiography were more strongly correlated (p < 0.05) with a slice thickness of 0.9 mm and 5% RR-interval (r = 0.77) than with 3 mm or 10% RR-interval. The diagnostic accuracy of predicting elevated filling pressure (E / E′ ≥ 13, n = 14) was better with a slice thickness of 0.9 mm and 5% RR-interval (87.0%) than with 0.9 mm and 10% RR-interval (71.7%) (p = 0.123) and significantly higher than that with a slice thickness of 3 mm with 5% (67.4%) and 10% RR-interval (63.0%), (p < 0.05), respectively. Data reconstruction with a slice thickness of 0.9 mm at 5% RR-interval is superior to that with a slice thickness of 3 mm or 10% RR-interval in terms of the correlation of E / E′ between CT and echocardiography. Thin slices and frequent sampling also allow for more accurate prediction of elevated filling pressure.

  16. Estimation of tracheal pressure and imposed expiratory work of breathing by the endotracheal tube, heat and moisture exchanger, and ventilator during mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Akinori; Yoshida, Takeshi; Yamanaka, Hidenori; Fujino, Yuji

    2013-07-01

    The resistance of the endotracheal tube (ETT), the heat and moisture exchanger (HME), and the ventilator may affect the patient's respiratory status. Although previous studies examined the inspiratory work of breathing (WOB), investigation of WOB in the expiratory phase is rare. We estimated tracheal pressure at the tip of the ETT (Ptrach) and calculated expiratory WOB imposed by the ETT, the HME, and the expiratory valve. We examined imposed expiratory WOB in patients under a continuous mandatory ventilation (CMV) mode and during spontaneous breathing trials (SBTs). We hypothesized that imposed expiratory WOB would increase with heightened ventilatory demand. We measured airway pressure (Paw) and respiratory flow (V). We estimated Ptrach using the equation Ptrach = Paw - K1 × V(K2) - 2.70 × V(L/s)(1.42). K1 and K2 were determined by the inner diameter (ID) of the ETT. Imposed expiratory WOB was calculated from the area of Ptrach above PEEP versus lung volume. We examined imposed expiratory WOB and imposed expiratory resistance in relation to mean expiratory flow. We examined 28 patients under CMV mode, and 29 during SBT. During both CMV and SBT, as mean expiratory flow increased, imposed expiratory WOB increased. The regression curves between mean expiratory flow (x) (L/s) and imposed expiratory WOB (y) (J/L) were y = 1.35x(0.83) (R(2) = 0.79) for 7 mm ID ETT under CMV, y = 1.12x(0.82) (R(2) = 0.73) for 8 mm ID ETT under CMV, y = 1.07x(1.04) (R(2) = 0.85) for 7 mm ID ETT during SBT, and y = 0.84x(0.93) (R(2) = 0.75) for 8 mm ID ETT during SBT. Levels of imposed expiratory WOB were affected by ETT diameter and ventilator mode. The reason for increasing imposed expiratory WOB was an increase in expiratory resistance imposed by the ETT and HME. Under mechanical ventilation, imposed expiratory WOB should be considered in patients with higher minute ventilation.

  17. Hypotensive anesthesia: Comparing the effects of different drug combinations on mean arterial pressure, estimated blood loss, and surgery time in orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, James; Portnof, Jason E; Kalayeh, Mona; Hardigan, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    Sevoflurane, an inhalational hypotensive anesthetic agent with a vasodilatory property, has been commonly used as a single agent to induce hypotension and effectively decrease blood loss in orthognathic surgery. However, it is common for patients to receive other hypotensive anesthetic agents in combination with sevoflurane. The purpose of our retrospective cohort study is to investigate whether administering an additional hypotensive agent has greater effect at reducing mean arterial pressure (MAP), estimated blood loss (EBL) and surgery time during orthognathic surgery. 57 subjects, aged 0-89 of both genders, who underwent orthognathic surgery were investigated in this study. Each patient's anesthesia records were reviewed to record the following variables of interest: EBL, duration of surgery, and MAP reduction in %. 41 subjects were placed in Group I and they received sevoflurane alone. 16 subjects were placed in Group II and they received sevoflurane plus a "supportive" agent. These "supportive" agents were esmolol, labetalol, metoprolol, nicardipine, and dexmedetomidine. The significant differences between two groups were assessed by using ANCOVA and p surgery time. Subjects in Group II experienced a greater reduction in MAP during surgery than subjects in Group I, 27.30% and 20.44%, respectively (p = 0.027). There was no significant difference for sex (p = 0.417) or age group (p = 0.113) in estimated blood loss, however. The mean surgery time in Group I was 1.93, 2.77, and 4.54 h with respect to LeFort, BSSO/IVRO, and double jaw surgery. Patients in Group II had a mean surgery time of 1.73, 2.07, and 5.64 h with respect to LeFort, BSSO/IVRO, and double jaw surgery. No statistically significant difference was demonstrated in surgery time between Group I vs. Group II (p > 0.05). Subjects in Group II experienced, on average, more blood loss than subjects in Group I, 355.50 ml and 238.90 ml, respectively. The use of multi-drug combination may offer

  18. Potential of right to left ventricular volume ratio measured on chest CT for the prediction of pulmonary hypertension: correlation with pulmonary arterial systolic pressure estimated by echocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Heon [Soon Chun Hyang University, Department of Radiology, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seok Yeon [Seoul Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soo Jeong [Terarecon Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Kyun [Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Reddy, Ryan P.; Schoepf, U.J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science and Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2012-09-15

    To investigate the correlation of right ventricular (RV) to left ventricular (LV) volume ratio measured by chest CT with pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP) estimated by echocardiography. 104 patients (72.47 {+-} 13.64 years; 39 male) who had undergone chest CT and echocardiography were divided into two groups (hypertensive and normotensive) based upon an echocardiography-derived PASP of 25 mmHg. RV to LV volume ratios (RV{sub V}/LV{sub V}) were calculated. RV{sub V}/LV{sub V} was then correlated with PASP using regression analysis. The Area Under the Curve (AUC) for predicting pulmonary hypertension on chest CT was calculated. In the hypertensive group, the mean PASP was 46.29 {+-} 14.42 mmHg (29-98 mmHg) and there was strong correlation between the RV{sub V}/LV{sub V} and PASP (R = 0.82, p < 0.001). The intraobserver and interobserver correlation coefficients for RV{sub V}/LV{sub V} were 0.990 and 0.892. RV{sub V}/LV{sub V} was 1.01 {+-} 0.44 (0.51-2.77) in the hypertensive and 0.72 {+-} 0.14 (0.52-1.11) in the normotensive group (P <0.05). With 0.9 as the cutoff for RV{sub V}/LV{sub V}, sensitivity and specificity for predicting pulmonary hypertension over 40 mmHg were 79.5 % and 90 %, respectively. The AUC for predicting pulmonary hypertension was 0.87 RV/LV volume ratios on chest CT correlate well with PASP estimated by echocardiography and can be used to predict pulmonary hypertension over 40 mmHg with high sensitivity and specificity. (orig.)

  19. On Better Estimating and Normalizing the Relationship between Clinical Parameters: Comparing Respiratory Modulations in the Photoplethysmogram and Blood Pressure Signal (DPOP versus PPV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S. Addison

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DPOP (ΔPOP or Delta-POP is a noninvasive parameter which measures the strength of respiratory modulations present in the pulse oximeter waveform. It has been proposed as a noninvasive alternative to pulse pressure variation (PPV used in the prediction of the response to volume expansion in hypovolemic patients. We considered a number of simple techniques for better determining the underlying relationship between the two parameters. It was shown numerically that baseline-induced signal errors were asymmetric in nature, which corresponded to observation, and we proposed a method which combines a least-median-of-squares estimator with the requirement that the relationship passes through the origin (the LMSO method. We further developed a method of normalization of the parameters through rescaling DPOP using the inverse gradient of the linear fitted relationship. We propose that this normalization method (LMSO-N is applicable to the matching of a wide range of clinical parameters. It is also generally applicable to the self-normalizing of parameters whose behaviour may change slightly due to algorithmic improvements.

  20. On better estimating and normalizing the relationship between clinical parameters: comparing respiratory modulations in the photoplethysmogram and blood pressure signal (DPOP versus PPV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, Paul S; Wang, Rui; Uribe, Alberto A; Bergese, Sergio D

    2015-01-01

    DPOP (ΔPOP or Delta-POP) is a noninvasive parameter which measures the strength of respiratory modulations present in the pulse oximeter waveform. It has been proposed as a noninvasive alternative to pulse pressure variation (PPV) used in the prediction of the response to volume expansion in hypovolemic patients. We considered a number of simple techniques for better determining the underlying relationship between the two parameters. It was shown numerically that baseline-induced signal errors were asymmetric in nature, which corresponded to observation, and we proposed a method which combines a least-median-of-squares estimator with the requirement that the relationship passes through the origin (the LMSO method). We further developed a method of normalization of the parameters through rescaling DPOP using the inverse gradient of the linear fitted relationship. We propose that this normalization method (LMSO-N) is applicable to the matching of a wide range of clinical parameters. It is also generally applicable to the self-normalizing of parameters whose behaviour may change slightly due to algorithmic improvements.

  1. Comparison of noninvasive pulse transit time estimates as markers of blood pressure using invasive pulse transit time measurements as a reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mingwu; Olivier, N Bari; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2016-05-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) measured as the time delay between invasive proximal and distal blood pressure (BP) or flow waveforms (invasive PTT [I-PTT]) tightly correlates with BP PTT estimated as the time delay between noninvasive proximal and distal arterial waveforms could therefore permit cuff-less BP monitoring. A popular noninvasive PTT estimate for this application is the time delay between ECG and photoplethysmography (PPG) waveforms (pulse arrival time [PAT]). Another estimate is the time delay between proximal and distal PPG waveforms (PPG-PTT). PAT and PPG-PTT were assessed as markers of BP over a wide physiologic range using I-PTT as a reference. Waveforms for determining I-PTT, PAT, and PPG-PTT through central arteries were measured from swine during baseline conditions and infusions of various hemodynamic drugs. Diastolic, mean, and systolic BP varied widely in each subject (group average (mean ± SE) standard deviation between 25 ± 2 and 36 ± 2 mmHg). I-PTT correlated well with all BP levels (group average R(2) values between 0.86 ± 0.03 and 0.91 ± 0.03). PPG-PTT also correlated well with all BP levels (group average R(2) values between 0.81 ± 0.03 and 0.85 ± 0.02), and its R(2) values were not significantly different from those of I-PTT PAT correlated best with systolic BP (group average R(2) value of 0.70 ± 0.04), but its R(2) values for all BP levels were significantly lower than those of I-PTT (P < 0.005) and PPG-PTT (P < 0.02). The pre-ejection period component of PAT was responsible for its inferior correlation with BP In sum, PPG-PTT was not different from I-PTT and superior to the popular PAT as a marker of BP. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  2. Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Index (AASI) is Unable to Estimate Arterial Stiffness of Hypertensive Subjects: Role of Nocturnal Dipping of Blood Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Raimondo, Domenico; Casuccio, Alessandra; Di Liberti, Rosangela; Musiari, Gaia; Zappulla, Valentina; D'Angelo, Alessandra; Pinto, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Index (AASI) has been proposed as an indirect and simpler method to estimate the Arterial Stiffness (AS). AASI, calculated from a set of data collected during a 24-hours ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), is defined as 1 minus the regression slope of diastolic on systolic blood pressure (BP) values. For a given increase in diastolic BP, the increase in systolic BP is smaller in a compliant compared to a stiff artery; the stiffer the arterial tree, the closer AASI is to 1. AASI was demonstrated to predict cardiovascular mortality, cerebrovascular events and to be associated with target organ damage. Taking into account the almost complete absence of data regarding the ability of AASI to predict the different degree of AS when hypertensives are divided into four classes of dipping in relation to the extent of the nocturnal reduction of BP (extreme dippers, dippers, mild dippers and reverse dippers) aim to clarify the ability of AASI to estimate the different degree of AS of hypertensive subjects with different nocturnal BP profile and resulting in different extent of organ damage. We enrolled 816 subjects (403 men and 413 women) with essential hypertension, referred to the U.O.C of Medicina Interna e Cardioangiologia of the University of Palermo; 173 subjects (71 men and 102 women, mean age 44.4 ± 14.6 years) without a history of hypertension were enrolled as controls. The analysis of data was performed by dividing the population into four categories in relation to the extent of the nocturnal decline of BP: 124 extreme dipper (mean age 54,8 ± 12,4 years, men 46.8 %); 287 dipper (mean age 55,9 ± 14,2 years, men 54,0 %); 271 mild dipper (mean age 61,5 ± 14,7 years, men 52,0 %); 134 reverse dipper (mean age 61,5 ± 14,7 years, men 33.6 %). The mean value of AASI was significantly higher for mild and reverse dippers versus control patients and versus the other categories of dipping. The multiple regression analysis with AASI as

  3. Non-invasive estimation of intracranial pressure. MR-based evaluation in children with hydrocephalus; Nichtinvasive Bestimmung des intrakraniellen Drucks. MR-basierte Untersuchung bei Kindern mit Hydrozephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehlmann, M.; Steffinger, D.; Ertl-Wagner, B.; Koerte, I.K. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Peraud, A. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Abteilung fuer Neurochirurgie, Muenchen (Germany); Lehner, M. [Dr. von Haunersches Kinderspital, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Abteilung fuer Kinderchirurgie, Muenchen (Germany); Heinen, F.; Alperin, N. [University Miami, Department of Radiology, Miller School of Medicine, Miami (United States)

    2012-09-15

    The intracranial pressure (ICP) is a crucially important parameter for diagnostic and therapeutic decision-making in patients with hydrocephalus. So far there is no standard method to non-invasively assess the ICP. Various approaches to obtain the ICP semi-invasively or non-invasively are discussed and the clinical application of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based method to estimate ICP (MR-ICP) is demonstrated in a group of pediatric patients with hydrocephalus. Arterial inflow, venous drainage and craniospinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow were quantified using phase-contrast imaging to derive the MR-ICP. A total of 15 patients with hydrocephalus (n=9 treated with shunt placement or ventriculostomy) underwent MRI on a 3 T scanner applying retrospectively-gated cine phase contrast sequences. Of the patients six had clinical symptoms indicating increased ICP (age 2.5-14.61 years, mean 7.4 years) and nine patients had no clinical signs of elevated ICP (age 2.1-15.9 years; mean 9.8 years; all treated with shunt or ventriculostomy). Median MR-ICP in symptomatic patients was 24.5 mmHg (25th percentile 20.4 mmHg; 75th percentile 44.6 mmHg). Median MR-ICP in patients without acute signs of increased ICP was 9.8 mmHg (25th percentile 8.6 mmHg; 75th percentile 11.4 mmHg). Group differences were significant (p < 0.001; Mann-Whitney U-test). The MR-ICP technique is a promising non-invasive tool for estimating ICP. Further studies in larger patient cohorts are warranted to investigate its application in children with hydrocephalus. (orig.) [German] Der intrakranielle Druck (''intracranial pressure'' - ICP) ist ein entscheidender Parameter bei der Diagnostik, Therapie und Verlaufsbeurteilung von Patienten mit Hydrozephalus. Derzeit gibt es keine radiologische Standardmethode, um den intrakraniellen Druck quantitativ zu bestimmen. Methoden zur invasiven und nichtinvasiven Einschaetzung des ICP werden diskutiert und die Anwendung eines MR

  4. Noise Reduction, Atmospheric Pressure Admittance Estimation and Long-Period Component Extraction in Time-Varying Gravity Signals Using Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linsong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-varying gravity signals, with their nonlinear, non-stationary and multi-scale characteristics, record the physical responses of various geodynamic processes and consist of a blend of signals with various periods and amplitudes, corresponding to numerous phenomena. Superconducting gravimeter (SG records are processed in this study using a multi-scale analytical method and corrected for known effects to reduce noise, to study geodynamic phenomena using their gravimetric signatures. Continuous SG (GWR-C032 gravity and barometric data are decomposed into a series of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs using the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD method, which is proposed to alleviate some unresolved issues (the mode mixing problem and the end effect of the empirical mode decomposition (EMD. Further analysis of the variously scaled signals is based on a dyadic filter bank of the IMFs. The results indicate that removing the high-frequency IMFs can reduce the natural and man-made noise in the data, which are caused by electronic device noise, Earth background noise and the residual effects of pre-processing. The atmospheric admittances based on frequency changes are estimated from the gravity and the atmospheric pressure IMFs in various frequency bands. These time- and frequency-dependent admittance values can be used effectively to improve the atmospheric correction. Using the EEMD method as a filter, the long-period IMFs are extracted from the SG time-varying gravity signals spanning 7 years. The resulting gravity residuals are well correlated with the gravity effect caused by the _ polar motion after correcting for atmospheric effects.

  5. The effect of aging on the backward stepping reaction as estimated from the velocity of center of foot pressure and muscular strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yahiko; Tanaka, Yasuyuki; Shimomura, Yoshihiro; Iwanaga, Koichi; Katsuura, Tetsuo

    2007-03-01

    By estimating the deflection velocity from the center of foot pressure (COP), this study aims to prove that the characteristics of the backward stepping reaction in the elderly are related to the strength of the antigravity muscles. The participants in this study were 10 elderly (average age 75.6+/-7.6 years) and 13 young (average age 22.0+/-2.6 years) subjects. Using force plate analysis, we measured the shift in the deflection velocity (V-RMS) and the maximum deflection velocity (V-MAX) from the beginning of the COP movement to the onset of the stepping reaction. Furthermore, we measured the strength of the antigravity muscles using a hand-held dynamometer. We correlated the V-RMS, V-MAX, and the rate of change of the deflection velocity (MAX/RMS) with muscular strength. When compared with the young subjects, the elderly showed significantly lower values of V-RMS (pmuscles studied (p<0.001). We established a significant correlation between the V-RMS, MAX/RMS, and muscular strength by carrying out a regression analysis (V-RMS: gluteus maximus (r=0.50, p<0.05) and rectus abdominis (r=0.48, p<0.05); MAX/RMS: adductor magnus (r=-0.66, p<0.001) and flexor digitorum longus (r=-0.62, p<0.01)). Differences were observed in the V-RMS and MAX/RMS during the backward stepping reaction; it was proposed that these differences were related to the age and muscular strength of the subjects. Therefore, further investigations should be undertaken in order to understand the effects of aging on the stepping reaction. In other words, the change-in-support strategy, including the preparatory phase of the stepping reaction, and its relationship with muscular strength should be further investigated.

  6. Synthesis of capillary pressure curves from post-stack seismic data with the use of intelligent estimators: A case study from the Iranian part of the South Pars gas field, Persian Gulf Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golsanami, Naser; Kadkhodaie-Ilkhchi, Ali; Erfani, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Capillary pressure curves are important data for reservoir rock typing, analyzing pore throat distribution, determining height above free water level, and reservoir simulation. Laboratory experiments provide accurate data, however they are expensive, time-consuming and discontinuous through the reservoir intervals. The current study focuses on synthesizing artificial capillary pressure (Pc) curves from seismic attributes with the use of artificial intelligent systems including Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), Fuzzy logic (FL) and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference Systems (ANFISs). The synthetic capillary pressure curves were achieved by estimating pressure values at six mercury saturation points. These points correspond to mercury filled pore volumes of core samples (Hg-saturation) at 5%, 20%, 35%, 65%, 80%, and 90% saturations. To predict the synthetic Pc curve at each saturation point, various FL, ANFIS and ANN models were constructed. The varying neural network models differ in their training algorithm. Based on the performance function, the most accurately functioning models were selected as the final solvers to do the prediction process at each of the above-mentioned mercury saturation points. The constructed models were then tested at six depth points of the studied well which were already unforeseen by the models. The results show that the Fuzzy logic and neuro-fuzzy models were not capable of making reliable estimations, while the predictions from the ANN models were satisfyingly trustworthy. The obtained results showed a good agreement between the laboratory derived and synthetic capillary pressure curves. Finally, a 3D seismic cube was captured for which the required attributes were extracted and the capillary pressure cube was estimated by using the developed models. In the next step, the synthesized Pc cube was compared with the seismic cube and an acceptable correspondence was observed.

  7. Left ventricular filling pressure estimation at rest and during exercise in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis: comparison of echocardiographic and invasive measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Morten; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Pecini, Redi

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Doppler index of left ventricular (LV) filling (E/e') is recognized as a noninvasive measure for LV filling pressure at rest but has also been suggested as a reliable measure of exercise-induced changes. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in LV filling pressure......, measured invasively as pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), at rest and during exercise to describe the relation with E/e' in patients with severe aortic stenosis. METHODS: Twenty-eight patients with an aortic valve areas

  8. Full-Scale 3-D Finite Element Modeling of a Two-Loop Pressurized Water Reactor for Heat Transfer, Thermal-Mechanical Cyclic Stress Analysis, and Environmental Fatigue Life Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Soppet, William K.; Majumdar, Saurindranath; Natesan, Krishnamurti

    2015-12-15

    This paper discusses a system-level finite element model of a two-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR). Based on this model, system-level heat transfer analysis and subsequent sequentially coupled thermal-mechanical stress analysis were performed for typical thermal-mechanical fatigue cycles. The in-air fatigue lives of example components, such as the hot and cold legs, were estimated on the basis of stress analysis results, ASME in-air fatigue life estimation criteria, and fatigue design curves. Furthermore, environmental correction factors and associated PWR environment fatigue lives for the hot and cold legs were estimated by using estimated stress and strain histories and the approach described in US-NRC report: NUREG-6909.

  9. Fracturing pressure curve analysis of highly-permeable formations to estimate fracture parameters; Analise da curva de pressao do fraturamento de formacoes de alta permeabilidade para estimativa dos parametros da fratura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, Cecilia Toledo de; Rosolen, Marcos Antonio [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). E e P Engenharia de Producao. Gerencia de Fluidos, Estimulacao e Contencao de Areia], e-mails: cecilia_toledo@petrobras.com.br, marcosrosolen@petrobras.com.br

    2010-06-15

    Hydraulic fracturing, in keeping with other petroleum industry operations, is regarded as a complex process since it can not be directly observed. In this context, pressure analysis during fracturing treatment is a widely accepted powerful technique to develop a better understanding of the fracturing process. This study enhances the Valko and Oligney method, 1996, which estimates the fracture evolution using a direct interpretation of the measured bottom hole pressure curve during a hydraulic fracturing operation in a highly-permeable formation. Considering radial fracture geometry and using simplified flow and geomechanical equations, the model estimates a packing radius of the fracture using the slope of the increasing bottom hole pressure curve during tip screen out periods (TSO). The only model input data needed are the usual records available during and after the operation; namely: the bottom hole pressure, pumping rate and proppant concentrations. The proposed method enhancement was achieved with the inclusion and adjustment of state equations for the fracture growth and the leak-off process, respectively, but still maintaining the same input data for the original model. The case studies show that the modifications to the Valko and Oligney method closely follow the three-dimensional model results obtained using the commercial simulators. (author)

  10. Clinical validity of the estimated energy requirement and the average protein requirement for nutritional status change and wound healing in older patients with pressure ulcers: A multicenter prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizaka, Shinji; Kaitani, Toshiko; Nakagami, Gojiro; Sugama, Junko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-11-01

    Adequate nutritional intake is essential for pressure ulcer healing. Recently, the estimated energy requirement (30 kcal/kg) and the average protein requirement (0.95 g/kg) necessary to maintain metabolic balance have been reported. The purpose was to evaluate the clinical validity of these requirements in older hospitalized patients with pressure ulcers by assessing nutritional status and wound healing. This multicenter prospective study carried out as a secondary analysis of a clinical trial included 194 patients with pressure ulcers aged ≥65 years from 29 institutions. Nutritional status including anthropometry and biochemical tests, and wound status by a structured severity tool, were evaluated over 3 weeks. Energy and protein intake were determined from medical records on a typical day and dichotomized by meeting the estimated average requirement. Longitudinal data were analyzed with a multivariate mixed-effects model. Meeting the energy requirement was associated with changes in weight (P nutritional decline and of impaired healing of deep pressure ulcers. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  11. Two-voice fundamental frequency estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cheveigné, Alain

    2002-05-01

    An algorithm is presented that estimates the fundamental frequencies of two concurrent voices or instruments. The algorithm models each voice as a periodic function of time, and jointly estimates both periods by cancellation according to a previously proposed method [de Cheveigné and Kawahara, Speech Commun. 27, 175-185 (1999)]. The new algorithm improves on the old in several respects; it allows an unrestricted search range, effectively avoids harmonic and subharmonic errors, is more accurate (it uses two-dimensional parabolic interpolation), and is computationally less costly. It remains subject to unavoidable errors when periods are in certain simple ratios and the task is inherently ambiguous. The algorithm is evaluated on a small database including speech, singing voice, and instrumental sounds. It can be extended in several ways; to decide the number of voices, to handle amplitude variations, and to estimate more than two voices (at the expense of increased processing cost and decreased reliability). It makes no use of instrument models, learned or otherwise, although it could usefully be combined with such models. [Work supported by the Cognitique programme of the French Ministry of Research and Technology.

  12. Setting thresholds to varying blood pressure monitoring intervals differentially affects risk estimates associated with white-coat and masked hypertension in the population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asayama, Kei; Thijs, Lutgarde; Li, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Outcome-driven recommendations about time intervals during which ambulatory blood pressure should be measured to diagnose white-coat or masked hypertension are lacking. We cross-classified 8237 untreated participants (mean age, 50.7 years; 48.4% women) enrolled in 12 population studies, using ≥14...

  13. Sediment compaction and pore pressure prediction in deepwater basin of the South China Sea: Estimation from ODP and IODP drilling well data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yangbing; Wu, Tuoyu; Sun, Jin; Zhang, Hanyu; Wang, Jiliang; Gao, Jinwei; Chen, Chuanxu

    2018-02-01

    Overpressure in deepwater basins not only causes serious soft sediment deformation, but also significantly affects the safety of drilling operations. Therefore, prediction of overpressure in sediments has become an important task in deepwater oil exploration and development. In this study, we analyze the drilling data from ODP Leg 184 Sites 1144, 1146, and 1148, and IODP Leg 349 Sites U1431, U1432, U1433, and U1435 to study the sediment compaction and controls in the northern South China Sea. Sedimentation rate, sediment content, distribution area, and buried depth are the factors that influence sediment compaction in the deepwater basin of the South China Sea. Among these factors, the sediment content is the most important. The fitted normal compacted coefficients and mudline porosity for an interval of 50 m shows disciplinary variation versus depth. The pore pressure predicted from different fitted results shows varying overpressure situations. The normal compaction trend from Site 1144 reflects the porosity variation trend in stable deposition basins in the northern South China Sea. The predicted pore pressure shows overpressure at Site 1144, which is attributed to compaction disequilibrium. Nevertheless, the mixed lithology column may influence the predicted over-pressure at Site 1148, which is responsible for the confusing result. Above all, we find that sediment compaction should serve as a proxy for pore pressure in the deepwater basin of the South China Sea.

  14. Self-referenced octave-wide subharmonic GaP optical parametric oscillator centered at 3  μm and pumped by an Er-fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ru, Qitian; Loparo, Zachary E; Zhang, XiaoSheng; Crystal, Sean; Vasu, Subith; Schunemann, Peter G; Vodopyanov, Konstantin L

    2017-11-15

    We report an octave-wide mid-IR spectrum (2.3-4.8 μm) obtained from a subharmonic optical parametric oscillator (OPO) based on a newly developed nonlinear crystal, orientation-patterned gallium phosphide (OP-GaP), which was synchronously pumped by a femtosecond 1560 nm fiber laser. We proved that the octave-wide output is in the form of a single frequency comb. The observed f-to-2f frequency beats, originating directly from the OPO, can be used for self-referencing and phase locking of the pump laser comb with no need for supercontinuum generation. With an average output power of ∼30  mW, this setup might be beneficial for a variety of spectroscopic applications in the mid-IR.

  15. Water holdup estimation from pressure drop measurements in oil-water two-phase flows by means of the two-fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, L. P. M.; Guilizzoni, M.; Sotgia, G.; Babakhani Dehkordi, P.; Lucchini, A.

    2017-11-01

    The Two-Fluid Model (TFM) has been applied to determine water holdup from pressure drop measurements for core-annular flows in horizontal pipes. The fluids are Milpar 220 oil (ρo=890 kg/m3, μo=0.832 Pa·s at 20 °C) and tap water (μw=1.026×10-3 Pa·s at 20 °C). The investigated volume flow rates range from 2 to 6 m3/h, for water, and from 1 to 3.5 m3/h, for oil, respectively. The results are in very good agreement with available experimental data from the literature and a simple correlation between water holdup and water input fraction has been benchmarked to the overall data set. Eventually, the TFM endowed with the holdup correlation has been adopted to predict the pressure drop with quite satisfactory results: 98% of data fall within a percentage error of ±10%, 99% of the data fall within ±15%, and all the data are predicted within ±20%. On the other hand, the mean absolute relative error for the pressure drop reduction factor is 5.5%.

  16. Setting thresholds to varying blood pressure monitoring intervals differentially affects risk estimates associated with white-coat and masked hypertension in the population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asayama, Kei; Thijs, Lutgarde; Li, Yan; Gu, Yu-Mei; Hara, Azusa; Liu, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Zhenyu; Wei, Fang-Fei; Lujambio, Inés; Mena, Luis J; Boggia, José; Hansen, Tine W; Björklund-Bodegård, Kristina; Nomura, Kyoko; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Dolan, Eamon; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Malyutina, Sofia; Casiglia, Edoardo; Nikitin, Yuri; Lind, Lars; Luzardo, Leonella; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Sandoya, Edgardo; Filipovský, Jan; Maestre, Gladys E; Wang, Jiguang; Imai, Yutaka; Franklin, Stanley S; O'Brien, Eoin; Staessen, Jan A

    2014-11-01

    Outcome-driven recommendations about time intervals during which ambulatory blood pressure should be measured to diagnose white-coat or masked hypertension are lacking. We cross-classified 8237 untreated participants (mean age, 50.7 years; 48.4% women) enrolled in 12 population studies, using ≥140/≥90, ≥130/≥80, ≥135/≥85, and ≥120/≥70 mm Hg as hypertension thresholds for conventional, 24-hour, daytime, and nighttime blood pressure. White-coat hypertension was hypertension on conventional measurement with ambulatory normotension, the opposite condition being masked hypertension. Intervals used for classification of participants were daytime, nighttime, and 24 hours, first considered separately, and next combined as 24 hours plus daytime or plus nighttime, or plus both. Depending on time intervals chosen, white-coat and masked hypertension frequencies ranged from 6.3% to 12.5% and from 9.7% to 19.6%, respectively. During 91 046 person-years, 729 participants experienced a cardiovascular event. In multivariable analyses with normotension during all intervals of the day as reference, hazard ratios associated with white-coat hypertension progressively weakened considering daytime only (1.38; P=0.033), nighttime only (1.43; P=0.0074), 24 hours only (1.21; P=0.20), 24 hours plus daytime (1.24; P=0.18), 24 hours plus nighttime (1.15; P=0.39), and 24 hours plus daytime and nighttime (1.16; P=0.41). The hazard ratios comparing masked hypertension with normotension were all significant (Phypertension requires setting thresholds simultaneously to 24 hours, daytime, and nighttime blood pressure. Although any time interval suffices to diagnose masked hypertension, as proposed in current guidelines, full 24-hour recordings remain standard in clinical practice. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Setting Thresholds to Varying Blood Pressure Monitoring Intervals Differentially Affects Risk Estimates Associated With White-Coat and Masked Hypertension in the Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asayama, Kei; Thijs, Lutgarde; Li, Yan; Gu, Yu-Mei; Hara, Azusa; Liu, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Zhenyu; Wei, Fang-Fei; Lujambio, Inés; Mena, Luis J.; Boggia, José; Hansen, Tine W.; Björklund-Bodegård, Kristina; Nomura, Kyoko; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Dolan, Eamon; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Malyutina, Sofia; Casiglia, Edoardo; Nikitin, Yuri; Lind, Lars; Luzardo, Leonella; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Sandoya, Edgardo; Filipovský, Jan; Maestre, Gladys E.; Wang, Jiguang; Imai, Yutaka; Franklin, Stanley S.; O’Brien, Eoin; Staessen, Jan A.

    2015-01-01

    Outcome-driven recommendations about time intervals during which ambulatory blood pressure should be measured to diagnose white-coat or masked hypertension are lacking. We cross-classified 8237 untreated participants (mean age, 50.7 years; 48.4% women) enrolled in 12 population studies, using ≥140/≥90, ≥130/≥80, ≥135/≥85, and ≥120/≥70 mm Hg as hypertension thresholds for conventional, 24-hour, daytime, and nighttime blood pressure. White-coat hypertension was hypertension on conventional measurement with ambulatory normotension, the opposite condition being masked hypertension. Intervals used for classification of participants were daytime, nighttime, and 24 hours, first considered separately, and next combined as 24 hours plus daytime or plus nighttime, or plus both. Depending on time intervals chosen, white-coat and masked hypertension frequencies ranged from 6.3% to 12.5% and from 9.7% to 19.6%, respectively. During 91 046 person-years, 729 participants experienced a cardiovascular event. In multivariable analyses with normotension during all intervals of the day as reference, hazard ratios associated with white-coat hypertension progressively weakened considering daytime only (1.38; P=0.033), nighttime only (1.43; P=0.0074), 24 hours only (1.21; P=0.20), 24 hours plus daytime (1.24; P=0.18), 24 hours plus nighttime (1.15; P=0.39), and 24 hours plus daytime and nighttime (1.16; P=0.41). The hazard ratios comparing masked hypertension with normotension were all significant (Phypertension requires setting thresholds simultaneously to 24 hours, daytime, and nighttime blood pressure. Although any time interval suffices to diagnose masked hypertension, as proposed in current guidelines, full 24-hour recordings remain standard in clinical practice. PMID:25135185

  18. Fluid pressure arrival time tomography: Estimation and assessment in the presence of inequality constraints, with an application to a producing gas field at Krechba, Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rucci, A.; Vasco, D.W.; Novali, F.

    2010-04-01

    Deformation in the overburden proves useful in deducing spatial and temporal changes in the volume of a producing reservoir. Based upon these changes we estimate diffusive travel times associated with the transient flow due to production, and then, as the solution of a linear inverse problem, the effective permeability of the reservoir. An advantage an approach based upon travel times, as opposed to one based upon the amplitude of surface deformation, is that it is much less sensitive to the exact geomechanical properties of the reservoir and overburden. Inequalities constrain the inversion, under the assumption that the fluid production only results in pore volume decreases within the reservoir. We apply the formulation to satellite-based estimates of deformation in the material overlying a thin gas production zone at the Krechba field in Algeria. The peak displacement after three years of gas production is approximately 0.5 cm, overlying the eastern margin of the anticlinal structure defining the gas field. Using data from 15 irregularly-spaced images of range change, we calculate the diffusive travel times associated with the startup of a gas production well. The inequality constraints are incorporated into the estimates of model parameter resolution and covariance, improving the resolution by roughly 30 to 40%.

  19. Calculation of the Aqueous Thermodynamic Properties of Citric Acid Cycle Intermediates and Precursors and the Estimation of High Temperature and Pressure Equation of State Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell Schulte

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The citric acid cycle (CAC is the central pathway of energy transfer for many organisms, and understanding the origin of this pathway may provide insight into the origins of metabolism. In order to assess the thermodynamics of this key pathway for microorganisms that inhabit a wide variety of environments, especially those found in high temperature environments, we have calculated the properties and parameters for the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers equation of state for the major components of the CAC. While a significant amount of data is not available for many of the constituents of this fundamental pathway, methods exist that allow estimation of these missing data.

  20. Cretaceous high-pressure metamorphism and low pressure overprint in the Sistan Suture Zone, eastern Iran: Additional temperature estimates for eclogites, geological significance of U-Pb zircon ages and Rb-Sr constraints on the timing of exhumation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzawa, Timon; Bröcker, Michael; Fotoohi Rad, Gholamreza; Berndt, Jasper; Lisker, Frank

    2017-10-01

    The Sistan Suture Zone, eastern Iran, includes blocks and lenses of eclogite-, blueschist- and/or epidote amphibolite-facies rocks that provide an excellent opportunity to examine the exhumation history of oceanic HP/LT rocks and their retrograde derivatives. Zr-in-rutile thermometry of eclogites corroborates previous interpretations suggesting metamorphic temperatures of ca. 550-600 °C during the HP stage in the Sistan area. Flat HREE distribution patterns and Ti-in-zircon temperatures of ca. 500-600 °C document that zircon in eclogite is of metamorphic origin. REE patterns of zircon from felsic meta-igneous rocks do not allow to distinguish between a magmatic or metamorphic origin, but relatively low temperatures indicated by Ti-in-zircon thermometry (ca. 500-600 °C) and the close similarity of zircon (U-Pb) and white mica (Rb-Sr, Ar-Ar) ages favor a metamorphic zircon origin. Previously published isotopic ages of the felsic rocks cannot unambiguously be linked to the eclogite- and/or blueschist-facies P-T conditions due to the absence of unequivocal mineralogical and petrological evidence. Instead, these rocks may record contemporaneous metamorphic processes that took place at a different depth within the subduction complex, or may indicate active ridge subduction and/or melt formation in the subduction zone at relatively low pressures. Biotite-based internal Rb-Sr isochrons of newly dated epidote amphibolite and biotite-albite gneisses indicate ages of ca. 74-80 Ma, either dating fluid-infiltration-induced formation of biotite during relatively fast uplift, or the time of final passage through the effective biotite closure temperature. Rb-Sr ages of phengite from both an epidote amphibolite and a biotite-albite gneiss yield ages that correspond to the HP/LT stage. This outcome, combined with textural evidence for derivation from eclogitic precursors documents that white mica ages of some strongly overprinted Sistan rocks are compromised by inheritance and do

  1. Estimating the angle of attack from blade pressure measurements on the NREL Phase VI rotor using a free wake vortex model: axial conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sant, Tonio [Delft Univ. of Technology, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft (Netherlands); Malta Univ., Mechanical Engineering Dept., Msida (Malta); Kuik, Gijs van; Bussel, G.J.W. van [Delft Univ. of Technology, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft (Netherlands)

    2006-07-01

    Blade element momentum (BEM) methods are still the most common methods used for predicting the aerodynamic loads during the aeroelastic design of wind turbine blades. However, their accuracy is limited by the availability of reliable aerofoil data. Owing to the 3D nature of the flow over wind turbine blades, the aerofoil characteristics will vary considerably from the 2D aerofoil characteristics, especially at the inboard sections of the blades. Detailed surface pressure measurements on the blade surfaces may be used to derive more realistic aerofoil data. However, in doing so, knowledge of the angle of attack distributions is required. This study presents a method in which a free wake vortex model is used to derive such distributions for the NREL Phase VI wind turbine under different operating conditions. The derived free wake geometry solutions are plotted together with the corresponding wake circulation distribution. These plots provide better insight into how circulation formed at the blades is eventually diffused into the wake. The free wake model is described and its numerical behaviour is examined. (Author)

  2. In vivo biosynthesis of L-(/sup 35/S)Cys-arginine vasopressin, -oxytocin, and -somatostatin: rapid estimation using reversed phase high pressure liquid chromatography. [Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco-Bourland, R.E.; Fernstrom, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    L(/sup 35/S)Cys-arginine vasopressin, -oxytocin, and -somatostatin were purified from hypothalami and neurohypophyses 4 h after rats received L(/sup 35/S)Cys via the third ventricle. After acetic acid extraction, Sephadex G-25 filtration, and chemoadsorption to C18-silica (Sep-Pak cartridges), the labeled peptides were rapidly separated by gradient elution, reversed phase, high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The identity and isotopic purity of the labeled peptides were determined by several reversed phase HPLC procedures in conjunction with chemical modification. The labeled peptide fractions were at least 50% radiochemically pure. Using this HPLC isolation procedure, incorporation of L-(/sup 35/S)Cys into each peptide was determined in hydrated and dehydrated rats. Label incorporation into arginine vasopressin and oxytocin in the hypothalamus and the neurohypophysis of dehydrated rats was 2-3 times greater than that in hydrated rats. Incorporation of label into hypothalamic and neurohypophyseal somatostatin was unaffected by the hydration state of the animal. This procedure thus provides a very rapid, but sensitive, set of techniques for studying the control of small peptide biosynthesis in the brain.

  3. About the need to use specific population references in estimating paediatric hypertension: Sardinian blood pressure standards (age 11-14 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassareo Pier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous Italian paediatric blood pressure (BP tables overestimated the prevalence of hypertension in adolescents of specific geographic areas, such as Sardinia, an island in the Mediterranean Sea. This is probably due to a not very homogeneous distribution of the subjects studied, most from Middle and Northern Italy, and the long period from the survey. Methods BPs were repeatedly measured over a period of 3 years in 839 children (52.6% males. Age range: from 11 to 14 years during this period, using a standard mercury sphygmomanometer. For each gender, the specific percentile curves of systolic and diastolic BP were constructed. Results (corrected by the 50th percentile of height Males (11-14 years mean systolic BP (50th centile: from 111 to 115 mmHg. Hypertensive systolic BP (> 95th percentile: from 127 to 135 mmHg. Mean diastolic BP (50th centile: from 65 to 69 mmHg. Hypertensive diastolic BP (> 95th percentile: from 78 to 82 mmHg. Females(11-14 years mean systolic BP (50th centile: from 110 to 112 mmHg. Hypertensive systolic BP (> 95th percentile: from 127 to 130 mmHg. Mean diastolic BP (50th centile: from 65 to 67. Hypertensive diastolic BP (> 95th percentile: from 78 to 80 mmHg. Conclusions Sardinian BP tables emphasizes the need to integrate the previous standards with more up-to-date and representative reports on Italian children, as periodically performed in the USA, in order to increase the number of subjects to be checked, and to obtain a national coverage better and more completely representative of every geographic area of our country.

  4. Noninvasive estimation of central venous pressure in anesthetized dogs by measurement of hepatic venous blood flow velocity and abdominal venous diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Nathan C; Drost, Wm Tod; Lerche, Phillip; Bonagura, John D

    2010-01-01

    Determination of central venous pressure (CVP) is relevant to patients with right heart disease, hypovolemia, and following intravenous fluid therapy. We hypothesized that changes in CVP in dogs could be predicted by measurements of hepatic vein diameter, caudal vena cava (CVC) diameter, and hepatic venous flow velocities. Nine healthy American Foxhounds were anesthetized. Following baseline recordings, intravenous fluids were administered to increase CVP. Volume administration created treatment periods with CVP ranges of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 mm Hg. Flow velocities in the right medial hepatic vein were recorded using pulsed wave Doppler ultrasound. Hepatic vein, CVC, and aorta diameters were determined with B-mode ultrasound. Variables were compared across the treatment periods by ANOVA for repeated measures. Relationships between CVP, Doppler, and B-mode variables were evaluated using Spearman's rank correlations, multiple linear regression, and repeated measures linear regression. The a-, S- and v-wave velocities were augmented significantly with volume loading. The best part (semipartial) correlation coefficients predicting increasing CVP were identified with v-wave velocity (0.823), S-wave velocity (-0.800), CVC diameter (0.855), and hepatic vein diameter (0.815). Multiple linear regression indicated that CVP in this study could be predicted best by a combination of CVC and hepatic vein diameter and the v-wave velocity (r = 0.928). Ultrasound imaging identified gallbladder and pancreatic edema consistently, likely related to acute volume loading. These findings may be applicable in the assessment of volume status, dogs with right heart disease, and during serial monitoring of dogs receiving fluid or diuretic therapy.

  5. Measurement uncertainty in pulmonary vascular input impedance and characteristic impedance estimated from pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasound and pressure: clinical studies on 57 pediatric patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lian; Hunter, Kendall S; Kirby, K Scott; Ivy, D Dunbar; Shandas, Robin

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular input impedance better characterizes right ventricular (RV) afterload and disease outcomes in pulmonary hypertension compared to the standard clinical diagnostic, pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). Early efforts to measure impedance were not routine, involving open-chest measurement. Recently, the use of pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler-measured velocity to non-invasively estimate instantaneous flow has made impedance measurement more practical. One critical concern remains with clinical use: the measurement uncertainty, especially since previous studies only incorporated random error. This study utilized data from a large pediatric patient population to comprehensively examine the systematic and random error contributions to the total impedance uncertainty and determined the least error prone methodology to compute impedance from among four different methods. We found that the systematic error contributes greatly to the total uncertainty and that one of the four methods had significantly smaller propagated uncertainty; however, even when this best method is used, the uncertainty can be large for input impedance at high harmonics and for the characteristic impedance modulus. Finally, we found that uncertainty in impedance between normotensive and hypertensive patient groups displays no significant difference. It is concluded that clinical impedance measurement would be most improved by advancements in instrumentation, and the best computation method is proposed for future clinical use of the input impedance. PMID:20410558

  6. CFD- and Bernoulli-based pressure drop estimates: A comparison using patient anatomies from heart and aortic valve segmentation of CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weese, Jürgen; Lungu, Angela; Peters, Jochen; Weber, Frank M; Waechter-Stehle, Irina; Hose, D Rodney

    2017-06-01

    An aortic valve stenosis is an abnormal narrowing of the aortic valve (AV). It impedes blood flow and is often quantified by the geometric orifice area of the AV (AVA) and the pressure drop (PD). Using the Bernoulli equation, a relation between the PD and the effective orifice area (EOA) represented by the area of the vena contracta (VC) downstream of the AV can be derived. We investigate the relation between the AVA and the EOA using patient anatomies derived from cardiac computed tomography (CT) angiography images and computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations. We developed a shape-constrained deformable model for segmenting the AV, the ascending aorta (AA), and the left ventricle (LV) in cardiac CT images. In particular, we designed a structured AV mesh model, trained the model on CT scans, and integrated it with an available model for heart segmentation. The planimetric AVA was determined from the cross-sectional slice with minimum AV opening area. In addition, the AVA was determined as the nonobstructed area along the AV axis by projecting the AV leaflet rims on a plane perpendicular to the AV axis. The flow rate was derived from the LV volume change. Steady-state CFD simulations were performed on the patient anatomies resulting from segmentation. Heart and valve segmentation was used to retrospectively analyze 22 cardiac CT angiography image sequences of patients with noncalcified and (partially) severely calcified tricuspid AVs. Resulting AVAs were in the range of 1-4.5 cm2 and ejection fractions (EFs) between 20 and 75%. AVA values computed by projection were smaller than those computed by planimetry, and both were strongly correlated (R2 = 0.995). EOA values computed via the Bernoulli equation from CFD-based PD results were strongly correlated with both AVA values (R2 = 0.97). EOA values were ∼10% smaller than planimetric AVA values. For EOA values < 2.0 cm2 , the EOA was up to ∼15% larger than the projected AVA. The presented segmentation algorithm

  7. Estimation of lower flammability limits of C-H compounds in air at atmospheric pressure, evaluation of temperature dependence and diluent effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendiburu, Andrés Z; de Carvalho, João A; Coronado, Christian R

    2015-03-21

    Estimation of the lower flammability limits of C-H compounds at 25 °C and 1 atm; at moderate temperatures and in presence of diluent was the objective of this study. A set of 120 C-H compounds was divided into a correlation set and a prediction set of 60 compounds each. The absolute average relative error for the total set was 7.89%; for the correlation set, it was 6.09%; and for the prediction set it was 9.68%. However, it was shown that by considering different sources of experimental data the values were reduced to 6.5% for the prediction set and to 6.29% for the total set. The method showed consistency with Le Chatelier's law for binary mixtures of C-H compounds. When tested for a temperature range from 5 °C to 100 °C, the absolute average relative errors were 2.41% for methane; 4.78% for propane; 0.29% for iso-butane and 3.86% for propylene. When nitrogen was added, the absolute average relative errors were 2.48% for methane; 5.13% for propane; 0.11% for iso-butane and 0.15% for propylene. When carbon dioxide was added, the absolute relative errors were 1.80% for methane; 5.38% for propane; 0.86% for iso-butane and 1.06% for propylene. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Pressure ulcers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reddy, Madhuri

    2011-01-01

    Unrelieved pressure or friction of the skin, particularly over bony prominences, can lead to pressure ulcers in up to one third of people in hospitals or community care, and one fifth of nursing home residents...

  9. Barometric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of alterations in barometric pressure on human beings are described. Human tolerances for gaseous environments and low and high barometric pressure are discussed, including effects on specific areas, such as the ear, lungs, teeth, and sinuses. Problems due to trapped gas within the body, high dynamic pressures on the body, and blasts are also considered.

  10. Modeling cavitation in a rapidly changing pressure field - application to a small ultrasonic horn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žnidarčič, Anton; Mettin, Robert; Dular, Matevž

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic horn transducers are frequently used in applications of acoustic cavitation in liquids. It has been observed that if the horn tip is sufficiently small and driven at high amplitude, cavitation is very strong, and the tip can be covered entirely by the gas/vapor phase for longer time intervals. A peculiar dynamics of the attached cavity can emerge with expansion and collapse at a self-generated frequency in the subharmonic range, i.e. below the acoustic driving frequency. The term "acoustic supercavitation" was proposed for this type of cavitation Žnidarčič et al. (2014) [1]. We tested several established hydrodynamic cavitation models on this problem, but none of them was able to correctly predict the flow features. As a specific characteristic of such acoustic cavitation problems lies in the rapidly changing driving pressures, we present an improved approach to cavitation modeling, which does not neglect the second derivatives in the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. Comparison with measurements of acoustic supercavitation at an ultrasonic horn of 20kHz frequency revealed a good agreement in terms of cavity dynamics, cavity volume and emitted pressure pulsations. The newly developed cavitation model is particularly suited for simulation of cavitating flow in highly fluctuating driving pressure fields. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee, David K.; Ripley, Edward B.; Nienstedt, Zachary C.; Nienstedt, Alex W.; Howell, Jr., Layton N.

    2015-09-29

    Disclosed is a passive, in-situ pressure sensor. The sensor includes a sensing element having a ferromagnetic metal and a tension inducing mechanism coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The tension inducing mechanism is operable to change a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal based on a change in pressure in the sensing element. Changes in pressure are detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal when subjected to an alternating magnetic field caused by the change in the tensile stress. The sensing element is embeddable in a closed system for detecting pressure changes without the need for any penetrations of the system for power or data acquisition by detecting changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  12. Internal pressure and solubility parameter as a function of pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdier, Sylvain Charles Roland; Andersen, Simon Ivar

    2005-01-01

    The main goal of this work was to measure the solubility parameter of a complex mixture, such as a crude oil, especially as a function of pressure. Thus, its definition is explained, as well as the main approximations generally used in literature. Then, the internal pressure is investigated, since...... it is presented as an alternative of the solubility parameter. In this work, the assumption that internal pressure is a measure of the physical solubility parameter was made, i.e. representing the dispersion and polar forces. As for the pressure influence, it was seen that internal pressure reaches a maximum...... contrary to solubility parameter. An indirect method was chosen to estimate internal pressure, using thermal expansivities (determined by microcalorimetry) and isothermal compressibilities (determined by density measurements). The uncertainty is within 2% for the expansivity and 0.1% for the density. Five...

  13. Blood pressure measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reading; Measuring blood pressure; Hypertension - blood pressure measurement; High blood pressure - blood pressure measurement ... High blood pressure has no symptoms so you may not know if you have this problem. High blood pressure ...

  14. Wrinkling of Pressurized Elastic Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Dominic; Ajdari, Amin; Vaziri, Ashkan; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2011-10-01

    We study the formation of localized structures formed by the point loading of an internally pressurized elastic shell. While unpressurized shells (such as a ping-pong ball) buckle into polygonal structures, we show that pressurized shells are subject to a wrinkling instability. We study wrinkling in depth, presenting scaling laws for the critical indentation at which wrinkling occurs and the number of wrinkles formed in terms of the internal pressurization and material properties of the shell. These results are validated by numerical simulations. We show that the evolution of the wrinkle length with increasing indentation can be understood for highly pressurized shells from membrane theory. These results suggest that the position and number of wrinkles may be used in combination to give simple methods for the estimation of the mechanical properties of highly pressurized shells.

  15. Wrinkling of Pressurized Elastic Shells

    KAUST Repository

    Vella, Dominic

    2011-10-01

    We study the formation of localized structures formed by the point loading of an internally pressurized elastic shell. While unpressurized shells (such as a ping-pong ball) buckle into polygonal structures, we show that pressurized shells are subject to a wrinkling instability. We study wrinkling in depth, presenting scaling laws for the critical indentation at which wrinkling occurs and the number of wrinkles formed in terms of the internal pressurization and material properties of the shell. These results are validated by numerical simulations. We show that the evolution of the wrinkle length with increasing indentation can be understood for highly pressurized shells from membrane theory. These results suggest that the position and number of wrinkles may be used in combination to give simple methods for the estimation of the mechanical properties of highly pressurized shells. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  16. Subharmonic Solutions of Order One-Third

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Temple H.

    2005-01-01

    Finding a periodic solution to a nonlinear ordinary differential equation is in general a difficult task. Only in a very few cases can direct methods be applied to an equation to find initial values leading to a solution of the corresponding initial value problem that is periodic. Oscillatory periodic solutions have such practical importance that…

  17. Parameter Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sales-Cruz, Mauricio; Heitzig, Martina; Cameron, Ian

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter the importance of parameter estimation in model development is illustrated through various applications related to reaction systems. In particular, rate constants in a reaction system are obtained through parameter estimation methods. These approaches often require the application...... of optimisation techniques coupled with dynamic solution of the underlying model. Linear and nonlinear approaches to parameter estimation are investigated. There is also the application of maximum likelihood principles in the estimation of parameters, as well as the use of orthogonal collocation to generate a set...... of algebraic equations as the basis for parameter estimation.These approaches are illustrated using estimations of kinetic constants from reaction system models....

  18. Preconsolidation Pressure and Creep Settlements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Grete

    1995-01-01

    of oedometer tests with undisturbed samples have been analysed by means of different methods to determine the pre-consolidation pressure. An attempt is made to estimate the creep rates on the basis of AMS 14C-datings of the sediments and a model for creep determination proposed by Moust Jacobsen....

  19. Blood Pressure Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... several blood pressure readings at home. Tracking your blood pressure readings It can be helpful in diagnosing or ... medication options might work best for you. Low blood pressure Low blood pressure that either doesn't cause ...

  20. Low Blood Pressure (Hypotension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lowest at night and rises sharply on waking. Blood pressure: How low can you go? What's considered low ... low blood pressure. Medications that can cause low blood pressure Some medications can cause low blood pressure, including: ...

  1. Statistical analysis of silo wall pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager; Berntsen, Kasper Nikolaj

    1998-01-01

    Previously published silo wall pressure measurements during plug flow of barley in alarge concrete silo are re-analysed under the hypothesis that the wall pressures are gamma-distributed.The fits of the gamma distribution type to the local pressure data from each measuring cell are satisfactory.......However, the estimated parameters of the gamma distributions turn out to be significantly inhomogeneous overthe silo wall surface. This inhomogeneity is attributed to the geometrical imperfections of the silo wall.Motivated by the engineering importance of the problem a mathematical model for constructing astochastic...... gamma-type continuous pressure field is given. The model obeys the necessary equilibrium conditionsof the wall pressure field and reflects the spatial correlation properties as estimated from simultaneouslymeasured pressures at different locations along a horizontal perimeter....

  2. Statis pressure volumes in gas wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, E.D.

    1975-09-01

    A knowledge of the pressure exerted by the column in a gas well is necessary to determine subsurface pressures in several important areas. For example, the determination of bottom-hole pressures from surface pressures is important in reserve estimates, deliverabilities, etc., in gas reservoirs. Gas-lift installations require accurate pressure information at the valve horizons for proper functioning. Gas storage reservoirs require bottom-hole pressure data to compute deliverabilities, cushion, storage volume, etc. The relevant equations for computing the gas volume in the well are given. The difference in pressure or volume is small whether computed using average temperature or including the temperature gradient. The equations given should be more accurate and are as easy to use. Comparisons are given in tabular form.

  3. Development of an earth pressure model for design of earth retaining structures in piedmont soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that earth pressure in Piedmont residual soils is typically over estimated. Such estimates of earth pressure impact the design of earth retaining structures used on highway projects. Thus, the development of an appropriate...

  4. Pressure Ratio to Thermal Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Pedro; Wang, Winston

    2012-01-01

    A pressure ratio to thermal environments (PRatTlE.pl) program is a Perl language code that estimates heating at requested body point locations by scaling the heating at a reference location times a pressure ratio factor. The pressure ratio factor is the ratio of the local pressure at the reference point and the requested point from CFD (computational fluid dynamics) solutions. This innovation provides pressure ratio-based thermal environments in an automated and traceable method. Previously, the pressure ratio methodology was implemented via a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet and macro scripts. PRatTlE is able to calculate heating environments for 150 body points in less than two minutes. PRatTlE is coded in Perl programming language, is command-line-driven, and has been successfully executed on both the HP and Linux platforms. It supports multiple concurrent runs. PRatTlE contains error trapping and input file format verification, which allows clear visibility into the input data structure and intermediate calculations.

  5. Attitude Estimation or Quaternion Estimation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markley, F. Landis

    2003-01-01

    The attitude of spacecraft is represented by a 3x3 orthogonal matrix with unity determinant, which belongs to the three-dimensional special orthogonal group SO(3). The fact that all three-parameter representations of SO(3) are singular or discontinuous for certain attitudes has led to the use of higher-dimensional nonsingular parameterizations, especially the four-component quaternion. In attitude estimation, we are faced with the alternatives of using an attitude representation that is either singular or redundant. Estimation procedures fall into three broad classes. The first estimates a three-dimensional representation of attitude deviations from a reference attitude parameterized by a higher-dimensional nonsingular parameterization. The deviations from the reference are assumed to be small enough to avoid any singularity or discontinuity of the three-dimensional parameterization. The second class, which estimates a higher-dimensional representation subject to enough constraints to leave only three degrees of freedom, is difficult to formulate and apply consistently. The third class estimates a representation of SO(3) with more than three dimensions, treating the parameters as independent. We refer to the most common member of this class as quaternion estimation, to contrast it with attitude estimation. We analyze the first and third of these approaches in the context of an extended Kalman filter with simplified kinematics and measurement models.

  6. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has high ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  7. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 ... with a spinal cord injury to do to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow Why is pressure relief ...

  8. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... know about pressure sores? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to do to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow What role does diet and hydration play in preventing pressure ...

  9. Worldwide trends in blood pressure from 1975 to 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overvad, Kim

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Raised blood pressure is an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney disease. We estimated worldwide trends in mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure, and the prevalence of, and number of people with, raised blood pressure, defined as systolic blood...... pressure of 140 mm Hg or higher or diastolic blood pressure of 90 mm Hg or higher. METHODS: For this analysis, we pooled national, subnational, or community population-based studies that had measured blood pressure in adults aged 18 years and older. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate trends...... from 1975 to 2015 in mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure, and the prevalence of raised blood pressure for 200 countries. We calculated the contributions of changes in prevalence versus population growth and ageing to the increase in the number of adults with raised blood pressure. FINDINGS...

  10. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Volume 2, Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1995-11-01

    With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1998), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the 1978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ``green field`` condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities.

  11. Estimating Utility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Simler, Kenneth R.

    2010-01-01

    an information-theoretic approach to estimating cost-of-basic-needs (CBN) poverty lines that are utility consistent. Applications to date illustrate that utility-consistent poverty measurements derived from the proposed approach and those derived from current CBN best practices often differ substantially...

  12. Auscultatory versus oscillometric measurement of blood pressure in octogenarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosholm, Jens-Ulrik; Pedersen, Sidsel Arnspang; Matzen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Auscultatory measurement using a sphygmomanometer has been the predominant method for clinical estimation of blood pressure, but it is now rapidly being replaced by oscillometric measurement.......Auscultatory measurement using a sphygmomanometer has been the predominant method for clinical estimation of blood pressure, but it is now rapidly being replaced by oscillometric measurement....

  13. Managing water pressure for water savings in developing countries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-02

    Apr 2, 2014 ... prediction of the total amount of water savings under reduced pressures, with only 6% difference between measured and estimated volume ... efficiently used for estimating water savings when a calibrated simulation model .... that under high pressure these appliances consume water faster but the volumes ...

  14. Worldwide trends in blood pressure from 1975 to 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ezzati, Majid; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background

    Raised blood pressure is an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney disease. We estimated worldwide trends in mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure, and the prevalence of, and number of people with, raised blood pressure, defined as systolic

  15. Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis as a tool to extract fishing footprints and estimate fishing pressure: application to small scale coastal fisheries and implications for management in the context of the Maritime Spatial Planning Directive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. KAVADAS

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the Maritime Spatial Planning Directive and with the intention of contributing to the implementation of a future maritime spatial plan, it was decided to analyze data from the small scale coastal fisheries sector of Greece and estimate the actual extent of its activities, which is largely unknown to date. To this end we identified the most influential components affecting coastal fishing: fishing capacity, bathymetry, distance from coast, Sea Surface Chlorophyll (Chl-a concentration, legislation, marine traffic activity, trawlers and purse seiners fishing effort and no-take zones. By means of Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA conducted through a stepwise procedure, the potential fishing footprint with the corresponding fishing intensity was derived. The method provides an innovative and cost-effective way to assess the impact of the, notoriously hard to assess, coastal fleet. It was further considered how the inclusion of all relevant anthropogenic activities (besides fishing could provide the background needed to plan future marine activities in the framework of Marine Spatial Planning (MSP and form the basis for a more realistic management approach.

  16. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Situations Talking to Your Parents - or Other Adults Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) Print ... rest temperature diet emotions posture medicines Why Is High Blood Pressure Bad? High blood pressure means a person's heart ...

  17. Sitting: pressure ulcer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, F

    Seating is a major factor in pressure ulcer development, but it is frequently overlooked in the literature on pressure area management. Pressure ulcers are largely preventable and nurses are integral to the promotion of good practice. The author examines how implementing careful patient assessment, correct positioning and providing optimum seating equipment can help to reduce the risk of pressure ulcer development.

  18. Simultaneous extraction of acetylsalicylic acid and salicylic acid from human plasma and simultaneous estimation by liquid chromatography and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/tandem mass spectrometry detection. Application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Kandikere, Vishwottam; Mudigonda, Koteshwara; Ajjala, Devender; Suraneni, Ramakrishna; Thoddi, Parthasarathi

    2011-01-01

    A simple analytical method using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in atmospheric chemical ionization mode (APCI) for the simultaneous estimation of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, CAS 50-78-2) and its active metabolite salicylic acid (SA, CAS 69-72-7) in human plasma has been developed and validated. ASA and SA were analyzed simultaneously despite differences in plasma concentration ranges of ASA and SA after oral administration of ASA. In spite of having different chemical, ionization and chromatographic properties, ASA and SA were extracted simultaneously from the plasma sample using acetonitrile protein precipitation followed by liquid-liquid extraction. The analytes were separated on a reversed phase column with rapid gradient program using mobile phase consisting of ammonium acetate buffer and methanol. The structural analogue diclofenac was used as an internal standard. The multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions m/z 179 --> 137 for ASA, m/z 137 --> 65 for SA and m/z 294 --> 250 for IS were used. The assay exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.02-10 microg/mL for ASA and 0.1-50 microg/mL for SA. The between-batch precision (%CV) ranged from 2.1 to 7.9% for ASA and from 0.2 to 5.2% for SA. The between-batch accuracy ranged from 95.4 to 96.7% for ASA and from 94.6 to 111.3% for SA. The validated method was successfully applied for the evaluation of pharmacokinetics of ASA after single oral administration of 650 mg test formulation versus two 325 mg reference formulations of ASA in human subjects.

  19. Pressure Dome for High-Pressure Electrolyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Timothy; Schmitt, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    A high-strength, low-weight pressure vessel dome was designed specifically to house a high-pressure [2,000 psi (approx. = 13.8 MPa)] electrolyzer. In operation, the dome is filled with an inert gas pressurized to roughly 100 psi (approx. = 690 kPa) above the high, balanced pressure product oxygen and hydrogen gas streams. The inert gas acts to reduce the clamping load on electrolyzer stack tie bolts since the dome pressure acting axially inward helps offset the outward axial forces from the stack gas pressure. Likewise, radial and circumferential stresses on electrolyzer frames are minimized. Because the dome is operated at a higher pressure than the electrolyzer product gas, any external electrolyzer leak prevents oxygen or hydrogen from leaking into the dome. Instead the affected stack gas stream pressure rises detectably, thereby enabling a system shutdown. All electrical and fluid connections to the stack are made inside the pressure dome and require special plumbing and electrical dome interfaces for this to be accomplished. Further benefits of the dome are that it can act as a containment shield in the unlikely event of a catastrophic failure. Studies indicate that, for a given active area (and hence, cell ID), frame outside diameter must become ever larger to support stresses at higher operating pressures. This can lead to a large footprint and increased costs associated with thicker and/or larger diameter end-plates, tie-rods, and the frames themselves. One solution is to employ rings that fit snugly around the frame. This complicates stack assembly and is sometimes difficult to achieve in practice, as its success is strongly dependent on frame and ring tolerances, gas pressure, and operating temperature. A pressure dome permits an otherwise low-pressure stack to operate at higher pressures without growing the electrolyzer hardware. The pressure dome consists of two machined segments. An O-ring is placed in an O-ring groove in the flange of the bottom

  20. Performance of Honeywell silicon pressure transducers

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    VijayKumar, K.; Joseph, A.; Desai, R.G.P.; Nagvekar, S.; Prabhudesai, S.; Damodaran, V.

    use for a variety of measurements such as atmospheric pressure; tank-water level; water level in bore-wells, dams, rivers, estuaries, and seas; depth of conductivity-temperature probe for estimation of seawater salinity and density; depth... of deployment of ocean current meters; underwater tsunami signal; ocean waves; sea level oscillations, and so forth. Pressure transducers incorporate differing sensing elements such as Bourdon tube, variable capacitance elements, resonant wire, metal alloy...

  1. Measurement of vacuum pressure with a magneto-optical trap: A pressure-rise method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Rowan W G; Lee, Lucie A; Findlay, Elizabeth A; Torralbo-Campo, Lara; Bruce, Graham D; Cassettari, Donatella

    2015-09-01

    The lifetime of an atom trap is often limited by the presence of residual background gases in the vacuum chamber. This leads to the lifetime being inversely proportional to the pressure. Here, we use this dependence to estimate the pressure and to obtain pressure rate-of-rise curves, which are commonly used in vacuum science to evaluate the performance of a system. We observe different rates of pressure increase in response to different levels of outgassing in our system. Therefore, we suggest that this is a sensitive method which will find useful applications in cold atom systems, in particular, where the inclusion of a standard vacuum gauge is impractical.

  2. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... which blood flows through blood vessels (arteries) at higher than normal pressures. Measuring Blood Pressure Blood pressure ... blood pressure are defined as having blood pressures higher than 120/80 mmHg. The following table outlines ...

  3. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood, which leads to secondary high blood pressure. Risk Factors Anyone can develop high blood pressure; however, ... history of high blood pressure can increase your risk for developing high blood pressure. Age Blood pressure ...

  4. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Back To Health Topics / High Blood Pressure High Blood Pressure Also known as Hypertension Leer en español ... vessels (arteries) at higher than normal pressures. Measuring Blood Pressure Blood pressure is the force of blood ...

  5. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / High Blood Pressure High Blood Pressure Also known as Hypertension See also Information for ... arteries) at higher than normal pressures. Measuring Blood Pressure Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing ...

  6. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Back To Health Topics / High Blood Pressure High Blood Pressure Also known as Hypertension See also Information ... vessels (arteries) at higher than normal pressures. Measuring Blood Pressure Blood pressure is the force of blood ...

  7. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Back To Health Topics / High Blood Pressure High Blood Pressure Also known as Hypertension See also Information for ... vessels (arteries) at higher than normal pressures. Measuring Blood Pressure Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing ...

  8. Management of Chronic Pressure Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) conducted a systematic review on interventions used to treat pressure ulcers in order to answer the following questions: Do currently available interventions for the treatment of pressure ulcers increase the healing rate of pressure ulcers compared with standard care, a placebo, or other similar interventions? Within each category of intervention, which one is most effective in promoting the healing of existing pressure ulcers? Background A pressure ulcer is a localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in conjunction with shear and/or friction. Many areas of the body, especially the sacrum and the heel, are prone to the development of pressure ulcers. People with impaired mobility (e.g., stroke or spinal cord injury patients) are most vulnerable to pressure ulcers. Other factors that predispose people to pressure ulcer formation are poor nutrition, poor sensation, urinary and fecal incontinence, and poor overall physical and mental health. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in Ontario has been estimated to range from a median of 22.1% in community settings to a median of 29.9% in nonacute care facilities. Pressure ulcers have been shown to increase the risk of mortality among geriatric patients by

  9. Advanced Pressure Boundary Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Shingledecker, John P [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Increasing the operating temperatures of fossil power plants is fundamental to improving thermal efficiencies and reducing undesirable emissions such as CO{sub 2}. One group of alloys with the potential to satisfy the conditions required of higher operating temperatures is the advanced ferritic steels such as ASTM Grade 91, 9Cr-2W, and 12Cr-2W. These are Cr-Mo steels containing 9-12 wt% Cr that have martensitic microstructures. Research aimed at increasing the operating temperature limits of the 9-12 wt% Cr steels and optimizing them for specific power plant applications has been actively pursued since the 1970's. As with all of the high strength martensitic steels, specifying upper temperature limits for tempering the alloys and heat treating weldments is a critical issue. To support this aspect of development, thermodynamic analysis was used to estimate how this critical temperature, the A{sub 1} in steel terminology, varies with alloy composition. The results from the thermodynamic analysis were presented to the Strength of Weldments subgroup of the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code and are being considered in establishing maximum postweld heat treatment temperatures. Experiments are also being planned to verify predictions. This is part of a CRADA project being done with Alstom Power, Inc.

  10. Preventing High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease Cholesterol Salt Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Preventing High Blood Pressure: Healthy Living Habits Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... meal and snack options can help you avoid high blood pressure and its complications. Be sure to eat plenty ...

  11. High blood pressure - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007696.htm High blood pressure - children To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. High blood pressure (hypertension) is an increase in the force of ...

  12. Blood Pressure Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    High blood pressure, also called hypertension, usually has no symptoms. But it can cause serious problems such as stroke, ... and kidney failure. If you cannot control your high blood pressure through lifestyle changes such as losing weight and ...

  13. High blood pressure - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007329.htm High blood pressure - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. High blood pressure (hypertension) is an increase in the force of ...

  14. High blood pressure medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007484.htm High blood pressure medicines To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Treating high blood pressure will help prevent problems such as heart disease, ...

  15. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it be increased? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to know about pressure sores? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to do to prevent pressure ...

  16. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... especially prone to pressure sores? play_arrow What parts of the body are most likely to develop ... play_arrow How long is the typical healing time for a pressure sore? play_arrow Why do ...

  17. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury ... do to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow What role does diet and hydration play in preventing pressure ...

  18. Pressure vessel design manual

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, Dennis R

    2013-01-01

    Pressure vessels are closed containers designed to hold gases or liquids at a pressure substantially different from the ambient pressure. They have a variety of applications in industry, including in oil refineries, nuclear reactors, vehicle airbrake reservoirs, and more. The pressure differential with such vessels is dangerous, and due to the risk of accident and fatality around their use, the design, manufacture, operation and inspection of pressure vessels is regulated by engineering authorities and guided by legal codes and standards. Pressure Vessel Design Manual is a solutions-focused guide to the many problems and technical challenges involved in the design of pressure vessels to match stringent standards and codes. It brings together otherwise scattered information and explanations into one easy-to-use resource to minimize research and take readers from problem to solution in the most direct manner possible. * Covers almost all problems that a working pressure vessel designer can expect to face, with ...

  19. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... two types of high blood pressure. Primary (essential) hypertension For most adults, there's no identifiable cause of ... tends to develop gradually over many years. Secondary hypertension Some people have high blood pressure caused by ...

  20. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow What role does diet and hydration play in preventing pressure sores ... for families facing spinal cord injuries. The website does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health ...

  1. Pressure surge attenuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Alan M.; Snyder, Kurt I.

    1985-01-01

    A pressure surge attenuation system for pipes having a fluted region opposite crushable metal foam. As adapted for nuclear reactor vessels and heads, crushable metal foam is disposed to attenuate pressure surges.

  2. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores ... how are they treated? play_arrow When is surgical repair of a pressure sore required? play_arrow ...

  3. Preventing Pressure Sores

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    Full Text Available ... Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to ...

  4. High pressure Raman scattering of silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachadorian, Sevak; Scheel, Harald; Thomsen, Christian [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Papagelis, Konstantinos [Materials Science Department, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece); Colli, Alan [Nokia Research Centre, 21 J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Ferrari, Andrea C, E-mail: khachadorian@physik.tu-berlin.de [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-13

    We study the high pressure response, up to 8 GPa, of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with {approx} 15 nm diameter, by Raman spectroscopy. The first order Raman peak shows a superlinear trend, more pronounced compared to bulk Si. Combining transmission electron microscopy and Raman measurements we estimate the SiNWs' bulk modulus and the Grueneisen parameters. We detect an increase of Raman linewidth at {approx} 4 GPa, and assign it to pressure induced activation of a decay process into LO and TA phonons. This pressure is smaller compared to the {approx} 7 GPa reported for bulk Si. We do not observe evidence of phase transitions, such as discontinuities or change in the pressure slopes, in the investigated pressure range.

  5. Tunable high pressure lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, R. V.

    1976-01-01

    Atmospheric transmission of high energy CO2 lasers is considerably improved by high pressure operation which, due to pressure broadening, permits tuning the laser lines off atmospheric absorption lines. Pronounced improvement is shown for horizontal transmission at altitudes above several kilometers and for vertical transmission through the entire atmosphere. Applications of tunable high pressure CO2 lasers to energy transmission and to remote sensing are discussed along with initial efforts in tuning high pressure CO2 lasers.

  6. High-pressure microbiology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michiels, Chris; Bartlett, Douglas Hoyt; Aertsen, Abram

    2008-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. High Hydrostatic Pressure Effects in the Biosphere: from Molecules to Microbiology * Filip Meersman and Karel Heremans . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. Effects...

  7. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholson, W R; Matthews, J. N.; O'Sullivan, J J; WREN, C.

    1993-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in adults is proving to be useful. The aim of this study was to determine if ABPM is accurate in the lower blood pressure range encountered in children and, equally important, whether it is acceptable to children. Thirty one children, between the ages of 6 and 18 years, were assessed using an ambulatory blood pressure monitor that uses an auscultatory method. Blood pressure was measured in the contralateral arm with a mercury sphygmomanometer and an...

  8. High Blood Pressure Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Heart Disease Cholesterol Salt Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN High Blood Pressure Facts Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... the facts about high blood pressure [PDF-255K] . High Blood Pressure in the United States About 75 million American ...

  9. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other risk factors, like diabetes, you may need treatment. How does high blood pressure affect pregnant women? A few women will get high blood pressure when they are pregnant. When pregnant women get high blood pressure, it is called preeclampsia or toxemia. How do I control my high ...

  10. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... six stages of a pressure sore and how are they treated? play_arrow When is surgical repair of a pressure sore required? play_arrow How long is the typical healing time for a pressure sore? play_arrow Why do ...

  11. Reservoir pressure evolution model during exploration drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korotaev B. A.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the analysis of laboratory studies and literature data the method for estimating reservoir pressure in exploratory drilling has been proposed, it allows identify zones of abnormal reservoir pressure in the presence of seismic data on reservoir location depths. This method of assessment is based on developed at the end of the XX century methods using d- and σ-exponentials taking into account the mechanical drilling speed, rotor speed, bit load and its diameter, lithological constant and degree of rocks' compaction, mud density and "regional density". It is known that in exploratory drilling pulsation of pressure at the wellhead is observed. Such pulsation is a consequence of transferring reservoir pressure through clay. In the paper the mechanism for transferring pressure to the bottomhole as well as the behaviour of the clay layer during transmission of excess pressure has been described. A laboratory installation has been built, it has been used for modelling pressure propagation to the bottomhole of the well through a layer of clay. The bulge of the clay layer is established for 215.9 mm bottomhole diameter. Functional correlation of pressure propagation through the layer of clay has been determined and a reaction of the top clay layer has been shown to have bulge with a height of 25 mm. A pressure distribution scheme (balance has been developed, which takes into account the distance from layers with abnormal pressure to the bottomhole. A balance equation for reservoir pressure evaluation has been derived including well depth, distance from bottomhole to the top of the formation with abnormal pressure and density of clay.

  12. Relating external compressing pressure to mean arterial pressure in non-invasive blood pressure measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, K Y; Panerai, R B

    2015-01-01

    Arterial volume clamping uses external compression of an artery to provide continuous non-invasive measurement of arterial blood pressure. It has been assumed that mean arterial pressure (MAP) corresponds to the point where unloading leads to the maximum oscillation of the arterial wall as reflected by photoplethysmogram (PPG), an assumption that has been challenged. Five subjects were recruited for the study (three males, mean age (SD) = 32 (15) years). The PPG waveform was analysed to identify the relationship between the external compressing pressure, PPG pulse amplitude and MAP. Two separate tests were carried out at compression step intervals of 10 mmHg and 2 mmHg, respectively. No significant differences were found between the two tests. The bias between the compressing pressure and the MAP was -4.7 ± 5.63 mmHg (p < 0.001) showing a normal distribution. Further research is needed to identify optimal algorithms for estimation of MAP using PPG associated with arterial compression.

  13. Pressure relieving support surfaces (PRESSURE) trial: cost effectiveness analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Iglesias, Cynthia; Nixon, Jane; Cranny, Gillian; Nelson, E Andrea; Hawkins, Kim; Phillips, Angela; Torgerson, David; Mason, Su; Cullum, Nicky

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the cost effectiveness of alternating pressure mattresses compared with alternating pressure overlays for the prevention of pressure ulcers in patients admitted to hospital...

  14. Pore pressure migration during hydraulic stimulation due to permeability enhancement by low-pressure subcritical fracture slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukuhira, Yusuke; Moriya, Hirokazu; Ito, Takatoshi; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Häring, Markus

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the details of pressure migration during hydraulic stimulation is important for the design of an energy extraction system and reservoir management, as well as for the mitigation of hazardous-induced seismicity. Based on microseismic and regional stress information, we estimated the pore pressure increase required to generate shear slip on an existing fracture during stimulation. Spatiotemporal analysis of pore pressure migration revealed that lower pore pressure migrates farther and faster and that higher pore pressure migrates more slowly. These phenomena can be explained by the relationship between fracture permeability and stress state criticality. Subcritical fractures experience shear slip following smaller increases of pore pressure and promote migration of pore pressure because of their enhanced permeability. The difference in migration rates between lower and higher pore pressures suggests that the optimum wellhead pressure is the one that can stimulate relatively permeable fractures, selectively. Its selection optimizes economic benefits and minimizes seismic risk.

  15. Pressure locking test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.{close_quotes} Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; the authors will publish the results of their thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions.

  16. Design and Development of a Pressure Transducer for High Hydrostatic Pressure Measurements up to 200 MPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anuj; Yadav, Sanjay; Agarwal, Ravinder

    2017-08-01

    A number of pressure transducers, based on strain gauge, capacitance/inductance type, frequency resonators, are commercially available and are being used for sensing and producing an electrical output proportional to applied pressure. These sensors have their own advantages and limitations due to operational ease, measurement uncertainty and the costs. Strain gauge type transducers are now well established devices for accurate and precise measurement of pressure within measurement uncertainty up to 0.1 % of full scale. In the present research work, an indigenous strain gauge pressure transducer has been designed, developed, tested and calibrated for pressure measurement up to 200 MPa. The measurement uncertainty estimated using the pressure transducer was found better than 0.1 % of full scale. This transducer was developed using four foil type strain gauges, bonded, two in axial direction while other two in radial direction, to the controlled stress zones of a tubular maraging steel active cylinder working also as diaphragm. The strain gages were then connected to a Wheatstone bridge arrangement to measure stress generated strains. The pressure was applied through matching connector designed in the same tubular transducer active element. The threaded unique design in a single piece through collar, ferule and tubing arrangement provides leak proof pressure connections with external devices without using additional seals. The calibration and performance checking of the pressure transducer was carried out using dead weight type national pressure standard using the internationally accepted calibration procedure.

  17. Blood Pressure Measurement: Clinic, Home, Ambulatory, and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drawz, Paul E.; Abdalla, Mohamed; Rahman, Mahboob

    2014-01-01

    Blood pressure has traditionally been measured in the clinic setting using the auscultory method and a mercury sphygmomanometer. Technological advances have led to improvements in measuring clinic blood pressure and allowed for measuring blood pressures outside the clinic. This review outlines various methods for evaluating blood pressure and the clinical utility of each type of measurement. Home blood pressures and 24 hour ambulatory blood pressures have improved our ability to evaluate risk for target organ damage and hypertension related morbidity and mortality. Measuring home blood pressures may lead to more active participation in health care by patients and has the potential to improve blood pressure control. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring enables the measuring nighttime blood pressures and diurnal changes, which may be the most accurate predictors of risk associated with elevated blood pressure. Additionally, reducing nighttime blood pressure is feasible and may be an important component of effective antihypertensive therapy. Finally, estimating central aortic pressures and pulse wave velocity are two of the newer methods for assessing blood pressure and hypertension related target organ damage. PMID:22521624

  18. Dynamics of intrarenal pressures and glomerular filtration rate after acetazolamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leyssac, P P; Karlsen, F M; Skøtt, O

    1991-01-01

    The dynamics of intrarenal pressures, early distal tubular fluid conductivity (EDC), and renal flood flow (RBF) were studied in rats given acetazolamide (ACZ), an inhibitor of proximal reabsorption. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and end-proximal flow were estimated by clearances of 51Cr......-EDTA and lithium. Proximal tubular pressure (Pprox) increased initially by 1.7 +/- 0.1 mmHg after ACZ, causing a decrease in the hydrostatic pressure difference across the glomerular membrane (delta P). EDC increased, and then RBF, glomerular capillary pressure (Pgc), Pprox, and star vessel pressures (Psv) dropped...

  19. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Un [Ithaca, NY; Gruner, Sol M [Ithaca, NY

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  20. Thermistor Pressure Gauge Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanick, A. P.; Ainsworth, J. E.

    1961-01-01

    Thermistor pressure gauges are characterized by large pressure range, good accuracy and stability, fast measurement, insensitivity to over-pressure, negligible out-gassing, ease in cleaning, and physical and electrical simplicity and ruggedness. A number of excellent papers have been published describing these gauges. However, a detailed account of design procedure and characteristics for a specific gauge would eliminate much of the trial and error encountered in designing a gauge having prescribed range, sensitivity, and stability.

  1. Thermal pressure in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Dion L.

    1990-07-01

    Estimation of the thermal elastic effect is necessary for the calibration of the pressure and temperature conditions during laser-heated diamond anvil cell experiments, since above 800K, the standard technique of using ruby florescence to measure pressure fails. Continuum calculations based upon the thermoelastic equations for an elastic medium were used to estimate the thermal pressure resulting from a radially symmetric temperature gradient in an elastic sphere with zero displacement on its surface. This calculation corresponds to the thermal pressure generated in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell sample that is compressed without a pressure medium. This solution must fall between circumstances where the sample is held at constant pressure and where the sample is held at constant volume. It is shown here that the thermal pressure in an elastic medium with a Gaussian temperature gradient is approximately 40-60% of the thermodynamic value of the thermal pressure in a material raised to some constant temperature with the volume constrained to be constant. Even though the thermal pressure correction can be significant in terms of the total pressure that the sample experiences, these calculations indicate that the correction can be estimated to approximately 10%.

  2. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... complications. Preventing High Blood Pressure Onset Healthy lifestyle habits can help prevent high blood pressure from developing. It is important to check your blood pressure regularly. Children should have their blood pressure checked starting at ...

  3. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... those used to diagnose high blood pressure, prehypertension can progress to high blood pressure and should be ... pressure weakens and damages your blood vessels, which can lead to complications . Types of High Blood Pressure ...

  4. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can help you track your blood pressure. Pregnancy Planning High blood pressure can cause problems for mother ... View all news on High Blood Pressure RELATED EVENT The Role of Microbiota in Blood Pressure Regulation ...

  5. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pressures. Measuring Blood Pressure Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing against the walls of the ... blood pressure, sometimes called hypertension, happens when this force is too high. Health care workers check blood ...

  6. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood pressure and should be taken seriously. Over time, consistently high blood pressure weakens and damages your ... Blood Pressure When blood pressure stays high over time, it can damage the body and cause complications. ...

  7. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Card can help you track your blood pressure. Pregnancy Planning High blood pressure can cause problems for ... control your blood pressure before and during the pregnancy. Some women develop high blood pressure during pregnancy. ...

  8. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the development of high blood pressure later in life. Environmental Causes of High Blood Pressure Environmental causes ... Tend to get high blood pressure earlier in life. Often, on average, have higher blood pressure numbers. ...

  9. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sensor, and a blood pressure cuff. With this equipment, they measure: Systolic Pressure: blood pressure when the ... or at other locations that have blood pressure equipment and to keep a written log of all ...

  10. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and large arteries, which can affect blood pressure. Genetic Causes of High Blood Pressure Much of the ... involved in high blood pressure has come from genetic studies. High blood pressure often runs in families. ...

  11. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or its complications. Preventing High Blood Pressure Onset Healthy lifestyle habits can help prevent high blood pressure from developing. It is important to check your blood pressure regularly. Children should have their blood pressure checked starting at ...

  12. Pressurizing new reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neill, J.S.

    1956-01-30

    The Technical Division was asked recently to consider designs for new reactors that would add 8000 MW capacity to the Savannah River Plant. One modification of the existing SRP design that would enable a higher power rating, and therefore require fewer new reactors, is an increase in the maximum pressure in the D{sub 2}O system. The existing reactors at SRP are designed for a maximum pressure in the gas plenum of only 5 psig. Higher pressures enable higher D{sub 2} temperatures and higher sheath temperatures without local boiling or burnout. The requirements in reactor cooling facilities at any given power level would therefore be reduced by pressurizing.

  13. An Atmospheric Pressure Ping-Pong ``Ballometer''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazachkov, Alexander; Kryuchkov, Dmitriy; Willis, Courtney; Moore, John C.

    2006-11-01

    Classroom experiments on atmospheric pressure focus largely on demonstrating its existence, often in a most impressive way. A series of amusing physics demonstrations is widely known and practiced by educators teaching the topic. However, measuring the value of atmospheric pressure (Patm) is generally done in a rather mundane way, simply by reading some commercially produced meter. Even though students building a 35-ft high water barometer1,2 is definitely instructive, as is the measurement of Patm with much smaller gas-filled devices,3,4 there exist hardly any physics lab exercises focused on the measurement of atmospheric pressure. This paper describes a modification of a well-known physics demonstration into an experiment that allows one to estimate atmospheric pressure quite accurately. Our simple and inexpensive apparatus can be used in lecture demonstrations or as a tool in an educational laboratory setting.

  14. Pressurized subsampling system for pressured gas-hydrate-bearing sediment: Microscale imaging using X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Yusuke, E-mail: u-jin@aist.go.jp; Konno, Yoshihiro; Nagao, Jiro [Production Technology Team, Methane Hydrate Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Sapporo 062-8517 (Japan)

    2014-09-01

    A pressurized subsampling system was developed for pressured gas hydrate (GH)-bearing sediments, which have been stored under pressure. The system subsamples small amounts of GH sediments from cores (approximately 50 mm in diameter and 300 mm in height) without pressure release to atmospheric conditions. The maximum size of the subsamples is 12.5 mm in diameter and 20 mm in height. Moreover, our system transfers the subsample into a pressure vessel, and seals the pressure vessel by screwing in a plug under hydraulic pressure conditions. In this study, we demonstrated pressurized subsampling from artificial xenon-hydrate sediments and nondestructive microscale imaging of the subsample, using a microfocus X-ray computed tomography (CT) system. In addition, we estimated porosity and hydrate saturation from two-dimensional X-ray CT images of the subsamples.

  15. Capital Cost: Pressurized Water Reactor Plant Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-01

    The investment cost study for the 1139-MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) central station power plant consists of two volumes. This volume includes in addition to the foreword and summary, the plant description and the detailed cost estimate.

  16. EIT-Based Fabric Pressure Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents EIT-based fabric sensors that aim to provide a pressure mapping using the current carrying and voltage sensing electrodes attached to the boundary of the fabric patch. Pressure-induced shape change over the sensor area makes a change in the conductivity distribution which can be conveyed to the change of boundary current-voltage data. This boundary data is obtained through electrode measurements in EIT system. The corresponding inverse problem is to reconstruct the pressure and deformation map from the relationship between the applied current and the measured voltage on the fabric boundary. Taking advantage of EIT in providing dynamical images of conductivity changes due to pressure induced shape change, the pressure map can be estimated. In this paper, the EIT-based fabric sensor was presented for circular and rectangular sensor geometry. A stretch sensitive fabric was used in circular sensor with 16 electrodes and a pressure sensitive fabric was used in a rectangular sensor with 32 electrodes. A preliminary human test was carried out with the rectangular sensor for foot pressure mapping showing promising results.

  17. DIGITAL BLOOD PRESSURE MONITOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Fuentes

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present a blood pressure monitor which measures both the high blood pressure (systolic pressure,and the low blood pressure (diastolic pressure. It is a semiautomatic meter because the inflation of the occlusivecuff is carried out in a manual way. The transducer used is a piezoresistive silicon pressure sensor integrated onchip which provides a proportional voltage to the input pressure, with a measurement range from 0 to 50 kPa (0–7.3 PSI. The oscillometric method is employed, which consists on detecting the oscillometric signal on brachialartery, being processed at each pressure step, when the cuff is gradually deflated. Signal sampling is carried out ata rate determined by the heart rate.In order to program the digital electronics of the circuit we used Altera tools, with the compiler MAX-PLUS II, andthe device selected to implement the design was an EPM7128SLC84-15 CPLD (Complex Programmable LogicDevice

  18. Clamp Restrains Pressure Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliberti, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Safety restraint protects people and property if a high-pressure fitting fails. As long as pressure line remains attached at the fitting, clamp exerts essentially no force on hose. If fitting fails, force of fluid leaving free end of hose causes the cam on the clamp to compress hose with a positive locking action.

  19. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can it be increased? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to know about pressure sores? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to do to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow ...

  20. A life under pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings; von Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Microvessels live 'a life under pressure' in several ways. In a literal sense, vessels of the microcirculation are exposed to high levels of stress caused primarily by the intravascular pressure head. In a figurative sense, the individual vessel and the microvascular network as a whole must...

  1. Model-Based, Noninvasive Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Identification, and Model Reduction in Biomedicine. Invited keynote lecture. IV Congress of Applied, Computational and Industrial Mathematics, Society for...Verghese. Model-based estimation of intracranial pressure and cere- brovascular autoregulation. Computers in Cardiology 35:369-371, 2008. [3] FM Kashif...of arterial blood pressure pulses. Computers in Cardiology 30:259-262, 2003. [7] IT Hwang. Frequency-domain model-based intracranial pressure

  2. Pulse pressure and diurnal blood pressure variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Søren Tang; Poulsen, Per Løgstrup; Hansen, Klavs Würgler

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In nondiabetic subjects pulse pressure (PP) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease and microalbuminuria. Reduced circadian blood pressure (BP) variation is a potential risk factor for the development of diabetic complications. We investigated the association between...... retinopathy, nephropathy, macrovascular disease, PP, and diurnal BP variation in a group of type 2 diabetic patients. METHODS: In 80 type 2 diabetic patients we performed 24-h ambulatory BP (AMBP) and fundus photographs. Urinary albumin excretion was evaluated by urinary albumin/creatinine ratio. Presence...... or absence of macrovascular disease was assessed by an independent physician. RESULTS: Forty-nine patients had no detectable retinal changes (grade 1), 13 had grade 2 retinopathy, and 18 had more advanced retinopathy (grades 3-6). Compared to patients without retinopathy (grade 1), patients with grades 2...

  3. Pressure Ulcers Surveillance Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Esin Gencer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pressure ulcer is a chronic wound. It reduces the quality of life of the elderly and individuals with restricted range of motion. It prolongs hospital stay and increases the risk of complications. The cost is quite high. Preventive actions for the prevention of pressure ulcers should be developed. Planning protocols and standards of care are among the main targets. Material and Method: Research was conducted in one-year period between 2012 May and 2013 May on patients who were followed up in Akdeniz University Hospital clinics and intensive care unit with pressure ulcers. The research population consisted of 569 patients. Patient data were recorded in SPSS 16 for Windows program. Statistical analyzes were performed with retrospective methods. The demographic characteristics of patients with pressure ulcers were analyzed as frequency and descriptive statistics. Prevalence and incidence of one year were calculated. Results: Of the patients, 58% were males, 42% were females. Of the patients, 36% were in the age range of 61-80 years, and their average length of stay was 42,9 days. Of the patients, 70% were at stage 2 and 3. In 15% of patients pressure ulcers occurred on the first day of hospitalization. Pressure ulcers were developed between days 2 and 10 in 59% of the patients. Prevalence rate was 2.5%, the incidence was 1.9%, the prevalence rate was 5.9% in the intensive care unit. Conclusion: It is easier to prevent pressure ulcers than treating.

  4. Superconductivity under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaya, K.; Shimizu, K.; Takeda, K.; Tateiwa, N.; Muramatsu, T.; Ishizuka, M.; Kobayashi, T.C

    2003-05-01

    In part 1, we review techniques developed in our laboratory for producing the complex extreme condition of very low temperature and ultra-high pressure and those for measuring electrical resistance and magnetization of the sample confined in the extremely small space of the used pressure cell. In part 2, we review our experimental results in search for pressure-induced superconductivity, which have been obtained by the use of developed techniques. Typical examples are shown in the case of simple inorganic and organic molecular crystals, ionic crystals, and magnetic metals.

  5. High pressure induced superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaya, K.; Shimizu, K

    2003-10-15

    We have developed complex extreme condition of very low temperature down to 30 mK and ultra high pressure exceeding 200 GPa by assembling compact diamond anvil cell (DAC) on a powerful {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He dilution refrigerator. We have also developed measuring techniques of electrical resistance, magnetization and optical measurement for the sample confined in the sample space of the DAC. Using the newly developed apparatus and techniques, we have searched for superconductivity in various materials under pressure. In this paper, we will shortly review our newly developed experimental apparatus and techniques and discuss a few examples of pressure induced superconductivity which were observed recently.

  6. On output measurements via radiation pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeman, S.; Healey, A.J.; Forsberg, F.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown, by simple physical argument, that measurements of intensity with a radiation pressure balance should not agree with those based on calorimetric techniques. The conclusion is ultimately a consequence of the circumstance that radiation pressure measurements relate to wave momentum, while...... calorimetric methods relate to wave energy. Measurements with some typical ultrasound fields are performed with a novel type of hydrophone, and these allow an estimate to be made of the magnitude of the discrepancy to be expected between the two types of output measurement in a typical case....

  7. Oscillometric blood pressure: a review for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Bruce S; Quinn, David; Gallick, David

    2014-12-01

    Oscillometric devices for the non-invasive estimation of blood pressure (BP) have become the "clinical standard" because of training requirements for determination of BP by auscultation, cost, and the phasing-out/banning of mercury in many states and countries. Analysis of recent publications reveals a lack of understanding of the "meaning" of oscillometric blood pressure (OBP) measurements by authors, journal editors, and clinicians. We were invited to submit a review of OBP methodology written for clinicians. We hope that the material contained herein will clarify how clinicians should interpret OBP values for their patients. Copyright © 2014 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pressure Safety Orientation Live #769

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, George [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-17

    Pressure Safety Orientation (course #769) introduces workers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to the Laboratory Pressure Safety Program and to pressure-related hazards. This course also affords a hands-on exercise involving the assembly of a simple pressure system. This course is required for all LANL personnel who work on or near pressure systems and are exposed to pressure-related hazards. These personnel include pressure-system engineers, designers, fabricators, installers, operators, inspectors, maintainers, and others who work with pressurized fluids and may be exposed to pressure-related hazards.

  9. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to Home Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS Coping with ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ...

  10. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to Home Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS Coping with ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ...

  11. Increased intracranial pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by pressing on important structures and by restricting blood flow into the brain. Many conditions can increase intracranial pressure. Common causes include: Aneurysm rupture and subarachnoid hemorrhage Brain tumor Encephalitis Head ...

  12. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David ...

  13. Preventing Pressure Sores

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    Full Text Available ... Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores ... sores? What is a Spinal Cord Injury? SCI Medical Experts People Living With SCI Personal Experiences By ...

  14. Pressure Transducer Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Files are located here, defining the locations of the pressure transducers on the HIRENASD model. These locations also correspond to the locations that analysts...

  15. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury ... Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to Home Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS Coping with a New ...

  16. Gasoline Reid Vapor Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA regulates the vapor pressure of gasoline sold at retail stations during the summer ozone season to reduce evaporative emissions from gasoline that contribute to ground-level ozone and diminish the effects of ozone-related health problems.

  17. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from ... Rosenberg, PsyD Understanding SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa ...

  18. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing ...

  19. Preventing Pressure Sores

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    Full Text Available ... About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores Adult Injuries ... LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert Videos Contact Us Personal Experience Videos Blog Videos By ...

  20. Understanding Blood Pressure Readings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facts About HBP • Know Your Numbers Introduction Hypertensive Crisis Monitoring Your Blood Pressure At ... to lower your HBP and prevent a heart attack. Lower your HBP now . Watch, Learn and ...

  1. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to Home Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS Coping with a ... Understanding SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS ...

  2. High Blood Pressure Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High Blood Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN High Blood Pressure Fact Sheet Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ... time. High blood pressure is also called hypertension. High Blood Pressure in the United States Having high blood pressure ...

  3. Home monitoring of blood pressure

    OpenAIRE

    McGrath, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    Home blood pressure monitoring is the self-measurement of blood pressure by patients. In the diagnosis and management of high blood pressure it is complementary to 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and clinic blood pressure measurements. Home monitoring can also help to identify white-coat and masked hypertension.

  4. Pressure multiplying dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFord, Henry S.; Moss, Owen R.

    1986-01-01

    A pressure multiplying dispenser for delivering fluid, preferably as a spray to the atmosphere, from a source of fluid, preferably a spray bottle, is described. The dispenser includes in combination a hollow cylindrical member, a nozzle delivery tube within the cylindrical member and a hollow actuator piston slideable within the cylindrical member which acts to multiply the pressure of a squeeze applied to the spray bottle.

  5. The sodium chloride primary pressure gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, A. L.; Chhabildas, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    The failure of a central force model for sodium chloride is discussed. It is noted that it does not closely satisfy the Cauchy conditions at low temperatures, and that it fails the central force requirement of the Love condition. The available shock data for sodium chloride and its analysis is examined, and two reasons why the Hugoniot transformation pressure is likely to be less than 231 kbar are discussed. The important (but unjustified) theoretical assumptions made in converting Hugoniot to isothermal data is discussed; it is noted that serious error can enter for very large pressures for a given material and that at such high pressures the isothermal data should thus be considered only semiquantitative even if the Hugoniot data itself is accurate. An alternate method of estimating the isothermal transformation pressure from the Hugoniot transformation pressure is used. This method is based on the temperature derivative of the transformation pressure. On this basis it is concluded that an upper bound for the isothermal transformation of NaCl (to a CsCl-type structure) at room temperature is 257 kbar; it is noted that the actual value may be considerably less than this.

  6. Fluctuating shells under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulose, Jayson; Vliegenthart, Gerard A.; Gompper, Gerhard; Nelson, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal fluctuations strongly modify the large length-scale elastic behavior of cross-linked membranes, giving rise to scale-dependent elastic moduli. Whereas thermal effects in flat membranes are well understood, many natural and artificial microstructures are modeled as thin elastic shells. Shells are distinguished from flat membranes by their nonzero curvature, which provides a size-dependent coupling between the in-plane stretching modes and the out-of-plane undulations. In addition, a shell can support a pressure difference between its interior and its exterior. Little is known about the effect of thermal fluctuations on the elastic properties of shells. Here, we study the statistical mechanics of shape fluctuations in a pressurized spherical shell, using perturbation theory and Monte Carlo computer simulations, explicitly including the effects of curvature and an inward pressure. We predict novel properties of fluctuating thin shells under point indentations and pressure-induced deformations. The contribution due to thermal fluctuations increases with increasing ratio of shell radius to thickness and dominates the response when the product of this ratio and the thermal energy becomes large compared with the bending rigidity of the shell. Thermal effects are enhanced when a large uniform inward pressure acts on the shell and diverge as this pressure approaches the classical buckling transition of the shell. Our results are relevant for the elasticity and osmotic collapse of microcapsules. PMID:23150558

  7. High-pressure microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjort, K.

    2015-03-01

    When using appropriate materials and microfabrication techniques, with the small dimensions the mechanical stability of microstructured devices allows for processes at high pressures without loss in safety. The largest area of applications has been demonstrated in green chemistry and bioprocesses, where extraction, synthesis and analyses often excel at high densities and high temperatures. This is accessible through high pressures. Capillary chemistry has been used since long but, just like in low-pressure applications, there are several potential advantages in using microfluidic platforms, e.g., planar isothermal set-ups, large local variations in geometries, dense form factors, small dead volumes and precisely positioned microstructures for control of reactions, catalysis, mixing and separation. Other potential applications are in, e.g., microhydraulics, exploration, gas driven vehicles, and high-pressure science. From a review of the state-of-art and frontiers of high pressure microfluidics, the focus will be on different solutions demonstrated for microfluidic handling at high pressures and challenges that remain.

  8. Bladder pressure monitoring during intermittent catheterization: a comparison of gauges and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Corri L; Walter, James S; Lucero, Yuonne; Wheeler, John S; Damaser, Margot S

    2003-01-01

    We previously have investigated a technique for serial bladder pressure measurements in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) using intermittent catheterization. In the current study, we compared an FDA-approved digital gauge with the previously studied analog gauge and studied the effects of hydrostatic pressure differences. Either a digital or an analog pressure gauge was attached to each subject's catheter just before bladder catheterization. Both immediate and stable pressures were recorded. The bladder was then drained until nearly empty and pressure was again recorded (almost empty bladder pressure). Detrusor pressure was estimated as full minus almost empty bladder pressure. Bladder pressures greater than 40 cm H2O were presumed to represent bladder contractions. To investigate the effects of hydrostatic pressure, additional measurements, adjusting the level of the air-urine meniscus, were obtained in three subjects. Recordings were made from nine SCI subjects using both gauges. Estimates of detrusor pressure, with and without bladder contractions, and associated bladder volumes, were not significantly different between digital and analog gauges. In the absence of bladder contractions, detrusor pressure with the meniscus at the end of the catheter (5 +/- 1 cm H2O) was significantly lower than that recorded with no adjustment of the urine meniscus (12 +/- 1 cm H2O). Standardizing measurement techniques to equalize hydrostatic pressures should facilitate reliable estimates of detrusor pressure. Frequent monitoring of bladder pressure using this technique may assist with the urological care of SCI patients.

  9. Correction of static pressure on a research aircraft in accelerated flight using differential pressure measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Rodi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A method is described that estimates the error in the static pressure measurement on an aircraft from differential pressure measurements on the hemispherical surface of a Rosemount model 858AJ air velocity probe mounted on a boom ahead of the aircraft. The theoretical predictions for how the pressure should vary over the surface of the hemisphere, involving an unknown sensitivity parameter, leads to a set of equations that can be solved for the unknowns – angle of attack, angle of sideslip, dynamic pressure and the error in static pressure – if the sensitivity factor can be determined. The sensitivity factor was determined on the University of Wyoming King Air research aircraft by comparisons with the error measured with a carefully designed sonde towed on connecting tubing behind the aircraft – a trailing cone – and the result was shown to have a precision of about ±10 Pa over a wide range of conditions, including various altitudes, power settings, and gear and flap extensions. Under accelerated flight conditions, geometric altitude data from a combined Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS and inertial measurement unit (IMU system are used to estimate acceleration effects on the error, and the algorithm is shown to predict corrections to a precision of better than ±20 Pa under those conditions. Some limiting factors affecting the precision of static pressure measurement on a research aircraft are discussed.

  10. Ensemble estimators for multivariate entropy estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sricharan, Kumar; Wei, Dennis; Hero, Alfred O

    2013-07-01

    The problem of estimation of density functionals like entropy and mutual information has received much attention in the statistics and information theory communities. A large class of estimators of functionals of the probability density suffer from the curse of dimensionality, wherein the mean squared error (MSE) decays increasingly slowly as a function of the sample size T as the dimension d of the samples increases. In particular, the rate is often glacially slow of order O(T(-)(γ)(/)(d) ), where γ > 0 is a rate parameter. Examples of such estimators include kernel density estimators, k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) density estimators, k-NN entropy estimators, intrinsic dimension estimators and other examples. In this paper, we propose a weighted affine combination of an ensemble of such estimators, where optimal weights can be chosen such that the weighted estimator converges at a much faster dimension invariant rate of O(T(-1)). Furthermore, we show that these optimal weights can be determined by solving a convex optimization problem which can be performed offline and does not require training data. We illustrate the superior performance of our weighted estimator for two important applications: (i) estimating the Panter-Dite distortion-rate factor and (ii) estimating the Shannon entropy for testing the probability distribution of a random sample.

  11. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pressure and maintain normal blood pressure readings. Healthy Eating To help treat high blood pressure, health care ... more about the DASH eating plan. Heart-Healthy Eating Your health care provider also may recommend heart- ...

  12. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can help you track your blood pressure. Pregnancy Planning High blood pressure can cause problems for mother ... With DASH My Blood Pressure Wallet Card Other Resources Cigarette and Tobacco Facts (National Institute ... OIG USA.gov

  13. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... nervous system has important functions in blood pressure regulation, including heart rate, blood pressure, and breathing rate. ... EVENT The Role of Microbiota in Blood Pressure Regulation Executive Summary June 10, 2016 Bethesda, MD The ...

  14. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... providers diagnose high blood pressure when blood pressure readings are consistently 140/90 mmHg or above. Confirming ... minutes before the test. To track blood pressure readings over a period of time, the health care ...

  15. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nervous System Activity The sympathetic nervous system has important functions in blood pressure regulation, including heart rate, ... prevent high blood pressure from developing. It is important to check your blood pressure regularly. Children should ...

  16. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure For most patients, health care providers ... are consistently 140/90 mmHg or above. Confirming High Blood Pressure A blood pressure test is easy ...

  17. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood pressure. Primary High Blood Pressure Primary, or essential, high blood pressure is the most common type ... has no known cause, it might be called essential hypertension, primary hypertension, or idiopathic (id-ee-o- ...

  18. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood pressure, he or she can order additional tests to determine if your blood pressure is due to other conditions or medicines or if you have primary high blood pressure. ...

  19. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of your blood pressure, he or she can order additional tests to determine if your blood pressure ... health and can lower high blood pressure. Stress management techniques include: Being physically active Listening to music ...

  20. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure For most patients, health care providers diagnose ... consistently 140/90 mmHg or above. Confirming High Blood Pressure A blood pressure test is easy and ...

  1. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... increase your risk for developing high blood pressure. Age Blood pressure tends to rise with age. About 65 percent of Americans age 60 or older have high blood pressure. However, ...

  2. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... harder and leading to high blood pressure. Medicines Prescription medicines such as asthma or hormone therapies, including ... aldosterone system leading to high blood pressure. Other Medical Causes of High Blood Pressure Other medical causes ...

  3. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your blood pressure returns to your normal baseline range. Blood pressure normally rises with age and body ... 160 or higher OR 100 or higher The ranges in the table are blood pressure guides for ...

  4. Control Performance of Vehicle Abs Featuring ER Valve Pressure Modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, M. S.; Choi, S. B.; Wereley, N. M.

    In this work, an electrically controllable anti-lock brake system (ABS) for passenger vehicle is developed by utilizing electrorheological (ER) fluid. A pressure modulator which consists of a cylindrical ER valve and the hydraulic booster is constructed in order to achieve sufficient brake pressure variation during ABS operation. The principal design parameters of the modulator are determined by considering ER properties as well as required braking pressure. After investigating pressure controllability of the modulator, a vehicle model which is integrated with the proposed pressure modulator is formulated to design yaw rate controller. A sliding mode controller is designed to obtain desired yaw rate, and the friction forces between roads and wheels are estimated via the estimator. Braking performances of the proposed ABS under various roads are evaluated through the hardware-in-the-loop-simulation (HILS) and the steering stability during braking operation is demonstrated by undertaking split-μ test.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of Intensive Blood Pressure Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richman, Ilana B; Fairley, Michael; Jørgensen, Mads Emil

    2016-01-01

    -effectiveness of intensive blood pressure management among 68-year-old high-risk adults with hypertension but not diabetes. We used the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) to estimate treatment effects and adverse event rates. We used Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Life Tables to project age......Importance: Among high-risk patients with hypertension, targeting a systolic blood pressure of 120 mm Hg reduces cardiovascular morbidity and mortality compared with a higher target. However, intensive blood pressure management incurs additional costs from treatment and from adverse events....... Objective: To evaluate the incremental cost-effectiveness of intensive blood pressure management compared with standard management. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cost-effectiveness analysis conducted from September 2015 to August 2016 used a Markov cohort model to estimate cost...

  6. A note on measurement of sound pressure with intensity probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Peter; Jacobsen, Finn

    2004-01-01

    be improved under a variety of realistic sound field conditions by applying a different weighting of the two pressure signals from the probe. The improved intensity probe can measure the sound pressure more accurately at high frequencies than an ordinary sound intensity probe or an ordinary sound level meter......The effect of scattering and diffraction on measurement of sound pressure with "two-microphone" sound intensity probes is examined using an axisymmetric boundary element model of the probe. Whereas it has been shown a few years ago that the sound intensity estimated with a two-microphone probe...... is reliable up to 10 kHz when using 0.5 in. microphones in the usual face-to-face arrangement separated by a 12 mm spacer, the sound pressure measured with the same instrument will typically be underestimated at high frequencies. It is shown in this paper that the estimate of the sound pressure can...

  7. Pressure pain thresholds in volunteers and herniorrhaphy patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, J B; Rosenberg, J; Molke Jensen, F

    1990-01-01

    Pressure algometry is a method to estimate pressure pain sensitivity in tissues. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the reproducibility of pressure pain thresholds (PPT) in the abdominal integument and to evaluate the use of pressure algometry as a measure of wound tenderness following...... surgery. PPT was determined in 20 healthy volunteers on two separate examinations, and in 14 patients at the incisional site before and following inguinal herniotomy. In volunteers, PPT was higher for men than for women, and no difference was observed between the first and second day of examination...

  8. On the Responses of Azeotropes to Pressure Variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildskov, Jens; O’Connell, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Systems with azeotropes cannot be separated by simple distillation since the vapor and liquid compositions are the same. Variation of the applied pressure can shift the azeotropic composition out of the range of purification of a single column or may allow pressure swing operation of two columns....... Because of the sensitivity of column size to accurate estimates of the relative volatility, it is important to use reliable phase equilibrium thermodynamics when exploring the possibility of varying pressure to avoid an azeotrope. Based on an analysis of the pressure sensitivity of azeotropic compositions...

  9. Beat-to-Beat Blood Pressure Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Jin

    2012-01-01

    This device provides non-invasive beat-to-beat blood pressure measurements and can be worn over the upper arm for prolonged durations. Phase and waveform analyses are performed on filtered proximal and distal photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveforms obtained from the brachial artery. The phase analysis is used primarily for the computation of the mean arterial pressure, while the waveform analysis is used primarily to obtain the pulse pressure. Real-time compliance estimate is used to refine both the mean arterial and pulse pressures to provide the beat-to-beat blood pressure measurement. This wearable physiological monitor can be used to continuously observe the beat-to-beat blood pressure (B3P). It can be used to monitor the effect of prolonged exposures to reduced gravitational environments and the effectiveness of various countermeasures. A number of researchers have used pulse wave velocity (PWV) of blood in the arteries to infer the beat-to-beat blood pressure. There has been documentation of relative success, but a device that is able to provide the required accuracy and repeatability has not yet been developed. It has been demonstrated that an accurate and repeatable blood pressure measurement can be obtained by measuring the phase change (e.g., phase velocity), amplitude change, and distortion of the PPG waveforms along the brachial artery. The approach is based on comparing the full PPG waveform between two points along the artery rather than measuring the time-of-flight. Minimizing the measurement separation and confining the measurement area to a single, well-defined artery allows the waveform to retain the general shape between the two measurement points. This allows signal processing of waveforms to determine the phase and amplitude changes.

  10. Pressure Effect on Entrance Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jens Horslund; Couch, Mark

    1997-01-01

    The paper reports on experimentally determined pressure drops associated with orifice and capillary dies, where the exit pressure is elevated. The effect of hydrostatic pressure up to 70 MPa is reported for PS, LDPE and PP melts.......The paper reports on experimentally determined pressure drops associated with orifice and capillary dies, where the exit pressure is elevated. The effect of hydrostatic pressure up to 70 MPa is reported for PS, LDPE and PP melts....

  11. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... System Activity The sympathetic nervous system has important functions in blood pressure regulation, including heart rate, blood pressure, and breathing rate. Researchers are ...

  12. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... increased blood volumes and high blood pressure. Sympathetic Nervous System Activity The sympathetic nervous system has important functions in blood pressure regulation, including ...

  13. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... outlines and defines high blood pressure severity levels. Stages of High Blood Pressure in Adults Stages Systolic (top number) Diastolic (bottom number) Prehypertension 120– ...

  14. Dietary phosphorus and blood pressure: international study of macro- and micro-nutrients and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Paul; Kesteloot, Hugo; Appel, Lawrence J; Dyer, Alan R; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Chan, Queenie; Brown, Ian J; Zhao, Liancheng; Stamler, Jeremiah

    2008-03-01

    Raised blood pressure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide; improved nutritional approaches to population-wide prevention are required. Few data are available on dietary phosphorus and blood pressure and none are available on possible combined effects of phosphorus, magnesium, and calcium on blood pressure. The International Study of Macro- and Micro-Nutrients and Blood Pressure is a cross-sectional epidemiologic study of 4680 men and women ages 40 to 59 from 17 population samples in Japan, China, United Kingdom, and United States. Blood pressure was measured 8 times at 4 visits. Dietary intakes were obtained from four 24-hour recalls plus data on supplement use. Dietary phosphorus was inversely associated with blood pressure in a series of predefined multiple regression models, with the successive addition of potential confounders, both nondietary and dietary. Estimated blood pressure differences per 232 mg/1000 kcal (2 SD) of higher dietary phosphorus were -1.1 to -2.3 mm Hg systolic/-0.6 to -1.5 mm Hg diastolic (n=4680) and -1.6 to -3.5 mm Hg systolic/-0.8 to -1.8 mm Hg diastolic for 2238 "nonintervened" individuals, ie, those without special diet/nutritional supplements or diagnosis/treatment for cardiovascular disease or diabetes. Dietary calcium and magnesium, correlated with phosphorus (partial r=0.71 and r=0.68), were inversely associated with blood pressure. Blood pressures were lower by 1.9 to 4.2 mm Hg systolic/1.2 to 2.4 mm Hg diastolic for people with intakes above versus below country-specific medians for all 3 of the minerals. These results indicate the potential for increased phosphorus/mineral intake to lower blood pressure as part of the recommendations for healthier eating patterns for the prevention and control of prehypertension and hypertension.

  15. Relationship between outdoor temperature and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halonen, Jaana I; Zanobetti, Antonella; Sparrow, David; Vokonas, Pantel S; Schwartz, Joel

    2011-04-01

    Cardiovascular mortality has been linked to changes in outdoor temperature. However, the mechanisms behind these effects are not well established. We aimed to study the effect of outdoor temperature on blood pressure, as increased blood pressure is a risk factor for cardiovascular death. The study population consisted of men aged 53-100 years living in the Boston area. We used a mixed effects model to estimate the effect of three temperature variables: ambient, apparent and dew point temperature (DPT), on repeated measures (every 3-5 years) of diastolic (DBP) and systolic blood pressure (SBP). Random intercepts for subjects and several possible confounders were used in the models, including black carbon and barometric pressure. We found modest associations between DBP and ambient and apparent temperature. In the basic models, DBP in association with a 5 °C decrease in 7-day moving averages of temperatures increased by 1.01% (95% CI -0.06% to 2.09%) and 1.55% (95% CI 0.61% to 2.49%) for ambient and apparent temperature, respectively. Excluding extreme temperatures strengthened these associations (2.13%, 95% CI 0.66% to 3.63%, and 1.65%, 95% CI 0.41% to 2.90%, for ambient and apparent temperature, respectively). Effect estimates for DPT were close to null. The effect of apparent temperature on SBP was similar (1.30% increase (95% CI 0.32% to 2.29%) for a 5 °C decrease in 7-day moving average). Cumulative exposure to decreasing ambient and apparent temperature may increase blood pressure. These findings suggest that an increase in blood pressure could be a mechanism behind cold-related, but not heat-related, cardiovascular mortality.

  16. Oscillometric measurement of systolic and diastolic blood pressures validated in a physiologic mathematical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babbs Charles F

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The oscillometric method of measuring blood pressure with an automated cuff yields valid estimates of mean pressure but questionable estimates of systolic and diastolic pressures. Existing algorithms are sensitive to differences in pulse pressure and artery stiffness. Some are closely guarded trade secrets. Accurate extraction of systolic and diastolic pressures from the envelope of cuff pressure oscillations remains an open problem in biomedical engineering. Methods A new analysis of relevant anatomy, physiology and physics reveals the mechanisms underlying the production of cuff pressure oscillations as well as a way to extract systolic and diastolic pressures from the envelope of oscillations in any individual subject. Stiffness characteristics of the compressed artery segment can be extracted from the envelope shape to create an individualized mathematical model. The model is tested with a matrix of possible systolic and diastolic pressure values, and the minimum least squares difference between observed and predicted envelope functions indicates the best fit choices of systolic and diastolic pressure within the test matrix. Results The model reproduces realistic cuff pressure oscillations. The regression procedure extracts systolic and diastolic pressures accurately in the face of varying pulse pressure and arterial stiffness. The root mean squared error in extracted systolic and diastolic pressures over a range of challenging test scenarios is 0.3 mmHg. Conclusions A new algorithm based on physics and physiology allows accurate extraction of systolic and diastolic pressures from cuff pressure oscillations in a way that can be validated, criticized, and updated in the public domain.

  17. Oscillometric measurement of systolic and diastolic blood pressures validated in a physiologic mathematical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The oscillometric method of measuring blood pressure with an automated cuff yields valid estimates of mean pressure but questionable estimates of systolic and diastolic pressures. Existing algorithms are sensitive to differences in pulse pressure and artery stiffness. Some are closely guarded trade secrets. Accurate extraction of systolic and diastolic pressures from the envelope of cuff pressure oscillations remains an open problem in biomedical engineering. Methods A new analysis of relevant anatomy, physiology and physics reveals the mechanisms underlying the production of cuff pressure oscillations as well as a way to extract systolic and diastolic pressures from the envelope of oscillations in any individual subject. Stiffness characteristics of the compressed artery segment can be extracted from the envelope shape to create an individualized mathematical model. The model is tested with a matrix of possible systolic and diastolic pressure values, and the minimum least squares difference between observed and predicted envelope functions indicates the best fit choices of systolic and diastolic pressure within the test matrix. Results The model reproduces realistic cuff pressure oscillations. The regression procedure extracts systolic and diastolic pressures accurately in the face of varying pulse pressure and arterial stiffness. The root mean squared error in extracted systolic and diastolic pressures over a range of challenging test scenarios is 0.3 mmHg. Conclusions A new algorithm based on physics and physiology allows accurate extraction of systolic and diastolic pressures from cuff pressure oscillations in a way that can be validated, criticized, and updated in the public domain. PMID:22913792

  18. A cross-country Exchange Market Pressure (EMP) dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mohit; Patnaik, Ila; Felman, Joshua; Shah, Ajay

    2017-06-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article titled - "An exchange market pressure measure for cross country analysis" (Patnaik et al. [1]). In this article, we present the dataset for Exchange Market Pressure values (EMP) for 139 countries along with their conversion factors, ρ (rho). Exchange Market Pressure, expressed in percentage change in exchange rate, measures the change in exchange rate that would have taken place had the central bank not intervened. The conversion factor ρ can interpreted as the change in exchange rate associated with $1 billion of intervention. Estimates of conversion factor ρ allow us to calculate a monthly time series of EMP for 139 countries. Additionally, the dataset contains the 68% confidence interval (high and low values) for the point estimates of ρ's. Using the standard errors of estimates of ρ's, we obtain one sigma intervals around mean estimates of EMP values. These values are also reported in the dataset.

  19. Blood pressure control for diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Diana V; Wang, Xue; Vedula, Satyanarayana S; Marrone, Michael; Sleilati, Gina; Hawkins, Barbara S; Frank, Robert N

    2015-01-31

    , and cost-effectiveness at annual intervals after study entry whenever provided in published reports and other documents available from included trials. We included 15 RCTs, conducted primarily in North America and Europe, that had enrolled 4157 type 1 and 9512 type 2 diabetic participants, ranging from 16 to 2130 participants in individual trials. In 10 of the 15 RCTs, one group of participants was assigned to one or more anti-hypertensive agents and the control group received placebo. In three trials, intense blood pressure control was compared to less intense blood pressure control. In the remaining two trials, blood pressure control was compared with usual care. Five of the 15 trials enrolled type 1 diabetics, and 10 trials enrolled type 2 diabetics. Six trials were sponsored entirely by pharmaceutical companies, seven trials received partial support from pharmaceutical companies, and two studies received support from government-sponsored grants and institutional support.Study designs, populations, interventions, and lengths of follow-up (range one to nine years) varied among the included trials. Overall, the quality of the evidence for individual outcomes was low to moderate. For the primary outcomes, incidence and progression of retinopathy, the quality of evidence was downgraded due to inconsistency and imprecision of estimates from individual studies and differing characteristics of participants.For primary outcomes among type 1 diabetics, one of the five trials reported incidence of retinopathy and one trial reported progression of retinopathy after 4 to 5 years of treatment and follow-up; four of the five trials reported a combined outcome of incidence and progression over the same time interval. Among type 2 diabetics, 5 of the 10 trials reported incidence of diabetic retinopathy and 3 trials reported progression of retinopathy; one of the 10 trials reported a combined outcome of incidence and progression during a 4- to 5-year follow-up period. One trial in

  20. Patient-Specific Oscillometric Blood Pressure Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiankun; Cheng, Hao-Min; Chen, Chen-Huan; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Moslehpour, Mohsen; Hahn, Jin-Oh; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2016-06-01

    Most automatic cuff blood pressure (BP) measurement devices are based on oscillometry. These devices estimate BP from the envelopes of the cuff pressure oscillations using fixed ratios. The values of the fixed ratios represent population averages, so the devices may only be accurate in subjects with normal BP levels. The objective was to develop and demonstrate the validity of a patient-specific oscillometric BP measurement method. The idea of the developed method was to represent the cuff pressure oscillation envelopes with a physiologic model, and then estimate the patient-specific parameters of the model, which includes BP levels, by optimally fitting it to the envelopes. The method was investigated against gold standard reference BP measurements from 57 patients with widely varying pulse pressures. A portion of the data was used to optimize the patient-specific method and a fixed-ratio method, while the remaining data were used to test these methods and a current office device. The patient-specific method yielded BP root-mean-square-errors ranging from 6.0 to 9.3 mmHg. On an average, these errors were nearly 40% lower than the errors of each existing method. The patient-specific method may improve automatic cuff BP measurement accuracy. A patient-specific oscillometric BP measurement method was proposed and shown to be more accurate than the conventional method and a current device.

  1. Digital palpation of intraocular pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbach, C D; Leen, M M

    1998-09-01

    Previous studies investigating the accuracy of digital palpation through the eyelids to estimate intraocular pressure (IOP) have shown disappointing results. In this study, the accuracy of digital assessment of IOP by palpation of the bare cornea is investigated. The IOP of a cadaveric eye model was varied from 5 to 40 mm Hg in increments of 5 mm Hg. Two examiners, one experienced and one inexperienced, digitally palpated the corneas and estimated IOP. The results were compared before and after a 1-hour training session. Prior to the training session, the experienced examiner guessed correctly 46% of the time and was correct within 5 mm Hg 100% of the time. The inexperienced examiner guessed correctly 21% of the time and was within 5 mm Hg 62% of the time. After the training session, the experienced examiner's score did not significantly (38% correct, 88% within 5 mm Hg, P = .05. Digital assessment of IOP by palpation of bare cornea is accurate when performed by experienced individuals. A minimal amount of training using the eye model may improve one's accuracy.

  2. Validation of brachial artery pressure reconstruction from finger arterial pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guelen, Ilja; Westerhof, Berend E.; van der Sar, Gertrude L.; van Montfrans, Gert A.; Kiemeneij, Ferdinand; Wesseling, Karel H.; Bos, Willem Jan W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Measurement of finger artery pressure with Finapres offers noninvasive continuous blood pressure, which, however, differs from brachial artery pressure. Generalized waveform filtering and level correction may convert the finger artery pressure waveform to a brachial waveform. An upper-arm

  3. Price and cost estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Price and Cost Estimating Program (PACE II) was developed to prepare man-hour and material cost estimates. Versatile and flexible tool significantly reduces computation time and errors and reduces typing and reproduction time involved in preparation of cost estimates.

  4. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy Healthy Food Shopping Healthy Drinks for Kids High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) KidsHealth > For Parents > High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) ... How Is High Blood Pressure Treated? What Is High Blood Pressure? Blood pressure is the pressure of blood against ...

  5. Estimation of sea surface temperature (SST) using marine seismic data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sinha, S.K.; Dewangan, P.; Sain, K.

    these direct arrivals to accurately estimate soundspeed in near-surface seawater and invert for sea surface temperature. The established empirical equation describing the relationships among temperature, salinity, pressure and soundspeed is used...

  6. Estimating tail probabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, D.B.; Tolley, H.D.

    1982-12-01

    This paper investigates procedures for univariate nonparametric estimation of tail probabilities. Extrapolated values for tail probabilities beyond the data are also obtained based on the shape of the density in the tail. Several estimators which use exponential weighting are described. These are compared in a Monte Carlo study to nonweighted estimators, to the empirical cdf, to an integrated kernel, to a Fourier series estimate, to a penalized likelihood estimate and a maximum likelihood estimate. Selected weighted estimators are shown to compare favorably to many of these standard estimators for the sampling distributions investigated.

  7. Observation of the pulse oximeter trace to estimate systolic blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The estimation of systolic blood pressure by disappearance and reappearance of the pulse oximeter trace during cuff inflation and deflation was compared with non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) measurement, across the range of body mass index (BMI), during spinal anaesthesia for Caesarean section.

  8. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... High Blood Pressure Explore High Blood Pressure What Is... Other Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living ... Confirming High Blood Pressure A blood pressure test is easy and painless and can be done in ...

  9. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / High Blood Pressure High Blood Pressure Also known as Hypertension Leer en español See ... defines high blood pressure severity levels. Stages of High Blood Pressure in Adults Stages Systolic (top number) Diastolic (bottom ...

  10. Pressure Effect on Extensional Viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jens Horslund; Kjær, Erik Michael

    1999-01-01

    The primary object of these experiments was to investigate the influence of hydrostatic pressure on entrance flow. The effect of pressure on shear and extensional viscosity was evaluated using an axis symmetric capillary and a slit die where the hydrostatic pressure was raised with valves....... The experiments show a significant increase in extensional viscosity with increasing pressure....

  11. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / High Blood Pressure High Blood Pressure Also known as Hypertension See also Information for ... defines high blood pressure severity levels. Stages of High Blood Pressure in Adults Stages Systolic (top number) Diastolic (bottom ...

  12. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... care provider may need to change or add medicines to your treatment plan over time. NHLBI’s My Blood Pressure Wallet Card can help you track your blood pressure. Pregnancy Planning High blood pressure can cause problems for mother and baby. High blood pressure can ...

  13. Human gallbladder pressure and volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borly, L; Højgaard, L; Grønvall, S

    1996-01-01

    Increased gallbladder (GB) pressure is probably a part of the pathogenesis of acute cholecystitis, and measurements of GB pressure might therefore be of interest. The aim of this study was to validate a microtip pressure transducer for intraluminal GB pressure measurements. In vitro precision and...

  14. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood pressure: primary and secondary high blood pressure. Primary High Blood Pressure Primary, or essential, high blood pressure is the most ... known cause, it might be called essential hypertension, primary hypertension, or idiopathic (id-ee-o-PATH-ick) ...

  15. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may stiffen small and large arteries, which can affect blood pressure. Genetic Causes of High Blood Pressure Much of the understanding of the body systems involved in high blood pressure has come from genetic studies. High blood pressure often runs in families. Years ...

  16. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are two main types of high blood pressure: primary and secondary high blood pressure. Primary High Blood Pressure Primary, ... plan based on whether you were diagnosed with primary or secondary high blood pressure and if there is a ...

  17. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mmHg or above. Confirming High Blood Pressure A blood pressure test is easy and painless and can be done ... high blood pressure. Using the results of your blood pressure test, your health care provider will diagnose prehypertension or ...

  18. Pressure simulation program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoll, B.; Phaff, J.C.; Gids, W.F. de

    1995-01-01

    A computer program has been developed to predict the wind pressure coefficients Cp on facades and roofs of block shaped buildings. The program is based on fits of measured data, including wind shielding by obstacles and terrain roughness. Main advantages of the program are: it needs no expertise of

  19. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... arrow Is it true that a pressure sore can develop in a few hours? play_arrow What's ... play_arrow What is “skin tolerance” and how can it be increased? play_arrow What do family ...

  20. GOLD PRESSURE VESSEL SEAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A.E.

    1963-11-26

    An improved seal between the piston and die member of a piston-cylinder type pressure vessel is presented. A layer of gold, of sufficient thickness to provide an interference fit between the piston and die member, is plated on the contacting surface of at least one of the members. (AEC)